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Sample records for monomeric gtpases analysed

  1. The Monomeric GTPase Rab35 Regulates Phagocytic Cup Formation and Phagosomal Maturation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Datta, Sunando

    2017-03-24

    One of the hallmarks of amoebic colitis is the detection of Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) trophozoites with ingested erythrocytes. Therefore, erythrophagocytosis is traditionally considered as one of the most important criteria to identify the pathogenic behavior of the amoebic trophozoites. Phagocytosis is an essential process for the proliferation and virulence of this parasite. Phagocytic cargo, upon internalization, follows a defined trafficking route to amoebic lysosomal degradation machinery. Here, we demonstrated the role of EhRab35 in the early and late phases of erythrophagocytosis by the amoeba. EhRab35 showed large vacuolar as well as punctate vesicular localization. The spatiotemporal dynamics of vacuolar EhRab35 and its exchange with soluble cytosolic pool were monitored by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Using extensive microscopy and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that upon incubation with RBCs EhRab35 is recruited to the site of phagocytic cups as well as to the nascent phagosomes that harbor Gal/GalNAc lectin and actin. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of EhRab35 reduced phagocytic cup formation and thereby reduced RBC internalization, suggesting a potential role of the Rab GTPase in the cup formation. Furthermore, we also performed a phagosomal maturation assay and observed that the activated form of EhRab35 significantly increased the rate of RBC degradation. Interestingly, this mutant also significantly enhanced the number of acidic compartments in the trophozoites. Taken together, our results suggest that EhRab35 is involved in the initial stage of phagocytosis as well as in the phagolysosomal biogenesis in E. histolytica and thus contributes to the pathogenicity of the parasite. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza.

  3. Functional mapping of human dynamin-1-like GTPase domain based on x-ray structure analyses.

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    Julia Wenger

    Full Text Available Human dynamin-1-like protein (DNM1L is a GTP-driven molecular machine that segregates mitochondria and peroxisomes. To obtain insights into its catalytic mechanism, we determined crystal structures of a construct comprising the GTPase domain and the bundle signaling element (BSE in the nucleotide-free and GTP-analogue-bound states. The GTPase domain of DNM1L is structurally related to that of dynamin and binds the nucleotide 5'-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP via five highly conserved motifs, whereas the BSE folds into a pocket at the opposite side. Based on these structures, the GTPase center was systematically mapped by alanine mutagenesis and kinetic measurements. Thus, residues essential for the GTPase reaction were characterized, among them Lys38, Ser39 and Ser40 in the phosphate binding loop, Thr59 from switch I, Asp146 and Gly149 from switch II, Lys216 and Asp218 in the G4 element, as well as Asn246 in the G5 element. Also, mutated Glu81 and Glu82 in the unique 16-residue insertion of DNM1L influence the activity significantly. Mutations of Gln34, Ser35, and Asp190 in the predicted assembly interface interfered with dimerization of the GTPase domain induced by a transition state analogue and led to a loss of the lipid-stimulated GTPase activity. Our data point to related catalytic mechanisms of DNM1L and dynamin involving dimerization of their GTPase domains.

  4. Structure-Function Analyses of the Interactions between Rab11 and Rab14 Small GTPases with Their Shared Effector Rab Coupling Protein (RCP)*

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    Lall, Patrick; Lindsay, Andrew J.; Hanscom, Sara; Kecman, Tea; Taglauer, Elizabeth S.; McVeigh, Una M.; Franklin, Edward; McCaffrey, Mary W.; Khan, Amir R.

    2015-01-01

    Rab GTPases recruit effector proteins, via their GTP-dependent switch regions, to distinct subcellular compartments. Rab11 and Rab25 are closely related small GTPases that bind to common effectors termed the Rab11 family of interacting proteins (FIPs). The FIPs are organized into two subclasses (class I and class II) based on sequence and domain organization, and both subclasses contain a highly conserved Rab-binding domain at their C termini. Yeast two-hybrid and biochemical studies have revealed that the more distantly related Rab14 also interacts with class I FIPs. Here, we perform detailed structural, thermodynamic, and cellular analyses of the interactions between Rab14 and one of the class I FIPs, the Rab-coupling protein (RCP), to clarify the molecular aspects of the interaction. We find that Rab14 indeed binds to RCP, albeit with reduced affinity relative to conventional Rab11-FIP and Rab25-FIP complexes. However, in vivo, Rab11 recruits RCP onto biological membranes. Furthermore, biophysical analyses reveal a noncanonical 1:2 stoichiometry between Rab14-RCP in dilute solutions, in contrast to Rab11/25 complexes. The structure of Rab14-RCP reveals that Rab14 interacts with the canonical Rab-binding domain and also provides insight into the unusual properties of the complex. Finally, we show that both the Rab coupling protein and Rab14 function in neuritogenesis. PMID:26032412

  5. Structure-Function Analyses of the Interactions between Rab11 and Rab14 Small GTPases with Their Shared Effector Rab Coupling Protein (RCP).

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    Lall, Patrick; Lindsay, Andrew J; Hanscom, Sara; Kecman, Tea; Taglauer, Elizabeth S; McVeigh, Una M; Franklin, Edward; McCaffrey, Mary W; Khan, Amir R

    2015-07-24

    Rab GTPases recruit effector proteins, via their GTP-dependent switch regions, to distinct subcellular compartments. Rab11 and Rab25 are closely related small GTPases that bind to common effectors termed the Rab11 family of interacting proteins (FIPs). The FIPs are organized into two subclasses (class I and class II) based on sequence and domain organization, and both subclasses contain a highly conserved Rab-binding domain at their C termini. Yeast two-hybrid and biochemical studies have revealed that the more distantly related Rab14 also interacts with class I FIPs. Here, we perform detailed structural, thermodynamic, and cellular analyses of the interactions between Rab14 and one of the class I FIPs, the Rab-coupling protein (RCP), to clarify the molecular aspects of the interaction. We find that Rab14 indeed binds to RCP, albeit with reduced affinity relative to conventional Rab11-FIP and Rab25-FIP complexes. However, in vivo, Rab11 recruits RCP onto biological membranes. Furthermore, biophysical analyses reveal a noncanonical 1:2 stoichiometry between Rab14-RCP in dilute solutions, in contrast to Rab11/25 complexes. The structure of Rab14-RCP reveals that Rab14 interacts with the canonical Rab-binding domain and also provides insight into the unusual properties of the complex. Finally, we show that both the Rab coupling protein and Rab14 function in neuritogenesis.

  6. Rho GTPases and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Peyrollier, Karine; Kilic, Gülcan;

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTPases, which play an important role in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Not surprisingly, Rho GTPases are crucial for cell migration and therefore highly important for cancer cell invasion and the formation of metastases. In addition, Rho GTPases...... are involved in growth and survival of tumor cells, in the interaction of tumor cells with their environment, and they are vital for the cancer supporting functions of the tumor stroma. Recent research has significantly improved our understanding of the regulation of Rho GTPase activity, the specificity of Rho...

  7. Medicago truncatula Rop GTPases expression in young nodules

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    Lucia Kusu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases are monomeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins with molecular weight of 21 to 30 kD. Plants have plantspecific small GTPases, termed Rop (Rho GTPases from plants which serve as signaling proteins in plant signal transduction. To have better understanding on nodulation process in legume, which Rop proteins that play a dominant role in nodule formation would be determined. Therefore, the expression of five Medicago truncatula Rop GTPase genes (MtRops in young nodules were studied in this experiment. RT-PCR method was used to examine the expression of MtRops. The MtRops expression in inoculated M. truncatula plants were compared with those in uninoculated plants. Results of this studies showed that the expression of MtRop5 and MtRop6 were significantly induced in young nodules, it was suggesting that these Rops may have important role during nodule formation.

  8. Monomeric G-proteins as signal transducers in airway physiology and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Dedmer; Roscioni, Sara S.; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2008-01-01

    Monomeric G-proteins, also referred to as small GTPases, function as biological hubs being activated by extracellular stimuli and regulate downstream signalling events, which result in different cellular responses. The importance of these mechanisms is mirrored by the fact that several pathological

  9. GTPases in semaphorin signaling.

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    Püschel, Andreas W

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of semaphorin receptors is their interaction with multiple GTPases. Plexins, the signal transducing component of semaphorin receptors, directly associate with several GTPases. In addition, they not only recruit guaninine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) but also are the only known integral membrane proteins that show a catalytic activity as GAPs for small GTPases. GTPases function upstream of semaphorin receptors and regulate the activity of plexins through an interaction with the cytoplasmic domain. The association of Plexin-Al (Sema3A receptor) or Plexin-B1 (Sema4D receptor) with the GTPase Rnd1 and ligand-dependent receptor clustering are required for their activity as R-Ras GAPs. The GTPases R-Ras and Rho function downstream of plexins and are required for the repulsive effects of semaphorins. In this review, I will focus on the role of GTPases in signaling by two plexins that have been analyzed in most detail, Plexin-A1 and Plexin-B1.

  10. Small GTPases and cilia.

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    Li, Yujie; Hu, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases are key molecular switches that bind and hydrolyze GTP in diverse membrane- and cytoskeleton-related cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences have highlighted the role of various small GTPases, including the members in Arf/Arl, Rab, and Ran subfamilies, in cilia formation and function. Once overlooked as an evolutionary vestige, the primary cilium has attracted more and more attention in last decade because of its role in sensing various extracellular signals and the association between cilia dysfunction and a wide spectrum of human diseases, now called ciliopathies. Here we review recent advances about the function of small GTPases in the context of cilia, and the correlation between the functional impairment of small GTPases and ciliopathies. Understanding of these cellular processes is of fundamental importance for broadening our view of cilia development and function in normal and pathological states and for providing valuable insights into the role of various small GTPases in disease processes, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  11. Rho GTPase function in development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Esben; Brakebusch, Cord

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPase functions have been carefully investigated for many years using cell biological models. In recent years, mouse models with targeted mutations in Rho GTPase genes enabled the study of Rho GTPase function in vivo, partially confirming and partially contradicting expectations based...... on earlier in vitro experiments. This review sums up recent findings on the role of Rho GTPases in development, underlining the importance of in vivo research for our understanding of Rho GTPases in living organisms, and describing challenges for the future....

  12. Zipper-mediated oligomerization of the mixed lineage kinase SPRK/MLK-3 is not required for its activation by the GTPase cdc 42 but Is necessary for its activation of the JNK pathway. Monomeric SPRK L410P does not catalyze the activating phosphorylation of Thr258 of murine MITOGEN-ACTIVATED protein kinase kinase 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacratsis, P O; Gallo, K A

    2000-09-08

    Src homology 3 domain-containing proline-rich kinase (SPRK)/mixed lineage kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has been identified as an upstream activator of the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. SPRK is capable of activating MKK4 by phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues, and mutant forms of MKK4 that lack the phosphorylation sites Ser(254) and Thr(258) block SPRK-induced JNK activation. A region of 63 amino acids following the kinase domain of SPRK is predicted to form a leucine zipper. The leucine zipper domain of SPRK has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for SPRK oligomerization, but its role in regulating activation of SPRK and downstream signaling remains unclear. In this study, we substituted a proposed stabilizing leucine residue in the zipper domain with a helix-disrupting proline to abrogate zipper-mediated SPRK oligomerization. We demonstrate that constitutively activated Cdc42 fully activates this monomeric SPRK mutant in terms of both autophosphorylation and histone phosphorylation activity and induces the same in vivo phosphorylation pattern as wild type SPRK. However, this catalytically active SPRK zipper mutant is unable to activate JNK. Our data show that the monomeric SPRK mutant fails to phosphorylate one of the two activating phosphorylation sites, Thr(258), of MKK4. These studies suggest that zipper-mediated SPRK oligomerization is not required for SPRK activation by Cdc42 but instead is critical for proper interaction and phosphorylation of a downstream target, MKK4.

  13. Atypical GTPases as drug targets.

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    Soundararajan, Meera; Eswaran, Jeyanthy

    2012-01-01

    The Ras GTPases are the founding members of large Ras superfamily, which constitutes more than 150 of these important class of enzymes. These GTPases function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary switches that control many fundamental cellular processes. There are a number of GTPases that have been identified recently, which do not confine to this prototype termed as "atypical GTPases" but have proved to play a remarkable role in vital cellular functions. In this review, we provide an overview of the crucial physiological functions mediated by RGK and Centaurin class of multi domain atypical GTPases. Moreover, the recently available atypical GTPase structures of the two families, regulation, physiological functions and their critical roles in various diseases will be discussed. In summary, this review will highlight the emerging atypical GTPase family which allows us to understand novel regulatory mechanisms and thus providing new avenues for drug discovery programs.

  14. Are There Rab GTPases in Archaea?

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    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2016-07-01

    A complex endomembrane system is one of the hallmarks of Eukaryotes. Vesicle trafficking between compartments is controlled by a diverse protein repertoire, including Rab GTPases. These small GTP-binding proteins contribute identity and specificity to the system, and by working as molecular switches, trigger multiple events in vesicle budding, transport, and fusion. A diverse collection of Rab GTPases already existed in the ancestral Eukaryote, yet, it is unclear how such elaborate repertoire emerged. A novel archaeal phylum, the Lokiarchaeota, revealed that several eukaryotic-like protein systems, including small GTPases, are present in Archaea. Here, we test the hypothesis that the Rab family of small GTPases predates the origin of Eukaryotes. Our bioinformatic pipeline detected multiple putative Rab-like proteins in several archaeal species. Our analyses revealed the presence and strict conservation of sequence features that distinguish eukaryotic Rabs from other small GTPases (Rab family motifs), mapping to the same regions in the structure as in eukaryotic Rabs. These mediate Rab-specific interactions with regulators of the REP/GDI (Rab Escort Protein/GDP dissociation Inhibitor) family. Sensitive structure-based methods further revealed the existence of REP/GDI-like genes in Archaea, involved in isoprenyl metabolism. Our analysis supports a scenario where Rabs differentiated into an independent family in Archaea, interacting with proteins involved in membrane biogenesis. These results further support the archaeal nature of the eukaryotic ancestor and provide a new insight into the intermediate stages and the evolutionary path toward the complex membrane-associated signaling circuits that characterize the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, and specifically Rab proteins. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. RHO GTPase in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Plants possess a single subfamily of Rho GTPases, ROP, which does usual things as do Rho-family GTPases in animal and fungal systems, namely participating in the spatial control of cellular processes by signaling to the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking. As one would expect, ROPs are modulated by conserved regulators such as DHR2-type GEFs, RhoGAPs and Rho GDIs. What is surprising is that plants have invented new regulators such as PRONE-type GEFs (known as RopGEFs) and effectors such as RICs and ICRs/RIPs in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking. This review will discuss recent work on characterizing ROP regulators and effectors as well as addressing why and how a mixture of conserved and novel Rho signaling mechanisms is utilized to modulate fundamental cellular processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics/reorganization and vesicular trafficking. PMID:21686259

  16. Rho GTPases in platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, J E; McCarty, O J T

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTP binding proteins, also commonly referred to as the Rho GTPases, are master regulators of the platelet cytoskeleton and platelet function. These low-molecular-weight or 'small' GTPases act as signaling switches in the spatial and temporal transduction, and amplification of signals from platelet cell surface receptors to the intracellular signaling pathways that drive platelet function. The Rho GTPase family members RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 have emerged as key regulators in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in platelets and play key roles in platelet aggregation, secretion, spreading and thrombus formation. Rho GTPase regulators, including GEFs and GAPs and downstream effectors, such as the WASPs, formins and PAKs, may also regulate platelet activation and function. In this review, we provide an overview of Rho GTPase signaling in platelet physiology. Previous studies of Rho GTPases and platelets have had a shared history, as platelets have served as an ideal, non-transformed cellular model to characterize Rho function. Likewise, recent studies of the cell biology of Rho GTPase family members have helped to build an understanding of the molecular regulation of platelet function and will continue to do so through the further characterization of Rho GTPases as well as Rho GAPs, GEFs, RhoGDIs and Rho effectors in actin reorganization and other Rho-driven cellular processes. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. The universally conserved prokaryotic GTPases.

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    Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Versées, Wim; Michiels, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Members of the large superclass of P-loop GTPases share a core domain with a conserved three-dimensional structure. In eukaryotes, these proteins are implicated in various crucial cellular processes, including translation, membrane trafficking, cell cycle progression, and membrane signaling. As targets of mutation and toxins, GTPases are involved in the pathogenesis of cancer and infectious diseases. In prokaryotes also, it is hard to overestimate the importance of GTPases in cell physiology. Numerous papers have shed new light on the role of bacterial GTPases in cell cycle regulation, ribosome assembly, the stress response, and other cellular processes. Moreover, bacterial GTPases have been identified as high-potential drug targets. A key paper published over 2 decades ago stated that, "It may never again be possible to capture [GTPases] in a family portrait" (H. R. Bourne, D. A. Sanders, and F. McCormick, Nature 348:125-132, 1990) and indeed, the last 20 years have seen a tremendous increase in publications on the subject. Sequence analysis identified 13 bacterial GTPases that are conserved in at least 75% of all bacterial species. We here provide an overview of these 13 protein subfamilies, covering their cellular functions as well as cellular localization and expression levels, three-dimensional structures, biochemical properties, and gene organization. Conserved roles in eukaryotic homologs will be discussed as well. A comprehensive overview summarizing current knowledge on prokaryotic GTPases will aid in further elucidating the function of these important proteins.

  18. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  19. Rho GTPase function in tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, R; Pedersen, Esben Ditlev Kølle; Wang, Zhipeng;

    2009-01-01

    Malignant tumor cells display uncontrolled proliferation, loss of epithelial cell polarity, altered interactions with neighboring cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix, and enhanced migratory properties. Proteins of the Rho GTPase family regulate all these processes in cell culture and......, for that reason, Rho GTPases, their regulators, and their effectors have been suggested to control tumor formation and progression in humans. However, while the tumor-relevant functions of Rho GTPases are very well documented in vitro, we are only now beginning to assess their contribution to cancer in human...... patients and in animal models. This review will give a very brief overview of Rho GTPase function in general and then focus on in vivo evidence for a role of Rho GTPases in malignant tumors, both in human patients and in genetically modified mice....

  20. Evidence for Lateral gene Transfer (LGT in the evolution of eubacteria-derived small GTPases in plant organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Suwastika

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genomes of free-living bacteria frequently exchange genes via lateral gene transfer (LGT, which has played a major role in bacterial evolution. LGT also played a significant role in the acquisition of genes from non-cyanobacterial bacteria to the lineage of ‘primary’ algae and land plants. Small GTPases are widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, we inferred the evolutionary history of organelle-targeted small GTPases in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana contains at least one ortholog in seven subfamilies of OBG-HflX-like and TrmE-Era-EngA-YihA-Septin-like GTPase superfamilies (together referred to as Era-like GTPases. Subcellular localization analysis of all Era-like GTPases in Arabidopsis revealed that all thirteen eubacteria-related GTPases are localized to chloroplasts and/or mitochondria, whereas archaea-related DRG and NOG1 are localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, suggesting that chloroplast- and mitochondrion-localized GTPases are derived from the ancestral cyanobacterium and α-proteobacterium, respectively, through endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT. However, phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant organelle GTPase evolution is rather complex. Among the eubacterium-related GTPases, only four localized to chloroplasts (including one dual targeting GTPase and two localized to mitochondria were derived from cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Three other chloroplast-targeted GTPases were related to α-proteobacterial proteins, rather than to cyanobacterial GTPases. Furthermore, we found that four other GTPases showed neither cyanobacterial nor α-proteobacterial affiliation. Instead, these GTPases were closely related to clades from other eubacteria, such as Bacteroides (Era1, EngB-1, and EngB-2 and green non-sulfur bacteria (HflX. This study thus provides novel evidence that LGT significantly contributed to the evolution of organelle-targeted Era-like GTPases in plants.

  1. Computational model explains high activity and rapid cycling of Rho GTPases within protein complexes.

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    Andrew B Goryachev

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of multiprotein complexes on cellular membranes is critically dependent on the cyclic activation of small GTPases. FRAP-based analyses demonstrate that within protein complexes, some small GTPases cycle nearly three orders of magnitude faster than they would spontaneously cycle in vitro. At the same time, experiments report concomitant excess of the activated, GTP-bound form of GTPases over their inactive form. Intuitively, high activity and rapid turnover are contradictory requirements. How the cells manage to maximize both remains poorly understood. Here, using GTPases of the Rab and Rho families as a prototype, we introduce a computational model of the GTPase cycle. We quantitatively investigate several plausible layouts of the cycling control module that consist of GEFs, GAPs, and GTPase effectors. We explain the existing experimental data and predict how the cycling of GTPases is controlled by the regulatory proteins in vivo. Our model explains distinct and separable roles that the activating GEFs and deactivating GAPs play in the GTPase cycling control. While the activity of GTPase is mainly defined by GEF, the turnover rate is a sole function of GAP. Maximization of the GTPase activity and turnover rate places conflicting requirements on the concentration of GAP. Therefore, to achieve a high activity and turnover rate at once, cells must carefully maintain concentrations of GEFs and GAPs within the optimal range. The values of these optimal concentrations indicate that efficient cycling can be achieved only within dense protein complexes typically assembled on the membrane surfaces. We show that the concentration requirement for GEF can be dramatically reduced by a GEF-activating GTPase effector that can also significantly boost the cycling efficiency. Interestingly, we find that the cycling regimes are only weakly dependent on the concentration of GTPase itself.

  2. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

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    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  3. What vibrations tell us about GTPases.

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    Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    In this review, we discuss how time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used to understand how GTP hydrolysis is catalyzed by small GTPases and their cognate GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). By interaction with small GTPases, GAPs regulate important signal transduction pathways and transport mechanisms in cells. The GTPase reaction terminates signaling and controls transport. Dysfunctions of GTP hydrolysis in these proteins are linked to serious diseases including cancer. Using FTIR, we resolved both the intrinsic and GAP-catalyzed GTPase reaction of the small GTPase Ras with high spatiotemporal resolution and atomic detail. This provided detailed insight into the order of events and how the active site is completed for catalysis. Comparisons of Ras with other small GTPases revealed conservation and variation in the catalytic mechanisms. The approach was extended to more nearly physiological conditions at a membrane. Interactions of membrane-anchored GTPases and their extraction from the membrane are studied using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique.

  4. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

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    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  5. Small GTPases : emerging targets in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira de Abreu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The studies provided in this thesis show that modulation of small GTPase function regulates cellular activation and inflammation in RA and animal models of the disease. Small GTPases are therefore emerging targets in RA and further studies should explore the development of novel small GTPase modulat

  6. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils.

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    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology.

  7. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouda Gamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology.

  8. GTPases in intracellular trafficking: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Nava

    2011-02-01

    Small GTPases that belong to the ras sub-families of Rab, Arf, and Rho, and the large GTPase dynamin, regulate intracellular trafficking. This issue of Seminars of Cell and Developmental Biology highlights topics regarding mechanisms by which these GTPases regulate the different steps of vesicular transport: vesicle formation, scission, targeting and fusion. In addition, the emerging roles of GTPases in coordination of individual transport steps as well as coordination of intracellular trafficking with other cellular processes are reviewed. Finally, common structures and mechanisms underlying the function of the ras-like GTPases and the importance of their function to human health and disease are discussed.

  9. A competitive nucleotide binding inhibitor: in vitro characterization of Rab7 GTPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agola, Jacob O; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Oprea, Tudor I; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-06-15

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (K(i)) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure-activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase, as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors.

  10. Evolution and diversity of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuichet, Kristin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-12-04

    The Ras superfamily of small GTPases are single domain nucleotide-dependent molecular switches that act as highly tuned regulators of complex signal transduction pathways. Originally identified in eukaryotes for their roles in fundamental cellular processes including proliferation, motility, polarity, nuclear transport, and vesicle transport, recent studies have revealed that single domain GTPases also control complex functions such as cell polarity, motility, predation, development and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Here, we used a computational genomics approach to understand the abundance, diversity, and evolution of small GTPases in prokaryotes. We collected 520 small GTPase sequences present in 17% of 1,611 prokaryotic genomes analyzed that cover diverse lineages. We identified two discrete families of small GTPases in prokaryotes that show evidence of three distinct catalytic mechanisms. The MglA family includes MglA homologs, which are typically associated with the MglB GTPase activating protein, whereas members of the Rup (Ras superfamily GTPase of unknown function in prokaryotes) family are not predicted to interact with MglB homologs. System classification and genome context analyses support the involvement of small GTPases in diverse prokaryotic signal transduction pathways including two component systems, laying the foundation for future experimental characterization of these proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic GTPases supports that the last universal common ancestor contained ancestral MglA and Rup family members. We propose that the MglA family was lost from the ancestral eukaryote and that the Ras superfamily members in extant eukaryotes are the result of vertical and horizontal gene transfer events of ancestral Rup GTPases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Rho GTPases in ameloblast differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Otsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During tooth development, ameloblasts differentiate from inner enamel epithelial cells to enamel-forming cells by modulating the signal pathways mediating epithelial–mesenchymal interaction and a cell-autonomous gene network. The differentiation process of epithelial cells is characterized by marked changes in their morphology and polarity, accompanied by dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion over time. Functional ameloblasts are tall, columnar, polarized cells that synthesize and secrete enamel-specific proteins. After deposition of the full thickness of enamel matrix, ameloblasts become smaller and regulate enamel maturation. Recent significant advances in the fields of molecular biology and genetics have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the ameloblast cell life cycle, mediated by the Rho family of small GTPases. They act as intracellular molecular switch that transduce signals from extracellular stimuli to the actin cytoskeleton and the nucleus. In our review, we summarize studies that provide current evidence for Rho GTPases and their involvement in ameloblast differentiation. In addition to the Rho GTPases themselves, their downstream effectors and upstream regulators have also been implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

  12. Regulation of Rap GTPases in mammalian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhavin; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-10-01

    Small GTPases are central regulators of many cellular processes. The highly conserved Rap GTPases perform essential functions in the mammalian nervous system during development and in mature neurons. During neocortical development, Rap1 is required to regulate cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesion. In the adult nervous system Rap1 and Rap2 regulate the maturation and plasticity of dendritic spine and synapses. Although genetic studies have revealed important roles of Rap GTPases in neurons, their regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate them and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that inactivate them by stimulating their intrinsic GTPase activity is just beginning to be explored in vivo. Here we review how GEFs and GAPs regulate Rap GTPases in the nervous system with a focus on their in vivo function.

  13. GTPases in bacterial cell polarity and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Hot, Edina; Huntley, Stuart; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2011-12-01

    In bacteria, large G domain GTPases have well-established functions in translation, protein translocation, tRNA modification and ribosome assembly. In addition, bacteria also contain small Ras-like GTPases consisting of stand-alone G domains. Recent data have revealed that small Ras-like GTPases as well as large G domain GTPases in bacteria function in the regulation of cell polarity, signal transduction and possibly also in cell division. The small Ras-like GTPase MglA together with its cognate GAP MglB regulates cell polarity in Myxococcus xanthus, and the small Ras-like GTPase CvnD9 in Streptomyces coelicolor is involved in signal transduction. Similarly, the large GTPase FlhF together with the ATPase FlhG regulates the localization and number of flagella in polarly flagellated bacteria. Moreover, large dynamin-like GTPases in bacteria may function in cell division. Thus, the function of GTPases in bacteria may be as pervasive as in eukaryotes.

  14. PIKE GTPase Signaling and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jee-Yin; Ye, Keqiang

    2005-01-01

    PIKE (PI 3-Kinase Enhancer) is a recently identified brain specific nuclear GTPase, which binds PI 3-kinase and stimulates its lipid kinase activity. Nerve growth factor treatment leads to PIKE activation by triggering the nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1), which acts as a physiologic guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for PIKE through its SH3 domain. To date, three forms of PIKE have been characterized: PIKE-S, PIKE-L and PIKE-A. PIKE-S is initially identified shorte...

  15. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  16. Monomeric Friction Coefficient of Metalnanodispersible Polymeric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Kolupayev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of a nanodispersible metal excipient in number of 0    5,0 vol.% Cu for the size of a monomeric friction coefficient of polyvinylchloride (PVC systems in temperature range 298  Т  (Tg + 10 K is investigated. It is shown that various types of coordination movements of building blocks are described by a friction coefficient which serves as a measure of influence of external fields and ingredients on viscoelastic behavior of a composite. The analysis of processes of a relaxation on the basis of the theory of flexible chains taking into account power and entropic factors is carried out.

  17. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  18. Role of Rab family GTPases and their effectors in melanosomal logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-04-01

    Rab GTPases constitute a family of small GTPases that regulate a variety of membrane trafficking events in all eukaryotic cells by recruiting their specific effector molecules. Recent accumulating evidence indicates that members of the mammalian Rab small GTPase family are involved in certain physiological and pathological processes. In particular, functional impairments of specific Rab proteins, e.g. Rab38 and Rab27A, their regulators or their effectors cause pigmentation disorders in humans and coat colour variations in mice because such impairments cause defects in melanosomal logistics, i.e. defects in melanosome biogenesis and transport. Genetic and biochemical analyses of the gene products responsible for mammalian pigmentation disorders in the past decade have revealed that Rab-mediated endosomal transport systems and melanosome transport systems play crucial roles in the efficient darkening of mammalian hair and skin. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding melanosomal logistics, with particular focus on the roles of Rab small GTPases and their effectors.

  19. Rem, a member of the RGK GTPases, inhibits recombinant CaV1.2 channels using multiple mechanisms that require distinct conformations of the GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Xu, Xianghua; Kernan, Timothy; Wu, Vincent; Colecraft, Henry M

    2010-05-15

    Rad/Rem/Gem/Kir (RGK) GTPases potently inhibit Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)2 (Ca(V)1-2) channels, a paradigm of ion channel regulation by monomeric G-proteins with significant physiological ramifications and potential biotechnology applications. The mechanism(s) underlying how RGK proteins inhibit I(Ca) is unknown, and it is unclear how key structural and regulatory properties of these GTPases (such as the role of GTP binding to the nucleotide binding domain (NBD), and the C-terminus which contains a membrane-targeting motif) feature in this effect. Here, we show that Rem inhibits Ca(V)1.2 channels by three independent mechanisms that rely on distinct configurations of the GTPase: (1) a reduction in surface density of channels is accomplished by enhancing dynamin-dependent endocytosis, (2) a diminution of channel open probability (P(o)) that occurs without impacting on voltage sensor movement, and (3) an immobilization of Ca(V) channel voltage sensors. The presence of both the Rem NBD and C-terminus (whether membrane-targeted or not) in one molecule is sufficient to reconstitute all three mechanisms. However, membrane localization of the NBD by a generic membrane-targeting module reconstitutes only the decreased P(o) function (mechanism 2). A point mutation that prevents GTP binding to the NBD selectively eliminates the capacity to immobilize voltage sensors (mechanism 3). The results reveal an uncommon multiplicity in the mechanisms Rem uses to inhibit I(Ca), predict new physiological dimensions of the RGK GTPase-Ca(V) channel crosstalk, and suggest original approaches for developing novel Ca(V) channel blockers.

  20. Insights into the classification of small GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Heider

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Heider1, Sascha Hauke3, Martin Pyka4, Daniel Kessler21Department of Bioinformatics, Center for Medical Biotechnology, 2Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Computer Science, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 4Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: In this study we used a Random Forest-based approach for an assignment of small guanosine triphosphate proteins (GTPases to specific subgroups. Small GTPases represent an important functional group of proteins that serve as molecular switches in a wide range of fundamental cellular processes, including intracellular transport, movement and signaling events. These proteins have further gained a special emphasis in cancer research, because within the last decades a huge variety of small GTPases from different subgroups could be related to the development of all types of tumors. Using a random forest approach, we were able to identify the most important amino acid positions for the classification process within the small GTPases superfamily and its subgroups. These positions are in line with the results of earlier studies and have been shown to be the essential elements for the different functionalities of the GTPase families. Furthermore, we provide an accurate and reliable software tool (GTPasePred to identify potential novel GTPases and demonstrate its application to genome sequences.Keywords: cancer, machine learning, classification, Random Forests, proteins

  1. PIKE GTPase Signaling and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available PIKE (PI 3-Kinase Enhancer is a recently identified brain specific nuclear GTPase, which binds PI 3-kinase and stimulates its lipid kinase activity. Nerve growth factor treatment leads to PIKE activation by triggering the nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1, which acts as a physiologic guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for PIKE through its SH3 domain. To date, three forms of PIKE have been characterized: PIKE-S, PIKE-L and PIKE-A. PIKE-S is initially identified shorter isoform. PIKE-L, a longer isoform of PIKE gene, differs from PIKE-S by C-terminal extension containing Arf-GAP (ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase Activating Protein and two ankyrin repeats domains. In contrast to the exclusive nuclear localization of PIKE-S, PIKE-L occurs in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PIKE-L physiologically associates with Homer 1, an mGluR I binding adaptor protein. The Homer/PIKE-L complex couples PI 3-kinase to mGluR I and regulates a major action of group I mGluRs, prevention of neuronal apoptosis. More recently, a third PIKE isoform, PIKE-A was identified in human glioblastoma multiforme brain cancers. Unlike the brain specific PIKE-L and -S isoforms, PIKE-A distributes in various tissues. PIKE-A contains the same domains present in PIKE-L but lacks N-terminal proline-rich domain (PRD, which binds PI 3-kinase and PLC-γ1. Instead, PIKE-A specifically binds to active Akt and upregulates its activity in a GTP-dependent manner, mediating human cancer cell invasion and preventing apoptosis. Thus, PIKE extends its roles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, mediating cellular processes from cell invasion to programmed cell death.

  2. X-ray structure of the T. aquaticus FtsY:GDP complex suggests functional roles for the C-terminal helix of the SRP GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski-Salerno, Joseph; Coon, John S; Focia, Pamela J; Freymann, Douglas M

    2007-03-01

    FtsY and Ffh are structurally similar prokaryotic Signal Recognition Particle GTPases that play an essential role in the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP)-mediated cotranslational targeting of proteins to the membrane. The two GTPases assemble in a GTP-dependent manner to form a heterodimeric SRP targeting complex. We report here the 2.1 A X-ray structure of FtsY from T. aquaticus bound to GDP. The structure of the monomeric protein reveals, unexpectedly, canonical binding interactions for GDP. A comparison of the structures of the monomeric and complexed FtsY NG GTPase domain suggests that it undergoes a conformational change similar to that of Ffh NG during the assembly of the symmetric heterodimeric complex. However, in contrast to Ffh, in which the C-terminal helix shifts independently of the other subdomains, the C-terminal helix and N domain of T. aquaticus FtsY together behave as a rigid body during assembly, suggesting distinct mechanisms by which the interactions of the NG domain "module" are regulated in the context of the two SRP GTPases.

  3. Ribosome-associated GTPases: the role of RNA for GTPase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nina; Polacek, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The GTPase super-family comprises a variety of G proteins found in all three domains of life. Although they are participating in completely different processes like signal transduction, protein biosynthesis and regulation of cell proliferation, they all share a highly conserved G domain and use a common mechanism for GTP hydrolysis. Exact timing in hydrolyzing the bound GTP serves as a molecular switch to initiate diverse cellular reactions. Classical GTPases depend on external proteins to fire GTP hydrolysis (GAPs), and following the GTPase reaction to exchange GDP for GTP (GEFs), converting the GTPase into the active state again. In recent years it became clear that there are many GTPases that do not follow this classical switch mode scheme. Certain ribosome-associated GTPases are not reliant on other GEF proteins to exchange GDP for GTP. Furthermore many of these G proteins are not activated by external GAPs, but by evolutionarily ancient molecules, namely by RNA.

  4. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P.; Goody, Roger S.

    2015-07-01

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase-acryl-nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins.

  5. Structural Basis of Rnd1 Binding to Plexin Rho GTPase Binding Domains (RBDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Hota, Prasanta K.; Tong, Yufeng; Li, Buren; Shen, Limin; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Borthakur, Susmita; Kim, SoonJeung; Tempel, Wolfram; Buck, Matthias; Park, Hee-Won (Toronto); (Case Western U.-Med)

    2011-09-20

    Plexin receptors regulate cell adhesion, migration, and guidance. The Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD) of plexin-A1 and -B1 can bind GTPases, including Rnd1. By contrast, plexin-C1 and -D1 reportedly bind Rnd2 but associate with Rnd1 only weakly. The structural basis of this differential Rnd1 GTPase binding to plexin RBDs remains unclear. Here, we solved the structure of the plexin-A2 RBD in complex with Rnd1 and the structures of the plexin-C1 and plexin-D1 RBDs alone, also compared with the previously determined plexin-B1 RBD.Rnd1 complex structure. The plexin-A2 RBD {center_dot} Rnd1 complex is a heterodimer, whereas plexin-B1 and -A2 RBDs homodimerize at high concentration in solution, consistent with a proposed model for plexin activation. Plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs are monomeric, consistent with major residue changes in the homodimerization loop. In plexin-A2 and -B1, the RBD {beta}3-{beta}4 loop adjusts its conformation to allow Rnd1 binding, whereas minimal structural changes occur in Rnd1. The plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs lack several key non-polar residues at the corresponding GTPase binding surface and do not significantly interact with Rnd1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on plexin-C1 and -D1 mutants reveal that the introduction of non-polar residues in this loop generates affinity for Rnd1. Structure and sequence comparisons suggest a similar mode of Rnd1 binding to the RBDs, whereas mutagenesis suggests that the interface with the highly homologous Rnd2 GTPase is different in detail. Our results confirm, from a structural perspective, that Rnd1 does not play a role in the activation of plexin-C1 and -D1. Plexin functions appear to be regulated by subfamily-specific mechanisms, some of which involve different Rho family GTPases.

  6. GTPases and the origin of the ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Temple F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to trace the evolution of the ribosome through the evolution of the universal P-loop GTPases that are involved with the ribosome in translation and with the attachment of the ribosome to the membrane. The GTPases involved in translation in Bacteria/Archaea are the elongation factors EFTu/EF1, the initiation factors IF2/aeIF5b + aeIF2, and the elongation factors EFG/EF2. All of these GTPases also contain the OB fold also found in the non GTPase IF1 involved in initiation. The GTPase involved in the signal recognition particle in most Bacteria and Archaea is SRP54. Results 1 The Elongation Factors of the Archaea based on structural considerations of the domains have the following evolutionary path: EF1→ aeIF2 → EF2. The evolution of the aeIF5b was a later event; 2 the Elongation Factors of the Bacteria based on the topological considerations of the GTPase domain have a similar evolutionary path: EFTu→ IF→2→EFG. These evolutionary sequences reflect the evolution of the LSU followed by the SSU to form the ribosome; 3 the OB-fold IF1 is a mimic of an ancient tRNA minihelix. Conclusion The evolution of translational GTPases of both the Archaea and Bacteria point to the evolution of the ribosome. The elongation factors, EFTu/EF1, began as a Ras-like GTPase bringing the activated minihelix tRNA to the Large Subunit Unit. The initiation factors and elongation factor would then have evolved from the EFTu/EF1 as the small subunit was added to the evolving ribosome. The SRP has an SRP54 GTPase and a specific RNA fold in its RNA component similar to the PTC. We consider the SRP to be a remnant of an ancient form of an LSU bound to a membrane. Reviewers This article was reviewed by George Fox, Leonid Mirny and Chris Sander.

  7. Rho GTPase expression in human myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F G van Helden

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells are critical for innate immunity and the initiation of adaptive immunity. Strict regulation of the adhesive and migratory behavior is essential for proper functioning of these cells. Rho GTPases are important regulators of adhesion and migration; however, it is unknown which Rho GTPases are expressed in different myeloid cells. Here, we use a qPCR-based approach to investigate Rho GTPase expression in myeloid cells.We found that the mRNAs encoding Cdc42, RhoQ, Rac1, Rac2, RhoA and RhoC are the most abundant. In addition, RhoG, RhoB, RhoF and RhoV are expressed at low levels or only in specific cell types. More differentiated cells along the monocyte-lineage display lower levels of Cdc42 and RhoV, while RhoC mRNA is more abundant. In addition, the Rho GTPase expression profile changes during dendritic cell maturation with Rac1 being upregulated and Rac2 downregulated. Finally, GM-CSF stimulation, during macrophage and osteoclast differentiation, leads to high expression of Rac2, while M-CSF induces high levels of RhoA, showing that these cytokines induce a distinct pattern. Our data uncover cell type specific modulation of the Rho GTPase expression profile in hematopoietic stem cells and in more differentiated cells of the myeloid lineage.

  8. Comparison of human and Drosophila atlastin GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuyun; Hu, Xiaoyu; Bian, Xin; Liu, Xinqi; Hu, Junjie

    2015-02-01

    Formation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network requires homotypic membrane fusion, which involves a class of atlastin (ATL) GTPases. Purified Drosophila ATL is capable of mediating vesicle fusion in vitro, but such activity has not been reported for any other ATLs. Here, we determined the preliminary crystal structure of the cytosolic segment of Drosophila ATL in a GDP-bound state. The structure reveals a GTPase domain dimer with the subsequent three-helix bundles associating with their own GTPase domains and pointing in opposite directions. This conformation is similar to that of human ATL1, to which GDP and high concentrations of inorganic phosphate, but not GDP only, were included. Drosophila ATL restored ER morphology defects in mammalian cells lacking ATLs, and measurements of nucleotide-dependent dimerization and GTPase activity were comparable for Drosophila ATL and human ATL1. However, purified and reconstituted human ATL1 exhibited no in vitro fusion activity. When the cytosolic segment of human ATL1 was connected to the transmembrane (TM) region and C-terminal tail (CT) of Drosophila ATL, the chimera still exhibited no fusion activity, though its GTPase activity was normal. These results suggest that GDP-bound ATLs may adopt multiple conformations and the in vitro fusion activity of ATL cannot be achieved by a simple collection of functional domains.

  9. RhoGTPases in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RhoGTPases are small molecules that control a wide variety of signal transduction pathways. Their profound function in regulating the actin cytoskeleton is well recognized. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and produce progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells. RhoGT-Pases influence stem cell morphology and cell migration as well as stem cell self-renewal, proliferation, transplantation, homing and differentiation. In this review, the multiple roles of the RhoGTPases in stem cells are discussed.

  10. A GTPase chimera illustrates an uncoupled nucleotide affinity and release rate, Providing insight into the activation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P.; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Font Sadurni, Josep;

    2014-01-01

    The release of GDP from GTPases signals the initiation of a GTPase cycle, where the association of GTP triggers conformational changes promoting binding of downstream effector molecules. Studies have implicated the nucleotide-binding G5 loop to be involved in the GDP release mechanism. For example......, biophysical studies on both the eukaryotic Gα proteins and the GTPase domain (NFeoB) of prokaryotic FeoB proteins have revealed conformational changes in the G5 loop that accompany nucleotide binding and release. However, it is unclear whether this conformational change in the G5 loop is a prerequisite...... GTPase activity at a similar level to wild-type NFeoB, and structural analyses of the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound proteins show that the G5 loop adopts conformations analogous to that of the human nucleotide-bound Giα1 protein in both states. Interestingly, isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped...

  11. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  12. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle traffickin

  13. Invited review: Small GTPases and their GAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashwini K; Lambright, David G

    2016-08-01

    Widespread utilization of small GTPases as major regulatory hubs in many different biological systems derives from a conserved conformational switch mechanism that facilitates cycling between GTP-bound active and GDP-bound inactive states under control of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which accelerate slow intrinsic rates of activation by nucleotide exchange and deactivation by GTP hydrolysis, respectively. Here we review developments leading to current understanding of intrinsic and GAP catalyzed GTP hydrolytic reactions in small GTPases from structural, molecular and chemical mechanistic perspectives. Despite the apparent simplicity of the GTPase cycle, the structural bases underlying the hallmark hydrolytic reaction and catalytic acceleration by GAPs are considerably more diverse than originally anticipated. Even the most fundamental aspects of the reaction mechanism have been challenging to decipher. Through a combination of experimental and in silico approaches, the outlines of a consensus view have begun to emerge for the best studied paradigms. Nevertheless, recent observations indicate that there is still much to be learned. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 431-448, 2016.

  14. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle

  15. Rho GTPase signaling promotes constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2 by human trabecular meshwork cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervan, Cynthia L; Lautz, Jonathan D; Blitzer, Andrea L; Langert, Kelly A; Stubbs, Evan B

    2016-05-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is causally implicated in the pathophysiology of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The molecular mechanisms responsible for elevated IOP remain elusive, but may involve aberrant expression and signaling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 within the trabecular meshwork (TM). Consistent with previously published studies, we show here that exogenous addition of TGF-β2 to cultured porcine anterior segments significantly attenuates outflow facility in a time-dependent manner. By comparison, perfusing segments with a TGFβRI/ALK-5 antagonist (SB-431542) unexpectedly elicited a significant and sustained increase in outflow facility, implicating a role for TM-localized constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2. Consistent with this thesis, cultured primary or transformed (GTM3) quiescent human TM cells were found to constitutively express and secrete measurable amounts of biologically-active TGF-β2. Disrupting monomeric GTPase post-translational prenylation and activation with lovastatin or GGTI-298 markedly reduced constitutive TGF-β2 expression and release. Specifically, inhibiting the Rho subfamily of GTPases with C3 exoenzyme similarly reduced constitutive expression and secretion of TGF-β2. These findings suggest that Rho GTPase signaling, in part, regulates constitutive expression and release of biologically-active TGF-β2 from human TM cells. Localized constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2 by TM cells may promote or exacerbate elevation of IOP in POAG.

  16. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lin; Guo, Yuna; BasuRay, Soumik; Agola, Jacob O; Romero, Elsa; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simons, Peter; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark; Ursu, Oleg; Gouveia, Kristine; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  17. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hong

    Full Text Available Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  18. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  19. A tale of two GTPases in cotranslational protein targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraogi, Ishu; Akopian, David; Shan, Shu-Ou

    2011-11-01

    Guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) comprise a superfamily of proteins that provide molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The "GTPase switch" paradigm, in which a GTPase acts as a bimodal switch that is turned "on" and "off" by external regulatory factors, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. Recent work on a pair of GTPases in the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway has revealed a distinct mode of GTPase regulation. Instead of the classical GTPase switch, the two GTPases in the SRP and SRP receptor undergo a series of conformational changes during their dimerization and reciprocal activation. Each conformational rearrangement provides a point at which these GTPases can communicate with and respond to their upstream and downstream biological cues, thus ensuring the spatial and temporal precision of all the molecular events in the SRP pathway. We suggest that the SRP and SRP receptor represent an emerging class of "multistate" regulatory GTPases uniquely suited to provide exquisite control over complex cellular pathways that require multiple molecular events to occur in a highly coordinated fashion.

  20. Homotropic cooperativity of monomeric cytochrome P450 3A4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baas, Bradley J.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G. (UIUC)

    2010-11-16

    Mechanistic studies of mammalian cytochrome P450s are often obscured by the phase heterogeneity of solubilized preparations of membrane enzymes. The various protein-protein aggregation states of microsomes, detergent solubilized cytochrome or a family of aqueous multimeric complexes can effect measured substrate binding events as well as subsequent steps in the reaction cycle. In addition, these P450 monooxygenases are normally found in a membrane environment and the bilayer composition and dynamics can also effect these catalytic steps. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a homogeneous monomeric population of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP 3A4) in a soluble nanoscale membrane bilayer, or Nanodisc [Nano Lett. 2 (2002) 853]. Cytochrome P450 3A4:Nanodisc assemblies were formed and purified to yield a 1:1 ratio of CYP 3A4 to Nanodisc. Solution small angle X-ray scattering was used to structurally characterize this monomeric CYP 3A4 in the membrane bilayer. The purified CYP 3A4:Nanodiscs showed a heretofore undescribed high level of homotropic cooperativity in the binding of testosterone. Soluble CYP 3A4:Nanodisc retains its known function and shows prototypic hydroxylation of testosterone when driven by hydrogen peroxide. This represents the first functional characterization of a true monomeric preparation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase in a phospholipid bilayer and elucidates new properties of the monomeric form.

  1. Monomeric tartrate resistant acid phosphatase induces insulin sensitive obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Lång

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  2. Crosstalk of small GTPases at the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschieri, Francesco; Farhan, Hesso

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases regulate a wide range of homeostatic processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics, organelle homeostasis, cell migration and vesicle trafficking, as well as in pathologic conditions such as carcinogenesis and metastatic spreading. Therefore, it is important to understand the regulation of small GTPase signaling, but this is complicated by the fact that crosstalk exists between different GTPase families and that we have to understand how they signal in time and space. The Golgi apparatus represents a hub for several signaling molecules and its importance in this field is constantly increasing. In this review we will discuss small GTPases signaling at the Golgi apparatus. Then, we will highlight recent work that contributed to a better understanding of crosstalk between different small GTPase families, with a special emphasis on their crosstalk at the Golgi apparatus. Finally, we will give a brief overview of available methods and tools to investigate spatio-temporal small GTPase crosstalk.

  3. Posttranslational lipid modification of Rho family small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitin, Natalia; Roberts, Patrick J; Chenette, Emily J; Der, Channing J

    2012-01-01

    The Rho family comprises a major branch of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. A majority of Rho GTPases are synthesized as inactive, cytosolic proteins. They then undergo posttranslational modification by isoprenoid or fatty acid lipids, and together with additional carboxyl-terminal sequences target Rho GTPases to specific membrane and subcellular compartments essential for function. We summarize the use of biochemical and cellular assays and pharmacologic inhibitors instrumental for the study of the role of posttranslational lipid modifications and processing in Rho GTPase biology.

  4. A Novel Domain in Translational GTPase BipA Mediates Interaction with the 70S Ribosome and Influences GTP Hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLivron, M.; Makanji, H; Lane, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and {beta}-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  5. A novel domain in translational GTPase BipA mediates interaction with the 70S ribosome and influences GTP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLivron, Megan A; Makanji, Heeren S; Lane, Maura C; Robinson, Victoria L

    2009-11-10

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and beta-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  6. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  7. Plant small monomeric G-proteins (RAC/ROPs) of barley are common elements of susceptibility to fungal leaf pathogens, cell expansion and stomata development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathuri, Indira Priyadarshini; Eichmann, Ruth; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2009-02-01

    Small monomeric RAC/ROP GTPases act as molecular switches in signal transduction processes of plant development and stress responses. They emerged as crucial players in plant-pathogen interactions either by supporting susceptibility or resistance. In a recent publication, we showed that constitutively activated (CA) mutants of different barley (Hordeum vulgare) RAC/ROPs regulate susceptibility to barley fungal leaf pathogens of different life style in a contrasting way. This illustrates the distinctive signalling roles of RAC/ROPs for different plant-pathogen combinations. We also reported the involvement of RAC/ROPs in plant epidermis development in a monocotyledonous plant. Here we further discuss a failure of CA HvRAC/ROP-expressing barley to normally develop stomata.

  8. Synthesis and structure of monomeric, trimeric, and mixed phenylcyanamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Harald; Mayer, Peter; Schulz, Axel; Soller, Thomas; Villinger, Alexander

    2008-06-02

    In a new synthetic approach phenylcyanamide (Hpca) was synthesized by methylation of phenylthiourea followed by a basic work-up. All products along the synthetic route have been fully characterized by means of NMR, IR, and X-ray studies. The first structural report of neutral mixed crystals of phenylcyanamide containing monomeric and trimeric Hpca is presented. Examination of these intriguing mixed crystals revealed the formation of distinct layers of monomeric and trimeric Hpca. These layers are interconnected by weak hydrogen bonds. The trimer represents triphenylisomelamine, which readily isomerizes to the triphenylmelamine in the melt, in accord with computations at the B3LYP level, indicating an exothermic process (DeltaH = -49.4 kcal mol(-1)). Pure trimeric Hpca (triphenylisomelamine) was obtained either by recrystallization of the mixed crystals from boiling water or by trimerization of monomeric Hpca in isopropanol for 12 h under reflux conditions. For comparison tritylcyanamide (Htca) and potassium phenylcyanamide as an [18]crown-6 complex [K([18]crown-6)pca] have been synthesized, and the solid-state structures were determined using X-ray diffraction techniques. The thermal behavior was studied by thermo-analytical experiments. In agreement with the experimental results, computations predict an exothermic cyclotrimerization process for Hpca (DeltaH = -41.3 kcal mol(-1)).

  9. Nucleotide binding affects intrinsic dynamics and structural communication in Ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesca; Raimondi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. These proteins act biologically as molecular switches, which, cycling between OFF and ON states, play fundamental role in cell biology. This review article summarizes the inferences from the widest computational analyses done so far on Ras GTPases aimed at providing a comprehensive structural/dynamic view of the trans-family and family-specific functioning mechanisms. These variegated comparative analyses could infer the evolutionary and intrinsic flexibilities as well as the structural communication features in the most representative G protein families in different functional states. In spite of the low sequence similarities, the members of the Ras superfamily share the topology of the Ras-like domain, including the nucleotide binding site. GDP and GTP make very similar interactions in all GTPases and differences in their binding modes are localized around the γ-phosphate of GTP. Remarkably, such subtle local differences result in significant differences in the functional dynamics and structural communication features of the protein. In Ras GTPases, the nucleotide plays a central and active role in dictating functional dynamics, establishing the major structure network, and mediating the communication paths instrumental in function retention and specialization. Collectively, the results of these studies support the speculation that an "extended conformational selection model" that embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes is likely more suitable to describe the nucleotide behavior in these important molecular switches.

  10. Age-dependent preferential dense-core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells revealed by newly developed monomeric fluorescent timer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Although it is evident that only a few secretory vesicles accumulating in neuroendocrine cells are qualified to fuse with the plasma membrane and release their contents to the extracellular space, the molecular mechanisms that regulate their exocytosis are poorly understood. For example, it has been controversial whether secretory vesicles are exocytosed randomly or preferentially according to their age. Using a newly developed protein-based fluorescent timer, monomeric Kusabira Green Orange (mK-GO), which changes color with a predictable time course, here we show that small GTPase Rab27A effectors regulate age-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles in PC12 cells. When the vesicles were labeled with mK-GO-tagged neuropeptide Y or tissue-type plasminogen activator, punctate structures with green or red fluorescence were observed. Application of high [K(+)] stimulation induced exocytosis of new (green) fluorescent secretory vesicles but not of old (red) vesicles. Overexpression or depletion of rabphilin and synaptotagmin-like protein4-a (Slp4-a), which regulate exocytosis positively and negatively, respectively, disturbed the age-dependent exocytosis of the secretory vesicles in different manners. Our results suggest that coordinate functions of the two effectors of Rab27A, rabphilin and Slp4-a, are required for regulated secretory pathway.

  11. Rho GTPase-formin pairs in cytoskeletal remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Peng, Jun; Wallar, Bradley J; Alberts, Arthur S

    2005-01-01

    Diaphanous-related formins (Drfs) are members of a conserved formin family of actin-nucleating proteins and are thought to act as Rho GTPase effectors in signal transduction pathways that govern gene expression, cytoskeletal remodelling and cell division. In vitro evidence suggests that the three mammalian Drf proteins--mDia1, mDia2 and mDia3-have distinct GTPase-binding specificities. However, much of our current understanding of GTPase-Drf partnerships in mammalian cell signalling is based on expression studies using Drfs missing their unique GTPase-binding domains. We have employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and gene targeting approaches to identify the function of different GTPase-formin pairs in cell signalling. These studies have allowed us to uncover new roles for Drf proteins in cytoskeletal remodelling and novel regulatory mechanisms whereby GTPases influence formin function. Our genetic experiments strongly suggest that Drfs cooperate with other GTPase effector proteins, including the gene product of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene, WASP, during the regulation of cell proliferation. Further, the Drf gene knockout experiments indicate that this family of formins has a role in cancer pathophysiology.

  12. Role of host GTPases in infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, Keith; Rigano, Luciano A; Dowd, Georgina C

    2014-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces internalization into mammalian cells and uses actin-based motility to spread within tissues. Listeria accomplishes this intracellular life cycle by exploiting or antagonizing several host GTPases. Internalization into human cells is mediated by the bacterial surface proteins InlA or InlB. These two modes of uptake each require a host actin polymerization pathway comprised of the GTPase Rac1, nucleation promotion factors, and the Arp2/3 complex. In addition to Rac1, InlB-mediated internalization involves inhibition of the GTPase Arf6 and participation of Dynamin and septin family GTPases. After uptake, Listeria is encased in host phagosomes. The bacterial protein GAPDH inactivates the human GTPase Rab5, thereby delaying phagosomal acquisition of antimicrobial properties. After bacterial-induced destruction of the phagosome, cytosolic Listeria uses the surface protein ActA to stimulate actin-based motility. The GTPase Dynamin 2 reduces the density of microtubules that would otherwise limit bacterial movement. Cell-to-cell spread results when motile Listeria remodel the host plasma membrane into protrusions that are engulfed by neighbouring cells. The human GTPase Cdc42, its activator Tuba, and its effector N-WASP form a complex with the potential to restrict Listeria protrusions. Bacteria overcome this restriction through two microbial factors that inhibit Cdc42-GTP or Tuba/N-WASP interaction.

