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Sample records for monolithic solid tungsten

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, J. P.; Young, J. E.

    1983-10-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. The core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  2. Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, K. M.; McPheeters, C. C.

    1989-12-01

    The Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (MSOFC) is an oxide-ceramic structure in which appropriate electronic and ionic conductors are fabricated in a honeycomb shape similar to a block of corrugated paperboard. These electronic and ionic conductors are arranged to provide short conduction paths to minimize resistive losses. The power density achievable with the MSOFC is expected to be about 8 kW/kg or 4 kW/L, at fuel efficienceis over 50 percent, because of small cell size and low resistive losses in the materials. The MSOFC operates in the range of 700 to 1000 C, at which temperatures rapid reform of hydrocarbon fuels is expected within the nickel-YSZ fuel channels. Tape casting and hot roll calendering are used to fabricate the MSOFC structure. The performance of the MSOFC has improved significantly during the course of development. The limitation of this system, based on materials resistance alone without interfacial resistances, is 0.093 ohm-sq cm area-specific resistance (ASR). The current typical performance of MSOFC single cells is characterized by ASRs of about 0.4 to 0.5 ohm-sq cm. With further development the ASR is expected to be reduced below 0.2 ohm-sq cm, which will result in power levels greater than 1.4 W/sq cm. The feasibility of the MSOFC concept was proven, and the performance was dramatically improved. The differences in thermal expansion coefficients and firing shrinkages among the fuel cell materials were minimized. As a result of good matching of these properties, the MSOFC structure was successfully fabricated with few defects, and the system shows excellent promise for development into a practical power source.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, N. Q.; Horne, C. R.; Liu, F. S.; Moffatt, D. M.; Staszak, P. R.

    The monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) is an all-ceramic structure in which cell components are configured in a compact corrugated array. The MSOFC shows promise for use in a wide range of sizes (kilowatt to megawatt) and a broad spectrum of applications (electric utility, cogeneration, on-site, and aerospace power). A process based on the tape calendering technique is being developed for the fabrication of the MSOFC. MSOFC single cells have been fabricated by this process without cracking or delamination. Stacks of various sizes have been formed and processed to demonstrate fabricability of the monolithic structure. Extensive physical, chemical, electrical, and electrochemical characterization of fabricated samples has been carried out to confirm the required properties of each cell component. The characterization results reported have been used to support material and fabrication improvements.

  4. Room-Temperature Tensile Behavior of Oriented Tungsten Single Crystals with Rhenium in Dilute Solid Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    SINGLE CRYSTALS WITH RHENIUM IN DILUTE SOLID SOLUTION Sby M. Garfinkle Lewis Research Center Cleveland, Ohio 20060516196 NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND...WITH RHENIUM IN DILUTE SOLID SOLUTION By M. Garfinkle Lewis Research Center Cleveland, Ohio NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION For sale by...ORIENTED TUNGSTEN SINGLE CRYSTALS WITH RHENIUM IN DILUTE SOLID SOLUTION * by M. Garfinkle Lewis Research Center SUMMARY Tungsten single crystals

  5. Nondestructive characterization methods for monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic solid oxide fuel cells (MSOFCS) represent a potential breakthrough in fuel cell technology, provided that reliable fabrication methods can be developed. Fabrication difficulties arise in several steps of the processing: First is the fabrication of uniform thin (305 {mu}m) single-layer and trilayer green tapes (the trilayer tapes of anode/electrolyte/cathode and anode/interconnect/cathode must have similar coefficients of thermal expansion to sinter uniformly and to have the necessary electrochemical properties); Second is the development of fuel and oxidant channels in which residual stresses are likely to develop in the tapes; Third is the fabrication of a ``complete`` cell for which the bond quality between layers and the quality of the trilayers must be established; and Last, attachment of fuel and oxidant manifolds and verification of seal integrity. Purpose of this report is to assess nondestructive characterization methods that could be developed for application to laboratory, prototype, and full-scale MSOFCs.

  6. Solid State Characterizations of Long-Term Leached Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmussen, Robert M.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Parker, Kent E.; Miller, Brian W.; Lee, Brady D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Washton, Nancy M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Lawter, Amanda R.; McElroy, Erin M.; Serne, R Jeffrey

    2016-09-30

    This report describes the results from the solid phase characterization of six Cast Stone monoliths from the extended leach tests recently reported on (Serne et al. 2016),that were selected for characterization using multiple state-of-the-art approaches. The Cast Stone samples investigated were leached for > 590 d in the EPA Method 1315 test then archived for > 390 d in their final leachate. After reporting the long term leach behavior of the monoliths (containing radioactive 99Tc and stable 127I spikes and for original Westsik et al. 2013 fabricated monoliths, 238U), it was suggested that physical changes to the waste forms and a depleting inventory of contaminants of potential concern may mean that effective diffusivity calculations past 63 d should not be used to accurately represent long-term waste form behavior. These novel investigations, in both length of leaching time and application of solid state techniques, provide an initial arsenal of techniques which can be utilized to perform such Cast Stone solid phase characterization work, which in turn can support upcoming performance assessment maintenance. The work was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to characterize several properties of the long- term leached Cast Stone monolith samples.

  7. Yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells: Monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    The monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) is currently under development for a variety of applications including coal-based power generation. The MSOFC is a design concept that places the thin components of a solid oxide fuel cell in lightweight, compact, corrugated structure, and so achieves high efficiency and excellent performance simultaneously with high power density. The MSOFC can be integrated with coal gasification plants and is expected to have high overall efficiency in the conversion of the chemical energy of coal to electrical energy. This report describes work aimed at: (1) assessing manufacturing costs for the MSOFC and system costs for a coal-based plant; (2) modifying electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces to improve the electrochemical performance of the MSOFC; and (3) testing the performance of the MSOFC on hydrogen and simulated coal gas. Manufacturing costs for both the coflow and crossflow MSOFC's were assessed based on the fabrication flow charts developed by direct scaleup of tape calendering and other laboratory processes. Integrated coal-based MSOFC systems were investigated to determine capital costs and costs of electricity. Design criteria were established for a coal-fueled 200-Mw power plant. Four plant arrangements were evaluated, and plant performance was analyzed. Interfacial modification involved modification of electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces to improve the MSOFC electrochemical performance. Work in the cathode and cathode/electrolyte interface was concentrated on modification of electrode porosity, electrode morphology, electrode material, and interfacial bonding. Modifications of the anode and anode/electrolyte interface included the use of additives and improvement of nickel distribution. Single cells have been tested for their electrochemical performance. Performance data were typically obtained with humidified H2 or simulated coal gas and air or oxygen.

  8. Solid state tungsten oxide hydrate/tin oxide hydrate electrochromic device prepared by electrochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kentaro; Matsuo, Ryo; Sasano, Junji; Yokoyama, Seiji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The solid state electrochromic device composed of tungsten oxide hydrate (WO3(H2O)0.33) and tin oxide hydrate (Sn(O,OH)) has been constructed by anodic deposition of WO3(H2O)0.33 and Sn(O,OH) layers and showed the color change from clear to blue by applying voltage through an Au electrode.

  9. Development of a monolithic polymer pipette for solid-phase extraction of liquiritigenin in rat plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wu Zhang; Kang Li; Zhi Xian Liang; Feng Yang Wang; Qi Wen Lu

    2012-01-01

    A monolithic polymer column with mixed-mode interaction was prepared by in situ polymerization in a 1000 μ,L pipette.Two kinds of monomers,butyl methacrylate (BMA) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAM) were applied to constructing the mixed-mode interaction of monolithic polymer column.Its solid-phase extraction properties for liquiritigenin (LQG) were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a gradient elution procedure.After the extraction procedure was optimized,the maximum binding capacity and extraction recovery following the optimal extraction procedure were investigated.Calibration curve was expressed as A =65.9C + 4.53 (r2 =0.998) with a linear range of 0.151-1.80 μg/mL.The experimental results indicate that the monolithic polymer pipette presents good extraction efficiency for LQG.It can be envisaged that the developed monolithic polymer pipette possesses the potential for its application to the enrichment of other flavonoids compounds being siniilar to the structure of LQG.

  10. Solid State Characterizations of Long-Term Leached Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmussen, Robert M.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Parker, Kent E.; Miller, Brian W.; Lee, Brady D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Washton, Nancy M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Lawter, Amanda R.; McElroy, Erin M.; Serne, R Jeffrey

    2016-09-30

    This report describes the results from the solid phase characterization of six Cast Stone monoliths from the extended leach tests recently reported on (Serne et al 2016),that were selected for characterization using multiple state-of-the-art approaches. The Cast Stone samples investigated were leached for > 590 d in the EPA Method 1315 test then archived for > 390 d in their final leachate. After reporting the long term leach behavior of the monoliths, it was suggested that physical changes to the waste form samples and a depleting inventory of contaminants of potential concern may mean that effective diffusivity calculations past 63 d should not be used to t accurately represent long-term waste form behavior. Understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms that occur in the Cast Stone during the long-term leaching process is thus imperative to support long term modelling of cementitious waste form performance. These novel investigations provide an initial arsenal of techniques which can be utilized to perform such Cast Stone solid phase characterization work, which in turn can support upcoming performance assessment maintenance. The work was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to characterize several properties of the long term leached Cast Stone monolith samples:

  11. Magnetism-Enhanced Monolith-Based In-Tube Solid Phase Microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Luo, Qing; Yuan, Dongxin

    2016-02-02

    Monolith-based in-tube solid phase microextraction (MB/IT-SPME) has received wide attention because of miniaturization, automation, expected loading capacity, and environmental friendliness. However, the unsatisfactory extraction efficiency becomes the main disadvantage of MB/IT-SPME. To overcome this circumstance, magnetism-enhanced MB/IT-SPME (ME-MB/IT-SPME) was developed in the present work, taking advantage of magnetic microfluidic principles. First, modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles were mixed with polymerization solution and in situ polymerized in the capillary to obtain a magnetic monolith extraction phase. After that, the monolithic capillary column was placed inside a magnetic coil that allowed the exertion of a variable magnetic field. The effects of intensity of magnetic field, adsorption and desorption flow rate, volume of sample, and desorption solvent on the performance of ME-MB/IT-SPME were investigated in detail. The analysis of six steroid hormones in water samples by the combination of ME-MB/IT-SPME with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was selected as a paradigm for the practical evaluation of ME-MB/IT-SPME. The application of a controlled magnetic field resulted in an obvious increase of extraction efficiencies of the target analytes between 70% and 100%. The present work demonstrated that application of different magnetic forces in adsorption and desorption steps can effectively enhance extraction efficiency of MB/IT-SPME systems.

  12. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-14

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  13. Solid state consolidation nanocrystalline copper-tungsten using cold spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Aaron Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sarobol, Pylin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Argibay, Nicolas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Diantonio, Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that nanostructured metals can exhibit significantly improved properties compared to metals with conventional grain size. Unfortunately, nanocrystalline metals typically are not thermodynamically stable and exhibit rapid grain growth at moderate temperatures. This severely limits their processing and use, making them impractical for most engineering applications. Recent work has shown that a number of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metal alloys exist. These alloys have been prepared as powders using severe plastic deformation (e.g. ball milling) processes. Consolidation of these powders without compromise of their nanocrystalline microstructure is a critical step to enabling their use as engineering materials. We demonstrate solid-state consolidation of ball milled copper-tantalum nanocrystalline metal powder using cold spray. Unfortunately, the nanocrystalline copper-tantalum powder that was consolidated did not contain the thermodynamically stable copper-tantalum nanostructure. Nevertheless, this does this demonstrates a pathway to preparation of bulk thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Furthermore, it demonstrates a pathway to additive manufacturing (3D printing) of nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Additive manufacturing of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metals is attractive because it enables maximum flexibility and efficiency in the use of these unique materials.

  14. Synthesis of Mesoporous Silica Monoliths — A Novel Approach Towards Fabrication of Solid-State Optical Sensors for Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, D.; Subashini, C.; Akhila Maheswari, M.

    2016-10-01

    Mesoporous silica monoliths are an attractive area of research owing to their high specific surface area, uniform channels and mesoporous size (2-30nm). This paper deals with the direct templating synthesis of a mesoporous worm-like silica monolithic material using F127 — a triblock copolymer, by micro-emulsion technique using trimethyl benzene (TMB), as the solvent. The synthesized silica monolith is characterized using SEM-EDAX, XRD, BET, NMR and FT-IR. The monolith shows an ordered worm-like mesoporous structure with tuneable through pores, an excellent host for the anchoring of chromo-ionophores for the naked-eye metal ion-sensing. The mesoporous monoliths were loaded with 4-dodecyl-6-(2-pyridylazo)-phenol (DPAP) ligand through direct immobilization, thereby acting as solid-state naked-eye colorimetric ion-sensors for the sensing toxic Pb(II) ions at parts-per-billion (ppb) level in various industrial and environmental systems. The influence of various experimental parameters such as solution pH, limiting ligand loading concentration, amount of monolith material, matrix tolerance level, limit of detection and quantification has been studied and optimized.

  15. Design and concept validation of the new solid tungsten divertor for ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, A., E-mail: albrecht.herrmann@ipp.mpg.de; Greuner, H.; Jaksic, N.; Böswirth, B.; Reimold, F.; Scarabosio, A.; Vorbrugg, S.; Wischmeier, M.

    2013-10-15

    Div-III, a divertor with solid tungsten target tiles for ASDEX Upgrade is designed and tested and will be installed in 2013. It is a further step in exploring tungsten as material for plasma facing components. It avoids the restrictions of tungsten coatings on graphite and realizes an operation range up to 50 MJ energy removing capability in the outer divertor. In addition, it allows physics investigation such as erosion and deuterium retention as well as effects of castellation and target tilting. The design of the target itself and the attachment was optimized with FE-analysis and was intensively high heat tested up to a double overload. Cyclic tests reveal that the target and the attachment can be operated with the design load of 50 MJ without any damage. Even a twofold overload results in local recrystallization and minor cracks but the targets did not fail during operation. The redesign of the divertor structure was used to increase the conductance between the cryo-pump and the divertor region. The impact of the changed pumping efficiency was investigated with SOLPS/Eirene modeling. The modeling results are an indication for an easier access to lower SOL densities as expected for a higher pumping efficiency in the main chamber.

  16. Fully printable transparent monolithic solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell with mesoscopic indium tin oxide counter electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Ri, Kwangho; Rong, Yaoguang; Liu, Linfeng; Liu, Tongfa; Hu, Min; Li, Xiong; Han, Hongwei

    2014-09-07

    We present a new transparent monolithic mesoscopic solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell based on trilamellar films of mesoscopic TiO2 nanocrystalline photoanode, a ZrO2 insulating layer and an indium tin oxide counter electrode (ITO-CE), which were screen-printed layer by layer on a single substrate. When the thickness of the ITO-CE was optimized to 2.1 μm, this very simple and fully printable solid-state DSSC with D102 dye and spiro-OMeTAD hole transport materials presents efficiencies of 1.73% when irradiated from the front side and 1.06% when irradiated from the rear side under a standard simulated sunlight condition (AM 1.5 Global, 100 mW cm(-2)). Higher parameters could be expected with a better transparent mesoscopic counter electrode and hole conductor for the printable monolithic mesoscopic solid-state DSSC.

  17. Results of high heat flux tests and structural analysis of the new solid tungsten divertor tile for ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaksic, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.jaksic@ipp.mpg.de; Greuner, Henri; Herrmann, Albrecht; Böswirth, Bernd; Vorbrugg, Stefan

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The main motivation for the HHF investigation of tungsten tiles was an untypical deformation of some specimens under thermal loading, observed during the previous tests in GLADIS test facility. • A nonlinear finite element (FE) model for simulations of the GLADIS tests has been built. • The unexpected plastic deformations are mainly caused by internal stresses due to the manufacturing process. The small discrepancies among the FEA investigated and measured plastic deformations are most likely caused, beside of the practical difficulties by measuring of low items, also by tile internal stresses. • The influences of the residual stresses caused by special production processes have to be taken into account by design of the structural part made of solid tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten as plasma-facing material for fusion devices is currently the most favorable candidate. In general solid tungsten is used for shielding the plasma chamber interior against the high heat generated from the plasma. For the purposes of implementation at ASDEX Upgrade and as a contribution to ITER the thermal performance of tungsten tiles has been extensively tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS during the development phase and beyond. These tests have been performed on full scale tungsten tile prototypes including their clamping and cooling structure. Simulating the adiabatically thermal loading due to plasma operation in ASDEX Upgrade, the tungsten tiles have been subjected to a thermal load with central heat flux of 10–24 MW/m{sup 2} and absorbed energy between 370 and 680 kJ. This loading results in maximum surface temperatures between 1300 °C and 2800 °C. The tests in GLADIS have been accompanied by intensive numerical investigations using FEA methods. For this purpose a multiple nonlinear finite element model has been set up. This paper discusses the main results of the high heat flux final tests and their numerical simulation. Moreover, first

  18. Method for Making a Fuel Cell from a Solid Oxide Monolithic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Thomas L. (Inventor); Sofie, Stephen W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention is a novel solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack comprising individual bi-electrode supported fuel cells in which a thin electrolyte is supported between electrodes of essentially equal thickness. Individual cell units are made from graded pore ceramic tape that has been created by the freeze cast method followed by freeze drying. Each piece of graded pore tape later becomes a graded pore electrode scaffold that subsequent to sintering, is made into either an anode or a cathode by means of appropriate solution and thermal treatment means. Each cell unit is assembled by depositing of a thin coating of ion conducting ceramic material upon the side of each of two pieces of tape surface having the smallest pore openings, and then mating the coated surfaces to create an unsintered electrode scaffold pair sandwiching an electrolyte layer. The opposing major outer exposed surfaces of each cell unit is given a thin coating of electrically conductive ceramic, and multiple cell units are stacked, or built up by stacking of individual cell layers, to create an unsintered fuel cell stack. Ceramic or glass edge seals are installed to create flow channels for fuel and air. The cell stack with edge sealants is then sintered into a ceramic monolithic framework. Said solution and thermal treatments means convert the electrode scaffolds into anodes and cathodes. The thin layers of electrically conductive ceramic become the interconnects in the assembled stack.

  19. Direct tandem mass spectrometric analysis of amino acids in plasma using fluorous derivatization and monolithic solid-phase purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamashima, Erina; Hayama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2015-11-10

    In this study, we developed a novel direct tandem mass spectrometric method for rapid and accurate analysis of amino acids utilizing a fluorous derivatization and purification technique. Amino acids were perfluoroalkylated with 2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluoroundecan-1-al in the presence of 2-picoline borane via reductive amination. The derivatives were purified by perfluoroalkyl-modified silica-based monolithic solid-phase extraction (monolithic F-SPE), and directly analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization without liquid chromatographic separation. The perfluoroalkyl derivatives could be sufficiently distinguished from non-fluorous compounds, i.e. the biological matrix, due to their fluorous interaction. Thus, rapid and accurate determination of amino acids was accomplished. The method was validated with human plasma samples and applied to the analysis of amino acids in the plasma of mice with maple syrup urine disease or phenylketonuria.

  20. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction monolithic capillary column for selective extraction and sensitive determination of safranine T in wolfberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zihao; Zhai, Haiyun; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Jiangmei; Liu, Zhenping

    2014-02-01

    A method was developed to sensitively determine safranine T in wolfberry by molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and laser-induced fluorescence detection (HPLC-LIF). The MISPE capillary monolithic column was prepared by water-bath in situ polymerization, using safranine T, methacrylic acid (MAA), and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as template, functional monomer, and cross-linker, respectively. The properties of the homemade MISPE capillary monolithic column, including capacity and specificity, were investigated under optimized conditions and the morphologies of inner polymers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean recoveries of safranine T in wolfberry ranged from 91.2 % to 92.9 % and the intraday and interday relative standard deviation (RSD) values all ranged from 3.4 % to 4.2 %. Good linearity was obtained over 0.001-1.0 μg mL(-1) (r = 0.9999) with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.4 ng g(-1). Under the selected conditions, enrichment factors of over 90-fold were obtained and the extraction on the monolithic column effectively cleaned up the wolfberry matrix. The results demonstrated that the proposed MISPE-HPLC-LIF method could be applied to sensitively determine safranine T in wolfberry.

  1. Poly(methacrylic acid-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) monolith in-tube solid phase microextraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography and analysis of amphetamines in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Feng, Yu-Qi; Zhang, Jian-Tao; Da, Shi-Lu; Zhang, Min

    2005-05-13

    In-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) based on a poly(methacrylic acid-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) monolithic capillary column was investigated for the extraction of amphetamine, methamphetamine and their methylenedioxy derivatives. The monolithic capillary column showed high extraction efficiency towards target analytes, which could be attributed to its larger loading amount of extraction phase than conventional open-tubular extraction capillaries and the convective mass transfer procedure provided by its monolithic structure. The extraction mechanism was studied, and the results indicated that the extraction process of the target analytes was involved with hydrophobic interaction and ion-exchange interaction. The polymer monolith in-tube SPME-HPLC system with UV detection was successfully applied to the determination of amphetamine, methamphetamine and their methylenedioxy derivatives in urine samples, yielding the detection limits of 1.4 - 4.0 ng/mL. Excellent method reproducibility (RSD urine samples.

  2. Hybrid organic-inorganic silica monolith with hydrophobic/strong cation-exchange functional groups as a sorbent for micro-solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Ming; Ruan, Ge-Deng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2009-11-06

    A hybrid organic-inorganic silica monolith with hydrophobic and strong cation-exchange functional groups was prepared and used as a sorbent for micro-solid phase extraction (micro-SPE). The hybrid silica monolith functionalized with octyl and thiol groups was conveniently synthesized by hydrolysis and polycondensation of a mixture of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), n-octyltriethoxysilane (C8-TEOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) via a two-step catalytic sol-gel process. Due to the favorable chemical reactivity of mercapto pendant moieties, the obtained hybrid monolith was oxidized using hydrogen peroxide (30%, w/w) to yield sulfonic acid groups, which provided strong cation-exchange sites. The obtained hybrid monolith was characterized by diffused infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The results show that the resulting monolith contains much higher carbon (31.6%) and sulfur (4.8%) contents than traditionally bonded silica materials. The extraction performance of the hybrid monolith was evaluated using sulfonamides as testing analytes by micro-SPE on-line coupled to HPLC. The results show that the hybrid monolith with hydrophobic and strong cation-exchange functional groups exhibits high extraction efficiency towards the testing analytes. The column-to-column RSD values were 1.3-9.8% for the extraction of SAs investigated. The extraction performance of the hybrid silica monolith remained practically unchanged after treated with acid (pH 1.0) and basic solutions (pH 10.5). Finally, the application of the hybrid monolith was demonstrated by micro-SPE of sulfonamide residues from milk followed by HPLC-UV analysis. The limits of detection (S/N=3) for eight SAs were found to be 1.0-3.0ng/mL in milk. The recoveries of eight SAs spiked in milk sample ranged from 80.2% to 115.6%, with relative standard deviations less than 11.8%.

  3. Crystallographic analysis of the solid solution of iron doped potassium strontium niobate with tetragonal tungsten bronze structure

    OpenAIRE

    Silvania Lanfredi; Nobre,Marcos A. L.; Lima,Alan R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Solid solution of iron doped potassium strontium niobate with KSr2(FeNb4)O15-Δ stoichiometry was prepared by high efficiency ball milling method. Structural characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Crystalline structure was analyzed by the Rietveld refinements using the FullProf software. The results showed a tetragonal system with the tetragonal tungsten bronze structure - TTB (a = 12.4631 (2) Å and c = 3.9322 (6) Å, V = 610.78 (2) ų). In this work, the sites occupancy by...

  4. Solid-phase extraction based on ground methacrylate monolith modified with gold nanoparticles for isolation of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Barberán, María; Lerma-García, María Jesús; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto Francisco; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel

    2016-04-21

    In this study, a novel polymeric material functionalized with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent for isolation of proteins. The sorbent was synthesized from a powdered poly(glycidyl-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith, and modified with ammonia, followed by immobilization of AuNPs on the pore surface of the material. To evaluate the performance of this SPE support, proteins were selected as test solutes, being the extraction conditions and other parameters (loading capacity and regenerative ability of sorbent) established. The results indicated that this sorbent could be employed to selectively capture proteins according to their pI, on the basis of the strong affinity of these biomacromolecules towards to AuNPs surface. The applicability of this sorbent was demonstrated by isolating protein species of interest (bovine serum albumin, cytochrome c and lectins in European mistletoe leaves), followed by SDS-PAGE analysis.

  5. High Strength Carbide-Based Fibrous Monolith Materials for Solid Rocket Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-19

    3950°C and 3928°C, respectively. Compared to refractory metal candidates such as Rhenium (W) and Tungsten (W), these carbides offer significant...45HfC-10VC at 1538 W/cm² in the LHMEL Facility laser Sample gone within ~3 seconds, ablated and blew away; carbon foam backing remained intact for...Response of 45TaC-45HfC-10VC at 1529 W/cm² in the LHMEL Facility laser Sample gone within 6 seconds, ablated and blew away; carbon foam backing

  6. Graphene aerogel based monolith for effective solid-phase extraction of trace environmental pollutants from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang; Liang, Qionglin; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Yang, Liu; Ding, Mingyu

    2016-05-20

    Graphene aerogel (GA), a typical kind of three-dimensional (3D) macroscopic assembly, not only provides inherently excellent properties of graphene sheets (GS), but also exhibits interesting characteristics of the 3D macroporous architecture including large and tunable pore volumes, high specific surface areas and fast mass transport kinetics. Thus, it is rational to expect GA to be an efficient adsorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE). In this paper, a novel GA monolith based solid-phase extraction method was investigated in the application of environment analysis. The GA monolith based SPE cartridge was fabricated directly in the empty cartridge through template-free "sol-cryo" method. Due to the efficient mass transfer, more adsorption sites as well as effective retention for the analytes, the adsorption property of GA for bisphenol A revealed better performance than that of GS. What's more, GA also outperformed in loading and eluting for target analysis. On the basis of the above advantages, the obtained cartridge was applied for the separation of environmental pollutants from water samples. Taking endocrine disrupting chemicals and polychlorinated biphenyls as the polar and weak polar model analytes, optimizing several parameters influencing the recoveries, limits of detection in the range of 0.01-0.11ngmL(-1) and 0.19-1.53ngL(-1) for the two series of compounds were provided by the established methods. The satisfied sensitivity was accessed and recoveries ranging from 76.3 to 112.5% were obtained for all the analytes when the proposed methods were applied in real water samples analysis. The results revealed the potential of GA as an effective sorbent in sample preparation processes.

  7. [Determination of trace silver in water samples by solid phase extraction portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guang-yu; Jiang, Xiao-ming; Zheng, Cheng-bin; Hou, Xian-deng; Xu, Kai-lai

    2011-07-01

    A simple method has been developed for the determination of silver in environmental water samples using solid phase extraction with tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Silica gel was used as an adsorbent and packed into a syringe barrel for solid phase extraction of silver prior to its determination by using a portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. Optimum conditions for adsorption and desorption of silver ion, as well as interferences from co-existing ions, were investigated. A sample pH value of 6.0, a sample loading flow rate of 4.0 mL x min(-1), and the mixture of 4% (m/v) thiourea and 2% (phi) nitrate acid with the eluent flow rate of 0.5 mL x min(-1) for desorption were selected for further studies. Under optimal conditions, a linear range of 0.20-4.00 ng x mL(-1), a limit of detection (3sigma) of 0.03 ng x mL(-1) and a preconcentration factor of 94 were achieved. The proposed method was validated by testing three environmental water samples with satisfactory results.

  8. Compatibility study towards monolithic self-charging power unit based on all-solid thin-film solar module and battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbaumhüter, Florian; Agbo, Solomon N.; Tsai, Chih-Long; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Uhlenbruck, Sven; Rau, Uwe; Merdzhanova, Tsvetelina

    2017-10-01

    Aiming at the development of a monolithic integrated all-solid-state self-rechargeable power unit, we perform a V-I characteristics compatibility study for the integration of such a device having a thin-film silicon multi-junction photovoltaic (PV) module and a thin-film solid Li//lithium phosphorus oxynitride//LiCoO2 battery. The battery and PV module are connected to mimic a monolithic module-to-storage cell device and the performance of this device in various temperature conditions has been tested. Few issues regarding the matching of the battery and PV module characteristics are identified for improvement. The concept of the integrated all-solid-state PV-battery solution appears viable especially in three-terminal device configuration.

  9. Preparation of a pipette tip-based molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction monolith by epitope approach and its application for determination of enkephalins in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Li, Dan

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolith for highly selective extraction of enkephalins was synthesized and prepared in a micropipette tip using epitope imprinting technique. The synthesized MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy. A molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction (MISPME) method was developed for extraction of enkephalins in aqueous solutions. The parameters affecting MISPME were optimized. The results indicated that this MIP monolith exhibited specific recognition capability, high enrichment efficiency and excellent reusability for enkephalins. MALDI-TOF MS analysis demonstrated that this MIP monolith can act as a useful tool for highly selective purification and enrichment of enkephalin, a kind of low abundance protein, from high-abundance proteins in human cerebrospinal fluids (CSF). Employed this MIP monolith as solid-phase microextraction column, quantitative assay of enkephalins in human CSF was developed by HPLC-ultraviolet (UV) detection in this work. The detection limits were 0.05-0.08nM. This MISPME/HPLC-UV method was used to quantify Met-enkephalin and Leu-enkephalin levels in the CSF of patients with cancer pain.

  10. Solid state synthesis of tungsten carbide nanorods and nanoplatelets by a single-step pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Jacob, David S; Gedanken, Aharon

    2005-10-20

    We report a simple and efficient single-step synthesis of tungsten carbide nanorods and nanoplatelets by direct pyrolysis of a hybrid composite material of 12-tungstophosphoric acid and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide in a closed Swagelok cell at 1000 degrees C. The product was characterized by XRD, TGA, SEM, TEM, XPS, and CV. The diameter of the nanorods is 30-50 nm, and the length varies from 200 to 500 nm. The size of the platelets is around 55 nm. The WC exhibits an interesting structural surface with kinks, steps, and terraces which is evidenced by HRTEM studies.

  11. Development of high temperature materials for solid propellant rocket nozzle applications. [tantalum carbides-tungsten fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C. R., Jr.; Honeycutt, L., III

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of tantalum carbide-tungsten fiber composites has been completed as far as weight percent carbon additions and weight percent additions of tungsten fiber. Extensive studies were undertaken concerning Young's Modulus and fracture strength of this material. Also, in-depth analysis of the embrittling effects of the extra carbon additions on the tungsten fibers has been completed. The complete fabrication procedure for the tantalum carbide-tungsten fiber composites with extra carbon additions is given. Microprobe and metallographic studies showed the effect of extra carbon on the tungsten fibers, and evaluation of the thermal shock parameter fracture strength/Young's Modulus is included.

  12. Preparation and application of a novel molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction monolith for selective enrichment of cholecystokinin neuropeptides in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang; Li, Dan; Li, Hua

    2015-08-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolith for highly selective extraction of cholecystokinin (CCK) neuropeptides was prepared in a micropipette tip. The MIPs were synthesized by epitope imprinting technique and the polymerization conditions were investigated and optimized. The synthesized MIPs were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analyzer and scanning electron microscope. A molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction (MI-μ-SPE) method was developed for the extraction of CCK neuropeptides in aqueous solutions. The parameters affecting MI-μ-SPE were optimized. The results indicated that this MIP monolith exhibited specific recognition capability and high enrichment efficiency for CCK neuropeptides. In addition, it showed excellent reusability. This MIP monolith was used for desalting and enrichment of CCK4, CCK5 and CCK8 from human cerebrospinal fluid prior to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, and the results show that this MIP monolith can be a useful tool for effective purification and highly selective enrichment of multiple homologous CCK neuropeptides in cerebrospinal fluid simultaneously. By employing MI-μ-SPE combined with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis, endogenous CCK4 in human cerebrospinal fluid was quantified.

  13. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the physical properties of monolithic carbons derived from solid iron bamboo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzesinska, Marta [Institute of Chemistry and Environment Protection, Jan Dlugosz University Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13-15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sowinskiego 5, 44-121 Gliwice (Poland); Zachariasz, Justyna [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sowinskiego 5, 44-121 Gliwice (Poland)

    2007-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the physical properties of new monolithic porous carbon materials derived from exceptional kind of bamboo characterized by solid, very strong stem, i.e., from iron bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus). Raw and carbonised bamboo (carbon content up to 82%) was characterized using various methods: elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), helium gas densitometry, ultrasonic measurements, light and scanning electron microscopes. The DSC thermogram showed that the thermal decomposition of iron bamboo was characterized by T{sub 1} = 264 C and T{sub 2} = 356 C, i.e., was finished at T > 400 C. For the higher carbonisation temperatures, above 600 C, weight loss and carbon content were found to be almost constant, while the true density and the elastic parameters: the ultrasonic velocity and the dynamic elastic modulus still increased. This means that more intensive heating did not remove any compounds from stem, but there was probably reorganization of structure of carbonised iron bamboo, resulting in more compact matrix in porous carbon. (author)

  14. Determination of Gibbs Energy of Mixing of Tungsten-Boron Binary System by Electromotive Force Measurement Using Solid Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Morishita, Masao; Miyake, Yuta; Hiramatsu, Shusuke

    2017-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the tungsten-boron binary system were determined by measuring electromotive forces of galvanic cells using an Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 solid oxide electrolyte. Assuming that W2B and αWB are the stoichiometric compounds, and W2B5- x and W1- x B3 are the nonstoichiometric compounds having solubility widths of 0.670 ≤ X B ≤ 0.690 and 0.805 ≤ X B ≤ 0.822, respectively, they were treated as the intermediate phases of W0.667B0.333, αW0.50B0.50, W0.330B0.670 W0.310B0.690, and W0.195B0.805 W0.178B0.822. The Gibbs energies of mixing, ∆mix G, determined in the present study are listed as follows: Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.667} {B}_{0.333} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}78070 + 26.01T ± 70 [1305{-}1422{{ K}}(1032{-}1149°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G(α {W}_{0.50} {B}_{0.50} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}86140 + 20.19T ± 200 [1310{-}1399{{ K }}(1037{-}1126°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.330} {B}_{0.670} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}78910 + 18.11T ± 200 [1228{-}1410{{ K }}(955{-}1137°C)], ; Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.310} {B}_{0.690} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}77350 + 17.52T ± 500 [1228{-}1410{{ K }}(955{-}1137°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.195} {B}_{0.805} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}63920 + 12.08T ± 500 [1170{-}1340{{ K }}(897{-}1067°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.178} {B}_{0.822} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}60090 + 11.15T ± 200 [1170{-}1340{{ K }}(897{-}1067°C)]. Using the thermodynamic properties determined in the present study, the composition-oxygen partial pressure diagram of the tungsten-boron-oxygen system was constructed under the conditions at 1273 K (1000 °C) and a total pressure of 1 bar (100 kPa). It is useful to understand the oxidation property of tungsten-boron binary alloys.

  15. A novel hybrid metal-organic framework-polymeric monolith for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Lan; Lirio, Stephen; Chen, Ya-Ting; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2014-03-17

    This study describes the fabrication of a novel hybrid metal-organic framework- organic polymer (MOF-polymer) for use as a stationary phase in fritless solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for validating analytical methods. The MOF-polymer was prepared by using ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), butyl methacrylate (BMA), and an imidazolium-based ionic liquid as porogenic solvent followed by microwave-assisted polymerization with the addition of 25 % MOF. This novel hybrid MOF-polymer was used to extract penicillin (penicillin G, penicillin V, oxacillin, cloxacillin, nafcillin, dicloxacillin) under different conditions. Quantitative analysis of the extracted penicillin samples using the MOF-organic polymer for SPME was conducted by using capillary electrochromatography (CEC) coupled with UV analysis. The penicillin recovery was 63-96.2 % with high reproducibility, sensitivity, and reusability. The extraction time with the proposed fabricated SPME was only 34 min.

  16. Method of fabricating a monolithic core for a solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, S. A.; Ackerman, J. P.

    1983-10-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a core for use in a solid oxide fuel cell that electrochemically combines fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support consisting instead only of the active anode, cathode, electrolyte and interconnect materials. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching interconnect material therebetween. The method consists of building up the electrolyte and interconnect walls by depositing each material on individually and endwise of the wall itself, where each material deposit is sequentially applied for one cycle; and where the depositing cycle is repeated many times until the material buildup is sufficient to formulate the core. The core is heat cured to become dimensionally and structurally stable.

  17. Tungsten toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Mark L; Sheppard, Paul R; Witten, Brandon L

    2012-04-05

    There is emerging evidence that tungsten has toxic health effects. We summarize the recent tungsten toxicity research in this short review. Tungsten is widely used in many commercial and military applications because it has the second highest melting temperature of any element. Consequently, it is important to elucidate the potential health effects of tungsten.

  18. BACE0.85Y0.15O3-DELTA Based Materials for Inovative Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhov, Kiril; Vladikova, Daria

    2016-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a promising green technology of direct conversion of chemical energy of fuel into electricity. Among the families of metal oxides, which can be successfully used as electrodes (cathodes or anodes) in SOFC, certain members of the large family of transition-metal oxides with perovskite structure ABO _{3} were found very prospective to fulfil most of the features required for preparation of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) oxide materials for SOFCs operated in the intermediate temperature range. In this regard Barium cerate with Y-substitution at the B-site (Ce site) is well known for excellent conduction capabilities in the temperature range 400-800 °C as a result from the proton motion in the crystal lattice. Doping with Y ^{3+} is very effective and the proton conductivity in BaCe _{1-x}Y _{x}O _{3-δ} increases with the increasing of the dopant concentration up to x =0.2. However, the phase behaviour of the composition BCY20 (x=0.20) is very complicated. Even at room temperature the crystalline structure remains contradictory because various structures of monoclinic, rhombohedral and orthorhombic symmetry are reported. The characterization of the chemical composition and stability, oxygen stoichiometry and cationic ratios of each synthesized phase is of great importance to understand the defect-chemistry that would govern the transport properties. We report on oxygen-deficient BaCe _{0.85}Y _{0.15}O _{3-δ} (BCY15) perovskites prepared by auto-combustion with following calcination at high temperature. The structural details of powder, dense and porous samples of materials based on BCY15 were investigated from full profile analysis of neutron and x-ray diffraction patterns. The materials were used recently as cathode, anode and central membrane in an innovative monolithic design of SOFC.

  19. Online micro-solid-phase extraction based on boronate affinity monolithic column coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoting; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke

    2014-05-16

    Quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters is very important in diagnosing and monitoring of patients with neurological disorders. We developed an online analytical method to selectively determine urinary monoamine neurotransmitters, which coupled the boronate affinity monolithic column micro-solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The boronate affinity monolithic column was prepared by in situ polymerization of vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBAA) in a stainless capillary column. The prepared monolithic column showed good permeability, high extraction selectivity and capacity. The column-to-column reproducibility was satisfactory and the enrichment factors were 17-243 for four monoamine neurotransmitters. Parameters that influence the online extraction efficiency, including pH of sample solution, flow rate of extraction and desorption, extraction volume and desorption volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method exhibited low limit of detection (0.06-0.80μg/L), good linearity (with R(2) between 0.9979 and 0.9993). The recoveries in urine samples were 81.0-105.5% for four monoamine neurotransmitters with intra- and inter-day RSDs of 2.1-8.2% and 3.7-10.6%, respectively. The online analytical method was sensitive, accurate, selective, reliable and applicable to analysis of trace monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine sample.

  20. Monolithic molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction for the selective determination of trace cytokinins in plant samples with liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fuyou; Ruan, Guihua; Liang, Shenghua; Xie, Fuwei; Liu, Huwei

    2012-08-01

    Cytokinins (CTKs) are a class of growth-regulating hormones involved in various physiological and developmental processes. More novel analytical methods for the accurate identification and quantitative determination of trace CTKs in plants have been desired to better elucidate the roles of CTKs. In this work, a novel method based on monolithic molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (mMI-SPE-LC-MS/MS) was developed for accurate determination of four CTKs in plant samples. The molecularly imprinted polymer monolith was prepared by using kinetin as the template in syringes and exhibited specific recognition ability for the four CTKs in comparison with that of non-imprinted polymer monolith. Several factors affecting the extraction performance of mMI-SPE, including the pH of loading sample solution, the nature and volume of elution solvent, the flow rate of sample loading, and sample volume, were investigated, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed mMI-SPE-LC-MS/MS method was successfully applied in the selective extraction and determination of four CTKs in plant tissues, and it offers detection limits (S/N = 3) of 104, 113, 130, and 89 pg/mL and mean recoveries of 85.9%, 79.3%, 73.5%, and 70.1% for kinetin, kinetin glucoside, trans-zeatin, and meta-topolin (mT), respectively, with the corresponding RSDs less than 15%.

  1. Fast analysis of glycosides based on HKUST-1-coated monolith solid-phase microextraction and direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianjiang; Wang, Xin; Ma, Wen; Ai, Wanpeng; Bai, Yu; Ding, Li; Liu, Huwei

    2017-04-01

    Glycosides are a kind of highly important natural aromatic precursors in tobacco leaves. In this study, a novel HKUST-1-coated monolith dip-it sampler was designed for the fast and sensitive analysis of trace glycosides using direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry. This device was prepared in two steps: in situ polymerization of monolith in a glass capillary of dip-it and layer-by-layer growth of HKUST-1 on the surface of monolith. Sufficient extraction was realized by immersing the tip to solution and in situ desorption was carried out by plasma direct analysis in real time. Compared with traditional solid-phase microextraction protocols, sample desorption was not needed anymore, and only extraction conditions were needed to be optimized in this method, including the gas temperature of direct analysis in real time, extraction time, and CH3 COONH4 additive concentration. This method enabled the simultaneous detection of six kinds of glycosides with the limits of detection of 0.02-0.05 μg/mL and the linear ranges covering two orders of magnitude with the limits of quantitation of 0.05-0.1 μg/mL. Moreover, the developed method was applied for the glycosides analysis of three tobacco samples, which only took about 2 s for every sample.

  2. Thermodynamic Optimization of a Monolithic-Type Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Sciacovelli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    In the presented paper possible design modifications in tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC geometry are investigated in order to increase its performance. The analysis of entropy generation mechanism is very important to optimize the second-law performance of these energy conversion devices. The use of this technique makes it possible to identify the main irreversibilities, understand their causes and propose changes in the system design and operation. The various contributions to the entropy generation are analyzed separately in order to identify which are the main geometrical parameters to be considered as the independent variables in the optimization procedure. The optimization is

  3. Molecularly imprinted coated graphene oxide solid-phase extraction monolithic capillary column for selective extraction and sensitive determination of phloxine B in coffee bean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Haiyun, E-mail: zhaihaiyun@126.com [College of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Su, Zihao [College of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Zuanguang, E-mail: chenzg@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Zhenping; Yuan, Kaisong; Huang, Lu [College of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2015-03-20

    Highlights: • A new GO-MISPE monolithic capillary column was prepared. • The column showed ability of impurities removal and excellent selectivity. • Phloxine B existed in real sample was enriched more than 90 times. • The GO-MISPE column presented good recovery and high stability. • The method was prospered to analyze phloxine B and LOD achieved 0.3 ng g{sup −1}. - Abstract: A method was developed to sensitively determine phloxine B in coffee bean by molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) coated graphene oxide (GO) solid-phase extraction (GO-MISPE) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and laser-induced fluorescence detection (HPLC–LIF). The GO-MISPE capillary monolithic column was prepared by water-bath in situ polymerization, using GO as supporting material, phloxine B, methacrylic acid (MAA), and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as template, functional monomer, and cross-linker, respectively. The properties of the homemade GO-MISPE capillary monolithic column, including capacity and specificity, were investigated under optimized conditions. The GO-MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The mean recoveries of phloxine B in coffee bean ranged from 89.5% to 91.4% and the intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) values all ranged from 3.6% to 4.7%. Good linearity was obtained over 0.001–2.0 μg mL{sup −1} (r = 0.9995) with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.075 ng mL{sup −1}. Under the selected conditions, enrichment factors of over 90-fold were obtained and extraction on the monolithic column effectively cleaned up the coffee bean matrix. The results demonstrated that the proposed GO-MISPE HPLC–LIF method can be applied to sensitively determine phloxine B in coffee bean.

  4. Determination of urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine by capillary electrophoresis with molecularly imprinted monolith in-tube solid phase microextraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine(8-OHdG) is an excellent marker of oxidative DNA damage.In this study,employing guanosine as dummy template a novel molecularly imprinted(MIP) monolithic capillary column had been synthesized,and that was used as medium of in-tube solid phase microextraction(SPME).Coupled with capillary electrophoresis-electrochemical detection(CE-ECD),the system of extraction and detection of 8-OHdG in urinary sample had been developed.Because of its greater phase ratio combined with c...

  5. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Quarterly technical status report, January--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-14

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  6. Monolithic translucent BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors for laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Cozzan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With high power light emitting diodes and laser diodes being explored for white light generation and visible light communication, thermally robust encapsulation schemes for color-converting inorganic phosphors are essential. In the current work, the canonical blue-emitting phosphor, high purity Eu-doped BaMgAl10O17, has been prepared using microwave-assisted heating (25 min and densified into translucent ceramic phosphor monoliths using spark plasma sintering (30 min. The resulting translucent ceramic monoliths convert UV laser light to blue light with the same efficiency as the starting powder and provide superior thermal management in comparison with silicone encapsulation.

  7. Monolithic translucent BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors for laser-driven solid state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzan, Clayton; Brady, Michael J.; O'Dea, Nicholas; Levin, Emily E.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Seshadri, Ram

    2016-10-01

    With high power light emitting diodes and laser diodes being explored for white light generation and visible light communication, thermally robust encapsulation schemes for color-converting inorganic phosphors are essential. In the current work, the canonical blue-emitting phosphor, high purity Eu-doped BaMgAl10O17, has been prepared using microwave-assisted heating (25 min) and densified into translucent ceramic phosphor monoliths using spark plasma sintering (30 min). The resulting translucent ceramic monoliths convert UV laser light to blue light with the same efficiency as the starting powder and provide superior thermal management in comparison with silicone encapsulation.

  8. Monolithic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  9. Monolithic translucent BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors for laser-driven solid state lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton Cozzan; Brady, Michael J.; Nicholas O’Dea; Emily E. Levin; Shuji Nakamura; Steven P. DenBaars; Ram Seshadri

    2016-01-01

    With high power light emitting diodes and laser diodes being explored for white light generation and visible light communication, thermally robust encapsulation schemes for color-converting inorganic phosphors are essential. In the current work, the canonical blue-emitting phosphor, high purity Eu-doped BaMgAl10O17, has been prepared using microwave-assisted heating (25 min) and densified into translucent ceramic phosphor monoliths using spark plasma sintering (30 min). The resulting transluc...

  10. Determination of imidazole derivatives by micellar electrokinetic chromatography combined with solid-phase microextraction using activated carbon-polymer monolith as adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yung-Han; Lirio, Stephen; Li, Chih-Keng; Liu, Wan-Ling; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-08

    In this study, an effective method for the separation of imidazole derivatives 2-methylimidazole (2-MEI), 4- methylimidazole (4-MEI) and 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI) in caramel colors using cation-selective exhaustive injection and sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweeping-MEKC) was developed. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for the CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 4.3-80μgL(-1) and 14-270μgL(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, a rapid fabrication activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monolithic column as adsorbent for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of imidazole colors was developed. Under the optimized SPME condition, the extraction recoveries for intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 84.5-95.1% (<6.3% RSDs), 85.6-96.1% (<4.9% RSDs), and 81.3-96.1% (<7.1% RSDs), respectively. The LODs and LOQs of AC-polymer monolithic column combined with CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 33.4-60.4μgL(-1) and 111.7-201.2μgL(-1), respectively. The use of AC-polymer as SPME adsorbent demonstrated the reduction of matrix effect in food samples such as soft drink and alcoholic beverage thereby benefiting successful determination of trace-level caramel colors residues using CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method. The developed AC-polymer monolithic column can be reused for more than 30 times without any significant loss in the extraction recovery for imidazole derivatives.

  11. Effective extraction of triazines from environmental water samples using magnetism-enhanced monolith-based in-tube solid phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Yang, Xiaodong; Luo, Qing

    2016-09-21

    This article reports on the effective extraction of triazines from environmental water samples using magnetism-enhanced monolith-based in-tube solid phase microextraction (ME-MB/IT-SPME). Firstly, monolithic poly (octyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) capillary column doped with magnetic nanoparticles was synthesized inside a fused silica. After that, the monolithic capillary column was placed inside a magnetic coil that allowed the exertion of a variable magnetic field during adsorption and desorption steps. The effects of intensity of magnetic field, adsorption and desorption flow rate, volume of sample and desorption solvent, pH value and ionic strength in sample matrix on the performance of ME-MB/IT-SPME for triazines were investigated in details. Under the optimized conditions, the developed ME-MB/IT-SPME showed satisfactory quantitative extraction efficiencies of the target analytes between 64.8% and 99.7%. At the same time, the ME-MB/IT-SPME was combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection to detect six triazines in water samples. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) and limits of quantification (S/N = 10) were in the ranges of 0.074-0.23 μg/L and 0.24-0.68 μg/L, respectively. The precision of the proposed method was evaluated in terms of intra- and inter-assay variability calculated as relative standard deviation, and it was found that the values were all below 10%. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for environmental water samples such as farmland, lake and river water with spiked recoveries in the range of 70.7-119%.

  12. A novel ionic liquid-modified organic-polymer monolith as the sorbent for in-tube solid-phase microextraction of acidic food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Yi-Hui; Ma, Jun-Feng; Hu, Min-Jie; Li, Ying; Fang, Jiang-Hua; Gao, Hao-Qi

    2014-08-01

    A novel ionic liquid-modified organic-polymer monolithic capillary column was prepared and used for in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of acidic food additives. The primary amino group of 1-aminopropyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride was reacted with the epoxide group of glycidyl methacrylate. The as-prepared new monomer was then copolymerized in situ with acrylamide and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-8000 and PEG-10,000 as porogens. The extraction performance of the developed monolithic sorbent was evaluated for benzoic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, cinnamic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 3-(trifluoromethyl)-cinnamic acid. Such a sorbent, bearing hydrophobic and anion-exchange groups, had high extraction efficiency towards the test compounds. The adsorption capacities for the analytes dissolved in water ranged from 0.18 to 1.74 μg cm(-1). Good linear calibration curves (R(2) > 0.99) were obtained, and the limits of detection (S/N = 3) for the analytes were found to be in the range 1.2-13.5 ng mL(-1). The recoveries of five acidic food additives spiked in Coca-Cola beverage samples ranged from 85.4 % to 98.3 %, with RSD less than 6.9 %. The excellent applicability of the ionic liquid (IL)-modified monolithic column was further tested by the determination of benzoic acid content in Sprite samples, further illustrating its good potential for analyzing food additives in complex samples.

  13. Preparation and evaluation of open tubular C18-silica monolithic microcartridges for preconcentration of peptides by on-line solid phase extraction capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Villanueva, Elena; Benavente, Fernando; Giménez, Estela; Yilmaz, Fatma; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria

    2014-10-10

    In this study, C18-silica monoliths were synthesized as a porous layer in open tubular capillary columns, to be cut later into microcartridges for the analysis of neuropeptides by on-line solid-phase extraction capillary electrophoresis with UV and MS detection (SPE-CE-UV and SPE-CE-MS). First, several types of C18-silica monolithic (MtC18) microcartridges were used to analyse standard solutions of five neuropeptides (i.e. dynorphin A (1-7), substance P (7-11), endomorphin 1, methionine enkephalin and [Ala]-methionine enkephalin). The MtC18 sorbents were especially selective against endomorphin 1 and substance P (7-11)). The best results in terms of sensitivity and inter-microcartridge reproducibility were achieved with the microcartridges obtained from a 10-cm open tubular capillary column with a thin monolithic coating with large through-pores (1-5μm). Run-to-run repeatability, microcartridge durability, linearity ranges and LODs were studied by MtC18-SPE-CE-MS. As expected due to their greater selectivity, the best LOD enhancement was obtained for End1 and SP (7-11) (50 times with regard to CE-MS). Finally, the suitability of the methodology for analysing biological fluids was tested with plasma samples spiked with End1 and SP (7-11). Results obtained were promising because both neuropeptides could be detected at 0.05μgmL(-1), which was almost the same concentration level as for the standard solutions (0.01μgmL(-1)).

  14. Sensitive Monitoring of Fluoroquinolones in Milk and Honey Using Multiple Monolithic Fiber Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled to Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-11-16

    In the present study, a new multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction (MMF-SPME) based on poly(apronal-co-divinylbenzene/ethylenedimethacrylate) monolith (APDE) was synthesized. The effect of the preparation parameters of APED on extraction efficiency was studied thoroughly. The combination of APDE/MMF-SPME with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection (HPLC/MS-MS) was developed for sensitive monitoring of ultratrace fluoroquinolones (FQs) in foodstuffs, including milk and honey samples. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limits of detection (S/N = 3) for the targeted FQs ranged from 0.0019 to 0.018 μg/kg in milk and 0.0010 to 0.0028 μg/kg in honey. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for method reproducibility were less than 9% in all samples. The established method was successfully applied for the monitoring of FQs residues in milk and honey samples with the recoveries between 74.5% and 116% (RSDs were in the range 0.9-9.5%). In comparison to previous methods, the developed APDE/MMF-SPME-HPLC/MS-MS showed some merits, including satisfactory sensitivity, simplicity, high cost-effectiveness, and low consumption of organic solvent.

  15. Graphene oxide reinforced polymeric ionic liquid monolith solid-phase microextraction sorbent for high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of phenolic compounds in aqueous environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Feng, Juanjuan; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-01-01

    A graphene oxide reinforced polymeric ionic liquids monolith was obtained by copolymerization of graphene oxide doped 1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(4-vinylbenzyl)imidazolium 4-styrenesulfonate monomer and 1,6-di-(3-vinylimidazolium) hexane bihexafluorophosphate cross-linking agent. Coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography, the monolith was used as a solid-phase microextraction sorbent to analyze several phenolic compounds in aqueous samples. Under the optimized extraction and desorption conditions, linear ranges were 5-400 μg/L for 3-nitrophenol, 2-nitrophenol, and 2,5-dichlorophenol and 2-400 μg/L for 4-chlorophenol, 2-methylphenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (R(2) = 0.9973-0.9988). The limits of detection were 0.5 μg/L for 3-nitrophenol and 2-nitrophenol and 0.2 μg/L for the rest of the analytes. The proposed method was used to determine target analytes in groundwater from an industrial park and river water. None of the analytes was detected. Relative recoveries were in the range of 75.5-113%.

  16. Comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification by affinity zirconium oxide-silica composite monolithic column online solid-phase microextraction - Mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Chu, Jie-Mei; Lan, Meng-Dan; Liu, Ping; Yang, Na; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-02

    More than 140 modified ribonucleosides have been identified in RNA. Determination of endogenous modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive disease diagnostic strategy. However, detection of the modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids is challenging, especially for the low abundant modified ribonucleosides due to the serious matrix interferences of biological fluids. Here, we developed a facile preparation strategy and successfully synthesized zirconium oxide-silica (ZrO2/SiO2) composite capillary monolithic column that exhibited excellent performance for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing compounds. Compared with the boronate-based affinity monolith, the ZrO2/SiO2 monolith showed ∼2 orders of magnitude higher extraction capacity and can be used under physiological pH (pH 6.5-7.5). Using the prepared ZrO2/SiO2 composite monolith as the trapping column and reversed-phase C18 column as the analytical column, we further established an online solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (online SPME-LC-MS/MS) analysis for the comprehensive profiling of ribonucleosides modification in human urine. Our results showed that 68 cis-diol-containing ribosylated compounds were identified in human urine, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest numbers of cis-diol-containing compounds were determined in a single analysis. It is worth noting that four modified ribonucleosides were discovered in the human urine for the first time. In addition, the quantification results from the pooled urine samples showed that compared to healthy controls, the contents of sixteen ribose conjugates in the urine of gastric cancer, eleven in esophagus cancer and seven in lymphoma increased more than two folds. Among these ribose conjugates, four ribose conjugates increased more than two folds in both gastric cancer and esophagus cancer; three ribose conjugates increased more than two

  17. Aluminum based metal-organic framework-polymer monolith in solid-phase microextraction of penicillins in river water and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Stephen; Liu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Chen-Lan; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-08

    In this study, aluminum based metal-organic framework (Al-MOF)-organic polymer monoliths were prepared via microwave-assisted polymerization of ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), butyl methacrylate (BMA) with different weight percentages of Al-MOF (MIL-53; 37.5-62.5%) and subsequently utilized as sorbent in solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of penicillins (penicillin G, penicillin V, oxacillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin). The Al-MOF-polymer was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to clarify the retained crystalline structure well as the homogeneous dispersion of Al-MOF (MIL-53) in polymer monolith. The developed Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column was evaluated according to its extraction recovery of penicillins. Several parameters affecting the extraction recoveries of penicillins using fabricated Al-MOF-polymer (MIL-53) monolithic column including different MIL-53 weight percentages, column length, pH, desorption solvent, and mobile phase flow rate were investigated. For comparison, different Al-based MOFs (MIL-68, CYCU-4 and DUT-5) were fabricated using the optimized condition for MIL-53-polymer (sample matrix at pH 3, 200μL desorption volume using methanol, 37.5% of MOF, 4-cm column length at 0.100mLmin(-1) flow rate). Among all the Al-MOF-polymers, MIL-53(Al)-polymer still afforded the best extraction recovery for penicillins ranging from 90.5 to 95.7% for intra-day with less than 3.5% relative standard deviations (RSDs) and inter-day precision were in the range of 90.7-97.6% with less than 4.2% RSDs. Meanwhile, the recoveries for column-to-column were in the range of 89.5-93.5% (polymer was applied for the extraction of penicillin in river water and milk by spiking trace-level penicillin for as low as 50μgL(-1) and 100μgL(-1) with recoveries ranging from 80.8% to 90.9% (<6.7% RSDs) in

  18. [Determination of five avermectins in bovine liver by on-line solid-phase extraction with hydrophobic monolithic column coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yaoqin; Ai, Lianfeng; Wang, Xuesheng; Wang, Manman; Xu, Houjun; Hao, Yulan

    2015-06-01

    A method based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) with hydrophobic monolithic column coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of five avermectins in bovine liver. A poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column was used as the sorbent. The parameters influenced on on-line SPE and separation process such as the loading mobile phase, the eluting flow rate and the solvent for the separation were investigated in detail. Blank samples, spiked samples, matrix effect and recovery experiments were investigated to evaluate the extraction efficiency and potential interfering compounds originating from the matrix. Under the optimized conditions, the method showed a linear range of 1-100 µg/L and the quantification limit of 5 µg/kg for each analyte. The presented method gave recoveries of 77.4%-98.4%. The relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day were 4.46%-8.03% and 4.79%-8.68%, respectively. Moreover, no significant changes were found in the extraction performance after more than 400 usages on one monolithic column, and even on the monoliths with various batches. The feasibility of the developed poly (butyl methacrylate-coethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column based on the on-line SPE method for the determination of avermectins was further demonstrated by the analysis of real samples.

  19. Tungsten(VI) Carbyne/Bis(carbene) Tautomerization Enabled by N-Donor SBA15 Surface Ligands: A Solid-State NMR and DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa

    2016-08-11

    Designing supported well-defined bis(carbene) complexes remains a key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. The reaction of W(CtBu)(CH(2)tBu)(3) with amine-modified mesoporous SBA15 silica, which has vicinal silanol/silylamine pairs [(SiOH)(SiNH2)], leads to [(SiNH2-)(SiO-)W(CHtBu)(CH(2)tBu)(2)] and [(SiNH2-)(SiO-)W(=CHtBu)(2)(CH(2)tBu). Variable temperature, H-1-H-1 2D double-quantum, H-1-C-13 HETCOR, and HETCOR with spin diffusion solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrate tautomerization between the alkyl alkylidyne and the bis(alkylidene) on the SBA15 surface. Such equilibrium is possible through the coordination of W to the surface [(Si-OH)(Si-NH2)] groups, which act as a [N,O] pincer ligand. DFT calculations provide a rationalization for the surface-complex tautomerization and support the experimental results. This direct observation of such a process shows the strong similarity between molecular mechanisms in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. In propane metathesis (at 150 degrees C), the tungsten bis(carbene) tautomer is favorable, with a turnover number (TON) of 262. It is the highest TON among all the tungsten alkyl-supported catalysts.

  20. Validated method for bioactive lignans in Schisandra chinensis in vitro cultures using a solid phase extraction and a monolithic column application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinová, Lenka; Vlasínová, Helena; Havel, Ladislav; Humpa, Otakar; Slanina, Jirí

    2010-09-01

    A simple and rapid method for determination of six lignans found in plant cell cultures of Schisandra chinensis was developed and validated. The lignans were extracted from plant samples with methanol and the extracts were effectively cleaned by solid-phase extraction using Strata C18-E (Phenomenex) cartridges. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a Chromolith Performance RP-18e monolithic column (100 x 4.6 mm, Merck) using an isocratic mobile phase of acetonitrile and water in a 50:50 (v/v) ratio. The eluent was monitored at 220 nm. The baseline separation of schizandrin, gomisin A, deoxyschizandrin, gamma-schizandrin, gomisin N and wuweizisu C was achieved in a relatively short time period (20 min), which was made possible by the relatively high flow rate of the mobile phase (2 mL/min). The lower limit of quantitation was 0.1 mg/L for schizandrin and gomisin A, 0.3 mg/L for deoxyschizandrin, gamma-schizandrin, and gomisin N and 1 mg/L for wuweizisu C. The analysis of spiked samples containing six lignans provided absolute recoveries between 93 and 101% in all cases. The validated method was successfully applied to the determination of lignans in embryogenic plant cell cultures of Schisandra chinensis.

  1. Monolithic molecular imprinted polymer fiber for recognition and solid phase microextraction of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in biological samples prior to capillary electrophoresis analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong-Li; Zhang, Ji-You; Chen, Chen; Hou, Xiao-Ling; Su, Ying-Ying; Wu, Lan

    2012-01-01

    A novel capillary electrophoresis (CE) method coupled with monolithic molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) fiber based solid phase microextraction (SPME) was developed for selective and sensitive determination of ephedrine (E) and pseudoephedrine (PE). With in situ polymerization in a silica capillary mold and E as template, the MIP fibers could be produced in batch reproducibly and each fiber was available for 50 extraction cycles without significant decrease in extraction ability. Using the MIP fiber under optimized extraction conditions, CE detection limits of E and PE were greatly lowered from 0.20 to 0.00096 μg/mL and 0.12 to 0.0011 μg/mL, respectively. Analysis of urine and serum samples by the MIP-SPME-CE method was also performed, with results indicating that E and PE could be selectively extracted. The recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) for sample analysis were found in the range of 91-104% and 3.8-9.1%, respectively.

  2. Tungsten diffusion in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Van Orman, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion of tungsten has been characterized in synthetic forsterite and natural olivine (Fo90) under dry conditions. The source of diffusant was a mixture of magnesium tungstate and olivine powders. Experiments were prepared by sealing the source material and polished olivine under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers to buffer at NNO or IW. Prepared capsules were annealed in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 45 min to several weeks, at temperatures from 1050 to 1450 °C. Tungsten distributions in the olivine were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation is obtained for W diffusion in forsterite: D=1.0×10-8exp(-365±28 kJ mol/RT) m s Diffusivities for the synthetic forsterite and natural Fe-bearing olivine are similar, and tungsten diffusion in olivine shows little dependence on crystallographic orientation or oxygen fugacity. The slow diffusivities measured for W in olivine indicate that Hf-W ages in olivine-metal systems will close to diffusive exchange at higher temperatures than other chronometers commonly used in cosmochronology, and that tungsten isotopic signatures will be less likely to be reset by subsequent thermal events.

  3. Fabrication of a polymeric ionic liquid-based adsorbent for multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction of endocrine disrupting chemicals in complicated samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Miao; Zhang, Zirui; Huang, Xiaojia; Wu, Yuanfei

    2017-04-01

    A multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction (MMF-SPME) utilizing polymeric ionic liquid-based adsorbent was prepared. The adsorbent was obtained by in situ copolymerization of an ionic liquid, 1-trimethyl-(4-vinylbenzyl) aminium chloride and dual cross-linkers (divinylbenzene and ethylenedimethacrylate). The effect of preparation conditions including the content of ionic liquid and porogen in the polymerization mixture on extraction performance was studied in detail. Infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry were used to inspect the physicochemical properties of the new adsorbent. The applicability of the new MMF-SPME was demonstrated by the extraction of trace endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Results indicated that the prepared MMF-SPME could extract EDCs effectively through multi-interactions such as ion-exchange, π-π and hydrophobic interactions. After optimization of extraction parameters, a method of MMF-SPME coupled to high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection was conducted to detect trace EDCs in complicated samples including environmental water and human urine. The limits of detection (S/N=3) and quantification (S/N=10) for targeted compounds were 0.011-0.065μg/L and 0.036-0.21μg/L, respectively. Satisfactory precision was also achieved by evaluating the repeatability and intermediate precision with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of less than 9% and 10%, respectively. At the same time, the proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of EDCs in water and human urine with spiking recoveries ranged from 70.6% to 119%.

  4. Free energies of formation of WC and WzC and the thermodynamic properties of carbon in solid tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D. K.; Seigle, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The activity of carbon in the two-phase regions - W + WC and W + W2C was obtained from the carbon content of iron rods equilibrated with mixtures of metal plus carbide powders. From this activity data the standard free energies of formation of WC and W2C were calculated. The temperature of the invariant reaction W2C = W + WC was fixed at 1570 + or - 5K. Using available solubility data for C in solid W, the partial molar free energy of C in the dilute solid solution was also calculated. The heat of solution of C in W, and the excess entropy for the interstitial solid solution, were computed, assuming that the carbon atoms reside in the octahedral interstices of bcc W.

  5. Flexible relaxor materials: Ba(2)Pr(x)Nd(1-x)FeNb(4)O(15) tetragonal tungsten bronze solid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Elias; Josse, Michaël; Michau, Dominique; Maglione, Mario

    2009-11-11

    Relaxors are very interesting materials but most of the time they are restricted to perovskite materials and thus their flexibility is limited. We have previously shown that tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) niobate Ba(2)PrFeNb(4)O(15) was a relaxor below 170 K and that Ba(2)NdFeNb(4)O(15) displays a ferroelectric behavior with a T(C) = 323 K. On scanning the whole solid solution Ba(2)Pr(x)Nd(1-x)FeNb(4)O(15) (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8 and 1), we demonstrate here a continuous crossover between these end member behaviors with a coexistence of ferroelectricity and relaxor in the intermediate range. This tunability is ascribed to the peculiar structure of the TTB networks which is more open than the classical perovskites. This allows for the coexistence of long range and short range orders and thus opens up the range of relaxor materials.