  13. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor I Oprea

    Full Text Available Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42 collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses-using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen-led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766 and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141 specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid

  14. In vitro comparative kinetic analysis of the chloroplast Toc GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, L Evan; Vaughn, Michael D; Wright, Sarah J; Campbell, Ian M; Bruce, Barry D

    2007-04-13

    A unique aspect of protein transport into plastids is the coordinate involvement of two GTPases in the translocon of the outer chloroplast membrane (Toc). There are two subfamilies in Arabidopsis, the small GTPases (Toc33 and Toc34) and the large acidic GTPases (Toc90, Toc120, Toc132, and Toc159). In chloroplasts, Toc34 and Toc159 are implicated in precursor binding, yet mechanistic details are poorly understood. How the GTPase cycle is modulated by precursor binding is complex and in need of careful dissection. To this end, we have developed novel in vitro assays to quantitate nucleotide binding and hydrolysis of the Toc GTPases. Here we present the first systematic kinetic characterization of four Toc GTPases (cytosolic domains of atToc33, atToc34, psToc34, and the GTPase domain of atToc159) to permit their direct comparison. We report the KM, Vmax, and Ea values for GTP hydrolysis and the Kd value for nucleotide binding for each protein. We demonstrate that GTP hydrolysis by psToc34 is stimulated by chloroplast transit peptides; however, this activity is not stimulated by homodimerization and is abolished by the R133A mutation. Furthermore, we show peptide stimulation of hydrolytic rates are not because of accelerated nucleotide exchange, indicating that transit peptides function as GTPase-activating proteins and not guanine nucleotide exchange factors in modulating the activity of psToc34. Finally, by using the psToc34 structure, we have developed molecular models for atToc33, atToc34, and atToc159G. By combining these models with the measured enzymatic properties of the Toc GTPases, we provide new insights of how the chloroplast protein import cycle may be regulated.

  15. Slow Unfolding of Monomeric Proteins from Hyperthermophiles with Reversible Unfolding

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    Atsushi Mukaiyama

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the differences in their optimal growth temperatures microorganisms can be classified into psychrophiles, mesophiles, thermophiles, and hyperthermophiles. Proteins from hyperthermophiles generally exhibit greater stability than those from other organisms. In this review, we collect data about the stability and folding of monomeric proteins from hyperthermophilies with reversible unfolding, from the equilibrium and kinetic aspects. The results indicate that slow unfolding is a general strategy by which proteins from hyperthermophiles adapt to higher temperatures. Hydrophobic interaction is one of the factors in the molecular mechanism of the slow unfolding of proteins from hyperthermophiles.

  16. Addition-type polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The monomeric reactants approach was used to fabricate addition-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites with improved mechanical properties and thermal stability characteristics over those of composites derived from addition-type amide acid prepolymers. A screening study of 24 different monomer combinations was performed. The results of a more extensive investigation of a selected number of monomer combinations showed that the combination providing the best thermomechanical properties was 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester/4,4'-methylenedianiline/3,3'4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester at a molar ratio of 2/3.09/2.09.

  17. Metal binding properties of Escherichia coli YjiA, a member of the metal homeostasis-associated COG0523 family of GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Andrew M; Jost, Marco; Ryan, Katherine S; Turo, Kaitlyn E; Douglas, Colin D; Drennan, Catherine L; Zamble, Deborah B

    2013-03-12

    GTPases are critical molecular switches involved in a wide range of biological functions. Recent phylogenetic and genomic analyses of the large, mostly uncharacterized COG0523 subfamily of GTPases revealed a link between some COG0523 proteins and metal homeostasis pathways. In this report, we detail the bioinorganic characterization of YjiA, a representative member of COG0523 subgroup 9 and the only COG0523 protein to date with high-resolution structural information. We find that YjiA is capable of binding several types of transition metals with dissociation constants in the low micromolar range and that metal binding affects both the oligomeric structure and GTPase activity of the enzyme. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis, we identify, among others, a metal-binding site adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site in the GTPase domain that involves a conserved cysteine and several glutamate residues. Mutations of the coordinating residues decrease the impact of metal, suggesting that metal binding to this site is responsible for modulating the GTPase activity of the protein. These findings point toward a regulatory function for these COG0523 GTPases that is responsive to their metal-bound state.

  18. The large conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel interacts with the small GTPase Rab11b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Sophia; Harvey, Margaret; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Jordan, Amy; Sokolowski, Bernd

    2012-09-21

    The transduction of sound by the receptor or hair cells of the cochlea leads to the activation of ion channels found in the basal and lateral regions of these cells. Thus, the processing of these transduced signals to the central nervous system is tied to the regulation of baso-lateral ion channels. The large conductance calcium-activated potassium or BK channel was revealed to interact with the small GTPase, Rab11b, which is one of many Rabs found in various endosomal pathways. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the colocalization of these two proteins in receptor cells and auditory neurons. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells as a heterologous expression system, Rab11b increased or decreased BK expression, depending on the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Rab, respectively. Additional mutation analyses, using a yeast two-hybrid assay, suggested that this GTPase moderately interacts within a region of BK exclusive of the N- or C-terminal tails. These data suggest that this small GTPase regulates BK in a slow recycling process through the endocytic compartment and to the plasmalemma.

  19. Characterization of monomeric intermediates during VSV glycoprotein structural transition.

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    Aurélie A Albertini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes, driven by conformational changes of viral glycoproteins. Crystal structures provide static pictures of pre- and post-fusion conformations of these proteins but the transition pathway remains elusive. Here, using several biophysical techniques, including analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroïsm, electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, we have characterized the low-pH-induced fusogenic structural transition of a soluble form of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV glycoprotein G ectodomain (G(th, aa residues 1-422, the fragment that was previously crystallized. While the post-fusion trimer is the major species detected at low pH, the pre-fusion trimer is not detected in solution. Rather, at high pH, G(th is a flexible monomer that explores a large conformational space. The monomeric population exhibits a marked pH-dependence and adopts more elongated conformations when pH decreases. Furthermore, large relative movements of domains are detected in absence of significant secondary structure modification. Solution studies are complemented by electron micrographs of negatively stained viral particles in which monomeric ectodomains of G are observed at the viral surface at both pH 7.5 and pH 6.7. We propose that the monomers are intermediates during the conformational change and thus that VSV G trimers dissociate at the viral surface during the structural transition.

  20. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus U. Pietrzik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  1. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Uta-Mareike; Strecker, Paul; Storck, Steffen E; Thomas, Carolin; Rabiej, Verena; Junker, Anne; Schilling, Sandra; Schmidt, Nadine; Dowds, C Marie; Eggert, Simone; Pietrzik, Claus U; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third) but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  2. Study on the chaperone properties of conserved GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Xue, Jiaying; Sun, Zhe; Qin, Yan; Gong, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    As a large family of hydrolases, GTPases are widespread in cells and play the very important biological function of hydrolyzing GTP into GDP and inorganic phosphate through binding with it. GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, protein synthesis, and protein transportation. Chaperones can facilitate the folding or refolding of nascent peptides and denatured proteins to their native states. However, chaperones do not occur in the native structures in which they can perform their normal biological functions. In the current study, the chaperone activity of the conserved GTPases of Escherichia coli is tested by the chemical denaturation and chaperone-assisted renaturation of citrate synthase and α-glucosidase. The effects of ribosomes and nucleotides on the chaperone activity are also examined. Our data indicate that these conserved GTPases have chaperone properties, and may be ancestral protein folding factors that have appeared before dedicated chaperones.

  3. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-02

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Lewis Base Stabilized Monomeric Parent Stibanylboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Christian; Hegen, Oliver; Hautmann, Matthias; Balázs, Gábor; Bodensteiner, Michael; Virovets, Alexander V; Timoshkin, Alexey Y; Scheer, Manfred

    2015-10-26

    The synthesis of the Lewis base stabilized monomeric parent compound of stibanylboranes, "H2 Sb-BH2 ", is reported. Through a salt metathesis route, the silyl-substituted compounds (Me3 Si)2 Sb-BH2 ⋅LB (LB=NMe3 , NHC(Me) ) were synthesized as representatives of derivatives with a Sb-B σ bond. Under very mild conditions, they could be transformed into the target compounds Me3 N⋅H2 B-HSb-BH2 ⋅NMe3 and H2 Sb-BH2 ⋅NHC(Me) , respectively. The products were characterized by X-ray structure analysis, NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. DFT calculations give further insight into the stability and bonding of these unique compounds.

  5. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Takala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes.

  6. Characterization of the Partially Folded Monomeric Intermediate of Creatine Kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴龙斗; 周海梦

    2002-01-01

    The importance of understanding the protein folding pathway and intermediates is well recognized on the basis of extensive studies of protein folding in vitro and in vivo. Creatine kinase (CK) is a typical model for studying unfolding and refolding of proteins due to several interesting properties. Recent studies on the folding of CK show that its partially folded monomeric intermediate is present kinetically and is stable at equilibrium. The present paper contains 33 References as a mini review to characterize the properties of CK from studies on the CK folding pathway. Characterization of these intermediates is an essential step toward understanding the mechanism of protein folding. Some well-determined schemes are suggested as protein folding models.

  7. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malý, Pavel; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlo...

  8. mKikGR, a monomeric photoswitchable fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Habuchi

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration and utilization of fluorescent proteins whose fluorescence can be switched on and off has greatly expanded the toolkit of molecular and cell biology. These photoswitchable proteins have facilitated the characterization of specifically tagged molecular species in the cell and have enabled fluorescence imaging of intracellular structures with a resolution far below the classical diffraction limit of light. Applications are limited, however, by the fast photobleaching, slow photoswitching, and oligomerization typical for photoswitchable proteins currently available. Here, we report the molecular cloning and spectroscopic characterization of mKikGR, a monomeric version of the previously reported KikGR that displays high photostability and switching rates. Furthermore, we present single-molecule imaging experiments that demonstrate that individual mKikGR proteins can be localized with a precision of better than 10 nanometers, suggesting their suitability for super-resolution imaging.

  9. Computational design and characterization of a monomeric helical dinuclear metalloprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Kono, Hidetoshi; Lahr, Steven; Wang, Wei; DeGrado, William F; Saven, Jeffery G

    2003-12-12

    The de novo design of di-iron proteins is an important step towards understanding the diversity of function among this complex family of metalloenzymes. Previous designs of due ferro (DF) proteins have resulted in tetrameric and dimeric four-helix bundles having crystallographically well-defined structures and active-site geometries. Here, the design and characterization of DFsc, a 114 residue monomeric four-helix bundle, is presented. The backbone was modeled using previous oligomeric structures and appropriate inter-helical turns. The identities of 26 residues were predetermined, including the primary and secondary ligands in the active site, residues involved in active site accessibility, and the gamma beta gamma beta turn between helices 2 and 3. The remaining 88 amino acid residues were determined using statistical computer aided design, which is based upon a recent statistical theory of protein sequences. Rather than sampling sequences, the theory directly provides the site-specific amino acid probabilities, which are then used to guide sequence design. The resulting sequence (DFsc) expresses well in Escherichia coli and is highly soluble. Sedimentation studies confirm that the protein is monomeric in solution. Circular dichroism spectra are consistent with the helical content of the target structure. The protein is structured in both the apo and the holo forms, with the metal-bound form exhibiting increased stability. DFsc stoichiometrically binds a variety of divalent metal ions, including Zn(II), Co(II), Fe(II), and Mn(II), with micromolar affinities. 15N HSQC NMR spectra of both the apo and Zn(II) proteins reveal excellent dispersion with evidence of a significant structural change upon metal binding. DFsc is then a realization of complete de novo design, where backbone structure, activity, and sequence are specified in the design process.

  10. Thousands of rab GTPases for the cell biologist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Diekmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rab proteins are small GTPases that act as essential regulators of vesicular trafficking. 44 subfamilies are known in humans, performing specific sets of functions at distinct subcellular localisations and tissues. Rab function is conserved even amongst distant orthologs. Hence, the annotation of Rabs yields functional predictions about the cell biology of trafficking. So far, annotating Rabs has been a laborious manual task not feasible for current and future genomic output of deep sequencing technologies. We developed, validated and benchmarked the Rabifier, an automated bioinformatic pipeline for the identification and classification of Rabs, which achieves up to 90% classification accuracy. We cataloged roughly 8.000 Rabs from 247 genomes covering the entire eukaryotic tree. The full Rab database and a web tool implementing the pipeline are publicly available at www.RabDB.org. For the first time, we describe and analyse the evolution of Rabs in a dataset covering the whole eukaryotic phylogeny. We found a highly dynamic family undergoing frequent taxon-specific expansions and losses. We dated the origin of human subfamilies using phylogenetic profiling, which enlarged the Rab repertoire of the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor with Rab14, 32 and RabL4. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the Choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis Rab family pinpointed the changes that accompanied the emergence of Metazoan multicellularity, mainly an important expansion and specialisation of the secretory pathway. Lastly, we experimentally establish tissue specificity in expression of mouse Rabs and show that neo-functionalisation best explains the emergence of new human Rab subfamilies. With the Rabifier and RabDB, we provide tools that easily allows non-bioinformaticians to integrate thousands of Rabs in their analyses. RabDB is designed to enable the cell biology community to keep pace with the increasing number of fully-sequenced genomes and change the scale

  11. Thousands of rab GTPases for the cell biologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Yoan; Seixas, Elsa; Gouw, Marc; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Seabra, Miguel C; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2011-10-01

    Rab proteins are small GTPases that act as essential regulators of vesicular trafficking. 44 subfamilies are known in humans, performing specific sets of functions at distinct subcellular localisations and tissues. Rab function is conserved even amongst distant orthologs. Hence, the annotation of Rabs yields functional predictions about the cell biology of trafficking. So far, annotating Rabs has been a laborious manual task not feasible for current and future genomic output of deep sequencing technologies. We developed, validated and benchmarked the Rabifier, an automated bioinformatic pipeline for the identification and classification of Rabs, which achieves up to 90% classification accuracy. We cataloged roughly 8.000 Rabs from 247 genomes covering the entire eukaryotic tree. The full Rab database and a web tool implementing the pipeline are publicly available at www.RabDB.org. For the first time, we describe and analyse the evolution of Rabs in a dataset covering the whole eukaryotic phylogeny. We found a highly dynamic family undergoing frequent taxon-specific expansions and losses. We dated the origin of human subfamilies using phylogenetic profiling, which enlarged the Rab repertoire of the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor with Rab14, 32 and RabL4. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the Choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis Rab family pinpointed the changes that accompanied the emergence of Metazoan multicellularity, mainly an important expansion and specialisation of the secretory pathway. Lastly, we experimentally establish tissue specificity in expression of mouse Rabs and show that neo-functionalisation best explains the emergence of new human Rab subfamilies. With the Rabifier and RabDB, we provide tools that easily allows non-bioinformaticians to integrate thousands of Rabs in their analyses. RabDB is designed to enable the cell biology community to keep pace with the increasing number of fully-sequenced genomes and change the scale at which we perform

  12. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis.

  13. IFN-inducible GTPases in host cell defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Shenoy, Avinash R; Kumar, Pradeep; Bradfield, Clinton J; MacMicking, John D

    2012-10-18

    From plants to humans, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell-a process termed cell-autonomous immunity-equates firmly with survival of the species. Recent work has begun to unravel this programmed cell-intrinsic response and the central roles played by IFN-inducible GTPases in defending the mammalian cell's interior against a diverse group of invading pathogens. These immune GTPases regulate vesicular traffic and protein complex assembly to stimulate oxidative, autophagic, membranolytic, and inflammasome-related antimicrobial activities within the cytosol, as well as on pathogen-containing vacuoles. Moreover, human genome-wide association studies and disease-related transcriptional profiling have linked mutations in the Immunity-Related GTPase M (IRGM) locus and altered expression of guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) with tuberculosis susceptibility and Crohn's colitis.

  14. Properties of monomeric paramyosin using a transient electric birefringence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, D; Krause, S

    1976-01-01

    Paramyosin samples obtained from the chowder clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, by different extraction techniques were studied using transient electric birefringence techniques. The protein remain monomeric (unaggregated) in 1 mM buffer solution at pH 3.1 to 3.8 and near pH 10. At pH 3.2, the molecules obtained by different extraction techniques exhibit rotational diffusion constants that indicate a 5% difference in length between them, with the probable native form of paramyosin being the longer species. This difference in rotational diffusion constant disappears at higher pH, and, in addition, a large difference in dipole moment between the molecules observed at pH 3.2 also disappears at high pH. These results are used to hypothesize that the rodlike native paramyosin molecules have one or two partly flexible portions on their ends; at one end of each molecule this portion probably contains excess basic amino acids which are charged at low pH to account for the higher dipole moment of this form of paramyosin at these low pH values. At pH 3.2, these portions of the macromolecule are not flexible and act as stiff parts of the rodlike molecules, but they gradually become flexible at higher pH. Possible mechanisms for this change in flexibility are discussed.

  15. Labeling Monomeric Insulin with Renal-Clearable Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Yu, Mengxiao; Gannaway, Melissa; Sullins, Justin; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Jie

    2015-12-16

    In the native physiological environment, inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) often induce nonspecific protein adsorption, which could significantly alter the function of the proteins they labeled. As a result, small fluorescent dyes are still widely used in the imaging of proteins in animals due to their minimal interference with protein function. Here, we used monomeric insulin as a model and compared its bioactivity before and after labeling with renal-clearable near-infrared-emitting gold NPs. These NPs were chosen because they have high resistance to serum protein adsorption and low nonspecific accumulation. We have found that a 1:1 insulin-NP ratio can be achieved, where the insulin-NPs show minimal serum protein binding with fully retained bioactivity comparable to that of unlabeled insulin. These results show a proof of concept that renal-clearable NPs can behave like small molecules in protein labeling without changing the individual protein's function, laying down a foundation for in vivo tracking of proteins with multimodality imaging techniques.

  16. Substrate-Induced Dimerization of Engineered Monomeric Variants of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Lara-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The dimeric nature of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs is maintained by an extensive surface area interface of more than 1600 Å2. TIMs from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvTIM are held in their dimeric state by two mechanisms: a ball and socket interaction of residue 45 of one subunit that fits into the hydrophobic pocket of the complementary subunit and by swapping of loop 3 between subunits. TvTIMs differ from other TIMs in their unfolding energetics. In TvTIMs the energy necessary to unfold a monomer is greater than the energy necessary to dissociate the dimer. Herein we found that the character of residue I45 controls the dimer-monomer equilibrium in TvTIMs. Unfolding experiments employing monomeric and dimeric mutants led us to conclude that dimeric TvTIMs unfold following a four state model denaturation process whereas monomeric TvTIMs follow a three state model. In contrast to other monomeric TIMs, monomeric variants of TvTIM1 are stable and unexpectedly one of them (I45A is only 29-fold less active than wild-type TvTIM1. The high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIMs contrast with the marginal catalytic activity of diverse monomeric TIMs variants. The stability of the monomeric variants of TvTIM1 and the use of cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments permit us to understand the differences between the catalytic activities of TvTIMs and other marginally active monomeric TIMs. As TvTIMs do not unfold upon dimer dissociation, herein we found that the high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIM variants is explained by the formation of catalytic dimeric competent species assisted by substrate binding.

  17. Structural Mechanisms and Drug Discovery Prospects of Rho GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers, Cameron C; Overduin, Michael

    2016-06-13

    Rho GTPases regulate cellular morphology and dynamics, and some are key drivers of cancer progression. This superfamily offers attractive potential targets for therapeutic intervention, with RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 being prime examples. The challenges in developing agents that act on these signaling enzymes include the lack of obvious druggable pockets and their membrane-bound activities. However, progress in targeting the similar Ras protein is illuminating new strategies for specifically inhibiting oncogenic GTPases. The structures of multiple signaling and regulatory states of Rho proteins have been determined, and the post-translational modifications including acylation and phosphorylation points have been mapped and their functional effects examined. The development of inhibitors to probe the significance of overexpression and mutational hyperactivation of these GTPases underscores their importance in cancer progression. The ability to integrate in silico, in vitro, and in vivo investigations of drug-like molecules indicates the growing tractability of GTPase systems for lead optimization. Although no Rho-targeted drug molecules have yet been clinically approved, this family is clearly showing increasing promise for the development of precision medicine and combination cancer therapies.

  18. Plant GTPases: regulation of morphogenesis by ROPs and ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, Joachim F; Hülskamp, Martin

    2006-03-21

    Polarized cell growth in plants is controlled by Rho-like small GTPases (ROPs), not only through the canonical WAVE/Arp2/3 pathway, but also through newly defined plant-specific pathways involving the regulated release of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  19. Roc, a Ras/GTPase domain in complex proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgraaf, Leonard; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    We identified a novel group of the Ras/GTPase superfamily, termed Roc, that is present as domain in complex proteins together with other domains, including leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), ankyrin repeats, WD40 repeats, kinase domains, RasGEF and RhoGAP domains. Roc is always succeeded by a novel 300–40

  20. The cytoskeletal protein Ndel1 regulates dynamin 2 GTPase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Chansard

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton dynamics, membranes trafficking and positioning are essential for the proper functioning of any mammalian cell. The identification of the molecules and mechanisms that allow these cellular processes to interface is vital for understanding cell behaviors. Ndel1, the mammalian homolog of the Aspergillus nidulans NudE, organizes the cytoskeleton and regulates molecular motors, thereby impacting on the positioning of membranes. Hypothetically, Ndel1 can act in concert with enzymes controlling membrane trafficking (vesicle-mediated transport per se, but this idea has never been investigated. We now report that a pool of Ndel1 associates directly with Dynamin 2 (Dyn2, a large cytosolic GTPase involved in the trafficking of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1. In vitro, Ndel1 enhances Dyn2 GTPase activity in its unassembled and assembled forms, without promoting oligomerization of the enzyme. In cells, gain and loss of function of Ndel1 recapitulate the effects of overexpression of Dyn2 and Dyn2 dominant negative with reduced GTPase activity on the intracellular localization of GluR1, respectively, without affecting the stability of microtubules. Together, these results indicate that Ndel1 regulates Dyn2 GTPase activity and impacts GluR1-containing membranes distribution in a manner reminiscent of Dyn2.

  1. Rho GTPase inactivation impairs lens growth and integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vasantha; Wawrousek, Eric; Tamm, Ernst R; Zigler, Samuel

    2002-02-01

    To elucidate the significance of Rho GTPase signaling on lens growth and structural integrity, we have selectively inactivated Rho GTPase in the ocular lens. To achieve this tissue-specific inactivation, a transgene encoding the C3-exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum has been expressed in mice under transcriptional control of the lens-specific alphaA-crystallin promoter. C3-exoenzyme is known to selectively inactivate all Rho GTPase isoforms by ADP-ribosylating an asparagine residue at position 41. Mice expressing the C3-exoenzyme transgene exhibited selective ocular defects, including cataract and microphthalmia. Extralenticular effects included ocular hemorrhage (blood accumulation in the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye) and abnormalities of the iris including focal attachments to lens and cornea (synechiae). C3-transgene expression was found only in the lens and not in the other ocular tissues as determined by RT-PCR analysis. Histologic examination of the eyes of C3 transgenic mice from two independent lines revealed extensive abnormalities of the lens, including defective fiber cell differentiation and elongation, ruptured posterior lens capsule, and thickened anterior lens capsule. Electron microscopic analysis of hemorrhaged C3 eyes showed abnormalities in the posterior hyaloid vessels. Collectively these data reveal the importance of Rho GTPase signaling in regulating lens growth and maintenance of lens transparency.

  2. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudell Eva G

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. Results Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin β1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to β1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. Conclusions GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  3. Activation of the Small GTPase Rap1 in Human Neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M'Rabet, Laura; Coffer, P.J.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Franke, Barbara; Segal, Anthony W.; Koenderman, L.; Bos, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The small GTPase Rap1 is highly expressed in human neutrophils, but its function is largely unknown. Using the Rap1- binding domain of RalGDS (RalGDS-RBD) as an activationspecific probe for Rap1, we have investigated the regulation of Rap1 activity in primary human neutrophils. We found that a varie

  4. A RHOse by any other name: a comparative analysis of animal and plant Rho GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brembu, Tore; Winge, Per; Bones, Atle Magnar; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2006-05-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that act as key regulators of a many cellular processes, including cell movement, morphogenesis, host defense, cell division and gene expression. Rho GTPases are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms. Plants lack clear homologs to conventional Rho GTPases found in yeast and animals; instead, they have over time developed a unique subfamily, ROPs, also known as RAC. The origin of ROP-like proteins appears to precede the appearance of land plants. This review aims to discuss the evolution of ROP/RAC and to compare plant ROP and animal Rho GTPases, focusing on similarities and differences in regulation of the GTPases and their downstream effectors.

  5. SGCC successfully developed large-capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Through many years' cooperation,SGCC and Shanghai Silicate Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Science successfully developed 650 ampere-hours capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric storage battery with the independent intellectual property right

  6. Amphiphile dependency of the monomeric and dimeric forms of acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, P; Brodbeck, U

    1984-08-08

    Human erythrocyte membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase was converted to a monomeric species by treatment of ghosts with 2-mercaptoethanol and iodoacetic acid. After solubilization with Triton X-100, the reduced and alkylated enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography and separated from residual dimeric enzyme by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in a zonal rotor. Monomeric and dimeric acetylcholinesterase showed full enzymatic activity in presence of Triton X-100 whereas in the absence of detergent, activity was decreased to approx. 20% and 15%, respectively. Preformed egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles fully sustained activity of the monomeric species whereas the dimer was only 80% active. The results suggest that a dimeric structure is not required for manifestation of amphiphile dependency of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, monomeric enzyme appears to be more easily inserted into phospholipid bilayers than the dimeric species.

  7. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by dynamin GTPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Huang, Su; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Largura, Heather W; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts, but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0-21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased in osteoblasts over-expressing dynamin. Conversely, ALP activity was increased following shRNA-mediated knockdown of dynamin and in osteoblasts treated with the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore. Dynasore also reduced c-fos and osterix expression, markers of early osteoblasts, suggesting a role for dynamin in pre-osteoblast to osteoblast differentiation. Since dynamin GTPase activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, we examined the mechanism of dynamin dephosphorylation in osteoblasts. Dynamin formed a protein complex with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST and inhibition of phosphatase activity increased the level of phosphorylated dynamin. Further, PTP-PEST blocked the Src-mediated increase in the phosphorylation and GTPase activity of wild-type dynamin but not the phosphorylation mutant dynY231F/Y597F. Although ALP activity was increased in osteoblasts expressing GTPase-defective dynK44A, and to a lesser extent dynY231F/Y597F, osteoblast migration was significantly inhibited by dynK44A and dynY231F/Y597F. These studies demonstrate a novel role for dynamin GTPase activity and phosphorylation in osteoblast differentiation and migration, which may be important for bone formation.

  8. Atlastin GTPases are required for Golgi apparatus and ER morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismanchi, Neggy; Soderblom, Cynthia; Stadler, Julia; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Blackstone, Craig

    2008-06-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (SPG1-33) comprise a cluster of inherited neurological disorders characterized principally by lower extremity spasticity and weakness due to a length-dependent, retrograde axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the large oligomeric GTPase atlastin-1 are responsible for SPG3A, a common autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia. Here we describe a family of human GTPases, atlastin-2 and -3 that are closely related to atlastin-1. Interestingly, while atlastin-1 is predominantly localized to vesicular tubular complexes and cis-Golgi cisternae, mostly in brain, atlastin-2 and -3 are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are most enriched in other tissues. Knockdown of atlastin-2 and -3 levels in HeLa cells using siRNA (small interfering RNA) causes disruption of Golgi morphology, and these Golgi structures remain sensitive to brefeldin A treatment. Interestingly, expression of SPG3A mutant or dominant-negative atlastin proteins lacking GTPase activity causes prominent inhibition of ER reticularization, suggesting a role for atlastin GTPases in the formation of three-way junctions in the ER. However, secretory pathway trafficking as assessed using vesicular stomatitis virus G protein fused to green fluorescent protein (VSVG-GFP) as a reporter was essentially normal in both knockdown and dominant-negative overexpression conditions for all atlastins. Thus, the atlastin family of GTPases functions prominently in both ER and Golgi morphogenesis, but they do not appear to be required generally for anterograde ER-to-Golgi trafficking. Abnormal morphogenesis of the ER and Golgi resulting from mutations in atlastin-1 may ultimately underlie SPG3A by interfering with proper membrane distribution or polarity of the long corticospinal motor neurons.

  9. Redox control of GTPases: from molecular mechanisms to functional significance in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jongyun

    2011-02-15

    Small GTPases, including the proto-oncoprotein Ras and Rho GTPases, are involved in various cellular signaling events. Some of these small GTPases are redox sensitive, including Ras, Rho, Ran, Dexras1, and Rhes GTPases. Thus, the redox-mediated regulation of these GTPases often determines the course of their cellular signaling cascades. This article takes into consideration the application of Marcus theory to potential redox-based molecular mechanisms in the regulation of these redox-sensitive GTPases and the relevance of such mechanisms to a specific redox-sensitive motif. The discussion also takes into account various diseases, including cancers, heart, and neuronal disorders, that are often linked with the dysregulation of the redox signaling cascades associated with these redox-sensitive GTPases.

  10. Some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors inhibit dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kenichi; Nakashima, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2008-08-01

    Neuronal dynamin I plays a critical role in the recycling of synaptic vesicles, and thus in nervous system function. We expressed and purified dynamin I to explore potentially clinically useful endocytosis inhibitors and to examine the mechanism of their action. We estimated the IC(50) of nineteen psychotropic drugs for dynamin I. The IC(50) values of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (sertraline and fluvoxamine) were 7.3+/-1.0 and 14.7+/-1.6 microM, respectively. Kinetic analyses revealed that fluvoxamine is a noncompetitive inhibitor of dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) with respect to guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and a competitive inhibitor with respect to L-phosphatidylserine (PS). Fluvoxamine may compete with PS for binding to the pleckstrin homology domain of dynamin I. On the other hand, sertraline was a mixed type inhibitor with respect to both GTP and PS. Our results indicate that sertraline and fluvoxamine may regulate the transportation of neurotransmitters by modulating synaptic vesicle endocytosis via the inhibition of dynamin I GTPase.

  11. A monomeric variant of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE loses its regulatory properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Suk Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE is a key enzyme in the metabolism of both insulin and amyloid beta peptides. IDE is unique in that it is subject to allosteric activation which is hypothesized to occur through an oligomeric structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IDE is known to exist as an equilibrium mixture of monomers, dimers, and higher oligomers, with the dimer being the predominant form. Based on the crystal structure of IDE we deleted the putative dimer interface in the C-terminal region, which resulted in a monomeric variant. Monomeric IDE retained enzymatic activity, however instead of the allosteric behavior seen with wild type enzyme it displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetic behavior. With the substrate Abz-GGFLRKHGQ-EDDnp, monomeric IDE retained approximately 25% of the wild type activity. In contrast with the larger peptide substrates beta-endorphin and amyloid beta peptide 1-40, monomeric IDE retained only 1 to 0.25% of wild type activity. Unlike wild type IDE neither bradykinin nor dynorphin B-9 activated the monomeric variant of the enzyme. Similarly, monomeric IDE was not activated by polyphosphates under conditions in which the activity of wild type enzyme was increased more than 50 fold. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings serve to establish the dimer interface in IDE and demonstrate the requirement for an oligomeric form of the enzyme for its regulatory properties. The data support a mechanism where the binding of activators to oligomeric IDE induces a conformational change that cannot occur in the monomeric variant. Since a conformational change from a closed to a more open structure is likely the rate-determining step in the IDE reaction, the subunit induced conformational change likely shifts the structure of the oligomeric enzyme to a more open conformation.

  12. Signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor: a new paradigm for multistate regulatory GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shu-ou; Schmid, Sandra L; Zhang, Xin

    2009-07-28

    The GTP-binding proteins or GTPases comprise a superfamily of proteins that provide molecular switches in numerous cellular processes. The "GTPase switch" paradigm, in which a GTPase acts as a bimodal switch that is turned "on" and "off" by external regulatory factors, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases for more than two decades. Nevertheless, recent work has unveiled an emerging class of "multistate" regulatory GTPases that do not adhere to this classical paradigm. Instead of relying on external nucleotide exchange factors or GTPase activating proteins to switch between the on and off states, these GTPases have the intrinsic ability to exchange nucleotides and to sense and respond to upstream and downstream factors. In contrast to the bimodal nature of the GTPase switch, these GTPases undergo multiple conformational rearrangements, allowing multiple regulatory points to be built into a complex biological process to ensure the efficiency and fidelity of the pathway. We suggest that these multistate regulatory GTPases are uniquely suited to provide spatial and temporal control of complex cellular pathways that require multiple molecular events to occur in a highly coordinated fashion.

  13. How to analyze bacterial toxins targeting Rho GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielek, Heike; Schmidt, Gudula

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens developed several strategies to overcome defense systems of eukaryotic hosts. Within the infection process, they need to attach to and cross through epithelial layers, escape from the innate and adaptive immune response, and find a physiological niche to survive. One target to modulate the host-pathogen interaction in order to deceit pathogen resistance is the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators: the family of Rho GTPases. Some bacterial toxins catalyze a covalent modification of Rho GTPases to keep these molecular switches in a constitutive active or inactive state. This leads to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Toxin-treated cells show typical morphological changes depending on substrate specificity and action of the toxins. In this chapter, we discuss the classes of bacterial toxins based on their mode of action, their recombinant expression (specifically CNF1), intoxication and subsequent morphological changes of the actin cytoskeleton, and cell shape.

  14. Integrin-mediated function of Rab GTPases in cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alahari Suresh K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The RAS (rat sarcoma superfamily of small GTPases is broadly subdivided into five groups: Ras, Rho, Rab, Ran, and Arf. Rab family proteins are important in regulating signal transduction and cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, vesicle transport, nuclear assembly, and cytoskeleton formation. However, some Rab proteins have been reported to be necessary for the adhesion and migration of cancer cells. Although Ras and Rho family members have been strongly implicated in cancer progression, knowledge of Rabs action in this regard is limited. Some reports have also linked Rab GTPases with cancer cell migration and invasiveness. This review discusses the implications of the involvement of Rabs in malignant transformation and cancer therapy through integrin-mediated signaling events, with particular emphasis on breast cancer.

  15. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  16. Rational design of Rho GTPase-targeting inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xun; Zheng, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases have been implicated in diverse cellular functions and are potential therapeutic targets in inflammation, cancer, and neurologic diseases. Virtual screening of compounds that fit into surface grooves of RhoA known to be critical for guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) interaction produced chemical candidates with minimized docking energy. Subsequent screening for inhibitory activity of RhoA binding to the Rho-GEF, LARG, identified a Rho-specific inhibitor as a lead compound capable of blocking RhoA-LARG interaction and RhoA activation by LARG specifically and dose dependently. A microscale thermophoresis analysis was applied to directly quantify the binding interaction of the lead inhibitor with RhoA target. The lead inhibitor highlights the principle that rational targeting of subfamily members of Rho GTPases is feasible and potentially useful in future drug design effort.

  17. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by Dynamin GTPase activity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0–21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased...

  18. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  19. Structural determinants allowing endolysosomal sorting and degradation of endosomal GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Ruth A; Oeste, Clara L; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Ramos, Irene; Herrera, Mónica; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2010-09-01

    Rapid control of protein degradation is usually achieved through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We recently found that the short-lived GTPase RhoB is degraded in lysosomes. Moreover, the fusion of the RhoB C-terminal sequence CINCCKVL, containing the isoprenylation and palmitoylation sites, to other proteins directs their sorting into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and rapid lysosomal degradation. Here, we show that this process is highly specific for RhoB. Alteration of late endosome lipid dynamics produced the accumulation of RhoB, but not of other endosomal GTPases, including Rab5, Rab7, Rab9 or Rab11, into enlarged MVB. Other isoprenylated and bipalmitoylated GTPases, such as H-Ras, Rap2A, Rap2B and TC10, were not accumulated into MVB and were stable. Remarkably, although TC10, which is highly homologous to RhoB, was stable, a sequence derived from its C-terminus (CINCCLIT) elicited MVB sorting and degradation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-chimeric protein. This led us to identify a cluster of basic amino acids (KKH) in the TC10 hypervariable region, constituting a secondary signal potentially involved in electrostatic interactions with membrane lipids. Mutation of this cluster allowed TC10 MVB sorting and degradation, whereas inserting it into RhoB hypervariable region rescued this protein from its lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings define a highly specific structural module for entering the MVB pathway and rapid lysosomal degradation.

  20. Small GTPases and Brucella entry into the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    A key determinant for intracellular pathogenic bacteria to ensure their virulence within host cells is their ability to bypass the endocytic pathway and to reach a safe niche of replication. In the case of Brucella, the bacterium targets the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to create a replicating niche called the BCV (Brucella-containing vacuole). The ER is a suitable strategic place for pathogenic Brucella. Indeed, bacteria can be hidden from host cell defences to persist within the host, and they can take advantage of the membrane reservoir delivered by the ER to replicate. Interaction with the ER leads to the presence on the BCV of the GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the small GTPase Rab2 known to be located on secretory vesicles that traffic between the ER and the Golgi apparatus. GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab2 controls Brucella replication at late times post-infection. A specific interaction between the human small GTPase Rab2 and a Brucella spp. protein named RicA was identified. Altered kinetics of intracellular trafficking and faster proliferation of the Brucella abortus ΔricA mutant was observed compared with the wild-type strain. RicA is the first reported effector with a proposed function for B. abortus.

  1. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  2. Rapid parallel flow cytometry assays of active GTPases using effector beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranda, Tione; BasuRay, Soumik; Swanson, Scarlett; Agola, Jacob; Bondu, Virginie; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-11-15

    We describe a rapid assay for measuring the cellular activity of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) in response to a specific stimulus. Effector-functionalized beads are used to quantify in parallel multiple GTP-bound GTPases in the same cell lysate by flow cytometry. In a biologically relevant example, five different Ras family GTPases are shown for the first time to be involved in a concerted signaling cascade downstream of receptor ligation by Sin Nombre hantavirus.

  3. Anthocyanins and their variation in red wines I. Monomeric anthocyanins and their color expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Liang, Na-Na; Mu, Lin; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Wang, Jun; Reeves, Malcolm J; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2012-02-07

    Originating in the grapes, monomeric anthocyanins in young red wines contribute the majority of color and the supposed beneficial health effects related to their consumption, and as such they are recognized as one of the most important groups of phenolic metabolites in red wines. In recent years, our increasing knowledge of the chemical complexity of the monomeric anthocyanins, their stability, together with the phenomena such as self-association and copigmentation that can stabilize and enhance their color has helped to explain their color representation in red wine making and aging. A series of new enological practices were developed to improve the anthocyanin extraction, as well as their color expression and maintenance. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the monomeric anthocyanins in red wines, emphasizing their origin, occurrence, color enhancing effects, their degradation and the effect of various enological practices on them.

  4. Anthocyanins and Their Variation in Red Wines I. Monomeric Anthocyanins and Their Color Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qing Duan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Originating in the grapes, monomeric anthocyanins in young red wines contribute the majority of color and the supposed beneficial health effects related to their consumption, and as such they are recognized as one of the most important groups of phenolic metabolites in red wines. In recent years, our increasing knowledge of the chemical complexity of the monomeric anthocyanins, their stability, together with the phenomena such as self-association and copigmentation that can stabilize and enhance their color has helped to explain their color representation in red wine making and aging. A series of new enological practices were developed to improve the anthocyanin extraction, as well as their color expression and maintenance. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the monomeric anthocyanins in red wines, emphasizing their origin, occurrence, color enhancing effects, their degradation and the effect of various enological practices on them.

  5. B22 Glu Des-B30 Insulin: A Novel Monomeric Insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Juan DU; Jia-Hao SHI; Da-Fu CUI; You-Shang ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Studies on monomeric insulin with reduced self-association are important in the development of insulin pharmaceutical preparations with rapid hypoglycemic action on patients with diabetes. Here we report a novel monomeric insulin, B22 Glu des-B30 insulin, prepared from a single chain insulin precursor with B22 Arg mutated to Glu, which was expressed in Pichia pastoris and converted to B22 Glu des-B30 insulin by tryptic digestion. It still retains 50% of the in vivo biological activity of porcine insulin and does not form a dimer even at a concentration of 10 mg/ml, showing that B22 Glu plays a key role in reducing the selfassociation of the insulin molecule without greatly reducing its biological activity. This novel monomeric insulin might have potential applications in the clinic.

  6. Analysis of the role of the Rac/Cdc42 GTPases during planar cell polarity generation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Descalzo, Silvia; Gómez-Cabrero, Azucena; Mlodzik, Marek; Paricio, Nuria

    2007-01-01

    Initial genetic studies in Drosophila suggested that several members of the Rho subfamily (RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42) are involved in planar cell polarity (PCP) establishment. However, analyses of Rac1, Rac2 and Mtl loss-of-function (LOF) mutants have argued against their role in this process. Here, we investigate in detail the role of the Rho GTPases Mtl, Cdc42, Rac1 and Rac2 in PCP generation. These functional analyses were performed by overexpressing Mtl in eyes and wings, by performing genetic interaction assays and by using a combination of triple and quadruple mutant LOF clones. We found that Mtl overexpression caused PCP phenotypes and that it interacted genetically with other Rho GTPases, such as Rac1 and Cdc42 as well as with several PCP genes, such as stbm, pk and aos. However, Mtl was not found to interact with Rac2, RhoA and other members of the Fz/PCP pathway. Triple mutant clones of Rac1, Rac2 and Mtl were found to exhibit mild PCP defects which were enhanced by reduction of Cdc42 function with a hypomorphic Cdc42 allele. Taken together, these and previous results suggest that Rho GTPases may have partially overlapping functions during PCP generation. Alternatively, it is also possible that the mild PCP phenotypes observed could indicate that they are required at low levels in that process. However, since not all of them function upstream of a JNK cassette, we propose that they may act in at least two parallel pathways.

  7. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazzad eKarim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicates presence of a vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Little is known about the protein components of this system. However, as chloroplasts harbour the photosynthetic apparatus that ultimately supports most organisms on the planet, close attention to their pathways is warranted. This may also reveal novel diversification and/or distinct solutions to the problems posed by the targeted intra-cellular trafficking of important molecules. To date two homologues to well-known yeast cytosolic vesicle transport proteins, CPSAR1 and CPRabA5e, have been shown to have roles in chloroplast vesicle transport, both being GTPases. Bioinformatic data indicate that several homologues of cytosolic vesicle transport system components are putatively chloroplast-localized and in addition other proteins have been implicated to participate in chloroplast vesicle transport, including vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (VIPP1, thylakoid formation 1 (THF1, snowy cotyledon 2/cotyledon chloroplast biogenesis factor (SCO2/CYO1, curvature thylakoid 1 (CURT1 proteins, and a dynamin like GTPase FZO-like (FZL protein. Several putative potential cargo proteins have also been identified, including building blocks of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we discuss details of the largely unknown putative chloroplast vesicle transport system, focusing on GTPase-related components.

  8. The 'invisible hand': regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-07-22

    The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle.

  9. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian interferon-γ-inducible GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premzl, Marko

    2012-11-01

    The interferon-γ-inducible GTPases, IFGGs, are intracellular proteins involved in immune response against pathogens. A comprehensive comparative genomic review and analysis of eutherian IFGGs was carried out using public genomic sequences. The 64 eutherian IFGG genes were examined in detail and annotated. The eutherian IFGG promoter types were first catalogued followed by a phylogenetic analysis of eutherian IFGGs, which described five major IFGG clusters. The patterns of differential gene expansions and protein regions that may regulate IFGG catalytic features suggested a new classification of eutherian IFGGs. This mini-review has also provided new tests of reliability of public genomic sequences as well as tests of protein molecular evolution.

  10. A novel method to highly versatile monomeric PNA building blocks by multi component reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, Alexander; Chi, Kai-Zu; Barrère, Mathieux

    1999-01-01

    A novel approach to monomeric PNA building blocks by a solution phase Ugi multi component reaction (MCR) is described. The reaction is easily performed in 96 well plates. The products precipitate from the reaction solution and are thus obtained in high yields and purity. Those products are not amena

  11. Self-healing mechanism based on dispersed solid particles of various monomeric bismaleimides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkenburg, D.H.; Fischer, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    In view of self-healing materials for high temperature applications we have studied the use of solid monomeric bismaleimide particles as embedded self-healing component dispersed in a host material. Below the self-healing activation temperature, bismaleimides remain inert while above it they may rap

  12. Monomeric red fluorescent protein variants used for imaging studies in different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Taubenberger, Annette; Vos, Michel J.; Boettger, Angelika; Lasi, Margherita; Lai, Frank P. L.; Fischer, Markus; Rottner, Klemens

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have proven to be excellent tools for live-cell imaging studies. In addition to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants, recent progress was achieved in the development of monomeric red fluorescent proteins (mRFPs) that show improved properties in respect to maturation

  13. Monomeric and dendritic second generation Grubbs- and Hoveyda-Grubbs-type catalysts for olefin metathesis Metallodendrimers Special Issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, Niels J M; Tomás-Mendivil, Eder; Mayland, Kimberley E.; Kleijn, Henk; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L.; Van Koten, Gerard; Klein Gebbink, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of monomeric and dendritic Grubbs II and Hoveyda-Grubbs II-based complexes are reported. These complexes were synthesized via a route based on the connection of monomeric or dendritic N-alkyl-N′-mesitylimidazol-2-ylidene pre-ligands to Grubbs I or Hoveyda-Grubbs I

  14. Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation by Rho GTPase Through a Novel Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    87: 635-44. 18. Burbelo P, Wellstein A, Pestell RG. Altered Rho GTPase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2004; 84...Burbelo P, Wellstein A, Pestell RG. Altered Rho GTPase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2004;84:43–8. 19. Band V

  15. Review: Ras GTPases and myosin: Qualitative conservation and quantitative diversification in signal and energy transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Matthias P; Goody, Roger S

    2016-08-01

    Most GTPases and many ATPases belong to the P-loop class of proteins with significant structural and mechanistic similarities. Here we compare and contrast the basic properties of the Ras family GTPases and myosin, and conclude that there are fundamental similarities but also distinct differences related to their specific roles. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 422-430, 2016.

  16. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  17. Monomeric yeast PCNA mutants are defective in interacting with and stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Costin N; Shea, Kathleen A; Mehra, Rajendra; Prundeanu, Lucia; McAlear, Michael A

    2002-10-29

    Yeast PCNA is a homo-trimeric, ring-shaped DNA polymerase accessory protein that can encircle duplex DNA. The integrity of this multimeric sliding DNA clamp is maintained through the protein-protein interactions at the interfaces of adjacent subunits. To investigate the importance of trimer stability for PCNA function, we introduced single amino acid substitutions at residues (A112T, S135F) that map to opposite ends of the monomeric protein. Recombinant wild-type and mutant PCNAs were purified from E. coli, and they were tested for their properties in vitro. Unlike the stable wild-type PCNA trimers, the mutant PCNA proteins behaved as monomers when diluted to low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast to what has been reported for a monomeric form of the beta clamp in E. coli, the monomeric PCNAs were compromised in their ability to interact with their associated clamp loader, replication factor C (RFC). Similarly, monomeric PCNAs were not effective in stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC. The mutant PCNAs were able to form mixed trimers with wild-type subunits, although these mixed trimers were unstable when loaded onto DNA. They were able to function as weak DNA polymerase delta processivity factors in vitro, and when the monomeric PCNA-41 (A112T, S135F double mutant) allele was introduced as the sole source of PCNA in vivo, the cells were viable and healthy. These pol30-41 mutants were, however, sensitive to UV irradiation and to the DNA damaging agent methylmethane sulfonate, implying that DNA repair pathways have a distinct requirement for stable DNA clamps.

  18. Controlling the switches: Rho GTPase regulation during animal cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yan; Oh, Wonkyung; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    Animal cell division is a fundamental process that requires complex changes in cytoskeletal organization and function. Aberrant cell division often has disastrous consequences for the cell and can lead to cell senescence, neoplastic transformation or death. As important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases play major roles in regulating many aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis. These include centrosome duplication and separation, generation of cortical rigidity, microtubule-kinetochore stabilization, cleavage furrow formation, contractile ring formation and constriction, and abscission. The ability of Rho proteins to function as regulators of cell division depends on their ability to cycle between their active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound states. However, Rho proteins are inherently inefficient at fulfilling this cycle and require the actions of regulatory proteins that enhance GTP binding (RhoGEFs), stimulate GTPase activity (RhoGAPs), and sequester inactive Rho proteins in the cytosol (RhoGDIs). The roles of these regulatory proteins in controlling cell division are an area of active investigation. In this review we will delineate the current state of knowledge of how specific RhoGEFs, RhoGAPs and RhoGDIs control mitosis and cytokinesis, and highlight the mechanisms by which their functions are controlled.

  19. The Role of Rho GTPase Proteins in CNS Neuronal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govek, Eve-Ellen; Hatten, Mary E.; Van Aelst, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The architectonics of the mammalian brain arise from a remarkable range of directed cell migrations, which orchestrate the emergence of cortical neuronal layers and pattern brain circuitry. At different stages of cortical histogenesis, specific modes of cell motility are essential to the stepwise formation of cortical architecture. These movements range from interkinetic nuclear movements at the ventricular zone (VZ), to migrations of early-born, postmitotic polymorphic cells into the preplate, to the radial migration of precursors of cortical output neurons across the thickening cortical wall, and the vast, tangential migrations of interneurons from the basal forebrain into the emerging cortical layers. In all cases, acto-myosin motors act in concert with cell adhesion receptor systems to provide the force and traction needed for forward movement. As key regulators of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, cell polarity, and adhesion, the Rho GTPases play a critical role in CNS neuronal migration. This review will focus on the different types of migration in the developing neocortex and cerebellar cortex, and the role of the Rho GTPases, their regulators and effectors in these CNS migrations, with particular emphasis on their involvement in radial migration. PMID:21557504

  20. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  1. Rabifier2: an improved bioinformatic classifier of Rab GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Diekmann, Yoan; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2017-02-15

    The Rab family of small GTPases regulates and provides specificity to the endomembrane trafficking system; each Rab subfamily is associated with specific pathways. Thus, characterization of Rab repertoires provides functional information about organisms and evolution of the eukaryotic cell. Yet, the complex structure of the Rab family limits the application of existing methods for protein classification. Here, we present a major redesign of the Rabifier, a bioinformatic pipeline for detection and classification of Rab GTPases. It is more accurate, significantly faster than the original version and is now open source, both the code and the data, allowing for community participation. Rabifier and RabDB are freely available through the web at http://rabdb.org . The Rabifier package can be downloaded from the Python Package Index at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/rabifier , the source code is available at Github https://github.com/evocell/rabifier . jsurkont@igc.gulbenkian.pt or jleal@igc.gulbenkian.pt. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Molecular pathways: targeting the kinase effectors of RHO-family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Rawat, Sonali J; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    RHO GTPases, members of the RAS superfamily of small GTPases, are adhesion and growth factor-activated molecular switches that play important roles in tumor development and progression. When activated, RHO-family GTPases such as RAC1, CDC42, and RHOA, transmit signals by recruiting a variety of effector proteins, including the protein kinases PAK, ACK, MLK, MRCK, and ROCK. Genetically induced loss of RHO function impedes transformation by a number of oncogenic stimuli, leading to an interest in developing small-molecule inhibitors that either target RHO GTPases directly, or that target their downstream protein kinase effectors. Although inhibitors of RHO GTPases and their downstream signaling kinases have not yet been widely adopted for clinical use, their potential value as cancer therapeutics continues to facilitate pharmaceutical research and development and is a promising therapeutic strategy.

  3. Retinal rod GTPase turnover rate increases with concentration: a key to the control of visual excitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dratz, E A; Lewis, J W; Schaechter, L E; Parker, K R; Kliger, D S

    1987-07-31

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding proteins mediate cellular responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, growth factors and light. Activated GTP binding proteins are shut off by GTPase mediated hydrolysis of GTP. Photoreceptor GTPase rates are reported to be 10-50 times too slow to account for electrophysiological recovery time after light stimulus. Recovery rates of other parts of the system, however, appear fast enough. We present evidence that the GTPase rate increases markedly with photoreceptor membrane concentration implying the existence of a diffusible factor controlling the GTPase. When extrapolated to physiological concentrations, the GTPase turnover rate is fast enough (0.25-1.5 sec) to account for the recovery rate of the light stimulated signal of the photoreceptor cells.

  4. Phosphorylation of mouse immunity-related GTPase (IRG resistance proteins is an evasion strategy for virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Steinfeldt

    Full Text Available Virulence of complex pathogens in mammals is generally determined by multiple components of the pathogen interacting with the functional complexity and multiple layering of the mammalian immune system. It is most unusual for the resistance of a mammalian host to be overcome by the defeat of a single defence mechanism. In this study we uncover and analyse just such a case at the molecular level, involving the widespread intracellular protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii and one of its most important natural hosts, the house mouse (Mus musculus. Natural polymorphism in virulence of Eurasian T. gondii strains for mice has been correlated in genetic screens with the expression of polymorphic rhoptry kinases (ROP kinases secreted into the host cell during infection. We show that the molecular targets of the virulent allelic form of ROP18 kinase are members of a family of cellular GTPases, the interferon-inducible IRG (immunity-related GTPase proteins, known from earlier work to be essential resistance factors in mice against avirulent strains of T. gondii. Virulent T. gondii strain ROP18 kinase phosphorylates several mouse IRG proteins. We show that the parasite kinase phosphorylates host Irga6 at two threonines in the nucleotide-binding domain, biochemically inactivating the GTPase and inhibiting its accumulation and action at the T. gondii parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Our analysis identifies the conformationally active switch I region of the GTP-binding site as an Achilles' heel of the IRG protein pathogen-resistance mechanism. The polymorphism of ROP18 in natural T. gondii populations indicates the existence of a dynamic, rapidly evolving ecological relationship between parasite virulence factors and host resistance factors. This system should be unusually fruitful for analysis at both ecological and molecular levels since both T. gondii and the mouse are widespread and abundant in the wild and are well-established model species with

  5. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  6. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M; Burrows, M; Ferreira, S A; Dazzi, F; Apperley, J F; Bradshaw, A; Brand, D D; Czernuszka, J; Gentleman, E

    2017-03-03

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  7. Monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass: modeling of dilute acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Juan G; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Roberto, Inês C; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-12-01

    Statistical modeling and optimization of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass has been performed using response surface methodology. Central composite rotatable design was applied to assess the effect of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature on efficiency and selectivity of hemicellulosic monomeric carbohydrates to d-xylose. Second-order polynomial model was fitted to experimental data to find the optimum reaction conditions by multiple regression analysis. The monomeric d-xylose recovery 85% (as predicted by the model) was achieved under optimized hydrolysis conditions (1.27% acid concentration, 96.5°C and 138 min), confirming the high validity of the developed model. The content of d-glucose (8.3%) and monosaccharide degradation products (0.1% furfural and 0.04% 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) provided a high quality subtract, ready for subsequent biochemical conversion to value-added products.

  8. The Roles of Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins in Macroautophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular degradation process that sequesters components into a double-membrane structure called the autophagosome, which then fuses with the lysosome or vacuole for hydrolysis and recycling of building blocks. Bulk phase autophagy, also known as macroautophagy, controlled by specific Atg proteins, can be triggered by a variety of stresses, including starvation. Because autophagy relies extensively on membrane traffic to form the membranous structures, factors that control membrane traffic are essential for autophagy. Among these factors, the monomeric GTP-binding proteins that cycle between active and inactive conformations form an important group. In this review, we summarize the functions of the monomeric GTP-binding proteins in autophagy, especially with reference to experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  9. Role of Ran GTPase in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Qing; LU Zhigang; ZHANG Chuanmao

    2004-01-01

    Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase superfamily,is a multifunctional protein and abundant in the nucleus.Many evidences suggest that Ran and its interacting proteins are involved in multiple aspects of the cell cycle regulation.So far it has been conformed that Ran and its interacting proteins control the nucleocytoplasmic transport, the nuclear envelope (NE) assembly, the DNA replication and the spindle assembly, although many details of the mechanisms are waiting for elucidation. It has also been implicated that Ran and its interacting proteins are involved in regulating the integrity of the nuclear structure, the mRNA transcription and splicing, and the RNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In this review we mainly discuss the mechanisms by which Ran and its interacting proteins regulate NE assembly, DNA replication and spindle assembly.

  10. Multistage modeling of protein dynamics with monomeric Myc oncoprotein as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaojiao; Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Niemi, Antti J.; Ilieva, Nevena

    2017-03-01

    We propose to combine a mean-field approach with all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) into a multistage algorithm that can model protein folding and dynamics over very long time periods yet with atomic-level precision. As an example, we investigate an isolated monomeric Myc oncoprotein that has been implicated in carcinomas including those in colon, breast, and lungs. Under physiological conditions a monomeric Myc is presumed to be an example of intrinsically disordered proteins that pose a serious challenge to existing modeling techniques. We argue that a room-temperature monomeric Myc is in a dynamical state, it oscillates between different conformations that we identify. For this we adopt the C α backbone of Myc in a crystallographic heteromer as an initial ansatz for the monomeric structure. We construct a multisoliton of the pertinent Landau free energy to describe the C α profile with ultrahigh precision. We use Glauber dynamics to resolve how the multisoliton responds to repeated increases and decreases in ambient temperature. We confirm that the initial structure is unstable in isolation. We reveal a highly degenerate ground-state landscape, an attractive set towards which Glauber dynamics converges in the limit of vanishing ambient temperature. We analyze the thermal stability of this Glauber attractor using room-temperature molecular dynamics. We identify and scrutinize a particularly stable subset in which the two helical segments of the original multisoliton align in parallel next to each other. During the MD time evolution of a representative structure from this subset, we observe intermittent quasiparticle oscillations along the C-terminal α helix, some of which resemble a translating Davydov's Amide-I soliton. We propose that the presence of oscillatory motion is in line with the expected intrinsically disordered character of Myc.

  11. Fine blood vascular casting by monomeric methacrylate injection and microwave treatment

    OpenAIRE

    日根野谷, 仁

    1992-01-01

    A modified injection replica SEM method was introduced. Thorough injection of a resin mixture (monomeric metacrylate containing 1% benzoyl peroxide and 1% N, N-dimethylaniline) prior to the microwave treatment prepares good and fine blood vascular casts or replicas of brain, hypophysis, pineal body, thyroid gland and other organs. These casts sufficiently withstood ionbombardment and were useful for scanning electron microscopy. In this casting, preliminary perfusion fixation prior to the res...

  12. Role of Arf GTPases in fungal morphogenesis and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbaoui, Hayet; Bogliolo, Stéphanie; Ghugtyal, Vikram; Solis, Norma V.

    2017-01-01

    Virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans depends on the switch from budding to filamentous growth, which requires sustained membrane traffic and polarized growth. In many organisms, small GTPases of the Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) family regulate membrane/protein trafficking, yet little is known about their role in fungal filamentous growth. To investigate these GTPases in C. albicans, we generated loss of function mutants in all 3 Arf proteins, Arf1-Arf3, and 2 Arf-like proteins, Arl1 and Arl3. Our results indicate that of these proteins, Arf2 is required for viability and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. Repressible ARF2 expression results in defects in filamentous growth, cell wall integrity and virulence, likely due to alteration of the Golgi. Arl1 is also required for invasive filamentous growth and, although arl1/arl1 cells can initiate hyphal growth, hyphae are substantially shorter than that of the wild-type, due to the inability of this mutant to maintain hyphal growth at a single site. We show that this defect does not result from an alteration of phospholipid distribution and is unlikely to result from the sole Golgin Imh1 mislocalization, as Imh1 is not required for invasive filamentous growth. Rather, our results suggest that the arl1/arl1 hyphal growth defect results from increased secretion in this mutant. Strikingly, the arl1/arl1 mutant is drastically reduced in virulence during oropharyngeal candidiasis. Together, our results highlight the importance of Arl1 and Arf2 as key regulators of hyphal growth and virulence in C. albicans and identify a unique function of Arl1 in secretion. PMID:28192532

  13. Heteroexpression and characterization of a monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ao; Cao, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Peng; Liu, Ai-Min; Pan, Wei; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2011-08-01

    A monomeric NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 (SaIDH) was heteroexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the His-tagged enzyme was further purified to homogeneity. The molecular weight of SaIDH was about 80 kDa which is typical for monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the deduced amino acid sequence of SaIDH shows high sequence identity with known momomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase, and the coenzyme, substrate and metal ion binding sites are completely conserved. The optimal pH and temperature of SaIDH were found to be pH 9.4 and 45°C, respectively. Heat-inactivation studies showed that heating for 20 min at 50°C caused a 50% loss in enzymatic activity. In addition, SaIDH was absolutely specific for NADP+ as electron acceptor. Apparent Km values were 4.98 μM for NADP+ and 6,620 μM for NAD+, respectively, using Mn2+ as divalent cation. The enzyme performed a 33,000-fold greater specificity (kcat/Km) for NADP+ than NAD+. Moreover, SaIDH activity was entirely dependent on the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+, but was strongly inhibited by Ca2+ and Zn2+. Taken together, our findings implicate the recombinant SaIDH is a divalent cation-dependent monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase which presents a remarkably high cofactor preference for NADP+.

  14. Two mechanisms for dissipation of excess light in monomeric and trimeric light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Osto, Luca [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Cazzaniga, Stefano [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Bressan, Mauro [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Paleček, David [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Židek, Karel [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Niyogi, Krishna K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology; Zigmantas, Donatas [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Bassi, Roberto [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Firenze (Italy). Istituto per la Protezione delle Piante (IPP)

    2017-04-10

    Oxygenic photoautotrophs require mechanisms for rapidly matching the level of chlorophyll excited states from light harvesting with the rate of electron transport from water to carbon dioxide. These photoprotective reactions prevent formation of reactive excited states and photoinhibition. The fastest response to excess illumination is the so-called non-photochemical quenching which, in higher plants, requires the luminal pH sensor PsbS and other yet unidentified components of the photosystem II antenna. Both trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and monomeric LHC proteins have been indicated as site(s) of the heat-dissipative reactions. Different mechanisms have been proposed: Energy transfer to a lutein quencher in trimers, formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation in monomers. Here, we report on the construction of a mutant lacking all monomeric LHC proteins but retaining LHCII trimers. Its non-photochemical quenching induction rate was substantially slower with respect to the wild type. A carotenoid radical cation signal was detected in the wild type, although it was lost in the mutant. Here, we conclude that non-photochemical quenching is catalysed by two independent mechanisms, with the fastest activated response catalysed within monomeric LHC proteins depending on both zeaxanthin and lutein and on the formation of a radical cation. Trimeric LHCII was responsible for the slowly activated quenching component whereas inclusion in supercomplexes was not required. Finally, this latter activity does not depend on lutein nor on charge transfer events, whereas zeaxanthin was essential.

  15. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hebert, Vincent R; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-25

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  16. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  17. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  18. First synthesis and structural determination of a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide, LiNH(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotjahn, D B; Sheridan, P M; Al Jihad, I; Ziurys, L M

    2001-06-13

    Alkali metal amides typically aggregate in solution and the solid phase, and even in the gas phase. In addition, even in the few known monomeric structures, the coordination number of the alkali metal is raised by binding of Lewis-basic solvent molecules, with concomitant changes in structure. In contrast, the simplest lithium amide LiNH(2) has never been made in a monomeric form, even though its structure has been theoretically predicted several times. Here, the first experimental structural data for a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide are determined using a combination of gas-phase synthesis and millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy. All data point to a planar structure for LiNH(2). The r(o) structure of LiNH(2) has a Li-N distance of 1.736(3) A, an N-H distance of 1.022(3) A, and a H-N-H angle of 106.9(1) degrees. These results are compared with theoretical predictions for LiNH(2), and experimental data for oligomeric, solid-phase samples, which could not resolve the question of whether LiNH(2) is planar or not. In addition, comparisons are made with revised gas-phase and solid-phase data and calculated structures of NaNH(2).

  19. The peroxisomal protein import machinery displays a preference for monomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Marta O; Francisco, Tânia; Rodrigues, Tony A; Lismont, Celien; Domingues, Pedro; Pinto, Manuel P; Grou, Cláudia P; Fransen, Marc; Azevedo, Jorge E

    2015-04-01

    Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and transported by the shuttling receptor PEX5 to the peroxisomal membrane docking/translocation machinery, where they are translocated into the organelle matrix. Under certain experimental conditions this protein import machinery has the remarkable capacity to accept already oligomerized proteins, a property that has heavily influenced current models on the mechanism of peroxisomal protein import. However, whether or not oligomeric proteins are really the best and most frequent clients of this machinery remain unclear. In this work, we present three lines of evidence suggesting that the peroxisomal import machinery displays a preference for monomeric proteins. First, in agreement with previous findings on catalase, we show that PEX5 binds newly synthesized (monomeric) acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and urate oxidase (UOX), potently inhibiting their oligomerization. Second, in vitro import experiments suggest that monomeric ACOX1 and UOX are better peroxisomal import substrates than the corresponding oligomeric forms. Finally, we provide data strongly suggesting that although ACOX1 lacking a peroxisomal targeting signal can be imported into peroxisomes when co-expressed with ACOX1 containing its targeting signal, this import pathway is inefficient.

  20. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  1. RhoGDI: multiple functions in the regulation of Rho family GTPase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    insight as to how RhoGDI exerts its effects on nucleotide binding, the membrane association-dissociation cycling of the GTPase and how these activities are controlled. Despite the initial negative roles attributed to RhoGDI, recent evidence has come to suggest that it may also act as a positive regulator...... and the importance of the particular membrane microenvironment that represents the site of action for GTPases. All these results point to a wider role for RhoGDI than initially perceived, making it a binding partner that can tightly control Rho GTPases, but which also allows them to reach their full spectrum...

  2. The interaction properties of the human Rab GTPase family--comparative analysis reveals determinants of molecular binding selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Stein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rab GTPases constitute the largest subfamily of the Ras protein superfamily. Rab proteins regulate organelle biogenesis and transport, and display distinct binding preferences for effector and activator proteins, many of which have not been elucidated yet. The underlying molecular recognition motifs, binding partner preferences and selectivities are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences and the three-dimensional electrostatic and hydrophobic molecular interaction fields of 62 human Rab proteins revealed a wide range of binding properties with large differences between some Rab proteins. This analysis assists the functional annotation of Rab proteins 12, 14, 26, 37 and 41 and provided an explanation for the shared function of Rab3 and 27. Rab7a and 7b have very different electrostatic potentials, indicating that they may bind to different effector proteins and thus, exert different functions. The subfamily V Rab GTPases which are associated with endosome differ subtly in the interaction properties of their switch regions, and this may explain exchange factor specificity and exchange kinetics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have analysed conservation of sequence and of molecular interaction fields to cluster and annotate the human Rab proteins. The analysis of three dimensional molecular interaction fields provides detailed insight that is not available from a sequence-based approach alone. Based on our results, we predict novel functions for some Rab proteins and provide insights into their divergent functions and the determinants of their binding partner selectivity.

  3. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J;

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected to...... immunogenic structures inaccessible on the envelope oligomer. The limited ability of recombinant gp120 vaccines to induce neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates may thus not exclusively reflect genetic variation.......An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...

  4. To finish things well: cysteine methylation ensures selective GTPase membrane localization and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansado, José

    2017-09-19

    Isoprenylcysteine-O-Carboxyl Methyltransferase (ICMT) catalyzes the final step in the prenylation process of different proteins including members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases. While cysteine methylation is essential in mammalian cells for growth, membrane association, and signalling by Ras and Rho GTPases, its role during signal transduction events in simple eukaryotes like yeasts appears irrelevant. By using a multidisciplinary approach our group has recently shown that, contrary to this initial assumption, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ICMT activity encoded by the Mam4 gene is not only important to promote selective plasma membrane targeting of Ras and specific Rho GTPases, but also to allow precise downstream signalling to the mitogen-activated protein kinase and target of rapamycin pathways in response to diverse environmental cues. Thus, the dynamic regulation of in vivo methylation as a modulator of GTPase localization and function is an evolutionary conserved mechanism, making fission yeast an appealing model organism to study the regulation of this process.

  5. LRRK2 GTPase Dysfunction in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are the most frequent genetic cause of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and these mutations play important roles in sporadic PD. The LRRK2 protein contains GTPase and kinase domains and several protein-protein interaction domains. The kinase and GTPase activity of LRRK2 seem to be important in regulating LRRK2-dependent cellular signaling pathways. LRRK2’s GTPase and kinase domains may reciprocally regulate each other to direct LRRK2’s ultimate function. While most LRRK2 investigations are centered on LRRK2’s kinase activity, this review focuses on the function of LRRK2’s GTPase in LRRK2 physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:22988868

  6. Control of cell growth: Rag GTPases in activation of TORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huirong; Gong, Rui; Xu, Yanhui

    2013-08-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central regulator controlling cell growth. TOR is highly conserved from yeast to mammals, and is deregulated in human cancers and diabetes. TOR complex 1 (TORC1) integrates signals from growth factors, cellular energy status, stress, and amino acids to control cell growth, mitochondrial metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis. The mechanisms of growth factors and cellular energy status in regulating TORC1 have been well established, whereas the mechanism by which amino acid induces TORC1 remains largely unknown. Recent studies revealed that Rag GTPases play a central role in the regulation of TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress in our understanding of Rag GTPase-regulated TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. Particular focus will be given to the function of Rag GTPases in TORC1 activation and how Rag GTPases are regulated by amino acids.

  7. An overexpression screen of Toxoplasma gondii Rab-GTPases reveals distinct transport routes to the micronemes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Kremer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic organisation of the endomembrane system is conserved in all eukaryotes and comparative genome analyses provides compelling evidence that the endomembrane system of the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA is complex with many genes required for regulated traffic being present. Although apicomplexan parasites, causative agents of severe human and animal diseases, appear to have only a basic set of trafficking factors such as Rab-GTPases, they evolved unique secretory organelles (micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules that are sequentially secreted during invasion of the host cell. In order to define the secretory pathway of apicomplexans, we performed an overexpression screen of Rabs in Toxoplasma gondii and identified Rab5A and Rab5C as important regulators of traffic to micronemes and rhoptries. Intriguingly, we found that not all microneme proteins traffic depends on functional Rab5A and Rab5C, indicating the existence of redundant microneme targeting pathways. Using two-colour super-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED we verified distinct localisations of independent microneme proteins and demonstrate that micronemal organelles are organised in distinct subsets or subcompartments. Our results suggest that apicomplexan parasites modify classical regulators of the endocytic system to carryout essential parasite-specific roles in the biogenesis of their unique secretory organelles.

  8. Guanylate-Binding Protein 1, an Interferon-Induced GTPase, Exerts an Antiviral Activity against Classical Swine Fever Virus Depending on Its GTPase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Jiahui; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Su; Zhang, Lingkai; Xia, Shui-Li; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses trigger the type I interferon (IFN) pathway upon infection, resulting in the transcription of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which define the antiviral state of the host. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious viral disease endangering the pig industry in many countries. However, anti-CSFV ISGs are poorly documented. Here we screened 20 ISGs that are commonly induced by type I IFNs against CSFV in lentivirus-delivered cell lines, resulting in the identification of guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) as a potent anti-CSFV ISG. We observed that overexpression of GBP1, an IFN-induced GTPase, remarkably suppressed CSFV replication, whereas knockdown of endogenous GBP1 expression by small interfering RNAs significantly promoted CSFV growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GBP1 acted mainly on the early phase of CSFV replication and inhibited the translation efficiency of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV. In addition, we found that GBP1 was upregulated at the transcriptional level in CSFV-infected PK-15 cells and in various organs of CSFV-infected pigs. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays revealed that GBP1 interacted with the NS5A protein of CSFV, and this interaction was mapped in the N-terminal globular GTPase domain of GBP1. Interestingly, the K51 of GBP1, which is crucial for its GTPase activity, was essential for the inhibition of CSFV replication. We showed further that the NS5A-GBP1 interaction inhibited GTPase activity, which was critical for its antiviral effect. Taking our findings together, GBP1 is an anti-CSFV ISG whose action depends on its GTPase activity. IMPORTANCE Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important viral disease affecting the pig industry in many countries. To date, only a few host restriction factors against CSFV

  9. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blombach, Fabian; Brouns, Stan J J; van der Oost, John

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major type of ribosome-assembly factor in Eukaryota and Bacteria. They are thought to aid the stepwise assembly of ribosomal subunits through a 'molecular switch' mechanism that involves conformational changes in response to GTP hydrolysis. Most conserved TRAFAC GTPases are involved in ribosome assembly or other translation-associated processes. They typically interact with ribosomal subunits, but in many cases, the exact role that these GTPases play remains unclear. Previous studies almost exclusively focused on the systems of Bacteria and Eukaryota. Archaea possess several conserved TRAFAC GTPases as well, with some GTPase families being present only in the archaeo-eukaryotic lineage. In the present paper, we review the occurrence of TRAFAC GTPases with translation-associated functions in Archaea.

  10. Implications of Rho GTPase signaling in glioma cell invasion and tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Patricia Fortin Ensign

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is the most malignant of primary adult brain tumors, characterized by a highly locally-invasive cell population, as well as abundant proliferative cells, neoangiogenesis, and necrosis. Clinical intervention with chemotherapy or radiation may either promote or establish an environment for manifestation of invasive behavior. Understanding the molecular drivers of invasion in the context of glioma progression may be insightful in directing new treatments for patients with GB. Here, we review current knowledge on Rho family GTPases, their aberrant regulation in GB, and their effect on GB cell invasion and tumor progression. Rho GTPases are modulators of cell migration through effects on actin cytoskeleton rearrangement; in non-neoplastic tissue, expression and activation of Rho GTPases are normally under tight regulation. In GB, Rho GTPases are deregulated, often via hyperactivity or overexpression of their activators, Rho GEFs. Downstream effectors of Rho GTPases have been shown to promote invasiveness and, importantly, glioma cell survival. The study of aberrant Rho GTPase signaling in GB is thus an important investigation of cell invasion as well as treatment resistance and disease progression.

  11. Monomeric banana lectin at acidic pH overrules conformational stability of its native dimeric form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed M Khan

    Full Text Available Banana lectin (BL is a homodimeric protein categorized among jacalin-related family of lectins. The effect of acidic pH was examined on conformational stability of BL by using circular dichroism, intrinsic fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-napthalene sulfonate (ANS binding, size exclusion chromatography (SEC and dynamic light scattering (DLS. During acid denaturation of BL, the monomerization of native dimeric protein was found at pH 2.0. The elution profile from SEC showed two different peaks (59.65 ml & 87.98 ml at pH 2.0 while single peak (61.45 ml at pH 7.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R h of native BL was 2.9 nm while at pH 2.0 two species were found with R h of 1.7 and 3.7 nm. Furthermore at, pH 2.0 the secondary structures of BL remained unaltered while tertiary structure was significantly disrupted with the exposure of hydrophobic clusters confirming the existence of molten globule like state. The unfolding of BL with different subunit status was further evaluated by urea and temperature mediated denaturation to check their stability. As inferred from high Cm and ΔG values, the monomeric form of BL offers more resistance towards chemical denaturation than the native dimeric form. Besides, dimeric BL exhibited a Tm of 77°C while no loss in secondary structures was observed in monomers even up to 95°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on monomeric subunit of lectins showing more stability against denaturants than its native dimeric state.

  12. Conformational equilibria in monomeric alpha-synuclein at the single-molecule level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Sandal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human alpha-Synuclein (alphaSyn is a natively unfolded protein whose aggregation into amyloid fibrils is involved in the pathology of Parkinson disease. A full comprehension of the structure and dynamics of early intermediates leading to the aggregated states is an unsolved problem of essential importance to researchers attempting to decipher the molecular mechanisms of alphaSyn aggregation and formation of fibrils. Traditional bulk techniques used so far to solve this problem point to a direct correlation between alphaSyn's unique conformational properties and its propensity to aggregate, but these techniques can only provide ensemble-averaged information for monomers and oligomers alike. They therefore cannot characterize the full complexity of the conformational equilibria that trigger the aggregation process. We applied atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule mechanical unfolding methodology to study the conformational equilibrium of human wild-type and mutant alphaSyn. The conformational heterogeneity of monomeric alphaSyn was characterized at the single-molecule level. Three main classes of conformations, including disordered and "beta-like" structures, were directly observed and quantified without any interference from oligomeric soluble forms. The relative abundance of the "beta-like" structures significantly increased in different conditions promoting the aggregation of alphaSyn: the presence of Cu2+, the pathogenic A30P mutation, and high ionic strength. This methodology can explore the full conformational space of a protein at the single-molecule level, detecting even poorly populated conformers and measuring their distribution in a variety of biologically important conditions. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time evidence of a conformational equilibrium that controls the population of a specific class of monomeric alphaSyn conformers, positively correlated with conditions known to promote the formation of

  13. Interaction of LRRK2 with kinase and GTPase signaling cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Y Boon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available LRRK2 is a protein that interacts with a plethora of signaling molecules, but the complexity of LRRK2 function presents a challenge for understanding the role of LRRK2 in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. Studies of LRRK2 using over-expression in transgenic mice have been disappointing, however studies using invertebrate systems have yielded a much clearer picture, with clear effects of LRRK2 expression, knockdown or deletion in C. elegans and Drosophila on modulation of survival of dopaminergic neurons. Recent studies have begun to focus attention on particular signaling cascades that are a target of LRRK2 function. LRRK2 interacts with members of the MAPK pathway and might regulate the pathway action by acting as a scaffold that directs the location of MAPK pathway activity, without strongly affecting the amount of MAPK pathway activity. Binding to GTPases, GAPs and GEFs are another strong theme in LRRK2 biology, with LRRK2 binding to Rac1, cdc42, rab5, rab7L1, endoA, RGS2, ArfGAP1 and ArhGEF7. All of these molecules appear to feed into a function output for LRRK2 that modulates cytoskeletal outgrowth and vesicular dynamics, including autophagy. These functions likely impact modulation of α-synuclein aggregation and associated toxicity eliciting the disease processes that we term Parkinson’s disease.

  14. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic.

  15. RAC/ROP GTPases and Auxin Signaling[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hen-ming; Hazak, Ora; Cheung, Alice Y.; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-01-01

    Auxin functions as a key morphogen in regulating plant growth and development. Studies on auxin-regulated gene expression and on the mechanism of polar auxin transport and its asymmetric distribution within tissues have provided the basis for realizing the molecular mechanisms underlying auxin function. In eukaryotes, members of the Ras and Rho subfamilies of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases function as molecular switches in many signaling cascades that regulate growth and development. Plants do not have Ras proteins, but they contain Rho-like small G proteins called RACs or ROPs that, like fungal and metazoan Rhos, are regulators of cell polarity and may also undertake some Ras functions. Here, we discuss the advances made over the last decade that implicate RAC/ROPs as mediators for auxin-regulated gene expression, rapid cell surface-located auxin signaling, and directional auxin transport. We also describe experimental data indicating that auxin–RAC/ROP crosstalk may form regulatory feedback loops and theoretical modeling that attempts to connect local auxin gradients with RAC/ROP regulation of cell polarity. We hope that by discussing these experimental and modeling studies, this perspective will stimulate efforts to further refine our understanding of auxin signaling via the RAC/ROP molecular switch. PMID:21478442

  16. Isolation of monomeric photosystem II that retains the subunit PsbS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; De Sanctis, Daniele; Büchel, Claudia; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Loi, Maria Cecilia; Kieselbach, Thomas; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2013-12-01

    Photosystem II has been purified from a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum according to two different protocols. Using the procedure described in Piano et al. (Photosynth Res 106:221-226, 2010) it was possible to isolate highly active PSII composed of monomers and dimers but depleted in their PsbS protein content. A "milder" procedure than the protocol reported by Fey et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1777:1501-1509, 2008) led to almost exclusively monomeric PSII complexes which in part still bind the PsbS protein. This finding might support a role for PSII monomers in higher plants.

  17. Monomeric CH3: A Small, Stable Antibody Domain with Therapeutic Promise | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Antibody domains are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size compared to full-sized antibodies, which are too large to effectively penetrate tumors and bind to sterically restricted therapeutic targets. In an article published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Protein Interactions Group, Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, reported their design of a novel antibody domain, monomeric CH3 (mCH3).

  18. The Beckman DxI 800 prolactin assay demonstrates superior specificity for monomeric prolactin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Brendan

    2010-02-01

    Commercially available prolactin immunoassays detect macroprolactin to variable degrees. Best practice requires laboratories to assess the cross-reactivity of their prolactin assay with macroprolactin, and where appropriate, introduce a screen for the presence of macroprolactin. Our policy has been to reanalyse hyperprolactinaemic samples following polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and to report the resultant value as the monomeric prolactin content of the sample. The goal of this study was to determine the need to continue PEG precipitation when prolactin measurements with the Wallac AutoDELFIA were replaced by the Beckman DxI 800.

  19. GIMAP GTPase family genes: potential modifiers in autoimmune diabetes, asthma, and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Mirkka T; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Söderhäll, Cilla; Gruzieva, Olena; Rautio, Sini; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Lähdesmäki, Harri J; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Henttinen, Tiina A; Kere, Juha; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2015-06-15

    GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (GIMAP) family members are differentially regulated during human Th cell differentiation and have been previously connected to immune-mediated disorders in animal studies. GIMAP4 is believed to contribute to the Th cell subtype-driven immunological balance via its role in T cell survival. GIMAP5 has a key role in BB-DR rat and NOD mouse lymphopenia. To elucidate GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 function and role in human immunity, we conducted a study combining genetic association in different immunological diseases and complementing functional analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the GIMAP haplotype variation were genotyped in Finnish type 1 diabetes (T1D) families and in a prospective Swedish asthma and allergic sensitization birth cohort. Initially, GIMAP5 rs6965571 was associated with risk for asthma and allergic sensitization (odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p = 0.00072, and OR 2.70, p = 0.0063, respectively) and protection from T1D (OR 0.64, p = 0.0058); GIMAP4 rs13222905 was associated with asthma (OR 1.28, p = 0.035) and allergic sensitization (OR 1.27, p = 0.0068). However, after false discovery rate correction for multiple testing, only the associations of GIMAP4 with allergic sensitization and GIMAP5 with asthma remained significant. In addition, transcription factor binding sites surrounding the associated loci were predicted. A gene-gene interaction in the T1D data were observed between the IL2RA rs2104286 and GIMAP4 rs9640279 (OR 1.52, p = 0.0064) and indicated between INS rs689 and GIMAP5 rs2286899. The follow-up functional analyses revealed lower IL-2RA expression upon GIMAP4 knockdown and an effect of GIMAP5 rs2286899 genotype on protein expression. Thus, the potential role of GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 as modifiers of immune-mediated diseases cannot be discarded.

  20. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P.

    2011-01-01

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases. PMID:21930699

  1. Unique structural and nucleotide exchange features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Dustin E; Wittchen, Erika S; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P

    2011-11-11

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  2. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P. (UNC)

    2012-08-10

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  3. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  4. Nortriptyline inhibits aggregation and neurotoxicity of alpha-synuclein by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomeric form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Timothy J; Srivastava, Kinshuk R; Justman, Craig; Grammatopoulous, Tom; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Prokesch, Manuela; Havas, Daniel; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Liu, Fang; Jock, Kevin; de Oliveira, Patrícia; Stirtz, Georgia L; Dettmer, Ulf; Sortwell, Caryl E; Feany, Mel B; Lansbury, Peter; Lapidus, Lisa; Paumier, Katrina L

    2017-10-01

    The pathology of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies is characterized by the formation of intracellular inclusions comprised primarily of misfolded, fibrillar α-synuclein (α-syn). One strategy to slow disease progression is to prevent the misfolding and aggregation of its native monomeric form. Here we present findings that support the contention that the tricyclic antidepressant compound nortriptyline (NOR) has disease-modifying potential for synucleinopathies. Findings from in vitro aggregation and kinetics assays support the view that NOR inhibits aggregation of α-syn by directly binding to the soluble, monomeric form, and by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomer, inhibits formation of toxic conformations of the protein. We go on to demonstrate that NOR inhibits the accumulation, aggregation and neurotoxicity of α-syn in multiple cell and animal models. These findings suggest that NOR, a compound with established safety and efficacy for treatment of depression, may slow progression of α-syn pathology by directly binding to soluble, native, α-syn, thereby inhibiting pathological aggregation and preserving its normal functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Monomeric, Oligomeric and Polymeric Proteins in Huntington Disease and Other Diseases of Polyglutamine Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guylaine Hoffner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease and other diseases of polyglutamine expansion are each caused by a different protein bearing an excessively long polyglutamine sequence and are associated with neuronal death. Although these diseases affect largely different brain regions, they all share a number of characteristics, and, therefore, are likely to possess a common mechanism. In all of the diseases, the causative protein is proteolyzed, becomes abnormally folded and accumulates in oligomers and larger aggregates. The aggregated and possibly the monomeric expanded polyglutamine are likely to play a critical role in the pathogenesis and there is increasing evidence that the secondary structure of the protein influences its toxicity. We describe here, with special attention to huntingtin, the mechanisms of polyglutamine aggregation and the modulation of aggregation by the sequences flanking the polyglutamine. We give a comprehensive picture of the characteristics of monomeric and aggregated polyglutamine, including morphology, composition, seeding ability, secondary structure, and toxicity. The structural heterogeneity of aggregated polyglutamine may explain why polyglutamine-containing aggregates could paradoxically be either toxic or neuroprotective.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of a monomeric mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase with partially reconstituted enzymic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banci, L; Bertini, I; Chiu, C Y; Mullenbach, G T; Viezzoli, M S

    1995-12-15

    A monomeric analog of human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (F50E/G51E SOD), previously characterized and found to have reduced enzymic activity, was here further modified by replacing Glu133 with Gln. This substitution does not dramatically affect the coordination geometry at the active site, but enhances enzymic activity, and also increases the affinity for anions at the active site. This behavior parallels earlier published results in which this point mutation was made in the dimeric wild-type enzyme. The analog described here has afforded for the first time a monomeric superoxide dismutase with substantial activity. This point mutation does not significantly influence the protein structure but interactions with anions, including superoxide, are altered with respect to the monomeric form. The present monomeric Glu133Gln mutant has partially restored enzymic activity. The diminished activity of the monomeric analogs is discussed in the light of possible minor structural changes and some of their characteristics are compared with those of naturally occurring mutants associated with various neurological diseases.

  7. The exocyst and regulatory GTPases in urinary exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Choi, Soo Young; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Baek, Jeong-In; Ward, Chris; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    Cilia, organelles that function as cellular antennae, are central to the pathogenesis of "ciliopathies", including various forms of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). To date, however, the molecular mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and ciliary function remain incompletely understood. A recently proposed model of cell-cell communication, called "urocrine signaling", hypothesizes that a subset of membrane bound vesicles that are secreted into the urinary stream (termed exosome-like vesicles, or ELVs), carry cilia-specific proteins as cargo, interact with primary cilia, and affect downstream cellular functions. This study was undertaken to determine the role of the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein trafficking complex, in the secretion and/or retrieval of ELVs. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells expressing either Sec10-myc (a central component of the exocyst complex) or Smoothened-YFP (a ciliary protein found in ELVs) in experiments utilizing electron gold microscopy and live fluorescent microscopy, respectively. Additionally, human urinary exosomes were isolated via ultracentrifugation and subjected to mass-spectrometry-based proteomics analysis to determine the composition of ELVs. We found, as determined by EM, that the exocyst localizes to primary cilia, and is present in vesicles attached to the cilium. Furthermore, the entire exocyst complex, as well as most of its known regulatory GTPases, are present in human urinary ELVs. Finally, in living MDCK cells, ELVs appear to interact with primary cilia using spinning disc confocal microscopy. These data suggest that the exocyst complex, in addition to its role in ciliogenesis, is centrally involved in the secretion and/or retrieval of urinary ELVs.

  8. The Interplay between ROS and Ras GTPases: Physiological and Pathological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Ferro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The members of the RasGTPase superfamily are involved in various signaling networks responsible for fundamental cellular processes. Their activity is determined by their guanine nucleotide-bound state. Recent evidence indicates that some of these proteins may be regulated by redox agents. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs and reactive nitrogen species (RNSs have been historically considered pathological agents which can react with and damage many biological macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids. However, a growing number of reports have suggested that the intracellular production of ROS is tightly regulated and that these redox agents serve as signaling molecules being involved in a variety of cell signaling pathways. Numerous observations have suggested that some Ras GTPases appear to regulate ROS production and that oxidants function as effector molecules for the small GTPases, thus contributing to their overall biological function. Thus, redox agents may act both as upstream regulators and as downstream effectors of Ras GTPases. Here we discuss current understanding concerning mechanisms and physiopathological implications of the interplay between GTPases and redox agents.

  9. Rab GTPases Regulate Vesicle Traffic%Rab蛋白调控胞内囊泡运输

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯婉娟; 徐子静; 孟令锋; 张蓉颖

    2012-01-01

    细胞内各个细胞器之间通过囊泡的膜转运是真核细胞存在的基本.Rab蛋白确保了转运蛋白被运输至正确的目的地.Rab蛋白是小GTP酶中的一大家族,它通过募集其效应物蛋白,其中包括接头蛋白,栓系因子,激酶,磷酸酶以及动力蛋白等,调控了细胞膜的选取,囊泡出芽,去包被,转运以及膜融合等过程.本文主要从Rab蛋白循环着手,依次论述了Rab蛋白在囊泡出芽,去包被,转运和膜融合等过程中起到的作用,从而使读者对Rab蛋白能有一个更加系统的了解.%Rab GTPases is a targe family of small GTPases. Rab GTPases regulate vesicle traffic which is fundamental to the existence of eukaryotic cells. Rab GTPases recruit their effect proteins including sorting adaptors, tethering factors, kinases, phosphatases and motors, control membrane identity and vesicle budding, uncoating, motility and fusion. This paper introduced the circuitry of Rab GTPases and their function in vesicle budding, uncoating, motility and fusion.

  10. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffzek Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components.

  11. Characterizing Plexin GTPase Interactions Using Gel Filtration, Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectrometry, and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Greven, Jeannine; Kim, SoonJeung; Hota, Prasanta K; Tong, Yufeng; Borthakur, Susmita; Buck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Plexins are unique, as they are the first example of a transmembrane receptor that interacts directly with small GTPases, a family of proteins that are essential for cell motility and proliferation/survival. We and other laboratories have determined the structure of the Rho GTPase-binding domain (RBD) of several plexins and also of the entire intracellular region of plexin-B1. Structures of plexin complexes with Rho GTPases, Rac1 and Rnd1, and a structure with a Ras GTPase, Rap1b, have also been solved. The relationship between plexin-Rho and plexin-Ras interactions is still unclear and in vitro biophysical experiments that characterize the protein interactions of purified components play an important role in advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the function of plexin. This chapter describes the use of gel filtration (also known as size-exclusion chromatography or SEC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in studies of plexin-small GTPase interactions with plexin-B1:Rac1 as an example. Together with other assays and manipulations (e.g., by mutagenesis or protein domain truncation/deletion), these in vitro measurements provide an important reference for the role and extent of the interactions.

  12. Enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts requires Rac GTPases and mDia2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Jayapal, Senthil Raja; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-03-01

    Mammalian erythroid cells undergo enucleation, an asymmetric cell division involving extrusion of a pycnotic nucleus enveloped by the plasma membrane. The mechanisms that power and regulate the enucleation process have remained obscure. Here, we show that deregulation of Rac GTPase during a late stage of erythropoiesis completely blocks enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts without affecting their proliferation or differentiation. Formation of the contractile actin ring (CAR) on the plasma membrane of enucleating erythroblasts was disrupted by inhibition of Rac GTPases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mDia2, a downstream effector of Rho GTPases and a formin protein required for nucleation of unbranched actin filaments, is also required for enucleation of mouse fetal erythroblasts. We show that Rac1 and Rac2 bind to mDia2 in a GTP-dependent manner and that downregulation of mDia2, but not mDia1, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) during the late stages of erythropoiesis blocked both CAR formation and erythroblast enucleation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of mDia2 rescued the enucleation defects induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPases. These results reveal important roles for Rac GTPases and their effector mDia2 in enucleation of mammalian erythroblasts.

  13. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  14. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  15. Prenylated Rab acceptor protein is a receptor for prenylated small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, C; Taylor, J; Vojtek, A B

    2001-07-27

    Localization of Ras and Ras-like proteins to the correct subcellular compartment is essential for these proteins to mediate their biological effects. Many members of the Ras superfamily (Ha-Ras, N-Ras, TC21, and RhoA) are prenylated in the cytoplasm and then transit through the endomembrane system on their way to the plasma membrane. The proteins that aid in the trafficking of the small GTPases have not been well characterized. We report here that prenylated Rab acceptor protein (PRA1), which others previously identified as a prenylation-dependent receptor for Rab proteins, also interacts with Ha-Ras, RhoA, TC21, and Rap1a. The interaction of these small GTPases with PRA1 requires their post-translational modification by prenylation. The prenylation-dependent association of PRA1 with multiple GTPases is conserved in evolution; the yeast PRA1 protein associates with both Ha-Ras and RhoA. Earlier studies reported the presence of PRA1 in the Golgi, and we show here that PRA1 co-localizes with Ha-Ras and RhoA in the Golgi compartment. We suggest that PRA1 acts as an escort protein for small GTPases by binding to the hydrophobic isoprenoid moieties of the small GTPases and facilitates their trafficking through the endomembrane system.

  16. Kvalitative analyser ..

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boolsen, Merete Watt

    bogen forklarer de fundamentale trin i forskningsprocessen og applikerer dem på udvalgte kvalitative analyser: indholdsanalyse, Grounded Theory, argumentationsanalyse og diskursanalyse......bogen forklarer de fundamentale trin i forskningsprocessen og applikerer dem på udvalgte kvalitative analyser: indholdsanalyse, Grounded Theory, argumentationsanalyse og diskursanalyse...

  17. Properties and metathesis activity of monomeric and dimeric Mo centres variously located on γ-alumina A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handzlik, Jarosław

    2007-05-01

    Ethene metathesis proceeding on monomeric and dimeric Mo species on the (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) γ-alumina is investigated by density functional theory, applying the cluster approach. The calculated vibrational frequencies of the surface OH groups are assigned to the experimental IR bands. It is shown that both monomeric and dimeric Mo forms can be the active sites of olefin metathesis. Metathesis activity and stability of the Mo-methylidene centres depend on their location on alumina. The differences in the sites reactivity are explained on the basis of their geometrical and electronic structure parameters. For the monomeric centres, isomerisation of the trigonal bipyramidal intermediate to the stable square pyramidal molybdacyclobutane is kinetically favoured over the cycloreversal step. The situation is opposite in the case of the dimeric species.

  18. Sevoflurane Inhalation Accelerates the Long-Term Memory Consolidation via Small GTPase Overexpression in the Hippocampus of Mice in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Emi; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Feng, Guo-Gang; Hayashi, Hisaki; Satomoto, Maiko; Sato, Motohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane exposure impairs the long-term memory in neonates. Whether the exposure to animals in adolescence affects the memory, however, has been unclear. A small hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate (GTPase) rac1 plays a role in the F-actin dynamics related to the synaptic plasticity, as well as superoxide production via reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation. The current study was designed to examine whether sevoflurane exposure to mice in early adolescence modifies the long-term learning ability concomitantly with the changes in F-actin constitution as well as superoxide production in the hippocampus according to the levels of rac1 protein expression. Four-week-old mice were subjected to the evaluation of long-term learning ability for three days. On day one, each mouse was allowed to enter a dark chamber for five min to acclimatization. On day two, the procedure was repeated with the addition of an electric shock as soon as a mouse entered the dark chamber. All mice subsequently inhaled 2 L/min air with (Sevoflurane group) and without (Control group) 2.5% sevoflurane for three hours. On day three, each mouse was placed on the platform and retention time, which is the latency to enter the dark chamber, was examined. The brain removed after the behavior test, was used for analyses of immunofluorescence, Western immunoblotting and intracellular levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure significantly prolonged retention time, indicating the enhanced long-term memory. Sevoflurane inhalation augmented F-actin constitution coexisting with the rac1 protein overexpression in the hippocampus whereas it did not alter the levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure to 4-week-old mice accelerates the long-term memory concomitantly with the enhanced F-actin constitution coexisting with the small GTPase rac1 overexpression in the hippocampus. These results suggest that sevoflurane inhalation may amplify long-term memory

  19. Lyophilization-induced protein denaturation in phosphate buffer systems: monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikal-Cleland, K A; Carpenter, J F

    2001-09-01

    During freezing in phosphate buffers, selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component and subsequent pH shifts may induce protein denaturation. Previous reports indicate significantly more inactivation and secondary structural perturbation of monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) during freeze-thawing in sodium phosphate (NaP) buffer as compared with potassium phosphate (KP) buffer. This observation was attributed to the significant pH shifts (from 7.0 to as low as 3.8) observed during freezing in the NaP buffer (1). In the current study, we investigated the impact of the additional stress of dehydration after freezing on the recovery of active protein on reconstitution and the retention of the native structure in the dried state. Freeze-drying monomeric and tetrameric beta-gal in either NaP or KP buffer resulted in significant secondary structural perturbations, which were greatest for the NaP samples. However, similar recoveries of active monomeric protein were observed after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, indicating that most dehydration-induced unfolding was reversible on reconstitution of the freeze-dried protein. In contrast, the tetrameric protein was more susceptible to dehydration-induced denaturation as seen by the greater loss in activity after reconstitution of the freeze-dried samples relative to that measured after freeze-thawing. To ensure optimal protein stability during freeze-drying, the protein must be protected from both freezing and dehydration stresses. Although poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran are preferentially excluded solutes and should confer protection during freezing, they were unable to prevent lyophilization-induced denaturation. In addition, Tween did not foster maintenance of native protein during freeze-drying. However, sucrose, which hydrogen bonds to dried protein in the place of lost water, greatly reduced freezing- and drying-induced denaturation, as observed by the high retention of native

  20. New Insights into Rho signaling from plant ROP/Rac GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Christian; Lavagi, Irene; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2012-01-01

    In animal and plant cells, a wide range of key cellular processes that require the establishment of cell polarity are governed by Rho-GTPases. In contrast to animals and yeast, however, plants possess a single Rho-GTPase subfamily called ROP (Rho-like GTPases from plants). This raises the question of how plants achieve the high level of regulation required for polar cellular processes. It is becoming evident that plants have evolved specific regulators, including ROP-Guanine Exchange Factors (GEFs) and the Rop-interactive CRIB motif–containing proteins (RIC) effectors. Recent research shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of ROPs, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis and exocytosis are intertwined. This review focuses on the proposed self-organizing nature of ROPs in plants and how ROP-mediated cellular mechanisms compare with those responsible for cell polarity in animals and yeast. PMID:22795444

  1. Rho GTPases and Nox dependent ROS production in skin. Is there a connection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Alanna; Hynes, Ailish; Brakebusch, Cord Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTP binding proteins most commonly known for the regulation of many cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton re-organisation, cell proliferation, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. Additionally, a link between Rho GTPases and reactive oxygen...... species (ROS) has been shown. In line with the growing interest in the role of ROS in cell biology, the relevance of this connection is becoming increasingly clearer. ROS production is classically associated with oxidative metabolic pathways (e.g. respiratory chain, arachidonic acid). During...... cell biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, aimed at maintaining tissue homeostasis. Data suggests that skin cells are capable of a regulated ROS production via Nox complexes. Members of the Rho GTPase family have been found to play a central regulatory...

  2. New insights into Rho signaling from plant ROP/Rac GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Christian; Lavagi, Irene; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2012-09-01

    In animal and plant cells, a wide range of key cellular processes that require the establishment of cell polarity are governed by Rho-GTPases. In contrast to animals and yeast, however, plants possess a single Rho-GTPase subfamily called Rho-like GTPases from plants (ROPs). This raises the question of how plants achieve the high level of regulation required for polar cellular processes. It is becoming evident that plants have evolved specific regulators, including ROP-Guanine Exchange Factors (GEFs) and the Rop-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein (RIC) effectors. Recent research shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of ROPs, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, and exocytosis are intertwined. This review focuses on the proposed self-organizing nature of ROPs in plants and how ROP-mediated cellular mechanisms compare with those responsible for cell polarity in animals and yeast.

  3. Functional interaction of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafa, Klodjan; Tsika, Elpida; Moser, Roger; Musso, Alessandra; Glauser, Liliane; Jones, Amy; Biskup, Saskia; Xiong, Yulan; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Moore, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 cause autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a multi-domain protein containing GTPase and kinase domains, and putative protein–protein interaction domains. Familial PD mutations alter the GTPase and kinase activity of LRRK2 in vitro. LRRK2 is suggested to regulate a number of cellular pathways although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To explore such mechanisms, it has proved informative to identify LRRK2-interacting proteins, some of which serve as LRRK2 kinase substrates. Here, we identify common interactions of LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily. LRRK2 interacts with dynamin 1–3 that mediate membrane scission in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and with dynamin-related proteins that mediate mitochondrial fission (Drp1) and fusion (mitofusins and OPA1). LRRK2 partially co-localizes with endosomal dynamin-1 or with mitofusins and OPA1 at mitochondrial membranes. The subcellular distribution and oligomeric complexes of dynamin GTPases are not altered by modulating LRRK2 in mouse brain, whereas mature OPA1 levels are reduced in G2019S PD brains. LRRK2 enhances mitofusin-1 GTP binding, whereas dynamin-1 and OPA1 serve as modest substrates of LRRK2-mediated phosphorylation in vitro. While dynamin GTPase orthologs are not required for LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast, LRRK2 functionally interacts with dynamin-1 and mitofusin-1 in cultured neurons. LRRK2 attenuates neurite shortening induced by dynamin-1 by reducing its levels, whereas LRRK2 rescues impaired neurite outgrowth induced by mitofusin-1 potentially by reversing excessive mitochondrial fusion. Our study elucidates novel functional interactions of LRRK2 with dynamin-superfamily GTPases that implicate LRRK2 in the regulation of membrane dynamics important for endocytosis and mitochondrial morphology. PMID:24282027

  4. Extracellular monomeric tau protein is sufficient to initiate the spread of tau protein pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Claire H; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2014-01-10

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau.

  5. Monomeric GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triagonism corrects obesity, hepatosteatosis, and dyslipidemia in female mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jall, Sigrid; Sachs, Stephan; Clemmensen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: Our results show that GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triple agonism inhibits food intake and decreases body weight and body fat mass with comparable potency in male and female mice that have been matched for body fat mass. Treatment improved dyslipidemia in both sexes and reversed diet......OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a major health threat that affects men and women equally. Despite this fact, weight-loss potential of pharmacotherapies is typically first evaluated in male mouse models of diet-induced obesity (DIO). To address this disparity we herein determined whether a monomeric peptide...... mice and a cohort of fatmass-matched C57BL/6J male mice were treated for 27 days via subcutaneous injections with either the GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triagonist or PBS. A second cohort of C57BL/6J male mice was included to match the females in the duration of the high-fat, high-sugar diet (HFD) exposure...

  6. Novel Monomeric Phenanthroline—Thallium(Ⅲ) Complexes Multinuclear NMR Characterization in Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuiBinMA; JuliusGLASER

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex of monomeric thallium (Ⅲ) with the nitrogen donor ligand phenanthroline (phen) has been prepared and characterized by multimuclear NMR(1H,13C,205Tl). The three complexes exist in equilibria in DMSO and acetonitrile solution, which was proved by the 205Tl NMR spectra. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of tris-phen T1(Ⅲ) complex have been measured, where the spin-spin coupling between T1(I=1/2) and 13C or 1H signals were observed with the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile. The coupling constants are presented and the chemical shifts of complexes are discussed in detail.

  7. Novel Monomeric Phenanthroline - Thallium(Ⅲ) Complexes Multinuclear NMR Characterization in Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex of monomeric thallium(III) with the nitrogen donor ligand phenanthrolinc (phen) has been prepared and characterized by multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C, 205T1).The three complexes exist in equilibria in DMSO and acetonitrile solution, which was proved by the 205Tl NMR spectra. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of tris-phen Tl(III) complex have been measured, where the spin-spin coupling between TI (1 = 1/2) and 13C or 1H signals were observed with the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile. The coupling constants are presented and the chemical shifts of complexes are discussed in detail.

  8. Kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to monomeric hemoproteins. Role of the proximal histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, M; Ascenzi, P; Traylor, T G; Brunori, M

    1985-04-10

    The effect of pH on (i) the second-order rate constant for CO binding and (ii) the spectral properties of the deoxygenated derivative of several monomeric hemoproteins has been investigated in the pH range between 2.3 and 9.0. As in the case of 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester mesoheme, the rate constant for CO binding to sperm whale, horse, Dermochelys coriacea, Coryphaena hippurus, and Aplysia limacina myoglobins (the latter only in the presence of acetate/acetic acid mixture) increases, as the pH is lowered, to a value at least 1 order of magnitude higher than at pH 7.0. Such an effect is not observed in A. limacina myoglobin (in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) and Chironomus thummi thummi erythrocruorin. Moreover, the absorption spectrum, in the visible region, of the deoxy derivative of all these monomeric hemoproteins (with the exception of A. limacina myoglobin in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) undergoes a transition as the pH is lowered, an effect observed previously with 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester protoheme. On the basis of analogous spectroscopic and kinetic properties of chelated heme model compounds we attribute this behavior to the protonation of the N epsilon of the proximal imidazole involved in the bond with the iron atom. On the basis of this model the movement of the iron atom to the heme plane appears as a crucial step for CO binding, the activation free energy of the process amounting to approximately 2 kcal/mol.

  9. Critical roles for Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases in B cell development and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Marita J; Ooi, Steen K T; Reynolds, Lucinda F; Smith, Susan Harless; Ruf, Sandra; Mathiot, Anne; Vanes, Lesley; Williams, David A; Cancro, Michael P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2003-10-17

    The Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including actin dynamics, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration resulting from signaling by multiple receptors, including the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We used conditional gene targeting to generate mice with specific Rac1 deficiency in the B cell lineage. In the absence of both Rac1 and the highly related Rac2, B cell development was almost completely blocked. Both GTPases were required to transduce BCR signals leading to proliferation, survival and up-regulation of BAFF-R, a receptor for BAFF, a key survival molecule required for B cell development and maintenance.

  10. The large GTPase Mx1 is involved in apical transport in MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Florian; Greb, Christoph; Hollmann, Christina; Hönig, Ellena; Jacob, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    In epithelial cells apical proteins are transported by specific transport carriers to the correct membrane domain. The composition of these carriers is heterogeneous and comprises components such as motor proteins, annexins, lectins, Rab GTPases and cargo molecules. Here, we provide biochemical and fluorescence microscopic data to show that the dynamin-related large GTPase Mx1 is a component of post-Golgi vesicles carrying the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) . Moreover, siRNA-mediated depletion of Mx1 significantly decreased the transport efficiency of apical proteins in MDCK cells. In conclusion, Mx1 plays a crucial role in the delivery of cargo molecules to the apical membrane of epithelial cells.

  11. Rab27 GTPases Distribute Extracellular Nanomaps for Invasive Growth and Metastasis: Implications for Prognosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier De Wever

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Rab27 family of small GTPases regulates exocytosis of distinct vesicle types including multivesicular endosomes, which results in the release of exosomes. Exosomes are nanometer-sized membrane vesicles that enclose soluble factors such as proteins and nucleic acids within a lipid bilayer and can travel toward distant tissues to influence multiple aspects of cell behavior. In our view that tumors are endocrine organs producing exosomes, Rab27 GTPases and their effector proteins are critical determinants for invasive growth and metastasis. Rab27 proteins and their effectors may serve as prognostic biomarkers or as targets for patient-tailored therapy.

  12. Evolution of Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) Rab GTPase-activating proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gabernet-Castello, Carme; O'Reilly, Amanda J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Field, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases serve as major control elements in the coordination and definition of specific trafficking steps and intracellular compartments. Rab activity is modulated in part by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), and many RabGAPs share a Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC)–domain architecture, although the majority of TBC proteins are poorly characterized. We reconstruct the evolutionary history of the TBC family using ScrollSaw, a method for the phylogenetic analysis of pan-eukaryotic data sets, and find...

  13. Rab27 GTPases distribute extracellular nanomaps for invasive growth and metastasis: implications for prognosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, An; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-05-10

    The Rab27 family of small GTPases regulates exocytosis of distinct vesicle types including multivesicular endosomes, which results in the release of exosomes. Exosomes are nanometer-sized membrane vesicles that enclose soluble factors such as proteins and nucleic acids within a lipid bilayer and can travel toward distant tissues to influence multiple aspects of cell behavior. In our view that tumors are endocrine organs producing exosomes, Rab27 GTPases and their effector proteins are critical determinants for invasive growth and metastasis. Rab27 proteins and their effectors may serve as prognostic biomarkers or as targets for patient-tailored therapy.

  14. Quantification of the predominant monomeric catechins in baking chocolate standard reference material by LC/APCI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Sharpless, Katherine E

    2003-01-29

    Catechins are polyphenolic plant compounds (flavonoids) that may offer significant health benefits to humans. These benefits stem largely from their anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and antimutagenic properties. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of flavonoid-containing foods is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Chocolate is a natural cocoa bean-based product that reportedly contains high levels of monomeric, oligomeric, and polymeric catechins. We have applied solid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry to the identification and determination of the predominant monomeric catechins, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, in a baking chocolate Standard Reference Material (NIST Standard Reference Material 2384). (+)-Catechin and (-)-epicatechin are detected and quantified in chocolate extracts on the basis of selected-ion monitoring of their protonated [M + H](+) molecular ions. Tryptophan methyl ester is used as an internal standard. The developed method has the capacity to accurately quantify as little as 0.1 microg/mL (0.01 mg of catechin/g of chocolate) of either catechin in chocolate extracts, and the method has additionally been used to certify (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin levels in the baking chocolate Standard Reference Material. This is the first reported use of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of monomeric catechins in chocolate and the only report certifying monomeric catechin levels in a food-based Standard Reference Material.

  15. Principal component regression analysis of the relation between CIELAB color and monomeric anthocyanins in young Cabernet Sauvignon wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fu-Liang; Zhang, Wen-Na; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Zheng, Cheng-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2008-11-17

    Color is one of the key characteristics used to evaluate the sensory quality of red wine, and anthocyanins are the main contributors to color. Monomeric anthocyanins and CIELAB color values were investigated by HPLC-MS and spectrophotometry during fermentation of Cabernet Sauvignon red wine, and principal component regression (PCR), a statistical tool, was used to establish a linkage between the detected anthocyanins and wine coloring. The results showed that 14 monomeric anthocyanins could be identified in wine samples, and all of these anthocyanins were negatively correlated with the L*, b* and H*ab values, but positively correlated with a* and C*ab values. On an equal concentration basis for each detected anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3-glu) had the most influence on CIELAB color value, while malvidin 3-O-glucoside (Mv3-glu) had the least. The color values of various monomeric anthocyanins were influenced by their structures, substituents on the B-ring, acyl groups on the glucoside and the molecular steric structure. This work develops a statistical method for evaluating correlation between wine color and monomeric anthocyanins, and also provides a basis for elucidating the effect of intramolecular copigmentation on wine coloring.

  16. Principal Component Regression Analysis of the Relation Between CIELAB Color and Monomeric Anthocyanins in Young Cabernet Sauvignon Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qing Duan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Color is one of the key characteristics used to evaluate the sensory quality of red wine, and anthocyanins are the main contributors to color. Monomeric anthocyanins and CIELAB color values were investigated by HPLC-MS and spectrophotometry during fermentation of Cabernet Sauvignon red wine, and principal component regression (PCR, a statistical tool, was used to establish a linkage between the detected anthocyanins and wine coloring. The results showed that 14 monomeric anthocyanins could be identified in wine samples, and all of these anthocyanins were negatively correlated with the L*, b* and H*ab values, but positively correlated with a* and C*ab values. On an equal concentration basis for each detected anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3-glu had the most influence on CIELAB color value, while malvidin 3-O-glucoside (Mv3-glu had the least. The color values of various monomeric anthocyanins were influenced by their structures, substituents on the B-ring, acyl groups on the glucoside and the molecular steric structure. This work develops a statistical method for evaluating correlation between wine color and monomeric anthocyanins, and also provides a basis for elucidating the effect of intramolecular copigmentation on wine coloring.

  17. Responses of three very large inducible GTPases to bacterial and white spot syndrome virus challenges in the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Ding, Zhengfeng; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines secreted by cells in response to invasion by pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, or tumor cells. Very large inducible GTPases (VLIG) are the latest IFN-inducible GTPase family to be discovered and are the largest known GTPases of any species. However, VLIG proteins from invertebrates have yet to be characterized. In this study, three forms of VLIGs designated as MrVLIG1, MrVLIG2, and MrVLIG3 were cloned from the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrVLIG1 has a 5445 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding an 1814-amino acid protein. The complete nucleotide sequence of MrVLIG2 cDNA is 7055 bp long consisting of a 5757 bp ORF encoding a protein with 1918 amino acids. The full length of the MrVLIG3 gene consists of 5511 bp with a 3909 bp ORF encoding a peptide with 1302 amino acids. BLASTP and phylogenetic tree analyses showed that the three MrVLIGs are clustered into one subgroup and, together with other vertebrate VLIGs, into a branch. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the mRNAs of the three MrVLIGs were widely expressed in almost all detected tissues, including the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine, with the highest expression in the hepatopancreas. They were also detected in the intestine but with relatively low expression levels. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA transcripts of the MrVLIGs in the hepatopancreas were significantly expressed at various time points after infection with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus. In summary, the three isoforms of VLIG genes participate in the innate immune response of the shrimps to bacterial and viral infections.

  18. Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV induces PC12 apoptotic cell death via JNK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, Mikhail V; Chernoff, Jonathan; Korobko, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including apoptosis. Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase which functions are poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of Chp in regulation of cell viability using PC12 cells with inducible expression of Chp as a model. We found that expression of Chp results in apoptosis in PC12 cells. Chp-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of JNK signaling and both death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as justified by caspase-8 and caspase-9 activation, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of JNK by SP600125 rescued PC12 cells from Chp-triggered cell death and attenuated activation of caspases-9 and -3/7 suggesting that activation of JNK mediates pro-apoptotic effect of Chp. Expression of Chp resulted in increased phosphorylation of c-Jun in PC12 cells, and Chp expression in HE K293 cells upregulated AP-1-dependent transcription in a JNK-dependent manner. Together results of our study reveal the role of Chp GTPase as a putative regulator of JNK-dependent apoptotic death in PC12 cells, similarly to previously described pro-apoptotic activity of the related Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases.

  19. The Rho-GTPase cdc42 regulates neural progenitor fate at the apical surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappello, Silvia; Attardo, Alessio; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    the fundamental difference between these progenitors. Here we show that the conditional deletion of the small Rho-GTPase cdc42 at different stages of neurogenesis in mouse telencephalon results in an immediate increase in basal mitoses. Whereas cdc42-deficient progenitors have normal cell cycle length...