  6. Developing a Thermal- and Coking-Resistant Cobalt-Tungsten Bimetallic Anode Catalyst for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, N.; Pandey, J.; Zeng, Y.; Amirkhiz, B.S.; Hua, B.; Geels, N.J.; Luo, J.L.; Rothenberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a novel Co–W bimetallic anode catalyst for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) via a facile infiltration-annealing process. Using various microscopic and spectroscopic measurements, we find that the formed intermetallic nanoparticles are highly thermally stable up to 900 °C

  7. Monoliths in Bioprocess Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Rajamanickam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic columns are a special type of chromatography column, which can be used for the purification of different biomolecules. They have become popular due to their high mass transfer properties and short purification times. Several articles have already discussed monolith manufacturing, as well as monolith characteristics. In contrast, this review focuses on the applied aspect of monoliths and discusses the most relevant biomolecules that can be successfully purified by them. We describe success stories for viruses, nucleic acids and proteins and compare them to conventional purification methods. Furthermore, the advantages of monolithic columns over particle-based resins, as well as the limitations of monoliths are discussed. With a compilation of commercially available monolithic columns, this review aims at serving as a ‘yellow pages’ for bioprocess engineers who face the challenge of purifying a certain biomolecule using monoliths.

  8. High Performance All-Solid-State Flexible Micro-Pseudocapacitor Based on Hierarchically Nanostructured Tungsten Trioxide Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuezhen; Liu, Hewei; Zhang, Xi; Jiang, Hongrui

    2015-12-23

    Microsupercapacitors (MSCs) are promising energy storage devices to power miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. With the increasing attention on all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors, new strategies for high-performance flexible MSCs are highly desired. Here, we demonstrate all-solid-state, flexible micropseudocapacitors via direct laser patterning on crack-free, flexible WO3/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites containing high levels of porous hierarchically structured WO3 nanomaterials (up to 50 wt %) and limited binder (PVDF, work leads to an areal capacitance of 62.4 mF·cm(-2) and a volumetric capacitance of 10.4 F·cm(-3), exceeding that of graphene based flexible MSCs by a factor of 26 and 3, respectively. As a noncarbon based flexible MSC, hierarchically nanostructured WO3 in the narrow finger electrode is essential to such enhancement in energy density due to its pseudocapacitive property. The effects of WO3/PVDF/MWCNTs composite composition and the dimensions of interdigital structure on the performance of the flexible MSCs are investigated.

  9. Shape-anchored porous polymer monoliths for integrated online solid-phase extraction-microchip electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordman, Nina; Barrios-Lopez, Brianda; Laurén, Susanna; Suvanto, Pia; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto; Sikanen, Tiina

    2015-02-01

    We report a simple protocol for fabrication of shape-anchored porous polymer monoliths (PPMs) for on-chip SPE prior to online microchip electrophoresis (ME) separation and on-chip (ESI/MS). The chip design comprises a standard ME separation channel with simple cross injector and a fully integrated ESI emitter featuring coaxial sheath liquid channel. The monolith zone was prepared in situ at the injection cross by laser-initiated photopolymerization through the microchip cover layer. The use of high-power laser allowed not only maskless patterning of a precisely defined monolith zone, but also faster exposure time (here, 7 min) compared with flood exposure UV lamps. The size of the monolith pattern was defined by the diameter of the laser output (∅500 μm) and the porosity was geared toward high through-flow to allow electrokinetic actuation and thus avoid coupling to external pumps. Placing the monolith at the injection cross enabled firm anchoring based on its cross-shape so that no surface premodification with anchoring linkers was needed. In addition, sample loading and subsequent injection (elution) to the separation channel could be performed similar to standard ME setup. As a result, 15- to 23-fold enrichment factors were obtained already at loading (preconcentration) times as short as 25 s without sacrificing the throughput of ME analysis. The performance of the SPE-ME-ESI/MS chip was repeatable within 3.1% and 11.5% RSD (n = 3) in terms of migration time and peak height, respectively, and linear correlation was observed between the loading time and peak area.

  10. Multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction based on a polymeric ionic liquid with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of steroid sex hormones in water and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Keren; Mei, Meng; Li, Haonan; Huang, Xiaojia; Wu, Cuiqin

    2016-02-01

    The development of a simple and sensitive analytical approach that combines multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction with liquid desorption followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection is proposed for the determination of trace levels of seven steroid sex hormones (estriol, 17β-estradiol, testosterone, ethinylestradiol, estrone, progesterone and mestranol) in water and urine matrices. To extract the target analytes effectively, multiple monolithic fiber solid-phase microextraction based on a polymeric ionic liquid was used to concentrate hormones. Several key extraction parameters including desorption solvent, extraction and desorption time, pH value and ionic strength in sample matrix were investigated in detail. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection were found to be in the range of 0.027-0.12 μg/L. The linear range was 0.10-200 μg/L for 17β-estradiol, 0.25-200 μg/L estriol, ethinylestradiol and estrone, and 0.50-200 μg/L for the other hormones. Satisfactory linearities were achieved for analytes with the correlation coefficients above 0.99. Acceptable method reproducibility was achieved by evaluating the repeatability and intermediate precision with relative standard deviations of both less than 8%. The enrichment factors ranged from 54- to 74-fold. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of steroid sex hormones in environmental water samples and human urines with spiking recoveries ranged from 75.6 to 116%.

  11. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  12. A Study of Scandia Doped Tungsten Nano-Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Scandia and rhenium doped tungsten powders were prepared by solid-liquid doping combined with two-step reduction method. The particle size of doped tungsten and distribution of scandia and rhenium were studied by SEM, EDS, XRD and granularity analysis. Experimental results showed that scandia distributed evenly on the surface of tungsten particles. Addition of scandia and rhenium decreased the particle size of doped tungsten, and the more the content of scandia and rhenium, the smaller the doped tungsten particles. Tungsten powders doped with 3% Sc2O3 and 3% Re (mass fraction) had an average size of about 80 nm in diameter. The mechanism of the decrease in the tungsten particle size was discussed.

  13. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  14. Monolithic Rare Earth Doped PTR Glass Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a monolithic solid state laser on the basis of PTR glass co-doped with luminescent rare earth ions....

  15. Synthesis and characterization of tungsten carbide doped cobalt via gas-solid reaction in rotary bed reactor; Sintese e caracterizacao de carbeto de tungstenio dopado com cobalto via reacao gas-solido em reator de leito rotativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tertuliano, R.S.C.; Araujo, C.P.B. de; Frota, A.V.V.M.; Moriyama, A.L.L.; Souza, C.P. de, E-mail: ruasavio@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2016-07-01

    The search for materials with high added value, high applicability and sustainability, motivates innovations in all areas of engineering. In this context, so-called doped carbides, ceramic and metal compounds are included. This work proposes the synthesis and characterization of tungsten carbide doped cobalt (WC-Co) through the gas-solid reaction in a rotating bed reactor. The production stages of the material are: precursor synthesis by wetting, drying at 80 deg C, characterization of the precursor by MEV, DRX and FRX, gas-solid reaction at 750 deg C in a reducing atmosphere of CH{sub 4} / H{sub 2} in a rotary reactor at 34 rpm and characterization of the reaction product by the techniques already mentioned. The results showed that tungsten carbide powders were produced with cobalt inserted into the structure, with high surface area, nanometric grains and with potential for applications in the areas of catalysis, reactors and fuel cells, showing the relevance of this type of research.

  16. Preliminary shielding analysis for the CSNS target station monolith

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 陈义学; 杨寿海; 吴军; 殷雯; 梁天骄; 贾学军

    2010-01-01

    The construction of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) has been initiated at Dongguan,Guangdong,China.In spallation neutron sources the target station monolith is contaminated by a large number of fast neutrons whose energies can be as large as those of the protons of the proton beam directed towards the tungsten target.A detailed radiation transport analysis of the target station monolith is important for the construction of the CSNS.The analysis is performed using the coupled Monte Carlo and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates method.Successful elimination of the primary ray effects via the two-dimensional uncollided flux and first collision source methodology is also illustrated.The dose at the edge of the monolith is calculated.The results demonstrate that the doses received by the hall staff members are below the required standard limit.

  17. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... is to act both as a diffusion barrier for chromium and provide better protection against high temperature oxidation than a pure cobalt coating. This work presents a characterization of a cobalt-tungsten alloy coating electrodeposited on the ferritic steel Crofer 22 H which subsequently was oxidized in air...... of oxidation time. The coating had completely oxidized during the 300 h oxidation time. GDOES measurements showed that the tungsten was located in an inner zone in the coating/substrate interface. The outer layer of the coating did not contain any tungsten after oxidation but consisted mainly of cobalt...

  18. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  19. Synthesis and electrical characterization of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Rui; Zhu Jing; Yu Rong

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires of diameters ranging from 7 to 200 nm are prepared on a tungsten rod substrate by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method with vapour-solid (VS) mechanism. Tin powders are used to control oxygen concentration in the furnace, thereby assisting the growth of the tungsten oxide nanowires. The grown tungsten oxide nanowires are determined to be of crystalline W18O49. Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are measured by an in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the electrical properties of the nanowires. All of the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves observed are symmetric, which reveals that the tungsten oxide nanowires are semiconducting. Quantitative analyses of the experimental I V curves by using a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) model give some intrinsic parameters of the tungsten oxide nanowires, such as the carrier concentration, the carrier mobility and the conductivity.

  20. Enhanced Microwave Resonance Properties of Pseudo-Tungsten-Bronze Ba6-3xR8+2xTi18O54 (R = Rare Earth) Solid Solutions Explained by Electron-Phonon Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Wilfried; Ohsato, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Microwave dielectrics consisting of pseudo-tungsten-bronze solid solutions form compositional ordering at x = 2/3 with the Ba6-3xR8+2xTi18O54 (R = La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, and Gd) formula. The Qf value of the x = 2/3 composition shows the highest value for Sm, but a discontinuity at Eu. When doping with heavier rare earth species, the crystal structure becomes unstable and needs stabilization with Nd. In this paper, we suggest for the first time that the electron-phonon interaction is responsible for this phenomenon. As the unit cells without Ba ions in the perovskite blocks caused tensile stress, the dielectric constant and dielectric losses increase by means of the ionic size of the dopant in the octahedral sites, but only when elements with a low electron-phonon interaction are used.

  1. Crystallographic analysis of the solid solution of iron doped potassium strontium niobate with tetragonal tungsten bronze structure; Analise cristalografica da solucao solida com estrutura tipo Tungstenio Bronze de niobato de potassio e estroncio dopado com ferro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanfredi, Silvania; Nobre, Marcos A.L., E-mail: silvania@fct.unesp.b [UNESP, Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Biologia; Lima, Alan R.F. [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (DQ/UEPG), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Solid solution of iron doped potassium strontium niobate with KSr{sub 2}(FeNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} stoichiometry was prepared by high efficiency ball milling method. Structural characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Crystalline structure was analyzed by the Rietveld refinements using the FullProf software. The results showed a tetragonal system with the tetragonal tungsten bronze structure - TTB (a = 12.4631 (2) A and c = 3.9322 (6) A, V = 610.78 (2) A{sup 3}). In this work, the sites occupancy by the K{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} cations on the TTB structure were determined. NbO{sub 6} polyhedra distortion and its correlation with the theoretical polarization are discussed. (author)

  2. Scandia doped tungsten matrix for impregnated cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinshu; WANG Yanchun; LIU Wei; LI Hongyi; ZHOU Meiling

    2008-01-01

    As a matrix for Sc-type impregnated cathode,scandia doped tungsten with a uniform ldistribution of SC2O3 was obtained by powder metallurgy combined with the liquid-solid doping method.The microstructure and composition of the powder and the anti-ion bombardment behavior of scandium in the matrix were studied by means of SEM,EDS,XRD,and in-situ AES methods.Tungsten powder covered with scandium oxide,an ideal scandium oxide-doped tungsten powder for the preparation of Sc-type impregnated cathode,was obtained using the liquid-solid doping method.Compared with the matrix prepared with the mechanically mixed powder of tungsten and scandium oxide,SC2O3-W matrix prepared with this kind of powder had smaller grain size and uniform distribution of scandium.Sc on the surface of Sc2O3 doped tungsten mauix had good high temperature stability and good anti-ion bombardment capability.

  3. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, K. E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; O'Dell, S.; McKechnie, T.; Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Seal, S.; O’Dell, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured then no-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on

  4. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  5. Direct solid analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hardmetal precursors by laser-induced argon spark ablation with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holá, Markéta; Kanický, Viktor; Mermet, Jean-Michel; Otruba, Vítezslav

    2003-12-01

    The potential of the laser-induced argon spark atomizer (LINA-Spark atomizer) coupled with ICP-AES as a convenient device for direct analysis of WC/Co powdered precursors of sintered hardmetals was studied. The samples were presented for the ablation as pressed pellets prepared by mixing with powdered silver binder containing GeO2 as internal standard. The pellets were ablated with the aid of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) focused 16 mm behind the target surface with a resulting estimated power density of 5 GW cm(-2). Laser ablation ICP-AES signals were studied as a function of ablation time, and the duration of time prior to measurement (pre-ablation time) which was necessary to obtain reliable results was about 40 s. Linear calibration plots were obtained up to 10% (m/m) Ti, 9% Ta and 3.5% Nb both without internal standardization and by using germanium as an added internal standard or tungsten as a contained internal standard. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 6% to +/- 11% for Nb, Ta and Ti both with and without internal standardisation by Ge. A higher spread of points about the regression was observed for cobalt for which the relative uncertainty at the centroid was in the range from +/- 9% to +/- 14%. Repeatability of results was improved by the use of both Ge and W internal standards. The lowest determinable quantities calculated for calibration plots were 0.060% Co, 0.010% Nb, 0.16% Ta and 0.030% Ti with internal standardization by Ge. The LA-ICP-AES analyses of real samples led to good agreement with the results obtained by solution-based ICP determination with a relative bias not exceeding 10%. The elimination of the dissolution procedure of powdered tungsten (Nb, Ta, Ti) carbide is the principal advantage of the developed LA-ICP-AES method.

  6. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  7. Preparation of highly (001)-oriented photoactive tungsten diselenide (WSe{sub 2}) films by an amorphous solid-liquid-crystalline solid (aSLcS) rapid-crystallization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozheyev, Farabi; Friedrich, Dennis; Nie, Man; Rengachari, Mythili; Ellmer, Klaus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highly (001)-textured tungsten diselenide WSe{sub 2} thin films have been prepared by a two-step process on quartz glass and TiN metallic back contacts, respectively. At first, X-ray amorphous, selenium-rich WSe{sub 2+x} films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature onto a thin metal promoter film (Ni or Pd) and afterwards annealed in an H{sub 2}Se/Ar atmosphere. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show that highly (001)-oriented WSe{sub 2} films can be grown, which is caused by the formation of liquid promoter-metal selenide droplets which dissolve tungsten or tungsten selenide at temperatures, higher than the eutectic temperature in the promoter metal-selenium system, followed by oversaturation and eventually crystallization of WSe{sub 2} platelets. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements show that the films are photoactive. The sum of the carrier mobilities of the best films μ{sub e} + μ{sub h} is in the range of 1-7 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Monolithic microwave integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucel, R. A.

    Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), a new microwave technology which is expected to exert a profound influence on microwave circuit designs for future military systems as well as for the commercial and consumer markets, is discussed. The book contains an historical discussion followed by a comprehensive review presenting the current status in the field. The general topics of the volume are: design considerations, materials and processing considerations, monolithic circuit applications, and CAD, measurement, and packaging techniques. All phases of MMIC technology are covered, from design to testing.

  9. Monolithic fuel cell based power source for burst power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, D. C.; Blackburn, P. E.; Busch, D. E.; Dees, D. W.; Dusek, J.; Easler, T. E.; Ellingson, W. A.; Flandermeyer, B. K.; Fousek, R. J.; Heiberger, J. J.

    A unique fuel cell coupled with a low power nuclear reactor presents an attractive approach for SDI burst power requirements. The monolithic fuel cell looks attractive for space applications and represents a quantum jump in fuel cell technology. Such a breakthrough in design is the enabling technology for lightweight, low volume power sources for space based pulse power systems. The monolith is unique among fuel cells in being an all solid state device. The capability for miniaturization, inherent in solid state devices, gives the low volume required for space missions. In addition, the solid oxide fuel cell technology employed in the monolith has high temperature reject heat and can be operated in either closed or open cycles. Both these features are attractive for integration into a burst power system.

  10. Embedded-monolith armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfresh, Michael W.; Groves, Scott E; Moffet, Mitchell L.; Martin, Louis P.

    2016-07-19

    A lightweight armor system utilizing a face section having a multiplicity of monoliths embedded in a matrix supported on low density foam. The face section is supported with a strong stiff backing plate. The backing plate is mounted on a spall plate.

  11. Interfacing on-line solid phase extraction with monolithic column multisyringe chromatography and chemiluminescence detection: An effective tool for fast, sensitive and selective determination of thiazide diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Fernando; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2010-01-15

    A new, multisyringe flow injection set-up has been developed for the completely automated determination of trace thiazide compounds with diuretic action in different types of samples. The proposed instrumental set-up exploits for the first time, a low pressure on-line solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-chemiluminescence detection method. This novel combination of sample treatments in flow systems expands the current applicability of low pressure liquid chromatography due to the isolation/preconcentration of the target compounds, besides high selectivity and sensitivity. For the determination of three thiazide compounds named hydroflumethiazide, furosemide and bendroflumethiazide, the proposed set-up provided with the preconcentration of only 1mL of sample, limits of detection of 3, 60 and 40microgL(-1), respectively. Furthermore wide linear dynamic ranges of 6-4000, 140-20,000 and 90-40,000microgL(-1), respectively, were obtained. Besides of this, a high injection throughput of 12h(-1) was also achieved. As in sports, thiazide diuretics are prohibited substances, the proposed method has been applied to their determination in urine samples. Furthermore the potential of the proposed method as a fast-screening approach for emerging contaminants in waters has been also tested by applying it to well water and leachates from a solid waste landfill.

  12. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  13. Monolithic MACS micro resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Jacquinot, J.-F.; Ginefri, J. C.; Bonhomme, C.; Sakellariou, D.

    2016-10-01

    Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) aids improving the intrinsically low NMR sensitivity of heterogeneous microscopic samples. We report on the design and testing of a new type of monolithic 2D MACS resonators to overcome known limitations of conventional micro coils. The resonators' conductors were printed on dielectric substrate and tuned without utilizing lumped element capacitors. Self-resonance conditions have been computed by a hybrid FEM-MoM technique. Preliminary results reported here indicate robust mechanical stability, reduced eddy currents heating and negligible susceptibility effects. The gain in B1 /√{ P } is in agreement with the NMR sensitivity enhancement according to the principle of reciprocity. A sensitivity enhancement larger than 3 has been achieved in a monolithic micro resonator inside a standard 4 mm rotor at 500 MHz. These 2D resonators could offer higher performance micro-detection and ease of use of heterogeneous microscopic substances such as biomedical samples, microscopic specimens and thin film materials.

  14. The MONOLITH prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Bencivenni, G; Candela, A M; Chiarini, A; Chignoli, F; De Deo, M; D'Incecco, M; Gerli, S; Giusti, P; Gómez, F; Gustavino, C; Lindozzi, M; Mannocchi, G; Menghetti, H; Morello, C; Murtas, F; Paoluzzi, G; Pilastrini, R; Redaelli, N G; Santoni, M; Sartorelli, G; Terranova, F; Trinchero, G C

    2000-01-01

    MONOLITH (Massive Observatory for Neutrino Oscillation or LImits on THeir existence) is the project of an experiment to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with a massive magnetized iron detector. The baseline option is a 34 kt iron detector based on the use of about 50000 m/sup 2/ of the glass Resistive Plate Chambers (glass RPCs) developed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS). An 8 ton prototype equipped with 23 m/sup 2/ of glass RPC has been realized and tested at the T7-PS beam at CERN. The energy resolution for pions follows a 68%/ square root (E(GeV))+2% law for orthogonally incident particles, in the energy range between 2 and 10 GeV. The time resolution and the tracking capability of the glass RPC are suitable for the MONOLITH experiment. (7 refs).

  15. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WROUGHT TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanical properties of wrought tungsten vol. II. Creep rupture test data from 1500 to 5000 F, and tensile test data from room temperature to 5000 F at various strain rates for tungsten sheet material.

  16. Polymethacrylate monolithic and hybrid particle-monolithic columns for reversed-phase and hydrophilic interaction capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandera, Pavel; Urban, Jirí; Skeríková, Veronika; Langmaier, Pavel; Kubícková, Romana; Planeta, Josef

    2010-01-01

    We prepared hybrid particle-monolithic polymethacrylate columns for micro-HPLC by in situ polymerization in fused silica capillaries pre-packed with 3-5microm C(18) and aminopropyl silica bonded particles, using polymerization mixtures based on laurylmethacrylate-ethylene dimethacrylate (co)polymers for the reversed-phase (RP) mode and [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) zwitterionic (co)polymers for the hydrophilic interaction (HILIC) mode. The hybrid particle-monolithic columns showed reduced porosity and hold-up volumes, approximately 2-2.5 times lower in comparison to the pure monolithic columns prepared in the whole volume of empty capillaries. The elution volumes of sample compounds are also generally lower in comparison to packed or pure monolithic columns. The efficiency and permeability of the hybrid columns are intermediate in between the properties of the reference pure monolithic and particle-packed columns. The chemistries of the embedded solid particles and of the interparticle monolithic moiety in the hybrid capillary columns contribute to the retention to various degrees, affecting the selectivity of separation. Some hybrid columns provided improved separations of proteins in comparison to the reference particle-packed columns in the reversed-phase mode. Zwitterionic hybrid particle-monolithic columns show dual mode retention HILIC/RP behaviour depending on the composition of the mobile phase and allow separations of polar compounds such as phenolic acids in the HILIC mode at lower concentrations of acetonitrile and, often in shorter analysis time in comparison to particle-packed and full-volume monolithic columns.

  17. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J.-H. Pee; G.H. Kim; H.Y. Lee; Y.J. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide...

  18. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K. (Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Electro-Optics Technology Center); Wei, G. (Mobil Solar Energy Corp., Billerica, MA (United States)); Yu, P.C. (PPG Industries, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors' institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  19. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Electro-Optics Technology Center; Wei, G. [Mobil Solar Energy Corp., Billerica, MA (United States); Yu, P.C. [PPG Industries, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors` institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  20. Bioaffinity chromatography on monolithic supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Beek, van T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Affinity chromatography on monolithic supports is a powerful analytical chemical platform because it allows for fast analyses, small sample volumes, strong enrichment of trace biomarkers and applications in microchips. In this review, the recent research using monolithic materials in the field of bi

  1. Bioaffinity chromatography on monolithic supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Beek, van T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Affinity chromatography on monolithic supports is a powerful analytical chemical platform because it allows for fast analyses, small sample volumes, strong enrichment of trace biomarkers and applications in microchips. In this review, the recent research using monolithic materials in the field of bi

  2. 赣南某钨矿山废水悬浮物处理试验研究%Treatment of Effluent Suspended Solids in a Tungsten Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈后兴; 赖兰萍

    2014-01-01

    采用混凝法处理钨矿山废水中的悬浮物,研究不同混凝剂、混凝剂用量、搅拌强度、pH值、沉降时间等对废水处理效果的影响,得出优化操作条件。试验表明:采用石灰乳+FeCl3工艺处理该尾矿库外排水效果好,最佳工艺条件为:废水pH值调节至10左右,FeCl3的投加量为15 mg/L左右,搅拌强度为250 r/min,快速搅拌0.5 min,然后50 r/min慢速搅拌5 min,沉降时间为60 min。在此工艺条件下,悬浮物去除率可达到98.4%,上清液悬浮物含量可降至5.4 mg/L。%This paper studies the treatment of suspended solids in wastewater by coagulation method. Effects of Different coagulant, coagulant dosage, stirring intensity, pH, settling time on the treatment results are studied, resulting the optimized conditions. The research results show that, the treatment process of tailings drainage by Lime+FeCl3 process has the favorable results. The optimum conditions were:waste water pH is adjusted to about 10, FeCl 3 the dosage of about 15 mg/L, stirring intensity of 250 r/min rapid mixing 0.5 min, then 50 r/min slow stirring 5 min, settling time of 60 min. Suspended solids removal rate reached 98.4 percent. The supernatant suspended solids content can be reduced to 5.4 mg/L.

  3. Design of monoliths through their mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornik, Aleš; Savnik, Aleš; Jančar, Janez; Krajnc, Nika Lendero

    2014-03-14

    Chromatographic monoliths have several interesting properties making them attractive supports for analytics but also for purification, especially of large biomolecules and bioassemblies. Although many of monolith features were thoroughly investigated, there is no data available to predict how monolith mechanical properties affect its chromatographic performance. In this work, we investigated the effect of porosity, pore size and chemical modification on methacrylate monolith compression modulus. While a linear correlation between pore size and compression modulus was found, the effect of porosity was highly exponential. Through these correlations it was concluded that chemical modification affects monolith porosity without changing the monolith skeleton integrity. Mathematical model to describe the change of monolith permeability as a function of monolith compression modulus was derived and successfully validated for monoliths of different geometries and pore sizes. It enables the prediction of pressure drop increase due to monolith compressibility for any monolith structural characteristics, such as geometry, porosity, pore size or mobile phase properties like viscosity or flow rate, based solely on the data of compression modulus and structural data of non-compressed monolith. Furthermore, it enables simple determination of monolith pore size at which monolith compressibility is the smallest and the most robust performance is expected. Data of monolith compression modulus in combination with developed mathematical model can therefore be used for the prediction of monolith permeability during its implementation but also to accelerate the design of novel chromatographic monoliths with desired hydrodynamic properties for particular application.

  4. Porous polymer monolithic col

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Terborg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surface coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.46–4.51 molecules/nm2 significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.39–2.45 molecules/nm2. The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water, respectively.

  5. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  6. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  7. Many-body effects in the mobility and diffusivity of interstitial solute in a crystalline solid: The case of helium in BCC tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haohua; Semenov, A. A.; Woo, C. H.

    2017-09-01

    The many-body dynamics of a crystalline solid containing an interstitial solute atom (ISA) is usually interpreted within the one-particle approximation as a random walker hopping among trapping centers at periodic lattice sites. The corresponding mobility and diffusivity can be formulated based on the transition-state theory in the form of the Arrhenius law. Possible issues arising from the many-body nature of the dynamics may need to be understood and resolved both scientifically and technologically. Noting the congruence between the dynamics of the many-body and stochastic systems within the Mori-Zwanzig theory, we analyzed the dynamics of a model particle subjected to a saw-tooth potential in a noisy medium. The ISA mobility is found to be governed by two sources of dissipative friction: that which is produced by the scattering of lattice waves by the moving ISA (phonon wind), and that which is derived from the energy dissipation associated with overcoming the migration barrier screened by lattice waves (i.e., phonon screened). The many-body effect in both cases increases with temperature, so that the first component of the friction is important at high temperatures and the second component is important at low temperatures. A formulation built on this mechanistic structure of the dissipative friction requires the mobility and diffusivity to be expressed not only in terms of the migration enthalpy and entropy, but also of the phonon drag coefficient. As a test, the complex temperature dependence of the mobility and diffusivity of interstitial helium in BCC W obtained from molecular-dynamics simulation is very well reproduced.

  8. Molecularly imprinted macroporous monolithic materials for protein recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Liang Deng; Yan Li Li; Li Hua Zhang; Yu Kui Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic materials that can specifically recognize proteins will find wide application in many fields. In this report, bovine serum albumin was chosen as the template protein. Acrylamide and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide were employed as the functional and cross-linker monomers, respectively. Molecularly imprinted macroporous monolithic materials that can preferentially bind the template protein in an aqueous environment were prepared by combination of molecular imprinting technique and freezing/thawing preparation method. The resulted imprinted macroporous monolithic columns were evaluated by utilizing as stationary phase in high performance liquid chromatography and solid-phase extraction materials. The experimental results indicated that the imprinted macroporous monolithic column exhibited good recognition for template protein, as compared with the control protein (hemoglobin), whereas the non-imprinted polymer (prepared under the same conditions except without addition template protein) had no selective properties.

  9. Biobased monoliths for adenovirus purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Gonçalves, Bianca; Sousa, Margarida; Martins, Duarte L; Barroso, Telma; Pina, Ana Sofia; Peixoto, Cristina; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana; Roque, A Cecília A

    2015-04-01

    Adenoviruses are important platforms for vaccine development and vectors for gene therapy, increasing the demand for high titers of purified viral preparations. Monoliths are macroporous supports regarded as ideal for the purification of macromolecular complexes, including viral particles. Although common monoliths are based on synthetic polymers as methacrylates, we explored the potential of biopolymers processed by clean technologies to produce monoliths for adenovirus purification. Such an approach enables the development of disposable and biodegradable matrices for bioprocessing. A total of 20 monoliths were produced from different biopolymers (chitosan, agarose, and dextran), employing two distinct temperatures during the freezing process (-20 °C and -80 °C). The morphological and physical properties of the structures were thoroughly characterized. The monoliths presenting higher robustness and permeability rates were further analyzed for the nonspecific binding of Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) preparations. The matrices presenting lower nonspecific Ad5 binding were further functionalized with quaternary amine anion-exchange ligand glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride hydrochloride by two distinct methods, and their performance toward Ad5 purification was assessed. The monolith composed of chitosan and poly(vinyl) alcohol (50:50) prepared at -80 °C allowed 100% recovery of Ad5 particles bound to the support. This is the first report of the successful purification of adenovirus using monoliths obtained from biopolymers processed by clean technologies.

  10. Monolithic microchannel heatsink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, William J.; Beach, Raymond J.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon wafer has slots sawn in it that allow diode laser bars to be mounted in contact with the silicon. Microchannels are etched into the back of the wafer to provide cooling of the diode bars. To facilitate getting the channels close to the diode bars, the channels are rotated from an angle perpendicular to the diode bars which allows increased penetration between the mounted diode bars. This invention enables the fabrication of monolithic silicon microchannel heatsinks for laser diodes. The heatsinks have low thermal resistance because of the close proximity of the microchannels to the laser diode being cooled. This allows high average power operation of two-dimensional laser diode arrays that have a high density of laser diode bars and therefore high optical power density.

  11. Recent advances in the preparation and application of monolithic capillary columns in separation science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tingting; Yang, Xi; Xu, Yujing [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Ji, Yibing, E-mail: jiyibing@msn.com [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing, 210009 (China)

    2016-08-10

    Novel column technologies involving various materials and efficient reactions have been investigated for the fabrication of monolithic capillary columns in the field of analytical chemistry. In addition to the development of these miniaturized systems, a variety of microscale separation applications have achieved noteworthy results, providing a stepping stone for new types of chromatographic columns with improved efficiency and selectivity. Three novel strategies for the preparation of capillary monoliths, including ionic liquid-based approaches, nanoparticle-based approaches and “click chemistry”, are highlighted in this review. Furthermore, we present the employment of state-of-the-art capillary monolithic stationary phases for enantioseparation, solid-phase microextraction, mixed-mode separation and immobilized enzyme reactors. The review concludes with recommendations for future studies and improvements in this field of research. - Highlights: • Preparation of novel monolithic capillary columns have shown powerful potential in analytical chemistry field. • Various materials including ionic liquids and nanoparticles involved into capillary monolithic micro-devices are concluded. • Click chemistry strategy applied for preparing monolithic capillary columns is reviewed. • Recent strategies utilized in constructing different capillary monoliths for enantiomeric separation are summarized. • Advancement of capillary monoliths for complex samples analysis is comprehensively described.

  12. Mineral resource of the month: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on tungsten. It says that tungsten is a metal found in chemical compounds such as in the scheelite and ore minerals wolframite. It states that tungsten has the highest melting point and it forms a compound as hard as diamond when combined with carbon. It states that tungsten can be used as a substitute for lead in fishing weights, ammunition, and hunting shot. Moreover, China started to export tungsten materials and products instead of tungsten raw materials.

  13. Data in support of preparation and functionalization of a clickable polycarbonate monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanrong Xin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article provides supplementary figures to the research article entitled, “Phase separation approach to a reactive polycarbonate monolith for “click” modifications” (Xin et al., Polymer, 2015, doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2015.04.008. Here, the nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms of the prepared porous polycarbonate monolith are shown to classify its inner structure and calculate the specific surface area. The monoliths were modified by using the thiol-ene click chemistry and the olefin metathesis, which was examined by contact angle measurements, FT-IR, solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy as well as thermogravimetric analysis.

  14. Electrochromic behavior in CVD grown tungsten oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogova, D.; Iossifova, A.; Ivanova, T.; Dimitrova, Zl; Gesheva, K.

    1999-03-01

    Solid state electrochemical devices (ECDs) for smart windows, large area displays and automobile rearview mirrors are of considerable technological and commercial interest. In this paper, we studied the electrochromic properties of amorphous and polycrystalline CVD carbonyl tungsten oxide films and the possibility for sol-gel thin TiO 2 film to play the role of passive electrode in an electrochromic window with solid polymer electrolyte.

  15. Electrochromic behavior in CVD grown tungsten oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogova, D.; Iossifova, A.; Ivanova, T.; Gesheva, K.; Dimitrova, Z. [Central Laboratory for Solar Energy and New Energy Sources at Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko shossee Blvd., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1999-03-15

    Solid state electrochemical devices (ECDs) for smart windows, large area displays and automobile rearview mirrors are of considerable technological and commercial interest. In this paper, we studied the electrochromic properties of amorphous and polycrystalline CVD carbonyl tungsten oxide films and the possibility for sol-gel thinTiO{sub 2} film to play the role of passive electrode in an electrochromic window with solid polymer electrolyte

  16. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    W-3.0% Ni-1.6% Fe and a zirconium foil (2 mils ) laminate. In addition, a GTE tungsten alloy (tungsten blended with 8% nickel and 2% iron) was...vescide.Wolframbleche sollten des- direction. i.e. the longitudinal direction. qu’elles sont lonaitudinales ou transver- ’AIM 1btakeristalliso tion noch 1 Stunde

  17. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  18. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  19. 固相烧结低钨含量W-Ni-Fe合金的微观结构与力学性能%Microstructure and mechanical property of W-Ni-Fe alloys with lower tungsten content fabricated by solid state sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐欢; 曹顺华; 陈炳煌; 肖彬; 李世康

    2016-01-01

    采用固相烧结工艺(1300℃保温1 h)制备低钨含量(质量分数为60%~80%)的W-Ni-Fe合金,测定合金的抗拉强度、抗压强度和伸长率,利用金相显微镜观察合金的显微组织,并通过扫描电镜(SEM)观察合金断口形貌,研究钨含量对固相烧结W-Ni-Fe合金力学性能与微观结构的影响。结果表明:随钨含量降低,合金的孔隙率和平均孔径减小,抗拉强度增大,伸长率显著提高,抗压强度变化不大。W含量为60%~80%的W-Ni-Fe合金,其孔隙率为17.8%~21.4%,抗拉强度为231~262 MPa,抗压强度2450~2550 MPa,伸长率为0.3%~2.3%,压拉比为9.45~11.04,都能满足易碎型穿甲弹弹芯材料的性能要求。%W-Ni-Fe alloys with low tungsten content (60%−80%, mass fraction) were prepared by solid state sintering. The mechanical properties including tensile strength, compression strength and elongation of the sample were tested. The microstructure and fracture morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of tungsten content on mechanical properties and microstructure of W-Ni-Fe alloys after solid state sintering were also studied. The results show that, with decreasing tungsten content, the porosity and average pore size of alloys decrease, tensile strength increases, elongation increases significantly, and compression strength changes a little. The W-Ni-Fe alloys with tungsten content in the range of 60%−80% have porosity of 17.8%−21.4%, tensile strength of 231−262 MPa, compressive strength of 2 450−2 550MPa, elongation of 0.3%−2.3%, and the proportion of compressive strength and tensile strength of 9.45−11.04, which all meet the requirements of the fragile armour-piercing projectile.

  20. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service. [ 74 FR 16143, Apr. 9,...

  1. Carbon monolith: preparation, characterization and application as microextraction fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhi-Guo; Chen, Fei; Xing, Jun; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2009-07-10

    A carbon monolith was synthesized via a polymerization-carbonization method, styrene and divinylbenzene being adopted as precursors and dodecanol as a porogen during polymerization. The resultant monolith had bimodal porous substructure, narrowly distributed nano skeleton pores and uniform textural pores or throughpores. The carbon monolith was directly used as an extracting fiber, taking place of the coated silica fibers in commercially available solid-phase microextraction device, for the extraction of phenols followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Under the studied conditions, the calibration curves were linear from 0.5 to 50 ng mL(-1) for phenol, o-nitrophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and p-chlorophenol. The limits of detection were between 0.04 and 0.43 ng mL(-1). The recoveries of the phenols spiked in real water samples at 10 ng mL(-1) were between 85% and 98% with the relative standard deviations below 10%. Compared with the commercial coated ones (e.g. PDMS, CW/DVB and DVB/CAR/PDMS), the carbon monolith-based fiber had advantages of faster extraction equilibrium and higher extraction capacity due to the superior pore connectivity and pore openness resulting from its bimodal porous substructure.

  2. 3D-Printed MOF Monoliths for Gas Adsorption Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Harshul; Eastman, Stephen; Al-Naddaf, Qasim; Rownaghi, Ali Asghar; Rezaei, Fateme

    2017-09-27

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have shown promising performance in separation, adsorption, reaction and storage of various industrial gases, however, their large-scale applications have been hampered by the lack of a proper strategy to formulate them into scalable gas-solid contactors. Herein, we report fabrication of MOF monoliths using 3D printing technique and evaluation of their adsorptive performance in CO2 removal from air. The 3D-printed MOF-74(Ni) and UTSA-16(Co) monoliths with MOF loadings as high as 80 and 85 wt %, respectively were developed and their physical and structural properties were characterized and compared with those of MOF powders. Our adsorption experiments showed that upon exposure to 5,000 ppm (0.5%) CO2 at 25 ºC, the MOF-74(Ni) and UTSA-16(Co) monoliths can adsorb CO2 with the uptake capacity of 1.35 and 1.31 mmol/g, respectively, which are 79 and 87% of the capacity of their MOF analogues under the same conditions. Furthermore, a stable performance was obtained for self-standing 3D-printed monolithic structures with relatively good adsorption kinetics. The preliminary findings reported in this investigation highlight the advantage of robocasting (3D printing) technique for shaping MOF materials into practical configurations that are suitable for various gas separation applications.

  3. Deposition and Coating Properties on CVD Tungsten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ji-hong; LI Zheng-xiang; LIU Gao-jian; ZHOU Hui-Huang; CHUN liang

    2004-01-01

    Surface characterization and microstructure studies are performed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten coating. There is about 2 μm thickness diffusion layer of tungsten in the molybdenum substrate. The thermal shock test shows tungsten coating has good adhesion with molybdenum substrate, but the elements of oxygen and carbon in the tungsten coating have the bad affection to the adhesion. The result of high-temperature diffusion experiment is the diffusion rate from molybdenum substrate to tungsten coating is faster.

  4. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  5. Tungsten resources of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Max Gregg

    1974-01-01

    Brazilian tungsten production, 85 percent of which is exported, comes almost entirely from scheelite-bearing tactites in northeast Brazil, and has reached an annual rate of about 2,000 metric tons (2,200 short tons) of scheelite concentrate with 70 percent WO3. Scheelite ore reserves, located principally in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, are estimated to be as high as 8,300,000 tons (9,100,000 short tons) containing 0.7 percent WO3. Minor deposits (or those about which only minimal information is available) of wolframite, with which some cassiterite is associated, are located in Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul. Both the scheelite and the wolframite deposits are considered . to be late Precambrian A (620 to 900 m.y.) or early Cambrian in age.

  6. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  7. In situ Fabrication of Monolithic Copper Azide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Qingxuan; Wu, Xingyu

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication and characterization of monolithic copper azide were performed. The monolithic nanoporous copper (NPC) with interconnected pores and nanoparticles was prepared by decomposition and sintering of the ultrafine copper oxalate. The preferable monolithic NPC can be obtained through decomposition and sintering at 400°C for 30 min. Then, the available monolithic NPC was in situ reacted with the gaseous HN3 for 24 h and the monolithic NPC was transformed into monolithic copper azide. Additionally, the copper particles prepared by electrodeposition were also reacted with the gaseous HN3 under uniform conditions as a comparison. The fabricated monolithic copper azide was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  8. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  9. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  10. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark J. Rigali

    2001-10-01

    Published mechanical and thermal properties data on a variety of materials was gathered, with focus on materials that have potential with respect to developing wear resistant and damage tolerant composite for mining industry applications. Preliminary core materials of interest include but are not limited to: Diamond, Tungsten Carbide and Cemented Tungsten Carbides, Carbides of Boron, Silicon, Titanium and Aluminum, Diboride of Titanium and Aluminum, Nitrides of Aluminum, Silicon, Titanium, and Boron, Aluminum Oxide, Tungsten, Titanium, Iron, Cobalt and Metal Alloys. Preliminary boundary materials of interest include but are not limited to: W metal, WC-Co, W-Co, WFeNi, and Mo metal and alloys. Several FM test coupons were fabricated with various compositions using the above listed materials. These coupons were consolidated to varying degrees by uniaxial hot pressing, then cut and ground to expose the FM cell structure. One promising system, WC-Co core and WFeNi boundary, was consolidated to 97% of theoretical density, and demonstrates excellent hardness. Data on standard mechanical tests was gathered, and tests will begin on the consolidated test coupons during the upcoming reporting period. The program statements of work for ACR Inc. and its subcontractors, as well as the final contract negotiations, were finalized during the current reporting period. The program start date was February 22nd, 2001. In addition to the current subcontractors, Kennametal Inc., a major manufacturer of cutting tools and wear resistant tooling for the mining industry, expressed considerable interest in ACR's Fibrous Monolith composites for both machine and mining applications. At the request of Kennametal, ARC Inc fabricated and delivered several Fibrous Monolith coupons and components for testing and evaluation in the mining and machine tool applications. Additional samples of Diamond/Tungsten Carbide-6%Cobalt Fibrous Monolith were fabricated and delivered for testing Kennametal

  11. Solvers for large-displacement fluid structure interaction problems: segregated versus monolithic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L.; Boyle, Jonathan

    2008-12-01

    We compare the relative performance of monolithic and segregated (partitioned) solvers for large- displacement fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems within the framework of oomph-lib, the object-oriented multi-physics finite-element library, available as open-source software at http://www.oomph-lib.org . Monolithic solvers are widely acknowledged to be more robust than their segregated counterparts, but are believed to be too expensive for use in large-scale problems. We demonstrate that monolithic solvers are competitive even for problems in which the fluid solid coupling is weak and, hence, the segregated solvers converge within a moderate number of iterations. The efficient monolithic solution of large-scale FSI problems requires the development of preconditioners for the iterative solution of the linear systems that arise during the solution of the monolithically coupled fluid and solid equations by Newton’s method. We demonstrate that recent improvements to oomph-lib’s FSI preconditioner result in mesh-independent convergence rates under uniform and non-uniform (adaptive) mesh refinement, and explore its performance in a number of two- and three-dimensional test problems involving the interaction of finite-Reynolds-number flows with shell and beam structures, as well as finite-thickness solids.

  12. High-Performance Solid-State and Fiber Lasers Controlled by Volume Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    poral shaping of laser pulses, integration of different laser components in the same material and fabrica - tion of monolithic solid state lasers...shaping of laser pulses, integration of different laser components in the same material and fabrica - tion of monolithic solid state lasers; and...same material and fabrica - tion of monolithic solid state lasers; and passive and active coherent combining along with high density spectral

  13. Análise cristalográfica da solução sólida com estrutura tipo Tungstênio Bronze de niobato de potássio e estrôncio dopado com ferro Crystallographic analysis of the solid solution of iron doped potassium strontium niobate with tetragonal tungsten bronze structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvania Lanfredi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid solution of iron doped potassium strontium niobate with KSr2(FeNb4O15-Δ stoichiometry was prepared by high efficiency ball milling method. Structural characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Crystalline structure was analyzed by the Rietveld refinements using the FullProf software. The results showed a tetragonal system with the tetragonal tungsten bronze structure - TTB (a = 12.4631 (2 Å and c = 3.9322 (6 Å, V = 610.78 (2 ų. In this work, the sites occupancy by the K+, Sr2+ and Fe3+ cations on the TTB structure were determined. NbO6 polihedra distortion and its correlation with the theoretical polarization are discussed.

  14. Global Tungsten Demand and Supply Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořáček, Jaroslav; Sousedíková, Radmila; Vrátný, Tomáš; Jureková, Zdenka

    2017-03-01

    An estimate of the world tungsten demand and supply until 2018 has been made. The figures were obtained by extrapolating from past trends of tungsten production from1905, and its demand from 1964. In addition, estimate suggestions of major production and investment companies were taken into account with regard to implementations of new projects for mining of tungsten or possible termination of its standing extraction. It can be assumed that tungsten supply will match demand by 2018. This suggestion is conditioned by successful implementation of new tungsten extraction projects, and full application of tungsten recycling methods.

  15. China’s Tungsten Resources Supply and Demand Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>China’s production of tungsten products mainly includes tungsten ore concentrates and a series of intermediate tungsten products such as ferro-tungsten, tungstic acid, sodium tungstate, calcium tungstate, tungsten trioxide, tungsten blue oxide, ammonium paratungstate, ammonium metatungstate, tungsten powder etc. During the period between 1949-1997, China produced 1.85 million tons of tungsten ore concentrates, in which 873,000 tons were exported with US$3.1 billion in value.

  16. Preparation of boronate-functionalized molecularly imprinted monolithic column with polydopamine coating for glycoprotein recognition and enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zian; Wang, Juan; Tan, Xiaoqing; Sun, Lixiang; Yu, Ruifang; Yang, Huanghao; Chen, Guonan

    2013-12-06

    A novel imprinting strategy using reversible covalent complexation of glycoprotein was described for creating glycoprotein-specific recognition cavities on boronate-functionalized monolithic column. Based on it, a molecularly imprinted monolithic column was prepared by self-polymerization of dopamine (DA) on the surface of 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA)-based polymeric skeletons after reversible immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Due to the combination of boronate affinity and surface imprinting of DA, the stable and accessible recognition sites in the as-prepared imprinted monolith could be obtained after the removal of the template, which facilitated the rebinding of the template and provided good reproducibility and lifetime of use. The recognition behaviors of proteins on the bare VPBA-based, HRP-imprinted and nonimprinted monolithic columns were evaluated in detail and the results showed that the HRP-imprinted monolith exhibited higher recognition ability toward the template than another two monolithic columns. Not only nonglycoproteins but also glycoproteins can be well separated with the HRP-imprinted monolith. In addition, the feasibility of the HRP-imprinted monolith, adopted as an in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME), was further assessed by selective extraction and enrichment of HRP from human serum. The good results demonstrated its potential in glycoproteome analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Further development of the tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietl, Hanns; Hoeschen, Till; Riesch, Johann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumann, Martin; Coenen, Jan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Huber, Philipp [Lehrstuhl fuer Textilmaschinenbau und Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the use in a fusion device tungsten has a unique property combination. The brittleness below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the embrittlement during operation e.g. by overheating, neutron irradiation are the main drawbacks for the use of pure tungsten. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites utilize extrinsic mechanisms to improve the toughness. After proofing that this idea works in principle the next step is the conceptual proof for the applicability in fusion reactors. This will be done by producing mock-ups and testing them in cyclic high heat load tests. For this step all constituents of the composite, which are fibre, matrix and interface, and all process steps need to be investigated. Tungsten fibres are investigated by means of tension tests to find the optimum diameter and pretreatment. New interface concepts are investigated to meet the requirements in a fusion reactor, e.g. high thermal conductivity, low activation. In addition weaving processes are evaluated for their use in the fibre preform production. This development is accompanied by an extensive investigation of the materials properties e.g. single fibre tension tests.

  18. Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Process Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. R. Clark; N. P. Hallinan; J. F. Jue; D. D. Keiser; J. M. Wight

    2006-05-01

    The pursuit of a high uranium density research reactor fuel plate has led to monolithic fuel, which possesses the greatest possible uranium density in the fuel region. Process developments in fabrication development include friction stir welding tool geometry and cooling improvements and a reduction in the length of time required to complete the transient liquid phase bonding process. Annealing effects on the microstructures of the U-10Mo foil and friction stir welded aluminum 6061 cladding are also examined.

  19. Pressure drop in CIM disk monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelic, Igor; Nemec, Damjan; Podgornik, Ales; Koloini, Tine

    2005-02-11

    Pressure drop analysis in commercial CIM disk monolithic columns is presented. Experimental measurements of pressure drop are compared to hydrodynamic models usually employed for prediction of pressure drop in packed beds, e.g. free surface model and capillary model applying hydraulic radius concept. However, the comparison between pressure drop in monolith and adequate packed bed give unexpected results. Pressure drop in a CIM disk monolithic column is approximately 50% lower than in an adequate packed bed of spheres having the same hydraulic radius as CIM disk monolith; meaning they both have the same porosity and the same specific surface area. This phenomenon seems to be a consequence of the monolithic porous structure which is quite different in terms of the pore size distribution and parallel pore nonuniformity compared to the one in conventional packed beds. The number of self-similar levels for the CIM monoliths was estimated to be between 1.03 and 2.75.

  20. Graphene-supported metal oxide monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika A.; Wang, Yinmin; Ye, Jianchao; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-01-10

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, wherein the graphene sheets are coated by at least one metal oxide such as iron oxide or titanium oxide. Also provided is an electrode comprising the aforementioned graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, wherein the electrode can be substantially free of any carbon-black and substantially free of any binder.

  1. Graphene-supported metal oxide monolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika A.; Wang, Yinmin; Ye, Jianchao; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-01-10

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, wherein the graphene sheets are coated by at least one metal oxide such as iron oxide or titanium oxide. Also provided is an electrode comprising the aforementioned graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, wherein the electrode can be substantially free of any carbon-black and substantially free of any binder.

  2. Development of Monolithic Column Materials for the Separation and Analysis of Glycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan J. Alla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic column materials offer great advantages as chromatographic media in bioseparations and as solid-supports in biocatalysis. These single-piece porous materials have an interconnected ligament structure that limits the void volume inside the column, thus increasing the efficiency without sacrificing the permeability. The preparation of monolithic materials is easy, reproducible and has available a wide range of chemistries to utilize. Complex, heterogeneous and isobaric glycan structures require preparation methods that may include glycan release, separation and enrichment prior to a comprehensive and site-specific glycosylation analysis. Monolithic column materials aid that demand, as shown by the results reported by the research works presented in this review. These works include selective capture of glycans and glycoproteins via their interactions with lectins, boronic acids, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic/polar functional groups on monolith surfaces. It also includes immobilization of enzymes trypsin and PNGase F on monoliths to digest and deglycosylate glycoproteins and glycopeptides, respectively. The use of monolithic capillary columns for glycan separations through nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC and capillary electrochromatography (CEC and coupling these columns to MS instruments to create multidimensional systems show the potential in the development of miniaturized, high-throughput and automated systems of glycan separation and analysis.

  3. Preparation of tungsten disulfide motor oil and its tribological characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through using mineral oil and synthetic oil to deploy the semisynthesis base oil, modifying the surfaces of ultrafine tungsten disulfide grains by surface chemical embellishment and adsorption embellishment to make them suspended steadily in the base oil as solid lubricating additive, and adding some function additives, the tungsten disulfide motor oil was prepared. The tribological characteristics of this kind motor oil and the well-known motor oils in our country and overseas were studied. The results show that the oil film strength of this kind of motor oil is respectively 1.06 and 1.38 times of that of shell helix ultra motor oil and great wall motor oil, and its sintering load is 1.75 and 2.33 times of that of them, and when tested under 392 N, 1 450 r/min and 30 min, the friction coefficients of friction pairs lubricated by the tungsten disulfide motor oil decrease with the increase of time, meanwhile, the diameter of worn spot is small, and the surface of worn spot is smooth, and no obvious furrows appear. The experiments indicate that the tungsten disulfide motor oil has the better antiwear, antifriction and extreme pressure properties than the well-known motor oils.

  4. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rea, K.E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A. [Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Facility (SNF), University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Hosson, J.Th.M. de [Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747 AG (Netherlands); O' Dell, S.; McKechnie, T. [Plasma Processes, Inc., 4914 Moores Mill Road, Huntsville, AL 35811 (United States); Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R. [AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Seal, S. [Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Facility (SNF), University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)], E-mail: sseal@mail.ucf.edu

    2008-03-25

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured thermo-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on the improved mechanical properties of the bulk nanocomposite. The reported elastic modulus of the nanocomposite nearly doubles due to the presence of HfC nano particulates in the W matrix. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed the retention of nanostructures at the select process conditions and is correlated with the enhanced mechanical properties of the nanocomposite.

  5. Simple preparation of tungsten supported carbon nanoreactors for specific applications: Adsorption, catalysis and electrochemical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayani, Vishal J.; Mayani, Suranjana V.; Kim, Sang Wook, E-mail: swkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2015-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Tungsten carbon composites have shown great recognition in catalysis and electrochemistry. • W-carbon composites are prepared by template replication and W-doping on carbon cage. • Nanocomposites offer enormous assurance as adsorbent, electrode and heterogeneous catalyst. - Abstract: Porous carbon supported tungsten carbide nanoreactors, two sizes (∼25 and 170 nm), were designed using economical petroleum pitch residue followed by tungsten (W) doping. X-ray diffractions showed both carbon tungsten composites (CTC-25 and CTC-170) contained tungsten subcarbide (W{sub 2}C) and monocarbide (WC) as the major and minor crystalline phases, respectively. The present study provides a multiple perspective of carbon tungsten composites (CTCs) for methanol oxidation (as an electrode), adsorption (as an adsorbent) and degradation (as a solid catalyst) of methylene blue (MB). The operational electrodes were designed from both CTCs and used as a catalyst in an electrocatalysis process. The electrocatalysts exhibited high and stable catalytic performance (CTCE-25 > CTCE-170) in methanol electro-oxidation. The newly synthesized W-doped carbon nanoreactors were used successfully as an adsorbent for MB and a heterogeneous catalyst for MB oxidation. Ordered CTC-25 and CTC-170 exhibited dynamic MB adsorption within 15 min and complete oxidation of MB in 25–40 min. A synergetic effect between tungsten carbide and the carbon cage framework was noted.

  6. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.; Bol, E.; Krijgen, G.; Wolterbeek, H.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native–native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t1/2 = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mM, of

  7. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Bol, E.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native-native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t(1/2) = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mu M

  8. Tungsten:Balance between Demand and Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2011,the tungsten market remained basically consistent with macro economic trends. In the first half of 2011, under the backdrop of upward economic situation,tungsten export and domestic consumption grew significantly and tungsten enterprises achieved remarkable economic benefits. However, as European debt crisis deepened in the second half of 2011, the global economic growth slowed down and

  9. Tungsten:Value Regression Is Inevitable Trend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>China boasts rich reserve of tungsten resources,which accounts for about 65% of proved global tungsten mineral resource reserve,ranking top in the world.Judging from global production in the past five years,China’s tungsten production also far outstrips those of other countries,about

  10. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Bioaccumulation of Tungsten in Plants Natural Sources • Trees & shrubs in Rocky Mountain region, USA • Siberian pine, willows, mosses & lichen in tungsten...Transitional metal ion binding • Peptidase activity • DNA & protein binding BUILDING STRONG® Geochemistry: • Aging of tungsten in soil results in

  11. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  12. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  13. Nanosecond monolithic CMOS readout cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchkov, Vitali V.

    2004-08-24

    A pulse shaper is implemented in monolithic CMOS with a delay unit formed of a unity gain buffer. The shaper is formed of a difference amplifier having one input connected directly to an input signal and a second input connected to a delayed input signal through the buffer. An elementary cell is based on the pulse shaper and a timing circuit which gates the output of an integrator connected to the pulse shaper output. A detector readout system is formed of a plurality of elementary cells, each connected to a pixel of a pixel array, or to a microstrip of a plurality of microstrips, or to a detector segment.

  14. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  15. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  16. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  17. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  18. Thermal response of nanostructured tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajita, Shin; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, Thomas; van Eden, Stein; de Kruif, Thijs; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal response of nanostructured tungsten, which was fabricated in the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II, was investigated using pulsed plasma in the MAGNUM-PSI device and by using high powered laser pulses. The temperature evolution in response to the pulses was measured with an infrared fa

  19. Mineral of the month: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals, one of the highest densities and, when combined with carbon, is almost as hard as diamond. These and other properties make it useful in a wide variety of important commercial, industrial and military applications.

  20. Tungsten biochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten is the heaviest element that exhibits biological activity (atomic number 74), when it is present in an enzyme. It is taken up by cells in the form of tungstate, and it is subsequently processed into an organic cofactor referred to as tungstopterin, which is found as active center in several

  1. Preparation and applications of monolithic structures containing metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yongqin; Tan, Xinyi; Svec, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks are a new category of advanced porous materials with large surface areas and porosities, uniform pore sizes, tunable surface chemistry, and structural diversity. In combination with monoliths, they allow the fine tuning of desired interactions required in a variety of applications. This review article summarizes results of recent studies focused on synthetic strategies enabling incorporation of metal-organic frameworks in monolithic structures. A diverse array of applications including chromatographic separation, solid-phase microextraction, sample enrichment, heterogeneous catalysis, and enzymatic catalysis are also described. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, B E; Roszell, L E; Murr, L E; Ramirez, D A; Demaree, J D; Klotz, B R; Rosencrance, A B; Dennis, W E; Bao, W; Perkins, E J; Dillman, J F; Bannon, D I

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up-regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down-regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin-dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas.

  3. Preparation and electrocatalytic properties of tungsten carbide electrocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马淳安; 张文魁; 成旦红; 周邦新

    2002-01-01

    The tungsten carbide(WC) electrocatalysts with definite phase components and high specific surface area were prepared by gas-solid reduction method. The crystal structure, phase components and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, BET(Brunauer Emmett and Teller Procedure) and electrochemical test techniques. It is shown that the tungsten carbide catalysts with definite phase components can be obtained by controlling the carburizing conditions including temperature, gas flowing rate and duration time. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of W2C show higher electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of WC are suitable to be used as the anodic electrocatalyst for hydrogen anodic oxidation, which exhibit higher hydrogen anodic oxidation electrocatalytic properties in HCl solutions.

  4. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  5. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, B.E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Roszell, L.E. [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States); Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Demaree, J.D. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Klotz, B.R. [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005‐5609 (United States); Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E. [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702‐5010 (United States); Bao, W. [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States); Perkins, E.J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States); Dillman, J.F. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5400 (United States); Bannon, D.I., E-mail: desmond.bannon@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  6. Purification of Astaxanthin from Laminariajaponica by Ionic Liquid-based Monolithic Cartridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOON Chang-hwan; ZHU Tao; ROW Kyung-ho

    2012-01-01

    An effective and accurate method was developed for the extraction of astaxanthin from Laminariajaponica with subsequent separation by ionic liquid-based monolithic cartridge.The optimized extraction conditions including extraction solvent(ethanol),extraction time(90 min) and ultrasonic power(75 W) were obtained by systematical investigation.Chromatographic analysis was performed on a C18 column with ultraviolet(UV) detection at 476nm,and a solution consisting of methanol/acetonitrile/H20/dichloromethane(83:6:6:5,volume ratio) was used as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min.After ionic liquid-based monolithic solid phase extraction,17.82 μg/g astaxanthin was obtained from Laminariajaponica.This ionic liquid-based monolithic cartridge exhibits high affinity and selectivity for astaxanthin,and it can be potentially used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography( HPLC).

  7. A monolithic integrated micro direct methanol fuel cell based on sulfo functionalized porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Lu, Y. X.; Liu, L. T.; Wang, X. H.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a monolithic integrated micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) for the first time. The monolithic integrated μDMFC combines proton exchange membrane (PEM) and Pt nanocatalysts, in which PEM is achieved by the functionalized porous silicon membrane and 3D Pt nanoflowers being synthesized in situ on it as catalysts. Sulfo groups functionalized porous silicon membrane serves as a PEM and a catalyst support simultaneously. The μDMFC prototype achieves an open circuit voltage of 0.3 V, a maximum power density of 5.5 mW/cm2. The monolithic integrated μDMFC offers several desirable features such as compatibility with micro fabrication techniques, an undeformable solid PEM and the convenience of assembly.

  8. Feasibility evaluation of the monolithic braided ablative nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Director, Mark N.; McPherson, Douglass J., Sr.

    1992-02-01

    The feasibility of the monolithic braided ablative nozzle was evaluated as part of an independent research and development (IR&D) program complementary to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) Low-Cost, High-Reliability Case, Insulation and Nozzle for Large Solid Rocket Motors (LOCCIN) Program. The monolithic braided ablative nozzle is a new concept that utilizes a continuous, ablative, monolithic flame surface that extends from the nozzle entrance, through the throat, to the exit plane. The flame surface is fabricated using a Through-the-Thickness braided carbon-fiber preform, which is impregnated with a phenolic or phenolic-like resin. During operation, the braided-carbon fiber/resin material ablates, leaving the structural backside at temperatures which are sufficiently low to preclude the need for any additional insulative materials. The monolithic braided nozzle derives its potential for low life cycle cost through the use of automated processing, one-component fabrication, low material scrap, low process scrap, inexpensive raw materials, and simplified case attachment. It also has the potential for high reliability because its construction prevents delamination, has no nozzle bondlines or leak paths along the flame surface, is amenable to simplified analysis, and is readily inspectable. In addition, the braided construction has inherent toughness and is damage-tolerant. Two static-firing tests were conducted using subscale, 1.8 - 2.0-inch throat diameter, hardware. Tests were approximately 15 seconds in duration, using a conventional 18 percent aluminum/ammonium perchlorate propellant. The first of these tests evaluated the braided ablative as an integral backside insulator and exit cone; the second test evaluated the monolithic braided ablative as an integral entrance/throat/exit cone nozzle. Both tests met their objectives. Radial ablation rates at the throat were as predicted, approximately 0.017 in

  9. Recent Advances and Uses of Monolithic Columns for the Analysis of Residues and Contaminants in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Díaz-Bao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic columns are gaining interest as excellent substitutes to conventional particle-packed columns. These columns show higher permeability and lower flow resistance than conventional liquid chromatography columns, providing high-throughput performance, resolution and separation in short run times. Monoliths possess also great potential for the clean-up and preparation of complex mixtures. In situ polymerization inside appropriate supports allows the development of several microextraction formats, such as in-tube solid-phase and pipette tip-based extractions. These techniques using porous monoliths offer several advantages, including miniaturization and on-line coupling with analytical instruments. Additionally, monoliths are ideal support media for imprinting template-specific sites, resulting in the so-called molecularly-imprinted monoliths, with ultra-high selectivity. In this review, time-saving LC columns and preparative applications applied to the analysis of residues and contaminants in food in 2010–2014 are described, focusing on recent improvements in design and with emphasis in automated on-line systems and innovative materials and formats.

  10. Monolithic Continuous-Flow Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Kornfield, Julia A.; Voecks, Gerald A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic matrices containing many small flow passages useful as continuous-flow bioreactors. Ceramic matrix containing passages made by extruding and firing suitable ceramic. Pores in matrix provide attachment medium for film of cells and allow free movement of solution. Material one not toxic to micro-organisms grown in reactor. In reactor, liquid nutrients flow over, and liquid reaction products flow from, cell culture immobilized in one set of channels while oxygen flows to, and gaseous reaction products flow from, culture in adjacent set of passages. Cells live on inner surfaces containing flowing nutrient and in pores of walls of passages. Ready access to nutrients and oxygen in channels. They generate continuous high yield characteristic of immobilized cells, without large expenditure of energy otherwise incurred if necessary to pump nutrient solution through dense biomass as in bioreactors of other types.

  11. Laser cleaning of tungsten ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Aniruddha, E-mail: nontee65@rediffmail.com [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, Maharashtra, 401504 (India); Sonar, V.R.; Das, D.K.; Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd.; Kumar, Arun [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, Maharashtra, 401504 (India); Nilaya, J.P.; Biswas, D.J. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, 400085 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Removal of a thin oxide layer from a tungsten ribbon was achieved using the fundamental, second and third harmonic radiation from a Q- switched Nd-YAG laser. It was found that beyond the threshold, oxide removal was achieved at all wavelengths for a wide range of fluence values. The removal mechanism of the oxide layer was found to be critically dependent on both wavelength and fluence of the incident radiation and has been identified as ejection or sublimation. The un-cleaned and cleaned surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Laser cleaned tungsten ribbons were used in a thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS) to determine isotopic composition of Neodymium atoms.

  12. Synthesis of nanosized tungsten powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Nanosized tungsten powder was synthesized by means of different methods and under different conditions with nanosized WO3 powder. The powder and the intermediate products were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM, BET (Brunauer Emmett Teller Procedure) and SAXS (X-ray diffracto-spectrometer/Kratky small angle scattering goniometer). The results show that nanosized WO3 can be completely reduced to WO2 at 600℃ after 40 min, and WO2 can be reduced to W at 700℃ after 90 min, moreover, the mean size of W particles is less than 40 nm. Furthermore, the process of WO3→WO2→W excelled that of WO3→W in getting stable nanosized tungsten powder with less grain size.

  13. Does speciation matter for tungsten ecotoxicology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigul, Nikolay

    2010-09-01

    Tungsten is a widely used transition metal that has not been thoroughly investigated with regards to its ecotoxicological effects. Tungsten anions polymerize in environmental systems as well as under physiological conditions in living organisms. These polymerization/condensation reactions result in the development of several types of stable polyoxoanions. Certain chemical properties (in particular redox and acidic properties) differentiate these polyanions from monotungstates. However, our current state of knowledge on tungsten toxicology, biological and environmental effects is based entirely on experiments where monotungstates were used and assumed by the authors to be the form of tungsten that was present and that produced the observed effect. Recent discoveries indicate that tungsten speciation may be important to ecotoxicology. New results obtained by different research groups demonstrate that polytungstates develop and persist in environmental systems, and that polyoxotungstates are much more toxic than monotungstates. This paper reviews the available toxicological information from the standpoint of tungsten speciation and identifies knowledge gaps and pertinent future research directions.