  20. The immunity-related GTPase Irga6 dimerizes in a parallel head-to-head fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Kathrin; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Faelber, Katja; Fröhlich, Chris; Howard, Jonathan; Daumke, Oliver

    2016-03-02

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) constitute a powerful cell-autonomous resistance system against several intracellular pathogens. Irga6 is a dynamin-like protein that oligomerizes at the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) of Toxoplasma gondii leading to its vesiculation. Based on a previous biochemical analysis, it has been proposed that the GTPase domains of Irga6 dimerize in an antiparallel fashion during oligomerization. We determined the crystal structure of an oligomerization-impaired Irga6 mutant bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog. Contrary to the previous model, the structure shows that the GTPase domains dimerize in a parallel fashion. The nucleotides in the center of the interface participate in dimerization by forming symmetric contacts with each other and with the switch I region of the opposing Irga6 molecule. The latter contact appears to activate GTP hydrolysis by stabilizing the position of the catalytic glutamate 106 in switch I close to the active site. Further dimerization contacts involve switch II, the G4 helix and the trans stabilizing loop. The Irga6 structure features a parallel GTPase domain dimer, which appears to be a unifying feature of all dynamin and septin superfamily members. This study contributes important insights into the assembly and catalytic mechanisms of IRG proteins as prerequisite to understand their anti-microbial action.

  1. WAVE regulatory complex activation by cooperating GTPases Arf and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koronakis, Vassilis; Hume, Peter J; Humphreys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) is a critical element in the control of actin polymerization at the eukaryotic cell membrane, but how WRC is activated remains uncertain. While Rho GTPase Rac1 can bind and activate WRC in vitro, this interaction is of low affinity, suggesting other factors may b...

  2. RhoC GTPase Overexpression Modulates Induction of Angiogenic Factors in Breast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth L. van Golen

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is a distinct and aggressive form of locally advanced breast cancer. IBC is highly angiogenic, invasive, and metastatic at its inception. Previously, we identified specific genetic alterations of IBC that contribute to this highly invasive phenotype. RhoC GTPase was overexpressed in 90% of archival IBC tumor samples, but not in stage-matched, non-IBC tumors. To study the role of RhoC GTPase in contributing to an IBC-like phenotype, we generated stable transfectants of human mammary epithelial cells overexpressing the RhoC gene, and studied the effect of RhoC GTPase overexpression on the modulation of angiogenesis in IBC. Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and interleukin-8 (IL-8 were significantly higher in the conditioned media of the HME-RhoC transfectants than in the untransfected HME and HME-β-galactosidase control media, similar to the SUM149 IBC cell line. Inhibition of RhoC function by introduction of C3 exotransferase decreased production of angiogenic factors by the HME-RhoC transfectants and the SUM149 IBC cell line, but did not affect the control cells. These data support the conclusion that overexpression of RhoC GTPase is specifically and directly implicated in the control of the production of angiogenic factors by IBC cells.

  3. Divergent functions of the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 in podocyte injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blattner, Simone M; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Nishio, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes are highly specialized epithelial cells with complex actin cytoskeletal architecture crucial for maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. The mammalian Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 are molecular switches that control many cellular processes, but are best known for their roles in ...

  4. G domain dimerization controls dynamin's assembly-stimulated GTPase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappie, Joshua S.; Acharya, Sharmistha; Leonard, Marilyn; Schmid, Sandra L.; Dyda, Fred (NIH); (Scripps)

    2010-06-14

    Dynamin is an atypical GTPase that catalyses membrane fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The mechanisms of dynamin's basal and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis are unknown, though both are indirectly influenced by the GTPase effector domain (GED). Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a human dynamin 1-derived minimal GTPase-GED fusion protein, which was dimeric in the presence of the transition state mimic GDP.AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structure reveals dynamin's catalytic machinery and explains how assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis is achieved through G domain dimerization. A sodium ion present in the active site suggests that dynamin uses a cation to compensate for the developing negative charge in the transition state in the absence of an arginine finger. Structural comparison to the rat dynamin G domain reveals key conformational changes that promote G domain dimerization and stimulated hydrolysis. The structure of the GTPase-GED fusion protein dimer provides insight into the mechanisms underlying dynamin-catalysed membrane fission.

  5. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blombach, F.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major typ

  6. Human GTPases associate with RNA polymerase II to mediate its nuclear import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Clément; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    Small GTPases share a biochemical mechanism and act as binary molecular switches. One important function of small GTPases in the cell is nucleocytoplasmic transport of both proteins and RNA. Here, we show the stable association of human GPN1 and GPN3, small GTPases related to Ran, with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) isolated from either the cytoplasmic or nuclear fraction. GPN1 and GPN3 directly interact with RNAPII subunit 7 (RPB7)/RPB4 and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII. Depletion of GPN1 or GPN3 using small interfering RNAs led to decreased RNAPII levels in the nucleus and an accumulation of this enzyme in the cytoplasm of human cells. Furthermore, isolation of a GPN1/GPN3/RNAPII complex from stable cell lines expressing a dominant negative GPN1 harboring mutations in the GTP-binding pocket demonstrated a role for these proteins in nuclear import of RNAPII. Thus, GPN1/GPN3 define a new family of small GTPases that are specialized for the transport of RNA polymerase II into the nucleus.

  7. Distinct actions of Rab3 and Rab27 GTPases on late stages of exocytosis of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, Victor A; Subramani, Arasakumar; Saldate, Johnny J; Hoerauf, Widmann; Stuenkel, Edward L

    2014-09-01

    Rab GTPases associated with insulin-containing secretory granules (SGs) are key in targeting, docking and assembly of molecular complexes governing pancreatic β-cell exocytosis. Four Rab3 isoforms along with Rab27A are associated with insulin granules, yet elucidation of the distinct roles of these Rab families on exocytosis remains unclear. To define specific actions of these Rab families we employ Rab3GAP and/or EPI64A GTPase-activating protein overexpression in β-cells from wild-type or Ashen mice to selectively transit the entire Rab3 family or Rab27A to a GDP-bound state. Ashen mice carry a spontaneous mutation that eliminates Rab27A expression. Using membrane capacitance measurements we find that GTP/GDP nucleotide cycling of Rab27A is essential for generation of the functionally defined immediately releasable pool (IRP) and central to regulating the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). By comparison, nucleotide cycling of Rab3 GTPases, but not of Rab27A, is essential for a kinetically rapid filling of the RRP with SGs. Aside from these distinct functions, Rab3 and Rab27A GTPases demonstrate considerable functional overlap in building the readily releasable granule pool. Hence, while Rab3 and Rab27A cooperate to generate release-ready SGs in β-cells, they also direct unique kinetic and functional properties of the exocytotic pathway.

  8. Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 controls migration of Langerhans cells in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckashenak, Nancy; Wähe, Anna; Breit, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    and contributions of this cell type. To target the migratory properties of DCs, we generated mice lacking the Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 specifically in DCs. In these animals, the initial seeding of the epidermis with LCs is functional, resulting in slightly reduced Langerhans cell numbers. However, Cdc42-deficient...

  9. High yield production of myristoylated Arf6 small GTPase by recombinant N-myristoyl transferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Dominique; Zeghouf, Mahel; Traverso, José A.; Giglione, Carmela; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Arf family (Arf GTPases) interact with multiple cellular partners and with membranes to regulate intracellular traffic and organelle structure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms requires in vitro biochemical assays to test for regulations and functions. Such assays should use proteins in their cellular form, which carry a myristoyl lipid attached in N-terminus. N-myristoylation of recombinant Arf GTPases can be achieved by co-expression in E. coli with a eukaryotic N-myristoyl transferase. However, purifying myristoylated Arf GTPases is difficult and has a poor overall yield. Here we show that human Arf6 can be N-myristoylated in vitro by recombinant N-myristoyl transferases from different eukaryotic species. The catalytic efficiency depended strongly on the guanine nucleotide state and was highest for Arf6-GTP. Large-scale production of highly pure N-myristoylated Arf6 could be achieved, which was fully functional for liposome-binding and EFA6-stimulated nucleotide exchange assays. This establishes in vitro myristoylation as a novel and simple method that could be used to produce other myristoylated Arf and Arf-like GTPases for biochemical assays. PMID:23319116

  10. Small GTPases and Stress Responses of vvran1 in the Straw Mushroom Volvariella volvacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases play important roles in the growth, development and environmental responses of eukaryotes. Based on the genomic sequence of the straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea, 44 small GTPases were identified. A clustering analysis using human small GTPases as the references revealed that V. volvacea small GTPases can be grouped into five families: nine are in the Ras family, 10 are in the Rho family, 15 are in the Rab family, one is in the Ran family and nine are in the Arf family. The transcription of vvran1 was up-regulated upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stress, and could be repressed by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI, a NADPH oxidase-specific inhibitor. The number of vvran1 transcripts also increased upon cold stress. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, but not the superoxide dismutase (SOD inhibitor diethy dithiocarbamate (DDC, could suppress the up-regulation of vvran1 gene expression to cold stress. These results combined with the high correlations between gene expression and superoxide anion (O2− generation indicated that vvran1 could be one of the candidate genes in the downstream of O2− mediated pathways that are generated by NADPH oxidase under low temperature and oxidative stresses.

  11. Reactivity studies on [Cp'FeI]2: monomeric amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marc D; White, Peter S

    2012-11-05

    A series of monomeric mono(cyclopentadienyl) iron amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes were synthesized, and their structure and reactivity are presented. The iron(II) centers in these 14VE one-legged piano stool complexes are high spin (S = 2) in solid state and solution independent of solvent. The silylamide compound [Cp'FeN(SiMe(3))(2)] (2a, Cp' = 1,2,4-(Me(3)C)(3)C(5)H(2)) is an excellent starting material for the reaction with more acidic substrates such as phenols. Sterically encumbered phenols 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H, Me, and tBu) were investigated. In all cases monomeric iron phenoxo half-sandwich complexes [Cp'FeOR'] (4-R) are initially formed. Rearrangement of 4-R to the diamagnetic oxocyclohexadienyl complex [Cp'Fe(η(5)-O═C(6)H(2)R'(2)R")] (5-R) is observed for 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H and Me) and the Gibbs free enthalpy of activation (ΔG(‡)) was determined. In contrast this rearrangement is inhibited when the 4-position is blocked by a tBu group. Removing the steric bulk from the 2,6-positions leads to the formation of a μ-phenoxo dimer, [Cp'Fe(μ-OC(6)H(3)tBu(2)-3,5)](2) (5). Density functional theory (DFT) was used to further elucidate the structure-reactivity relationship in these molecules. The one-legged piano stool anilido complex [Cp'Fe(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)] (7) is not accessible via acid-base reaction between 2a and H(2)NC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6, but can be prepared by conventional salt metathesis reaction from [Cp'FeI](2) and [Li(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)(OEt(2))](2). In contrast, reaction of 2a with Ph(2)NH yields the bimetallic [Cp'Fe(N,C-κ(1),η(5)-C(6)H(5)NPh)Fe(N-κ(1)-NPh(2))Cp'] (8) which combines two iron centers in the same oxidation state (+2), but different spin-states (S = 0 and S = 2) which is reflected in very different Cp(cent)-Fe distances of 1.68 and 2.04 Å, respectively. A monomeric iron alkyl half-sandwich complex [Cp'FeCH(SiMe(3))(2)] (9) was prepared that exhibits no reactivity toward H(2), C

  12. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, William R; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-07-19

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase ('wave-pinning') model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  13. Expression of Rho GTPases family in melanoma cells and its influence on cytoskeleton and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Si-Jian; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Na-Na; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Po; Lin, You-Kun; Sun, Jian-Fang

    2017-05-02

    Rho GTPases family members influenced the filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque of melanoma cells through regulating cytoskeleton recombination. The role of Rho GTPases family in the migration and invasion of melanoma and its molecular mechanism were explored. The morphological difference between three types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3) and human melanocyte (MC) was observed by the Hoffman microscope. Cells were stained by phalloidin labeled by rhodamine. The differences between 4 types of cells in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent) were observed under the super-high resolution microscope. The migration ability of 4 types of cells was detected by Transwell migration assay. QPCR was used to detect the mRNA transcription level of Rho GTPases family. WB was adopted to detect the expression of RhoD and DIAPH2 proteins. There were significant differences in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque between MC and 3 types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3). MC did not have stress fiber or adhesion plaque, while M14, A375 and MV3 had stress fiber and adhesion plaque. All 4 types of cells had thin and short filopodia. MV3 had fewer but thicker stress fibers than the latter two. Transwell migration test indicated the followings: M14 and A375 had a similar high migration rate; the migration rate of MV3 was slightly low; MC did not have the ability of transmembrane migration. QPCR results of Rho GTPases family in 4 types of cells showed the change corresponding to immunofluorescence. WB results showed that RhoD was barely expressed in M14, A375 or MV3. DIAPH2, the downstream effector molecule of RhoD, had the corresponding change. Rho GTPases influences the migration and invasion of melanoma cells through regulating filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent).

  14. Characterization of the activation of small GTPases by their GEFs on membranes using artificial membrane tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurois, François; Veyron, Simon; Ferrandez, Yann; Ladid, Ilham; Benabdi, Sarah; Zeghouf, Mahel; Peyroche, Gérald; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2017-02-14

    Attachment of active, GTP-bound small GTPases to membranes by post-translational lipid modifications is pivotal for their ability to process and propagate information in cells. However, generating and manipulating lipidated GTPases has remained difficult, which has limited our quantitative understanding of their activation by GEFs and their termination by GAPs. Here we replaced the lipid modification by a histidine tag in eleven full-length, human small GTPases belonging to the Arf, Rho and Rab families, which allowed to tether them to nickel-lipid containing membranes and characterize the kinetics of their activation by GEFs. Remarkably this strategy uncovered large effects of membranes on the efficiency and/or specificity in all systems studied. Notably, it recapitulated the release of autoinhibition of Arf1, Arf3, Arf4, Arf5 and Arf6 GTPases by membranes and revealed that all isoforms are efficiently activated by two GEFs with different regulatory regimes, ARNO and Brag2. It demonstrated that membranes stimulate the GEF activity of Trio towards RhoG by ≈30 fold and Rac1 by ≈10 fold, and uncovered a previously unknown broader specificity towards RhoA and Cdc42 that was undetectable in solution. Finally, it demonstrated that the exceptional affinity of the bacterial RabGEF DrrA for the phosphoinositide PI(4)P delimits the activation of Rab1 to the immediate vicinity of the membrane-bound GEF. Our study thus validates the histidine tag strategy as a potent and simple means to mimic small GTPases lipidation, which opens broad perspectives of applications to uncover regulations brought about by membranes.

  15. GTPase activity plays a key role in the pathobiology of LRRK2.

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    Yulan Xiong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are associated with late-onset, autosomal-dominant, familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to sporadic disease. The LRRK2 gene encodes a large protein with multiple domains, including functional Roc GTPase and protein kinase domains. Mutations in LRRK2 most likely cause disease through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism. The expression of human LRRK2 variants in cultured primary neurons induces toxicity that is dependent on intact GTP binding or kinase activities. However, the mechanism(s underlying LRRK2-induced neuronal toxicity is poorly understood, and the contribution of GTPase and/or kinase activity to LRRK2 pathobiology is not well defined. To explore the pathobiology of LRRK2, we have developed a model of LRRK2 cytotoxicity in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protein domain analysis in this model reveals that expression of GTPase domain-containing fragments of human LRRK2 are toxic. LRRK2 toxicity in yeast can be modulated by altering GTPase activity and is closely associated with defects in endocytic vesicular trafficking and autophagy. These truncated LRRK2 variants induce similar toxicity in both yeast and primary neuronal models and cause similar vesicular defects in yeast as full-length LRRK2 causes in primary neurons. The toxicity induced by truncated LRRK2 variants in yeast acts through a mechanism distinct from toxicity induced by human alpha-synuclein. A genome-wide genetic screen identified modifiers of LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast including components of vesicular trafficking pathways, which can also modulate the trafficking defects caused by expression of truncated LRRK2 variants. Our results provide insight into the basic pathobiology of LRRK2 and suggest that the GTPase domain may contribute to the toxicity of LRRK2. These findings may guide future therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating LRRK2-mediated neurodegeneration.

  16. Topological and functional properties of the small GTPases protein interaction network.

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    Anna Delprato

    Full Text Available Small GTP binding proteins of the Ras superfamily (Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, and Ran regulate key cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, cell motility, and vesicle transport. A great deal of experimental evidence supports the existence of signaling cascades and feedback loops within and among the small GTPase subfamilies suggesting that these proteins function in a coordinated and cooperative manner. The interplay occurs largely through association with bi-partite regulatory and effector proteins but can also occur through the active form of the small GTPases themselves. In order to understand the connectivity of the small GTPases signaling routes, a systems-level approach that analyzes data describing direct and indirect interactions was used to construct the small GTPases protein interaction network. The data were curated from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING database and include only experimentally validated interactions. The network method enables the conceptualization of the overall structure as well as the underlying organization of the protein-protein interactions. The interaction network described here is comprised of 778 nodes and 1943 edges and has a scale-free topology. Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA, and HRas are identified as the hubs. Ten sub-network motifs are also identified in this study with themes in apoptosis, cell growth/proliferation, vesicle traffic, cell adhesion/junction dynamics, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase response, transcription regulation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, gene silencing, and growth factor signaling. Bottleneck proteins that bridge signaling paths and proteins that overlap in multiple small GTPase networks are described along with the functional annotation of all proteins in the network.

  17. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-08-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase (‘wave-pinning’) model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  18. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of monomeric mercury(II) selenolate complexes derived from 2-phenylbenzamide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saket; Meenakshi; Hodage, Ananda S; Verma, Ajay; Agrawal, Shailendra; Yadav, Abhimanyu; Kumar, Sangit

    2016-03-07

    Monomeric Hg(II) selenolate complexes derived from 2-phenylbenzamide ligands were prepared by oxidative addition of diselenides [{C6H4(CONR2)Se}2, R = Me, Et, iPr] to elemental Hg and reductive cleavage of the Se–N bond of isoselenazolone derivatives [(NO2)C6H3(CONSe)R, (R = allyl, nbutyl)] followed by the treatment with HgCl2. The complexes have been characterized by multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 77Se) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry which suggest the monomeric form of these in solution. The molecular structures of diselenides [C6H4(CONR2)Se]2 and mercury selenolates [Hg{(NO2)C6H3(CONH-C3H5) Se}2], [Hg{C6H4(CONiPr2)Se}2] and [Hg{C6H4(CONMe2)Se}2] were established by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Diselenides show strong intramolecular non-bonded Se⋯O interactions, which are influenced by the nature of C(O)NR̲2 and decrease with the sterically bulky alkyl substituent (Se⋯O =2.823 Å for R = di-Me, 2.760 Å for R = allyl, and 3.157 Å for R = di-iPr). Mercury complexes derived from less bulky 2-phenyl-N,N-dialkylbenzamide ligands associated with poor or no intramolecular nonbonded Hg⋯O interactions (4.91 Å for R = di-Me, 4.199 Å for R = allyl) and instead strong intermolecular Hg⋯O [2.792(3) and 2.820(4) Å] for di-Me and allyl and Hg⋯Se [3.3212(5) and 3.4076(8) Å] interactions were observed which lead to a dimeric form in the crystals. On the other hand, the mercury complex derived from the sterically bulky diisopropyl amide ligand shows a strong intramolecular non-bonded Hg⋯O (2.860 Å) interaction, adopts linear geometry and exists as a monomer. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the mercury selenolate complexes revealed two-step decomposition which leads to the formation of HgSe. The mercury selenolate complex 3c derived from the sterically bulky 2-phenyl-N,Ndiisopropylbenzamide ligand decomposed to give HgSe in the range of 220-300 °C.

  20. 11 Efficacy and Tolerability of HDM Injective Immunotherapy With Monomeric Allergoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compalati, Enrico; Atzeni, Isabella; Cabras, Sergio; Fancello, Paolo; Gaspardini, Giulio; Longo, Rocco; Patella, Vincenzo; Tore, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is an effective treatment of respiratory allergy and carbamylated monomeric allergoids (monoids), by virtue of their reduced IgE-binding activity, resulted clinically safe by sublingual administration. Purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of immunotherapy with house dust mites (HDM) monoid administered by injective route in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR). Methods A preparation of 0.70 mL of 10 BU/mL containing modified extract with 50% Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and 50% Dermatophagoides farinae (amount of major allergen: 4 μg of group 1 per milliliter) was delivered monthly for 12 months, following a 5-week build-up induction phase (0.10–0.20–0.30–0.50–0.70 mL), to 58 patients (60% males, mean age 25.1 ± 12.7) suffering from AR due to mites for at least 2 years, whereas 60 patients with similar baseline characteristics were observed as controls. All patients were allowed to assume traditional drug therapy for their condition. At the end of the study changes from baseline in symptoms scores, in number of days with drug assumption, in severity of AR (according to ARIA classification) were compared between the 2 groups; moreover an overall assessment of clinical efficacy and tolerability was based on patients' and physicians' judgements (unsatisfactory, mild, good, optimal). Results In respect to baseline both groups showed, after 1 year, an improvement in symptoms score (P < 0.001) with a significant difference in favour of SCIT group (P < 0.05). Days of drug intake were significantly lower in patients receiving SCIT (P < 0.05). The number of patients with severe AR decreased in the first group while no variation was observed in controls. The subjective clinical overall assessment was optimal in 31 cases and good in 24 according to physicians' and patients' judgements; similarly 38 patients judged tolerability as optimal and 18 as good, whereas according to

  1. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantis, I.; Efstratiadis, A.; Rozos, E.; Kopsiafti, M.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2011-03-01

    The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse) parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece with high complexities

  2. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Nalbantis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece

  3. Mapping the dynamics and nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins using monomeric streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, Ingrid; Letellier, Mathieu; Butler, Corey; Tessier, Béatrice; Lim, Kok-Hong; Gauthereau, Isabel; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Park, Sheldon; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The advent of super-resolution imaging (SRI) has created a need for optimized labelling strategies. We present a new method relying on fluorophore-conjugated monomeric streptavidin (mSA) to label membrane proteins carrying a short, enzymatically biotinylated tag, compatible with SRI techniques including uPAINT, STED and dSTORM. We demonstrate efficient and specific labelling of target proteins in confined intercellular and organotypic tissues, with reduced steric hindrance and no crosslinking compared with multivalent probes. We use mSA to decipher the dynamics and nanoscale organization of the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1β, neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2) in a dual-colour configuration with GFP nanobody, and show that these proteins are diffusionally trapped at synapses where they form apposed trans-synaptic adhesive structures. Furthermore, Nlg1 is dynamic, disperse and sensitive to synaptic stimulation, whereas LRRTM2 is organized in compact and stable nanodomains. Thus, mSA is a versatile tool to image membrane proteins at high resolution in complex live environments, providing novel information about the nano-organization of biological structures. PMID:26979420

  4. SuperNova, a monomeric photosensitizing fluorescent protein for chromophore-assisted light inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kiwamu; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakai, Naoki; Fu, Donald; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kotera, Ippei; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masataka; Fukui, Kiichi; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2013-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful technique for acute perturbation of biomolecules in a spatio-temporally defined manner in living specimen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas a chemical photosensitizer including fluorescein must be added to specimens exogenously and cannot be restricted to particular cells or sub-cellular compartments, a genetically-encoded photosensitizer, KillerRed, can be controlled in its expression by tissue specific promoters or subcellular localization tags. Despite of this superiority, KillerRed hasn't yet become a versatile tool because its dimerization tendency prevents fusion with proteins of interest. Here, we report the development of monomeric variant of KillerRed (SuperNova) by direct evolution using random mutagenesis. In contrast to KillerRed, SuperNova in fusion with target proteins shows proper localization. Furthermore, unlike KillerRed, SuperNova expression alone doesn't perturb mitotic cell division. Supernova retains the ability to generate ROS, and hence promote CALI-based functional analysis of target proteins overcoming the major drawbacks of KillerRed.

  5. Hydrogen production from the monomeric sugars hydrolyzed from hemicellulose by Enterobacter aerogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yunli; Wang, Jianji; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Yunlai; Li, Guozhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471039, Henan (China)

    2009-12-15

    Relatively large percentages of xylose with glucose, arabinose, mannose, galactose and rhamnose constitute the hydrolysis products of hemicellulose. In this paper, hydrogen production performance of facultative anaerobe (Enterobacter aerogenes) has been investigated from these different monomeric sugars except glucose. It was shown that the stereoisomers of mannose and galactose were more effective for hydrogen production than those of xylose and arabinose. The substrate of 5 g/l xylose resulted in a relative high level of hydrogen yield (73.8 mmol/l), hydrogen production efficiency (2.2 mol/mol) and a maximum hydrogen production rate (249 ml/l/h). The hydrogen yield, hydrogen production efficiency and the maximum hydrogen production rate reached 104 mmol/l, 2.35 mol/mol and 290 ml/l/h, respectively, on a substrate of 10 g/l galactose. The hydrogen yields and the maximum hydrogen production rates increased with an increase of mannose concentrations and reached 119 mmol/l and 518 ml/l/h on the culture of 25 g/l mannose. However, rhamnose was a relative poor carbon resource for E. aerogenes to produce hydrogen, from which the hydrogen yield and hydrogen production efficiency were about one half of that from the mannose substrate. E. aerogenes was found to be a promising strain for hydrogen production from hydrolysis products of hemicellulose. (author)

  6. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  7. Retention mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reversed-phase liquid chromatography with monomeric stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2011-12-23

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is the foremost technique for the separation of analytes that have very similar chemical functionalities, but differ only in their molecular shape. This ability is crucial in the analysis of various mixtures with environmental and biological importance including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and steroids. A large amount of effort has been devoted to studying this phenomenon experimentally, but a detailed molecular-level description remains lacking. To provide some insight on the mechanism of shape selectivity in RPLC, particle-based simulations were carried out for stationary phases and chromatographic parameters that closely mimic those in an experimental study by Sentell and Dorsey [J. Chromatogr. 461 (1989) 193]. The retention of aromatic hydrocarbons ranging in size from benzene to the isomeric PAHs of the formula C(18)H(12) was examined for model RPLC systems consisting of monomeric dimethyl octadecylsilane (ODS) stationary phases with surface coverages ranging from 1.6 to 4.2 μmol/m(2) (i.e., stationary phases yielding low to intermediate shape selectivity) in contact with a 67/33 mol% acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The simulations show that the stationary phase acts as a very heterogeneous environment where analytes with different shapes prefer different spatial regions with specific local bonding environments of the ODS chains. However, these favorable retentive regions cannot be described as pre-existing cavities because the chain conformation in these local stationary phase regions adapts to accommodate the analytes.

  8. Contribution of Monomeric Anthocyanins to the Color of Young Red Wine: Statistical and Experimental Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fu Liang; Li, Zheng; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Monomeric anthocyanin contributions to young red wine color were investigated using partial least square regression (PLSR) and aqueous alcohol solutions in this study. Results showed that the correlation between the anthocyanin concentration and the solution color fitted in a quadratic regression rather than linear or cubic regression. Malvidin-3-O-glucoside was estimated to show the highest contribution to young red wine color according to its concentration in wine, whereas peonidin-3-O-glucoside in its concentration contributed the least. The PLSR suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside under the same concentration resulted in a stronger color of young red wine compared with malvidin-3-O-glucoside. These estimates were further confirmed by their color in aqueous alcohol solutions. These results suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside were primary anthocyanins to enhance young red wine color by increasing their concentrations. This study could provide an alternative approach to improve young red wine color by adjusting anthocyanin composition and concentration.

  9. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

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    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  10. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-08-20

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first crystallization and structural analysis of the monomeric form of PSIIcc with high oxygen evolution capacity, isolated from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The crystals belong to the space group C222(1), contain one monomer per asymmetric unit, and diffract to a resolution of 3.6 A. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the PSIIcc-monomer crystals exhibit less anisotropy (dependence of resolution on crystal orientation) compared with crystals of dimeric PSIIcc, and the packing of the molecules within the unit cell is different. In the monomer, 19 protein subunits, 35 chlorophylls, two pheophytins, the non-heme iron, the primary plastoquinone Q(A), two heme groups, 11 beta-carotenes, 22 lipids, seven detergent molecules, and the Mn(4)Ca cluster of the water oxidizing complex could be assigned analogous to the dimer. Based on the new structural information, the roles of lipids and protein subunits in dimer formation of PSIIcc are discussed. Due to the lack of non-crystallographic symmetry and the orientation of the membrane normal of PSIIcc perpendicular ( approximately 87 degrees ) to the crystallographic b-axis, further information about the structure of the Mn(4)Ca cluster is expected to become available from orientation-dependent spectroscopy on this new crystal form.

  11. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP.

  12. Design of monomeric water-soluble β-hairpin and β-sheet peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Since the first report in 1993 (JACS 115, 5887-5888) of a peptide able to form a monomeric β-hairpin structure in aqueous solution, the design of peptides forming either β-hairpins (two-stranded antiparallel β-sheets) or three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets has become a field of growing interest and activity. These studies have yielded great insights into the principles governing the stability and folding of β-hairpins and antiparallel β-sheets. This chapter provides an overview of the reported β-hairpin/β-sheet peptides focussed on the applied design criteria, reviews briefly the factors contributing to β-hairpin/β-sheet stability, and describes a protocol for the de novo design of β-sheet-forming peptides based on them. Guidelines to select appropriate turn and strand residues and to avoid self-association are provided. The methods employed to check the success of new designed peptides are also summarized. Since NMR is the best technique to that end, NOEs and chemical shifts characteristic of β-hairpins and three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets are given.

  13. Lipoamino acid-based micelles as promising delivery vehicles for monomeric amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafim, Cláudia; Ferreira, Inês; Rijo, Patrícia; Pinheiro, Lídia; Faustino, Célia; Calado, António; Garcia-Rio, Luis

    2016-01-30

    Lipoamino acid-based micelles have been developed as delivery vehicles for the hydrophobic drug amphotericin B (AmB). The micellar solubilisation of AmB by a gemini lipoamino acid (LAA) derived from cysteine and its equimolar mixtures with the bile salts sodium cholate (NaC) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), as well as the aggregation sate of the drug in the micellar systems, was studied under biomimetic conditions (phosphate buffered-saline, pH 7.4) using UV-vis spectroscopy. Pure surfactant systems and equimolar mixtures were characterized by tensiometry and important parameters were determined, such as critical micelle concentration (CMC), surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γmax), and minimum area occupied per molecule at the water/air interface (Amin). Rheological behaviour from viscosity measurements at different shear rates was also addressed. Solubilisation capacity was quantified in terms of molar solubilisation ratio (χ), micelle-water partition coefficient (KM) and Gibbs energy of solubilisation (ΔGs°). Formulations of AmB in micellar media were compared in terms of drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, aggregation state of AmB and in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The LAA-containing micellar systems solubilise AmB in its monomeric and less toxic form and exhibit in vitro antifungal activity comparable to that of the commercial formulation Fungizone.

  14. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatzky Katharina F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been

  15. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Sklar, Larry A.; Agola, Jacob O.; Guo, Yuna; Silberberg, Melina; Roxby, Joshua; Vestling, Anna; Romero, Elsa; Surviladze, Zurab; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Hudson, Laurie G.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42) collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac) as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID) as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses—using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen—led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines) demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766) and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid translation and

  16. Monomeric malonate precursors for the MOCVD of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian; Parala, Harish; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-01-28

    New Hf and Zr malonate complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal amides with different malonate ligands (L = dimethyl malonate (Hdmml), diethyl malonate (Hdeml), di-tert-butyl malonate (Hdbml) and bis(trimethylsilyl) malonate (Hbsml)). Homoleptic eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4 were obtained for Hf with all the malonate ligands employed. In contrast, for Zr only Hdmml and Hdeml yielded the eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4, while using the bulky Hdbml and Hbsml ligands resulted into mixed alkoxo-malonato six-coordinated compounds of the type [ML2(OR)2]. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of all the compounds are presented and discussed, and they are found to be monomeric. The complexes are solids and in solution, they retain their monomeric nature as evidenced by NMR measurements. Compared to the classical beta-diketonate complexes, [M(acac)4] and [M(thd)4] (M = Hf, Zr; acac: acetylacetonate; thd: tetramethylheptadione), the new malonate compounds are more volatile, decompose at lower temperatures and have lower melting points. In particular, the homoleptic diethyl malonate complexes of Hf and Zr melt at temperatures as low as 62 degrees C. In addition, the compounds are very stable in air and can be sublimed quantitatively. The promising thermal properties makes these compounds interesting for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This was demonstrated by depositing HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films successfully with two representative Hf and Zr complexes.

  17. Neurodevelopmental Expression Profile of Dimeric and Monomeric Group 1 mGluRs: Relevance to Schizophrenia Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Jeremy S.; Fernandez, Francesca; Matosin, Natalie; Andrews, Jessica L.; Huang, Xu-Feng; Ooi, Lezanne; Newell, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/mGluR5) play an integral role in neurodevelopment and are implicated in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. mGluR1 and mGluR5 are expressed as homodimers, which is important for their functionality and pharmacology. We examined the protein expression of dimeric and monomeric mGluR1α and mGluR5 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus throughout development (juvenile/adolescence/adulthood) and in the perinatal phencyclidine (PCP) model of schizophrenia. Under control conditions, mGluR1α dimer expression increased between juvenile and adolescence (209–328%), while monomeric levels remained consistent. Dimeric mGluR5 was steadily expressed across all time points; monomeric mGluR5 was present in juveniles, dramatically declining at adolescence and adulthood (−97–99%). The mGluR regulators, Homer 1b/c and Norbin, significantly increased with age in the PFC and hippocampus. Perinatal PCP treatment significantly increased juvenile dimeric mGluR5 levels in the PFC and hippocampus (37–50%) but decreased hippocampal mGluR1α (−50–56%). Perinatal PCP treatment also reduced mGluR1α dimer levels in the PFC at adulthood (−31%). These results suggest that Group 1 mGluRs have distinct dimeric and monomeric neurodevelopmental patterns, which may impact their pharmacological profiles at specific ages. Perinatal PCP treatment disrupted the early expression of Group 1 mGluRs which may underlie neurodevelopmental alterations observed in this model. PMID:27721389

  18. Control of developmental networks by Rac/Rho small GTPases: How cytoskeletal changes during embryogenesis are orchestrated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Zheleva, Angelina; Gastaca, Irene; Cabello, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Small GTPases in the Rho family act as major nodes with functions beyond cytoskeletal rearrangements shaping the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo during development. These small GTPases are key signal transducers that integrate diverse developmental signals to produce a coordinated response in the cell. In C. elegans, the best studied members of these highly conserved Rho family small GTPases, RHO-1/RhoA, CED-10/Rac, and CDC-42, are crucial in several cellular processes dealing with cytoskeletal reorganization. In this review, we update the functions described for the Rho family small GTPases in spindle orientation and cell division, engulfment, and cellular movements during C. elegans embryogenesis, focusing on the Rho subfamily Rac. Please also see the video abstract here. © 2016 The Authors BioEssays Published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-08

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  20. Identification of the chromophores involved in aggregation-dependent energy quenching of the monomeric photosystem II antenna protein Lhcb5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballottari, Matteo; Girardon, Julien; Betterle, Nico; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bassi, Roberto

    2010-09-03

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of excess absorbed light energy is a fundamental process that regulates photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. Among several proposed NPQ mechanisms, aggregation-dependent quenching (ADQ) and charge transfer quenching have received the most attention. In vitro spectroscopic features of both mechanisms correlate with very similar signals detected in more intact systems and in vivo, where full NPQ can be observed. A major difference between the models is the proposed quenching site, which is predominantly the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II in ADQ and exclusively monomeric Lhcb proteins in charge transfer quenching. Here, we studied ADQ in both monomeric and trimeric Lhcb proteins, investigating the activities of each antenna subunit and their dependence on zeaxanthin, a major modulator of NPQ in vivo. We found that monomeric Lhcb proteins undergo stronger quenching than light-harvesting complex II during aggregation and that this is enhanced by binding to zeaxanthin, as occurs during NPQ in vivo. Finally, the analysis of Lhcb5 mutants showed that chlorophyll 612 and 613, in close contact with lutein bound at site L1, are important facilitators of ADQ.

  1. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  2. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  3. A homogeneous quenching resonance energy transfer assay for the kinetic analysis of the GTPase nucleotide exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Kari; Ligabue, Alessio; Wang, Qi; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Veltel, Stefan; van Adrichem, Arjan J; Hänninen, Pekka; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET) assay for small GTPase nucleotide exchange kinetic monitoring is demonstrated using nanomolar protein concentrations. Small GTPases are central signaling proteins in all eukaryotic cells acting as a "molecular switches" that are active in the GTP-state and inactive in the GDP-state. GTP-loading is highly regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In several diseases, most prominently cancer, this process in misregulated. The kinetics of the nucleotide exchange reaction reports on the enzymatic activity of the GEF reaction system and is, therefore, of special interest. We determined the nucleotide exchange kinetics using europium-labeled GTP (Eu-GTP) in the QRET assay for small GTPases. After GEF catalyzed GTP-loading of a GTPase, a high time-resolved luminescence signal was found to be associated with GTPase bound Eu-GTP, whereas the non-bound Eu-GTP fraction was quenched by soluble quencher. The association kinetics of the Eu-GTP was measured after GEF addition, whereas the dissociation kinetics could be determined after addition of unlabeled GTP. The resulting association and dissociation rates were in agreement with previously published values for H-Ras(Wt), H-Ras(Q61G), and K-Ras(Wt), respectively. The broader applicability of the QRET assay for small GTPases was demonstrated by determining the kinetics of the Ect2 catalyzed RhoA(Wt) GTP-loading. The QRET assay allows the use of nanomolar protein concentrations, as more than 3-fold signal-to-background ratio was achieved with 50 nM GTPase and GEF proteins. Thus, small GTPase exchange kinetics can be efficiently determined in a HTS compatible 384-well plate format.

  4. Monomeric and gemini surfactants as antimicrobial agents - influence on environmental and reference strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziróg, Anna; Brycki, Bogumił

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) belong to surfactant commonly used both, in the household and in different branches of industry, primarily in the process of cleaning and disinfection. They have several positive features inter alia effectively limiting the development of microorganisms on many surfaces. In the present work, two compounds were used as biocides: hexamethylene-1,6-bis-(N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide) that belongs to the gemini surfactant (GS), and its single analogue - dodecyl(trimethyl)ammonium bromide (DTAB). Two fold dilution method was used to determine the minimum concentration of compounds (MIC) which inhibit the growth of bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and an environmental strain), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 85327 and an environmental strain), and yeast Candida albicans (ATCC 11509 and an environmental strain). The viability of cells in liquid cultures with addition of these substances at ¼ MIC, ½ MIC and MIC concentrations were also determined. The obtained results show that DTAB inhibits the growth of bacteria at the concentration of 0.126-1.010 µM/ml, and gemini surfactant is active at 0.036-0.029 µM/ml. Therefore, GS is active at more than 17-70-fold lower concentrations than its monomeric analogue. Strains isolated from natural environment are less sensitive upon testing biocides than the references strains. Both compounds at the MIC value reduced the number of cells of all strains. The use of too low concentration of biocides can limit the growth of microorganisms, but often only for a short period of time in case of special environmental strains. Later on, they can adapt to adverse environmental conditions and begin to evolve defence mechanisms.

  5. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Kobayashi, Mirina; Nagaya, Masaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nakano, Kazuaki; Maehara, Miki; Hayashida, Gota; Takayanagi, Shuko; Sakai, Rieko; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Onodera, Masafumi; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36-37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum.

  6. Crystal structure of a monomeric thiolase-like protein type 1 (TLP1 from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelanjana Janardan

    Full Text Available An analysis of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome suggests that it codes for several thiolases and thiolase-like proteins. Thiolases are an important family of enzymes that are involved in fatty acid metabolism. They occur as either dimers or tetramers. Thiolases catalyze the Claisen condensation of two acetyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the synthetic direction and the thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketoacyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the degradative direction. Some of the M. smegmatis genes have been annotated as thiolases of the poorly characterized SCP2-thiolase subfamily. The mammalian SCP2-thiolase consists of an N-terminal thiolase domain followed by an additional C-terminal domain called sterol carrier protein-2 or SCP2. The M. smegmatis protein selected in the present study, referred to here as the thiolase-like protein type 1 (MsTLP1, has been biochemically and structurally characterized. Unlike classical thiolases, MsTLP1 is a monomer in solution. Its structure has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution by the single wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure of the protomer confirms that the N-terminal domain has the thiolase fold. An extra C-terminal domain is indeed observed. Interestingly, it consists of six β-strands forming an anti-parallel β-barrel which is completely different from the expected SCP2-fold. Detailed sequence and structural comparisons with thiolases show that the residues known to be essential for catalysis are not conserved in MsTLP1. Consistent with this observation, activity measurements show that MsTLP1 does not catalyze the thiolase reaction. This is the first structural report of a monomeric thiolase-like protein from any organism. These studies show that MsTLP1 belongs to a new group of thiolase related proteins of unknown function.

  7. Purification and biochemical characterization of a monomeric form of papaya mosaic potexvirus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecours, Katia; Tremblay, Marie-Hélène; Gagné, Marie-Eve Laliberté; Gagné, Stéphane M; Leclerc, Denis

    2006-05-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a flexuous rod shape virus made of 1400 subunits that assemble around a plus sense genomic RNA. The structure determination of PapMV and of flexuous viruses in general is a major challenge for both NMR and X-ray crystallography. In this report, we present the characterization of a truncated version of the PapMV coat protein (CP) that is suitable for NMR study. The deletion of the N-terminal 26 amino acids of the PapMV CP (CP27-215) generates a monomer that can be expressed to high level and easily purified for production of an adequate NMR sample. The RNA gel shift assay showed that CP27-215 lost its ability to bind RNA in vitro, suggesting that the multimerization of the subunit is important for this function. The fusion of a 6x His tag at the C-terminus improved the solubility of the monomer and allowed its concentration to 0.2 mM. The CD spectra of the truncated and the wild-type proteins were similar, suggesting that both proteins are well ordered and have a similar secondary structure. CP27-215 was 15N labeled for NMR studies and a 2D 1H-15N-HSQC spectrum confirmed the presence of a well-ordered structure and the monomeric form of the protein. These results show that CP27-215 is amenable to a complete and exhaustive NMR study that should lead to the first three-dimensional structure determination of a flexuous rod shape virus.

  8. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  9. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  10. The Rho GTPase RhoE is a p53-regulated candidate tumor suppressor in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yajie; Zhou, Jitao; Xia, Hongwei; Chen, Xiangzheng; Qiu, Meng; Huang, Juan; Liu, Surui; Tang, Qiulin; Lang, Nan; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ming; Zheng, Yi; Bi, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that RhoE, an atypical member of the Rho GTPase family, may play an opposite role to RhoA in regulating cell proliferation and invasion. To explore the relationship between RhoE and the malignant phenotypes of human cancer, we have determined the expression patterns of RhoE in varying grade of human cancer tissues and tested the effects of RhoE expression in several RhoE underexpressing cancer cell lines. Systemic immunocytochemistry analyses of gastric, colorectal, lung and breast carcinomas, respectively, showed that RhoE protein expression was significantly decreased in most cancer cases compared with that of adjacent normal tissues. Enhanced RhoE expression could markedly inhibit proliferation, migration and invasion and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells which have relatively low levels of endogenous RhoE expression. Wild-type p53 (wt-p53) could strongly increase RhoE expression in p53-transfected cells. Furthermore, the luciferase assays indicated that wt-p53 significantly enhanced the activities of RhoE promoter compared with mutant p53 (mt-p53) in PC3 cells (p53 null). Collectively, data are presented showing that RhoE may participate in human cancer progression and act as a candidate target of p53, and these findings also strongly suggest that RhoE may be a new candidate tumor suppressor and could serve as a potential target in the gene therapy of cancer.

  11. The Small GTPase Rap1b: A Bidirectional Regulator of Platelet Adhesion Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Francesco Guidetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins and other families of cell adhesion receptors are responsible for platelet adhesion and aggregation, which are essential steps for physiological haemostasis, as well as for the development of thrombosis. The modulation of platelet adhesive properties is the result of a complex pattern of inside-out and outside-in signaling pathways, in which the members of the Rap family of small GTPases are bidirectionally involved. This paper focuses on the regulation of the main Rap GTPase expressed in circulating platelets, Rap1b, downstream of adhesion receptors, and summarizes the most recent achievements in the investigation of the function of this protein as regulator of platelet adhesion and thrombus formation.

  12. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii parasitophorous vacuoles by the mouse p47-resistance GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Martens

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The p47 GTPases are essential for interferon-gamma-induced cell-autonomous immunity against the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, in mice, but the mechanism of resistance is poorly understood. We show that the p47 GTPases, including IIGP1, accumulate at vacuoles containing T. gondii. The accumulation is GTP-dependent and requires live parasites. Vacuolar IIGP1 accumulations undergo a maturation-like process accompanied by vesiculation of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. This culminates in disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and finally of the parasite itself. Over-expression of IIGP1 leads to accelerated vacuolar disruption whereas a dominant negative form of IIGP1 interferes with interferon-gamma-mediated killing of intracellular parasites. Targeted deletion of the IIGP1 gene results in partial loss of the IFN-gamma-mediated T. gondii growth restriction in mouse astrocytes.

  13. ARF1 and SAR1 GTPases in endomembrane trafficking in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevher-Keskin, Birsen

    2013-09-05

    Small GTPases largely control membrane traffic, which is essential for the survival of all eukaryotes. Among the small GTP-binding proteins, ARF1 (ADP-ribosylation factor 1) and SAR1 (Secretion-Associated RAS super family 1) are commonly conserved among all eukaryotes with respect to both their functional and sequential characteristics. The ARF1 and SAR1 GTP-binding proteins are involved in the formation and budding of vesicles throughout plant endomembrane systems. ARF1 has been shown to play a critical role in COPI (Coat Protein Complex I)-mediated retrograde trafficking in eukaryotic systems, whereas SAR1 GTPases are involved in intracellular COPII-mediated protein trafficking from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. This review offers a summary of vesicular trafficking with an emphasis on the ARF1 and SAR1 expression patterns at early growth stages and in the de-etiolation process.

  14. Rho GTPases regulate PRK2/PKN2 to control entry into mitosis and exit from cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anja; Durgan, Joanne; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2007-03-21

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that influence many aspects of cell behaviour, including migration, morphology, polarity and cell cycle. Through their ability to control the assembly and organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, Rho and Cdc42 make several key contributions during the mitotic phase of the cell cycle, including spindle assembly, spindle positioning, cleavage furrow contraction and abscission. We now report that PRK2/PKN2, a Ser/Thr kinase and Rho/Rac effector protein, is an essential regulator of both entry into mitosis and exit from cytokinesis in HeLa S3 cells. PRK2 is required for abscission of the midbody at the end of the cell division cycle and for phosphorylation and activation of Cdc25B, the phosphatase required for activation of mitotic cyclin/Cdk1 complexes at the G2/M transition. This reveals an additional step in the mammalian cell cycle controlled by Rho GTPases.

  15. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii Parasitophorous Vacuoles by the Mouse p47-Resistance GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The p47 GTPases are essential for interferon-gamma-induced cell-autonomous immunity against the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, in mice, but the mechanism of resistance is poorly understood. We show that the p47 GTPases, including IIGP1, accumulate at vacuoles containing T. gondii. The accumulation is GTP-dependent and requires live parasites. Vacuolar IIGP1 accumulations undergo a maturation-like process accompanied by vesiculation of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. This culminates in disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and finally of the parasite itself. Over-expression of IIGP1 leads to accelerated vacuolar disruption whereas a dominant negative form of IIGP1 interferes with interferon-gamma-mediated killing of intracellular parasites. Targeted deletion of the IIGP1 gene results in partial loss of the IFN-gamma-mediated T. gondii growth restriction in mouse astrocytes.

  16. Evolution of Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) Rab GTPase-activating proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabernet-Castello, Carme; O'Reilly, Amanda J; Dacks, Joel B; Field, Mark C

    2013-05-01

    Rab GTPases serve as major control elements in the coordination and definition of specific trafficking steps and intracellular compartments. Rab activity is modulated in part by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), and many RabGAPs share a Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC)-domain architecture, although the majority of TBC proteins are poorly characterized. We reconstruct the evolutionary history of the TBC family using ScrollSaw, a method for the phylogenetic analysis of pan-eukaryotic data sets, and find a sophisticated, ancient TBC complement of at least 10 members. Significantly, the TBC complement is nearly always smaller than the Rab cohort in any individual genome but also suggests Rab/TBC coevolution. Further, TBC-domain architecture has been well conserved in modern eukaryotes. The reconstruction also shows conservation of ancestral TBC subfamilies, continuing evolution of new TBCs, and frequent secondary losses. These patterns give additional insights into the sculpting of the endomembrane system.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski7 Is a GTP-Binding Protein Adopting the Characteristic Conformation of Active Translational GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Conti, Elena

    2015-07-07

    Ski7 is a cofactor of the cytoplasmic exosome in budding yeast, functioning in both mRNA turnover and non-stop decay (NSD), a surveillance pathway that degrades faulty mRNAs lacking a stop codon. The C-terminal region of Ski7 (Ski7C) shares overall sequence similarity with the translational GTPase (trGTPase) Hbs1, but whether Ski7 has retained the properties of a trGTPase is unclear. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of Ski7C bound to either intact guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or guanosine diphosphate-Pi. The individual domains of Ski7C adopt the conformation characteristic of active trGTPases. Furthermore, the nucleotide-binding site of Ski7C shares similar features compared with active trGTPases, notably the presence of a characteristic monovalent cation. However, a suboptimal polar residue at the putative catalytic site and an unusual polar residue that interacts with the γ-phosphate of GTP distinguish Ski7 from other trGTPases, suggesting it might function rather as a GTP-binding protein than as a GTP-hydrolyzing enzyme.

  18. Kinetic timing: a novel mechanism that improves the accuracy of GTPase timers in endosome fusion and other biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangpu; Qian, Hong

    2002-04-01

    The GTPase superfamily contains a large number of proteins that function as molecular switches by binding and hydrolyzing GTP molecules. They are localized at various intracellular organelles and control diverse cellular processes. For many GTPases, the lifetime of the activated, GTP-bound state is believed to serve as a timer in determining the activation time of a biological event such as membrane fusion and signal transduction. However, such a timer is intrinsically stochastic due to thermal noise at the level of single GTPase molecules. Here, we describe a mathematical model that shows how a directional GTPase cycle, in a nonequilibrium steady-state driven by GTP hydrolysis, can significantly reduce the variance in the lifetime of an activated GTPase molecule and thereby increase the accuracy and efficiency of the timer. This mechanism, termed kinetic timing, articulates a clear function for the energy consumption in GTPase-controlled biological processes. It provides a rationale for why biological timers utilize a GTP hydrolysis cycle rather than a simple GTP binding-dissociation equilibrium, and why the GTP-bound state is a better timer than the GDP-bound state. It also explains the necessity for the existence of multiple GTP-bound intermediates identified by fluorescence spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

  19. Amino Acids Stimulate TORC1 through Lst4-Lst7, a GTPase-Activating Protein Complex for the Rag Family GTPase Gtr2

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    Marie-Pierre Péli-Gulli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rag GTPases assemble into heterodimeric complexes consisting of RagA or RagB and RagC or RagD in higher eukaryotes, or Gtr1 and Gtr2 in yeast, to relay amino acid signals toward the growth-regulating target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1. The TORC1-stimulating state of Rag GTPase heterodimers, containing GTP- and GDP-loaded RagA/B/Gtr1 and RagC/D/Gtr2, respectively, is maintained in part by the FNIP-Folliculin RagC/D GAP complex in mammalian cells. Here, we report the existence of a similar Lst4-Lst7 complex in yeast that functions as a GAP for Gtr2 and that clusters at the vacuolar membrane in amino acid-starved cells. Refeeding of amino acids, such as glutamine, stimulated the Lst4-Lst7 complex to transiently bind and act on Gtr2, thereby entailing TORC1 activation and Lst4-Lst7 dispersal from the vacuolar membrane. Given the remarkable functional conservation of the RagC/D/Gtr2 GAP complexes, our findings could be relevant for understanding the glutamine addiction of mTORC1-dependent cancers.

  20. Site-specific mutations of FtsZ - effects on GTPase and in vitro assembly

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    Stricker Jesse

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FtsZ, the major cytoskeletal protein in bacterial cytokinesis, assembles in vitro into protofilaments, which can further associate into sheets, bundles or tubes. We have constructed 16 site-directed mutants of E. coli ftsZ, and tested them for GTP hydrolysis and assembly in vitro, and for their ability to complement the temperature sensitive ftsZ84 mutation in E. coli. Results The mutants were grouped into three classes. Benign mutants, which mapped mostly to the front and back surface of the protofilament, were able to complement ftsZ84 in vivo and showed normal assembly in vitro. GTP contact mutations had less than 10% of wild type GTPase activity. They could all assemble in vitro, and several of these mutants could complement ftsZ84. A third, and newly discovered, class of mutations mapped to the sides of the protofilaments. These lateral mutants had mostly normal GTPase and assembly in vitro, but none of them complemented ftsZ84. The non-complementing mutants showed greatly reduced expression from the pBS58 vector, suggesting possible dominant negative effects. Conclusions Several mutants with greatly reduced GTPase could still complement ftsZ84, suggesting that the high level of GTPase observed in vitro is not essential for in vivo function. All of the lateral mutants failed to complement ftsZ84, which suggests that these surfaces of the protofilaments are important for function in cell division. These lateral surfaces may mediate association of FtsZ protofilaments into pairs or small sheets, although their structure is apparently different from the sheets assembled in DEAE dextran or calcium.

  1. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

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    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  2. RhoGTPases as Key Players in Mammalian Cell Adaptation to Microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Fiona Louis; Christophe Deroanne; Betty Nusgens; Laurence Vico; Alain Guignandon

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies are revealing that cells reorganize their cytoskeleton when exposed to conditions of microgravity. Most, if not all, of the structural changes observed on flown cells can be explained by modulation of RhoGTPases, which are mechanosensitive switches responsible for cytoskeletal dynamics control. This review identifies general principles defining cell sensitivity to gravitational stresses. We discuss what is known about changes in cell shape, nucleus, and focal adhes...

  3. Electrostatic free energies in translational GTPases: Classic allostery and the rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Thomas; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Satpati, Priyadarshi

    2015-05-01

    GTPases typically switch between an inactive, OFF conformation and an active, ON conformation when a GDP ligand is replaced by GTP. Their ON/OFF populations and activity thus depend on the stabilities of four protein complexes, two apo-protein forms, and GTP/GDP in solution. A complete characterization is usually not possible experimentally and poses major challenges for simulations. We review the most important methodological challenges and we review thermodynamic data for two GTPases involved in translation of the genetic code: archaeal Initiation Factors 2 and 5B (aIF2, aIF5B). One main challenge is the multiplicity of states and conformations, including those of GTP/GDP in solution. Another is force field accuracy, especially for interactions of GTP/GDP with co-bound divalent Mg(2+) ions. The calculation of electrostatic free energies also poses specific challenges, and requires careful protocols. For aIF2, experiments and earlier simulations showed that it is a "classic" GTPase, with distinct ON/OFF conformations that prefer to bind GTP and GDP, respectively. For aIF5B, we recently proposed a non-classic mechanism, where the ON/OFF states differ only in the protonation state of Glu81 in the nucleotide binding pocket. This model is characterized here using free energy simulations. The methodological analysis should help future studies, while the aIF2, aIF5B examples illustrate the diversity of ATPase/GTPase mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics.

  4. Interactions between Rab and Arf GTPases regulate endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate during endocytic recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D

    2013-01-01

    After endocytosis, a selective endocytic recycling process returns many endocytosed molecules back to the plasma membrane. The RAB-10/Rab10 GTPase is known to be a key recycling regulator for specific cargo molecules. New evidence, focused on C. elegans RAB-10 in polarized epithelia, points to a key role of RAB-10 in the regulation of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) levels. In turn, PI(4,5)P2 levels strongly influence the recruitment of many peripheral membrane proteins, including those important for vesicle budding through their membrane bending activities. Part of the effect of RAB-10 on endosomal PI(4,5)P2 is through its newly identified effector CNT-1, a predicted GTPase activating protein (GAP) of the small GTPase ARF-6/Arf6. In mammals PI(4,5)P2 generating enzymes are known Arf6 effectors. In C. elegans we found that RAB-10, CNT-1 and ARF-6 are present on the same endosomes, that RAB-10 recruits CNT-1 to endosomes, and that loss of CNT-1 or RAB-10 leads to overaccumulation of endosomal PI(4,5)P2, presumably via hyperactivation of endosomal ARF-6. In turn this leads to over-recruitment of PI(4,5)P2-dependent membrane-bending proteins RME-1/Ehd and SDPN-1/Syndapin/PACSIN. Conversely, in arf-6 mutants, endosomal PI(4,5)P2 levels were reduced and endosomal recruitment of RME-1 and SDPN-1 failed. This work makes an unexpected link between distinct classes of small GTPases that control endocytic recycling, and provides insight into how this interaction affects endosome function at the level of lipid phosphorylation.