  14. Anisotropically structured magnetic aerogel monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligtag, Florian J.; Airaghi Leccardi, Marta J. I.; Erdem, Derya; Süess, Martin J.; Niederberger, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture.Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Digital photographs of dispersions and gels with different water-to-ethanol ratios; magnetic measurements of an anatase aerogel containing 0.25 mol% Fe3O4 nanoparticles; XRD patterns of the iron oxide and

  15. Monolithic cells for solar fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongé, Jan; Bosserez, Tom; Martel, David; Nervi, Carlo; Boarino, Luca; Taulelle, Francis; Decher, Gero; Bordiga, Silvia; Martens, Johan A

    2014-12-07

    Hybrid energy generation models based on a variety of alternative energy supply technologies are considered the best way to cope with the depletion of fossil energy resources and to limit global warming. One of the currently missing technologies is the mimic of natural photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into chemical fuel using sunlight. This idea has been around for decades, but artificial photosynthesis of organic molecules is still far away from providing real-world solutions. The scientific challenge is to perform in an efficient way the multi-electron transfer reactions of water oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction using holes and single electrons generated in an illuminated semiconductor. In this tutorial review the design of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells that combine solar water oxidation and CO2 reduction is discussed. In such PEC cells simultaneous transport and efficient use of light, electrons, protons and molecules has to be managed. It is explained how efficiency can be gained by compartmentalisation of the water oxidation and CO2 reduction processes by proton exchange membranes, and monolithic concepts of artificial leaves and solar membranes are presented. Besides transferring protons from the anode to the cathode compartment the membrane serves as a molecular barrier material to prevent cross-over of oxygen and fuel molecules. Innovative nano-organized multimaterials will be needed to realise practical artificial photosynthesis devices. This review provides an overview of synthesis techniques which could be used to realise monolithic multifunctional membrane-electrode assemblies, such as Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), and porous silicon (porSi) engineering. Advances in modelling approaches, electrochemical techniques and in situ spectroscopies to characterise overall PEC cell performance are discussed.

  16. An Energy Preserving Monolithic Eulerian Fluid-Structure Numerical Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Pironneau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The conservation laws of continuum mechanic written in an Eulerian frame make no difference between fluids and solids except in the expression of the stress tensors, usually with Newton's hypothesis for the fluids and Helmholtz potentials of energy for hyperelastic solids. By taking the velocities as unknown , monolithic methods for fluid structure interactions (FSI) are built. In this article such a formulation is analyzed when the fluid is compressible and the fluid is incompressible. The idea is not new but the progress of mesh generators and numerical schemes like the Characteristics-Galerkin method render this approach feasible and reasonably robust. In this article the method and its discretization are presented, stability is discussed by through an energy estimate. A numerical section discusses implementation issues and presents a few simple tests.

  17. Gas-phase photofragmentation of tris(methyl vinyl ketone) tungsten(0) and the relationship to laser-assisted CVD of tungsten oxide thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner, Theodore W; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2002-02-25

    The gas-phase laser-induced photofragmentation of tris(methyl vinyl ketone) tungsten(0) is studied, and the photoproducts are identified by time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The initially populated excited electronic state of the complex is attributed to metal-to-ligand charge transfer by analysis of the electronic and preresonance Raman spectra. The major metal-containing photofragmentation products are W(+) and WO(+); smaller amounts of WC(+) and W(C(2)H(2))(+) are also observed. Intramolecular ligand coupling occurs, and dimeric products and their fragments are identified. Reaction pathways that explain the observed products are proposed. Thin films on silicon substrates are produced by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The films consist of polycrystalline tungsten oxide with less than 10% tungsten carbide and are characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Relationships between the composition of the gas-phase photofragments and that of the solid films are discussed.

  18. Laminated electrochromic windows based on nickel oxide, tungsten oxide, and gel electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passerini, S.; Scrosati, B.; Hermann, V. (Univ. di Roma (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica); Holmblad, C.; Bartlett, T. (Medtronic Promeon, Minneapolis, MN (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The characteristic and the performance of solid-state, laminated electrochromic windows using tungsten oxide as the principal electrochromic electrode and nonstoichiometric nickel oxide as the counterelectrode separated by selected gel electrolytes, are presented and discussed. These advanced-design, electro-optical devices show a very promising behavior in terms of light modulation and cyclability.

  19. Inkjet printing of sol-gel synthesized hydrated tungsten oxide nanoparticles for flexible electrochromic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cláudia; Pinheiro, Carlos; Henriques, Inês; Laia, César A T

    2012-03-01

    Tungsten oxide nanoparticles were synthesized via a sol-gel route using metallic tungsten as precursor, and were printed on a flexible electrode using inkjet printing in order to build solid-state electrochromic cells. Several spectroscopic techniques were used to characterize and compare tungsten oxide particles obtained from different origins. FTIR, Raman and X-ray diffraction spectroscopic measurements showed that the sol-gel synthesis described here produces nanoparticles mainly in an amorphous state with hexagonal crystalline domains and allowed the analysis of the hydration extent of those nanoparticles. The size was measured combining dynamic light scattering, sedimentation, and microscopic techniques (AFM), showing a consistent size of about 200 nm. The tungsten oxide nanoparticles were used to produce an ink formulation for application in inkjet printing. Solid-state electrochromic devices were assembled at room temperature, without sintering the tungsten oxide printed films, showing excellent contrast between on/off states. Electrochemical characterization of those films is described using cyclic voltammetry. The devices were then tested through spectroelectrochemistry by Visible/NIR absorption spectroscopy (400-2200 nm range), showing a dual spectroscopic response depending on the applied voltage. This phenomenon is attributed to the presence of two different crystalline states in accordance with results obtained from the spectroscopic characterization of the nanoparticles. The electrochromic cells had a good cycling stability showing high reversibility and a cyclability up to more than 50,000 cycles with a degradation of 25%. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Fine grain tungsten produced with nanoscale powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Lin; Fang Zhao; Liying Zhang; Chengyi Wu; Zhimeng Guo

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale tungsten powder was prepared by reducing nanoscale tungsten trioxide in hydrogen to WO2.90 and further to W powder. After compacted with a rubber die, the nanoscale tungsten powder was sintered in a high-temperature dilatometer to investigate its shrinkage process. The results show that the compact of the nanoscale tungsten powder starts to shrink at 1050℃ and ends at 1500℃. The shrinkage rate reaches the maximum value at 1210℃. The relative density of sintered samples is 96.4%, and its grain size is about 5.8 μm.

  1. Monolithic Time Delay Integrated APD Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of the proposed program by Epitaxial Technologies is to develop monolithic time delay integrated avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays with sensitivity...

  2. Crystallography properties of solid solution of NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}s}tructure of tetragonal tungsten bronze; Propriedades cristalograficas da solucao de NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} de estrutura tetragonal tungstenio bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, C.; Dantas, S.A.; Mikaro, C.; Lima, A.R.F.; Nobre, M.A.L.; Lanfredi, S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (LaCCeF/UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Biologia. Lab. de Compositos e Ceramicas Funcionais

    2009-07-01

    In this work was investigated the crystallographic characterization of single phase and nanometric powders of sodium strontium niobate doped with nickel, with NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} stoichiometry, prepared by conventional route from mechanical mixture of oxides / carbonates using the high energy ball milling. The optimization of the parameters as time and calcination temperature for the preparation of the NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} solid solution were monitored by X-ray diffraction, using the Rietveld method. The NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} single phase powders with tetragonal tungsten bronze type structure were obtained with crystallite size at around 30 nm. From crystallographic parameters was constructed the unitary cellule of the NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} using the CaRIne Crystallography 3.1 program. The occupation of sites by the Na{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} cations and the interatomic distances between nickel and niobium atoms were determined. Changes in structural parameters of sodium strontium niobate by addition of nickel are discussed. (author)

  3. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  4. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  5. Photoionization of the valence shells of the neutral tungsten atom

    CERN Document Server

    Ballance, Connor P

    2015-01-01

    Results from large-scale theoretical cross section calculations for the total photoionization of the 4f, 5s, 5p and 6s orbitals of the neutral tungsten atom using the Dirac Coulomb R-matrix approximation (DARC: Dirac-Atomic R-matrix codes) are presented. Comparisons are made with previous theoretical methods and prior experimental measurements. In previous experiments a time-resolved dual laser approach was employed for the photo-absorption of metal vapours and photo-absorption measurements on tungsten in a solid, using synchrotron radiation. The lowest ground state level of neutral tungsten is $\\rm 5p^6 5d^4 6s^2 \\; {^5}D_{\\it J}$, with $\\it J$=0, and requires only a single dipole matrix for photoionization. To make a meaningful comparison with existing experimental measurements, we statistically average the large-scale theoretical PI cross sections from the levels associated with the ground state $\\rm 5p^6 5d^4 6s^2 \\; {^5}D_{\\it J}[{\\it J}=0,1,2,3,4]$ levels and the $\\rm 5d^56s \\; ^7S_3$ excited metastable...

  6. Extraction Factor Of Pure Ammonium Paratungstate From Tungsten Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical oxidation process of tungsten scraps was modified by the rotary kiln with oxygen burner to increase the oxidation rate of tungsten scraps. Also to accelerate the solubility of solid oxidized products, the hydrothermal reflux method was adapted. By heating tungsten scraps in rotary kiln with oxygen burner at around 900° for 2hrs, the scraps was oxidized completely. Then oxidized products (WO3 and CoWO4 was fully dissolved in the solution of NaOH by hydrothermal reflux method at 150° for 2hrs. The dissolution rate of oxidized products was increased with increasing the reaction temperature and concentration of NaOH. And then CaWO4 and H2WO4 could be generated from the aqueous sodium tungstate solution. Ammonium paratungstate (APT also could be produced from tungstic acid using by aqueous ammonium solution. The morphologies (cubic and plate types of APT was controlled by the stirring process of purified solution of ammonium paratungstate.

  7. Activated Carbon Fiber Monoliths as Supercapacitor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelines Moreno-Fernandez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACF are interesting candidates for electrodes in electrochemical energy storage devices; however, one major drawback for practical application is their low density. In the present work, monoliths were synthesized from two different ACFs, reaching 3 times higher densities than the original ACFs’ apparent densities. The porosity of the monoliths was only slightly decreased with respect to the pristine ACFs, the employed PVDC binder developing additional porosity upon carbonization. The ACF monoliths are essentially microporous and reach BET surface areas of up to 1838 m2 g−1. SEM analysis reveals that the ACFs are well embedded into the monolith structure and that their length was significantly reduced due to the monolith preparation process. The carbonized monoliths were studied as supercapacitor electrodes in two- and three-electrode cells having 2 M H2SO4 as electrolyte. Maximum capacitances of around 200 F g−1 were reached. The results confirm that the capacitance of the bisulfate anions essentially originates from the double layer, while hydronium cations contribute with a mixture of both, double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance.

  8. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.T., E-mail: atnelson@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); O' Toole, J.A.; Valicenti, R.A. [Accelerator Operations and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Civilian Nuclear Program Office, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Development of a solid state bonding technique suitable to clad tungsten targets with tantalum was completed to improve operation of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centers spallation target. Significant deterioration of conventional bare tungsten targets has historically resulted in transfer of tungsten into the cooling system through corrosion resulting in increased radioactivity outside the target and reduction of delivered neutron flux. The fabrication method chosen to join the tantalum cladding to the tungsten was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) given the geometry constraints of a cylindrical assembly and previous success demonstrated at KENS. Nominal HIP parameters of 1500 Degree-Sign C, 200 MPa, and 3 h were selected based upon previous work. Development of the process included significant surface engineering controls and characterization given tantalums propensity for oxide and carbide formation at high temperatures. In addition to rigorous acid cleaning implemented at each step of the fabrication process, a three layer tantalum foil gettering system was devised such that any free oxygen and carbon impurities contained in the argon gas within the HIP vessel was mitigated to the extent possible before coming into contact with the tantalum cladding. The result of the numerous controls and refined techniques was negligible coarsening of the native Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surface oxide, no measureable oxygen diffusion into the tantalum bulk, and no detectable carburization despite use of argon containing up to 5 ppm oxygen and up to 40 ppm total CO, CO{sub 2}, or organic contaminants. Post bond characterization of the interface revealed continuous bonding with a few microns of species interdiffusion.

  9. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A. T.; O'Toole, J. A.; Valicenti, R. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a solid state bonding technique suitable to clad tungsten targets with tantalum was completed to improve operation of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centers spallation target. Significant deterioration of conventional bare tungsten targets has historically resulted in transfer of tungsten into the cooling system through corrosion resulting in increased radioactivity outside the target and reduction of delivered neutron flux. The fabrication method chosen to join the tantalum cladding to the tungsten was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) given the geometry constraints of a cylindrical assembly and previous success demonstrated at KENS. Nominal HIP parameters of 1500 °C, 200 MPa, and 3 h were selected based upon previous work. Development of the process included significant surface engineering controls and characterization given tantalums propensity for oxide and carbide formation at high temperatures. In addition to rigorous acid cleaning implemented at each step of the fabrication process, a three layer tantalum foil gettering system was devised such that any free oxygen and carbon impurities contained in the argon gas within the HIP vessel was mitigated to the extent possible before coming into contact with the tantalum cladding. The result of the numerous controls and refined techniques was negligible coarsening of the native Ta2O5 surface oxide, no measureable oxygen diffusion into the tantalum bulk, and no detectable carburization despite use of argon containing up to 5 ppm oxygen and up to 40 ppm total CO, CO2, or organic contaminants. Post bond characterization of the interface revealed continuous bonding with a few microns of species interdiffusion.

  10. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  11. [Reparation and application of perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column in extraction and enrichment of perfluorooctane sulfonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Zhou, Naiyuan; Chen, Bo

    2011-10-01

    A perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column has been prepared by using sol-gel method. The preparation steps included hydrolysis of alkoxy silane, fasculation of silanol, gelation, aging, meso-pore preparation, drying and surface modification. It could be used as a solid phase extraction (SPE) microcolumn for extraction and enrichment of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). The enrichment characteristics and efficiency of the perfluorodecyl modified monolithic silica capillary column has been investigated and compared with C18 silica monolithic capillary column. The results indicated that the perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column ( 15 cm x 75 microm) had a higher adsorption capacity and a better enrichment selectivity for PFOS. The average adsorption capacity of the perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column was 75 ng. And when the PFOS mass concentration in sample was 0. 25 mg/L, the enrichment factor was 29-fold in average. Owing to the good performance of the perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column, it can be used for the extraction and enrichment of trace PFOS in water to meet the requirements of water quality monitoring and analysis.

  12. Factors affecting the thermal shock behavior of yttria stabilized hafnia based graphite and tungsten composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineback, L. D.; Manning, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Hafnia-based composites containing either graphite or tungsten were investigated as rocket nozzle throat inserts in solid propellant rocket engines. The thermal shock resistance of these materials is considered in terms of macroscopic thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, modulus of elasticity, and compressive fracture stress. The effect of degree of hafnia stabilization, density, and graphite or tungsten content upon these parameters is discussed. The variation of the ratio of elastic modulus to compressive fracture stress with density and its effect upon thermal shock resistance of these materials are discussed in detail.

  13. Some features of sintering of tungsten powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreiev Igor Viktorovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of activating the sintering process for tungsten powders using a closed reaction space and hydrogen, steam-saturated water was observed. This sintering process is allowed to activate super coarse-grained (1000μm tungsten powder sat relatively low temperatures (1000-1200°C.

  14. Structures and transitions in tungsten grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhu, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marian, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization of tungsten for magnetic fusion applications being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  15. Monolithically integrated Ge CMOS laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Aguilera, Rodolfo

    2014-02-01

    Ge-on-Si devices are explored for photonic integration. Through the development of better growth techniques, monolithic integration, laser design and prototypes, it was possible to probe Ge light emitters with emphasis on lasers. Preliminary worked shows thermal photonic behavior capable of enhancing lamination at high temperatures. Increase luminescence is observed up to 120°C from L-band contribution. Higher temperatures show contribution from Δ -band. The increase carrier thermal contribution suggests high temperature applications for Ge light emitters. A Ge electrically pumped laser was probed under 0.2% biaxial strain and doping concentration ~4.5×1019cm-3 n-type. Ge pnn lasers exhibit a gain >1000cm-1 with 8mW power output, presenting a spectrum range of over 200nm, making Ge the ideal candidate for Si photonics. Large temperatures fluctuations and process limit the present device. Theoretically a gain of >4000cm- gain is possible with a threshold of as low as 1kA/cm2. Improvements in Ge work

  16. Tribological properties of sputtered tungsten and tungsten nitride thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wong; K.M.; ShenY.G.; Wong; P.L.

    2001-01-01

    The surface roughness, hardness and tribological properties of tungsten (W) and tung-sten nitride (WNx) thin films prepared by dc magnetron sputtering and reactive magnetron sputter-ing in Ar-N2 gas mixtures have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindenta-tion measurements and ball-on-disc wear testing. A pronounced surface roughness was observedonly for films under compressive strains. The surface was flat under tension but rough under com-pression. Similar hardness with value about 20 GPa were observed in the W and WNx (x=0.3)films. This is thought to be due to the fact the grains are restricted to a very small size in the coat-ings. The higher coefficients of friction (0.4 for W and 0.9 for WN0.3) suggest that WN0.3 is not theoptimum phase. Finally, discussions are made with tribological test results.

  17. Structural and electrical properties in tungsten/tungsten oxide multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacucci, Arnaud [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Potin, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.potin@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Imhoff, Luc [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Martin, Nicolas [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174 CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 Avenue de l' observatoire, F-25044, BESANCON Cedex (France)

    2014-02-28

    Tungsten and tungsten oxide periodic nanometric multilayers have been deposited by DC reactive sputtering using the reactive gas pulsing process. Different pulsing periods have been used for each deposition to produce metal-oxide periodic alternations ranging from 3.3 to 71.5 nm. The morphology, crystallinity and chemical composition of these films have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The produced multilayers exhibited an amorphous structure and the composition stability of WO{sub 3} sub-layers has been pointed out. Moreover, electrical properties have also been studied by the van der Pauw technique. It revealed a clear stability of resistivity versus temperature for almost all samples and an influence of the multilayered structure on the resistivity behavior. - Highlights: • W/WO{sub 3} multilayers with nanometric periods are produced by gas pulsing. • Multilayers are mainly amorphous and the oxide sub-layers composed of WO{sub 3}. • Crystallized inclusions of β-W and β-W{sub 3}O phases in metallic sub-layers • Metallic-like behavior with low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  18. Seed growth of tungsten diselenide nanotubes from tungsten oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seok Joon; Park, Jin Cheol; Park, Min Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-05-13

    We report growth of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with a two-zone furnace. WO3 nanowires were first grown by annealing tungsten thin films under argon ambient. WSe2 nanotubes were then grown at the tips of WO3 nanowires through selenization via two steps: (i) formation of tubular WSe2 structures on the outside of WO3 nanowires, resulting in core (WO3)-shell (WSe2) and (ii) growth of WSe2 nanotubes at the tips of WO3 nanowires. The observed seed growth is markedly different from existing substitutional growth of WSe2 nanotubes, where oxygen atoms are replaced by selenium atoms in WO3 nanowires to form WSe2 nanotubes. Another advantage of our growth is that WSe2 film was grown by simply supplying hydrogen gas, where the native oxides were reduced to thin film instead of forming oxide nanowires. Our findings will contribute to engineer other transition metal dichacogenide growth such as MoS2, WS2, and MoSe2.

  19. Structural tungsten-imido chemistry: the gas-phase structure of W(NBut)2(NHBut)2 and the solid-state structures of novel heterobimetallic W/N/M (M = Rh, Pd, Zn) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choujaa, Hamid; Cosham, Samuel D; Johnson, Andrew L; Kafka, Graeme R; Mahon, Mary F; Masters, Sarah L; Molloy, Kieran C; Rankin, David W H; Robertson, Heather E; Wann, Derek A

    2009-03-02

    The gas-phase (electron diffraction) and solid-state (X-ray) structures of W(NBut)2(NHBut)2 (1) have been determined. In the gas phase, 1 adopts both C1 and C2 conformations in a 69:31 ratio. The solid-state structure is disordered over two equal sites, both showing approximate C2 conformation as in the gas phase; the imido and amido centers are, however, clearly distinguished. Compound 1 has been used to synthesize novel heterobimetallic derivatives W(NBut)4[Rh(COD)]2 (3) and W(NBut)4[Pd(eta3-C3H5)]2 (4) via the dilithiated intermediate Li2[W(NBut)4] (2). In both cases, the [W(NBut)4] moiety bridges the two organometallic fragments. Reaction of 1 with Me2Zn has produced [Me(tBuN)W(mu-NBut)2ZnMe(NH2But)] (5). The structures of 3, 4, and 5 have been determined. Thermal decomposition of 4 under an autogenerated pressure at 700 degrees C has formed the hitherto uncharacterized bimetallic alloy WPd2.

  20. Rapid and simple preparation of thiol-ene emulsion-templated monoliths and their application as enzymatic microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P; Senkbeil, Silja; Novotny, Jakub;

    2015-01-01

    electron microscopy showed that the methanol-based emulsion templating process resulted in a network of highly interconnected and regular thiol-ene beads anchored solidly inside thiol-ene microchannels. Surface area measurements indicate that the monoliths are macroporous, with no or little micro...

  1. Luminescent Tungsten(VI) Complexes: Photophysics and Applicability to Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Kwan-Ting; To, Wai-Pong; Sun, Chenyue; Cheng, Gang; Ma, Chensheng; Tong, Glenna So Ming; Yang, Chen; Che, Chi-Ming

    2017-01-02

    The synthesis, excited-state dynamics, and applications of two series of air-stable luminescent tungsten(VI) complexes are described. These tungsten(VI) complexes show phosphorescence in the solid state and in solutions with emission quantum yields up to 22 % in thin film (5 % in mCP) at room temperature. Complex 2 c, containing a 5,7-diphenyl-8-hydroxyquinolinate ligand, displays prompt fluorescence (blue-green) and phosphorescence (red) of comparable intensity, which could be used for ratiometric luminescent sensing. Solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on 1 d showed a stable yellow emission with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) and luminance up to 4.79 % and 1400 cd m(-2) respectively. These tungsten(VI) complexes were also applied in light-induced aerobic oxidation reactions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Chromatographic separation of vanadium, tungsten and molybdenum with a liquid anion-exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, J S; Topping, J J

    1971-09-01

    In acidic solution only molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), vanadium(V), niobium(V) and tantalum(V) form stable, anionic complexes with dilute hydrogen peroxide. This fact has been used in developing an analytical method of separating molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI) and vanadium(V) from other metal ions and from each other. Preliminary investigations using reversed-phase paper chromatography and solvent extraction led to a reversed-phase column Chromatographic separation technique. These metal-peroxy anions are retained by a column containing a liquid anion-exchanger (General Mills Aliquat 336) in a solid support. Then molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI) and vanadium(V) are selectively eluted with aqueous solutions containing dilute hydrogen peroxide and varying concentrations of sulphuric acid.

  3. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  4. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  5. Fracture behaviour of polycrystalline tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Rupp, Daniel; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-03-01

    Fracture behaviour of round blank polycrystalline tungsten was studied by means of three point bending Fracture-Mechanical (FM) tests at temperatures between RT and 1000 °C and under high vacuum. To study the influence of the anisotropic microstructure on the fracture toughness (FT) and ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) the specimens were extracted in three different, i.e. longitudinal, radial and circumferential orientations. The FM tests yielded distinctive fracture behaviour for each specimen orientation. The crack propagation was predominantly intergranular for longitudinal orientation up to 600 °C, whereas transgranular cleavage was observed at low test temperatures for radial and circumferentially oriented specimens. At intermediate test temperatures the change of the fracture mode took place for radial and circumferential orientations. Above 800 °C all three specimen types showed large ductile deformation without noticeable crack advancement. For longitudinal specimens the influence of the loading rate on the FT and DBT was studied in the loading rate range between 0.06 and 18 MPa m1/2/s. Though an increase of the FT was observed for the lowest loading rate, no resolvable dependence of the DBT on the loading rate was found partly due to loss of FT validity. A Master Curve approach is proposed to describe FT vs. test temperature data on polycrystalline tungsten. Fracture safe design space was identified by analysis compiled FT data.

  6. Monolithic watt-level millimeter-wave diode-grid frequency tripler array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, R. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Rutledge, D. B.; Hancock, B.; Lieneweg, U.

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide watt-level CW output power throughout the millimeter and submillimeter wave region, thousands of solid-state diodes have been monolithically integrated using a metal grid to produce a highly efficient frequency multiplier. Devices considered include GaAs Schottky diodes, thin MOS diodes, and GaAs Barrier-Intrinsic-N(+)diodes. The performance of the present compact low-cost device has been theoretically and experimentally validated.

  7. Modified monolithic silica capillary for preconcentration of catecholamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chang; Tusyo-shi Komazu

    2009-01-01

    Preconcentration of catecholamines by the modified monolithic silica in the capillary was investigated in this study. In order to achieve a microchip-based method for determining catecholamines in the saliva, the monolithic silica was fabricated in the capillary and the monolithic silica was chemically modified by on-column reaction with phenylboronate. Different modified methods were compared. The concentration conditions were optimized. This study indicates the applicability of the modified monolithic silica capillary when it was used to concentrate catecholamines.

  8. Modified monolithic silica capillary for preconcentration of catecholamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Preconcentration of catecholamines by the modified monolithic silica in the capillary was investigated in this study. In order to achieve a microchip-based method for determining catecholamines in the saliva,the monolithic silica was fabricated in the capillary and the monolithic silica was chemically modified by on-column reaction with phenylboronate. Different modified methods were compared. The concentration conditions were optimized. This study indicates the applicability of the modified monolithic sili...

  9. Fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia molar crowns with reduced thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, A.; Inagaki, R.; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Y; Milleding, Percy; Ørtengren, Ulf Thore

    2015-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript version. Published version is available at Acta Odontologica Scandinavica Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between fracture load of monolithic zirconia crowns and axial/occlusal thickness, and to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic zirconia crowns with reduced thickness in comparison with that of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns with regular thickness. Materials and methods. Monolithic zi...

  10. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  11. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths as Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  12. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths for Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  13. Eigenpolarization theory of monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Alan C.; Gustafson, Eric K.; Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Diode-laser-pumped monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators (NPROs) in an applied magnetic field can operate as unidirectional traveling-wave lasers. The diode laser pumping, monolithic construction, and unidirectional oscillation lead to narrow linewidth radiation. Here, a comprehensive theory of the eigenpolarizations of a monolithic NPRO is presented. It is shown how the properties of the integral optical diode that forces unidirectional operation depend on the choice of the gain medium, the applied magnetic field, the output coupler, and the geometry of the nonplanar ring light path. Using optical equivalence theorems to gain insight into the polarization characteristics of the NPRO, a strategy for designing NPROs with low thresholds and large loss nonreciprocities is given. An analysis of the eigenpolarizations for one such NPRO is presented, alternative optimization approaches are considered, and the prospects for further reducing the linewidths of these lasers are briefly discussed.

  14. Deuterium blistering in tungsten and tungsten vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Kameel; Yuan, Yue; Cheng, Long; Wang, Jun [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Zhang-Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), Beijing 100083 (China); De Temmerman, Gregory [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: lgh@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-06-15

    In order to evaluate D blistering behavior in W based plasma facing materials, rolled W and different grades of W-V targets were exposed to high flux of 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, low energy (38 eV) D plasma at two different surface temperatures. The blistering behavior was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, accompanied by electron back-scattering diffraction. Highest numbers of blisters were observed on the surface of rolled tungsten. The addition of V precursor to W suppressed D blister formation. In the case of W-V alloys, comparatively submicron V-containing materials have shown high tendency but small size blisters formation than micron V-containing samples. A high density of blisters was observed near the (111) plane on the surface of both V-containing alloys. Nano-sized blisters were also observed on V enriched surface.

  15. Monolithic silica aerogel - material design on the nano-scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    By means of a production process in two major steps - a sol/gel process and a supercritical drying – open-cell, monolithic silica aerogel can be made. This material can have a density in the range of 30- to 300 kg/m3, corresponding to porosities between 86 and 98 %. The solid structure has...... of piezoelectric transducers. - Other applications could be; waste encapsulation, spacers for vacuum insulation panels, membranes, etc. Department of Civil Engineering is co-ordinator of a current EU FP5 research project1, which deals with the application of aerogel as transparent insulation materials in windows....... Due to the excellent optical and thermal properties of aerogel, it is possible to develop windows with both high insulation and high transmittance, which is impossible applying the conventional window techniques, i.e. extra layers of glass, low-e coatings and gas fillings. It can be shown...

  16. Physical and chemical sensing using monolithic semiconductor optical transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappe, Hans P.; Hofstetter, Daniel; Maisenhoelder, Bernd; Moser, Michael; Riel, Peter; Kunz, Rino E.

    1997-09-01

    We present two monolithically integrated optical sensor systems based on semiconductor photonic integrated circuits. These compact, robust and highly functional transducers perform all necessary optical and electro-optical functions on-chip; extension to multi-sensor arrays is easily envisaged. A monolithic Michelson interferometer for high-resolution displacement measurement and a monolithic Mach-Zehnder interferometer for refractometry are discussed.

  17. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  18. Characterization of CIM monoliths as enzyme reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopivec, Martina; Podgornik, Ales; Berovic, Marin; Strancar, Ales

    2003-09-25

    The immobilization of the enzymes citrate lyase, malate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase to CIM monolithic supports was performed. The long-term stability, reproducibility, and linear response range of the immobilized enzyme reactors were investigated along with the determination of the kinetic behavior of the enzymes immobilized on the CIM monoliths. The Michaelis-Menten constant K(m) and the turnover number k(3) of the immobilized enzymes were found to be flow-unaffected. Furthermore, the K(m) values of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were found to be comparable. Both facts indicate the absence of a diffusional limitation in immobilized CIM enzyme reactors.

  19. Monolithically integrated optoelectronic down-converter (MIOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoi, Efrim L.; Venus, G. B.; Khazan, A. A.; Gorfinkel, Vera B.; Kompa, Guenter; Avrutin, Evgenii A.; Thayne, Iain G.; Barrow, David A.; Marsh, John H.

    1995-06-01

    Optoelectronic down-conversion of very high-frequency amplitude-modulated signals using a semiconductor laser simultaneously as a local oscillator and a mixer is proposed. Three possible constructions of a monolithically integrated down-converter are considered theoretically: a four-terminal semiconductor laser with dual pumping current/modal gain control, and both a passively mode-locked and a passively Q-switched semiconductor laser monolithically integrated with an electroabsorption or pumping current modulator. Experimental verification of the feasibility of the concept of down conversion in a laser diode is presented.

  20. Preparation and evaluation of micro and meso porous silica monoliths with embedded carbon nanoparticles for the extraction of non-polar compounds from waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresco-Cala, Beatriz; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-10-14

    A novel hybrid micro and meso porous silica monolith with embedded carbon nanoparticles (Si-CNPs monolith) was prepared inside a fused silica capillary (3cm in length) and used as a sorbent for solid-phase microextraction. The hybrid monolithic capillary was synthetized by hydrolysis and polycondensation of a mixture of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), ethanol, and three different carbon nanoparticles such as carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWCNTs), carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNTs), and oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns (o-SWNHs) via a two-step catalytic sol-gel process. Compared with silica monolith without carbon nanoparticles, the developed monolithic capillary column exhibited a higher extraction efficiency towards the analytes which can be ascribed to the presence of the carbon nanoparticles. In this regard, the best performance was achieved for silica monolith with embedded c-MWCNTs. The resulted monolithic capillaries were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental analysis and nitrogen intrusion porosimetry. Variables affecting to the preparation of the sorbent phase including three different carbon nanoparticles and extraction parameters were studied in depth using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as target analytes. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was selected as instrumental technique. Detection limits range from 0.1 to 0.3μgL(-1), and the inter-extraction units precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) is between 5.9 and 14.4%.

  1. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels; Etude et developpement des flux solides en vue d'application en soudage ATIG applique au titane et ses alliages ainsi qu'aux aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, N

    2000-06-15

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  2. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bowen; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  3. The electron affinity of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, A.O.; Andersson, P.; Klason, P.; Hanstorp, D. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Diehl, C. [Institut fur Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat, Mainz (Germany); Present Address: Max-Planck-Institut fur Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Forstner, O. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Wien (Austria)

    2010-11-15

    The electron affinity of tungsten has been measured using laser photodetachment threshold spectroscopy in a collinear geometry. The electron affinity was determined to 6583.6(6) cm{sup -1} by observing the onset of the process when W{sup -} ions in the 5d{sup 5}6s{sup 2} {sup 6}S{sub 5/2} ground state are photo-detached producing neutral W atoms in the 5d{sup 4}6s{sup 2} {sup 5}D{sub 0} ground state. The measured value is in agreement with previous measurements and improves the accuracy by almost two orders of magnitude. Further, a photodetachment signal below the ground state photodetachment threshold was found, which indicates the existence of a bound excited state in W{sup -}. (authors)

  4. Viscosity of liquid undercooled tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Paul-François; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    2005-05-01

    Knowledge of the viscosity and its temperature dependence is essential to improve metallurgical processes as well as to validate theoretical and empirical models of liquid metals. However, data for metals with melting points above 2504K could not be determined yet due to contamination and containment problems. Here we report the viscosity of tungsten, the highest melting point metal (3695K), measured by a levitation technique. Over the 3350-3700-K temperature range, which includes the undercooled region by 345K, the viscosity data could be fitted as η(T )=0.108exp[1.28×105/(RT)](mPas). At the melting point, the datum agrees with the proposed theoretical and empirical models of liquid metals but presents atypical temperature dependence, suggesting a basic change in the mechanism of momentum transfer.

  5. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2017-02-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V ( vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  6. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasempour, Fariba [Plasma Physics Research Centre, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 147789-3855, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azimirad, Rouhollah [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Abbas [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Kingswood, NSW 2751 (Australia); Akhavan, Omid, E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Synthesis of tungsten oxide nano/micro-structures on W foils using KOH as a catalyst. • Strong antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods under visible light irradiation. • Decrease in photoinactivation of bacteria on tungsten oxide nano/micro-rods doped by potassium. - Abstract: Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400–800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50–90 nm and crystalline phase of WO{sub 3}) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO{sub 3} nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  7. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2016-10-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V (vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  8. Effect of process parameters on induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide from tungsten metal powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tungsten carbide deposit was made directly from tungsten metal powder through the reaction with methane in radio frequency induction plasma. Effect of major process parameters on the induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide was studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, water displacement method, and microhardness test. The results show that methane flow rate, powder feed rate, particle size, reaction chamber pressure and deposition distance have significant influences on the phase composition, density, and microhardness of the deposit. Extra carbon is necessary to ensure the complete conversion of tungsten metal into the carbide.

  9. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  10. Monolithic Integration of GaN-based LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao, Jin-Ping, E-mail: jpao@ee.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Institute of Technology and Science, University of Tokushima 2-1 Minami-Josanjima, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)

    2011-02-01

    The technology of monolithically integrated GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is reported. First, the technology details to realize monolithic integration are described, including the circuit design for high-voltage and alternating current (AC) operation and the technologies for device isolation. The performances of the fabricated monolithic LED arrays are then demonstrated. A monolithic series array with totally 40 LEDs exhibited expected operation function under AC bias. The operation voltage of the array is 72 V when 20 LEDs were connected in series. Some modified circuit designs for high-voltage operation and other monolithic LED arrays are finally reviewed.

  11. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  12. Thermal stability of warm-rolled tungsten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel

    Pure tungsten is considered as armor material for the most critical parts of fusion reactors (thedivertor and the blanket first wall), mainly due to its high melting point (3422 °C). This is becauseboth the divertor and the first wall have to withstand high temperatures during service which...... and recrystallization occur in tungsten, and quantifying the kinetics and microstructuralaspects of these restoration processes. Two warm-rolled tungsten plates are annealed attemperatures between 1100 °C and 1350 °C, under vacuum conditions or argon atmosphere. Theeffects of annealing on the microstructure...... on these activation energies) to lower annealingtemperatures allows predicting the lifespan of these tungsten plates under fusion reactor conditions.A much longer lifetime at normal operating temperatures was found for the plate W67 (e.g. at least1 million years at 800 °C) as compared to the plate W90 (e.g 71 years...

  13. Preparation and characterizations of Ce-Cu-O monolithic catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马瑞红; 苏孝文; 金凌云; 鲁继青; 罗孟飞

    2010-01-01

    Ce-Cu-O monolithic catalysts were prepared by using Ce0.9Cu0.1O1.9 solid solution or nitrate as precursors,and their catalytic performance for the combustion of ethyl acetate were studied.The catalysts calcined at a low temperature showed high catalytic activities.When calcined at high temperatures,the catalyst with Ce0.9Cu0.1O1.9 solid solution as precursor remained a high activity,while the catalyst with metal nitrates as precursors exhibited a suppressed reactivity.Therefore,the catalyst prepared with th...

  14. Monolithic resonant optical reflector laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, T.; Suehiro, M.; Maeda, M.; Hihara, M.; Hosomatsu, H.

    1991-10-01

    The first monolithic resonant optical reflector laser diode that has a waveguide directional coupler and two DBR reflectors integrated by compositional disordering of quantum-well heterostructures is described. A linewidth of 440 kHz was obtained, and this value is expected to be greatly decreased by reducing the propagation loss in the integrated waveguide.

  15. Constant capacitance in nanopores of carbon monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Alejandra; Moreno-Fernández, Gelines; Lobato, Belén; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-06-28

    The results obtained for binder-free electrodes made of carbon monoliths with narrow micropore size distributions confirm that the specific capacitance in the electrolyte (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile does not depend significantly on the micropore size and support the foregoing constant result of 0.094 ± 0.011 F m(-2).

  16. Characterization of the acid properties of tungsten/zirconia catalysts using adsorption microcalorimetry and n-pentane isomerization activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartuli, J.C.; Santiesteban, J.G.; Traverso, P.; Cardona-Martinez, N.; Chang, C.D.; Stevenson, S.A.

    1999-10-01

    Ammonia adsorption microcalorimetry was conducted on various solid acid tungsten/zirconia catalysts prepared by different techniques. The calorimetric data were compared to catalytic test results using n-pentane isomerization as a measure of acid activity. The results show that (1) the co-precipitation method of making the tungsten/zirconia catalyst produces a greater number of acidic sites than impregnating tungsten on hydrous zirconia, resulting in a more active catalyst, and (2) the addition of small amounts of iron to the tungsten/zirconia catalyst increases the acid site strength as determined by ammonia adsorption and improves the paraffin isomerization activity. The calorimetry data indicate that the acid site strength of the tungsten/zirconia materials is similar to or slightly higher than that found in zeolites or sulfated zirconia and is comparable to sulfuric acid. However, the paraffin isomerization activity results suggest that the acid sites of the tungsten/zirconia catalyst should be about four orders of magnitude more active than that of zeolite {beta} on the basis of turnover frequency. Their experimental results indicate a lack of correlation between the heat of ammonia adsorption with catalytic activity. Comparisons of catalytic activity between materials based entirely on acid strength may not be valid, and kinetic probes would be more appropriate.

  17. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide and cobalt were evaluated. Zinc volatility was suppressed by the enclosed graphite crucible and zinc volatilization pressure was produced in the reaction graphite crucible inside an electric furnace for ZDP (Zinc Decomposition Process. Decomposition reaction was done for 2hours at 650°, which 100% decomposed the tungsten scraps that were over 30 mm thick. Decomposed scraps were pulverized under 75μm and were composed of tungsten carbide and cobalt identified by the XRD (X-ray Diffraction. To produce the WC(Tungsten Carbide powder directly from decomposed scraps, pulverized powders were reacted with hydrochloric acid to remove the cobalt binder. Also to produce the tungstic acid, pulverized powders were reacted with aqua regia to remove the cobalt binder and oxidize the tungsten carbide. Tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders were identified by XRD and chemical composition analysis.

  18. Metal Monolithic Amine-grafted Zeolite for CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Steven

    2011-03-31

    The solid amine sorbent for CO{sub 2} capture process has advantages of simplicity and low operating cost compared to the MEA (monoethanolamine) process. Solid amine sorbents reported so far suffered from either low CO{sub 2} capture capacity or low stability. The solid amine sorbent developed in this project exhibited more than 3.2 mmol/g and degraded less than 10% even after 500 cycles of heating and cooling in absence of steam. The presence of steam further enhanced CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The cost of the sorbent is estimated to be less than $7.00/lb. This sorbent was developed using the results of in situ infrared spectroscopic study. Infrared results showed that CO{sub 2} adsorbs on TEPA (tetraethylenepentamine)/PEG (polyethylene glycol) as carbamates and bicarbonates. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and oxidation resistance of the amine sorbent can be enhanced by the interactions between NH{sub 2} of TEPA molecules with the OH group of PEG molecules. PEG was also found to be effectively disperse and immobilize the aromatic amines for SO{sub 2} adsorption. The infrared study also showed that SiO{sub 2} is a significantly better support than zeolites due to its proper hydrophobicity. The results of this study led to the development of a high performance solid amine sorbent under simulated gas flow condition in a fixed bed, a fluidized bed, and a metal monolith unit. This study showed heat transfer could become a major technical issue in scaling up a fixed bed adsorber. The use of the fluidized bed and metal monoliths can alleviate the heat transfer issue. The metal monolith could be suitable for small scale applications due to the high cost of manufacturing; the fluidized bed mode would be most suitable for large scale applications. Preliminary economic analysis suggested that the Akron solid amine process would cost 45% less than that of MEA process.

  19. Poly(ethylenimine)-Functionalized Monolithic Alumina Honeycomb Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Yoo, Chun-Jae; Tan, Shuai; Rashidi, Fereshteh; Jones, Christopher W

    2016-07-21

    The development of practical and effective gas-solid contactors is an important area in the development of CO2 capture technologies. Target CO2 capture applications, such as postcombustion carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from power plant flue gases or CO2 extraction directly from ambient air (DAC), require high flow rates of gas to be processed at low cost. Extruded monolithic honeycomb structures, such as those employed in the catalytic converters of automobiles, have excellent potential as structured contactors for CO2 adsorption applications because of the low pressure drop imposed on fluid moving through the straight channels of such structures. Here, we report the impregnation of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), an effective aminopolymer reported commonly for CO2 separation, into extruded monolithic alumina to form structured CO2 sorbents. These structured sorbents are first prepared on a small scale, characterized thoroughly, and compared with powder sorbents with a similar composition. Despite consistent differences observed in the filling of mesopores with PEI between the monolithic and powder sorbents, their performance in CO2 adsorption is similar across a range of PEI contents. A larger monolithic cylinder (1 inch diameter, 4 inch length) is evaluated under conditions closer to those that might be used in large-scale applications and shows a similar performance to the smaller monoliths and powders tested initially. This larger structure is evaluated over five cycles of CO2 adsorption and steam desorption and demonstrates a volumetric capacity of 350 molCO2  m-3monolith and an equilibration time of 350 min under a 0.4 m s(-1) linear flow velocity through the monolith channels using 400 ppm CO2 in N2 as the adsorption gas at 30 °C. This volumetric capacity surpasses that of a similar technology considered previously, which suggested that CO2 could be removed from air at an operating cost as low as $100 per ton.

  20. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  1. Thermal reaction of SiC films with tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y. [Univ Bordeaux 1, Lab Composites Thermostruct, CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1, UMR 5801, F-33600 Pessac, (France); Roger, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LTEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Solid-state reactions between SiC films and W-xRe (x = 0, 5 and 25 at%) substrates on thermal annealing between 1673 K and 1873 K for various durations have been investigated. SiC coatings were deposited on metallic wires by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) from a gas mixture of tetramethyl-silane (TMS) and hydrogen at 1373 K under normal pressure. The interface zones were characterized using scanning electron and optical microscopies, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe microanalysis. All analyses reveal that SiC reacts with substrates. Various metal silicides and carbides were formed in layered reaction and the presence of these phases was confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. The effects of rhenium on the reactivity were established by the determination of growth kinetics deducted from the thicknesses of reaction zones as a function of annealing time. It has been found that an increase in the diffusion kinetics and activation energy with the quantity of rhenium in the tungsten wire. (authors)

  2. Advances in the Development of a WCl6 CVD System for Coating UO2 Powders with Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Tieman, Alyssa; Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Demonstrated viability and utilization of: a) Fluidized powder bed. b) WCl6 CVD process. c) Coated spherical particles with tungsten. The highly corrosive nature of the WCl6 solid reagent limits material of construction. Indications that identifying optimized process variables with require substantial effort and will likely vary with changes in fuel requirements.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of thin-film sodium tungsten bronzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, H. E.; Fielder, W. L.; Singer, J.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Thin films of sodium tungsten bronze (NaxWO3) were investigated as reversible sodium ion electrodes for solid electrolytes. The films were made by electron beam evaporation of the three phases, W metal, Na2WO4, and WO3, followed by sintering. The substrates were sodium beta alumina disks and glass slides. X-ray diffraction analyses of the films showed that sintering in dry nitrogen with prior exposure to air lead to mixed phases. Sintering in vacuum with no air exposure produced tetragonal I bronze with a nominal composition of Na0.31WO3, single phase within the limits of X-ray diffraction detectability. The films were uniform and adherent on sodium beta alumina substrates. The ac and dc conductivities of the beta alumina were measured with the sodium tungsten bronze films as electrodes. These experiments indicated that the tetragonal I bronze electrodes were not completely reversible. This may have resulted from sodium ion blocking within the bronze film or at the bronze beta alumina interface. Methods for attempting to make more completely reversible electrodes are suggested.

  4. Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Trioxide Micro-spheres, Tungsten Carbide Microspheres and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-tungsten Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hongzhi; YAN Taining

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide micropheres were prepared by spray pyrolysis, and tungsten carbidemicrospheres were produced by spray pyrolysis-low temperature reduction and carbonization technology.Multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide composites were prepared by the continuous reductionand carbonization process using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and WO_3 precursor by mo-lecular level mixing and calcination. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized byscanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the crystal phase was identified by X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample was analyzed by means of me-thanol oxidation. Tungsten carbide microspheres were catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction.Nevertheless tungsten trioxide microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide compos-ites were not catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction. These results indicate that tungsten carbide micropheres are promising catalyst for methanol oxidation.

  5. WDM module research within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud; Koteles, Emil S.; Delage, Andre; Chatenoud, F.; Templeton, Ian M.; Champion, Garth; He, Jian Jun; Wang, Weijian; Dion, Michael M.; Barber, Richard A.

    1995-02-01

    We report on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of monolithic wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) modules produced within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium. The transmitter module includes multiple, discrete wavelength, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes monolithically integrated with waveguide combiners fabricated using an InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The wavelength demultiplexer unit is based on a Rowland circle grating spectrometer monolithically integrated with a metal- semiconductor-metal (MSM) detector array fabricated on an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The epitaxial layer wafers for both transmitter and receiver modules were grown in single molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) runs.

  6. A monolithic integrated photonic microwave filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño, Javier S.; Muñoz, Pascual; Doménech, David; Capmany, José

    2016-12-01

    Meeting the increasing demand for capacity in wireless networks requires the harnessing of higher regions in the radiofrequency spectrum, reducing cell size, as well as more compact, agile and power-efficient base stations that are capable of smoothly interfacing the radio and fibre segments. Fully functional microwave photonic chips are promising candidates in attempts to meet these goals. In recent years, many integrated microwave photonic chips have been reported in different technologies. To the best of our knowledge, none has monolithically integrated all the main active and passive optoelectronic components. Here, we report the first demonstration of a tunable microwave photonics filter that is monolithically integrated into an indium phosphide chip. The reconfigurable radiofrequency photonic filter includes all the necessary elements (for example, lasers, modulators and photodetectors), and its response can be tuned by means of control electric currents. This is an important step in demonstrating the feasibility of integrated and programmable microwave photonic processors.

  7. Macroporous Monolithic Polymers: Preparation and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Inés Alvarez Igarzabal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, macroporous monolithic materials have been introduced as a new and useful generation of polymers used in different fields. These polymers may be prepared in a simple way from a homogenous mixture into a mold and contain large interconnected pores or channels allowing for high flow rates at moderate pressures. Due to their porous characteristics, they could be used in different processes, such as stationary phases for different types of chromatography, high-throughput bioreactors and in microfluidic chip applications. This review reports the contributions of several groups working in the preparation of different macroporous monoliths and their modification by immobilization of specific ligands on the products for specific purposes.

  8. Monolithic pixel detectors for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Snoeys, W

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic pixel detectors integrating sensor matrix and readout in one piece of silicon have revolutionized imaging for consumer applications, but despite years of research they have not yet been widely adopted for high energy physics. Two major requirements for this application, radiation tolerance and low power consumption, require charge collection by drift for the most extreme radiation levels and an optimization of the collected signal charge over input capacitance ratio ( Q / C ). It is shown that monolithic detectors can achieve Q / C for low analog power consumption and even carryout the promise to practically eliminate analog power consumption, but combining suf fi cient Q / C , collection by drift, and integration of readout circuitry within the pixel remains a challenge. An overview is given of different approaches to address this challenge, with possible advantages and disadvantages.

  9. Ultrasonic drawing of tungsten wire for incandescent lamps production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordyuk, B N; Mordyuk, V S; Buryak, V V

    2004-04-01

    An influence of ultrasonic treatment (drawing) on structure, high temperature durability, evaporation and creep behaviours of tungsten single crystal and wires were investigated. A relation of tungsten wires properties with dislocation distribution was determined.

  10. Electroanalytical determination of tungsten and molybdenum in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, P L; van't Slot, P; van Leeuwen, H P; Hagen, W R

    2001-10-01

    Recent crystal structure determinations accelerated the progress in the biochemistry of tungsten-containing enzymes. In order to characterize these enzymes, a sensitive determination of this metal in protein-containing samples is necessary. An electroanalytical tungsten determination has successfully been adapted to determine the tungsten and molybdenum content in enzymes. The tungsten and molybdenum content can be measured simultaneously from 1 to 10 microg of purified protein with little or no sample handling. More crude protein samples require precipitation of interfering surface active material with 10% perchloric acid. This method affords the isolation of novel molybdenum- and tungsten-containing proteins via molybdenum and tungsten monitoring of column fractions, without using radioactive isotopes. A screening of soluble proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus for tungsten, using anion-exchange column chromatography to separate the proteins, has been performed. The three known tungsten-containing enzymes from P. furiosus were recovered with this screening.

  11. Update On Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. R Clark; J. M. Wight; G. C. Knighton; G. A. Moore; J. F. Jue

    2005-11-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Advancements have been made in the production of U-Mo foil including full sized foils. Progress has also been made in the friction stir welding and transient liquid phase bonding fabrication processes resulting in better bonding, more stable processes and the ability to fabricate larger fuel plates.

  12. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-12-22

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

  13. Monolithically integrated interferometer for optical displacement measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Daniel; Zappe, Hans P.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the fabrication of a monolithically integrated optical displacement sensors using III-V semiconductor technology. The device is configured as a Michelson interferometer and consists of a distributed Bragg reflector laser, a photodetector and waveguides forming a directional coupler. Using this interferometer, displacements in the 100 nm range could be measured at distances of up to 45 cm. We present fabrication, device results and characterization of the completed interferometer, problems, limitations and future applications will also be discussed.

  14. Downsizing of single crystalline high aspect ratio tungsten nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan [IMDEA Materials Institute, Eric Kandel 2, 28906, Getafe (Spain); Drensler, Stefanie [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040, Linz (Austria); Hassel, Achim Walter [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040, Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry, Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040, Linz (Austria)

    2015-06-15

    Directional solidification of eutectic NiAl-W alloys offers an intuitive method to produce tungsten nanowires. Through the use of two different methods, the well-established Bridgman method and a newer type floating zone method, the direct influence of process parameters, like the withdrawal rate and the temperature gradient, onto the sample microstructure were studied. The sharp temperature gradient, built up using a four mirror system focusing the light emitted by halogen lamps inside the optical floating zone furnace allows producing nanowires with a diameter as small as 75 nm. Differences in the solid/liquid interface morphology depending on the solidification method used are discussed. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Tungsten-encapsulated gadolinium nanoislands with enhanced magnetocaloric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. M.; Rosenmann, D.; Sangpo, T.; Holt, M. V.; Fuesz, P.; McNulty, I.

    2017-07-01

    We report a method for growing chemically pure, oxide-free, air-stable Gd nanoislands with enhanced magnetic properties. These nanoislands are grown by solid-state dewetting and are fully encapsulated in tungsten such that they remain stable in ambient environments. They display good crystalline properties with hexagonally close-packed crystal structure and strong preferential orientation. We show that the choice of substrate strongly affects their shape, crystal orientation, and magnetic properties. The temperature-dependent magnetic coercivity and remanence of the Gd islands can vary by as much as a factor of three depending on the substrate used. The magnetocaloric properties of Gd islands grown on a sapphire substrate exceed those of high-quality Gd thin films.

  16. Studies on argon collisions with smooth and rough tungsten surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhgibesov, M S; Leu, T S; Cheng, C H; Utkin, A V

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate argon scattering behaviors on the smooth and rough tungsten surfaces. Current work deals with numerical simulation of nanoscale heat transfer process accompanying with rarefied gas-solid substrate interactions using molecular dynamics (MD) method. Taking into account that this method is very time consuming, MD simulation using CUDA capable Graphic Cards is implemented. The results found that imperfection of the surface significantly influences on gas atom's momentum change upon collision. However, the energy exchange rate remains unchanged regardless to the surface roughness. This finding is in contrast with the results in extant literatures. We believed the results found in this paper are important for both numerical and theoretical analyses of rarefied gas flow in micro- and nano-systems where the choice of boundary conditions significantly influences flow.

  17. An overview of monolithic zirconia in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Malkondu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia restorations have been used successfully for years in dentistry owing to their biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Because of their lack of translucency, zirconia cores are generally veneered with porcelain, which makes restorations weaker due to failure of the adhesion between the two materials. In recent years, all-ceramic zirconia restorations have been introduced in the dental sector with the intent to solve this problem. Besides the elimination of chipping, the reduced occlusal space requirement seems to be a clear advantage of monolithic zirconia restorations. However, scientific evidence is needed to recommend this relatively new application for clinical use. This mini-review discusses the current scientific literature on monolithic zirconia restorations. The results of in vitro studies suggested that monolithic zirconia may be the best choice for posterior fixed partial dentures in the presence of high occlusal loads and minimal occlusal restoration space. The results should be supported with much more in vitro and particularly in vivo studies to obtain a final conclusion.

  18. Process for the recovery of tungsten in a pure form from tungsten-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, M.; Moscovici, A.

    1986-12-16

    A process is described for the recovery of tungsten from tungsten-containing materials which comprises the steps of (i) admixing the tungsten-containing material with a melt at a temperature of between 680/sup 0/C and 750/sup 0/C. The melt consists of a salt selected from the group consisting of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and mixtures thereof in a substantially stoichiometrical amount to the tungsten constituent of the tungsten-containing material. This is done to disintegrate the tungsten-containing material and to form sodium tungstate, cooling the melt, and leaching the cooled melt with water to obtain an aqueous solution of sodium tungstate; (ii) admixing a solution of calcium chloride with the aqueous solution of sodium tungstate at a temperature of between 40/sup 0/C and 95/sup 0/C to form a calcium tungstate precipitate and separating the calcium tungstate; (iii) admixing the calcium tungstate with a preheated concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to form a tungstic acid precipitate and a CaCl/sub 2/ solution having a concentration of between 80 g/l and 180 g/l free HCl and separating the tungstic acid precipitate and obtaining tungstic acid which is substantially free of calcium ions, and (iv) calcining the tungstic acid to convert it to tungstic oxide and reducing the tungstic oxide to form metallic tungsten.

  19. The Newly Released Export Quota for Tungsten Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>China’s Ministry of Commerce recently announced the second lot of export quota for tungsten products in 2005. Based on the new quota, the second lot for Ammonium Paratung-state (APT) and Ammonium Metatungstate (AMT) will be 1,232 tons. The second lot for tungsten trioxide and blue tungsten oxide will be 1,480 tons and the second lot for tungsten powder and its products will be 428 tons.

  20. Preparation of imprinted monolithic column under molecular crowding conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xia Li; Xin Liu; Li Hong Bai; Hong Quan Duan; Yan Ping Huang; Zhao Sheng Liu

    2011-01-01

    Molecular crowding is a new concept to obtain molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with greater capacity and selectivity. In this work, molecular crowding agent was firstly applied to the preparation of MIPs monolithic column. A new polymerization system based on molecular crowding surrounding was developed to prepare enrofloxacin-imprinted monolith, which was composed of polystyrene and tetrahydrofuran. The result showed that the monolithic MIPs under molecular crowding conditions presented good molecular recognition for enrofloxacin with an imprinting factor of 3.03.

  1. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México DF (Mexico); DuBois, R.D. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies.

  2. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  3. Raman scattering from rapid thermally annealed tungsten silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Samhita; Jackson, Howard E.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1987-01-01

    Raman scattering as a technique for studying the formation of tungsten silicide is presented. The tungsten silicide films have been formed by rapid thermal annealing of thin tungsten films sputter deposited on silicon substrates. The Raman data are interpreted by using data from resistivity measurements, Auger and Rutherford backscattering measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  5. Monolithic Lumped Element Integrated Circuit (M2LEIC) Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INTEGRATED CIRCUITS, *MONOLITHIC STRUCTURES(ELECTRONICS), *TRANSISTORS, CHIPS(ELECTRONICS), FABRICATION, EPITAXIAL GROWTH, ULTRAHIGH FREQUENCY, POLYSILICONS, PHOTOLITHOGRAPHY, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, IMPEDANCE MATCHING .

  6. Indication of worn WC/C surface locations of a dry-running twin-screw rotor by the oxygen incorporation in tungsten-related Raman modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, J.; Schindler, J. J.; Waldkirch, P.; Goeke, S.; Brümmer, A.; Biermann, D.; Bayer, M.

    2016-10-01

    By comparing the worn and untouched locations of a tungsten-carbide/carbon surface of a dry-running twin-screw rotor, we demonstrate that tungsten-oxide Raman modes become observable only at worn locations and the integral intensity of the Raman line at 680 cm-1, which is related to the incipient oxidation of the tungsten-carbide stretching mode, is enhanced. Its frequency and width moreover change significantly, thus indicating the mechanical distortion of the bonding that has been occurred during the wearing process. The shape of the tungsten-oxide Raman lines, resembling the Voigt function, hints at a surface morphology that is a characteristic for an amorphous solid environment. Our Raman scattering results may be exploited to characterize the degree of wear of coated surfaces and to identify signatures of a tribological layer.

  7. Estimation of the dust production rate from the tungsten armour after repetitive ELM-like heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Garkusha, I.; Makhlaj, V.; Landman, I.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental simulations for the erosion rate of tungsten targets under ITER edge-localized mode (ELM)-like surface heat loads of 0.75 MJ m-2 causing surface melting and of 0.45 MJ m-2 without melting have been performed in the QSPA-Kh50 plasma accelerator. Analytical considerations allow us to conclude that for both energy deposition values the erosion mechanism is solid dust ejection during surface cracking under the action of thermo-stress. Tungsten influx into the ITER containment of NW~5×1018 W per medium size ELM of 0.75 MJ m-2 and 0.25 ms time duration has been estimated. The radiation cooling power of Prad=150-300 MW due to such influx of tungsten is intolerable: it should cool the ITER core to 1 keV within a few seconds.

  8. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  9. Thermal cycling and high power density hydrogen ion beam irradiation of tungsten layers on tungsten substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gretskaya, I. Yu; Grunin, A. V.; Dyachenko, M. Yu; Puntakov, N. A.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten layers with iron impurity were deposited on tungsten substrates modeling re-deposited layers in a fusion device. The samples were tested by thermocycling and hydrogen ion beam tests. Thermocycling revealed globule formation on the surface. The size of the globules depended on iron impurity content in the coating deposited. Pore formation was observed which in some cases lead to exfoliation of the coatings. Hydrogen ion irradiation lead to formation of blisters on the coating and finally its exfoliation.

  10. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01

    A aluminum matrix-W rod/wire structural material in support of DARPA initiative BAA 08-23 was developed and its density and mechanical strength ascertained, both being part of the DARPA matrices. Aluminum tubes and four 90 degree cross-ply tungsten fiber layers were arranged such that under extreme static pressure conditions the aluminum would viscoplastically flow into the tungsten arrangement to create a metal matrix composite. It was found that a cold isostatic process induced "Brazilian" ...

  11. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Fariba; Azimirad, Rouhollah; Amini, Abbas; Akhavan, Omid

    2015-05-01

    Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400-800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50-90 nm and crystalline phase of WO3) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K2W6O19 crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO3 nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K2W6O19 microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  12. Deuterium implantation into tungsten at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Balden, Martin; Schmid, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To study the interaction of hydrogen isotopes with tungsten many experiments are conducted in linear plasma devices, which provide high enough hydrogen fluxes to supersaturate the tungsten sample and create defects such as blister. Here an alternative approach is presented. Instead of achieving a high deuterium concentration via high flux exposure, the sample temperature is reduced and the implantation energy of deuterium into tungsten is increased. The lower temperature associated with a reduction in diffusivity as well as the deeper implantation of deuterium lead to an increase of deuterium concentration within the implantation zone. Deuterium is stepwise implanted into polycrystalline tungsten up to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 22} D/m{sup 2} with an energy of 3.0 keV/D at a sample temperature of 134 K. The retained deuterium is measured in-situ by nuclear reaction analysis. For low fluence approximately 100 % of the implanted deuterium is retained, while for higher fluence the retention saturates. Close to the surface deuterium concentrations up to 64 % are reached. This leads to massive grain orientation dependent blistering with blister sizes between 100-1000 nm at depths between 30-150 nm. Besides the characterization of the blisters their influence on deuterium transport is studied.

  13. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  14. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  15. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2.64E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  16. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.7E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  17. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.85E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  18. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  19. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.3E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  20. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity...

  1. The sodium tungsten bronzes as plasmonic materials: fabrication, calculation and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegg, Levi; Cuskelly, Dylan; Keast, Vicki J.

    2017-06-01

    The tungsten bronzes are non-stoichiometric transition metal oxides of the form M x WO3, where 0  ⩽  x  ⩽  1, and M is a dopant ion, most commonly an alkali metal. In this work, the sodium tungsten bronzes (Na x WO3) are investigated as materials for plasmonic applications. The bronzes were fabricated with a solid state reaction, the dielectric function calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and the nanoparticle responses calculated with the boundary element method (BEM). The results were compared to Au and Ag, the materials most widely used in plasmonic applications. It was shown that for x  >  0.5, the solid state fabrication method produces cube-shaped particles of diameter  ⩾1 µm, whose bulk optical properties are well described by a free-electron model and a rigid band structure. The addition of Na into the lattice increases the free electron density, increasing the bulk plasma frequency. Nanoparticle plasmon resonances are found to be highly tunable, and generally at a lower frequency than Au or Ag, and so sodium tungsten bronzes are predicted to be well suited to biomedical or chemical sensing applications.

  2. Monolith-Supported Amine-Functionalized Mg2(dobpdc) Adsorbents for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darunte, Lalit A; Terada, Yuri; Murdock, Christopher R; Walton, Krista S; Sholl, David S; Jones, Christopher W

    2017-05-24

    The potential of using an amine-functionalized metal organic framework (MOF), mmen-M2(dobpdc) (M = Mg and Mn), supported on a structured monolith contactor for CO2 capture from simulated flue gas is explored. The stability of the unsupported MOF powders under humid conditions is explored using nitrogen physisorption and X-ray diffraction analysis before and after exposure to humidity. Based on its superior stability to humidity, mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) is selected for further growth on a honeycomb cordierite monolith that is wash-coated with α-alumina. A simple approach for the synthesis of an Mg2(dobpdc) MOF film using MgO nanoparticles as the metal precursor is used. Rapid drying of MgO on the monolith surface followed by a hydrothermal treatment is demonstrated to allow for the synthesis of a MOF film with good crystallite density and favorable orientation of the MOF crystals. The CO2 adsorption behavior of the monolith-supported mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) material is assessed using 10% CO2 in helium and 100% CO2, demonstrating a CO2 uptake of 2.37 and 2.88 mmol/g, respectively. Excellent cyclic adsorption/desorption performance over multiple cycles is also observed. This is one of the first examples of the deployment of an advanced MOF adsorbent in a scalable, low-pressure drop gas-solid contactor. Such demonstrations are critical to the practical application of MOF materials in adsorptive gas separations, as structured contactors have many practical advantages over packed or fluidized beds.

  3. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  4. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  5. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest

  6. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintilla

  7. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintilla

  8. A Monolithic Perovskite Structure for Use as a Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Clemens, Frank; Menon, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A La0.67Ca0.26Sr0.07Mn1.05O3 (LCSM) perovskite was prepared for the first time as a ceramic monolithic regenerator used in a regenerative magnetic refrigeration device. The parameters influencing the extrusion process and the performance of the regenerator, such as the nature of the monolith paste...

  9. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  10. Hydrogel coated monoliths for enzymatic hydrolysis of penicillin G

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lathouder, K.M.; Smeltink, M.W.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Paasman, M.A.; Van de Sandt, E.J.A.X.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogel-coated monolith for the entrapment of penicillin G acylase (E. coli, PGA). After screening of different hydrogels, chitosan was chosen as the carrier material for the preparation of monolithic biocatalysts. This protocol leads to active immobilize

  11. A preliminary investigation of the growth of an aneurysm with a multiscale monolithic Fluid-Structure interaction solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerroni, D.; Manservisi, S.; Pozzetti, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we investigate the potentialities of multi-scale engineering techniques to approach complex problems related to biomedical and biological fields. In particular we study the interaction between blood and blood vessel focusing on the presence of an aneurysm. The study of each component of the cardiovascular system is very difficult due to the fact that the movement of the fluid and solid is determined by the rest of system through dynamical boundary conditions. The use of multi-scale techniques allows us to investigate the effect of the whole loop on the aneurysm dynamic. A three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model for the aneurysm is developed and coupled to a mono-dimensional one for the remaining part of the cardiovascular system, where a point zero-dimensional model for the heart is provided. In this manner it is possible to achieve rigorous and quantitative investigations of the cardiovascular disease without loosing the system dynamic. In order to study this biomedical problem we use a monolithic fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model where the fluid and solid equations are solved together. The use of a monolithic solver allows us to handle the convergence issues caused by large deformations. By using this monolithic approach different solid and fluid regions are treated as a single continuum and the interface conditions are automatically taken into account. In this way the iterative process characteristic of the commonly used segregated approach, it is not needed any more.

  12. A new large area monolithic silicon telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Tudisco, S; Cabibbo, M; Cardella, G; De Geronimo, G; Di Pietro, A; Fallica, G; Figuera, P; Musumarra, A; Papa, M; Pappalardo, G S; Rizzo, F; Valvo, G

    1999-01-01

    A new prototype of large area (20x20 mm sup 2) monolithic silicon telescope with an ultrathin DELTA E stage (1 mu m) has been built and tested. A particular mask for the ground electrode has been developed to improve the charge collection reducing the induction between the E and DELTA E stages. A special designed preamplifier has been used for the readout of the signal from the DELTA E stage to overcome the problem of the large input capacitance (40 nF). A rather low energy threshold charge discrimination has been obtained. Small side effects due to the electric field deformation near the ground electrode were observed and quantified.