  5. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C. E. [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lockyer, M. [Arrow Therapeutics Ltd, Britannia House, Trinity Street, Borough, London SE1 1DA (United Kingdom); Charles, I. G. [The Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, The Cruciform Building, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hawkins, A. R. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Stammers, D. K., E-mail: daves@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  6. Rho GTPases regulate PRK2/PKN2 to control entry into mitosis and exit from cytokinesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Anja; Durgan, Joanne; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that influence many aspects of cell behaviour, including migration, morphology, polarity and cell cycle. Through their ability to control the assembly and organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, Rho and Cdc42 make several key contributions during the mitotic phase of the cell cycle, including spindle assembly, spindle positioning, cleavage furrow contraction and abscission. We now report that PRK2/PKN2, a Ser/Thr kina...

  7. Interplay of Polarity Proteins and GTPases in T-Lymphocyte Function

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Fung; Russell, Sarah M.; Jane Oliaro

    2012-01-01

    Polarity refers to the asymmetric distribution of different cellular components within a cell and is central to many cell functions. In T-cells, polarity regulates the activation, migration, and effector function of cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs) during an immune response. The regulation of asymmetric cell division by polarity proteins may also dictate CTL effector and memory differentiation following antigen presentation. Small GTPases, along with their associated polarity and adaptor proteins, ar...

  8. The GTPase Rho has a critical regulatory role in thymus development.

    OpenAIRE

    Henning, S W; Galandrini, R; Hall, A; Cantrell, D A

    1997-01-01

    The present study employs a genetic approach to explore the role of Rho GTPases in murine thymic development. Inactivation of Rho function in the thymus was achieved by thymic targeting of a transgene encoding C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum which selectively ADP-ribosylates Rho within its effector domain and thereby abolishes its biological function. Thymi lacking functional Rho isolated from C3 transgenic mice were strikingly smaller and showed a marked (90%) decrease in cellulari...

  9. Monomeric adiponectin increases cell viability in porcine aortic endothelial cells cultured in normal and high glucose conditions: Data on kinases activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grossini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We found that monomeric adiponectin was able to increase cell viability in porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAE cultured both in normal and high glucose condition. Moreover, in normal glucose condition monomeric adiponectin increased p38MAPK, Akt, ERK1/2 and eNOS phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent way. Also in high glucose condition monomeric adiponectin increased eNOS and above kinases phosphorylation with similar patterns but at lower extent. For interpretation of the data presented in this article, please see the research article “Monomeric adiponectin modulates nitric oxide release and calcium movements in porcine aortic endothelial cells in normal/high glucose conditions” (Grossini et al., in press [1].

  10. A monomeric methyl and hydroxypropyl methacrylate injection medium and its utility in casting blood capillaries and liver bile canaliculi for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T; Itoshima, T; Hitomi, K; Ohtsuka, A; Jones, A L

    1984-06-01

    A mixture of 50-60% monomeric methyl methacrylate and 40-50% monomeric 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate was supplemented with 1.5% benzoyl peroxide (catalyst) and 1.5% N,N-dimethylaniline (accelerator) and injected into glutaraldehyde-perfusion fixed rat hypophyseal and other endocrine organ blood vessels and biliary tracts. This injection medium rapidly polymerized at room temperature and did not require partial polymerization prior to injection. Good casts of blood vessels, including the hypophyseal capillaries, were obtained for scanning electron microscopy. The monomeric methacrylate medium possesses a great advantage over previous ones, as its fluidity enables the casting of very fine vessels such as bile canaliculi. In the case of non-fixed tissues, the monomeric methacrylate medium should be injected carefully, as it is toxic and destructive to the vessels.

  11. Multiple sequence elements facilitate Chp Rho GTPase subcellular location, membrane association, and transforming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, Emily J; Mitin, Natalia Y; Der, Channing J

    2006-07-01

    Cdc42 homologous protein (Chp) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases and shares significant sequence and functional similarity with Cdc42. However, unlike classical Rho GTPases, we recently found that Chp depends on palmitoylation, rather than prenylation, for association with cellular membranes. Because palmitoylation alone is typically not sufficient to promote membrane association, we evaluated the possibility that other carboxy-terminal residues facilitate Chp subcellular association with membranes. We found that Chp membrane association and transforming activity was dependent on the integrity of a stretch of basic amino acids in the carboxy terminus of Chp and that the basic amino acids were not simply part of a palmitoyl acyltransferase recognition motif. We also determined that the 11 carboxy-terminal residues alone were sufficient to promote Chp plasma and endomembrane association. Interestingly, stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha activated only endomembrane-associated Chp. Finally, we found that Chp membrane association was not disrupted by Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitory proteins, which are negative regulators of Cdc42 membrane association and biological activity. In summary, the unique carboxy-terminal sequence elements that promote Chp subcellular location and function expand the complexity of mechanisms by which the cellular functions of Rho GTPases are regulated.

  12. Rac1 GTPase silencing counteracts microgravity-induced effects on osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignandon, Alain; Faure, Céline; Neutelings, Thibaut; Rattner, Aline; Mineur, Pierre; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Laroche, Norbert; Lambert, Charles; Deroanne, Christophe; Nusgens, Betty; Demets, René; Colige, Alain; Vico, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    Bone cells exposed to real microgravity display alterations of their cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, two major mechanosensitive structures. These structures are controlled by small GTPases of the Ras homology (Rho) family. We investigated the effects of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 modulation of osteoblastic cells under microgravity conditions. Human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells silenced for RhoGTPases were cultured in the automated Biobox bioreactor (European Space Agency) aboard the Foton M3 satellite and compared to replicate ground-based controls. The cells were fixed after 69 h of microgravity exposure for postflight analysis of focal contacts, F-actin polymerization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and matrix targeting. We found that RhoA silencing did not affect sensitivity to microgravity but that Rac1 and, to a lesser extent, Cdc42 abrogation was particularly efficient in counteracting the spaceflight-related reduction of the number of focal contacts [-50% in silenced, scrambled (SiScr) controls vs. -15% for SiRac1], the number of F-actin fibers (-60% in SiScr controls vs. -10% for SiRac1), and the depletion of matrix-bound VEGF (-40% in SiScr controls vs. -8% for SiRac1). Collectively, these data point out the role of the VEGF/Rho GTPase axis in mechanosensing and validate Rac1-mediated signaling pathways as potential targets for counteracting microgravity effects. © FASEB.

  13. Interplay of Polarity Proteins and GTPases in T-Lymphocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Fung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polarity refers to the asymmetric distribution of different cellular components within a cell and is central to many cell functions. In T-cells, polarity regulates the activation, migration, and effector function of cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs during an immune response. The regulation of asymmetric cell division by polarity proteins may also dictate CTL effector and memory differentiation following antigen presentation. Small GTPases, along with their associated polarity and adaptor proteins, are critical for mediating the polarity changes necessary for T-cell activation and function, and in turn, are regulated by guanine exchange factors (GEFS and GTPase activating proteins (GAPS. For example, a novel GEF, dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8 was recently identified as a regulator of immune cell function and mutations in DOCK8 have been detected in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. Both B and T-cells from DOCK8 mutant mice form defective immunological synapses and have abnormal functions, in addition to impaired immune memory development. This paper will discuss the interplay between polarity proteins and GTPases, and their role in T-cell function.

  14. RhoGTPase-binding proteins, the exocyst complex and polarized vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity, the asymmetric distribution of proteins and lipids, is essential for a variety of cellular functions. One mechanism orchestrating cell polarity is polarized vesicle trafficking; whereby cargo loaded secretory vesicles are specifically transported to predetermined areas of the cell. The evolutionarily conserved exocyst complex and its small GTPase regulators play crucial roles in spatiotemporal control of polarized vesicle trafficking. In studies on neuronal membrane remodeling and synaptic plasticity, conserved mechanisms of exocyst regulation and cargo recycling during polarized vesicle trafficking are beginning to emerge as well. Recently, our lab demonstrated that RhoGTPase-binding proteins in both yeast (Bem3) and mammals (Ocrl1) are also required for the efficient traffic of secretory vesicles to sites of polarized growth and signaling. Together with our studies, we highlight the evolutionary conservation of the basic elements essential for polarized vesicle traffic across different cellular functions and model systems. In conclusion, we emphasize that studies on RhoGTPase-binding proteins in these processes should be included in the next level of investigation, for a more complete understanding of their hitherto unknown roles in polarized membrane traffic and exocyst regulation.

  15. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybin, V.O.; Gureeva, A.A.

    1986-05-10

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP.

  16. Rho GTPase-activating bacterial toxins: from bacterial virulence regulation to eukaryotic cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonnier, Marc; Landraud, Luce; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2007-09-01

    Studies on the interactions of bacterial pathogens with their host have provided an invaluable source of information on the major functions of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell biology. In addition, this expanding field of research, known as cellular microbiology, has revealed fascinating examples of trans-kingdom functional interplay. Bacterial factors actually exploit eukaryotic cell machineries using refined molecular strategies to promote invasion and proliferation within their host. Here, we review a family of bacterial toxins that modulate their activity in eukaryotic cells by activating Rho GTPases and exploiting the ubiquitin/proteasome machineries. This family, found in human and animal pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, encompasses the cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs) from Escherichia coli and Yersinia species as well as dermonecrotic toxins from Bordetella species. We survey the genetics, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology of these bacterial factors from the standpoint of the CNF1 toxin, the paradigm of Rho GTPase-activating toxins produced by urinary tract infections causing pathogenic Escherichia coli. Because it reveals important connections between bacterial invasion and the host inflammatory response, the mode of action of CNF1 and its related Rho GTPase-targetting toxins addresses major issues of basic and medical research and constitutes a privileged experimental model for host-pathogen interaction.

  17. Statins have beneficial effects on platelet free radical activity and intracellular distribution of GTPases in hyperlipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Paul K; Hughes, Sinead M T; Plumb, Richard D; Devine, Adrian; Leahey, William; Lyons, Kristopher S; Johnston, Dennis; McVeigh, Gary E

    2010-03-01

    In addition to lowering cholesterol, statins may alter endothelial release of the vasodilator NO and harmful superoxide free radicals. Statins also reduce cholesterol intermediates including isoprenoids. These are important for post-translational modification of substances including the GTPases Rho and Rac. By altering the membrane association of these molecules, statins affect intracellular positioning and hence activity of a multitude of substances. These include eNOS(endothelial NO synthase), which produces NO (inhibited by Rho), and NADPH oxidase, which produces superoxide (dependent on Rac). Statins may improve endothelial function by enhancing production of NO while decreasing superoxide production. A total of 40 hypercholesterolaemic patients were randomized to treatment with either atorvastatin or placebo; 20 normolipidaemic patients were also studied. Platelet nitrite, NO and superoxide were examined as was the cellular distribution of the GTPases Rho and Rac at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment.Following atorvastatin therapy, platelet NO was increased (3.2 pmol/10(8) platelets) and superoxide output was attenuated [-3.4 pmol min(-1) (10(8) platelets)(-1)] when compared with placebo. The detection of both Rho and Rac was significantly reduced in the membranes of platelets, implying reduced activity. In conclusion, the results of the present study show altered NO/superoxide production following statin therapy. A potential mechanism for this is the change in the distribution of intracellular GTPases, which was considered to be secondary to decreases in isoprenoid intermediates, suggesting that the activity of the former had been affected by atorvastatin.

  18. Rab And Arl GTPase Family Members Cooperate in the Localization of the Golgin GCC185

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burguete, A.Schweizer; Fenn, T.D.; Brunger, A.T.; Pfeffer, S.R.

    2009-05-27

    GCC185 is a large coiled-coil protein at the trans Golgi network that is required for receipt of transport vesicles inbound from late endosomes and for anchoring noncentrosomal microtubules that emanate from the Golgi. Here, we demonstrate that recruitment of GCC185 to the Golgi is mediated by two Golgi-localized small GTPases of the Rab and Arl families. GCC185 binds Rab6, and mutation of residues needed for Rab binding abolishes Golgi localization. The crystal structure of Rab6 bound to the GCC185 Rab-binding domain reveals that Rab6 recognizes a two-fold symmetric surface on a coiled coil immediately adjacent to a C-terminal GRIP domain. Unexpectedly, Rab6 binding promotes association of Arl1 with the GRIP domain. We present a structure-derived model for dual GTPase membrane attachment that highlights the potential ability of Rab GTPases to reach binding partners at a significant distance from the membrane via their unstructured and membrane-anchored, hypervariable domains.

  19. Ribosome-induced tuning of GTP hydrolysis by a translational GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maracci, Cristina; Peske, Frank; Dannies, Ev; Pohl, Corinna; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-10-07

    GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), a translational GTPase that delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome, plays a crucial role in decoding and translational fidelity. The basic reaction mechanism and the way the ribosome contributes to catalysis are a matter of debate. Here we use mutational analysis in combination with measurements of rate/pH profiles, kinetic solvent isotope effects, and ion dependence of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu off and on the ribosome to dissect the reaction mechanism. Our data suggest that--contrary to current models--the reaction in free EF-Tu follows a pathway that does not involve the critical residue H84 in the switch II region. Binding to the ribosome without a cognate codon in the A site has little effect on the GTPase mechanism. In contrast, upon cognate codon recognition, the ribosome induces a rearrangement of EF-Tu that renders GTP hydrolysis sensitive to mutations of Asp21 and His84 and insensitive to K(+) ions. We suggest that Asp21 and His84 provide a network of interactions that stabilize the positions of the γ-phosphate and the nucleophilic water, respectively, and thus play an indirect catalytic role in the GTPase mechanism on the ribosome.

  20. Eukaryotic GPN-loop GTPases paralogs use a dimeric assembly reminiscent of archeal GPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Béatrice; Beraud, Carole; Meguellati, Sarra; Chen, Shu W; Pellequer, Jean Luc; Armengaud, Jean; Godon, Christian

    2013-02-01

    GTPases are molecular switches that regulate a wide-range of cellular processes. The GPN-loop GTPase (GPN) is a sub-family of P-loop NTPase that evolved from a single gene copy in archaea to triplicate paralog genes in eukaryotes, each having a non-redundant essential function in cell. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yGPN1 and yGPN2 are involved in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism, whereas nothing is known regarding yGPN3 function. Previous high-throughput experiments suggested that GPN paralogs interaction may occur. In this work, GPN|GPN contact was analyzed in details using TAP-Tag approach, yeast two-hybrid assay, in silico energy computation and site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved Glu residue located at the center of the interaction interface. It is demonstrated that this residue is essential for cell viability. A chromatid cohesion assay revealed that, like yGPN1 and yGPN2, yGPN3 also plays a role in sister chromatid cohesion. These results suggest that all three GPN proteins act at the molecular level in sister chromatid cohesion mechanism as a GPN|GPN complex reminiscent of the homodimeric structure of PAB0955, an archaeal member of GPN-loop GTPase.

  1. Maturation and integration of adult born hippocampal neurons: signal convergence onto small Rho GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna eVadodaria

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis, restricted to specific regions in the mammalian brain, represents one of the most interesting forms of plasticity in the mature nervous system. Adult-born hippocampal neurons play important roles in certain forms of learning and memory, and altered hippocampal neurogenesis has been associated with a number of neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression and epilepsy. Newborn neurons go through distinct developmental steps from a dividing neurogenic precursor to a synaptically integrated mature neuron. Previous studies have uncovered several molecular signaling pathways involved in distinct steps of this maturational process. In this context, the small Rho GTPases, Cdc42, Rac1 and RhoA have recently been shown to regulate the morphological and synaptic maturation of adult-born dentate granule cells in vivo. Distinct upstream regulators, including several growth factors that modulate maturation and integration of newborn neurons have been shown to also recruit the small Rho GTPases. Here we review recent findings and highlight the possibility that small Rho GTPases may act as central assimilators, downstream of critical input onto adult-born hippocampal neurons contributing to their maturation and integration into the existing dentate gyrus circuitry.

  2. The GTPase Rho has a critical regulatory role in thymus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, S W; Galandrini, R; Hall, A; Cantrell, D A

    1997-05-01

    The present study employs a genetic approach to explore the role of Rho GTPases in murine thymic development. Inactivation of Rho function in the thymus was achieved by thymic targeting of a transgene encoding C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum which selectively ADP-ribosylates Rho within its effector domain and thereby abolishes its biological function. Thymi lacking functional Rho isolated from C3 transgenic mice were strikingly smaller and showed a marked (90%) decrease in cellularity compared with their normal litter mates. We also observed a similar decrease in levels of peripheral T cells in C3 transgenic mice. Analysis of the maturation status of thymocytes indicated that differentiation of progenitor cells to mature T cells can occur in the absence of Rho function, and both positive and negative selection of T cells appear to be intact. However, transgenic mice that lack Rho function in the thymus show maturational, proliferative and cell survival defects during T-cell development that severely impair the generation of normal numbers of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells. The present study thus identifies a role for Rho-dependent signalling pathways in thymocyte development. The data show that the function of Rho GTPases is critical for the proliferative expansion of thymocytes. This defines a selective role for the GTPase Rho in early thymic development as a critical integrator of proliferation and cell survival signals.

  3. Modification of plant Rac/Rop GTPase signalling using bacterial toxin transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manoj K; Ren, Fugang; Giesemann, Torsten; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Pasternak, Taras P; Blein, Thomas; Ruperti, Benedetto; Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus; Molendijk, Arthur J; Palme, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial protein toxins which modify Rho GTPase are useful for the analysis of Rho signalling in animal cells, but these toxins cannot be taken up by plant cells. We demonstrate in vitro deamidation of Arabidopsis Rop4 by Escherichia coli Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) and glucosylation by Clostridium difficile toxin B. Expression of the catalytic domain of CNF1 caused modification and activation of co-expressed Arabidopsis Rop4 GTPase in tobacco leaves, resulting in hypersensitive-like cell death. By contrast, the catalytic domain of toxin B modified and inactivated co-expressed constitutively active Rop4, blocking the hypersensitive response caused by over-expression of active Rops. In transgenic Arabidopsis, both CNF1 and toxin B inhibited Rop-dependent polar morphogenesis of leaf epidermal cells. Toxin B expression also inhibited Rop-dependent morphogenesis of root hairs and trichome branching, and resulted in root meristem enlargement and dwarf growth. Our results show that CNF1 and toxin B transgenes are effective tools in Rop GTPase signalling studies.

  4. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the small GTPase Rab 2 are crucial for Brucella replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Fugier

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus survives and replicates inside host cells within an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-derived replicative organelle named the "Brucella-containing vacuole" (BCV. Here, we developed a subcellular fractionation method to isolate BCVs and characterize for the first time the protein composition of its replicative niche. After identification of BCV membrane proteins by 2 dimensional (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we focused on two eukaryotic proteins: the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab 2 recruited to the vacuolar membrane of Brucella. These proteins were previously described to localize on vesicular and tubular clusters (VTC and to regulate the VTC membrane traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the Golgi. Inhibition of either GAPDH or Rab 2 expression by small interfering RNA strongly inhibited B. abortus replication. Consistent with this result, inhibition of other partners of GAPDH and Rab 2, such as COPI and PKC iota, reduced B. abortus replication. Furthermore, blockage of Rab 2 GTPase in a GDP-locked form also inhibited B. abortus replication. Bacteria did not fuse with the ER and instead remained in lysosomal-associated membrane vacuoles. These results reveal an essential role for GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab 2 in B. abortus virulence within host cells.

  5. The GTPase Rab37 Participates in the Control of Insulin Exocytosis.

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    Sanda Ljubicic

    Full Text Available Rab37 belongs to a subclass of Rab GTPases regulating exocytosis, including also Rab3a and Rab27a. Proteomic studies indicate that Rab37 is associated with insulin-containing large dense core granules of pancreatic β-cells. In agreement with these observations, we detected Rab37 in extracts of β-cell lines and human pancreatic islets and confirmed by confocal microscopy the localization of the GTPase on insulin-containing secretory granules. We found that, as is the case for Rab3a and Rab27a, reduction of Rab37 levels by RNA interference leads to impairment in glucose-induced insulin secretion and to a decrease in the number of granules in close apposition to the plasma membrane. Pull-down experiments revealed that, despite similar functional effects, Rab37 does not interact with known Rab3a or Rab27a effectors and is likely to operate through a different mechanism. Exposure of insulin-secreting cells to proinflammatory cytokines, fatty acids or oxidized low-density lipoproteins, mimicking physiopathological conditions that favor the development of diabetes, resulted in a decrease in Rab37 expression. Our data identify Rab37 as an additional component of the machinery governing exocytosis of β-cells and suggest that impaired expression of this GTPase may contribute to defective insulin release in pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions.

  6. Single Enzyme Studies Reveal the Existence of Discrete Functional States for Monomeric Enzymes and How They Are “Selected” upon Allosteric Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos S.; Wei, Li; Jørgensen, Sune Klamer

    2012-01-01

    allosteric regulation of monomeric enzymes is poorly understood. Here we monitored for the first time allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity at the single molecule level. We measured single stochastic catalytic turnovers of a monomeric metabolic enzyme (Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase) while titrating...... its proximity to a lipid membrane that acts as an allosteric effector. The single molecule measurements revealed the existence of discrete binary functional states that could not be identified in macroscopic measurements due to ensemble averaging. The discrete functional states correlate...

  7. The Tumor-suppressive Small GTPase DiRas1 Binds the Noncanonical Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SmgGDS and Antagonizes SmgGDS Interactions with Oncogenic Small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergom, Carmen; Hauser, Andrew D; Rymaszewski, Amy; Gonyo, Patrick; Prokop, Jeremy W; Jennings, Benjamin C; Lawton, Alexis J; Frei, Anne; Lorimer, Ellen L; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Noon, Kathleen; Fierke, Carol A; Williams, Carol L

    2016-03-18

    The small GTPase DiRas1 has tumor-suppressive activities, unlike the oncogenic properties more common to small GTPases such as K-Ras and RhoA. Although DiRas1 has been found to be a tumor suppressor in gliomas and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the mechanisms by which it inhibits malignant phenotypes have not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS, a protein that promotes the activation of several oncogenic GTPases. In silico docking studies predict that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS in a manner similar to other small GTPases. SmgGDS is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RhoA, but we report here that SmgGDS does not mediate GDP/GTP exchange on DiRas1. Intriguingly, DiRas1 acts similarly to a dominant-negative small GTPase, binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting SmgGDS binding to other small GTPases, including K-Ras4B, RhoA, and Rap1A. DiRas1 is expressed in normal breast tissue, but its expression is decreased in most breast cancers, similar to its family member DiRas3 (ARHI). DiRas1 inhibits RhoA- and SmgGDS-mediated NF-κB transcriptional activity in HEK293T cells. We also report that DiRas1 suppresses basal NF-κB activation in breast cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. Taken together, our data support a model in which DiRas1 expression inhibits malignant features of cancers in part by nonproductively binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting the binding of other small GTPases to SmgGDS.

  8. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  9. Use of the quartz crystal microbalance to determine the monomeric friction coefficient of polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    When a thin film of polymer is coated on to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the QCM can be used to detect the rate of increase in weight of the polymer film as the volatile penetrant diffuses into the polymer. From this rate information the diffusion coefficient of the penetrant into the polymer can be computed. Calculations requiring this diffusion coefficient lead to values which approximate the monomeric friction coefficient of the polymer. This project has been concerned with the trial of crystal oscillating circuits suitable for driving polymer coated crystals in an atmosphere of penetrant. For these studies done at room temperature, natural rubber was used as an easily applied polymer that is readily penetrated by toluene vapors, qualities anticipated with polyimides when they are tested at T(g) in the presence of toluene. Three quartz crystal oscillator circuits were tested. The simplest circuit used +/- 5 volt dc and had a transistor to transistor logic (TTL) inverter chip that provides a 180 deg phase shift via a feed back loop. This oscillator circuit was stable but would not drive the crystal when the crystal was coated with polymer and subjected to toluene vapors. Removal of a variable resistor from this circuit increased stability but did not otherwise increase performance. Another driver circuit tested contained a two stage differential input, differential output, wide band video amplifier and also contain a feed back loop. The circuit voltage could not be varied and operated at +/- 5 volts dc; this circuit was also stable but failed to oscillate the polymer coated crystal in an atmosphere saturated with toluene vapors. The third oscillator circuit was of similar construction and relied on the same video amplifier but allowed operation with variable voltage. This circuit would drive the crystal when the crystal was submerged in liquid toluene and when the crystal was coated with polymer and immersed in toluene vapors. The frequency readings

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of RabX3, a tandem GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Srivastava, Vijay; Chandra, Mintu; Datta, Sunando

    2014-07-01

    Ras superfamily GTPases regulate signalling pathways that control multiple biological processes by modulating the GTP/GDP cycle. Various Rab GTPases, which are the key regulators of vesicular trafficking pathways, play a vital role in the survival and virulence of the enteric parasite Entamoeba histolytica. The Rab GTPases act as binary molecular switches that utilize the conformational changes associated with the GTP/GDP cycle to elicit responses from target proteins and thereby regulate a broad spectrum of cellular processes including cell proliferation, cytoskeletal assembly, nuclear transport and intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotes. Entamoeba histolytica RabX3 (EhRabX3) is a unique GTPase in the amoebic genome, the only member in the eukaryotic Ras superfamily that harbours tandem G-domains and shares only 8-16% sequence identity with other GTPases. Recent studies suggested that EhRabX3 binds to a single guanine nucleotide through its N-terminal G-domain (NTD), while the C-terminal G-domain (CTD) plays a potential role in binding of the nucleotide to the NTD. Thus, understanding the intermolecular regulation between the two GTPase domains is expected to reveal valuable information on the overall action of EhRabX3. To provide structural insights into the inclusive action of this unique GTPase, EhRabX3 was crystallized by successive micro-seeding using the vapour-diffusion method. A complete data set was collected to 3.3 Å resolution using a single native EhRabX3 crystal at 100 K on BM14 at the ESRF, Grenoble, France. The crystal belonged to monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=198.6, b=119.3, c=89.2 Å, β=103.1°. Preliminary analysis of the data using the Matthews Probability Calculator suggested the presence of four to six molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  11. Extensive in silico analysis of Mimivirus coded Rab GTPase homolog suggests a possible role in virion membrane biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrutraj eZade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rab GTPases are the key regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotes. Many viruses and intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to hijack the host Rab GTPase functions, mainly through activators and effector proteins, for their benefit. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV is one of the largest viruses and belongs to the monophyletic clade of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV. The inner membrane lining is integral to the APMV virion structure. APMV assembly involves extensive host membrane modifications, like vesicle budding and fusion, leading to the formation of a membrane sheet that is incorporated into the virion. Intriguingly, APMV and all group I members of the Mimiviridae family code for a putative Rab GTPase protein. APMV is the first reported virus to code for a Rab GTPase (encoded by R214 gene. Our thorough in silico analysis of the subfamily specific (SF region of Mimiviridae Rab GTPase sequences suggests that they are related to Rab5, a member of the group II Rab GTPases, of lower eukaryotes. Because of their high divergence from the existing three isoforms, A, B and C of the Rab5-family, we suggest that Mimiviridae Rabs constitute a new isoform, Rab5D. Phylogenetic analysis indicated probable horizontal acquisition from a lower eukaryotic ancestor followed by selection and divergence. Furthermore, interaction network analysis suggests that vps34 (a Class III P13K homolog, coded by APMV L615, Atg-8 and dynamin (host proteins are recruited by APMV Rab GTPase during capsid assembly. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that APMV Rab plays a role in the acquisition of inner membrane during virion assembly.

  12. Structure/function analysis of PARP-1 in oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced monomeric ADPR formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Buelow

    Full Text Available Poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a multifunctional enzyme that is involved in two major cellular responses to oxidative and nitrosative (O/N stress: detection and response to DNA damage via formation of protein-bound poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose (PAR, and formation of the soluble 2(nd messenger monomeric adenosine diphosphate-ribose (mADPR. Previous studies have delineated specific roles for several of PARP-1's structural domains in the context of its involvement in a DNA damage response. However, little is known about the relationship between the mechanisms through which PARP-1 participates in DNA damage detection/response and those involved in the generation of monomeric ADPR. To better understand the relationship between these events, we undertook a structure/function analysis of PARP-1 via reconstitution of PARP-1 deficient DT40 cells with PARP-1 variants deficient in catalysis, DNA binding, auto-PARylation, and PARP-1's BRCT protein interaction domain. Analysis of responses of the respective reconstituted cells to a model O/N stressor indicated that PARP-1 catalytic activity, DNA binding, and auto-PARylation are required for PARP-dependent mADPR formation, but that BRCT-mediated interactions are dispensable. As the BRCT domain is required for PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 to sites of DNA damage, these results suggest that DNA repair and monomeric ADPR 2(nd messenger generation are parallel mechanisms through which PARP-1 modulates cellular responses to O/N stress.

  13. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; Fanelli, Francesca

    2011-03-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP) and S(GTP), respectively). For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP) was higher than that of S(GTP), suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF) recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP) of Gα(t), is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins), compared to GTP.

  14. Nucleotide binding switches the information flow in ras GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Raimondi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. The guanine nucleotide-dependent intrinsic flexibility patterns of five G proteins were investigated in atomic detail through Molecular Dynamics simulations of the GDP- and GTP-bound states (S(GDP and S(GTP, respectively. For all the considered systems, the intrinsic flexibility of S(GDP was higher than that of S(GTP, suggesting that Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF recognition and nucleotide switch require higher amplitude motions than effector recognition or GTP hydrolysis. Functional mode, dynamic domain, and interaction energy correlation analyses highlighted significant differences in the dynamics of small G proteins and Gα proteins, especially in the inactive state. Indeed, S(GDP of Gα(t, is characterized by a more extensive energy coupling between nucleotide binding site and distal regions involved in GEF recognition compared to small G proteins, which attenuates in the active state. Moreover, mechanically distinct domains implicated in nucleotide switch could be detected in the presence of GDP but not in the presence of GTP. Finally, in small G proteins, functional modes are more detectable in the inactive state than in the active one and involve changes in solvent exposure of two highly conserved amino acids in switches I and II involved in GEF recognition. The average solvent exposure of these amino acids correlates in turn with the rate of GDP release, suggesting for them either direct or indirect roles in the process of nucleotide switch. Collectively, nucleotide binding changes the information flow through the conserved Ras-like domain, where GDP enhances the flexibility of mechanically distinct portions involved in nucleotide switch, and favors long distance allosteric communication (in Gα proteins, compared to GTP.

  15. Monomeric Cu(Ⅱ) Complex Containing Chiral Phase-transfer Catalyst as Ligand and Its Asymmetrically Catalytic Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Zhi-Rong; XIONG Ren-Gen

    2008-01-01

    The thermal treatment of CuCl2 with N-(4'-vinylbenzyl)cinchonidinitim chloride(L1)afforded a monomeric discrete homochiral copper(Ⅱ)complex N-4'-(vinylbenzyl)cinchonidinium trichlorocoprate(Ⅱ)(1).Their applications to the enantioselectively catalytic alkylation reaction of N-(diphenylmethylidene)glycine tert-butyl ester(3)show that the higher ee value observed in catalyst 1 than that in the corresponding free ligand L1 is probably due to the rigidity enhancement after the coordination of N atom of quinoline ring to the copper ion.

  16. Two-dimensional crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with bound cytochrome c in reconstituted lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuda, Yukiho; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Gerle, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase utilizes electrons provided by cytochrome c for the active vectorial transport of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane through the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Direct structural evidence on the transient cytochrome c oxidase-cytochrome c complex thus far, however, remains elusive and its physiological relevant oligomeric form is unclear. Here, we report on the 2D crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with tightly bound cytochrome c at a molar ratio of 1:1 in reconstituted lipid membranes at the basic pH of 8.5 and low ionic strength.

  17. Four GTPases differentially regulate the Sec7 Arf-GEF to direct traffic at the trans-golgi network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonold, Caitlin M; Fromme, J Christopher

    2014-09-29

    Traffic through the Golgi complex is controlled by small GTPases of the Arf and Rab families. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) proteins activate these GTPases to control Golgi function, yet the full assortment of signals regulating these GEFs is unknown. The Golgi Arf-GEF Sec7 and the homologous BIG1/2 proteins are effectors of the Arf1 and Arl1 GTPases. We demonstrate that Sec7 is also an effector of two Rab GTPases, Ypt1 (Rab1) and Ypt31/32 (Rab11), signifying unprecedented signaling crosstalk between GTPase pathways. The molecular basis for the role of Ypt31/32 and Rab11 in vesicle formation has remained elusive. We find that Arf1, Arl1, and Ypt1 primarily affect the membrane localization of Sec7, whereas Ypt31/32 exerts a dramatic stimulatory effect on the nucleotide exchange activity of Sec7. The convergence of multiple signaling pathways on a master regulator reveals a mechanism for balancing incoming and outgoing traffic at the Golgi.

  18. Signaling through rho gtpases in microgravity (rho signaling) on iss (soyuz tma-1) belgian soyuz mission "odissea"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusgens, B.; Lambert, Ch.; Lapière, C. M.

    2007-09-01

    Rho GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, are molecular switches in the intracellular signaling pathways, that relay the information collected by receptors to soluble mediators and insoluble extracellular matrix environment. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the impact of microgravity on cellular processes depending on Rho GTPases activity, i.e.cytoskeleton and focal adhesions organization, GTPases translocation to the membrane, nuclear translocation of signaling molecules and gene expression. WI26 fibroblasts were stably transfected by the constitutively active form of each of the Rho GTPase. Selected clone of the engineered cells and the wild-type cells were used during the belgian ODISSEA Soyuz mission to investigate the alterations of the mechanical and phenotypic expression of the cells induced by microgravity and their rescue by the engineered Rho GTPases. A failure in the time schedule, a disconnection of the experiment containers before the automatic activation of the fixation procedure, was responsible for the loss of the biological samples.

  19. Autophosphorylation-dependent degradation of Pak1, triggered by the Rho-family GTPase, Chp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz Hubsman, Monika; Volinsky, Natalia; Manser, Edward; Yablonski, Deborah; Aronheim, Ami

    2007-06-15

    The Paks (p21-activated kinases) Pak1, Pak2 and Pak3 are among the most studied effectors of the Rho-family GTPases, Rac, Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) and Chp (Cdc42 homologous protein). Pak kinases influence a variety of cellular functions, but the process of Pak down-regulation, following activation, is poorly understood. In the present study, we describe for the first time a negative-inhibitory loop generated by the small Rho-GTPases Cdc42 and Chp, resulting in Pak1 inhibition. Upon overexpression of Chp, we unexpectedly observed a T-cell migration phenotype consistent with Paks inhibition. In line with this observation, overexpression of either Chp or Cdc42 caused a marked reduction in the level of Pak1 protein in a number of different cell lines. Chp-induced degradation was accompanied by ubiquitination of Pak1, and was dependent on the proteasome. The susceptibility of Pak1 to Chp-induced degradation depended on its p21-binding domain, kinase activity and a number of Pak1 autophosphorylation sites, whereas the PIX- (Pak-interacting exchange factor) and Nck-binding sites were not required. Together, these results implicate Chp-induced kinase autophosphorylation in the degradation of Pak1. The N-terminal domain of Chp was found to be required for Chp-induced degradation, although not for Pak1 activation, suggesting that Chp provides a second function, distinct from kinase activation, to trigger Pak degradation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of signal termination mediated by the Rho-family GTPases Chp and Cdc42, which results in ubiquitin-mediated degradation of one of their direct effectors, Pak1.

  20. Rational design and characterization of a Rac GTPase-specific small molecule inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Dickerson, J Bradley; Guo, Fukun; Zheng, Jie; Zheng, Yi

    2004-05-18

    The signaling pathways mediated by Rho family GTPases have been implicated in many aspects of cell biology. The specificity of the pathways is achieved in part by the selective interaction between Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their Rho GTPase substrates. Here, we report a first-generation small-molecule inhibitor of Rac GTPase targeting Rac activation by GEF. The chemical compound NSC23766 was identified by a structure-based virtual screening of compounds that fit into a surface groove of Rac1 known to be critical for GEF specification. In vitro it could effectively inhibit Rac1 binding and activation by the Rac-specific GEF Trio or Tiam1 in a dose-dependent manner without interfering with the closely related Cdc42 or RhoA binding or activation by their respective GEFs or with Rac1 interaction with BcrGAP or effector PAK1. In cells, it potently blocked serum or platelet-derived growth factor-induced Rac1 activation and lamellipodia formation without affecting the activity of endogenous Cdc42 or RhoA. Moreover, this compound reduced Trio or Tiam1 but not Vav, Lbc, Intersectin, or a constitutively active Rac1 mutant-stimulated cell growth and suppressed Trio, Tiam1, or Ras-induced cell transformation. When applied to human prostate cancer PC-3 cells, it was able to inhibit the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and invasion phenotypes that require the endogenous Rac1 activity. Thus, NSC23766 constitutes a Rac-specific small-molecule inhibitor that could be useful to study the role of Rac in various cellular functions and to reverse tumor cell phenotypes associated with Rac deregulation.

  1. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  2. Generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity in juvenile dogs caused by a defective DIRAS family GTPase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielaender, Franziska; Sarviaho, Riika; James, Fiona; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Cortez, Miguel A.; Kluger, Gerhard; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Arumilli, Meharji; Kornberg, Marion; Bathen-Noethen, Andrea; Tipold, Andrea; Rentmeister, Kai; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Hülsmeyer, Velia; Boettcher, Irene C.; Tästensen, Carina; Flegel, Thomas; Leeb, Tosso; Matiasek, Kaspar; Fischer, Andrea; Lohi, Hannes

    2017-01-01

    The clinical and electroencephalographic features of a canine generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity and onset in young Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs (6 wk to 18 mo) are described. A fully penetrant recessive 4-bp deletion was identified in the DIRAS family GTPase 1 (DIRAS1) gene with an altered expression pattern of DIRAS1 protein in the affected brain. This neuronal DIRAS1 gene with a proposed role in cholinergic transmission provides not only a candidate for human myoclonic epilepsy but also insights into the disease etiology, while establishing a spontaneous model for future intervention studies and functional characterization. PMID:28223533

  3. Calcineurin B-like Protein CBL10 Directly Interacts with TOC34 (Translocon of the Outer Membrane of the Chloroplasts) and Decreases Its GTPase Activity in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Park, Yoon Kook; Choi, Mi Na; Kim, Kyung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    As calcium sensor relays in plants, calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins provide an important contribution to decoding Ca2+ signatures elicited by a variety of abiotic stresses. Currently, it is well known that CBLs perceive and transmit the Ca2+ signals mainly to a group of serine/threonine protein kinases called CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs). In this study, we report that the CBL10 member of this family has a novel interaction partner besides the CIPK proteins. Yeast two-hybrid screening with CBL10 as bait identified an Arabidopsis cDNA clone encoding a TOC34 protein, which is a member of the TOC (Translocon of the Outer membrane of the Chloroplasts) complex and possesses the GTPase activity. Further analyses showed that in addition to CBL10, CBL7 also interacts with TOC34 at much lower strength in the yeast two-hybrid system. However, the rest of the CBL family members failed to interact with TOC34. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis verified that the CBL10-TOC34 interaction occurs at the outer membrane of chloroplasts in vivo. In addition, we also demonstrated that CBL10 physically associates with TOC34 in vitro, resulting in a significant decrease in the GTPase activity of the TOC34 protein. Taken together, our findings clearly indicate that a member of the CBL family, CBL10, can modulate not only the CIPK members but also TOC34, allowing the CBL family to relay the Ca2+ signals in more diverse ways than currently known. PMID:28018422

  4. Conditions for homogeneous preparation of stable monomeric and oligomeric forms of activated Vip3A toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunthic, Thittaya; Surya, Wahyu; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Torres, Jaume; Boonserm, Panadda

    2016-07-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins like Vip3A have been used for crop protection and to delay resistance to existing insecticidal Cry toxins. However, little is known about Vip3A's behavior or its mechanism of action, and a structural model is required. Herein, in an effort to facilitate future crystallization and functional studies, we have used the orthogonal biophysical techniques of light scattering and sedimentation to analyze the aggregation behavior and stability of trypsin-activated Vip3A toxin in solution. Both scattering and sedimentation data suggest that at pH 10 the toxin is monomeric and adopts an elongated shape, but after overnight incubation aggregation was observed at all pH values tested (5-12). The narrowest size distribution was observed at pH 7, but it was consistent with large oligomers of ~50 nm on average. The addition of β-D-glucopyranoside (OG) helped in achieving preparations that were stable and with a narrower particle size distribution. In this case, scattering was consistent with a 4-nm monomeric globular Vip3A form. After OG dialysis, 40-nm particles were detected, with a molecular weight consistent with homotetramers. Therefore, OG is proposed as the detergent of choice to obtain a Vip3A crystal for structural studies, either before (monomers) or after dialysis (tetramers).

  5. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  6. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed blueberry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownmiller, C; Howard, L R; Prior, R L

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of blueberries that were canned in syrup (CS), canned in water (CW), pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) assay using fluorescein (ORAC(FL)) were determined postprocessing after 1 d, and 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins (28% to 59%) and ORAC(FL) values (43% to 71%) in all products, with the greatest losses occurring in clarified juices and the least in nonclarified juices. Storage at 25 degrees C for 6 mo resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins, ranging from 62% in berries CW to 85% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. The ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Methods are needed to retain anthocyanins in thermally processed blueberries.

  7. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed black raspberry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, A; Howard, L R; Prior, R L; Brownmiller, C

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of black raspberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and ORAC(FL) were determined 1 d postprocessing and after 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 37% in puree to 69% to 73% in nonclarified and clarified juices, respectively, but only the juices showed substantial losses (38% to 41%) in ORAC(FL). Storage at 25 degrees C of all thermally processed products resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 49% in canned-in-syrup to 75% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Total anthocyanins and ORACFL of IQF berries were well retained during long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

  8. Interaction of Classical Platinum Agents with the Monomeric and Dimeric Atox1 Proteins: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations for a series of binary and ternary models of the cisplatin, transplatin and oxaliplatin agents binding to a monomeric Atox1 protein and a dimeric Atox1 protein to investigate their interaction mechanisms. All three platinum agents could respectively combine with the monomeric Atox1 protein and the dimeric Atox1 protein to form a stable binary and ternary complex due to the covalent interaction of the platinum center with the Atox1 protein. The results suggested that the extra interaction from the oxaliplatin ligand–Atox1 protein interface increases its affinity only for the OxaliPt + Atox1 model. The binding of the oxaliplatin agent to the Atox1 protein might cause larger deformation of the protein than those of the cisplatin and transplatin agents due to the larger size of the oxaliplatin ligand. However, the extra interactions to facilitate the stabilities of the ternary CisPt + 2Atox1 and OxaliPt + 2Atox1 models come from the α1 helices and α2-β4 loops of the Atox1 protein–Atox1 protein interface due to the cis conformation of the platinum agents. The combinations of two Atox1 proteins in an asymmetric way in the three ternary models were analyzed. These investigations might provide detailed information for understanding the interaction mechanism of the platinum agents binding to the Atox1 protein in the cytoplasm.

  9. The role of chemokine activation of Rac GTPases in hematopoietic stem cell marrow homing, retention, and peripheral mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelas, Jose A; Jansen, Michael; Williams, David A

    2006-08-01

    Signaling downstream from the chemokine receptor CXCR4, the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit and beta1-integrins has been shown to be crucial in the regulation of migration, homing, and engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors. Each of these receptors signal through Rac-type Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). Rac GTPases play a major role in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and also in the control of gene expression and the activation of proliferation and survival pathways. Here we review the specific roles of the members of the Rac subfamily of the Rho GTPase family in regulating the intracellular signaling of hematopoietic cells responsible for regulation of homing, marrow retention, and peripheral mobilization.

  10. The Conformation of Bound GMPPNP Suggests a Mechanism for Gating the Active Site of the SRP GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Freymann, D. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a phylogenetically conserved ribonucleoprotein that mediates cotranslational targeting of secreted and membrane proteins to the membrane. Targeting is regulated by GTP binding and hydrolysis events that require direct interaction between structurally homologous 'NG' GTPase domains of the SRP signal recognition subunit and its membrane-associated receptor, SR{alpha}. Structures of both the apo and GDP bound NG domains of the prokaryotic SRP54 homolog, Ffh, and the prokaryotic receptor homolog, FtsY, have been determined. The structural basis for the GTP-dependent interaction between the two proteins, however, remains unknown. We report here two structures of the NG GTPase of Ffh from Thermus aquaticus bound to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog GMPPNP. Both structures reveal an unexpected binding mode in which the {beta}-phosphate is kinked away from the binding site and magnesium is not bound. Binding of the GTP analog in the canonical conformation found in other GTPase structures is precluded by constriction of the phosphate binding P loop. The structural difference between the Ffh complex and other GTPases suggests a specific conformational change that must accompany movement of the nucleotide from an inactive to an active binding mode. Conserved side chains of the GTPase sequence motifs unique to the SRP subfamily may function to gate formation of the active GTP bound conformation. Exposed hydrophobic residues provide an interaction surface that may allow regulation of the GTP binding conformation, and thus activation of the GTPase, during the association of SRP with its receptor.

  11. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX leads to activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate in the sig...

  12. Chlamydophila pneumoniae HflX belongs to an uncharacterized family of conserved GTPases and associates with the Escherichia coli 50S large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Ziegler, Urs; González-Hernández, Yanela; Pospischil, Andreas; Timms, Peter; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2008-11-01

    Predicted members of the HflX subfamily of phosphate-binding-loop guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are widely distributed in the bacterial kingdom but remain virtually uncharacterized. In an attempt to understand mechanisms used for regulation of growth and development in the chlamydiae, obligate intracellular and developmentally complex bacteria, we have begun investigations into chlamydial GTPases; we report here what appears to be the first analysis of a HflX family GTPase using a predicted homologue from Chlamydophila pneumoniae. In agreement with phylogenetic predictions for members of this GTPase family, purified recombinant Cp. pneumoniae HflX was specific for guanine nucleotides and exhibited a slow intrinsic GTPase activity when incubated with [gamma-(32)P]GTP. Using HflX-specific monoclonal antibodies, HflX could be detected by Western blotting and high-resolution confocal microscopy throughout the vegetative growth cycle of Cp. pneumoniae and, at early time points, appeared to partly localize to the membrane. Ectopic expression of Cp. pneumoniae HflX in Escherichia coli revealed co-sedimentation of HflX with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. The results of this work open up some intriguing possibilities for the role of GTPases belonging to this previously uncharacterized family of bacterial GTPases. Ribosome association is a feature shared by other important conserved GTPase families and more detailed investigations will be required to delineate the role of HflX in bacterial ribosome function.

  13. GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 is regulated by ArfGAP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klodjan Stafa

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein with GTPase and kinase activity. Initial data indicates that an intact functional GTPase domain is critically required for LRRK2 kinase activity. PD-associated mutations in LRRK2, including the most common G2019S variant, have variable effects on enzymatic activity but commonly alter neuronal process morphology. The mechanisms underlying the intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of LRRK2 GTPase and kinase activity, and the pathogenic effects of familial mutations, are incompletely understood. Here, we identify a novel functional interaction between LRRK2 and ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein 1 (ArfGAP1. LRRK2 and ArfGAP1 interact in vitro in mammalian cells and in vivo in brain, and co-localize in the cytoplasm and at Golgi membranes. PD-associated and functional mutations that alter the GTPase activity of LRRK2 modulate the interaction with ArfGAP1. The GTP hydrolysis activity of LRRK2 is markedly enhanced by ArfGAP1 supporting a role for ArfGAP1 as a GTPase-activating protein for LRRK2. Unexpectedly, ArfGAP1 promotes the kinase activity of LRRK2 suggesting a potential role for GTP hydrolysis in kinase activation. Furthermore, LRRK2 robustly and directly phosphorylates ArfGAP1 in vitro. Silencing of ArfGAP1 expression in primary cortical neurons rescues the neurite shortening phenotype induced by G2019S LRRK2 overexpression, whereas the co-expression of ArfGAP1 and LRRK2 synergistically promotes neurite shortening in a manner dependent upon LRRK2 GTPase activity. Neurite shortening induced by ArfGAP1 overexpression is also attenuated by silencing of LRRK2. Our data reveal a novel role for ArfGAP1 in regulating the GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of LRRK2; reciprocally, LRRK2 phosphorylates ArfGAP1 and is

  14. In Vitro Assay for the Rap GTPase-Activating Protein Activity of the Purified Cytoplasmic Domain of Plexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Heath G; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu

    2017-01-01

    Plexins are cell surface receptors that bind semaphorins and regulate essential processes such as axon guidance and angiogenesis. The cytoplasmic regions of plexins contain a functionally essential GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain, which initiates downstream signaling by specifically inactivating the Rap GTPase. Here we describe the methods for expression and purification of the plexin cytoplasmic region in E. coli, and characterization of its GAP activity using a photometric assay. We also provide a protocol for measuring GAP activity of single-chain constructs with Rap covalently linked to the plexin cytoplasmic region.

  15. Two small GTPases act in concert with the bactofilin cytoskeleton to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Lindow, Steffi; Lin, Lin; Bolte, Kathrin; Wuichet, Kristin; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-29

    Cell polarity is essential for many bacterial activities, but the mechanisms responsible for its establishment are poorly understood. In Myxococcus xanthus, the type IV pili (T4P) motor ATPases PilB and PilT localize to opposite cell poles and switch poles during cellular reversals. We demonstrate that polar localization of PilB and PilT depends on the small GTPase SofG and BacP, a bactofilin cytoskeletal protein. Polymeric BacP localizes in both subpolar regions. SofG interacts directly with polymeric BacP and associates with one of these patches, forming a cluster that shuttles to the pole to establish localization of PilB and PilT at the same pole. Next, the small GTPase MglA sorts PilB and PilT to opposite poles to establish their correct polarity. During reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the inversion of PilB and PilT polarity. Thus, three hierarchically organized systems function in a cascade to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

  16. Extracellular signals and receptor-like kinases regulating ROP GTPases in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori N Miyawaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rho-like GTPase from plants (ROPs function as signaling switches that control a wide variety of cellular functions and behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 11 ROPs that form a distinct single subfamily contrarily to animal or fungal counterparts where multiple subfamilies of Rho GTPases exist. Since Rho proteins bind to their downstream effector proteins only in their GTP-bound active state, the activation of ROPs by upstream factor(s is a critical step in the regulation of ROP signaling. Therefore, it is critical to examine the input signals that lead to the activation of ROPs. Recent findings showed that the plant hormone auxin is an important signal for the activation of ROPs during PC morphogenesis as well as for other developmental processes. In contrast to auxin, another plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA, negatively regulates ROP signaling. Calcium is another emerging signal in the regulation of ROP signaling. Several lines of evidence indicate that plasma membrane localized-receptor like kinases play a critical role in the transmission of the extracellular signals to intracellular ROP signaling pathways. This review focuses on how these signals impinge upon various direct regulators of ROPs to modulate various plant processes.

  17. Control of Dendritic Spine Morphological and Functional Plasticity by Small GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Woolfrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural plasticity of excitatory synapses is a vital component of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and behaviour. Abnormal development or regulation of excitatory synapses has also been strongly implicated in many neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. In the mammalian forebrain, the majority of excitatory synapses are located on dendritic spines, specialized dendritic protrusions that are enriched in actin. Research over recent years has begun to unravel the complexities involved in the regulation of dendritic spine structure. The small GTPase family of proteins have emerged as key regulators of structural plasticity, linking extracellular signals with the modulation of dendritic spines, which potentially underlies their ability to influence cognition. Here we review a number of studies that examine how small GTPases are activated and regulated in neurons and furthermore how they can impact actin dynamics, and thus dendritic spine morphology. Elucidating this signalling process is critical for furthering our understanding of the basic mechanisms by which information is encoded in neural circuits but may also provide insight into novel targets for the development of effective therapies to treat cognitive dysfunction seen in a range of neurological disorders.

  18. Identification and function of 11 Rab GTPases in giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Rab GTPases, members of the Ras-like GTPase superfamily, are central elements in endocytic membrane trafficking. However, little is known of the Rab genes in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. In this study, 11 Rab genes were identified from M. rosenbergii. All MrRabs have a RAB domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these 11 MrRabs were divided into different groups. The MrRab genes were ubiquitously expressed in heart, hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestines. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the MrRab genes were significantly upregulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in the prawns, indicating that MrRabs might play an important role in innate immune response against WSSV. Moreover, after challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the expression levels of all MrRabs in the hepatopancreas were also upregulated, which might indicated the involvement of MrRabs in prawns antibacterial immunity. In all, these preliminary results showed that MrRabs were involved in innate immunity of M. rosenbergii.

  19. Extracellular signals and receptor-like kinases regulating ROP GTPases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Kaori N; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Rho-like GTPase from plants (ROPs) function as signaling switches that control a wide variety of cellular functions and behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 11 ROPs that form a distinct single subfamily contrarily to animal or fungal counterparts where multiple subfamilies of Rho GTPases exist. Since Rho proteins bind to their downstream effector proteins only in their GTP-bound "active" state, the activation of ROPs by upstream factor(s) is a critical step in the regulation of ROP signaling. Therefore, it is critical to examine the input signals that lead to the activation of ROPs. Recent findings showed that the plant hormone auxin is an important signal for the activation of ROPs during pavement cell morphogenesis as well as for other developmental processes. In contrast to auxin, another plant hormone, abscisic acid, negatively regulates ROP signaling. Calcium is another emerging signal in the regulation of ROP signaling. Several lines of evidence indicate that plasma membrane localized-receptor like kinases play a critical role in the transmission of the extracellular signals to intracellular ROP signaling pathways. This review focuses on how these signals impinge upon various direct regulators of ROPs to modulate various plant processes.

  20. A pathway linking oxidative stress and the Ran GTPase system in progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2014-04-01

    Maintaining the Ran GTPase at a proper concentration in the nucleus is important for nucleocytoplasmic transport. Previously we found that nuclear levels of Ran are reduced in cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a disease caused by constitutive attachment of a mutant form of lamin A (termed progerin) to the nuclear membrane. Here we explore the relationship between progerin, the Ran GTPase, and oxidative stress. Stable attachment of progerin to the nuclear membrane disrupts the Ran gradient and results in cytoplasmic localization of Ubc9, a Ran-dependent import cargo. Ran and Ubc9 disruption can be induced reversibly with H2O2. CHO cells preadapted to oxidative stress resist the effects of progerin on Ran and Ubc9. Given that HGPS-patient fibroblasts display elevated ROS, these data suggest that progerin inhibits nuclear transport via oxidative stress. A drug that inhibits pre-lamin A cleavage mimics the effects of progerin by disrupting the Ran gradient, but the effects on Ran are observed before a substantial ROS increase. Moreover, reducing the nuclear concentration of Ran is sufficient to induce ROS irrespective of progerin. We speculate that oxidative stress caused by progerin may occur upstream or downstream of Ran, depending on the cell type and physiological setting.

  1. The small GTPase Rab29 is a common regulator of immune synapse assembly and ciliogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnis, A; Finetti, F; Patrussi, L; Gottardo, M; Cassioli, C; Spanò, S; Baldari, C T

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence underscores the T-cell immune synapse (IS) as a site of intense vesicular trafficking, on which productive signaling and cell activation crucially depend. Although the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) is known to exploit recycling to accumulate to the IS, the specific pathway that controls this process remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that the small GTPase Rab29 is centrally implicated in TCR trafficking and IS assembly. Rab29 colocalized and interacted with Rab8, Rab11 and IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport system that regulates ciliogenesis and participates in TCR recycling in the non-ciliated T cell, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analysis. Rab29 depletion resulted in the inability of TCRs to undergo recycling to the IS, thereby compromizing IS assembly. Under these conditions, recycling TCRs accumulated in Rab11+ endosomes that failed to polarize to the IS due to defective Rab29-dependent recruitment of the dynein microtubule motor. Remarkably, Rab29 participates in a similar pathway in ciliated cells to promote primary cilium growth and ciliary localization of Smoothened. These results provide a function for Rab29 as a regulator of receptor recycling and identify this GTPase as a shared participant in IS and primary cilium assembly. PMID:26021297

  2. A complex distribution of elongation family GTPases EF1A and EFL in basal alveolate lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Kirill V; Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V; Mirzaeva, Gulnara S; Diakin, Andrei Yu; Simdyanov, Timur G; Mylnikov, Alexander P; Keeling, Patrick J; Aleoshin, Vladimir V

    2014-09-01

    Translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1A) and the related GTPase EF-like (EFL) are two proteins with a complex mutually exclusive distribution across the tree of eukaryotes. Recent surveys revealed that the distribution of the two GTPases in even closely related taxa is frequently at odds with their phylogenetic relationships. Here, we investigate the distribution of EF1A and EFL in the alveolate supergroup. Alveolates comprise three major lineages: ciliates and apicomplexans encode EF1A, whereas dinoflagellates encode EFL. We searched transcriptome databases for seven early-diverging alveolate taxa that do not belong to any of these groups: colpodellids, chromerids, and colponemids. Current data suggest all seven are expected to encode EF1A, but we find three genera encode EFL: Colpodella, Voromonas, and the photosynthetic Chromera. Comparing this distribution with the phylogeny of alveolates suggests that EF1A and EFL evolution in alveolates cannot be explained by a simple horizontal gene transfer event or lineage sorting.