  13. Monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Christophe; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-05-01

    High porosity monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases can be obtained from syndiotactic polystyrene and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)oxide thermoreversible gels by removing the solvent with supercritical CO2. The presence of crystalline nanopores in the aerogels based on these polymers allows a high uptake associated with a high selectivity of volatile organic compounds from vapor phase or aqueous solutions even at very low activities. The sorption and the fast kinetics make these materials particularly suitable as sorption medium to remove traces of pollutants from water and moist air.

  14. Microstructure and properties of liquid-phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys by using ultra-fine tungsten powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洋; 王尔德

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of liquid-phase sintered 93W-4.9Ni-2.1Fe tungsten heavy alloys using ultra-fine tungsten powders (medium particle size of 700 nm) and original tungsten powders (medium particle size of 3 μm) were investigated respectively. Commercial tungsten powders (original tungsten powders) were mechanically milled in a high-energy attritor mill for 35 h. Ultra-fine tungsten powders and commercial Ni, Fe powders were consolidated into green compacts by using CIP method and liquid-phase sintering at 1 465 ℃ for 30 min in the dissociated ammonia atmosphere. Liquid-phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys using ultra-fine tungsten powders exhibit full densification (above 99% in relative density) and higher strength and elongation compared with conventional liquidphase sintered alloys using original tungsten powders due to lower sintering temperature at 1 465 ℃ and short sintering time. The mechanical properties of sintered tungsten heavy alloy are found to be mainly dependent on the particles size of raw tungsten powders and liquid-phase sintering temperature.

  15. High pressure Raman and x-ray diffraction studies on the decomposition of tungsten carbonyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Subrahmanyam; Drozd, Vadym; Durygin, Andriy; Chen, Jiuhua

    2012-06-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten hexacarbonyl, W(CO)6, was studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) at high pressures up to 60 GPa in a diamond anvil cell. High pressure causes collapse of the Oh molecular symmetry in W(CO)6 leading to decomposition of the carbonyl compound. The decomposed material has characteristic of δ(OCO), v(C=C), v(C=O), and adsorbed CO Raman features. High pressure XRD results showed the irreversible amorphization of tungsten hexacarbonyl. A solid state vibrational coupling mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of δ(OCO) units. Further, the high pressure Raman results of W, Mo, and Cr hexacarbonyls are compared and the breakdown of the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model in this family is qualitatively discussed.

  16. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean A., E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai [University of Utah, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Oya, Yasuhisa [Shizuoka University, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Third Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and performed initial studies on a high temperature gas-driven permeation cell capable of operating at temperatures up to 1150 °C and at pressures between 0.1–1 atm. • Permeation measurements on ITER grade tungsten compare well with past studies by Frauenfelder and Zahkarov in the temperature range from 500 to 1000 °C. • First permeation measurements on Ti dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grained tungsten show higher permeation at 500 °C, but very similar permeation with ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. Diffusion along grain boundaries may be playing a role for this type of material. - Abstract: To address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D{sub 2} pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation

  17. Monolithic columns in plant proteomics and metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobello-Masini, Marilda; Penteado, José Carlos Pires; Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2013-03-01

    Since "omics" techniques emerged, plant studies, from biochemistry to ecology, have become more comprehensive. Plant proteomics and metabolomics enable the construction of databases that, with the help of genomics and informatics, show the data obtained as a system. Thus, all the constituents of the system can be seen with their interactions in both space and time. For instance, perturbations in a plant ecosystem as a consequence of application of herbicides or exposure to pollutants can be predicted by using information gathered from these databases. Analytical chemistry has been involved in this scientific evolution. Proteomics and metabolomics are emerging fields that require separation, identification, and quantification of proteins, peptides, and small molecules of metabolites in complex biological samples. The success of this work relies on efficient chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques, and on mass spectrometric detection. This paper reviews recent developments in the use of monolithic columns, focusing on their applications in "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches, including their use as supports for immobilization of proteolytic enzymes and their use in two-dimensional and multidimensional chromatography. Whereas polymeric columns have been predominantly used for separation of proteins and polypeptides, silica-based monoliths have been more extensively used for separation of small molecules of metabolites. Representative applications in proteomics and in analysis of plant metabolites are given and summarized in tables.

  18. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scruggs, S.J. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: Sscruggs2@uh.edu; Putman, P.T. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Fang, H. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Alessandrini, M. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Salama, K. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample.

  19. High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

  20. Hydrothermal method for preparing calcium phosphate monoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Carrodeguas Raúl

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new hydrothermal route for preparing biphasic calcium phosphate monoliths is proposed. Firstly, a slurry of beta-tricalcium phosphate/ortho-phosphoric acid (b-TCP/H3PO4 is cast into the desired final shape and size to obtain a block composed of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD and b-TCP. This block is then treated in 1.0 M Na2HPO4 at 60 °C in order to hydrolyze the DCPD into Ca10-x(HPO4x(PO4 6-x(OH2-x (CDHA and Ca8H2(PO46 .5H2O (OCP. The result is a monolithic piece which preserves the initial shape and size, but which is composed instead of CDHA, OCP, and b-TCP. During the initial stage, when the pH is slightly alkaline, the product of DCPD hydrolysis is CDHA. However, when a neutral or slightly acidic pH is reached OCP is formed. Test samples processed by this method showed complete conversion of DCPD into CDHA and OCP after 112 h of hydrolysis, and with a compressive strength of 16.2 MPa, similar to cancellous bone.

  1. Catastrophic failure of a monolithic zirconia prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae-Seung; Ji, Woon; Choi, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Sunjai

    2015-02-01

    Recently, monolithic zirconia restorations have received attention as an alternative to zirconia veneered with feldspathic porcelain to eliminate chipping failures of veneer ceramics. In this clinical report, a patient with mandibular edentulism received 4 dental implants in the interforaminal area, and a screw-retained monolithic zirconia prosthesis was fabricated. The patient also received a maxillary complete removable dental prosthesis over 4 anterior roots. At the 18-month follow-up, all of the zirconia cylinders were seen to be fractured, and the contacting abutment surfaces had lost structural integrity. The damaged abutments were replaced with new abutments, and a new prosthesis was delivered with a computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing fabricated titanium framework with denture teeth and denture base resins. At the 6-month recall, the patient did not have any problems. Dental zirconia has excellent physical properties; however, care should be taken to prevent excessive stresses on the zirconia cylinders when a screw-retained zirconia restoration is planned as a definitive prosthesis.

  2. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Structural and Mechanical Characterization of Nanocrystalline Tungsten and Tungsten-Based Alloy Thin Films for Extreme Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gustavo

    Extreme environments associated with nuclear applications often results in degradation of the physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of the materials. Tungsten (W) exhibits unique physical and mechanical properties, which makes tungsten a good candidate for nuclear applications; however, intrinsic W exhibits low fracture toughness at all temperatures in addition to a high ductile to brittle transition. In the present work, nanocrystalline W, W-Y and W-Mo alloys were nanoengineered for nuclear applications. Nanocrystalline tungsten coatings with a thickness of 1 microm were deposited onto Silicon (100) and Sapphire (C-plane) using RF and DC sputtering techniques under various growth conditions. Yttrium content in W-Y alloys has been varied to enhance the irradiation tolerance under optimum concentration. The W, W-Y coatings were characterized to understand the structure and morphology and to establish a mapping of conditions to obtain phase and size controlled materials. The samples were then subjected to depth-controlled irradiation by neutrons and Au3+ ions. Solid solution strengthening was achieved by doping molybdenum (Mo) solute atoms to W matrix under varied sputtering pressures and temperatures with the intention of creating interstitial point defects in the crystals that impede dislocation motion, increasing the hardness and young modulus of the material. The effect of PAr (3-19 mTorr) was also investigated and associated microstructure are significant on the mechanical characteristics; the hardness (H) and modulus of elasticity (Er) of the nc W-Mo thin films were higher at lower pressures but decreases continuously with increasing PAr. Using nano-indentation and nano-scratch technique, mechanical characterization testing was performed before and after irradiation. The structure, mechanics and irradiation stability of the W and W-Y coatings will be presented and discussed to demonstrate that Y-addition coupled with nano-scale features

  4. Advanced Manufacturing of Intermediate Temperature, Direct Methane Oxidation Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Durable Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation builds on the successes of the Phase I program by integrating our direct oxidation membrane electrode assembly (MEA) into a monolithic solid...

  5. Investigation of Surface Alkylation Strategy in SOMC: In Situ Generation of a Silica-Supported Tungsten Methyl Catalyst for Cyclooctane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali

    2016-07-28

    An efficient and potentially scalable method is described for the synthesis of the silica-supported complexes [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] and [(≡Si-O-)WMe2(≡CH)] obtained by in situ alkylation of the surface-grafted tungsten chloride [(≡Si-O-)WCl5] (1). [(≡Si-O-)WCl5] can be readily prepared by the reaction of commercially available and stable tungsten hexachloride WCl6 with partially dehydroxylated silica at 700 °C (SiO2-700). Further reaction with ZnMe2 at room temperature rapidly forms a mixture of surface-alkylated tungsten complexes. They were fully characterized by microanalysis, FTIR, mass balance, and solid-state NMR (1H, 13C, 1H-13C HETCOR, 1H-1H double quantum and triple quantum) and identified as [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] and another product, [(≡Si-O-)WMe2(≡CH)]. The latter might have been generated by partial decomposition of the tungsten methyl chloride compound, which is formed during the stepwise alkylation of [(≡Si-O-)WCl5]. DFT calculations were carried out to check the relative stability of the tungsten methyl chloride intermediates and the feasibility of the reaction and corroborate the experimental results. This tungsten complex and its derivative were found to be active catalysts for the metathesis of cyclooctane. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Temperature-responsive Porous Monoliths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG, Rongyue; QI, Li; XIN, Peiyong; YANG, Gengliang; CHEN, Yi

    2009-01-01

    A new temperature-responsive porous monolith has been prepared by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) within the pores of the porous polymer monolith. The grafting copolymerization was carried out by a method based on a continuous flow-through technique without special deoxygenation procedure needed in the general ATRP. The addition of ascorbic acid could counteract the oxidation effect of oxygen diffusing into the reaction system. The resulting grafted monolith was characterized by a mercury intrusion method and the size of macropore was 3.65 μm, which was suitable for flow through the monolith for HPLC. The thermally responsive property of the grafted monolith was evaluated by HPLC using steroids with various hydrophobicities as probes. Through determination of retention factor of each steroid on the grafted monolith at different temperatures using water as mobile phase, it was found that the slope of the plot of retention factor of each steroid versus the temperature changed around the low critical solution temperature (LCST, 32 ℃) of PNIPAAm in water. It was relative to the grafted PNIPAAm temperature sensitivity that a hydrophobic and hydrophilic alternation would take place around its LCST.Based on this thermally responsive property, the grafted monolith was used as stationary phase for HPLC and to separate the steroids using water as mobile phase by changing the column temperature. As a mobile phase, water is much better than organic solvents concerning the environment.

  7. Influence of different carbon monolith preparation parameters on pesticide adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukčević Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of carbon monolith for pesticide removal from water, and the mechanism of pesticide interaction with carbon surface were examined. Different carbon monolith samples were obtained by varying the carbonization and activation parameters. In order to examine the role of surface oxygen groups in pesticide adsorption, carbon monolith surface was functionalized by chemical treatment in HNO3, H2O2 and KOH. The surface properties of the obtained samples were investigated by BET surface area, pore size distribution and temperature-programmed desorption. Adsorption of pesticides from aqueous solution onto activated carbon monolith samples was studied by using five pesticides belonging to different chemical groups (acetamiprid, dimethoate, nicosulfuron, carbofuran and atrazine. Presented results show that higher temperature of carbonization and the amount of activating agent allow obtaining microporous carbon monolith with higher amount of surface functional groups. Adsorption properties of the activated carbon monolith were more readily affected by the amount of the surface functional groups than by specific surface area. Results obtained by carbon monolith functionalisation showed that π-π interactions were the main force for adsorption of pesticides with aromatic structure, while acidic groups play an important role in adsorption of pesticides with no aromatic ring in the chemical structure.

  8. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  9. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  10. Epitaxial growth of tungsten nanoparticles on alumina and spinel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Suarez, T; Lopez-Esteban, S; Pecharroman, C; Esteban-Cubillo, A; Moya, J S [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L A; Torrecillas, R [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research Center (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), C/ Francisco Pintado Fe 26, 33011, Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Gremillard, L [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 20 avenue Albert Einstein, Villeurbanne F-69621 (France)], E-mail: jsmoya@icmm.csic.es

    2008-05-28

    Isolated tungsten nanoparticles ({alpha}-W and {beta}-W phase) were synthesized and epitaxially grown on alumina and spinel particle surfaces with an average tungsten size of {<=}20 nm for a low tungsten content (of {<=}1.5 vol%). Using tungsten (VI) ethoxide alcoholic solutions, tungsten trioxide hydrated precursors were attached to a ceramic grains surface as a nanoparticle coating. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) micrographs showed epitaxial interfaces between alumina, spinel and metallic tungsten. This epitaxial growth is assumed to be due to the effect of water vapour on the sublimation of ortho-tungstic acid during the reduction process in a hydrogen atmosphere. The planes involved in the epitaxy were found to be (22-bar 0){sub Al2O3} parallel (121){sub W} and (311){sub MgAl2O4} parallel (110){sub W}.

  11. Induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten and molybdenum powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The melting, evaporation and oxidation behaviors as well as the solidification phenomena of tungsten and molybdenum in induction plasma were studied. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology and the cross section of plasma-processed powders. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the oxides formed on the particle surface of these two metals. The influence of spray chamber pressure on the spheroidization and oxidation phenomena was discussed. The results show that fewer Mo particles than W particles are spheroidized at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spray condition although molybdenum has a lower melting point. A small fraction of tungsten is evaporized and condensed either on the surface of tungsten particles nearby or on the wall of spray chamber. Tungsten oxides were found in tungsten powder processed under soft vacuum condition. Extremely large grains form inside some spheroidized particles of tungsten powder.

  12. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    thus are composed of single minerals. Iron minerals used in fitting included ferrihydrite, hematite , goethite, biotite, hornblende, and pyrite, which...tungstate adsorbing on ferrihy- drite. Ferrihydrite was selected for these tests as earlier X-ray microprobe studies indicated that this was the primary ...Camp Edwards soil profile 31T as a function of depth. The spectra all indicate that the primary coordination sphere of tungsten is dominated by

  13. In vitro evaluation of marginal discrepancy of monolithic zirconia restorations fabricated with different CAD-CAM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Tamer A; Sherif, Rana M

    2017-06-01

    Dental laboratories use different computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) systems to fabricate fixed prostheses; however, limited evidence is available concerning which system provides the best marginal discrepancy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal fit of 5 different monolithic zirconia restorations milled with different CAD-CAM systems. Thirty monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated on a custom-designed stainless steel die and were divided into 5 groups according to the type of monolithic zirconia crown and the CAD-CAM system used: group TZ, milled with an MCXL milling machine; group CZ, translucent zirconia milled with a motion milling machine; group ZZ, zirconia milled with a dental milling unit; group PZ, translucent zirconia milled with a zirconia milling unit; and group BZ, solid zirconia milled using an S1 VHF milling machine. The marginal fit was measured with a binocular microscope at an original magnification of ×100. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and post hoc surface range test, and pairwise multiple comparisons were made using Bonferroni correction (α=.05). The type of CAD-CAM used affected the marginal fit of the monolithic restoration. The mean (±SD) highest marginal discrepancy was recorded in group TZI at 39.3 ±2.3 μm, while the least mean marginal discrepancy was recorded in group IZ (22.8 ±8.9 μm). The Bonferroni post hoc test showed that group TZI was significantly different from all other groups tested (PCAD-CAM systems produced monolithic zirconia restorations with clinically acceptable marginal discrepancies; however, the CAD-CAM system with the 5-axis milling unit produced the best marginal fit. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm-3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm-1, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  15. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d' Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  16. The microstructure of chromium-tungsten steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueh, R. L.; Maziasz, P. J.

    1989-03-01

    Chromium-tungsten steels are being developed to replace the Cr-Mo steels for fusion-reactor applications. Eight experimental steels were produced and examined by optical and electron microscopy. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9 and 12 pct were used. Steels with these chromium compositions and with 2 pct W and 0.25 pct V were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, three other 2.25Cr steels were produced as follows: an alloy with 2 pct W and 0 pct V and alloys with 0 and 1 pct W and 0.25 pct V. A 9Cr steel containing 2 pct W, 0.25 pct V, and 0.07 pct Ta also was studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1 pct. Two pct tungsten was required in the 2.25Cr steels to produce 100 pct bainite (no polygonal ferrite). The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100 pct martensite, but the 12Cr steel contained about 25 pct delta-ferrite. Precipitate morphology and precipitate types varied, depending on the chromium content. For the 2.25Cr steels, M3C and M7C3 were the primary precipitates; for the 9Cr and 12Cr steels, M23C6 was the primary precipitate. The 5Cr steel contained M7C3 and M23C6. All of the steels with vanadium also contained MC.

  17. Defect and electrical properties of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xin-Sheng; Wang Yu; Dong Liang; Qi Li-Zhen; Zhang Feng

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide particles were prepared by a wet-chemical method. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis shows that the average grain size is about 15nm. The oxygen deficiency of nanometre-sized sample is higher than that of ordinary tungsten trioxide. The electric conductivity increases because of high oxygen deficiency. Ironic relaxation polarization and crystallographic shear (CS) planes theory were used to explain the unusual dielectric characteristic of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide.

  18. Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS-6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-14-73 Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten ...Technology, Boise State University, Army Research Laboratory Project Title: Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten -bearing Alloys and Composites...strength, we made them better suited to study the mechanical alloying of tungsten -transition metal couples in which interdiffusion during mechanical

  19. The Tungsten Demand and Supply Situation in Recent Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Tungsten is an important and valuable resource listed by the State as a kind of special minerals under the State protection. By the end of 2005, China had 310 tungsten mining areas with the total tungsten deposit amounting to 5.69 million tons. Among the total deposit, wolframite accounts for approximately 20.8 per cent and scheelite accounts for about 70 per cent with

  20. Preliminary comparison of monolithic and aperture optics for XRMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, G.J.; Worley, C.G.

    1997-08-01

    Comparisons between standard aperture optics and a custom designed monolithic capillary x-ray optic for the Kevex Omicron are presented. The results demonstrate the feasibility of retrofitting an Omicron with a monolithic capillary. Increased flux is observed especially at lower energies which results in an increase in sensitivity and potentially an increase in spatial resolution. Alignment is a critical factor in achieving optimal performance of the monolithic capillary. Further improvements in flux output, spot size and overall sensitivity are expected with better alignment.

  1. On monolithic stability and reinforcement analysis of high arch dams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Monolithic stability safety and reinforcement based on monolithic stability are very important for arch dam design.In this paper,the issue is addressed based on deformation reinforcement theory.In this approach,plastic complementary energy norm can be taken as safety Index for monolithic stability.According to deformation reinforcement theory,the areas where unbalanced force exists require reinforcement,and the required reinforcement forces are just the unbalanced forces with opposite direction.Results show that areas with unbalanced force mainly concentrate in dam-toes,dam-heels and faults.

  2. Hierarchically Structured Monolithic ZSM-5 through Macroporous Silica Gel Zeolitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Qian; Zhao Tianbo; Li Fengyan; Zong Baoning; Tong Yangchuan

    2006-01-01

    The hierarchically structured ZSM-5 monolith was prepared through transforming the skeletons of the macroporous silica gel into ZSM-5 by the steam-assisted conversion method. The morphology and monolithic shapes of macroporous silica gel were well preserved. The hierarchically structured ZSM-5 monolith exhibited the hierarchical porosity, with mesopores and macropores existing inside the macroporous silica gel, and micropores formed by the ZSM-5. The products have been characterized properly by using the XRD, SEM and N2 adsorption-desorption methods.

  3. Preparation of carbon monoliths from orange peel for NOx retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of monoliths are prepared from orange peels and chemically activated with H3PO4, KOH, ZnCl2, and water vapor without a binder. The monoliths were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms at 77 K, Boehm titrations and XPS. Thereafter, monoliths were tested for their ability to establish NOx retention. The results show that the retention capacities of NOx were a function of the textural properties and chemistries. The carbons synthesized with ZnCl2 and KOH retained similar amounts of NOx.

  4. A decoupled monolithic projection method for natural convection problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaomin; Kim, Kyoungyoun; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient monolithic numerical procedure based on a projection method for solving natural convection problems. In the present monolithic method, the buoyancy, linear diffusion, and nonlinear convection terms are implicitly advanced by applying the Crank-Nicolson scheme in time. To avoid an otherwise inevitable iterative procedure in solving the monolithic discretized system, we use a linearization of the nonlinear convection terms and approximate block lower-upper (LU) decompositions along with approximate factorization. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed method is more stable and computationally efficient than other semi-implicit methods, preserving temporal second-order accuracy.

  5. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten and tungsten silicide layers for applications in novel silicon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F X

    2002-01-01

    This work was a detailed investigation into the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of tungsten and tungsten silicide for potential applications in integrated circuit (IC) and other microelectronic devices. These materials may find novel applications in contact schemes for transistors in advanced ICs, buried high conductivity layers in novel Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology and in power electronic devices. The CVD techniques developed may also be used for metal coating of recessed or enclosed features which may occur in novel electronic or electromechanical devices. CVD of tungsten was investigated using the silicon reduction reaction of WF sub 6. W layers with an optimum self-limiting thickness of 100 nm and resistivity 20 mu OMEGA centre dot cm were produced self-aligned to silicon. A hydrogen passivation technique was developed as part of the wafer pre-clean schedule and proved essential in achieving optimum layer thickness. Layers produced by this approach are ideal for intimate contact to shallow junct...

  6. Monolithically Peltier-cooled laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hava, S.; Hunsperger, R.G.; Sequeira, H.B.

    1984-04-01

    A new method of cooling a GaAs/GaAlAs laser in an optical integrated circuit or on a discrete chip, by adding an integral thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling and heat spreading device to the laser, is presented. This cooling both reduces and stabilizes the laser junction temperature to minimize such deleterious effects as wavelength drift due to heating. A unified description of the electrical and thermal properties of a monolithic semiconductor mesa structure is given. Here it is shown that an improvement in thermal characteristics is obtained by depositing a relatively thick metallic layer, and by using this layer as a part of an active Peltier structure. Experimental results reveal a 14-percent increase in emitted power (external quantum efficiency) due to passive heat spreading and a further 8-percent if its Peltier cooler is operated. Fabrication techniques used to obtain devices exhibiting the above performance characteristics are given. 21 references.

  7. LSST primary/tertiary monolithic mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, J.; Gressler, W.; Liang, M.; Neill, D.; Araujo-Hauck, C.; Andrew, J.; Angeli, G.; Cho, M.; Claver, C.; Daruich, F.; Gessner, C.; Hileman, E.; Krabbendam, V.; Muller, G.; Poczulp, G.; Repp, R.; Wiecha, O.; Xin, B.; Kenagy, K.; Martin, H. M.; Tuell, M. T.; West, S. C.

    2016-08-01

    At the core of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) three-mirror optical design is the primary/tertiary (M1M3) mirror that combines these two large mirrors onto one monolithic substrate. The M1M3 mirror was spin cast and polished at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab at The University of Arizona (formerly SOML, now the Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab at the University of Arizona (RFCML)). Final acceptance of the mirror occurred during the year 2015 and the mirror is now in storage while the mirror cell assembly is being fabricated. The M1M3 mirror will be tested at RFCML after integration with its mirror cell before being shipped to Chile.

  8. Machining distortion prediction of aerospace monolithic components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-bo BI; Qun-lin CHENG; Hui-yue DONG; Ying-lin KE

    2009-01-01

    To predict the distortion of aerospace monolithic components.a model is established to simulate the numerical control (NC)milling process using 3D finite element method(FEM).In this model,the cutting layer is simplified firstly.Then,the models of cutting force and cutting temperature are established to gain the cutting loads,which are applied to the mesh model of the part.Finally,a prototype of machining simulation environment is developed to simulate the milling process of a spar.Key factors influencing the distortion,such as initial residual stress,cutting loads,fixture layout,cutting sequence,and tool path are considered all together.The total distortion of the spar is predicted and an experiment is conducted to validate the numerical results.It is found that the maximum discrepancy between the simulation results and experiment values is 19.0%

  9. Silver deposition on chemically treated carbon monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Zoran M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monolith was treated with HNO3, KOH and H2O2. Effects of these treatments on the surface functional groups and on the amount of silver deposited on the CM surface were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. As a result of chemical treatment there was an increase in the amount of surface oxygen complexes. The increase in the amount of silver deposit is proportional to the amount of surface groups that produce CO under decomposition. However, the high amount of CO groups, decomposing above 600°C, induces the smaller Ag crystallite size. Therefore, the high temperature CO evolving oxides are, most likely, the initial centers for Ag deposition.

  10. Secondary electron emission from plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, M.; Raitses, Y.; Wirz, R.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, several researchers [e.g., Yang et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 10959 (2015)] have shown that tungsten fuzz can grow on a hot tungsten surface under bombardment by energetic helium ions in different plasma discharges and applications, including magnetic fusion devices with plasma facing tungsten components. This work reports the direct measurements of the total effective secondary electron emission (SEE) from tungsten fuzz. Using dedicated material surface diagnostics and in-situ characterization, we find two important results: (1) SEE values for tungsten fuzz are 40%-63% lower than for smooth tungsten and (2) the SEE values for tungsten fuzz are independent of the angle of the incident electron. The reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz is most pronounced at high incident angles, which has important implications for many plasma devices since in a negative-going sheath the potential structure leads to relatively high incident angles for the electrons at the plasma confining walls. Overall, low SEE will create a relatively higher sheath potential difference that reduces plasma electron energy loss to the confining wall. Thus, the presence or self-generation in a plasma of a low SEE surface such as tungsten fuzz can be desirable for improved performance of many plasma devices.

  11. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA seq. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data shows the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. PMID:26164860

  12. Toxicologic evaluation of tungsten: 28-day inhalation study of tungsten blue oxide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Narayanan; Hu, Shu-Chieh; Sullivan, Dennis; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J; Venezia, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity and toxicokinetics of tungsten blue oxide (TBO) were examined. TBO is an intermediate in the production of tungsten powder, and has shown the potential to cause cellular damage in in vitro studies. However, in vivo evidence seems to indicate a lack of adverse effects. The present study was undertaken to address the dearth of longer-term inhalation toxicity studies of tungsten oxides by investigating the biological responses induced by TBO when administered via nose-only inhalation to rats at levels of 0.08, 0.325, and 0.65 mg TBO/L of air for 6 h/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day recovery period. Inhaled TBO was absorbed systemically and blood levels of tungsten increased as inhaled concentration increased. Among the tissues analyzed for tungsten levels, lung, femur and kidney showed increased levels, with lung at least an order of magnitude greater than kidney or femur. By exposure day 14, tungsten concentration in tissues had reached steady-state. Increased lung weight was noted for both terminal and recovery animals and was attributed to deposition of TBO in the lungs, inducing a macrophage influx. Microscopic evaluation of tissues revealed a dose-related increase in alveolar pigmented macrophages, alveolar foreign material and individual alveolar foamy macrophages in lung. After a recovery period there was a slight reduction in the incidence and severity of histopathological findings. Based on the absence of other adverse effects, the increased lung weights and the microscopic findings were interpreted as nonadverse response to exposure and were not considered a specific reaction to TBO.

  13. Combined flame and solution synthesis of nanoscale tungsten-oxide and zinc/tin-oxide heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhizhong; Huo, Di; Kear, Bernard H; Tse, Stephen D

    2015-12-28

    Heterostructures of tungsten-oxide nanowires decorated with zinc/tin-oxide nanostructures are synthesized via a combined flame and solution synthesis approach. Vertically well-aligned tungsten-oxide nanowires are grown on a tungsten substrate by a flame synthesis method. Here, tetragonal WO(2.9) nanowires (diameters of 20-50 nm, lengths >10 μm, and coverage density of 10(9)-10(10) cm(-2)) are produced by the vapor-solid mechanism at 1720 K. Various kinds of Zn/Sn-oxide nanostructures are grown or deposited on the WO(2.9) nanowires by adjusting the Sn(2+) : Zn(2+) molar ratio in an aqueous ethylenediamine solution at 65 °C. With WO(2.9) nanowires serving as the base structures, sequential growth or deposition on them of hexagonal ZnO nanoplates, Zn(2)SnO(4) nanocubes, and SnO(2) nanoparticles are attained for Sn(2+) : Zn(2+) ratios of 0 : 1, 1 : 10, and 10 : 1, respectively, along with different saturation conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the interfaces at the nanoheterojunctions shows abrupt interfaces for ZnO/WO(2.9) and Zn(2)SnO(4)/WO(2.9), despite lattice mismatches of >20%.

  14. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  15. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  16. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  17. Plant oil-based shape memory polymer using acrylic monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsujimoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the synthesis of a plant oil-based material using acrylic monolith. An acrylic monolith bearing oxirane groups was prepared via simple technique that involved the dissolution of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-comethyl methacrylate (PGMA in ethanolic – aqueous solution by heating and subsequent cooling. The PGMA monolith had topologically porous structure, which was attributed to the phase separation of the polymer solution. The PGMA monolith was impregnated by epoxidized soybean oil (ESO containing thermally-latent catalyst, and the subsequent curing produced a crosslinked material with relatively good transparency. The Young’s modulus and the tensile strength of polyESO/PGMA increased compared with the ESO homopolymer. The strain at break of polyESO/PGMA was larger than that of the ESO homopolymer and crosslinked PGMA. Furthermore, polyESO/PGMA exhibited good shape memory-recovery behavior.

  18. Application of monolithic chromatographic supports in virus research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajacic, Mladen; Ravnikar, Maja; Štrancar, Aleš; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion

    2017-05-12

    Key properties of monolithic chromatographic supports, make them suitable for separation and/or concentration of large biomolecules, especially virus particles and viral genomes. One by one, the studies that have been completed so far, contributed to the knowledge that monolith chromatography has hardly any limitation to be applied in virus research. Viruses of different sizes, possessing icosahedral structure and symmetrical morphology, as well as rod-shaped or filamentous viruses with helical structure, even enveloped ones, all of them could be successfully managed by means of monolith chromatography. Same is true for viral genomes, primarily when being distinct from other nucleic acid forms present in a host cell. This review is exclusively focused on viruses. It describes the application of monolith chromatography to different problematics within the virus research field. The reviewed achievements offer new possibilities and trigger new aspects in virology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Monolithic Perovskite Silicon Tandem Solar Cells with Advanced Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Jan C.; Bett, Alexander J.; Bivour, Martin; Blasi, Benedikt; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Kohlstadt, Markus; Lee, Seunghun; Mastroianni, Simone; Mundt, Laura; Mundus, Markus; Ndione, Paul; Reichel, Christian; Schubert, Martin; Schulze, Patricia S.; Tucher, Nico; Veit, Clemens; Veurman, Welmoed; Wienands, Karl; Winkler, Kristina; Wurfel, Uli; Glunz, Stefan W.; Hermle, Martin

    2016-11-14

    For high efficiency monolithic perovskite silicon tandem solar cells, we develop low-temperature processes for the perovskite top cell, rear-side light trapping, optimized perovskite growth, transparent contacts and adapted characterization methods.

  20. Effect of accelerated aging on translucency of monolithic zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Abdelbary

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Thickness of zirconia has significant effect on translucency. Aging has significant effect on thinner sections of zirconia. More research is required on zirconia towards making the material more translucent for its potential use as esthetic monolithic restoration.

  1. Monolithic CMOS pixel detector for international linear collider vertex detection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J E Brau; O Igonkina; N Sinew; D Strom; C Baltay; W Emmet; H Neal; D Rabinowitz

    2007-12-01

    A monolithic CMS pixel detector is under development for an ILC experiment. This chronopixel array provides a time stamp resolution of one bunch crossing, a critical feature for background suppression. The status of this effort is summarized.

  2. Characterization and Photocatalytic Activity of KSr_2Nb_5O_(15) with Tungsten Bronze Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gaoke; LI Yiqiu; WANG Junting; TU Haibin; YU Xinyi

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten bronze(TB)type potassium strontium niobate KSr_2Nb_5O_(15) was prepared by solid-state reaction method,and was characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and UV-vis diffuse spectrum.The photocatalyst shows high photocatalytic activity of photodegrading acid red G.The effects of photocatalyst dosage and initial concentration of acid red G on the photodegradation process were studied.The kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of acid red G by KSr_2Nb_5O_(15) catalyst follows the first order reaction.

  3. Mesoporous carbon nitride-tungsten oxide composites for enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailasam, Kamalakannan; Fischer, Anna; Zhang, Guigang; Zhang, Jinshui; Schwarze, Michael; Schröder, Marc; Wang, Xinchen; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Thomas, Arne

    2015-04-24

    Composites of mesoporous polymeric carbon nitride and tungsten(VI) oxide show very high photocatalytic activity for the evolution of hydrogen from water under visible light and in the presence of sacrificial electron donors. Already addition of very small amounts of WO3 yields up to a twofold increase in the efficiency when compared to bulk carbon nitrides and their composites and more notably even to the best reported mesoporous carbon nitride-based photocatalytic materials. The higher activity can be attributed to the high surface area and synergetic effect of the carbon nitrides and the WO3 resulting in improved charge separation through a photocatalytic solid-state Z-scheme mechanism.