  3. Fission yeast Ryh1 GTPase activates TOR Complex 2 in response to glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Tomoyuki; Morigasaki, Susumu; Tatebe, Hisashi; Ikeda, Kyoko; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Target Of Rapamycin (TOR) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase that forms 2 distinct protein complexes referred to as TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and 2 (TORC2). Recent extensive studies have demonstrated that TORC1 is under the control of the small GTPases Rheb and Rag that funnel multiple input signals including those derived from nutritional sources; however, information is scarce as to the regulation of TORC2. A previous study using the model system provided by the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe identified Ryh1, a Rab-family GTPase, as an activator of TORC2. Here, we show that the nucleotide-binding state of Ryh1 is regulated in response to glucose, mediating this major nutrient signal to TORC2. In glucose-rich growth media, the GTP-bound form of Ryh1 induces TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of Gad8, a downstream target of TORC2 in fission yeast. Upon glucose deprivation, Ryh1 becomes inactive, which turns off the TORC2-Gad8 pathway. During glucose starvation, however, Gad8 phosphorylation by TORC2 gradually recovers independently of Ryh1, implying an additional TORC2 activator that is regulated negatively by glucose. The paired positive and negative regulatory mechanisms may allow fine-tuning of the TORC2-Gad8 pathway, which is essential for growth under glucose-limited environment.

  4. Regulation of cargo-selective endocytosis by dynamin 2 GTPase-activating protein girdin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Liang; Enomoto, Atsushi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Asai, Naoya; Morone, Nobuhiro; Jiang, Ping; An, Jian; Kato, Takuya; Kuroda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Takashi; Asai, Masato; Ishida-Takagishi, Maki; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Hideki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-09-17

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), specificity and selectivity for cargoes are thought to be tightly regulated by cargo-specific adaptors for distinct cellular functions. Here, we show that the actin-binding protein girdin is a regulator of cargo-selective CME. Girdin interacts with dynamin 2, a GTPase that excises endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, and functions as its GTPase-activating protein. Interestingly, girdin depletion leads to the defect in clathrin-coated pit formation in the center of cells. Also, we find that girdin differentially interacts with some cargoes, which competitively prevents girdin from interacting with dynamin 2 and confers the cargo selectivity for CME. Therefore, girdin regulates transferrin and E-cadherin endocytosis in the center of cells and their subsequent polarized intracellular localization, but has no effect on integrin and epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis that occurs at the cell periphery. Our results reveal that girdin regulates selective CME via a mechanism involving dynamin 2, but not by operating as a cargo-specific adaptor.

  5. Discovery and characterization of small molecules that target the GTPase Ral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Liu, Degang; Li, Liwei; Wempe, Michael F.; Guin, Sunny; Khanna, May; Meier, Jeremy; Hoffman, Brenton; Owens, Charles; Wysoczynski, Christina L.; Nitz, Matthew D.; Knabe, William E.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Brautigan, David L.; Paschal, Bryce M.; Schwartz, Martin A.; Jones, David N. M.; Ross, David; Meroueh, Samy O.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-11-01

    The Ras-like GTPases RalA and RalB are important drivers of tumour growth and metastasis. Chemicals that block Ral function would be valuable as research tools and for cancer therapeutics. Here we used protein structure analysis and virtual screening to identify drug-like molecules that bind to a site on the GDP-bound form of Ral. The compounds RBC6, RBC8 and RBC10 inhibited the binding of Ral to its effector RALBP1, as well as inhibiting Ral-mediated cell spreading of murine embryonic fibroblasts and anchorage-independent growth of human cancer cell lines. The binding of the RBC8 derivative BQU57 to RalB was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance and 1H-15N transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR spectroscopy. RBC8 and BQU57 show selectivity for Ral relative to the GTPases Ras and RhoA and inhibit tumour xenograft growth to a similar extent to the depletion of Ral using RNA interference. Our results show the utility of structure-based discovery for the development of therapeutics for Ral-dependent cancers.

  6. Protective role of interferon-induced Mx GTPases against influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, O; Staeheli, P; Kochs, G

    2009-04-01

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced large GTPases with antiviral activities. They inhibit a wide range of viruses by blocking early stages of the replication cycles. Importantly, Mx GTPases also suppress the growth of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, such as currently circulating H5N1 viruses or the pandemic H1N1 virus strain of 1918. In this paper, the authors review the properties of Mx proteins and discuss their role in host defence against highly pathogenic viruses. The authors further suggest that mammalian Mx proteins may normally provide a barrier against zoonotic transmission of avian influenza A viruses and that acquired resistance to the antiviral action of human MxA may be one factor, among many others, that facilitates the spread of pandemic strains in human populations. The presently available evidence suggests that Mx proteins of domestic chickens lack the ability to efficiently combat avian influenza viruses known to cause devastating infections in this species. The deliberate introduction of an antivirally active Mx gene originating from resistant birds or mammals may confer some degree of protection and thus stop commercial birds from serving as amplifying hosts of potentially pandemic influenza virus strains.

  7. Crystal structures of Mycobacterial MeaB and MMAA-like GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas E; Baugh, Loren; Bullen, Jameson; Baydo, Ruth O; Witte, Pam; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Abendroth, Jan; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Grundner, Christoph; Lorimer, Donald D

    2015-06-01

    The methylmalonyl Co-A mutase-associated GTPase MeaB from Methylobacterium extorquens is involved in glyoxylate regulation and required for growth. In humans, mutations in the homolog methylmalonic aciduria associated protein (MMAA) cause methylmalonic aciduria, which is often fatal. The central role of MeaB from bacteria to humans suggests that MeaB is also important in other, pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the identity of the mycobacterial MeaB homolog is presently unclear. Here, we identify the M. tuberculosis protein Rv1496 and its homologs in M. smegmatis and M. thermoresistibile as MeaB. The crystal structures of all three homologs are highly similar to MeaB and MMAA structures and reveal a characteristic three-domain homodimer with GDP bound in the G domain active site. A structure of Rv1496 obtained from a crystal grown in the presence of GTP exhibited electron density for GDP, suggesting GTPase activity. These structures identify the mycobacterial MeaB and provide a structural framework for therapeutic targeting of M. tuberculosis MeaB.

  8. Bacterial Obg proteins: GTPases at the nexus of protein and DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kint, Cyrielle; Verstraeten, Natalie; Hofkens, Johan; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Obg proteins (also known as ObgE, YhbZ and CgtA) are conserved P-loop GTPases, essential for growth in bacteria. Like other GTPases, Obg proteins cycle between a GTP-bound ON and a GDP-bound OFF state, thereby controlling cellular processes. Interestingly, the in vitro biochemical properties of Obg proteins suggest that they act as sensors for the cellular GDP/GTP pools and adjust their activity according to the cellular energy status. Obg proteins have been attributed a host of cellular functions, including roles in essential cellular processes (DNA replication, ribosome maturation) and roles in different stress adaptation pathways (stringent response, sporulation, general stress response). This review summarizes the current knowledge on Obg activity and function. Furthermore, we present a model that integrates the different functions of Obg by assigning it a fundamental role in cellular physiology, at the hub of protein and DNA synthesis. In particular, we believe that Obg proteins might provide a connection between different global pathways in order to fine-tune cellular processes in response to a given energy status.

  9. Chemical proteomics reveals ADP-ribosylation of small GTPases during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Nathan P; Fernandez, Joseph P; Molina, Henrik; Hang, Howard C

    2017-03-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that is known to be involved in cellular homeostasis and stress but has been challenging to analyze biochemically. To facilitate the detection of ADP-ribosylated proteins, we show that an alkyne-adenosine analog, N(6)-propargyl adenosine (N(6)pA), is metabolically incorporated in mammalian cells and enables fluorescence detection and proteomic analysis of ADP-ribosylated proteins. Notably, our analysis of N(6)pA-labeled proteins that are upregulated by oxidative stress revealed differential ADP-ribosylation of small GTPases. We discovered that oxidative stress induced ADP-ribosylation of Hras on Cys181 and Cys184 in the C-terminal hypervariable region, which are normally S-fatty-acylated. Downstream Hras signaling is impaired by ADP-ribosylation during oxidative stress, but is rescued by ADP-ribosyltransferase inhibitors. Our study demonstrates that ADP-ribosylation of small GTPases not only is mediated by bacterial toxins but is endogenously regulated in mammalian cells. N(6)pA provides a useful tool to characterize ADP-ribosylated proteins and their regulatory mechanisms in cells.

  10. Suppression of dynamin GTPase activity by sertraline leads to inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Otomo, Masahiro; Osada, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Noboru; Nakashima, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) 1 plays a role in recycling of synaptic vesicles, and thus in nervous system function. We previously showed that sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a mixed-type inhibitor of Dyn 1 with respect to both GTP and L-alpha-phosphatidyl-L-serine (PS) in vitro, and we suggested that it may regulate the neurotransmitter transport by modulating synaptic vesicle endocytosis via inhibition of Dyn 1 GTPase. Here, we investigated the effect of sertraline on endocytosis of marker proteins in human neuroblastoma SH-Sy5Y cells and HeLa cells. Sertraline inhibited endocytosis in both cell lines. Western blotting showed that SH-Sy5Y expresses Dyn 1 and Dyn 2, while HeLa expresses only Dyn 2. GTPase assay showed that sertraline inhibited Dyn 2 as well as Dyn 1. Therefore, the effect of sertraline on endocytosis was mediated by Dyn 2, at least in HeLa cells, as well as by Dyn 1 in cell lines that express it. Moreover, the inhibition mechanism of transferrin (Tf) uptake by sertraline differed from that in cells expressing Dyn 1 K44A, a GTP binding-defective variant, and sertraline did not interfere with the interaction between Dyn 1 and PS-liposomes.

  11. Ablation of p120-Catenin Altering the Activity of Small GTPase in Human Lung Cancer Cells

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    Nan LIU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective p120-catenin (p120ctn, a member of the Armadillo gene family, has emerged as an important modulator of small GTPase activities. Therefore, it plays novel roles in tumor malignant phenotype, such as invasion and metastasis, whose mechanism are not well clarified yet. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of p120ctn on the regulation of small GTP family members in lung cancer and the effects to lung cancer invasions andmetastasis. Methods After p120ctn was knocked down by siRNA, in vivo and in vitro analysis was applied to investigate the role and possible mechanism of p120ctn in lung cancer, such as Western Blot, pull-down analysis, and nude mice models. Results p120ctn depletion inactivated RhoA, with the the activity of Cdc42 and Rac1 increased, the invasiveness of lung cancer cells was promoted both in vitro and in vivo . Conclusion p120ctn gene knockdown enhances the metastasis of lung cancer cells, probably by altering expression of small GTPase, such as inactivation of RhoA and activation of Cdc42/Rac1.

  12. Enhancement of migration and invasion of hepatoma cells via a Rho GTPase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Sheng Wang; Ke-Feng Dou; Kai-Zong Li; Zhen-Shun Song

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Intrahepatic extension is the main cause of liver failure and death in hepatocellular carcinoma patients. The small GTPase Rho and one of its effector molecules ROCK regulate cytoskeleton and actomyosin contractility, and play a crucial role in cell adhesion and motility. We investigated the role of small GTPase Rho in biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinoma to demonstrate the importance of Rho in cancer invasion and metastasis.METHODS: Using Western blotting, we quantitated Rho protein expression in SMMC-7721 cells induced by Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Furthermore, we examined the role of Rho signaling in regulating the motile and invasiveproperties of tumor cells.RESULTS: Rho protein expression was stimulated by LPA.Using the Rhotekin binding assay to assess Rho activation,we observed that the level of GTP-bound Rho was elevated transiently after the addition of LPA, and Y-27632 decreased the level of active Rho. LPA enhanced the motility of tumor cells and facilitated their invasion. Rho played an essential role in the migratory process, as evidenced by the inhibition of migration and motility of cancer cells by a specific inhibitor of ROCK, Y-27632.CONCLUSION: The finding that invasiveness of hepatocellular carcinoma is facilitated by the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway is likely to be relevant to tumor progression and Y-27632 may be a new potential effective agent for the prevention of intrahepatic extension of human liver cancer.

  13. Influence of simulated microgravity on the activation of the small GTPase Rho involved in cytoskeletal formation – molecular cloning and sequencing of bovine leukemia-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki Masaya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The irregular formation of cytoskeletal fibers in spaceflown experimental cells has been observed, but the disorganization process of fibers is still poorly understood. It is well known that the activation of the small GTPase Rho leads to actin stress fibers assembly. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of simulated microgravity on the activation of Rho that is involved in actin fiber remodeling in cells. Results Clinorotation influences actin fiber remodeling and its related signaling pathways that involve the small GTPase Rho. Actin stress fiber remodeling was significantly inhibited to a greater extent in cells cultured under clinorotation than in static cultured cells. From the gene and protein expression analyses, we found that the expression level of leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG, which activates Rho, was downregulated under clinorotation. Moreover, we identified the full-length LARG cDNA. The amount of GTP-bound RhoA, that is, the active form of RhoA, decreased under this condition. Conclusion The activation of the small GTPase Rho was influenced by simulated microgravity generated by a three-dimensional (3D clinostat. Furthermore, the full-length cDNA of bovine LARG, a member of the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF family, was identified, and its gene expression was observed to be downregulated under clinorotation. This downregulation subsequently resulted in the repression of RhoA activation. These results indicated that the disorganization of the actin fibers was caused by the inhibition of Rho activation by 3D clinorotation.

  14. Construction and analysis of Sj - Rho GTPase DNA vaccine and subunit vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum%日本血吸虫Rho GTPase DNA疫苗及亚单位疫苗的构建和分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冉; 易新元; 曾宪芳; 黄跃龙; 蔡春; 张顺科; Larry McReynolds

    2003-01-01

    目的构建日本血吸虫大陆株Sj-Rho GTPase-like真核及原核表达重组质粒,并进行鉴定分析.方法用PCR法将Si-Rho GTPase-like基因从已剪切阳性克隆中扩增出来,亚克隆至pcDNA3.1和pGEX-5X-3中,分别经PCR、双酶切、测序、SDS-PAGE和Western blot等方法鉴定.结果PCR和测序均证明Sj-Rho GTPase-like基因疫苗构建成功,重组蛋白经SDS-PAGE电泳可观察到与预期分子量相应的条带,转印后可被水牛感染血清识别.结论成功构建了Si-Rho GTPase-like基因的两种重组载体,为保护性免疫研究打下基础.

  15. Diagnóstico bioquímico de la hiperprolactinemia monomérica Biochemical diagnosis of monomeric hyperprolactinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rivero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento. La prolactina se puede presentar bajo varias formas moleculares siendo la forma monomérica (PRLm la biológicamente activa. La presencia de macroprolactina (MPRL puede originar un falso diagnóstico de hiperprolactinemia debido a la interferencia en el procedimiento de medida. El objetivo ha sido desarrollar un protocolo que permita diagnosticar la hiperprolactinemia monomérica, que además sea complementario al procedimiento que detecta MPRL. Material y métodos. La población de referencia para PRLm estaba formada por 122 mujeres y 140 hombres aparentemente sanos a los que se les extrajo sangre para la cuantificación de PRL. Además, se recogieron 49 sueros (33 mujeres y 16 hombres hiperprolactinémicos. Se cuantificó PRL en todas las muestras en un Immulite 2000. La detección de MPRL y de PRLm se realizó tras precipitación con polietilenglicol. Se confirmó el resultado por cromatografía de filtración en gel. Para la obtención de los valores de referencia se siguieron las indicaciones del Panel de Expertos de la IFCC. Resultados. Los valores de referencia de PRLm fueron 3,4-26,6 μg/L y 4,6-16,4 μg/L en mujeres y varones, respectivamente. De los 49 pacientes hiperprolactinémicos, en el 57 % la concentración de PRLm tras PEG se encontraba fuera del intervalo de referencia previamente obtenido, confirmándose la presencia de hiperprolactinemia monomérica. Conclusiones. Se ha desarrollado e implantado un protocolo para la cuantificación de PRLm. La obtención de los valores de referencia de PRLm permite el diagnóstico de la hiperprolactinemia monomérica o activa de forma complementaria a la identificación de MPRL.Background. Prolactin can take several molecular forms of which the most biologically active is the monomeric form (PRLm. The presence of macroprolactin (MPRL can give rise to a false diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia due to interference in the measuring procedure. The aim was to develop a protocol that

  16. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet...... the organization of the signaling complex between GPCRs and G proteins is poorly understood. The observations that some GPCRs are obligate heterodimers, and that many GPCRs form both homo- and heterodimers, has led to speculation that GPCR dimers may be required for efficient activation of G proteins. However......, technical limitations have precluded a definitive analysis of G protein coupling to monomeric GPCRs in a biochemically defined and membrane-bound system. Here we demonstrate that a prototypical GPCR, the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), can be incorporated into a reconstituted high-density lipoprotein...

  17. Synthesis of monomeric and polymeric alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes using a phosphinoselenoic amide ligand in metal coordination sphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayeeta Bhattacharjee; Ravi K Kottalanka; Harinath Adimulam; Tarun K Panda

    2014-09-01

    We report the monomeric complexes of magnesium and calcium of composition [M(THF){2-Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}2] [M= Mg (3), n = 1 andM = Ca (4), n = 2)] and polymeric complexes of potassium and barium of composition [K(THF)2{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}] (2) and [K(THF)Ba{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}3](5) respectively. The potassium complex 2 was readily prepared by the reaction of potassium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide with phosphinoselenoic amide ligand (1) at ambient temperature. The calcium complex 4 was prepared by two synthetic routes: in the first method, commonly known as salt metathesis reaction, the potassium complex 2 was made to react with alkaline earth metal diiodide at room temperature to afford the corresponding calcium complex. The metal bis(trimethylsilyl)amides were made to react with protic ligand 1 in the second method to eliminate the volatile bis(trimethyl)silyl amine. The magnesium complex 3 and barium complex 5 were prepared only through the first method. Solid-state structures of all the new complexes were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The smaller ionic radii of Mg2+ (0.72Å) and Ca2+ (0.99Å) ions form the monomeric complex, whereas the larger ions K+ (1.38Å) and Ba2+ (1.35Å) were found to form onedimensional polymeric complexes with monoanionic ligand 1. Compound 2 serves an example of magnesium complex with a Mg-Se direct bond.

  18. GTP analogue inhibits polymerization and GTPase activity of the bacterial protein FtsZ without affecting its eukaryotic homologue tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läppchen, Tilman; Hartog, Aloysius F; Pinas, Victorine A; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2005-05-31

    The prokaryotic tubulin homologue FtsZ plays a key role in bacterial cell division. Selective inhibitors of the GTP-dependent polymerization of FtsZ are expected to result in a new class of antibacterial agents. One of the challenges is to identify compounds which do not affect the function of tubulin and various other GTPases in eukaryotic cells. We have designed a novel inhibitor of FtsZ polymerization based on the structure of the natural substrate GTP. The inhibitory activity of 8-bromoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BrGTP) was characterized by a coupled assay, which allows simultaneous detection of the extent of polymerization (via light scattering) and GTPase activity (via release of inorganic phosphate). We found that BrGTP acts as a competitive inhibitor of both FtsZ polymerization and GTPase activity with a Ki for GTPase activity of 31.8 +/- 4.1 microM. The observation that BrGTP seems not to inhibit tubulin assembly suggests a structural difference of the GTP-binding pockets of FtsZ and tubulin.

  19. The small GTPase RhoA is required to maintain spinal cord neuroepithelium organization and the neural stem cell pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dominik; Loetscher, Pirmin; van Hengel, Jolanda

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of adherens junctions (AJs) is critical for multiple events during CNS development, including the formation and maintenance of the neuroepithelium. We have addressed the role of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse nervous system using tissue-specific conditional gene abla...

  20. Smoothened Regulates Migration of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis via Activation of Rho GTPase Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei-xiang; Zhu, Shang-ling; Zhang, Bai-yu; Shi, Yi-ming; Feng, Xiao-xue; Liu, Fang; Huang, Jian-lin; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) acquire aggressive phenotypes characterized with enhanced migration abilities and inherent invasive qualities in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Smoothened (Smo) is a key component of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and contributes to tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of Smo in the modulation of cell migration and explore the underlying molecular mechanism(s). FLSs were isolated from RA synovium. Shh levels were regulated by a Smo agonist (purmorphamine), Smo antagonist (KAAD-cyclopamine), or small interfering RNA targeting the Smo gene (Smo-siRNA) in RA-FLSs. Expression of Smo was detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and activation of Rho GTPases was measured by pull-down assays. Incubation with purmorphamine resulted in a significant increase of cell migration and activation of Rho GTPase signaling compared to controls (P < 0.05). However, treatment with KAAD-cyclopamine or transfection with Smo-siRNA suppressed migration of RA-FLSs and showed an inhibitory effect of Rho GTPase signaling. Together, these results suggest that Smo plays an important role in RA-FLSs migration through activation of Rho GTPase signaling and may contribute to progression of RA, thus, targeting Shh signal may have a therapeutic potential in patients with RA. PMID:28261216

  1. Mutation spectrum in the large GTPase dynamin 2, and genotype-phenotype correlation in autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böhm, Johann; Biancalana, Valérie; Dechene, Elizabeth T

    2012-01-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with general skeletal muscle weakness, type I fiber predominance and atrophy, and abnormally centralized nuclei. Autosomal dominant CNM is due to mutations in the large GTPase dynamin 2 (DNM2), a mechanochemical enzym...

  2. [Role of the adaptins, dynamin like GTP-ases and Rab proteins in metabolic disorders and various infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierczak, Marcin; Surmacz, Liliana; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    Numerous metabolic and genetic diseases are due to mutations in adaptins, dynamin-like GTP-ases or disorders in trafficking machinery mediated by Rab proteins. A great number of pathogenes including viruses (HIV, SIV), bacteria and protozoa use various elements of endocytic/trafficking machinery to get into the host cells and to make their infection successful. Their different strategies are discussed.

  3. The rho GTPase Rac1 is required for proliferation and survival of progenitors in the developing forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leone, Dino P; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brakebusch, Cord;

    2010-01-01

    , although the homeodomain transcription factor Cux2 and Cyclin D2, a core component of the cell cycle machinery, are specifically involved in controlling SVZ cell proliferation. Rho GTPases have been implicated in regulating the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of many cell types, and one...

  4. A distinct mechanism regulating a pollen-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rop in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rop/Rac small GTPases are central to diverse developmental and cellular activities in plants, playing an especially important Role in polar growth of pollen tubes. Although it is established that a class of plant-specific RopGEFs promotes the activity of Rop/Rac through the catalytic PRONE (Plant-sp...

  5. Ras GTPases modulate morphogenesis, sporulation and cellulase gene expression in the cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei.

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    Jiwei Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina is capable of responding to environmental cues to compete for nutrients in its natural saprophytic habitat despite its genome encodes fewer degradative enzymes. Efficient signalling pathways in perception and interpretation of environmental signals are indispensable in this process. Ras GTPases represent a kind of critical signal proteins involved in signal transduction and regulation of gene expression. In T. reesei the genome contains two Ras subfamily small GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 homologous to Ras1 and Ras2 from S. cerevisiae, but their functions remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have investigated the roles of GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 during fungal morphogenesis and cellulase gene expression. We show that both TrRas1 and TrRas2 play important roles in some cellular processes such as polarized apical growth, hyphal branch formation, sporulation and cAMP level adjustment, while TrRas1 is more dominant in these processes. Strikingly, we find that TrRas2 is involved in modulation of cellulase gene expression. Deletion of TrRas2 results in considerably decreased transcription of cellulolytic genes upon growth on cellulose. Although the strain carrying a constitutively activated TrRas2(G16V allele exhibits increased cellulase gene transcription, the cbh1 and cbh2 expression in this mutant still strictly depends on cellulose, indicating TrRas2 does not directly mediate the transmission of the cellulose signal. In addition, our data suggest that the effect of TrRas2 on cellulase gene is exerted through regulation of transcript abundance of cellulase transcription factors such as Xyr1, but the influence is independent of cAMP signalling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these findings elucidate the functions for Ras signalling of T. reesei in cellular morphogenesis, especially in cellulase gene expression, which contribute

  6. mRNA expression of Rho GTPase-related signaling molecules during rat hippocampal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqing Guo; Jifeng Zhang; Li Xin; Jing Chen; Weizai Shen; Lin Yuan; Shizhen Zhong

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Rho GTPase family members have been shown to participate in neurite growth by regulating the neuronal cytoskeleton.However,there are very few reports of developmental roles of signaling molecules related to Rho GTPases.OBJECTIVE:To investigate messenger ribonucleic acid mRNA expression of signaling molecules associated with Rho GTPases,including Rho-A,Rac-1,collapsin response mediator protein 1(CRMP-1),and tubulin β3 (Tub β3) during rat hippocampus development.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A non-randomized,controlled,animal experiment,based on different developmental stages of the rat hippocampus,was performed at the Guangdong Key Laboratory of Tissue Construction and Detection,Institute of Clinical Anatomy,Southern Medical University between December 2005 and July 2007.MATERIALS:Trizol reagent was purchased from Invitrogen,USA.RNA PCR kit (AMV) Ver 3.0 and 150 bp DNA Ladder Marker were purchased from TaKaRa,Japan.Unless otherwise specified,all other reagents were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich,USA.METHODS:Twenty-five Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to five groups (n=5) according to developmental stages:embryonic (embryonic 15 days),neonatal (postnatal 5 days),juvenile (postnatal 1 month),adult (postnatal 3 months),and senile (postnatal 18 months).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Detection of mRNA expression of Rho-A,Rac-1,CRMP-1,and Tub β3 during various hippocampal developmental stages by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS:Hippocampal mRNA expression of Rho-A,as well as Rac-1,reached peak levels at embryonic,juvenile,and senile stages,and was relatively less during neonatal and adult stages.mRNA expression of Rac-1 was greater than Rho-A during each hippocampal developmental stage.CRMP-1 mRNA expression levels were as follows:embryonic>neonatal>juvenile>adult<senile,while Tub β3 mRNA expression was embryonic>neonatal>juvenile>adult=senile.CONCLUSION:Rho-A and Rac-1 shared similar expression profiles,which demonstrated similar

  7. Involvement of Chromatin Remodeling Genes and the Rho GTPases RhoB and CDC42 in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Skovbjerg Arildsen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveOvarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCCs constitute a rare ovarian cancer subtype with distinct clinical features, but may nonetheless be difficult to distinguish morphologically from other subtypes. There is limited knowledge of genetic events driving OCCC tumorigenesis beyond ARID1A, which is reportedly mutated in 30–50% of OCCCs. We aimed to further characterize OCCCs by combined global transcriptional profiling and targeted deep sequencing of a panel of well-established cancer genes. Increased knowledge of OCCC-specific genetic aberrations may help in guiding development of targeted treatments and ultimately improve patient outcome.MethodsGene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue from a cohort of the major ovarian cancer subtypes (cohort 1; n = 67 was performed using whole-genome cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (WG-DASL bead arrays, followed by pathway, gene module score, and gene ontology analyses, respectively. A second FFPE cohort of 10 primary OCCCs was analyzed by targeted DNA sequencing of a panel of 60 cancer-related genes (cohort 2. Non-synonymous and non-sense variants affecting single-nucleotide variations and insertions or deletions were further analyzed. A tissue microarray of 43 OCCCs (cohort 3 was used for validation by immunohistochemistry and chromogenic in situ hybridization.ResultsGene expression analyses revealed a distinct OCCC profile compared to other histological subtypes, with, e.g., ERBB2, TFAP2A, and genes related to cytoskeletal actin regulation being overexpressed in OCCC. ERBB2 was, however, not overexpressed on the protein level and ERBB2 amplification was rare in the validation cohort. Targeted deep sequencing revealed non-synonymous variants or insertions/deletions in 11/60 cancer-related genes. Genes involved in chromatin remodeling, including ARID1A, SPOP, and KMT2D were frequently mutated across OCCC tumors.ConclusionOCCCs appear

  8. Analysis of GTPases carrying hydrophobic amino acid substitutions in lieu of the catalytic glutamine: implications for GTP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rajeev; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Mishra, Shambhavi; Prakash, Balaji

    2005-05-01

    Ras superfamily GTP-binding proteins regulate important signaling events in the cell. Ras, which often serves as a prototype, efficiently hydrolyzes GTP in conjunction with its regulator GAP. A conserved glutamine plays a vital role in GTP hydrolysis in most GTP-binding proteins. Mutating this glutamine in Ras has oncogenic effects, since it disrupts GTP hydrolysis. The analysis presented here is of GTP-binding proteins that are a paradox to oncogenic Ras, since they have the catalytic glutamine (Glncat) substituted by a hydrophobic amino acid, yet can hydrolyze GTP efficiently. We term these proteins HAS-GTPases. Analysis of the amino acid sequences of HAS-GTPases reveals prominent presence of insertions around the GTP-binding pocket. Homology modeling studies suggest an interesting means to achieve catalysis despite the drastic hydrophobic substitution replacing the key Glncat of Ras-like GTPases. The substituted hydrophobic residue adopts a "retracted conformation," where it is positioned away from the GTP, as its role in catalysis would be unproductive. This conformation is further stabilized by interactions with hydrophobic residues in its vicinity. These interacting residues are strongly conserved and hydrophobic in all HAS-GTPases, and correspond to residues Asp92 and Tyr96 of Ras. An experimental support for the "retracted conformation" of Switch II arises from the crystal structures of Ylqf and hGBP1. This conformation allows us to hypothesize that, unlike in classical GTPases, catalytic residues could be supplied by regions other than the Switch II (i.e., either the insertions or a neighboring domain).

  9. The Rab-GTPase-activating protein TBC1D1 regulates skeletal muscle glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szekeres, Ferenc; Chadt, Alexandra; Tom, Robby Z

    2012-01-01

    The Rab-GTPase-activating protein TBC1D1 has emerged as a novel candidate involved in metabolic regulation. Our aim was to determine whether TBC1D1 is involved in insulin as well as energy-sensing signals controlling skeletal muscle metabolism. TBC1D1-deficient congenic B6.SJL-Nob1.10 (Nob1.10(SJL...... be explained partly by a 50% reduction in GLUT4 protein, since proximal signaling at the level of Akt, AMPK, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) was unaltered. Paradoxically, in vivo insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake was increased in EDL and tibialis anterior muscle from TBC1D1-deficient mice....... In conclusion, TBC1D1 plays a role in regulation of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Moreover, functional TBC1D1 is required for AICAR- or contraction-induced metabolic responses, implicating a role in energy-sensing signals....

  10. Rho GTPases as pathogen targets: Focus on curable sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Cristián A; Tudela, Julián Gambarte; Damiani, María T

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved highly specialized mechanisms to infect hosts. Several microorganisms modulate the eukaryotic cell surface to facilitate their engulfment. Once internalized, they hijack the molecular machinery of the infected cell for their own benefit. At different stages of phagocytosis, particularly during invasion, certain pathogens manipulate pathways governed by small GTPases. In this review, we focus on the role of Rho proteins on curable, sexually transmitted infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis and Treponema pallidum. Despite the high, worldwide frequencies of these sexually-transmitted diseases, very little is known about the strategies developed by these microorganisms to usurp key eukaryotic proteins that control intracellular signaling and actin dynamics. Improved knowledge of these molecular mechanisms will contribute to the elucidation of how these clinically important pathogens manipulate intracellular processes and parasitize their hosts.

  11. Rho GTPases as pathogen targets: Focus on curable sexually transmitted infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Cristián A; Tudela, Julián Gambarte; Damiani, María T

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved highly specialized mechanisms to infect hosts. Several microorganisms modulate the eukaryotic cell surface to facilitate their engulfment. Once internalized, they hijack the molecular machinery of the infected cell for their own benefit. At different stages of phagocytosis, particularly during invasion, certain pathogens manipulate pathways governed by small GTPases. In this review, we focus on the role of Rho proteins on curable, sexually transmitted infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis and Treponema pallidum. Despite the high, worldwide frequencies of these sexually-transmitted diseases, very little is known about the strategies developed by these microorganisms to usurp key eukaryotic proteins that control intracellular signaling and actin dynamics. Improved knowledge of these molecular mechanisms will contribute to the elucidation of how these clinically important pathogens manipulate intracellular processes and parasitize their hosts. PMID:26023809

  12. Control of Homeostasis and Dendritic Cell Survival by the GTPase RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuai; Dislich, Bastian; Brakebusch, Cord H

    2015-01-01

    Tissues accommodate defined numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) in highly specific niches where different intrinsic and environmental stimuli control DC life span and numbers. DC homeostasis in tissues is important, because experimental changes in DC numbers influence immunity and tolerance toward...... various immune catastrophes and inflammation. However, the precise molecular mechanisms regulating DC life span and homeostasis are unclear. We report that the GTPase RhoA controls homeostatic proliferation, cytokinesis, survival, and turnover of cDCs. Deletion of RhoA strongly decreased the numbers of CD...... findings identify RhoA as a central regulator of DC homeostasis, and its deletion decreases DC numbers below critical thresholds for immune protection and homeostasis, causing aberrant compensatory DC proliferation....

  13. Bidirectional Synaptic Structural Plasticity after Chronic Cocaine Administration Occurs through Rap1 Small GTPase Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Michael E; Bagot, Rosemary C; Gancarz, Amy M; Walker, Deena M; Sun, HaoSheng; Wang, Zi-Jun; Heller, Elizabeth A; Feng, Jian; Kennedy, Pamela J; Koo, Ja Wook; Cates, Hannah M; Neve, Rachael L; Shen, Li; Dietz, David M; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-02-03

    Dendritic spines are the sites of most excitatory synapses in the CNS, and opposing alterations in the synaptic structure of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a primary brain reward region, are seen at early versus late time points after cocaine administration. Here we investigate the time-dependent molecular and biochemical processes that regulate this bidirectional synaptic structural plasticity of NAc MSNs and associated changes in cocaine reward in response to chronic cocaine exposure. Our findings reveal key roles for the bidirectional synaptic expression of the Rap1b small GTPase and an associated local synaptic protein translation network in this process. The transcriptional mechanisms and pathway-specific inputs to NAc that regulate Rap1b expression are also characterized. Collectively, these findings provide a precise mechanism by which nuclear to synaptic interactions induce "metaplasticity" in NAc MSNs, and we reveal the specific effects of this plasticity on reward behavior in a brain circuit-specific manner.

  14. Regulation of cytokinesis by membrane trafficking involving small GTPases and the ESCRT machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, cells undergo membrane remodeling to achieve changes in their size and shape. In addition, cell division entails local delivery and retrieval of membranes and specific proteins as well as remodeling of cytoskeletons, in particular, upon cytokinetic abscission. Accumulating lines of evidence highlight that endocytic membrane removal from and subsequent membrane delivery to the plasma membrane are crucial for the changes in cell size and shape, and that trafficking of vesicles carrying specific proteins to the abscission site participate in local remodeling of membranes and cytoskeletons. Furthermore, the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery has been shown to play crucial roles in cytokinetic abscission. Here, the author briefly overviews membrane-trafficking events early in cell division, and subsequently focus on regulation and functional significance of membrane trafficking involving Rab11 and Arf6 small GTPases in late cytokinesis phases and assembly of the ESCRT machinery in cytokinetic abscission.

  15. Subcellular control of Rac-GTPase signalling by magnetogenetic manipulation inside living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etoc, F.; Lisse, D.; Bellaiche, Y.; Piehler, J.; Coppey, M.; Dahan, M.

    2013-03-01

    Many cell functions rely on the coordinated activity of signalling pathways at a subcellular scale. However, there are few tools capable of probing and perturbing signalling networks with a spatial resolution matching the intracellular dimensions of their activity patterns. Here we present a generic magnetogenetic approach based on the self-assembly of signalling complexes on the surface of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles inside living cells. The nanoparticles act as nanoscopic hot spots that can be displaced by magnetic forces and trigger signal transduction pathways that bring about a cell response. We applied this strategy to Rho-GTPases, a set of molecular switches known to regulate cell morphology via complex spatiotemporal patterns of activity. We demonstrate that the nanoparticle-mediated activation of signalling pathways leads to local remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and to morphological changes.

  16. The Drosophila small GTPase Rac2 is required for normal feeding and mating behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goergen, Philip; Kasagiannis, Anna; Schiöth, Helgi B; Williams, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    All multicellular organisms require the ability to regulate bodily processes in order to maintain a stable condition, which necessitates fluctuations in internal metabolics, as well as modifications of outward behaviour. Understanding the genetics behind this modulation is important as a general model for the metabolic modification of behaviour. This study demonstrates that the activity of the small GTPase Rac2 is required in Drosophila for the proper regulation of lipid storage and feeding behaviour, as well as aggression and mating behaviours. Rac2 mutant males and females are susceptible to starvation and contain considerably less lipids than controls. Furthermore, Rac2 mutants also have disrupted feeding behaviour, eating fewer but larger meals than controls. Intriguingly, Rac2 mutant males rarely initiate aggressive behaviour and display significantly increased levels of courtship behaviour towards other males and mated females. From these results we conclude that Rac2 has a central role in regulating the Drosophila homeostatic system.

  17. The Rap GTPases regulate the migration, invasiveness and in vivo dissemination of B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K B L; Tan, P; Freeman, S A; Lam, M; McNagny, K M; Gold, M R

    2010-01-28

    B-cell lymphomas are common malignancies in which transformed B cells enter the circulation, extravasate into tissues and form tumors in multiple organs. Lymphoma cells are thought to exit the vasculature and enter tissues through the same chemokine- and adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms as normal B cells. We have previously shown that activation of the Rap GTPases, proteins that control cytoskeletal organization and integrin activation, is critical for chemokine-induced migration and adhesion in B-lymphoma cell lines. Using the A20 murine B-lymphoma cell line as a model, we now show that Rap activation is important for circulating lymphoma cells to enter tissues and form tumors in vivo. In vitro assays showed that Rap activation is required for A20 cells to efficiently adhere to vascular endothelial cells and undergo transendothelial migration. These findings suggest that Rap or its effectors could be novel targets for treating B-cell lymphomas.

  18. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baisakhi Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700 forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of decameric and monomeric forms of C49S mutant thioredoxin-dependent AhpC from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supangat [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Kyung Hye; Furqoni, Ahmad [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kon Ho, E-mail: lkh@gsnu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-01

    Decameric and monomeric forms of recombinant C49S mutant AhpC from H. pylori have been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 and 2.25 Å, respectively. Cys49Ser mutant Helicobacter pylori alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (C49S HpAhpC) was purified under reducing conditions in monomeric and decameric forms. The monomeric form was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 245.8, b = 140.7, c = 189.5 Å, β = 127°, and contained 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. A crystal of the decameric form was obtained by the microbatch crystallization method and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 257.5, b = 417.5, c = 95.6 Å. The structure of the monomeric form of C49S HpAhpC has been solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  20. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Baisakhi; Banerjee, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700) forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D) also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS) was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS. PMID:26617997

  1. Calcium, acylation, and molecular confinement favor folding of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase CyaA toxin into a monomeric and cytotoxic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Johanna C; Ntsogo Enguéné, V Yvette; Cannella, Sara E; Subrini, Orso; Hessel, Audrey; Debard, Sylvain; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2014-10-31

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, a multidomain protein of 1706 amino acids, is one of the major virulence factors produced by Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA is able to invade eukaryotic target cells in which it produces high levels of cAMP, thus altering the cellular physiology. Although CyaA has been extensively studied by various cellular and molecular approaches, the structural and functional states of the toxin remain poorly characterized. Indeed, CyaA is a large protein and exhibits a pronounced hydrophobic character, making it prone to aggregation into multimeric forms. As a result, CyaA has usually been extracted and stored in denaturing conditions. Here, we define the experimental conditions allowing CyaA folding into a monomeric and functional species. We found that CyaA forms mainly multimers when refolded by dialysis, dilution, or buffer exchange. However, a significant fraction of monomeric, folded protein could be obtained by exploiting molecular confinement on size exclusion chromatography. Folding of CyaA into a monomeric form was found to be critically dependent upon the presence of calcium and post-translational acylation of the protein. We further show that the monomeric preparation displayed hemolytic and cytotoxic activities suggesting that the monomer is the genuine, physiologically active form of the toxin. We hypothesize that the structural role of the post-translational acylation in CyaA folding may apply to other RTX toxins.

  2. Analysis of by-product formation and sugar monomerization in sugarcane bagasse pretreated at pilot plant scale: Differences between autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der E.C.; Bakker, R.; Zeeland, van A.N.T.; Sanchez Garcia, D.; Punt, A.M.; Eggink, G.

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an interesting feedstock for the biobased economy since a large fraction is polymerized sugars. Autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment conditions combined with enzyme hydrolysis were used on lignocellulose rich bagasse to acquire monomeric. By-products found after pretre

  3. Small GTPase Rab21 mediates fibronectin induced actin reorganization in Entamoeba histolytica: implications in pathogen invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlyn Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes a wide spectrum of intestinal infections. In severe cases, the trophozoites can breach the mucosal barrier, invade the intestinal epithelium and travel via the portal circulation to the liver, where they cause hepatic abscesses, which can prove fatal if left untreated. The host Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM plays a crucial role in amoebic invasion by triggering an array of cellular responses in the parasite, including induction of actin rich adhesion structures. Similar actin rich protrusive structures, known as 'invadosomes', promote chemotactic migration of the metastatic cancer cells and non-transformed cells by remodeling the ECM. Recent studies showed a central role for Rab GTPases, the master regulators of vesicular trafficking, in biogenesis of invadosomes. Here, we showed that fibronectin, a major host ECM component induced actin remodeling in the parasite in a Rab21 dependent manner. The focalized actin structures formed were reminiscent of the mammalian invadosomes. By using various approaches, such as immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, along with in vitro invasion assay and matrix degradation assay, we show that the fibronectin induced formation of amoebic actin dots depend on the nucleotide status of the GTPase. The ECM components, fibronectin and collagen type I, displayed differential control over the formation of actin dots, with fibronectin positively and collagen type I negatively modulating it. The cell surface adhesion molecule Gal/GalNAc complex was also found to impose additional regulation on this process, which might have implication in collagen type I mediated suppression of actin dots.

  4. The Small GTPase Rap1 Is a Novel Regulator of RPE Cell Barrier Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Erika S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether the small GTPase Rap1 regulates the formation and maintenance of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell junctional barrier. Methods. An in vitro model was used to study RPE barrier properties. To dissect the role of Rap1, two techniques were used to inhibit Rap1 function: overexpression of RapGAP, which acts as a negative regulator of endogenous Rap1 activity, and treatment with engineered, adenovirally-transduced microRNAs to knockdown Rap1 protein expression. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and real-time cellular analysis (RTCA) of impedance were used as readouts for barrier properties. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to visualize localization of cadherins under steady state conditions and also during junctional reassembly after calcium switch. Finally, choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) migration across RPE monolayers was quantified under conditions of Rap1 inhibition in RPE. Results. Knockdown of Rap1 or inhibition of its activity in RPE reduces TER and electrical impedance of the RPE monolayers. The loss of barrier function is also reflected by the mislocalization of cadherins and formation of gaps within the monolayer. TER measurement and immunofluorescent staining of cadherins after a calcium switch indicate that junctional reassembly kinetics are also impaired. Furthermore, CEC transmigration is significantly higher in Rap1-knockdown RPE monolayers compared with control. Conclusions. Rap1 GTPase is an important regulator of RPE cell junctions, and is required for maintenance of barrier function. This observation that RPE monolayers lacking Rap1 allow greater transmigration of CECs suggests a possible role for potentiating choroidal neovascularization during the pathology of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21873678

  5. Rho GTPase RhoJ is Associated with Gastric Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan; Yang, Hannah; Park, Intae; Chon, Hong Jae; Kim, Joo Hoon; Kwon, Woo Sun; Lee, Won Suk; Kim, Tae Soo; Rha, Sun Young

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases play a pivotal role in tumor progression by regulating tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rho GTPases in gastric cancer (GC) remains unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the clinical implications of RhoJ, which is an uncharted member of Rho family. RhoJ expression in human GC cell lines and surgical specimens from GC patients were analyzed. Moreover, in vitro gain-of-function analysis was performed to evaluate the malignant phenotypes of RhoJ-overexpressing GC cells. The extent of RhoJ expression varied among GC cell lines and GC patients. YCC-9 cell line displayed the strongest expression, while YCC-10, -11, and -16 showed scant expressions. Of the 70 GC patients, 34 (48.6%) had RhoJ expression in their GC tissue, and patients with high RhoJ expression had more diffuse type GC (73.5% vs. 41.7%), were at more advanced stages (stage III, IV: 85.3% vs. 58.4%), and had more frequent metastasis (47.1% vs. 11.1%), denoting that RhoJ has a potential role in GC progression and metastasis. High RhoJ expression significantly correlated with poor overall survival and recurrence-free survival after surgical resection of gastric cancer. Finally, In vitro gain-of-function experiments showed 41.3% enhanced motility and 60.4% enhanced invasiveness in RhoJ-overexpressing GC cells compared to control, with negligible difference in cell proliferation. Collectively, high RhoJ expression is an independent negative prognostic factor for the survival outcome of GC and correlated with the increased cell motility and invasiveness. PMID:27471571

  6. Quantification of local morphodynamics and local GTPase activity by edge evolution tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tsukada

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy have enabled us to directly observe dynamic cellular phenomena. Although the techniques themselves have promoted the understanding of dynamic cellular functions, the vast number of images acquired has generated a need for automated processing tools to extract statistical information. A problem underlying the analysis of time-lapse cell images is the lack of rigorous methods to extract morphodynamic properties. Here, we propose an algorithm called edge evolution tracking (EET to quantify the relationship between local morphological changes and local fluorescence intensities around a cell edge using time-lapse microscopy images. This algorithm enables us to trace the local edge extension and contraction by defining subdivided edges and their corresponding positions in successive frames. Thus, this algorithm enables the investigation of cross-correlations between local morphological changes and local intensity of fluorescent signals by considering the time shifts. By applying EET to fluorescence resonance energy transfer images of the Rho-family GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA, we examined the cross-correlation between the local area difference and GTPase activity. The calculated correlations changed with time-shifts as expected, but surprisingly, the peak of the correlation coefficients appeared with a 6-8 min time shift of morphological changes and preceded the Rac1 or Cdc42 activities. Our method enables the quantification of the dynamics of local morphological change and local protein activity and statistical investigation of the relationship between them by considering time shifts in the relationship. Thus, this algorithm extends the value of time-lapse imaging data to better understand dynamics of cellular function.

  7. Small GTPase Rab21 Mediates Fibronectin Induced Actin Reorganization in Entamoeba histolytica: Implications in Pathogen Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Merlyn; Nakano, Yumiko Saito; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes a wide spectrum of intestinal infections. In severe cases, the trophozoites can breach the mucosal barrier, invade the intestinal epithelium and travel via the portal circulation to the liver, where they cause hepatic abscesses, which can prove fatal if left untreated. The host Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in amoebic invasion by triggering an array of cellular responses in the parasite, including induction of actin rich adhesion structures. Similar actin rich protrusive structures, known as ‘invadosomes’, promote chemotactic migration of the metastatic cancer cells and non-transformed cells by remodeling the ECM. Recent studies showed a central role for Rab GTPases, the master regulators of vesicular trafficking, in biogenesis of invadosomes. Here, we showed that fibronectin, a major host ECM component induced actin remodeling in the parasite in a Rab21 dependent manner. The focalized actin structures formed were reminiscent of the mammalian invadosomes. By using various approaches, such as immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, along with in vitro invasion assay and matrix degradation assay, we show that the fibronectin induced formation of amoebic actin dots depend on the nucleotide status of the GTPase. The ECM components, fibronectin and collagen type I, displayed differential control over the formation of actin dots, with fibronectin positively and collagen type I negatively modulating it. The cell surface adhesion molecule Gal/GalNAc complex was also found to impose additional regulation on this process, which might have implication in collagen type I mediated suppression of actin dots. PMID:25730114

  8. Cloning and characterization of Rap GTPase from the Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Zhou, Jing; Jia, Yu-Ping; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2012-01-01

    Ras-related protein Rap GTPase has been implicated in cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and cell junction formation. The first shrimp Rap cDNA (FcRap) was recently identified from the Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The full length of FcRap is 1013 bp, with a 561 bp open reading frame that encodes a 186 amino acid protein. FcRap has a calculated molecular mass of 20.90 kDa and pI of 6.37. Phylogenetic analysis shows that FcRap and other Rap proteins are clustered into one group. Results from the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction show that FcRap could be detected mainly in the hemocytes, hepatopancreas, stomach, and gills, whereas a relatively lower expression level could be detected in the heart and intestines. FcRap in the hemocytes was upregulated 2h post Vibrio challenge, and it was upregulated 2h post white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, and peaked at 6h before it declined at 12h. No variation in the FcRap transcript was observed in the gills under the Vibrio challenge, but it was initially downregulated 2h post WSSV challenge, and then it was upregulated and peaked at 6h before it was eventually went down at 12h. The rFcRap protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21DE3. The pull-down analysis showed that rFcRap protein could interact with VP28, an envelope protein of WSSV. The probable roles of Rap GTPase in shrimp innate immunity are presented for the first time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sculpting the endomembrane system in deep time: high resolution phylogenetics of Rab GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Marek; Brighouse, Andrew; Gabernet-Castello, Carme; Field, Mark C; Dacks, Joel B

    2012-05-15

    The presence of a nucleus and other membrane-bounded intracellular compartments is the defining feature of eukaryotic cells. Endosymbiosis accounts for the origins of mitochondria and plastids, but the evolutionary ancestry of the remaining cellular compartments is incompletely documented. Resolving the evolutionary history of organelle-identity encoding proteins within the endomembrane system is a necessity for unravelling the origins and diversification of the endogenously derived organelles. Comparative genomics reveals events after the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA), but resolution of events prior to LECA, and a full account of the intracellular compartments present in LECA, has proved elusive. We have devised and exploited a new phylogenetic strategy to reconstruct the history of the Rab GTPases, a key family of endomembrane-specificity proteins. Strikingly, we infer a remarkably sophisticated organellar composition for LECA, which we predict possessed as many as 23 Rab GTPases. This repertoire is significantly greater than that present in many modern organisms and unexpectedly indicates a major role for secondary loss in the evolutionary diversification of the endomembrane system. We have identified two Rab paralogues of unknown function but wide distribution, and thus presumably ancient nature; RabTitan and RTW. Furthermore, we show that many Rab paralogues emerged relatively suddenly during early metazoan evolution, which is in stark contrast to the lack of significant Rab family expansions at the onset of most other major eukaryotic groups. Finally, we reconstruct higher-order ancestral clades of Rabs primarily linked with endocytic and exocytic process, suggesting the presence of primordial Rabs associated with the establishment of those pathways and giving the deepest glimpse to date into pre-LECA history of the endomembrane system.

  10. Structural and functional insights into the mode of action of a universally conserved Obg GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boya Feng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obg proteins are a family of P-loop GTPases, conserved from bacteria to human. The Obg protein in Escherichia coli (ObgE has been implicated in many diverse cellular functions, with proposed molecular roles in two global processes, ribosome assembly and stringent response. Here, using pre-steady state fast kinetics we demonstrate that ObgE is an anti-association factor, which prevents ribosomal subunit association and downstream steps in translation by binding to the 50S subunit. ObgE is a ribosome dependent GTPase; however, upon binding to guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp, the global regulator of stringent response, ObgE exhibits an enhanced interaction with the 50S subunit, resulting in increased equilibrium dissociation of the 70S ribosome into subunits. Furthermore, our cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM structure of the 50S·ObgE·GMPPNP complex indicates that the evolutionarily conserved N-terminal domain (NTD of ObgE is a tRNA structural mimic, with specific interactions with peptidyl-transferase center, displaying a marked resemblance to Class I release factors. These structural data might define ObgE as a specialized translation factor related to stress responses, and provide a framework towards future elucidation of functional interplay between ObgE and ribosome-associated (pppGpp regulators. Together with published data, our results suggest that ObgE might act as a checkpoint in final stages of the 50S subunit assembly under normal growth conditions. And more importantly, ObgE, as a (pppGpp effector, might also have a regulatory role in the production of the 50S subunit and its participation in translation under certain stressed conditions. Thus, our findings might have uncovered an under-recognized mechanism of translation control by environmental cues.

  11. Whole-Organism Developmental Expression Profiling Identifies RAB-28 as a Novel Ciliary GTPase Associated with the BBSome and Intraflagellar Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor L Jensen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are specialised sensory and developmental signalling devices extending from the surface of most eukaryotic cells. Defects in these organelles cause inherited human disorders (ciliopathies such as retinitis pigmentosa and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, frequently affecting many physiological and developmental processes across multiple organs. Cilium formation, maintenance and function depend on intracellular transport systems such as intraflagellar transport (IFT, which is driven by kinesin-2 and IFT-dynein motors and regulated by the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS cargo-adaptor protein complex, or BBSome. To identify new cilium-associated genes, we employed the nematode C. elegans, where ciliogenesis occurs within a short timespan during late embryogenesis when most sensory neurons differentiate. Using whole-organism RNA-Seq libraries, we discovered a signature expression profile highly enriched for transcripts of known ciliary proteins, including FAM-161 (FAM161A orthologue, CCDC-104 (CCDC104, and RPI-1 (RP1/RP1L1, which we confirm are cilium-localised in worms. From a list of 185 candidate ciliary genes, we uncover orthologues of human MAP9, YAP, CCDC149, and RAB28 as conserved cilium-associated components. Further analyses of C. elegans RAB-28, recently associated with autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy, reveal that this small GTPase is exclusively expressed in ciliated neurons where it dynamically associates with IFT trains. Whereas inactive GDP-bound RAB-28 displays no IFT movement and diffuse localisation, GTP-bound (activated RAB-28 concentrates at the periciliary membrane in a BBSome-dependent manner and undergoes bidirectional IFT. Functional analyses reveal that whilst cilium structure, sensory function and IFT are seemingly normal in a rab-28 null allele, overexpression of predicted GDP or GTP locked variants of RAB-28 perturbs cilium and sensory pore morphogenesis and function. Collectively, our findings present a new

  12. Whole-Organism Developmental Expression Profiling Identifies RAB-28 as a Novel Ciliary GTPase Associated with the BBSome and Intraflagellar Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Victor L; Carter, Stephen; Sanders, Anna A W M; Li, Chunmei; Kennedy, Julie; Timbers, Tiffany A; Cai, Jerry; Scheidel, Noemie; Kennedy, Breandán N; Morin, Ryan D; Leroux, Michel R; Blacque, Oliver E

    2016-12-01

    Primary cilia are specialised sensory and developmental signalling devices extending from the surface of most eukaryotic cells. Defects in these organelles cause inherited human disorders (ciliopathies) such as retinitis pigmentosa and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), frequently affecting many physiological and developmental processes across multiple organs. Cilium formation, maintenance and function depend on intracellular transport systems such as intraflagellar transport (IFT), which is driven by kinesin-2 and IFT-dynein motors and regulated by the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) cargo-adaptor protein complex, or BBSome. To identify new cilium-associated genes, we employed the nematode C. elegans, where ciliogenesis occurs within a short timespan during late embryogenesis when most sensory neurons differentiate. Using whole-organism RNA-Seq libraries, we discovered a signature expression profile highly enriched for transcripts of known ciliary proteins, including FAM-161 (FAM161A orthologue), CCDC-104 (CCDC104), and RPI-1 (RP1/RP1L1), which we confirm are cilium-localised in worms. From a list of 185 candidate ciliary genes, we uncover orthologues of human MAP9, YAP, CCDC149, and RAB28 as conserved cilium-associated components. Further analyses of C. elegans RAB-28, recently associated with autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy, reveal that this small GTPase is exclusively expressed in ciliated neurons where it dynamically associates with IFT trains. Whereas inactive GDP-bound RAB-28 displays no IFT movement and diffuse localisation, GTP-bound (activated) RAB-28 concentrates at the periciliary membrane in a BBSome-dependent manner and undergoes bidirectional IFT. Functional analyses reveal that whilst cilium structure, sensory function and IFT are seemingly normal in a rab-28 null allele, overexpression of predicted GDP or GTP locked variants of RAB-28 perturbs cilium and sensory pore morphogenesis and function. Collectively, our findings present a new approach for

  13. Serine34 phosphorylation of RHO guanine dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI{alpha}) links signaling from conventional protein kinase C to RHO GTPase in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Choi, Youngsil; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) is an essential serine/threonine kinase regulating many signaling networks. At cell adhesion sites, PKCalpha can impact the actin cytoskeleton through its influence on RhoGTPases but the intermediate steps are not well known. One important regulator of Rho......GTPase function is the multifunctional guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor RhoGDIalpha that sequesters several related RhoGTPases in an inactive form, but may also target them through interactions with actin-associated proteins. Here it is demonstrated that PKCalpha phosphorylates RhoGDIalpha on serine 34...

  14. Functional alteration of a dimeric insecticidal lectin to a monomeric antifungal protein correlated to its oligomeric status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjana Banerjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL is a 25-kDa homodimeric, insecticidal, mannose binding lectin whose subunits are assembled by the C-terminal exchange process. An attempt was made to convert dimeric ASAL into a monomeric form to correlate the relevance of quaternary association of subunits and their functional specificity. Using SWISS-MODEL program a stable monomer was designed by altering five amino acid residues near the C-terminus of ASAL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By introduction of 5 site-specific mutations (-DNSNN-, a β turn was incorporated between the 11(th and 12(th β strands of subunits of ASAL, resulting in a stable monomeric mutant ASAL (mASAL. mASAL was cloned and subsequently purified from a pMAL-c2X system. CD spectroscopic analysis confirmed the conservation of secondary structure in mASAL. Mannose binding assay confirmed that molecular mannose binds efficiently to both mASAL and ASAL. In contrast to ASAL, the hemagglutination activity of purified mASAL against rabbit erythrocytes was lost. An artificial diet bioassay of Lipaphis erysimi with mASAL displayed an insignificant level of insecticidal activity compared to ASAL. Fascinatingly, mASAL exhibited strong antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria brassicicola in a disc diffusion assay. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of mASAL might be associated with the alteration of the membrane permeability of the fungus. Furthermore, a ligand blot assay of the membrane subproteome of R. solani with mASAL detected a glycoprotein receptor having interaction with mASAL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conversion of ASAL into a stable monomer resulted in antifungal activity. From an evolutionary aspect, these data implied that variable quaternary organization of lectins might be the outcome of defense-related adaptations to diverse situations in plants. Incorporation of m

  15. Functional alteration of a dimeric insecticidal lectin to a monomeric antifungal protein correlated to its oligomeric status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Nilanjana; Sengupta, Subhadipa; Roy, Amit; Ghosh, Prithwi; Das, Kalipada; Das, Sampa

    2011-04-07

    Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is a 25-kDa homodimeric, insecticidal, mannose binding lectin whose subunits are assembled by the C-terminal exchange process. An attempt was made to convert dimeric ASAL into a monomeric form to correlate the relevance of quaternary association of subunits and their functional specificity. Using SWISS-MODEL program a stable monomer was designed by altering five amino acid residues near the C-terminus of ASAL. By introduction of 5 site-specific mutations (-DNSNN-), a β turn was incorporated between the 11(th) and 12(th) β strands of subunits of ASAL, resulting in a stable monomeric mutant ASAL (mASAL). mASAL was cloned and subsequently purified from a pMAL-c2X system. CD spectroscopic analysis confirmed the conservation of secondary structure in mASAL. Mannose binding assay confirmed that molecular mannose binds efficiently to both mASAL and ASAL. In contrast to ASAL, the hemagglutination activity of purified mASAL against rabbit erythrocytes was lost. An artificial diet bioassay of Lipaphis erysimi with mASAL displayed an insignificant level of insecticidal activity compared to ASAL. Fascinatingly, mASAL exhibited strong antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria brassicicola in a disc diffusion assay. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of mASAL might be associated with the alteration of the membrane permeability of the fungus. Furthermore, a ligand blot assay of the membrane subproteome of R. solani with mASAL detected a glycoprotein receptor having interaction with mASAL. Conversion of ASAL into a stable monomer resulted in antifungal activity. From an evolutionary aspect, these data implied that variable quaternary organization of lectins might be the outcome of defense-related adaptations to diverse situations in plants. Incorporation of mASAL into agronomically-important crops could be an alternative method to protect them

  16. A role for the rap GTPase YlRsr1 in cellular morphogenesis and the involvement of YlRsr1 and the ras GTPase YlRas2 in bud site selection in the dimorphic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Qing; Li, Min; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a dimorphic yeast species that can grow in the ovoid yeast form or in the elongated pseudohyphal or hyphal form depending on the growth conditions. Here, we show that the Rap GTPase Rsr1 of Y. lipolytica (YlRsr1) plays an important role in cellular morphogenesis in this microorganism. Cells deleted for YlRSR1 exhibited impaired polarized growth during yeast-form growth. Pseudohyphal and hyphal development were also abnormal. YlRsr1 is also important for cell growth, since the deletion of YlRSR1 in cells lacking the Ras GTPase YlRas2 caused lethality. Y. lipolytica cells bud in a bipolar pattern in which the cells produce the new buds at the two poles. YlRsr1 plays a prominent role in this bud site selection process. YlRsr1's function in bud site selection absolutely requires the cycling of YlRsr1 between the GTP- and GDP-bound states but its function in cellular morphogenesis does not, suggesting that the two processes are differentially regulated. Interestingly, the Ras GTPase YlRas2 is also involved in the control of bud site selection, as Ylras2Δ cells were severely impaired in bipolar bud site selection. The GTP/GDP cycling and the plasma membrane localization of YlRas2 are important for YlRas2's function in bud site selection. However, they are not essential for this process, suggesting that the mechanism by which YlRas2 acts is different from that of YlRsr1. Our results suggest that YlRsr1 is regulated by the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) YlBud2 and partially by YlCdc25, the potential guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for YlRas2.

  17. Differing modes of interaction between monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides and model lipid membranes: an AFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Khizar; Giordani, Cristiano; McManus, Jennifer J; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Jarvis, Suzanne P

    2012-02-01

    Membrane interactions with β-amyloid peptides are implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and cholesterol has been shown to be key modulator of this interaction, yet little is known about the mechanism of this interaction. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the interaction of monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides with planar mica-supported bilayers composed of DOPC and DPPC containing varying concentrations of cholesterol. We show that below the bilayer melting temperature, Aβ monomers adsorb to, and assemble on, the surface of DPPC bilayers to form layers that grow laterally and normal to the bilayer plane. Above the bilayer melting temperature, we observe protofibril formation. In contrast, in DOPC bilayers, Aβ monomers exhibit a detergent-like action, forming defects in the bilayer structure. The kinetics of both modes of interaction significantly increases with increasing membrane cholesterol content. We conclude that the mode and rate of the interaction of Aβ monomers with lipid bilayers are strongly dependent on lipid composition, phase state and cholesterol content.

  18. The full-length cell-cell fusogen EFF-1 is monomeric and upright on the membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Siebert, C. Alistair; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-05-01

    Fusogens are membrane proteins that remodel lipid bilayers to facilitate membrane merging. Although several fusogen ectodomain structures have been solved, structural information on full-length, natively membrane-anchored fusogens is scarce. Here we present the electron cryo microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of the Caenorhabditis elegans epithelial fusion failure 1 (EFF-1) protein natively anchored in cell-derived membrane vesicles. This reveals a membrane protruding, asymmetric, elongated monomer. Flexible fitting of a protomer of the EFF-1 crystal structure, which is homologous to viral class-II fusion proteins, shows that EFF-1 has a hairpin monomeric conformation before fusion. These structural insights, when combined with our observations of membrane-merging intermediates between vesicles, enable us to propose a model for EFF-1 mediated fusion. This process, involving identical proteins on both membranes to be fused, follows a mechanism that shares features of SNARE-mediated fusion while using the structural building blocks of the unilaterally acting class-II viral fusion proteins.

  19. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice.

  20. A response regulator interfaces between the Frz chemosensory system and the MglA/MglB GTPase/GAP module to regulate polarity in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Wuichet, Kristin; Drescher, Florian; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2012-09-01

    How cells establish and dynamically change polarity are general questions in cell biology. Cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move on surfaces with defined leading and lagging cell poles. Occasionally, cells undergo reversals, which correspond to an inversion of the leading-lagging pole polarity axis. Reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system and depend on relocalization of motility proteins between the poles. The Ras-like GTPase MglA localizes to and defines the leading cell pole in the GTP-bound form. MglB, the cognate MglA GTPase activating protein, localizes to and defines the lagging pole. During reversals, MglA-GTP and MglB switch poles and, therefore, dynamically localized motility proteins switch poles. We identified the RomR response regulator, which localizes in a bipolar asymmetric pattern with a large cluster at the lagging pole, as important for motility and reversals. We show that RomR interacts directly with MglA and MglB in vitro. Furthermore, RomR, MglA, and MglB affect the localization of each other in all pair-wise directions, suggesting that RomR stimulates motility by promoting correct localization of MglA and MglB in MglA/RomR and MglB/RomR complexes at opposite poles. Moreover, localization analyses suggest that the two RomR complexes mutually exclude each other from their respective poles. We further show that RomR interfaces with FrzZ, the output response regulator of the Frz chemosensory system, to regulate reversals. Thus, RomR serves at the functional interface to connect a classic bacterial signalling module (Frz) to a classic eukaryotic polarity module (MglA/MglB). This modular design is paralleled by the phylogenetic distribution of the proteins, suggesting an evolutionary scheme in which RomR was incorporated into the MglA/MglB module to regulate cell polarity followed by the addition of the Frz system to dynamically regulate cell polarity.

  1. A response regulator interfaces between the Frz chemosensory system and the MglA/MglB GTPase/GAP module to regulate polarity in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Keilberg

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How cells establish and dynamically change polarity are general questions in cell biology. Cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move on surfaces with defined leading and lagging cell poles. Occasionally, cells undergo reversals, which correspond to an inversion of the leading-lagging pole polarity axis. Reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system and depend on relocalization of motility proteins between the poles. The Ras-like GTPase MglA localizes to and defines the leading cell pole in the GTP-bound form. MglB, the cognate MglA GTPase activating protein, localizes to and defines the lagging pole. During reversals, MglA-GTP and MglB switch poles and, therefore, dynamically localized motility proteins switch poles. We identified the RomR response regulator, which localizes in a bipolar asymmetric pattern with a large cluster at the lagging pole, as important for motility and reversals. We show that RomR interacts directly with MglA and MglB in vitro. Furthermore, RomR, MglA, and MglB affect the localization of each other in all pair-wise directions, suggesting that RomR stimulates motility by promoting correct localization of MglA and MglB in MglA/RomR and MglB/RomR complexes at opposite poles. Moreover, localization analyses suggest that the two RomR complexes mutually exclude each other from their respective poles. We further show that RomR interfaces with FrzZ, the output response regulator of the Frz chemosensory system, to regulate reversals. Thus, RomR serves at the functional interface to connect a classic bacterial signalling module (Frz to a classic eukaryotic polarity module (MglA/MglB. This modular design is paralleled by the phylogenetic distribution of the proteins, suggesting an evolutionary scheme in which RomR was incorporated into the MglA/MglB module to regulate cell polarity followed by the addition of the Frz system to dynamically regulate cell polarity.

  2. Molecular characterization of CLPT1, a SEC4-like Rab/GTPase of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum which is regulated by the carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, B; Borel, C; Herbert, C; Maury, J; Jacquet, C; Balsse, R; Esquerré-Tugayé, M T

    2001-07-11

    The gene CLPT1 (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Protein Transport 1) encoding a Rab/GTPase was isolated from the filamentous fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of bean anthracnose. At the amino acid level, CLPT1 shows between 54 and 80% identity to SEC4-like proteins, a class of molecules required for intracellular vesicular transport in yeasts. In particular, typical SEC4 domains involved in nucleotide binding and membrane attachment are present in the CLPT1 sequence. Functional identity of CLPT1 with SEC4 was confirmed by complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec4-8 mutation. This is the first report of a gene involved in the control of intracellular vesicular trafficking in a phytopathogenic fungus. RNA blot analyses of CLPT1 expression were performed during in vitro growth of the fungus on synthetic media containing glucose or pectin, as single carbon source. The accumulation of CLPT1 mRNA was strongly increased on pectin, a plant cell wall polysaccharide that induces the production of extracellular pectinases, whereas the level of CLPT1 mRNA was below the detection threshold on glucose. These results suggest that CLPT1 is mainly involved in protein secretion and that the production of extracellular enzymes potentially involved in pathogenesis in filamentous fungi is sustained by induction of the genes involved in the secretory machinery.

  3. The mammalian Rab family of small GTPases: definition of family and subfamily sequence motifs suggests a mechanism for functional specificity in the Ras superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Leal, J B; Seabra, M C

    2000-08-25

    The Rab/Ypt/Sec4 family forms the largest branch of the Ras superfamily of GTPases, acting as essential regulators of vesicular transport pathways. We used the large amount of information in the databases to analyse the mammalian Rab family. We defined Rab-conserved sequences that we designate Rab family (RabF) motifs using the conserved PM and G motifs as "landmarks". The Rab-specific regions were used to identify new Rab proteins in the databases and suggest rules for nomenclature. Surprisingly, we find that RabF regions cluster in and around switch I and switch II regions, i.e. the regions that change conformation upon GDP or GTP binding. This finding suggests that specificity of Rab-effector interaction cannot be conferred solely through the switch regions as is usually inferred. Instead, we propose a model whereby an effector binds to RabF (switch) regions to discriminate between nucleotide-bound states and simultaneously to other regions that confer specificity to the interaction, possibly Rab subfamily (RabSF) specific regions that we also define here. We discuss structural and functional data that support this model and its general applicability to the Ras superfamily of proteins.

  4. 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) induces bundling of Escherichia coli FtsZ polymers inhibiting the GTPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova, Esteban; Montecinos, Felipe; Brunet, Juan E; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2007-09-15

    FtsZ (Filamentous temperature sensitivity Z) cell division protein from Escherichia coli binds the fluorescence probe DAPI. Bundling of FtsZ was facilitated in the presence of DAPI, and the polymers in solution remained polymerized longer time than the protofilaments formed in the absence of DAPI. DAPI decreased both the maximal velocity of the GTPase activity and the Michaelis-Menten constant for GTP, indicating that behaves like an uncompetitive inhibitor of the GTPase activity favoring the GTP form of FtsZ in the polymers. The results presented in this work support a cooperative polymerization mechanism in which the binding of DAPI favors protofilament lateral interactions and the stability of the resulting polymers.

  5. Cooperative assembly of proteins in the ribosomal GTPase centre demonstrated by their interactions with mutant 23S rRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1995-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L11 binds to the region of 23S rRNA associated with the GTPase-dependent steps of protein synthesis. Nucleotides 1054-1107 within this region of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene were mutagenized with bisulphite. Twenty point mutations (G-->A and C-->T transitions) and nume......The ribosomal protein L11 binds to the region of 23S rRNA associated with the GTPase-dependent steps of protein synthesis. Nucleotides 1054-1107 within this region of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene were mutagenized with bisulphite. Twenty point mutations (G-->A and C-->T transitions...

  6. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromm, Philipp M; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-14

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets.

  7. Analysis of Arf1 GTPase-dependent membrane binding and remodeling using the exomer secretory vesicle cargo adaptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions play a critical role in shaping biological membranes through direct physical contact with the membrane surface. This is particularly evident in many steps of membrane trafficking, in which proteins deform the membrane and induce fission to form transport carriers. The small GTPase Arf1 and related proteins have the ability to remodel membranes by insertion of an amphipathic helix into the membrane. Arf1 and the exomer cargo adaptor coordinate cargo sorting into subset of secretory vesicle carriers in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we detail the assays we used to explore the cooperative action of Arf1 and exomer to bind and remodel membranes. We expect these methods are broadly applicable to other small GTPase/effector systems where investigation of membrane binding and remodeling is of interest. PMID:27632000

  8. Crystal structure of the GTPase domain and the bundle signalling element of dynamin in the GDP state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Roopsee; Eschenburg, Susanne; Reubold, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin is the prototype of a family of large multi-domain GTPases. The 100 kDa protein is a key player in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, where it cleaves off vesicles from membranes using the energy from GTP hydrolysis. We have solved the high resolution crystal structure of a fusion protein of the GTPase domain and the bundle signalling element (BSE) of dynamin 1 liganded with GDP. The structure provides a hitherto missing snapshot of the GDP state of the hydrolytic cycle of dynamin and reveals how the switch I region moves away from the active site after GTP hydrolysis and release of inorganic phosphate. Comparing our structure of the GDP state with the known structures of the GTP state, the transition state and the nucleotide-free state of dynamin 1 we describe the structural changes through the hydrolytic cycle.

  9. Structural analyses of Legionella LepB reveal a new GAP fold that catalytically mimics eukaryotic RasGAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yu; Liyan Hu; Qing Yao; Yongqun Zhu; Na Dong; Da-Cheng Wang; Feng Shao

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases are emerging targets of diverse bacterial pathogens.Here,we perform biochemical and structural analyses of LepB,a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) effector from Legionellapneumophila.We map LepB GAP domain to residues 313-618 and show that the GAP domain is Rab1 specific with a catalytic activity higher than the canonical eukaryotic TBC GAP and the newly identified VirA/EspG family of bacterial RabGAP effectors.Exhaustive mutation analyses identify Arg444 as the arginine finger,but no catalytically essential glutamine residues.Crystal structures of LepB313-618 alone and the GAP domain of Legionella drancourtii LepB in complex with Rab1-GDP-AIF3 support the catalytic role of Arg444,and also further reveal a 3D architecture and a GTPase-binding mode distinct from all known GAPs.Glu449,structurally equivalent to TBC RabGAP glutamine finger in apo-LepB,undergoes a drastic movement upon Rab1 binding,which induces Rab1 Gin70 side-chain flipping towards GDP-AIF3 through a strong ionic interaction.This conformationally rearranged Gln70 acts as the catalytic cis-glutamine,therefore uncovering an unexpected RasGAP-like catalytic mechanism for LepB.Our studies highlight an extraordinary structural and catalytic diversity of RabGAPs,particularly those from bacterial pathogens.

  10. EFL GTPase in cryptomonads and the distribution of EFL and EF-1alpha in chromalveolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Patron, Nicola J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    EFL (EF-like protein) is a member of the GTPase superfamily that includes several translation factors. Because it has only been found in a few eukaryotic lineages and its presence correlates with the absence of the related core translation factor EF-1alpha, its distribution is hypothesized to be the result of lateral gene transfer and replacement of EF-1alpha. In one supergroup of eukaryotes, the chromalveolates, two major lineages were found to contain EFL (dinoflagellates and haptophytes), while the others encode EF-1alpha (apicomplexans, ciliates, heterokonts and cryptomonads). For each of these groups, this distribution was deduced from whole genome sequence or expressed sequence tag (EST) data from several species, with the exception of cryptomonads from which only a single EF-1alpha PCR product from one species was known. By sequencing ESTs from two cryptomonads, Guillardia theta and Rhodomonas salina, and searching for all GTPase translation factors, we revealed that EFL is present in both species, but, contrary to expectations, we found EF-1alpha in neither. On balance, we suggest the previously reported EF-1alpha from Rhodomonas salina is likely an artefact of contamination. We also identified EFL in EST data from two members of the dinoflagellate lineage, Karlodinium micrum and Oxyrrhis marina, and from an ongoing genomic sequence project from a third, Perkinsus marinus. Karlodinium micrum is a symbiotic pairing of two lineages that would have both had EFL (a dinoflagellate and a haptophyte), but only the dinoflagellate gene remains. Oxyrrhis marina and Perkinsus marinus are early diverging sister-groups to dinoflagellates, and together show that EFL originated early in this lineage. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these genes are all EFL homologues, and showed that cryptomonad genes are not detectably related to EFL from other chromalveolates, which collectively form several distinct groups. The known distribution of EFL now includes a third group

  11. Use of synthetic isoprenoids to target protein prenylation and Rho GTPases in breast cancer invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of Ras and Rho family small GTPases drives the invasion and metastasis of multiple cancers. For their biological functions, these GTPases require proper subcellular localization to cellular membranes, which is regulated by a series of post-translational modifications that result in either farnesylation or geranylgeranylation of the C-terminal CAAX motif. This concept provided the rationale for targeting farnesyltransferase (FTase and geranylgeranyltransferases (GGTase for cancer treatment. However, the resulting prenyl transferase inhibitors have not performed well in the clinic due to issues with alternative prenylation and toxicity. As an alternative, we have developed a unique class of potential anti-cancer therapeutics called Prenyl Function Inhibitors (PFIs, which are farnesol or geranyl-geraniol analogs that act as alternate substrates for FTase or GGTase. Here, we test the ability of our lead PFIs, anilinogeraniol (AGOH and anilinofarnesol (AFOH, to block the invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that AGOH treatment effectively decreased invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells in a two-dimensional (2D invasion assay at 100 µM while it blocked invasive growth in three-dimensional (3D culture model at as little as 20 µM. Notably, the effect of AGOH on 3D invasive growth was phenocopied by electroporation of cells with C3 exotransferase. To determine if RhoA and RhoC were direct targets of AGOH, we performed Rho activity assays in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells and found that AGOH blocked RhoA and RhoC activation in response to LPA and EGF stimulation. Notably, the geranylgeraniol analog AFOH was more potent than AGOH in inhibiting RhoA and RhoC activation and invasive growth. Interestingly, neither AGOH nor AFOH impacted 3D growth of MCF10A cells. Collectively, this study demonstrates that AGOH and AFOH dramatically inhibit breast cancer invasion, at least in part by blocking Rho function, thus, suggesting that targeting

  12. Involvement of rho-gtpases in fibroblast adhesion and fibronectine fibrillogenesis under stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignandon, A.; Lambert, C.; Rattner, A.; Servotte, S.; Lapiere, C.; Nusgens, B.; Vico, L.

    The Rho family small GTPases play a crucial role in mediating cellular adaptation to mechanical stimulation (MS), and possibly to microgravity (μg), through effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion which is, in turn, mainly regulated by fibronectin fibrillogenesis (FnF). It remains unclear how mechanical stimulation is transduced to the Rho signaling pathways and how it impacts on fibronectin (fbn) fibrillogenesis (FnF). μg (2 days, mission STS-095) led to de-adhesion of fibroblasts and modification of the underlying extracellular matrix. To determine whether GTPases modulated FnF, we generated stable cell lines expressing high level of activated RhoA and Rac1 (QL) as compared to wild type (WI26-WT). After MS application [8% deformation, 1Hz, 15 min., 3 times/day for 1-2 days], we quantified focal adhesion (vinculin, paxillin, FAKY397), f-actin stress fibers (Sf) and FnF with home-developed softwares. We reported that after MS, Sf are more rapidly (30min) formed under the nucleus in Wi26-WT (+100%) and Rac1 (+200%) than in RhoA (+20%). Vinculin & paxillin were only restricted to the cell edge in static conditions and homogeneously distributed after MS in WT and Rac1. The relative area of contacts (vinculin & paxillin) was more dramatically enhanced by MS in Rac1 (+80%) than in WT (+40%) and RhoA (+25%) indicating that new focal contacts are formed under MS and supported the presence of Sf. MS Activation of FAK (FAKY397) was clear in WT and Rac1 and reduced in RhoA. FnF was restricted to cell-cell contacts zone without any change in the relative area of fbn after a 2-days MS. However we found more numerous spots of fbn at the cell center in Rac1 as compared with RhoA & WT suggesting that these fibrillar contacts will grow upon maturation and modulate FnF. The results indicate that MS induces formation of Sf and focal adhesions and enhances FF. RhoA has been shown to induce the formation of Sf and focal adhesions, and Rac1 activation decreases Rho activity in

  13. The Srp54 GTPase is essential for protein export in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, S M; Stevens, S W; Wise, J A

    1994-12-01

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) is a cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein required for targeting a subset of presecretory proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Here we report the results of a series of experiments to define the function of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe homolog of the 54-kDa subunit of mammalian SRP. One-step gene disruption reveals that the Srp54 protein, like SRP RNA, is essential for viability in S. pombe. Precursor to the secretory protein acid phosphatase accumulates in cells in which Srp54 synthesis has been repressed under the control of a regulated promoter, indicating that S. pombe SRP functions in protein targeting. In common with other Srp54 homologs, the S. pombe protein has a modular structure consisting of an amino-terminal G (GTPase) domain and a carboxyl-terminal M (methionine-rich) domain. We have analyzed the effects of 17 site-specific mutations designed to alter the function of each of the four GTPase consensus motifs individually. Several alleles, including some with relatively conservative amino acid substitutions, confer lethal or conditional phenotypes, indicating that GTP binding and hydrolysis are critical to the in vivo role of the protein. Two mutations (R to L at position 194 [R194L] and R194H) which were designed, by analogy to oncogenic mutations in rats, to dramatically decrease the catalytic rate and one (T248N) predicted to alter nucleotide binding specificity produce proteins that are unable to support growth at 18 degrees C. Consistent with its design, the R194L mutant hydrolyzes GTP at a reduced rate relative to wild-type Srp54 in enzymatic assays on immunoprecipitated proteins. In strains that also contain wild-type srp54, this mutant protein, as well as others designed to be locked in a GTP-bound conformation, exhibits temperature-dependent dominant inhibitory effects on growth, while a mutant predicted to be GDP locked does not interfere with the function of the wild-type protein. These results form

  14. Modulation of Rho GTPases rescues brain mitochondrial dysfunction, cognitive deficits and aberrant synaptic plasticity in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; de Bari, Lidia; Fiorentini, Carla; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Fabbri, Alessia; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Rho GTPases are molecules critically involved in neuronal plasticity and cognition. We have previously reported that modulation of brain Rho GTPases by the bacterial toxin CNF1 rescues the neurobehavioral phenotype in MeCP2-308 male mice, a model of Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a rare X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and a genetic cause of intellectual disability, for which no effective therapy is available. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to be involved in the mechanism of the disease pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that modulation of Rho GTPases by CNF1 rescues the reduced mitochondrial ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the condition which more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. In RTT mouse brain, CNF1 also restores the alterations in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes and of ATP synthase, the molecular machinery responsible for the majority of cell energy production. Such effects were achieved through the upregulation of the protein content of those MRC complexes subunits, which were defective in RTT mouse brain. Restored mitochondrial functionality was accompanied by the rescue of deficits in cognitive function (spatial reference memory in the Barnes maze), synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation) and Tyr1472 phosphorylation of GluN2B, which was abnormally enhanced in the hippocampus of RTT mice. Present findings bring into light previously unknown functional mitochondrial alterations in the brain of female mice modeling RTT and provide the first evidence that RTT brain mitochondrial dysfunction can be rescued by modulation of Rho GTPases.

  15. Mutation Spectrum in the Large GTPase Dynamin 2, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in Autosomal Dominant Centronuclear Myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Böhm, Johann; Biancalana, Valérie; DeChene, Elizabeth T; Bitoun, Marc; Pierson, Christopher R.; Schaefer, Elise; Karasoy, Hatice; Dempsey, Melissa A.; Klein, Fabrice; Dondaine, Nicolas; Kretz, Christine; Haumesser, Nicolas; Poirson, Claire; Toussaint, Anne; Greenleaf, Rebecca S.

    2012-01-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with general skeletal muscle weakness, type I fiber predominance and atrophy, and abnormally centralized nuclei. Autosomal dominant CNM is due to mutations in the large GTPase dynamin 2 (DNM2), a mechanochemical enzyme regulating cytoskeleton and membrane trafficking in cells. To date, 40 families with CNM-related DNM2 mutations have been described, and here we report 60 additional families encompassing a broad ge...

  16. CARACTERISATION BIOCHIMIQUE DE YPHC, UNE PROTEINE DE BACILLUS SUBTILIS A DEUX DOMAINES GTPASE IMPLIQUEE DANS LA BIOGENESE DU RIBOSOME

    OpenAIRE

    Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    Genome sequencing programs have revealed many genes of unknown function. The systematic disruption of these genes revealed the essentiality for some of them. Studying orphan proteins became of first importance as they are ideal targets for new antibacterial compounds. YphC is a GTPase from Bacillus subtilis that meets these criteria. It is well conserved throughout bacterial kingdom but is not found in eukaryota or archeas, strengthening the choice of this protein as a future target for antib...

  17. A Rac1 GTPase is a critical factor in the immune response of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Gui-Hong; Wang, Wei-Na; Peng, Ting; Huang, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Yuan

    2015-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 acts as a molecular switch for signal transduction that regulates various cellular functions. However, its functions in crustaceans remain unclear. In this study, a cDNA encoding a RAS GTPase (LvRac1) in the Pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei) was identified and characterized. A recombinant variant of this GTPase, rLvRac1, was expressed in the model organism P. pastoris and its expression was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Biochemical assays indicated that the recombinant protein retained GTPase activity and was expressed in all of the organism's tested tissues. Injection of the bacterium V. alginolyticus into L. vannamei induced hepatopancreatic upregulation of LvRac1 expression. Moreover, knocking down LvRac1 in vivo significantly reduced the expression of the L. vannamei p53 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase genes (Lvp53 and LvCu/Zn SOD, respectively) while increasing that of the galectin gene (Lvgal). Hemolymph samples from control and LvRac1-silenced L. vannamei individuals were analyzed by flow cytometry, revealing that the latter exhibited significantly reduced respiratory burst activity and total hemocyte counts. Cumulative mortality in shrimp lacking LvRac1 was significantly greater than in control groups following V. alginolyticus challenge. The silencing of LvRac1 by double-stranded RNA injection thus increased the V. alginolyticus challenge sensitivity of L. vannamei and weakened its bacterial clearance ability in vivo. Suppressing LvRac1 also promoted the upregulation of Lvp53, LvCu/ZnSOD, and Lvgal following V. alginolyticus injection. Taken together, these results suggest that LvRac1 is important in the innate immune response of shrimp to V. alginolyticus infection.

  18. Obligatory role in GTP hydrolysis for the amide carbonyl oxygen of the Mg(2+)-coordinating Thr of regulatory GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Adolfo; Zhang, Yinghao; Pedersen, Lee; Darden, Tom; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2010-05-25

    When G-protein alpha subunits binds GTP and Mg(2+), they transition from their inactive to their active conformation. This transition is accompanied by completion of the coordination shell of Mg(2+) with electrons from six oxygens: two water molecules, the ss and gamma phosphoryls of GTP, a helix-alpha1 Ser, and a switch I domain (SWI) Thr, and the repositioning of SWI and SWII domains. SWII binds and regulates effector enzymes and facilitates GTP hydrolysis by repositioning the gamma-carbonyl of a Gln. Mutating the Ser generates regulatory GTPases that cannot lock Mg(2+) into its place and are locked in their inactive state with dominant negative properties. Curiously, mutating the Thr appears to reduce GTP hydrolysis. The reason for this difference is not known because it is also not known why removal of the Thr should affect the overall GTPase cycle differently than removal of the Ser. Working with recombinant Gsalpha, we report that mutating its SWI-Thr to either Ala, Glu, Gln, or Asp results not only in diminished GTPase activity but also in spontaneous activation of the SWII domain. Upon close examination of existing alpha subunit crystals, we noted the oxygen of the backbone carbonyl of SWI-Thr and of the gamma-carbonyl of SWII Gln to be roughly equidistant from the oxygen of the hydrolytic H(2)O. Our observations indicate that the Gln and Thr carbonyls play equihierarchical roles in the GTPase process and provide the mechanism that explains why mutating the Thr mimics mutating the Gln and not that of the Ser.

  19. Aldynoglia cells and modulation of RhoGTPase activity as useful tools for spinal cord injury repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ernesto Doncel-Prez; Manuel Nieto-Sampedro

    2016-01-01

    A combined approach in spinal cord injury (SCI) therapy is the modulation of the cellular and molecular processes involved in glial scarring. Aldaynoglial cells are neural cell precursors with a high capacity to differentiate into neurons, promote axonal growth, wrapping and myelination of resident neurons. These important characteristics of aldaynoglia can be combined with speciifc inhibition of the RhoGTPase ac-tivity in astroglia and microglia that cause reduction of glial proliferation, retraction of glial cell processes and myelin production by oligodendrocytes. Previously we used experimental central nervous system (CNS) injury models, like spinal cord contusion and striatal lacunar infarction and observed that adminis-tration of RhoGTPase glycolipid inhibitor or aldaynoglial cells, respectively, produced a signiifcant gain of functional recovery in treated animals. The combined therapy with neuro-regenerative properties strategy is highly desirable to treat SCI for functional potentiation of neurons and oligodendrocytes, resulting in better locomotor recovery. Here we suggest that treatment of spinal lesions with aldaynoglia from neu-rospheres plus local administration of a RhoGTPase inhibitor could have an additive effect and promote recovery from SCI.

  20. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-03-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population.

  1. Pak6 protein kinase is a novel effector of an atypical Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, M V; Korobko, I V

    2012-01-01

    Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase whose functions are far from being fully understood. To date several effector proteins of Chp have been identified, including p21-activated kinases Pak1, Pak2, and Pak4. Using a yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation, here we show that another p21-activated kinase, Pak6, is a novel Chp-binding protein. Interaction between Chp and Pak6 depends on the activation state of the GTPase, suggesting that Pak6 is an effector protein for Chp. Point mutations in the effector domain of Chp or in the CRIB motif of Pak6 significantly impair the interaction between Chp and Pak6 upon co-immunoprecipitation, suggesting that the binding interface involves the effector domain of Chp and the CRIB motif in Pak6. We found that Chp does not affect the phosphorylation status of the S560 residue in the catalytic domain of Pak6 when Chp and Pak6 are co-expressed in HEK293 cells. Therefore, similarly to Cdc42, Chp is not likely to activate Pak6. In NCI-H1299 cells, Chp co-localizes with Pak6 on vesicular structures in activation state-dependent manner. Taking the data together, we report here the identification of p21-activated kinase Pak6 as a novel effector of the atypical Rho GTPase Chp. Our data suggest further directions in elucidating biological functions of these proteins.

  2. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B, a novel small GTPase, is involved in the regulation of DNA gyrase and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Han, Jiao; Wu, Hanyu; Hu, Xinling; Deng, Jiaoyu; Fleming, Joy; Maxwell, Anthony; Bi, Lijun; Mi, Kaixia

    2013-01-01

    DNA gyrase plays a vital role in resolving DNA topological problems and is the target of antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein A (MfpA) from Mycobacterium smegmatis is a newly identified DNA gyrase inhibitor that is believed to confer intrinsic resistance to fluoroquinolones. However, MfpA does not prevent drug-induced inhibition of DNA gyrase in vitro, implying the involvement of other as yet unknown factors. Here, we have identified a new factor, named Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B (MfpB), which is involved in the protection of DNA gyrase against drugs both in vivo and in vitro. Genetic results suggest that MfpB is necessary for MfpA protection of DNA gyrase against drugs in vivo; an mfpB knockout mutant showed greater susceptibility to ciprofloxacin than the wild-type, whereas a strain overexpressing MfpA and MfpB showed higher loss of susceptibility. Further biochemical characterization indicated that MfpB is a small GTPase and its GTP bound form interacts directly with MfpA and influences its interaction with DNA gyrase. Mutations in MfpB that decrease its GTPase activity disrupt its protective efficacy. Our studies suggest that MfpB, a small GTPase, is required for MfpA-conferred protection of DNA gyrase. PMID:23275532

  3. The Arabidopsis small GTPase AtRAC7/ROP9 is a modulator of auxin and abscisic acid signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alice Y.

    2013-01-01

    Rac-like GTPases or Rho-related GTPases from plants (RAC/ROPs) are important components of hormone signalling pathways in plants. Based on phylogeny, several groups can be distinguished, and the underlying premise is that members of different groups perform distinct functions in the plant. AtRAC7/ROP9 is phylogenetically unique among 11 Arabidopsis RAC/ROPs, and here it was shown that it functions as a modulator of auxin and abscisic acid (ABA) signalling, a dual role not previously assigned to these small GTPases. Plants with reduced levels of AtRAC7/ROP9 had increased sensitivity to auxin and were less sensitive to ABA. On the other hand, overexpressing AtRAC7/ROP9 activated ABA-induced gene expression but repressed auxin-induced gene expression. In addition, both hormones regulated the activity of the AtRAC7/ROP9 promoter, suggesting a feedback mechanism to modulate the signalling output from the AtRAC7/ROP9-controlled molecular switch. High levels of AtRAC7/ROP9 were detected specifically in embryos and lateral roots, underscoring the important role of this protein during embryo development and lateral root formation. These results place AtRAC7/ROP9 as an important signal transducer in recently described pathways that integrate auxin and ABA signalling in the plant. PMID:23918972

  4. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population. PMID:28248929

  5. Toxoplasma GRA7 effector increases turnover of immunity-related GTPases and contributes to acute virulence in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaganan, Aditi; Fentress, Sarah J; Tang, Keliang; Wang, Qiuling; Sibley, L David

    2014-01-21

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii enjoys a wide host range and is adept at surviving in both naive and activated macrophages. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of the active serine-threonine protein kinase rhoptry protein 18 (ROP18), which targets immunity-related GTPases (IRGs), in mediating macrophage survival and acute virulence of T. gondii in mice. Here, we demonstrate that ROP18 exists in a complex with the pseudokinases rhoptry proteins 8 and 2 (ROP8/2) and dense granule protein 7 (GRA7). Individual deletion mutant gra7 or rop18 was partially attenuated for virulence in mice, whereas the combined gra7rop18 mutant was avirulent, suggesting these proteins act together in the same pathway. The virulence defect of the double mutant was mirrored by increased recruitment of IRGs and clearance of the parasite in IFN-γ-activated macrophages in vitro. GRA7 was shown to recognize a conserved feature of IRGs, binding directly to the active dimer of immunity-related GTPase a6 in a GTP-dependent manner. Binding of GRA7 to immunity-related GTPase a6 led to enhanced polymerization, rapid turnover, and eventual disassembly. Collectively, these studies suggest that ROP18 and GRA7 act in a complex to target IRGs by distinct mechanisms that are synergistic.

  6. Time-resolved FTIR studies provide activation free energy, activation enthalpy and activation entropy for GTPase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2004-12-01

    GTPases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP and P i, play a key role in the regulation of many biological processes. In this work, we quantify the activation parameters ΔG0∗,ΔH0∗andΔS0∗ for the hydrolysis reaction of GTP in water, in water with Mg 2+ ions and in Ras. Ras belongs to the superfamily of small GTPases (guanine nucleotide-binding proteins; GNBPs). Surprisingly, we find that in all cases, the activation energy consists mainly of enthalpic contributions. Additionally, the small entropic contributions in water and in Ras are similar, so that ΔΔ S* is close to 0. Thus the entropic contributions are only minor in GTPase catalysis and the enthalpic contributions from electrostatic interactions are key to the catalysis. The protein induced change in charge distribution of GTP can be monitored by time-resolved difference FTIR spectroscopy. For Ras the main effect due to protein binding is a charge shift towards the β-phosphate of GTP. This seems to have the main contribution to the catalytic mechanism. Because the G-domain of Ras is highly conserved in GNBPs, we propose that the finding here holds for all GNBPs.

  7. Aldynoglia cells and modulation of RhoGTPase activity as useful tools for spinal cord injury repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A combined approach in spinal cord injury (SCI) therapy is the modulation of the cellular and molecular processes involved in glial scarring. Aldaynoglial cells are neural cell precursors with a high capacity to differentiate into neurons, promote axonal growth, wrapping and myelination of resident neurons. These important characteristics of aldaynoglia can be combined with specific inhibition of the RhoGTPase activity in astroglia and microglia that cause reduction of glial proliferation, retraction of glial cell processes and myelin production by oligodendrocytes. Previously we used experimental central nervous system (CNS) injury models, like spinal cord contusion and striatal lacunar infarction and observed that administration of RhoGTPase glycolipid inhibitor or aldaynoglial cells, respectively, produced a significant gain of functional recovery in treated animals. The combined therapy with neuro-regenerative properties strategy is highly desirable to treat SCI for functional potentiation of neurons and oligodendrocytes, resulting in better locomotor recovery. Here we suggest that treatment of spinal lesions with aldaynoglia from neurospheres plus local administration of a RhoGTPase inhibitor could have an additive effect and promote recovery from SCI. PMID:27630672

  8. Physiological functions of the small GTPase Arf6 in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masahiro; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) plays important roles in membrane dynamics-based neuronal cell events such as neurite outgrowth and spine formation. However, physiological functions of Arf6 in the nervous system at whole animal level have not yet been explored. We have recently generated conditional knockout mice lacking Arf6 in neurons or oligodendrocytes of central nervous system (CNS) or both cell lineages, and analyzed them. We found that ablation of Arf6 gene from neurons, but not from oligodendrocytes, caused the defect in axon myelination at the fimbria of hippocampus (Fim) and corpus callosum (CC). We also found that migration of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) from the subventricular zone to the Fim and CC in mice lacking Arf6 in neurons was impaired. Finally, it was found that secretion of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a guidance factor for OPC migration, from hippocampi lacking Arf6 was impaired. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Arf6 in neurons of the CNS plays an important role in OPC migration by regulating secretion of FGF-2 from neurons, thereby contributing to the axon myelination. Here, we discuss our current understanding of physiological functions of Arf6 in the nervous system.

  9. Role of Rab GTPases and their interacting proteins in mediating metabolic signalling and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-06-01

    The vesicular transport pathways, which shuttle materials to and from the cell surface and within the cell, and the metabolic (growth factor and nutrient) signalling pathways, which integrate a variety of extracellular and intracellular signals to mediate growth, proliferation or survival, are both important for cellular physiology. There is evidence to suggest that the transport and metabolic signalling pathways intersect-vesicular transport can affect the regulation of metabolic signals and vice versa. The Rab family GTPases regulate the specificity of vesicular transport steps in the cell. Together with their interacting proteins, Rabs would likely constitute the points of intersection between vesicular transport and metabolic signalling pathways. Examples of these points would include growth factor signalling, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as autophagy. Many of these processes involve mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) in downstream cascades, or are regulated by TORC signalling. A general functionality of the vesicular transport processes controlled by the Rabs is also important for spatial and temporal regulation of the transmission of metabolic signals between the cell surface and the nucleus. In other cases, specific Rabs and their interacting proteins are known to function in recruiting metabolism-related proteins to target membranes, or may compete with other factors in the TORC signalling pathway as a means of metabolic regulation. We review and discuss herein examples of how Rabs and their interacting proteins can mediate metabolic signalling and regulation in cells.

  10. Abl tyrosine kinases modulate cadherin-dependent adhesion upstream and downstream of Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandy, Nicole L; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2008-02-15

    Formation and dissolution of intercellular adhesions are processes of paramount importance during tissue morphogenesis and for pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion requires dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. The pathways that link cadherin signaling to cytoskeletal regulation remain poorly defined. We have recently uncovered a novel role for the Abl family of tyrosine kinases linking cadherin-mediated adhesion to actin dynamics via the regulation of Rho family GTPases. Abl kinases are activated by cadherin engagement, localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for the formation of adherens junctions. Notably, we showed that Abl kinases are required for Rac activation during formation of adherens junctions, and also regulate a Rho-ROCK-myosin signaling pathway that is required for the maintenance of intercellular adhesion. Here we show that Abl kinases regulate the formation and strengthening of adherens junctions downstream of active Rac, and that Abl tyrosine kinases are components of a positive feed-back loop that employs the Crk/CrkL adaptor proteins to promote the formation and maturation of adherens junctions.

  11. Rho GTPase-independent regulation of mitotic progression by the RhoGEF Net1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sarita; Oh, Wonkyung; Carr, Heather S; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-01

    Neuroepithelial transforming gene 1 (Net1) is a RhoA-subfamily-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and is required for proliferation. Molecular mechanisms underlying its role in cell proliferation are unknown. Here we show that overexpression or knockdown of Net1 causes mitotic defects. Net1 is required for chromosome congression during metaphase and generation of stable kinetochore microtubule attachments. Accordingly, inhibition of Net1 expression results in spindle assembly checkpoint activation. The ability of Net1 to control mitosis is independent of RhoA or RhoB activation, as knockdown of either GTPase does not phenocopy effects of Net1 knockdown on nuclear morphology, and effects of Net1 knockdown are effectively rescued by expression of catalytically inactive Net1. We also observe that Net1 expression is required for centrosomal activation of p21-activated kinase and its downstream kinase Aurora A, which are critical regulators of centrosome maturation and spindle assembly. These results identify Net1 as a novel regulator of mitosis and indicate that altered expression of Net1, as occurs in human cancers, may adversely affect genomic stability.

  12. Rac-GTPases Regulate Microtubule Stability and Axon Growth of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivodar, Simona; Kalemaki, Katerina; Kounoupa, Zouzana; Vidaki, Marina; Theodorakis, Kostas; Denaxa, Myrto; Kessaris, Nicoletta; de Curtis, Ivan; Pachnis, Vassilis; Karagogeos, Domna

    2015-09-01

    Cortical interneurons are characterized by extraordinary functional and morphological diversity. Although tremendous progress has been made in uncovering molecular and cellular mechanisms implicated in interneuron generation and function, several questions still remain open. Rho-GTPases have been implicated as intracellular mediators of numerous developmental processes such as cytoskeleton organization, vesicle trafficking, transcription, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Specifically in cortical interneurons, we have recently shown a cell-autonomous and stage-specific requirement for Rac1 activity within proliferating interneuron precursors. Conditional ablation of Rac1 in the medial ganglionic eminence leads to a 50% reduction of GABAergic interneurons in the postnatal cortex. Here we examine the additional role of Rac3 by analyzing Rac1/Rac3 double-mutant mice. We show that in the absence of both Rac proteins, the embryonic migration of medial ganglionic eminence-derived interneurons is further impaired. Postnatally, double-mutant mice display a dramatic loss of cortical interneurons. In addition, Rac1/Rac3-deficient interneurons show gross cytoskeletal defects in vitro, with the length of their leading processes significantly reduced and a clear multipolar morphology. We propose that in the absence of Rac1/Rac3, cortical interneurons fail to migrate tangentially towards the pallium due to defects in actin and microtubule cytoskeletal dynamics.

  13. Rotenone-induced toxicity is mediated by Rho-GTPases in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Monica; Gastaldi, Laura; Remedi, Monica; Cáceres, Alfredo; Landa, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we have examined the effects of rotenone in primary cultures of hippocampal and dopaminergic neurons in order to obtain insights into the possible mechanisms underlying the neurotoxic effects of this pesticide. The results obtained indicate that a 48-h exposure to rotenone (0.1 microM) produces a complete and selective suppression of axon formation. This effect was dose dependent, not accompanied by changes in microtubule organization, and reversible after washout of the agrochemical from the tissue culture medium. Interestingly, pull-down assays revealed that rotenone decreases Cdc42 and Rac activities, whereas increasing that of Rho. In accordance with this, treatment of neuronal cultures with cytochalasin D, an actin-depolymerizing drug, or with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632, or overexpression of Tiam1, a guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac, reverts the inhibitory effect of rotenone on axon formation. Taken together, our data suggest that at least some of the neurotoxic effects of rotenone are associated with an inhibition of actin dynamics through modifications of Rho-GTPase activity.

  14. RIT1 GTPase Regulates Sox2 Transcriptional Activity and Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Sajad; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A

    2017-02-10

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from neuronal progenitor cells, makes critical contributions to neural circuitry and brain function in both healthy and disease states. Neurogenesis is a highly regulated process in which diverse environmental and physiological stimuli are relayed to resident neural stem cell populations to control the transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing neurogenesis is necessary for the development of translational strategies to harness this process for neuronal repair. Here we report that the Ras-related GTPase RIT1 serves to control the sequential proliferation and differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitor cells, with in vivo expression of active RIT1 driving robust adult neurogenesis. Gene expression profiling analysis demonstrates increased expression of a specific set of transcription factors known to govern adult neurogenesis in response to active RIT1 expression in the hippocampus, including sex-determining region Y-related HMG box 2 (Sox2), a well established regulator of stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis. In adult hippocampal neuronal precursor cells, RIT1 controls an Akt-dependent signaling cascade, resulting in the stabilization and transcriptional activation of phosphorylated Sox2. This study supports a role for RIT1 in relaying niche-derived signals to neural/stem progenitor cells to control transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation.

  15. Rho-GTPase effector ROCK phosphorylates cofilin in actin-meditated cytokinesis during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Liu, Jun; Dai, Xiao-Xin; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-02-01

    During oocyte meiosis, a spindle forms in the central cytoplasm and migrates to the cortex. Subsequently, the oocyte extrudes a small body and forms a highly polarized egg; this process is regulated primarily by actin. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is involved in various cellular functions, such as stress fiber formation, cell migration, tumor cell invasion, and cell motility. In this study, we investigated possible roles for ROCK in mouse oocyte meiosis. ROCK was localized around spindles after germinal vesicle breakdown and was colocalized with cytoplasmic actin and mitochondria. Disrupting ROCK activity by RNAi or an inhibitor resulted in cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion failure. Time-lapse microscopy showed that this may have been due to spindle migration and cytokinesis defects, as chromosomes segregated but failed to extrude a polar body and then realigned. Actin expression at oocyte membranes and in cytoplasm was significantly decreased after these treatments. Actin caps were also disrupted, which was confirmed by a failure to form cortical granule-free domains. The mitochondrial distribution was also disrupted, which indicated that mitochondria were involved in the ROCK-mediated actin assembly. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Cofilin, a downstream molecule of ROCK, decreased after disrupting ROCK activity. Thus, our results indicated that a ROCK-Cofilin-actin pathway regulated meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during mouse oocyte maturation.

  16. Spatial control of plasma membrane domains: ROP GTPase-based symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Lavagi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Breaking of the cell membrane symmetry to form polarized or localized domains/regions of the plasma membrane (PM) is a fundamental cellular process that occurs in essentially all cellular organisms, and is required for a wide variety of cellular functions/behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. In plants, the development of localized or polarized PM domains has been linked to a vast array of cellular and developmental processes such as polar cell expansion, asymmetric cell division, cell morphogenesis, the polarization of auxin transporters (and thus auxin polar transport), secondary cell wall patterning, cell type specification, and tissue pattern formation. Rho GTPases from plants (ROPs) are known to be involved in many of these processes. Here, we review the current knowledge on ROP involvement in breaking symmetry and propose that ROP-based self-organizing signaling may provide a common mechanism for the spatial control of PM domains required in various cellular and developmental processes in plants. PMID:23177207

  17. A Small GTPase Activator Protein Interacts with Cytoplasmic Phytochromes in Regulating Root Development*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Cho, Man-Ho; Kim, Tae-Lim; Yoo, Jihye; Kim, Jeong-Il; Han, Yun-Jeong; Song, Pill-Soon; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Ryong

    2010-01-01

    Phytochromes enable plants to sense light information and regulate developmental responses. Phytochromes interact with partner proteins to transmit light signals to downstream components for plant development. PIRF1 (phytochrome-interacting ROP guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (RopGEF 1)) functions as a light-signaling switch regulating root development through the activation of ROPs (Rho-like GTPase of plant) in the cytoplasm. In vitro pulldown and yeast two-hybrid assays confirmed the interaction between PIRF1 and phytochromes. PIRF1 interacted with the N-terminal domain of phytochromes through its conserved PRONE (plant-specific ROP nucleotide exchanger) region. PIRF1 also interacted with ROPs and activated them in a phytochrome-dependent manner. The Pr form of phytochrome A enhanced the RopGEF activity of PIRF1, whereas the Pfr form inhibited it. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis demonstrated that PIRF1 was localized in the cytoplasm and bound to the phytochromes in darkness but not in light. PIRF1 loss of function mutants (pirf1) of Arabidopsis thaliana showed a longer root phenotype in the dark. In addition, both PIRF1 overexpression mutants (PIRF1-OX) and phytochrome-null mutants (phyA-211 and phyB-9) showed retarded root elongation and irregular root hair formation, suggesting that PIRF1 is a negative regulator of phytochrome-mediated primary root development. We propose that phytochrome and ROP signaling are interconnected through PIRF1 in regulating the root growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:20551316

  18. NMR derived model of GTPase effector domain (GED self association: relevance to dynamin assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Self-association of dynamin to form spiral structures around lipidic vesicles during endocytosis is largely mediated by its 'coiled coil' GTPase Effector Domain (GED, which, in vitro, self-associates into huge helical assemblies. Residue-level structural characterizations of these assemblies and understanding the process of association have remained a challenge. It is also impossible to get folded monomers in the solution phase. In this context, we have developed here a strategy to probe the self-association of GED by first dissociating the assembly using Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO and then systematically monitoring the refolding into helix and concomitant re-association using NMR spectroscopy, as DMSO concentration is progressively reduced. The short segment, Arg109 - Met116, acts as the nucleation site for helix formation and self-association. Hydrophobic and complementary charge interactions on the surfaces drive self-association, as the helices elongate in both the directions resulting in an antiparallel stack. A small N-terminal segment remains floppy in the assembly. Following these and other published results on inter-domain interactions, we have proposed a plausible mode of dynamin self assembly.

  19. The Rab2A GTPase Promotes Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorigenesis via Erk Signaling Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Li Luo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proline-directed phosphorylation is regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1, which plays a fundamental role in driving breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs. Rab2A is a small GTPase critical for vesicle trafficking. Here, we show that Pin1 increases Rab2A transcription to promote BCSC expansion and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Rab2A directly interacts with and prevents dephosphorylation/inactivation of Erk1/2 by the MKP3 phosphatase, resulting in Zeb1 upregulation and β-catenin nuclear translocation. In cancer cells, Rab2A is activated via gene amplification, mutation or Pin1 overexpression. Rab2A overexpression or mutation endows BCSC traits to primary normal human breast epithelial cells, whereas silencing Rab2A potently inhibits the expansion and tumorigenesis of freshly isolated BCSCs. Finally, Rab2A overexpression correlates with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Thus, Pin1/Rab2A/Erk drives BCSC expansion and tumorigenicity, suggesting potential drug targets.

  20. Disassembly of the Staphylococcus aureus hibernating 100S ribosome by an evolutionarily conserved GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arnab; Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2017-09-11

    The bacterial hibernating 100S ribosome is a poorly understood form of the dimeric 70S particle that has been linked to pathogenesis, translational repression, starvation responses, and ribosome turnover. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and most other bacteria, hibernation-promoting factor (HPF) homodimerizes the 70S ribosomes to form a translationally silent 100S complex. Conversely, the 100S ribosomes dissociate into subunits and are presumably recycled for new rounds of translation. The regulation and disassembly of the 100S ribosome are largely unknown because the temporal abundance of the 100S ribosome varies considerably among different bacterial phyla. Here, we identify a universally conserved GTPase (HflX) as a bona fide dissociation factor of the S. aureus 100S ribosome. The expression levels hpf and hflX are coregulated by general stress and stringent responses in a temperature-dependent manner. While all tested guanosine analogs stimulate the splitting activity of HflX on the 70S ribosome, only GTP can completely dissociate the 100S ribosome. Our results reveal the antagonistic relationship of HPF and HflX and uncover the key regulators of 70S and 100S ribosome homeostasis that are intimately associated with bacterial survival.

  1. How not to do kinetics: examples involving GTPases and guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are crucial regulators of the action of GTPases in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Although their basic mechanism of action has been apparent for almost 20 years, there are still misconceptions concerning their properties, and these are confounded by superficial or incorrect interpretation of experimental results in individual cases. Here, an example is described in which an incorrect mechanism was derived because of an inadequate analysis of kinetic results. In a second example, a case is discussed where certain GTP analogs were erroneously described as being able to function as low molecular mass GEFs. In both cases, a lack of distinction between rates, rate constants, and apparent rate constants, together with a disregard of relative signal amplitudes, led to the misinterpretations. In a final example, it is shown how the lack of an appropriate kinetic investigation led to the false conclusion that a secreted protein from Legionella pneumophila can act not only as a GEF towards eukaryotic Rab1 but also as a factor that is able to actively dissociate the stable complex between Rab1 and GDP dissociation inhibitor.

  2. A conserved role for atlastin GTPases in regulating lipid droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Robin W; Norton, Justin P; Cole, Ronald A; Li, Chen S; Park, Seong H; Crane, Matthew M; Li, Liying; Jin, Diana; Boye-Doe, Alexandra; Liu, Tina Y; Shibata, Yoko; Lu, Hang; Rapoport, Tom A; Farese, Robert V; Blackstone, Craig; Guo, Yi; Mak, Ho Yi

    2013-05-30

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are the major fat storage organelles in eukaryotic cells, but how their size is regulated is unknown. Using genetic screens in C. elegans for LD morphology defects in intestinal cells, we found that mutations in atlastin, a GTPase required for homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, cause not only ER morphology defects, but also a reduction in LD size. Similar results were obtained after depletion of atlastin or expression of a dominant-negative mutant, whereas overexpression of atlastin had the opposite effect. Atlastin depletion in Drosophila fat bodies also reduced LD size and decreased triglycerides in whole animals, sensitizing them to starvation. In mammalian cells, co-overexpression of atlastin-1 and REEP1, a paralog of the ER tubule-shaping protein DP1/REEP5, generates large LDs. The effect of atlastin-1 on LD size correlates with its activity to promote membrane fusion in vitro. Our results indicate that atlastin-mediated fusion of ER membranes is important for LD size regulation.

  3. Caspase-11 activation requires lysis of pathogen-containing vacuoles by IFN-induced GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Etienne; Dick, Mathias S; Dreier, Roland F; Schürmann, Nura; Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Warming, Søren; Roose-Girma, Merone; Bumann, Dirk; Kayagaki, Nobuhiko; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Broz, Petr

    2014-05-15

    Lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria is sensed in the host cell cytoplasm by a non-canonical inflammasome pathway that ultimately results in caspase-11 activation and cell death. In mouse macrophages, activation of this pathway requires the production of type-I interferons, indicating that interferon-induced genes have a critical role in initiating this pathway. Here we report that a cluster of small interferon-inducible GTPases, the so-called guanylate-binding proteins, is required for the full activity of the non-canonical caspase-11 inflammasome during infections with vacuolar Gram-negative bacteria. We show that guanylate-binding proteins are recruited to intracellular bacterial pathogens and are necessary to induce the lysis of the pathogen-containing vacuole. Lysis of the vacuole releases bacteria into the cytosol, thus allowing the detection of their lipopolysaccharide by a yet unknown lipopolysaccharide sensor. Moreover, recognition of the lysed vacuole by the danger sensor galectin-8 initiates the uptake of bacteria into autophagosomes, which results in a reduction of caspase-11 activation. These results indicate that host-mediated lysis of pathogen-containing vacuoles is an essential immune function and is necessary for efficient recognition of pathogens by inflammasome complexes in the cytosol.

  4. The Toxoplasma pseudokinase ROP5 is an allosteric inhibitor of the immunity-related GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Michael L; Shah, Niket; Boothroyd, John C

    2014-10-03

    The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that there is an evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. One possible example of such a phenomenon could be the recently discovered interaction between host defense proteins known as immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and a family of rhoptry pseudokinases (ROP5) expressed by the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Mouse IRGs are encoded by an extensive and rapidly evolving family of over 20 genes. Similarly, the ROP5 family is highly polymorphic and consists of 4-10 genes, depending on the strain of Toxoplasma. IRGs are known to be avidly bound and functionally inactivated by ROP5 proteins, but the molecular basis of this interaction/inactivation has not previously been known. Here we show that ROP5 uses a highly polymorphic surface to bind adjacent to the nucleotide-binding domain of an IRG and that this produces a profound allosteric change in the IRG structure. This has two dramatic effects: 1) it prevents oligomerization of the IRG, and 2) it alters the orientation of two threonine residues that are targeted by the Toxoplasma Ser/Thr kinases, ROP17 and ROP18. ROP5s are highly specific in the IRGs that they will bind, and the fact that it is the most highly polymorphic surface of ROP5 that binds the IRG strongly supports the notion that these two protein families are co-evolving in a way predicted by the Red Queen hypothesis.

  5. Identification of potential small molecule binding pockets on Rho family GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Ortiz-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are conformational switches that control a wide variety of signaling pathways critical for eukaryotic cell development and proliferation. They represent attractive targets for drug design as their aberrant function and deregulated activity is associated with many human diseases including cancer. Extensive high-resolution structures (>100 and recent mutagenesis studies have laid the foundation for the design of new structure-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Although the inhibition of Rho signaling with drug-like compounds is an active area of current research, very little attention has been devoted to directly inhibiting Rho by targeting potential allosteric non-nucleotide binding sites. By avoiding the nucleotide binding site, compounds may minimize the potential for undesirable off-target interactions with other ubiquitous GTP and ATP binding proteins. Here we describe the application of molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, sequence conservation analysis, and ensemble small-molecule fragment mapping to provide an extensive mapping of potential small-molecule binding pockets on Rho family members. Characterized sites include novel pockets in the vicinity of the conformationaly responsive switch regions as well as distal sites that appear to be related to the conformations of the nucleotide binding region. Furthermore the use of accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, an advanced sampling method that extends the accessible time-scale of conventional simulations, is found to enhance the characterization of novel binding sites when conformational changes are important for the protein mechanism.

  6. Dimerization of TOC receptor GTPases and its implementation for the control of protein import into chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronsson, Henrik; Jarvis, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Pre-protein import into chloroplasts is facilitated by multiprotein translocon complexes in the envelope membranes. Major components of the TOC (translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts) complex are the receptor proteins Toc33 and Toc159. These two receptors are related GTPases, and they are predicted to engage in homodimerization and/or heterodimerization. Although such dimerization has been studied extensively, its exact function in vivo remains elusive. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Oreb et al. present evidence that homodimerization of Toc33 prevents nucleotide exchange, thereby locking the receptor in the GDP-loaded state and preventing further activity. Pre-protein arrival is proposed to release this lock, through disruption of the dimer and subsequent nucleotide exchange. The Toc33-bound pre-protein is then able to progress to downstream steps in the translocation mechanism, with GTP hydrolysis defining another important control point as well as preparing the receptor for the next pre-protein client. These new results are discussed in the context of previous findings pertaining to TOC receptor dimerization and function.

  7. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35-40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition.

  8. The small GTPase Rab33A participates in regulation of amylase release from parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Akane; Tsujimura, Maiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2015-06-05

    Amylase is released from exocrine parotid acinar cells via typical exocytosis. Exocytosis of amylase-containing granules occurs through several steps, including formation, maturation, and transport of granules. These steps are thought to be regulated by members of the small GTPase Rab family. We previously demonstrated that Rab27 and its effectors mediate amylase release from parotid acinar cells, but the functional involvement of other Rab proteins in exocrine granule exocytosis remains largely unknown. Here, we studied isoproterenol (IPR)-induced amylase release from parotid acinar cells to investigate the possible involvement of Rab33A, which was recently suggested to regulate exocytosis in hippocampal neurons and PC12 cells. Rab33A was endogenously expressed in parotid acinar cells and present in secretory granules and the Golgi body. Functional ablation of Rab33A with anti-Rab33A antibody or a dominant-negative Rab33A-T50N mutant significantly reduced IPR-induced amylase release. Our results indicated that Rab33A is a novel component of IPR-stimulated amylase secretion from parotid acinar cells.

  9. Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 as a metastasis suppressor in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, Tracy A; Shamsan, Ghaidan A; Edwards, Elizabeth N; Hazelton, Paige E; Rathe, Susan K; Cornax, Ingrid; Overn, Paula R; Varshney, Jyotika; Diessner, Brandon J; Moriarity, Branden S; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Odde, David J; Largaespada, David A

    2016-12-14

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor, with metastatic disease responsible for most treatment failure and patient death. A forward genetic screen utilizing Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in mice previously identified potential genetic drivers of osteosarcoma metastasis, including Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 (Srgap2). This study evaluates the potential role of SRGAP2 in metastases-associated properties of osteosarcoma cell lines through Srgap2 knockout via the CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease system and conditional overexpression in the murine osteosarcoma cell lines K12 and K7M2. Proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth were evaluated. RNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry of human osteosarcoma tissue samples were used to further evaluate the potential role of the Slit-Robo pathway in osteosarcoma. The effects of Srgap2 expression modulation in the murine OS cell lines support the hypothesis that SRGAP2 may have a role as a suppressor of metastases in osteosarcoma. Additionally, SRGAP2 and other genes in the Slit-Robo pathway have altered transcript levels in a subset of mouse and human osteosarcoma, and SRGAP2 protein expression is reduced or absent in a subset of primary tumor samples. SRGAP2 and other axon guidance proteins likely play a role in osteosarcoma metastasis, with loss of SRGAP2 potentially contributing to a more aggressive phenotype.

  10. The role of the small GTPase Rap in Drosophila R7 photoreceptor specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatakis, Yannis Emmanuel; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila R7 photoreceptor provides an excellent model system with which to study how cells receive and “decode” signals that specify cell fate. R7 is specified by the combined actions of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and Notch (N) signaling pathways. These pathways interact in a complex manner that includes antagonistic effects on photoreceptor specification: RTK promotes the photoreceptor fate, whereas N inhibits. Although other photoreceptors are subject to only mild N activation, R7 experiences a high-level N signal. To counter this effect and to ensure that the cell is specified as a photoreceptor, a high RTK signal is transduced in the cell. Thus, there are two levels of RTK transduction in the photoreceptors: in R7 it is high, whereas in others it is low. Here, we address how this high-level RTK signal is transduced in R7 and find that, in addition to Ras, another small GTPase, Rap, is also engaged. Thus, when N activity is high, a robust RTK signal operates that uses both Ras and Rap, but when N activity is low, only a mild RTK signal is transduced and Ras alone suffices for the purpose. PMID:22355117

  11. ROP GTPase-mediated auxin signaling regulates pavement cell interdigitation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deshu Lin; Huibo Ren; Ying Fu

    2015-01-01

    In multicel ular plant organs, cel shape formation depends on molecular switches to transduce developmental or environmental signals and to coordinate cel‐to‐cel communi-cation. Plants have a specific subfamily of the Rho GTPase family, usual y cal ed Rho of Plants (ROP), which serve as a critical signal transducer involved in many cel ular processes. In the last decade, important advances in the ROP‐mediated regulation of plant cel morphogenesis have been made by using Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and cotyledon pavement cel s. Especial y, the auxin‐ROP signaling networks have been demonstrated to control interdigitated growth of pavement cel s to form jigsaw‐puzzle shapes. Here, we review findings related to the discovery of this novel auxin‐signaling mecha-nism at the cel surface. This signaling pathway is to a large extent independent of the wel‐known Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR)–Auxin Signaling F‐Box (AFB) pathway, and instead requires Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) interaction with the plasma membrane‐localized, transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor‐like kinase to regulate ROP proteins. Once activated, ROP influences cytoskeletal organization and inhibits endocytosis of the auxin transporter PIN1. The present review focuses on ROP signaling and its self‐organizing feature al owing ROP proteins to serve as a bustling signal decoder and integrator for plant cel morphogenesis.

  12. Rho GTPases: Novel Players in the Regulation of the DNA Damage Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Fritz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 belongs to the family of Ras-homologous small GTPases. It is well characterized as a membrane-bound signal transducing molecule that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion as well as cell cycle progression, mitosis, cell death and gene expression. Rac1 also adjusts cellular responses to genotoxic stress by regulating the activity of stress kinases, including c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK and p38 kinases as well as related transcription factors. Apart from being found on the inner side of the outer cell membrane and in the cytosol, Rac1 has also been detected inside the nucleus. Different lines of evidence indicate that genotoxin-induced DNA damage is able to activate nuclear Rac1. The exact mechanisms involved and the biological consequences, however, are unclear. The data available so far indicate that Rac1 might integrate DNA damage independent and DNA damage dependent cellular stress responses following genotoxin treatment, thereby coordinating mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR that are related to DNA repair, survival and cell death.

  13. Formation of Tertiary Interactions during rRNA GTPase Center Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Michael J; Welty, Robb; Tom Stump, W; Hall, Kathleen B

    2015-08-28

    The 60-nt GTPase center (GAC) of 23S rRNA has a phylogenetically conserved secondary structure with two hairpin loops and a 3-way junction. It folds into an intricate tertiary structure upon addition of Mg(2+) ions, which is stabilized by the L11 protein in cocrystal structures. Here, we monitor the kinetics of its tertiary folding and Mg(2+)-dependent intermediate states by observing selected nucleobases that contribute specific interactions to the GAC tertiary structure in the cocrystals. The fluorescent nucleobase 2-aminopurine replaced three individual adenines, two of which make long-range stacking interactions and one that also forms hydrogen bonds. Each site reveals a unique response to Mg(2+) addition and temperature, reflecting its environmental change from secondary to tertiary structure. Stopped-flow fluorescence experiments revealed that kinetics of tertiary structure formation upon addition of MgCl2 are also site specific, with local conformational changes occurring from 5 ms to 4s and with global folding from 1 to 5s. Site-specific substitution with (15)N-nucleobases allowed observation of stable hydrogen bond formation by NMR experiments. Equilibrium titration experiments indicate that a stable folding intermediate is present at stoichiometric concentrations of Mg(2+) and suggest that there are two initial sites of Mg(2+) ion association.

  14. New strategy for high-level expression and purification of biologically active monomeric TGF-β1/C77S in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yana V; Gasparian, Marine E; Bocharov, Eduard V; Chertkova, Rita V; Tkach, Elena N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2015-02-01

    Mature transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) is a homodimeric protein with a single disulfide bridge between Cys77 on the respective monomers. The synthetic DNA sequence encoding the mature human TGF-β1/C77S (further termed TGF-β1m) was cloned into plasmid pET-32a downstream to the gene of fusion partner thioredoxin (Trx) immediately after the DNA sequence encoding enteropeptidase recognition site. High-level expression (~1.5 g l(-1)) of Trx/TGF-β1m fusion was achieved in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain mainly in insoluble form. The fusion was solubilized and refolded in glutathione redox system in the presence of zwitterionic detergent CHAPS. After refolding, Trx/TGF-β1m fusion was cleaved by enteropeptidase, and the carrier protein of TGF-β1m was separated from thioredoxin on Ni-NTA agarose. Separation of monomeric molecules from the noncovalently bounded oligomers was done using cation-exchange chromatography. The structure of purified TGF-β1m was confirmed by circular dichroism analysis. The developed technology allowed purifying biologically active tag-free monomeric TGF-β1m from bacteria with a yield of about 2.8 mg from 100 ml cell culture. The low-cost and easy purification steps allow considering that our proposed preparation of recombinant monomeric TGF-β1 could be employed for in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Recognition profile of Morus nigra agglutinin (Morniga G) expressed by monomeric ligands, simple clusters and mammalian polyvalent glycotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanuja; Wu, June H; Peumans, Willy J; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M; Wu, Albert M

    2007-01-01

    The carbohydrate binding properties of a novel member of the subfamily of galactose-specific jacalin-related lectin isolated from the bark of black mulberry (Morus nigra) (Morniga G) was studied in detail by enzyme-linked lectinosorbent and inhibition assays using panels of monomeric saccharides, mammalian polyvalent glycotopes and polysaccharides. Among the natural glycans tested for lectin binding, Morniga G reacted best with glycoproteins (gps) presenting a high density of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens Tn (GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr) and Talpha (Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-). Their reactivities, on a nanogram basis, were up to 72.5, 3.9x10(3), 6.0x10(3), 8.8x10(3) and 2.9x10(4) times higher than that of Tn-containing glycopeptides (M.W.Man/Glc, GlcNAc and lFuc; (ii) the mammalian glycotope specificity is Talpha1-benzyl>T>Tn>GalNAcbeta1-3Gal (P), while B/E (Galalpha1-3/4Gal), I/II (Galbeta1-3/4GlcNAc), S (GalNAcbeta1-4Gal), F/A (GalNAcalpha1-3GalNAc/Gal) and L (Galbeta1-4Glc) are inactive; (iii) the most active ligand is T/Tn; (iv) simple clustered Tn or triantennary N-glycans with II termini (Tri-II) have limited impact; (v) high-density polyvalent glycotopes play a prominent role for enhancing Morniga G reactivity. These results provide evidence for the binding of this lectin to dense cell surface T/Tn glycoconjugates and facilitate future usage of this lectin in biotechnological and medical applications.

  16. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health--a randomized controlled clinical pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje R Weseler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases are expanding to a major social-economic burden in the Western World and undermine man's deep desire for healthy ageing. Epidemiological studies suggest that flavanol-rich foods (e.g. grapes, wine, chocolate sustain cardiovascular health. For an evidenced-based application, however, sound clinical data on their efficacy are strongly demanded. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study we supplemented 28 male smokers with 200 mg per day of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF from grape seeds. At baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks we measured macro- and microvascular function and a cluster of systemic biomarkers for major pathological processes occurring in the vasculature: disturbances in lipid metabolism and cellular redox balance, and activation of inflammatory cells and platelets. RESULTS: In the MOF group serum total cholesterol and LDL decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05 by 5% (n = 11 and 7% (n = 9, respectively in volunteers with elevated baseline levels. Additionally, after 8 weeks the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulphide in erythrocytes rose from baseline by 22% (n = 15, P<0.05 in MOF supplemented subjects. We also observed that MOF supplementation exerts anti-inflammatory effects in blood towards ex vivo added bacterial endotoxin and significantly reduces expression of inflammatory genes in leukocytes. Conversely, alterations in macro- and microvascular function, platelet aggregation, plasma levels of nitric oxide surrogates, endothelin-1, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, prostaglandin F2alpha, plasma antioxidant capacity and gene expression levels of antioxidant defense enzymes did not reach statistical significance after 8 weeks MOF supplementation. However, integrating all measured effects into a global, so-called vascular health index revealed a significant improvement of overall vascular health by MOF compared to placebo (P ≤ 0.05. CONCLUSION: Our

  17. Aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of a beta-clam protein proceeds through a monomeric nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2005-05-17

    Mechanistic understanding of protein aggregation, leading either to structured amyloid fibrils or to amorphous inclusion body-like deposits, should facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic intervention strategies for the devastating amyloid-based diseases. Here we focus on the in vitro aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of the beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (P39A CRABP I), which forms inclusion bodies when expressed in Escherichia coli. Aggregation was monitored by observing the fluorescence of a fluorescein-based biarsenical dye (FlAsH) that ligates to a tetra-Cys motif, here incorporated into a flexible Omega-loop. The fluorescence signal of FlAsH on the tetra-Cys-containing P39A CRABP I is sensitive to whether this protein is native or unfolded, and was used in combination with other techniques to follow aggregate formation. The aggregation time course is compatible with a nucleation-dependent polymerization model, and detailed kinetic analysis showed that the energetically unfavorable nucleus is monomeric. A similar conclusion was reached previously for poly(Gln) species [Chen, S., Ferrone, F. A., and Wetzel, R. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889] and points to an unfavorable equilibrium between the misfolded intermediate and the bulk pool of monomers as causative in aggregation. The P39A mutation, which removes a helix-stop signal, may slow closure of the beta-barrel in P39A CRABP I relative to the wild type, leaving it vulnerable to aggregation. Wide-angle X-ray scattering showed that the amorphous aggregates formed by the aggregation-prone intermediates of P39A CRABP I contain predominantly beta-strands structured in a lamellar fashion with 10.03 A spacing between adjacent beta-sheets.

  18. Occurrence and Speciation of Polymeric Chromium(III), Monomeric Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) in Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    HU, LIGANG; CAI, YONG; JIANG, GUIBIN

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in aqueous solution for a relative long period of time. However, the occurrence of polymeric Cr(III) has not been reported in environmental media due partially to the lack of method for speciating polymeric Cr. We observed an unknown Cr species during the course of study on speciation of Cr in the leachates of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Efforts were made to identify structure of the unknown Cr species. Considering the forms of Cr existed in the CCA-treated woods, we mainly focused our efforts to determine if the unknown species were polymeric Cr(III), complex of Cr/As or complex of Cr with dissolved organic matter (DOM). In order to evaluate whether polymeric Cr(III) largely exist in wood leachates, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS was used) for simultaneous speciation of monomeric Cr(III), polymeric Cr(III), and Cr(VI). In addition to wood leachates where polymeric Cr (III) ranged from 39.1 to 67.4 %, occurrence of the unknown Cr species in other environmental matrices, including surface waters, tap and waste waters, was also investigated. It was found that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in environmental samples containing μg/L level of Cr, at a level up to 60% of total Cr, suggesting that polymeric Cr(III) could significantly exist in natural environments. Failure in quantifying polymeric Cr(III) would lead to the underestimation of total Cr and bias in Cr speciation. The environmental implication of the presence of polymeric Cr(III) species in the environment deserves further study. PMID:27156211

  19. Stability, structural and functional properties of a monomeric, calcium–loaded adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, from Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella, Sara E.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Davi, Marilyne; Malosse, Christian; Sotomayor Pérez, Ana Cristina; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, which invades eukaryotic cells and alters their physiology by cAMP overproduction. Calcium is an essential cofactor of CyaA, as it is the case for most members of the Repeat-in-ToXins (RTX) family. We show that the calcium-bound, monomeric form of CyaA, hCyaAm, conserves its permeabilization and haemolytic activities, even in a fully calcium-free environment. In contrast, hCyaAm requires sub-millimolar calcium in solution for cell invasion, indicating that free calcium in solution is involved in the CyaA toxin translocation process. We further report the first in solution structural characterization of hCyaAm, as deduced from SAXS, mass spectrometry and hydrodynamic studies. We show that hCyaAm adopts a compact and stable state that can transiently conserve its conformation even in a fully calcium-free environment. Our results therefore suggest that in hCyaAm, the C-terminal RTX-domain is stabilized in a high-affinity calcium-binding state by the N-terminal domains while, conversely, calcium binding to the C-terminal RTX-domain strongly stabilizes the N-terminal regions. Hence, the different regions of hCyaAm appear tightly connected, leading to stabilization effects between domains. The hysteretic behaviour of CyaA in response to calcium is likely shared by other RTX cytolysins. PMID:28186111

  20. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pei-Ling; Hassan, Osman; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Badri, Khairiah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF) was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen) and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP)] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt.) and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes) on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17 ± 49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67 ± 0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57 ± 1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68 ± 23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44 ± 6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26 ± 41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21 ± 2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75 ± 3.40 ppm ferulic acid), among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt.) was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid). Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g(-1) lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83 ± 14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19 ± 3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80 ± 1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06 ± 1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19 ± 2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoside diphosphate kinase inactivates small GTPases leading to evasion of innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Sun

    Full Text Available Defining the mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb persistence in the host macrophage and identifying mycobacterial factors responsible for it are keys to better understand tuberculosis pathogenesis. The emerging picture from ongoing studies of macrophage deactivation by Mtb suggests that ingested bacilli secrete various virulence determinants that alter phagosome biogenesis, leading to arrest of Mtb vacuole interaction with late endosomes and lysosomes. While most studies focused on Mtb interference with various regulators of the endosomal compartment, little attention was paid to mechanisms by which Mtb neutralizes early macrophage responses such as the NADPH oxidase (NOX2 dependent oxidative burst. Here we applied an antisense strategy to knock down Mtb nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk and obtained a stable mutant (Mtb Ndk-AS that displayed attenuated intracellular survival along with reduced persistence in the lungs of infected mice. At the molecular level, pull-down experiments showed that Ndk binds to and inactivates the small GTPase Rac1 in the macrophage. This resulted in the exclusion of the Rac1 binding partner p67(phox from phagosomes containing Mtb or Ndk-coated latex beads. Exclusion of p67(phox was associated with a defect of both NOX2 assembly and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to wild type Mtb. In contrast, Mtb Ndk-AS, which lost the capacity to disrupt Rac1-p67(phox interaction, induced a strong ROS production. Given the established link between NOX2 activation and apoptosis, the proportion of Annexin V positive cells and levels of intracellular active caspase 3 were significantly higher in cells infected with Mtb Ndk-AS compared to wild type Mtb. Thus, knock down of Ndk converted Mtb into a pro-apoptotic mutant strain that has a phenotype of increased susceptibility to intracellular killing and reduced virulence in vivo. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data revealed that Ndk

  2. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, Atsushi, E-mail: yamadaa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Junichi [Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Aizawa, Ryo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Dai [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kassai, Hidetoshi [Laboratory of Animal Resources, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Mishima, Kenji [Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Aiba, Atsu [Laboratory of Animal Resources, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Maki, Koutaro [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kamijo, Ryutaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}; Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages. - Highlights: • Tamoxifen-induced cartilage specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice were generated. • Cdc42 mutant mice were shorter limbs and body. • Severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes.

  3. How prenylation and S-acylation regulate subcellular targeting and function of ROP GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Nadav; Henis, Yoav I; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-07-01

    Rho of Plants (ROP) small G proteins function at discrete domains of the plasma and possibly endo membranes. ROPs are synthesized as soluble proteins and their attachment to membranes and partitioning in membrane microdomains are facilitated by the posttranslational lipid modifications prenylation and/or S-acylation. Based on their amino acid sequences, ROPs can be classified into two major subgroups: type-I ROPs terminate with a canonical CaaX box motif and are prenylated primarily by geranylgeranyltransferase-I (GGT-I) and to a lesser extent by farnesyltransferase (FT). Type-II ROPs terminate with a plant specific GC-CG box domain and are attached to the plasma membrane by stable S-acylation. In addition, type-I and possibly also type-II ROPs undergo activation dependent transient S-acylation in the G-domain and consequent partitioning into lipid rafts. Surprisingly, although geranylgeranylation is required for the membrane attachment of type-I ROPs and the γ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, Arabidopsis mutants lacking GGT-I function have a mild phenotype compared to wild type plants. The mild phenotype of the ggt-I mutants suggested that farnesylation by FT may compensate for the loss of GGT-I function and that possibly the prenylated type-I and S-acylated type-II ROPS have some overlapping functions. In a paper recently published in Plant Physiology we examined the role of the prenyl group type in type-I ROP function and membrane interaction dynamics and the functional redundancy between type-I and type-II ROPs. This study complements a second paper in which we examined the role of G-domain transient S-acylation in the membrane interaction dynamics and signaling by type-I ROPs. Together these two studies provide a framework for realizing the role of prenylation and S-acylation in subcellular targeting, membrane interaction dynamics and signaling by ROP GTPases.

  4. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  5. Identification and Characterization of a Chloroplast-Targeted Obg GTPase in Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Deng, Feng; Deng, Mengsheng; Han, Jincheng; Chen, Jianbin; Wang, Li; Yan, Shen; Tong, Kai; Liu, Fan; Tian, Mengliang

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial homologous chloroplast-targeted Obg GTPases (ObgCs) belong to the plant-typical Obg group, which is involved in diverse physiological processes during chloroplast development. However, the evolutionarily conserved function of ObgC in plants remains elusive and requires further investigation. In this study, we identified DoObgC from an epiphytic plant Dendrobium officinale and demonstrated the characteristics of DoObgC. Sequence analysis indicated that DoObgC is highly conserved with other plant ObgCs, which contain the chloroplast transit peptide (cTP), Obg fold, G domain, and OCT regions. The C terminus of DoObgC lacking the chloroplast-targeting cTP region, DoObgCΔ1-160, showed strong similarity to ObgE and other bacterial Obgs. Overexpression of DoObgCΔ1-160 in Escherichia coli caused slow cell growth and an increased number of elongated cells. This phenotype was consistent with the phenotype of cells overexpressing ObgE. Furthermore, the expression of recombinant DoObgCΔ1-160 enhanced the cell persistence of E. coli to streptomycin. Results of transient expression assays revealed that DoObgC was localized to chloroplasts. Moreover, we demonstrated that DoObgC could rescue the embryotic lethal phenotype of the Arabidopsis obgc-t mutant, suggesting that DoObgC is a functional homolog to Arabidopsis AtObgC in D. officinale. Gene expression profiles showed that DoObgC was expressed in leaf-specific and light-dependent patterns and that DoObgC responded to wounding treatments. Our previous and present studies reveal that ObgC has an evolutionarily conserved role in ribosome biogenesis to adapt chloroplast development to the environment.

  6. The small GTPase RhoB regulates TNFα signaling in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Kroon

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response of endothelial cells triggered by cytokines such as TNFα and IL1β plays a pivotal role in innate immunity. Upon pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulation, endothelial cells produce chemokines and cytokines that attract and activate leukocytes, and express high levels of leukocyte adhesion molecules. This process is mediated by intracellular signaling cascades triggered by activation of e.g. the TNFα receptor (TNFR that lead to the activation of the NFκB transcription factor and of MAP kinases, which in turn activate inflammatory gene transcription. We found that the small GTPase RhoB was strongly and rapidly upregulated in primary human endothelial cells by TNFα, IL1β and LPS. We subsequently investigated the role of RhoB in the regulation of TNFR signaling in endothelial cells by silencing RhoB expression with siRNA. We provide evidence that the TNFα-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase is strongly dependent on RhoB, but not on RhoA, while JNK activation is regulated by both RhoB and RhoA. Consistent with the important role of p38 MAP kinase in inflammation, we demonstrate that loss of RhoB impairs TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression and reduces cell production of IL6 and IL8. In addition, we show that RhoB silencing alters the intracellular traffic of TNFα after endocytosis. Since RhoB is a known regulator of the intracellular traffic of membrane receptors, our data suggest that RhoB controls TNFα signaling through the regulation of the TNFR traffic.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoside diphosphate kinase inactivates small GTPases leading to evasion of innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Sun

    Full Text Available Defining the mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb persistence in the host macrophage and identifying mycobacterial factors responsible for it are keys to better understand tuberculosis pathogenesis. The emerging picture from ongoing studies of macrophage deactivation by Mtb suggests that ingested bacilli secrete various virulence determinants that alter phagosome biogenesis, leading to arrest of Mtb vacuole interaction with late endosomes and lysosomes. While most studies focused on Mtb interference with various regulators of the endosomal compartment, little attention was paid to mechanisms by which Mtb neutralizes early macrophage responses such as the NADPH oxidase (NOX2 dependent oxidative burst. Here we applied an antisense strategy to knock down Mtb nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk and obtained a stable mutant (Mtb Ndk-AS that displayed attenuated intracellular survival along with reduced persistence in the lungs of infected mice. At the molecular level, pull-down experiments showed that Ndk binds to and inactivates the small GTPase Rac1 in the macrophage. This resulted in the exclusion of the Rac1 binding partner p67(phox from phagosomes containing Mtb or Ndk-coated latex beads. Exclusion of p67(phox was associated with a defect of both NOX2 assembly and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to wild type Mtb. In contrast, Mtb Ndk-AS, which lost the capacity to disrupt Rac1-p67(phox interaction, induced a strong ROS production. Given the established link between NOX2 activation and apoptosis, the proportion of Annexin V positive cells and levels of intracellular active caspase 3 were significantly higher in cells infected with Mtb Ndk-AS compared to wild type Mtb. Thus, knock down of Ndk converted Mtb into a pro-apoptotic mutant strain that has a phenotype of increased susceptibility to intracellular killing and reduced virulence in vivo. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data revealed that Ndk

  8. Endosomal maturation, Rab7 GTPase and phosphoinositides in African swine fever virus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Cuesta-Geijo

    Full Text Available Here we analyzed the dependence of African swine fever virus (ASFV infection on the integrity of the endosomal pathway. Using confocal immunofluorescence with antibodies against viral capsid proteins, we found colocalization of incoming viral particles with early endosomes (EE during the first minutes of infection. Conversely, viral capsid protein was not detected in acidic late endosomal compartments, multivesicular bodies (MVBs, late endosomes (LEs or lysosomes (LY. Using an antibody against a viral inner core protein, we found colocalization of viral cores with late compartments from 30 to 60 minutes postinfection. The absence of capsid protein staining in LEs and LYs suggested that virus desencapsidation would take place at the acid pH of these organelles. In fact, inhibitors of intraluminal acidification of endosomes caused retention of viral capsid staining virions in Rab7 expressing endosomes and more importantly, severely impaired subsequent viral protein production. Endosomal acidification in the first hour after virus entry was essential for successful infection but not thereafter. In addition, altering the balance of phosphoinositides (PIs which are responsible of the maintenance of the endocytic pathway impaired ASFV infection. Early infection steps were dependent on the production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P which is involved in EE maturation and multivesicular body (MVB biogenesis and on the interconversion of PtdIns3P to phosphatidylinositol 3, 5-biphosphate (PtdIns(3,5P(2. Likewise, GTPase Rab7 activity should remain intact, as well as processes related to LE compartment physiology, which are crucial during early infection. Our data demonstrate that the EE and LE compartments and the integrity of the endosomal maturation pathway orchestrated by Rab proteins and PIs play a central role during early stages of ASFV infection.

  9. Crystal structure of the GTPase-activating protein-related domain from IQGAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella, Vinodh B; Richard, Jessica M; Parke, Courtney L; Lecour, Louis F; Bellamy, Henry D; Worthylake, David K

    2009-05-29

    IQGAP1 is a 190-kDa molecular scaffold containing several domains required for interaction with numerous proteins. One domain is homologous to Ras GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domains. However, instead of accelerating hydrolysis of bound GTP on Ras IQGAP1, using its GAP-related domain (GRD) binds to Cdc42 and Rac1 and stabilizes their GTP-bound states. We report here the crystal structure of the isolated IQGAP1 GRD. Despite low sequence conservation, the overall structure of the GRD is very similar to the GAP domains from p120 RasGAP, neurofibromin, and SynGAP. However, instead of the catalytic "arginine finger" seen in functional Ras GAPs, the GRD has a conserved threonine residue. GRD residues 1099-1129 have no structural equivalent in RasGAP and are seen to form an extension at one end of the molecule. Because the sequence of these residues is highly conserved, this region likely confers a functionality particular to IQGAP family GRDs. We have used isothermal titration calorimetry to demonstrate that the isolated GRD binds to active Cdc42. Assuming a mode of interaction similar to that displayed in the Ras-RasGAP complex, we created an energy-minimized model of Cdc42.GTP bound to the GRD. Residues of the GRD that contact Cdc42 map to the surface of the GRD that displays the highest level of sequence conservation. The model indicates that steric clash between threonine 1046 with the phosphate-binding loop and other subtle changes would likely disrupt the proper geometry required for GTP hydrolysis.

  10. The small GTPase Cdc42 is necessary for primary ciliogenesis in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaofeng; Fogelgren, Ben; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2011-06-24

    Primary cilia are found on many epithelial cell types, including renal tubular epithelial cells, where they participate in flow sensing. Disruption of cilia function has been linked to the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrated previously that the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex, localizes to primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, is required for ciliogenesis, biochemically and genetically interacts with polycystin-2 (the protein product of the polycystic kidney disease 2 gene), and, when disrupted, results in MAPK pathway activation both in vitro and in vivo. The small GTPase Cdc42 is a candidate for regulation of the exocyst at the primary cilium. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42 biochemically interacts with Sec10, a crucial component of the exocyst complex, and that Cdc42 colocalizes with Sec10 at the primary cilium. Expression of dominant negative Cdc42 and shRNA-mediated knockdown of both Cdc42 and Tuba, a Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, inhibit ciliogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, exocyst Sec8 and polycystin-2 no longer localize to primary cilia or the ciliary region following Cdc42 and Tuba knockdown. We also show that Sec10 directly interacts with Par6, a member of the Par complex that itself directly interacts with Cdc42. Finally, we show that Cdc42 knockdown results in activation of the MAPK pathway, something observed in cells with dysfunctional primary cilia. These data support a model in which Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to the primary cilium, whereupon the exocyst then targets and docks vesicles carrying proteins necessary for ciliogenesis.

  11. The Small GTPase Cdc42 Is Necessary for Primary Ciliogenesis in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaofeng; Fogelgren, Ben; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    Primary cilia are found on many epithelial cell types, including renal tubular epithelial cells, where they participate in flow sensing. Disruption of cilia function has been linked to the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrated previously that the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex, localizes to primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, is required for ciliogenesis, biochemically and genetically interacts with polycystin-2 (the protein product of the polycystic kidney disease 2 gene), and, when disrupted, results in MAPK pathway activation both in vitro and in vivo. The small GTPase Cdc42 is a candidate for regulation of the exocyst at the primary cilium. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42 biochemically interacts with Sec10, a crucial component of the exocyst complex, and that Cdc42 colocalizes with Sec10 at the primary cilium. Expression of dominant negative Cdc42 and shRNA-mediated knockdown of both Cdc42 and Tuba, a Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, inhibit ciliogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, exocyst Sec8 and polycystin-2 no longer localize to primary cilia or the ciliary region following Cdc42 and Tuba knockdown. We also show that Sec10 directly interacts with Par6, a member of the Par complex that itself directly interacts with Cdc42. Finally, we show that Cdc42 knockdown results in activation of the MAPK pathway, something observed in cells with dysfunctional primary cilia. These data support a model in which Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to the primary cilium, whereupon the exocyst then targets and docks vesicles carrying proteins necessary for ciliogenesis. PMID:21543338

  12. Nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 proteins as a subfamily of YlqF/YawG GTPases function in pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation of mono- and dicotyledonous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chak Han; Hwang, Sung Min; Son, Young Sim; Heo, Jae Bok; Bang, Woo Young; Suwastika, I Nengah; Shiina, Takashi; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2011-03-11

    The YlqF/YawG families are important GTPases involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell proliferation, or cell growth, however, no plant homologs have yet to be characterized. Here we isolated rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 (OsNug2 and AtNug2, respectively) that belong to the YawG subfamily and characterized them for pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation. They showed typical intrinsic YlqF/YawG family GTPase activities in bacteria and yeasts with k(cat) values 0.12 ± 0.007 min(-1) (n = 6) and 0.087 ± 0.002 min(-1) (n = 4), respectively, and addition of 60S ribosomal subunits stimulated their activities in vitro. In addition, OsNug2 rescued the lethality of the yeast nug2 null mutant through recovery of 25S pre-rRNA processing. By yeast two-hybrid screening five clones, including a putative one of 60S ribosomal proteins, OsL10a, were isolated. Subcellular localization and pulldown assays resulted in that the N-terminal region of OsNug2 is sufficient for nucleolar/nuclear targeting and association with OsL10a. OsNug2 is physically associated with pre-60S ribosomal complexes highly enriched in the 25S, 5.8S, and 5S rRNA, and its interaction was stimulated by exogenous GTP. Furthermore, the AtNug2 knockdown mutant constructed by the RNAi method showed defective growth on the medium containing cycloheximide. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the distribution of AtNug2 mainly in the meristematic region underlies its potential role in active plant growth. Finally, it is concluded that Nug2/Nog2p GTPase from mono- and didicotyledonous plants is linked to the pre-60S ribosome complex and actively processed 27S into 25S during the ribosomal large subunit maturation process, i.e. prior to export to the cytoplasm.

  13. HIV signaling through CD4 and CCR5 activates Rho family GTPases that are required for optimal infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucera, Mark B; Fleissner, Zach; Tabler, Caroline O; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Troyer, Zach; Tilton, John C

    2017-01-24

    HIV-1 hijacks host cell machinery to ensure successful replication, including cytoskeletal components for intracellular trafficking, nucleoproteins for pre-integration complex import, and the ESCRT pathway for assembly and budding. It is widely appreciated that cellular post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity within cells; however, little is known about how PTMs influence HIV replication. Previously, we reported that blocking deacetylation of tubulin using histone deacetylase inhibitors promoted the kinetics and efficiency of early post-entry viral events. To uncover additional PTMs that modulate entry and early post-entry stages in HIV infection, we employed a flow cytometric approach to assess a panel of small molecule inhibitors on viral fusion and LTR promoter-driven gene expression. While viral fusion was not significantly affected, early post-entry viral events were modulated by drugs targeting multiple processes including histone deacetylation, methylation, and bromodomain inhibition. Most notably, we observed that inhibitors of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators-including RhoA, Cdc42, and Rho-associated kinase signaling pathways-significantly reduced viral infection. Using phosphoproteomics and a biochemical GTPase activation assay, we found that virion-induced signaling via CD4 and CCR5 activated Rho family GTPases including Rac1 and Cdc42 and led to widespread modification of GTPase signaling-associated factors. Together, these data demonstrate that HIV signaling activates members of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators that are required for optimal HIV infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

  14. Insights into the GTP/GDP cycle of RabX3, a novel GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica with tandem G-domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2014-02-25

    Members of the small GTPase Ras superfamily regulate a host of systems through their ability to catalyze the GTP/GDP cycle. All family members reported thus far possess a single GTPase domain with a P-loop containing a nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase fold. Here for the first time we report a novel member from Entamoeba histolytica, EhRabX3, which harbors two GTPase domains in tandem and exhibits unique biochemical properties. A combination of biochemical and microcalorimetric studies revealed that EhRabX3 binds to a single guanine nucleotide through its N-terminal domain. Unlike most of the members of the Ras superfamily, the dissociation of the nucleotide from EhRabX3 is independent of Mg(2+), perhaps indicating a novel mechanism of nucleotide exchange by this protein. We found that EhRabX3 is extremely sluggish in hydrolyzing GTP, and that could be attributed to its atypical nucleotide binding pocket. It harbors substitutions at two positions that confer oncogenicity to Ras because of impaired GTP hydrolysis. Engineering these residues into the conserved counterparts enhanced their GTPase activity by at least 20-fold. In contrast to most of the members of the Ras superfamily, EhRabX3 lacks the prenylation motif. Using indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we demonstrated that the protein is distributed all over the cytosol in amoebic trophozoites. Collectively, this unique ancient GTPase exhibits a striking evolutionary divergence from the other members of the superfamily.

  15. Stable divalent germanium, tin and lead amino(ether)-phenolate monomeric complexes: structural features, inclusion heterobimetallic complexes, and ROP catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfang; Roşca, Sorin-Claudiu; Poirier, Valentin; Sinbandhit, Sourisak; Dorcet, Vincent; Roisnel, Thierry; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-03-21

    Stable germanium(II) and lead(II) amido complexes {LO(i)}M(N(SiMe3)2) (M = Ge(II), Pb(II)) bearing amino(ether)phenolate ligands are readily available using the proteo-ligands {LO(i)}H of general formula 2-CH2NR2-4,6-tBu2-C6H2OH (i = 1, NR2 = N((CH2)2OCH3)2; i = 2, NR2 = NEt2; i = 3, NR2 = aza-15-crown-5) and M(N(SiMe3)2)2 precursors. The molecular structures of these germylenes and plumbylenes, as well as those of {LO(3)}GeCl, {LO(3)}SnCl and of the congeneric {LO(4)}Sn(II)(N(SiMe3)2) where NR2 = aza-12-crown-4, have been determined crystallographically. All complexes are monomeric, with 3-coordinate metal centres. The phenolate systematically acts as a N^O(phenolate) bidentate ligand, with no interactions between the metal and the O(side-arm) atoms in these cases (for {LO(1)}(-), {LO(3)}(-) and {LO(4)}(-)) where they could potentially arise. For each family, the lone pair of electrons essentially features ns(2) character, and there is little, if any, hybridization of the valence orbitals. Heterobimetallic complexes {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf, where the Li(+) cation sits inside the tethered crown-ether, were prepared by reaction of {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2) and LiOTf (M = Ge(II), Sn(II)). The inclusion of Li(+) (featuring a close contact with the triflate anion) in the macrocycle bears no influence on the coordination sphere of the divalent tetrel element. In association with iPrOH, the amido germylenes, stannylenes and plumbylenes catalyse the controlled polymerisation of L- and racemic lactide. The activity increases linearly according to Ge(II) ≪ Sn(II) ≪ Pb(II). The simple germylenes generate very sluggish catalysts, but the activity is significantly boosted if the heterobimetallic complex {LO(3)}Ge(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf is used instead. On the other hand, with 10-25 equiv. of iPrOH, the plumbylenes afford highly active binary catalysts, converting 1000 or 5000 equiv. of monomer at 60 °C within 3 or 45 min, respectively, in a controlled fashion.

  16. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun, E-mail: yinxj33@msn.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  17. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt. and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17±49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67±0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57±1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68±23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44±6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26±41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21±2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75±3.40 ppm ferulic acid, among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt. was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g−1 lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83±14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19±3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80±1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06±1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19±2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  18. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies against monomeric dengue virus non-structural glycoprotein 1 (NS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Poole-Smith, B Katherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein is useful for diagnosis of DENV infections in the first 8 days of illness with any of the four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4). However, NS1 diagnostics are less sensitive for secondary DENV infections so the utility of NS1 diagnostics in dengue endemic countries where there is predominantly secondary infections is being questioned. Heat-mediated immunecomplex dissociation (ICD) prior to testing serum samples can significantly improve NS1 test sensitivity in secondary infections but requires monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive to heat-denatured NS1. In order to incorporate a simple heat-mediated ICD step, a crucial step was to develop new MAbs with high affinity and specificity to heat-denatured DENV NS1 protein. In the present study, six new MAbs were isolated from BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant monomeric NS1 of DENV-1 and DENV-2. Characterization using three different methods: indirect ELISA, fixed cell ELISA and western blot revealed that all six MAbs are serotype-cross-reactive and capable of recognizing dimeric and hexameric isoforms as well as heat-denatured NS1 from all four DENV serotypes. No cross-reactivity to NS1 of West Nile virus and Yellow fever virus was observed on western blot and indirect ELISA. Five of the six MAbs mapped to the DENV NS1 region of 105-119 amino acids. The remaining MAb mapped to DENV NS1 region of 25-39 amino acids. These two NS1 regions were found to be highly conserved among all four DENV serotypes by sequences analysis and database comparison. These MAbs were used to develop an NS1 capture ELISA and tested using a small panel of clinical specimens. The results from the NS1 capture ELISA indicated at least a three-fold increase in NS1 antigen detection in heat-denatured samples compared to untreated specimens. Furthermore, artificial immunecomplexed results also demonstrated the binding efficiency of these MAbs to heat denatured NS1. Taken together

  19. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vlahou, Georgia

    2009-07-14

    Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  20. The Arf GTPase-Activating Protein Family Is Exploited by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium To Invade Nonphagocytic Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Anthony C.; Humphreys, Daniel; Brooks, Andrew B. E.; Hume, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish intracellular infections, Salmonella bacteria trigger host cell membrane ruffling and invasion by subverting cellular Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases by promoting GTP binding. A family of cellular Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) can downregulate Arf signaling by stimulating GTP hydrolysis, but whether they do this during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered a remarkable role for distinct Arf GAP family members in Salmonella invasion. The Arf6 GAPs ACAP1 and ADAP1 and the Arf1 GAP ASAP1 localized at Salmonella-induced ruffles, which was not the case for the plasma membrane-localized Arf6 GAPs ARAP3 and GIT1 or the Golgi-associated Arf1 GAP1. Surprisingly, we found that loss of ACAP1, ADAP1, or ASAP1 impaired Salmonella invasion, revealing that GAPs cannot be considered mere terminators of cytoskeleton remodeling. Salmonella invasion was restored in Arf GAP-depleted cells by expressing fast-cycling Arf derivatives, demonstrating that Arf GTP/GDP cycles facilitate Salmonella invasion. Consistent with this view, both constitutively active and dominant-negative Arf derivatives that cannot undergo GTP/GDP cycles inhibited invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arf GEFs and GAPs colocalize at invading Salmonella and collaborate to drive Arf1-dependent pathogen invasion. This study revealed that Salmonella bacteria exploit a remarkable interplay between Arf GEFs and GAPs to direct cycles of Arf GTPase activation and inactivation. These cycles drive Salmonella cytoskeleton remodeling and enable intracellular infections. PMID:25670778

  1. The insert region of the Rac GTPases is dispensable for activation of superoxide-producing NADPH oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Kei; Koga, Hirofumi; Minakami, Reiko; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2009-08-13

    Rac1 and Rac2, which belong to the Rho subfamily of Ras-related GTPases, play an essential role in activation of gp91phox/Nox2 (cytochrome b-245, beta polypeptide; also known as Cybb), the catalytic core of the superoxide-producing NADPH oxidase in phagocytes. Rac1 also contributes to activation of the non-phagocytic oxidases Nox1 (NADPH oxidase 1) and Nox3 (NADPH oxidase 3), each related closely to gp91phox/Nox2. It has remained controversial whether the insert region of Rac (amino acids 123-135), unique to the Rho subfamily proteins, is involved in gp91phox/Nox2 activation. In the present study we show that removal of the insert region from Rac1 neither affects activation of gp91phox/Nox2, which is reconstituted under cell-free and whole-cell conditions, nor blocks its localization to phagosomes during ingestion of IgG-coated beads by macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The insert region of Rac2 is also dispensable for gp91phox/Nox2 activation at the cellular level. Although Rac2, as well as Rac1, is capable of enhancing superoxide production by Nox1 and Nox3, the enhancements by the two GTPases are both independent of the insert region. We also demonstrate that Rac3, a third member of the Rac family in mammals, has an ability to activate the three oxidases and that the activation does not require the insert region. Thus the insert region of the Rac GTPases does not participate in regulation of the Nox family NADPH oxidases.

  2. Identification and characterization of RBEL1 subfamily of GTPases in the Ras superfamily involved in cell growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, JoAnne; Lui, Ki; Sheikh, M Saeed; Huang, Ying

    2009-07-03

    Recently, we reported the identification of a novel gene named RBEL1 (Rab-like protein 1) and characterized its two encoded isoforms, RBEL1A and RBEL1B, that function as novel GTPases of Ras superfamily. Here we report the identification of two additional splice variants of RBEL1 that we have named RBEL1C and -D. All four RBEL1 isoforms (A, B, C, and D) have identical N termini harboring the Rab-like GTPase domains but contain variable C termini. Although all isoforms can be detected in both cytoplasm and nucleus, RBEL1A is predominantly cytoplasmic, whereas RBEL1B is mostly nuclear. RBEL1C and -D, by contrast, are evenly distributed between the cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, all four RBEL1 proteins are also capable of associating with cellular membrane. The RBEL1 proteins also exhibit a unique nucleotide-binding potential and, whereas the larger A and B isoforms are mainly GTP-bound, the smaller C and D variants bind to both GTP and GDP. Furthermore, a regulatory region at amino acid position 236-302 immediately adjacent to the GTP-binding domain is important for GTP-binding potential of RBEL1A, because deletion of this region converts RBEL1A from predominantly GTP-bound to GDP-bound. RBEL1 knockdown via RNA interference results in marked cell growth suppression, which is associated with morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis as well as inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, our results indicate that RBEL1 proteins are linked to cell growth and survival and possess unique biochemical, cellular, and functional characteristics and, therefore, appear to form a novel subfamily of GTPases within the Ras superfamily.

  3. The jaw of the worm: GTPase-activating protein EAT-17 regulates grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straud, Sarah; Lee, Inhwan; Song, Bomi; Avery, Leon; You, Young-Jai

    2013-09-01

    Constitutive transport of cellular materials is essential for cell survival. Although multiple small GTPase Rab proteins are required for the process, few regulators of Rabs are known. Here we report that EAT-17, a novel GTPase-activating protein (GAP), regulates RAB-6.2 function in grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified EAT-17 as a novel RabGAP that interacts with RAB-6.2, a protein that presumably regulates vesicle trafficking between Golgi, the endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membrane to form a functional grinder. EAT-17 has a canonical GAP domain that is critical for its function. RNA interference against 25 confirmed and/or predicted RABs in C. elegans shows that RNAi against rab-6.2 produces a phenotype identical to eat-17. A directed yeast two-hybrid screen using EAT-17 as bait and each of the 25 RAB proteins as prey identifies RAB-6.2 as the interacting partner of EAT-17, confirming that RAB-6.2 is a specific substrate of EAT-17. Additionally, deletion mutants of rab-6.2 show grinder defects identical to those of eat-17 loss-of-function mutants, and both RAB-6.2 and EAT-17 are expressed in the terminal bulb of the pharynx where the grinder is located. Collectively, these results suggest that EAT-17 is a specific GTPase-activating protein for RAB-6.2. Based on the conserved function of Rab6 in vesicular transport, we propose that EAT-17 regulates the turnover rate of RAB-6.2 activity in cargo trafficking for grinder formation.

  4. The immune system GTPase GIMAP6 interacts with the Atg8 homologue GABARAPL2 and is recruited to autophagosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Pascall

    Full Text Available The GIMAPs (GTPases of the immunity-associated proteins are a family of small GTPases expressed prominently in the immune systems of mammals and other vertebrates. In mammals, studies of mutant or genetically-modified rodents have indicated important roles for the GIMAP GTPases in the development and survival of lymphocytes. No clear picture has yet emerged, however, of the molecular mechanisms by which they perform their function(s. Using biotin tag-affinity purification we identified a major, and highly specific, interaction between the human cytosolic family member GIMAP6 and GABARAPL2, one of the mammalian homologues of the yeast autophagy protein Atg8. Chemical cross-linking studies performed on Jurkat T cells, which express both GIMAP6 and GABARAPL2 endogenously, indicated that the two proteins in these cells readily associate with one another in the cytosol under normal conditions. The GIMAP6-GABARAPL2 interaction was disrupted by deletion of the last 10 amino acids of GIMAP6. The N-terminal region of GIMAP6, however, which includes a putative Atg8-family interacting motif, was not required. Over-expression of GIMAP6 resulted in increased levels of endogenous GABARAPL2 in cells. After culture of cells in starvation medium, GIMAP6 was found to localise in punctate structures with both GABARAPL2 and the autophagosomal marker MAP1LC3B, indicating that GIMAP6 re-locates to autophagosomes on starvation. Consistent with this finding, we have demonstrated that starvation of Jurkat T cells results in the degradation of GIMAP6. Whilst these findings raise the possibility that the GIMAPs play roles in the regulation of autophagy, we have been unable to demonstrate an effect of GIMAP6 over-expression on autophagic flux.

  5. Sproglig Metode og Analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011......Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011...

  6. Interleukin-1-induced activation of the small GTPase Rac1 depends on receptor internalization and regulates gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windheim, Mark; Hansen, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) triggers the internalization of its cognate receptor from the plasma membrane. We recently demonstrated that this internalization is of critical importance for the IL-1-induced gene expression. In this study we report that the IL-1-induced activation of the small GTPase Rac1 requires receptor endocytosis. We further show that the depletion of Rac1 reduces the IL-1-dependent gene expression without affecting signaling events that are initiated at the plasma membrane. Collectively, we provide evidence for a key role of Rac1 in a pathway that regulates IL-1-induced gene expression depending on receptor endocytosis.

  7. Effects of Structure of Rho GTPase-activating Protein DLC-1 on Cell Morphology and Migration* S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    DLC-1 encodes a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) and negative regulator of specific Rho family proteins (RhoA-C and Cdc42). DLC-1 is a multi-domain protein, with the RhoGAP catalytic domain flanked by an amino-terminal sterile α motif (SAM) and a carboxyl-terminal START domain. The roles of these domains in the regulation of DLC-1 function remain to be determined. We undertook a structure-function analysis involving truncation and missense mutants of DLC-1. We determined that the amino-...

  8. A central role for the small GTPase Rac1 in hippocampal plasticity and spatial learning and memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haditsch, Ursula; Leone, Dino P; Farinelli, Mélissa

    2009-01-01

    in excitatory neurons in the forebrain in vivo not only affects spine structure, but also impairs synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus with consequent defects in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning. Furthermore, Rac1 mutants display deficits in working/episodic-like memory in the delayed matching......Rac1 is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases that are important for structural aspects of the mature neuronal synapse including basal spine density and shape, activity-dependent spine enlargement, and AMPA receptor clustering in vitro. Here we demonstrate that selective elimination of Rac1...

  9. Stage-specific control of neural crest stem cell proliferation by the small rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Herzog, Dominik; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    regulated by small Rho GTPases. Deletion of either Cdc42 or Rac1 in the NC results in size reduction of multiple NC target structures because of increased cell-cycle exit, while NC cells emigrating from the neural tube are not affected. Consistently, Cdc42 or Rac1 inactivation reduces self......The neural crest (NC) generates a variety of neural and non-neural tissues during vertebrate development. Both migratory NC cells and their target structures contain cells with stem cell features. Here we show that these populations of neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) are differentially...

  10. The Rho GTPase Effector ROCK Regulates Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, and p27Kip1 Levels by Distinct Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, Daniel R; Olson, Michael F.

    2006-01-01

    The members of the Rho GTPase family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeletal structures. In addition, they influence progression through the cell cycle. The RhoA and RhoC proteins regulate numerous effector proteins, with a central and vital signaling role mediated by the ROCK I and ROCK II serine/threonine kinases. The requirement for ROCK function in the proliferation of numerous cell types has been revealed by studies utilizing ROCK-selective inhibitors such as Y-27632. H...

  11. Unique fluorophores in the dimeric archaeal histones hMfB and hPyA1 reveal the impact of nonnative structure in a monomeric kinetic intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Matthew R; Gloss, Lisa M

    2008-02-01

    Homodimeric archaeal histones and heterodimeric eukaryotic histones share a conserved structure but fold through different kinetic mechanisms, with a correlation between faster folding/association rates and the population of kinetic intermediates. Wild-type hMfB (from Methanothermus fervidus) has no intrinsic fluorophores; Met35, which is Tyr in hyperthermophilic archaeal histones such as hPyA1 (from Pyrococcus strain GB-3A), was mutated to Tyr and Trp. Two Tyr-to-Trp mutants of hPyA1 were also characterized. All fluorophores were introduced into the long, central alpha-helix of the histone fold. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the fluorophores did not significantly alter the helical content of the histones. The equilibrium unfolding transitions of the histone variants were two-state, reversible processes, with DeltaG degrees (H2O) values within 1 kcal/mol of the wild-type dimers. The hPyA1 Trp variants fold by two-state kinetic mechanisms like wild-type hPyA1, but with increased folding and unfolding rates, suggesting that the mutated residues (Tyr-32 and Tyr-36) contribute to transition state structure. Like wild-type hMfB, M35Y and M35W hMfB fold by a three-state mechanism, with a stopped-flow CD burst-phase monomeric intermediate. The M35 mutants populate monomeric intermediates with increased secondary structure and stability but exhibit decreased folding rates; this suggests that nonnative interactions occur from burial of the hydrophobic Tyr and Trp residues in this kinetic intermediate. These results implicate the long central helix as a key component of the structure in the kinetic monomeric intermediates of hMfB as well as the dimerization transition state in the folding of hPyA1.

  12. Trapping of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin in the membrane-bound monomeric state blocks membrane insertion and functional pore formation by the toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2014-06-13

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a potent membrane-damaging cytolytic toxin that belongs to the family of β barrel pore-forming protein toxins. VCC induces lysis of its target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pores. The mechanism of membrane pore formation by VCC follows the overall scheme of the archetypical β barrel pore-forming protein toxin mode of action, in which the water-soluble monomeric form of the toxin first binds to the target cell membrane, then assembles into a prepore oligomeric intermediate, and finally converts into the functional transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pore. However, there exists a vast knowledge gap in our understanding regarding the intricate details of the membrane pore formation process employed by VCC. In particular, the membrane oligomerization and membrane insertion steps of the process have only been described to a limited extent. In this study, we determined the key residues in VCC that are critical to trigger membrane oligomerization of the toxin. Alteration of such key residues traps the toxin in its membrane-bound monomeric state and abrogates subsequent oligomerization, membrane insertion, and functional transmembrane pore-formation events. The results obtained from our study also suggest that the membrane insertion of VCC depends critically on the oligomerization process and that it cannot be initiated in the membrane-bound monomeric form of the toxin. In sum, our study, for the first time, dissects membrane binding from the subsequent oligomerization and membrane insertion steps and, thus, defines the exact sequence of events in the membrane pore formation process by VCC.

  13. The impact of single nucleotide polymorphism in monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitor genes from wild emmer wheat, primarily from Israel and Golan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ze-Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various enzyme inhibitors act on key insect gut digestive hydrolases, including alpha-amylases and proteinases. Alpha-amylase inhibitors have been widely investigated for their possible use in strengthening a plant's defense against insects that are highly dependent on starch as an energy source. We attempted to unravel the diversity of monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitor genes of Israeli and Golan Heights' wild emmer wheat with different ecological factors (e.g., geography, water, and temperature. Population methods that analyze the nature and frequency of allele diversity within a species and the codon analysis method (comparing patterns of synonymous and non-synonymous changes in protein coding sequences were used to detect natural selection. Results Three hundred and forty-eight sequences encoding monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitors (WMAI were obtained from 14 populations of wild emmer wheat. The frequency of SNPs in WMAI genes was 1 out of 16.3 bases, where 28 SNPs were detected in the coding sequence. The results of purifying and the positive selection hypothesis (p Conclusions Great diversity at the WMAI locus, both between and within populations, was detected in the populations of wild emmer wheat. It was revealed tha