  4. Effect of rare earth element cerium on preparation of tungsten powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何文; 谭敦强; 李亚蕾; 杨欣; 陆磊; 陆德平

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten powders and Ce doped powders were prepared by hydrogen reduction combined with the liquid-solid doping method. The phase composition, particle size and powder morphology of Ce doped tungsten powders were analyzed by X-ray diffrac-tion, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The results indicated that 10000 ppm Ce doped tungsten oxide powders were consisted of WO3 phase and Ce4W9O33 phase. The hydrogen reduction of Ce doped tungsten powders was basically accomplished at 800 ºC for 3 h. The size of Ce doped W powders was remarkably decreased compared to the undoped W powders. The phase of Ce4W9O33 was reduced to Ce2 (WO4)3 phase and Ce2W2O9 phase during the process of hydrogen reduction. Moreover, Ce2 (WO4)3 phase and Ce2W2O9 phase were observed form their morphologies, where the doping content of Ce was more than 100 ppm. The ternary phase embedding into W particles was assigned to Ce2 (WO4)3, while the ternary phase distrib-uting among W particles corresponded to Ce2W2O9. The phase of Ce2 (WO4)3 might be the nucleus of W particles and increase the number of the nucleus. And the particles of Ce2W2O9 covered WO2 particles and might inhibit the growth of W particles. These two reasons resulted in the decrease of the size of Ce doped W particles. Uniform fine W powders were fabricated with the doping content of Ce more than 100 ppm.

  5. Performance characteristics between monolithic and microservice-based systems

    OpenAIRE

    Flygare, Robin; Holmqvist, Anthon

    2017-01-01

    A new promising technology to face the problem of scalability and availability is the microservice architecture. The problem with this architecture is that there is no significant study that clearly proves the performance differences compared to the monolithic architecture. Our thesis aims to provide a more conclusive answer of how the microservice architecture differs performance wise compared to the monolithic architecture. In this study, we conducted several experiments on a self-developed...

  6. Sol-Gel Synthesis of Non-Silica Monolithic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Gaweł

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic materials have become very popular because of various applications, especially within chromatography and catalysis. Large surface areas and multimodal porosities are great advantages for these applications. New sol-gel preparation methods utilizing phase separation or nanocasting have opened the possibility for preparing materials of other oxides than silica. In this review, we present different synthesis methods for inorganic, non-silica monolithic materials. Some examples of application of the materials are also included.

  7. Reliability Analysis and Optimal Design of Monolithic Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Burcharth, Hans F.; Christiani, E.

    1994-01-01

    Reliability analysis and reliability-based design of monolithic vertical wall breakwaters are considered. Probabilistic models of the most important failure modes, sliding failure, failure of the foundation and overturning failure are described . Relevant design variables are identified and relia......Reliability analysis and reliability-based design of monolithic vertical wall breakwaters are considered. Probabilistic models of the most important failure modes, sliding failure, failure of the foundation and overturning failure are described . Relevant design variables are identified...

  8. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  9. Mechanically stable, hierarchically porous Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1) monoliths via direct conversion of copper(II) hydroxide-based monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Nirmalya; Fukumoto, Shotaro; Reboul, Julien; Sumida, Kenji; Zhu, Yang; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-28

    The synthesis of highly crystalline macro-meso-microporous monolithic Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1; btc(3-) = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) is demonstrated by direct conversion of Cu(OH)2-based monoliths while preserving the characteristic macroporous structure. The high mechanical strength of the monoliths is promising for possible applications to continuous flow reactors.

  10. Investigation on the formation of tungsten carbide in tungsten-containing diamond like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strondl, C.; Carvalho, N.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Kolk, G.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    A series of tungsten-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC) coatings have been produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering using a Hauzer HTC-1000 production PVD system. Sputtering from WC targets has been used to form W-C:H coatings. The metal to carbon ratio has been varied to study changes in th

  11. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  12. Behavior of tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten based on single fiber push-out study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jasper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten (W, a tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten-composite material (Wf/W is under development. The composite addresses the brittleness of W by extrinsic toughening through the introduction of energy dissipation mechanisms. These mechanisms allow the reduction of stress peaks and thus improve the materials resistance against crack growth. They do not rely on the intrinsinc material properties such as ductility. By utilizing powder metallurgy (PM one could benefit from available industrialized approaches for composite production and alloying routes. In this contribution the PM method of hot isostatic pressing (HIP is used to produce Wf/W samples containing W fibers coated with an Er2O3 interface. Analysis of the matrix material demonstrates a dense tungsten bulk, a deformed fiber and a deformed, but still intact interface layer. Metallographic analysis reveals indentations of powder particles in the interface, forming a complex 3D structure. Special emphasis is placed on push-out tests of single fiber HIP samples, where a load is applied via a small indenter on the fiber, to test the debonding and frictional properties of the Er2O3 interface region enabling the energy dissipation mechanisms. Together with the obtained experimental results, an axisymmetric finite element model is discussed and compared to existing work. In the HIP Wf/W composites the matrix adhesion is rather large and can dominate the push-out behavior. This is in contrast to the previously tested CVD produced samples.

  13. Monoliths: A Review of the Basics, Preparation Methods and Their Relevance to Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeeran Govender

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Considerable research has been conducted on monolithic catalysts for various applications. Strategies toward coating monoliths are of equal interest and importance. In this paper, the preparation of monoliths and monolithic catalysts have been summarized. More specifically, a brief explanation for the manufacturing of ceramic and metallic monoliths has been provided. Also, different methods for coating γ-alumina, as a secondary support, are included. Techniques used to deposit metal-based species, zeolites and carbon onto monoliths are discussed. Furthermore, monoliths extruded with metal oxides, zeolites and carbon are described. The main foci are on the reasoning and understanding behind the preparation of monolithic catalysts. Ideas and concerns are also contributed to encourage better approaches when designing these catalysts. More importantly, the relevance of monolithic structures to reactions, such as the selective oxidation of alkanes, catalytic combustion for power generation and the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide, has been described.

  14. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature. Peri

  15. Preparation and Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Carbide Nanorod Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High density tungsten carbide nanorod arrays have been prepared by magnetron sputtering (MS) using the aluminum lattice membrane (ALM) as template. Electrocatalytic properties of nitromethane electroreduction on the tungsten carbide nanorod arrays electrode were investigated by electrochemical method, and their electrocatalytic activity is approached to that of the Pt foil electrode.

  16. High-strength tungsten alloy with improved ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, W. D.; Raffo, P. L.; Rubenstein, L. S.; Witzke, W. R.

    1967-01-01

    Alloy combines superior strength at elevated temperatures with improved ductility at lower temperatures relative to unalloyed tungsten. Composed of tungsten, rhenium, hafnium, and carbon, the alloy is prepared by consumable electrode vacuum arc-melting and can be fabricated into rod, plate, and sheet.

  17. Tungsten and other refractory metals for VLSI applications II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on tungsten and other refractory metals for VLSI applications. Topics include the following: Selectivity loss and nucleation on insulators, fundamental reaction and growth studies, chemical vapor deposition of tungsten, chemical vapor deposition of molybdenum, reactive ion etching of refractory metal films; and properties of refractory metals deposited by sputtering.

  18. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  19. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  20. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  1. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  2. Biasable, Balanced, Fundamental Submillimeter Monolithic Membrane Mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Tsang, Raymond; Dengler, Robert; Lin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This device is a biasable, submillimeter-wave, balanced mixer fabricated using JPL s monolithic membrane process a simplified version of planar membrane technology. The primary target application is instrumentation used for analysis of atmospheric constituents, pressure, temperature, winds, and other physical and chemical properties of the atmospheres of planets and comets. Other applications include high-sensitivity gas detection and analysis. This innovation uses a balanced configuration of two diodes allowing the radio frequency (RF) signal and local oscillator (LO) inputs to be separated. This removes the need for external diplexers that are inherently narrowband, bulky, and require mechanical tuning to change frequency. Additionally, this mixer uses DC bias-ability to improve its performance and versatility. In order to solve problems relating to circuit size, the GaAs membrane process was created. As much of the circuitry as possible is fabricated on-chip, making the circuit monolithic. The remainder of the circuitry is precision-machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs circuit. The most critical alignments are performed using micron-scale semiconductor technology, enabling wide bandwidth and high operating frequencies. The balanced mixer gets superior performance with less than 2 mW of LO power. This can be provided by a simple two-stage multiplier chain following an amplifier at around 90 GHz. Further, the diodes are arranged so that they can be biased. Biasing pushes the diodes closer to their switching voltage, so that less LO power is required to switch the diodes on and off. In the photo, the diodes are at the right end of the circuit. The LO comes from the waveguide at the right into a reduced-height section containing the diodes. Because the diodes are in series to the LO signal, they are both turned on and off simultaneously once per LO cycle. Conversely, the RF signal is picked up from the RF waveguide by the probe at the left, and flows

  3. Electrical properties of rare earth based tungsten bronze vanadates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.B. Mohanty; P.S. Sahoo; R.N.P. Choudhary

    2012-01-01

    Barium based tungsten bronze (TB) oxides having high dielectric constant and low loss,can be effectively used as transducers,actuators,capacitors and also in memory devices.All these characteristics stimulated the researchers to replace toxic and hazardous lead based materials by barium based TB materials from industry.In the present research work,polycrystalline samples of Ba4SrRTi3V7O30 (R=Dy,Sm,La) were synthesized by a high temperature solid state reaction technique.Preliminary structural (X-ray diffraction) analyses of these compounds showed the formation of single-phase orthorhombic structures at room temperature having average crystallite size of the order of some nanometer for all the compounds.The scanning electron micrographs (SEM) provided information on the quality of the samples and showed more or less homogeneous distribution of grains over the entire surface of the samples.Detailed dielectric study in a wide temperature range (30-500 ℃) showed ferro to para phase transition for Dy and Sm substituted samples whereas no such transition was observed for La substituted samples.Both the grain and grain boundary resistances exhibited negative temperature coefficient of resistance behavior much like semiconductors.The dc conductivity of all the compounds obeyed Arrhenius relation.

  4. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C. [Lab. of Special Ceramic and P/M, University of Science and Technology, 100083 Beijing (China); Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [FZJ-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association Euratom-FZJ, Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Postfach 1913, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Song, S.X. [Research Center on Fusion Materials (RCFM), University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 {mu}m, 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m{sup 2} respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2}. Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 {mu}m size at 0.33 GW/m{sup 2} and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 {mu}m size at 0.55 GW/m{sup 2}. The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 {mu}m size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m{sup 2}. The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 {mu}m size has

  5. Thermal hydraulic design and decay heat removal of a solid target for a spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)]. E-mail: takenaka@mech.kobe-u.ac.jp; Nio, D. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kiyanagi, Y. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Mishima, K. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori (Japan); Kawai, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Furusaka, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Thermal hydraulic design and thermal stress calculations were conducted for a water-cooled solid target irradiated by a MW-class proton beam for a spallation neutron source. Plate type and rod bundle type targets were examined. The thickness of the plate and the diameter of the rod were determined based on the maximum and the wall surface temperature. The thermal stress distributions were calculated by a finite element method (FEM). The neutronics performance of the target is roughly proportional to its average density. The averaged densities of the designed targets were calculated for tungsten plates, tantalum-clad tungsten plates, tungsten rods sheathed by tantalum and Zircaloy and they were compared with mercury density. It was shown that the averaged density was highest for the tungsten plates and was high for the tantalum cladding tungsten plates, the tungsten rods sheathed by tantalum and Zircaloy in order. They were higher than or equal to that of mercury for the 1-2 MW proton beams. Tungsten target without the cladding or the sheath is not practical due to corrosion by water under irradiation condition. Therefore, the tantalum cladding tungsten plate already made successfully by HIP and the sheathed tungsten rod are the candidate of high performance solid targets. The decay heat of each target was calculated. It was low enough low compared to that of ISIS for the target without tantalum but was about four times as high as that of ISIS when the thickness of the tantalum cladding was 0.5 mm. Heat removal methods of the decay heat with tantalum were examined. It was shown that a special cooling system was required for the target exchange when tantalum was used for the target. It was concluded that the tungsten rod target sheathed with stainless steel or Zircaloy was the most reliable from the safety considerations and had similar neutronics performance to that of mercury.

  6. Thermal hydraulic design and decay heat removal of a solid target for a spallation neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, N.; Nio, D.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Mishima, K.; Kawai, M.; Furusaka, M.

    2005-08-01

    Thermal hydraulic design and thermal stress calculations were conducted for a water-cooled solid target irradiated by a MW-class proton beam for a spallation neutron source. Plate type and rod bundle type targets were examined. The thickness of the plate and the diameter of the rod were determined based on the maximum and the wall surface temperature. The thermal stress distributions were calculated by a finite element method (FEM). The neutronics performance of the target is roughly proportional to its average density. The averaged densities of the designed targets were calculated for tungsten plates, tantalum clad tungsten plates, tungsten rods sheathed by tantalum and Zircaloy and they were compared with mercury density. It was shown that the averaged density was highest for the tungsten plates and was high for the tantalum cladding tungsten plates, the tungsten rods sheathed by tantalum and Zircaloy in order. They were higher than or equal to that of mercury for the 1 2 MW proton beams. Tungsten target without the cladding or the sheath is not practical due to corrosion by water under irradiation condition. Therefore, the tantalum cladding tungsten plate already made successfully by HIP and the sheathed tungsten rod are the candidate of high performance solid targets. The decay heat of each target was calculated. It was low enough low compared to that of ISIS for the target without tantalum but was about four times as high as that of ISIS when the thickness of the tantalum cladding was 0.5 mm. Heat removal methods of the decay heat with tantalum were examined. It was shown that a special cooling system was required for the target exchange when tantalum was used for the target. It was concluded that the tungsten rod target sheathed with stainless steel or Zircaloy was the most reliable from the safety considerations and had similar neutronics performance to that of mercury.

  7. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingchen Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup, while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  8. Double phase conjugation in tungsten bronze crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, E J; Clark Iii, W W; Miller, M J; Wood, G L; Monson, B; Salamo, G J; Neurgaonkar, R R

    1990-02-20

    In this paper we report a new method for double phase conjugation particularly suited to the tungsten bronze crystal strontium barium niobate. It has also been observed to produce conjugate waves in BaTiO(3) and BSKNN. This new arrangement is called the bridge conjugator because the two beams enter opposing [100] crystal faces and fan together to form a bridge without reflection off a crystal face. Our measurements indicate that the bridge conjugator is competitive with previously reported double phase conjugate mirrors in reflectivity, response time, ease of alignment, and fidelity.

  9. Electrical properties of complex tungsten bronze ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhee, R.; Das, Piyush R.

    2014-09-01

    This paper highlights the electrical properties of two new complex tungsten bronze ceramics (K2Pb2Eu2W2Ti4Nb4O30 and K2Pb2Pr2W2Ti4Nb4O30) which were prepared by high temperature mixed oxide method. Variation of impedance parameters with temperature (27-500 °C) and frequency (1 kHz to 5 MHz) shows the grain and grain boundary effects in the samples. The variation of dielectric parameters with frequency is also studied. The ac conductivity variation with temperature clearly exhibits that the materials have thermally activated transport properties of Arrhenius type.

  10. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Mavromanolakis

    2007-12-01

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 layers and depth of 7.2 0 at normal incidence, having in total 3024 channels of 1 cm2, was tested recently with - beam. We describe the prototype and discuss some preliminary testbeam results on its performance with respect to position resolution, response inhomogeneity and transverse containment.

  11. A study on consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Wang Yuxin; Feng Jicai

    2009-01-01

    A consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding method has been studied. This method is different from the traditional TIG welding because it introduces an MIG welding torch into the traditional TIG welding system. An indirect arc is generated between the consumable electrode of the MIG welding torch and the tungsten electrode of the TIG welding torch, but not generated between the tungsten electrode of the welding torch and the base metal. Welding current flows from the consumable electrode to the tungsten electrode in the free-burning indirect arc. The consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding not only rapidly melts the welding wire but also effectively restrains the excessive fusion of the base metal. The welding experiment and the theoretical analysis confirm that this method can obtain a high deposition rate and a low dilution ratio during the welding process.

  12. Plasma spray forming of tungsten coatings on copper electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xian-liang(蒋显亮); F.Gitzhofer; M.I.Boulos

    2004-01-01

    Both direct current dc plasma and radio frequency induction plasma were used to deposit tungsten coatings on copper electrodes. Fine tungsten powder with mean particle size of 5μm and coarse tungsten powder with particle size in the range from 45 μm to 75 μm were used as plasma spray feedstock. It is found that dc plasma is only applicable to spray the fine tungsten powder and induction plasma can be used to spray both the coarse powder and the fine powder. The tungsten coating deposited by the induction plasma spraying of the coarse powder is extremely dense. Such a coating with an interlocking structure and an integral interface with the copper substrate demonstrates high cohesion strength and adhesion strength.

  13. Tungsten recycling in the United States in 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2011-01-01

    This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition in 2000, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of tungsten's many diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 2000, an estimated 46 percent of U.S. tungsten supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of tungsten consumed from new scrap to that consumed from old scrap was estimated to be 20:80. Of all the tungsten in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 66 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  14. Homogenous Silver-Tungsten Composite Production for Electrical Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid M. Azhar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver-tungsten composite materials have been widely used as medium duty electrical contacts since they offer the advantages of both refractory tungsten (welding and erosion resistance and silver (efficient electro-thermal conductivities. Since there is no alloying between the two elements (Ag and W, the properties of the composite depends on their composition. So for any particular application, a balance must be struck between the desirable properties of the two metals. Both welding and erosion resistance properties of silver-tungsten contacts depend on particle size, morphology and distribution of both elements within the composite, with finer W particles in Ag matrix give better performance. The main objective of this study is to produce an intimately mixed silver-tungsten powder with homogeneous distribution of both phases (silver and tungsten in the composite. Thus, to produce homogenous elemental silver-tungsten powder, the reduction behavior of each tungstate is studied at various reduction temperatures using TGA technique. Based on the results obtained from TGA, the reduction of silver tungstate carried out in two stage reduction process for producing elemental silver-tungsten powder with controlled particle size of tungsten. Also, small quantities of Fe and Co as sinter aids are introduced into tungstates by co-precipitation technique. However, the precipitated Fe and Co doped silver tungstates are reduced to yield Iron and cobalt doped silver-tungsten powders. The effect of Fe and Co on the morphology and particle size of the tungsten is studied using SEM. The reduced products will be used for subsequent sintering experiments to produce high density sintered compact for contact fabrication.

  15. Microstructural characterization and field emission properties of tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chia-Hsiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Su, Cherng-Yuh, E-mail: cysu@ntut.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yan-Fu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-01

    Tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires were synthesized by using the DC magnetron sputtering and infrared furnace annealing processes. Scanning election microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to evaluate the topography and sizes. X-ray diffraction (XRD), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to analyze the composition and structure. From the results of HRTEM, it was discovered that the prepared nanowires have a monoclinic single-crystal phase of W{sub 18}O{sub 49} with lattice growth along the (010) lattice plane, and the lattice spacing is 0.378 nm, which agrees with XRD and GI-XRD results. The prepared tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires have turn-on voltage of 3.06 V/μm and 1.46 V/μm respectively. They also possess superior field enhancement factors of 5103 and 10667 respectively. Their behavior thus follows the Fowler-Nordheim expression for tunneling. - Highlights: • A simple method to prepare tungsten oxide nanowires by annealing tungsten film. • High aspect ratio of the 1D titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires. • High field enhancement factor of titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires.

  16. R&D of A MW-class solid-target for a spallation neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Furusaka, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Ryuzo; Li, Jing-Feng; Sugimoto, Katsuhisa; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Hiraoka, Yutaka; Abe, Katsunori; Hasegawa, Akira; Yoshiie, Masatoshi; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Mishima, Katsuichiro; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Naoaki; Igarashi, Tadashi

    2003-05-01

    R&D for a MW-class solid target composed of tungsten was undertaken to produce a pulsed intense neutron source for a future neutron scattering-facility. In order to solve the corrosion of tungsten, tungsten target blocks were clad with tantalum by means of HIP'ing, brazing and electrolytic coating in a molten salt bath. The applicability of the HIP'ing method was tested through fabricating target blocks for KENS (spallation neutron source at KEK). A further investigation to certify the optimum HIP conditions was made with the small punch test method. The results showed that the optimum temperature was 1500 °C at which the W/Ta interface gave the strongest fracture strength. In the case of the block with a hole for thermocouple, it was found that the fabrication preciseness of a straight hole and a tantalum sheath influenced the results. The development of a tungsten stainless-steel alloy was tried to produce a bare tungsten target, using techniques in powder metallurgy. Corrosion tests for various tungsten alloys were made while varying the water temperature and velocity. The mass loss of tungsten in very slow water at 180 °C was as low as 0.022 mg/y, but increased remarkably with water velocity. Simulation experiments for radiation damage to supplement the STIP-III experiments were made to investigate material hardening by hydrogen and helium, and microstructures irradiated by electrons. Both experiments showed consistent results on the order of the dislocation numbers and irradiation hardness among the different tungsten materials. Thermal-hydraulic designs were made for two types of solid target system of tungsten: slab and rod geometry as a function of the proton beam power. The neutronic performance of a solid target system was compared with that of mercury target based on Monte Carlo calculations by using the MCNP code.

  17. Dedicated monolithic infrared spectrometer for process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Suneet; Kyle, William; Bolduc, Roy A.; Curtiss, Lawrence E.

    1999-12-01

    Foster-Miller has leveraged its innovations in IR fiber- optic probes and the recent development of a miniature spectrometer to build a novel IR sensor system for process applications. The developed sensor systems is a low-cost alternative to process FTIR and filter based systems. A monolithic wedge-grating optic provides the spectral dispersion with low cost thermopile point or array detectors picking off the diffracted wavelengths from the optic. The integrated optic provides spectral discrimination between 3- 12 micrometers with resolution at 8 cm-1 or better and high overall optical throughput. The device has a fixed cylindrical grating uniquely bonded to the edge of a ZnSe conditioning 'wedge'. The conditioning optic overcomes limitations of concave gratings as it accepts high angle light at the narrow end of the wedge and progressively conditions it to be near normal to the grating. On return, the diffracted wavelengths are concentrated on the discrete or array detector elements by the wedge, providing throughput comparable to that of an FTIR. The miniature spectrometer coupled to flow through liquid cells or multipass gas cells provides significant cost advantage over conventional sampling methodologies. Currently, we are investigating process applications for the petroleum and dairy markets. The sensor system eliminates the cost, complexity, reliability and bandwidth/resolution problems associated with either Fabry Perot or Michelson Interferometer based approaches for low-cost process applications.

  18. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Conte, A. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Farnesini, L. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Montani, M. [University of Urbino and INFN Firenze (Italy); Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Piergiovanni, F. [University of Urbino and INFN Firenze (Italy); Piluso, A. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Puppo, P., E-mail: paola.puppo@roma1.infn.it [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Rapagnani, P. [University of Roma Sapienza and INFN Roma (Italy); Travasso, F. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Vicerè, A. [University of Urbino and INFN Firenze (Italy); Vocca, H. [University of Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV. - Highlights: • Suspension system design for the test masses of the gravitational wave detectors. • Finite element model studies. • Suspension thermal noise studies.

  19. Monolithic supports with unique geometries and enhanced mass transfer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of natural gas has been the topic of much research over the past decade. Interest in this technology results from a desire to decrease or eliminate the emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides (NOX) from gas turbine power plants. A low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic monolith, is ideal for this high-temperature, high-flow application. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. 'Robocasting' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low pressure drops. This report details the mass transfer effects for novel 3-dimensional robocast monoliths, traditional honeycomb-type monoliths, and ceramic foams. The mass transfer limit is experimentally determined using the probe reaction of CO oxidation over a Pt / {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, and the pressure drop is measured for each monolith sample. Conversion versus temperature data is analyzed quantitatively using well-known dimensionless mass transfer parameters. The results show that, relative to the honeycomb monolith support, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application.

  20. Phase Transformations upon Doping in Tungsten Trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an emerging semiconductor material, with a growing number of applications in Li-ion batteries, photocatalysis, gas sensors and electrochromic devices. As an electrochromic material, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping with monovalent species. Due to it having an empty A-site in the ABO3 perovskite structure, high doping concentrations are possible through intercalation. Tungsten trioxide has been experimentally shown to transform from the ground-state monoclinic symmetry to cubic symmetry with increasing monovalent doping. We use first-principles calculations to understand this transformation. Our calculations show that the addition of electrons to the conduction band is a primary driver of the phase transformation. We quantify the energetics and structural aspects of this transformation using density functional theory, allowing us to elucidate the mechanism. Comparison with experiment, role of the dopant species, and implications of structural changes for device applications will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE and NSF GRFP.

  1. Concentration dependent hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.

    2016-10-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten is studied as a function of temperature, hydrogen concentration and pressure using Molecular Dynamics technique. A new analysis method to determine diffusion coefficients that accounts for the random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position is presented. The results indicate that the hydrogen migration barrier of 0.25 eV should be used instead of the presently recommended value of 0.39 eV. This conclusion is supported by both experiments and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the migration volume at the saddle point for H in W is found to be positive: ΔVm ≈ 0.488 Å3, leading to a decrease in the diffusivity at high pressures. At high H concentrations, a dramatic reduction in the diffusion coefficient is observed, due to site blocking and the repulsive H-H interaction. The results of this study indicates that high flux hydrogen irradiation leads to much higher H concentrations in tungsten than expected.

  2. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  3. Nanoporous Monolithic Microsphere Arrays Have Anti-Adhesive Properties Independent of Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Eichler-Volf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioinspired artificial surfaces with tailored adhesive properties have attracted significant interest. While fibrillar adhesive pads mimicking gecko feet are optimized for strong reversible adhesion, monolithic microsphere arrays mimicking the slippery zone of the pitchers of carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes show anti-adhesive properties even against tacky counterpart surfaces. In contrast to the influence of topography, the influence of relative humidity (RH on adhesion has been widely neglected. Some previous works deal with the influence of RH on the adhesive performance of fibrillar adhesive pads. Commonly, humidity-induced softening of the fibrils enhances adhesion. However, little is known on the influence of RH on solid anti-adhesive surfaces. We prepared polymeric nanoporous monolithic microsphere arrays (NMMAs with microsphere diameters of a few 10 µm to test their anti-adhesive properties at RHs of 2% and 90%. Despite the presence of continuous nanopore systems through which the inner nanopore walls were accessible to humid air, the topography-induced anti-adhesive properties of NMMAs on tacky counterpart surfaces were retained even at RH = 90%. This RH-independent robustness of the anti-adhesive properties of NMMAs significantly contrasts the adhesion enhancement by humidity-induced softening on nanoporous fibrillar adhesive pads made of the same material.

  4. CO2-Doped Diamond: A Potential Solid-State CO2 Laser Material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tratt, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a novel concept for a solid-state CO subscript 2 laser medium which, by eschewing the gas-phase approach, may offer prospects for a compact, robust 9 - 11 (micro)m coherent source, coupled with the potentially superior frequency stability characteristics afforded by monolithic solid-state construction.

  5. Influence of alloying and testing conditions on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of 〈100〉 tungsten-based single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skotnicova, Katerina, E-mail: Katerina.Skotnicova@vsb.cz [VSB – Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Department of Regional Materials Science and Technology Centre, Avenue 17 Listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Kirillova, Valentina M.; Ermishkin, Vjacheslav A. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninski Prospect 49, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cegan, Tomas; Jurica, Jan; Kraus, Martin [VSB – Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Department of Regional Materials Science and Technology Centre, Avenue 17 Listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Burkhanov, Gennadij S. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninski Prospect 49, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-11

    The results of the pressure testing of mechanical properties of single crystals of pure tungsten and low-alloyed alloys W–2Re and W–1Re–1Mo (wt%) with a crystallographic orientation 〈100〉 which were prepared by plasma-arc melting are summarized. The effect of alloying and the deformation rate on these properties have also been investigated and the fracture surfaces of the individual single crystals have been evaluated with the aid of the photometric method. The differences in the deformation behavior of pure tungsten and W–Re and W–1Mo–Re alloys were observed, which relate to the particularities of rhenium and molybdenum action in the tungsten solid solution. It can be seen from the observed results that tungsten alloying with low rhenium and molybdenum contents decreased all mechanical properties when applying the deformation rate of 0.2 mm/min. The biggest decrease was observed for the offset yield strength value. When testing with the deformation rate of 2 mm/min, the strength limit of the W–2Re alloy increased to 2013 MPa, while R{sub pt0.2} decreased by 33% in comparison with the pure tungsten single crystal. However, the ε{sub r} value remained at the same level ∼30%. In the W–1Re–1Mo single crystal, the R{sub pt0.2} and R{sub mt} values decreased, while ε{sub r} increased slightly.

  6. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  7. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  8. Design and fabrication of teflon-coated tungsten nanorods for tunable hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedir, Khedir R; Kannarpady, Ganesh K; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Woo, Justin; Ryerson, Charles; Biris, Alexandru S

    2011-04-19

    The nature of water interaction with tungsten nanorods (WNRs) fabricated by the glancing-angle deposition technique (GLAD)-using RF magnetron sputtering under various Ar pressures and substrate tilting angles and then subsequent coating with Teflon-has been studied and reported. Such nanostructured surfaces have shown strong water repellency properties with apparent water contact angles (AWCA) of as high as 160°, which were found to depend strongly upon the fabrication conditions. Variations in Ar pressure and the substrate tilting angle resulted in the generation of WNRs with different surface roughness and porosity properties. A theoretical model has been proposed to predict the observed high AWCAs measured at the nanostructure interfaces. The unique pyramidal tip geometry of WNRs generated at low Ar pressure with a high oblique angle reduced the solid fraction at the water interface, explaining the high AWCA measured on such surfaces. It was also found that the top geometrical morphologies controlling the total solid fraction of the WNRs are dependent upon and controlled by both the Ar pressure and substrate tilting angle. The water repellency of the tungsten nanorods with contact angles as high as 160° suggests that these coatings have enormous potential for robust superhydrophobic and anti-icing applications in harsh environments. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Partitioning tungsten between matrix precursors and chondrule precursors through relative settling

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of chondrites have found a tungsten isotopic anomaly between chondrules and matrix. Given the refractory nature of tungsten, this implies that W was carried into the solar nebula by at least two distinct families of pre-solar grains. The observed chondrule/matrix split requires that the distinct families were kept separate during the dust coagulation process, and that the two families of grain interacted with the chondrule formation mechanism differently. We take the co-existence of different families of solids in the same general orbital region at the chondrule-precursor size as given, and explore the requirements for them to have interacted with the chondrule formation process at significantly different rates. We show that this sorting of families of solids into chondrule and matrix destined dust had to have been at least as powerful a sorting mechanism as the relative settling of aerodynamically distinct grains at at least two scale heights above the midplane. The requirement that the chondr...

  10. New Graphene Form of Nanoporous Monolith for Excellent Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hui; Lin, Tianquan; Xu, Feng; Tang, Yufeng; Liu, Zhanqiang; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-01-13

    Extraordinary tubular graphene cellular material of a tetrahedrally connected covalent structure was very recently discovered as a new supermaterial with ultralight, ultrastiff, superelastic, and excellent conductive characteristics, but no high specific surface area will keep it from any next-generation energy storage applications. Herein, we prepare another new graphene monolith of mesoporous graphene-filled tubes instead of hollow tubes in the reported cellular structure. This graphene nanoporous monolith is also composed of covalently bonded carbon network possessing high specific surface area of ∼1590 m(2) g(-1) and electrical conductivity of ∼32 S cm(-1), superior to graphene aerogels and porous graphene forms self-assembled by graphene oxide. This 3D graphene monolith can support over 10 000 times its own weight, significantly superior to CNT and graphene cellular materials with a similar density. Furthermore, pseudocapacitance-active functional groups are introduced into the new nanoporous graphene monolith as an electrode material in electrochemical capacitors. Surprisingly, the electrode of 3D mesoporous graphene has a specific capacitance of 303 F g(-1) and maintains over 98% retention after 10 000 cycles, belonging to the list for the best carbon-based active materials. The macroscopic mesoporous graphene monolith suggests the great potential as an electrode for supercapacitors in energy storage areas.

  11. Recent advances in polymer monoliths for ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordborg, Anna; Hilder, Emily F

    2009-05-01

    The use of polymeric materials in ion-exchange chromatography applications is advantageous because of their typically high mechanical stability and tolerance of a wide range of pH conditions. The possibility of using polymeric monoliths in ion-exchange chromatography is therefore obvious and many of the same strategies developed for polymeric particles have been adapted for use with polymeric monoliths. In this review different strategies for the synthesis of polymeric monoliths with ion-exchange functionality are discussed. The incorporation of ion-exchange functionality by co-polymerization is included, as also are different post-polymerization alterations to the monolith surface such as grafting. The formulations and strategies presented include materials intended for use in analytical separations in ion-exchange chromatography, sample pre-treatment or enrichment applications, and materials for capillary electrochromatography. Finally, examples of the use of polymeric monoliths in ion-exchange chromatography applications are included with examples published in the years 2003 to 2008.

  12. HPLC analysis of synthetic polymers on short monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, Elena; Vlakh, Evgenia; Sinitsyna, Ekaterina; Tennikova, Tatiana

    2013-12-01

    Ultrashort monolithic columns (disks) were thoroughly studied as efficient stationary phases for precipitation-dissolution chromatography of synthetic polymers. Gradient elution mode was applied in all chromatographic runs. The mixtures of different flexible chain homopolymers, such as polystyrenes, poly(methyl methacrylates), and poly(tert-butylmethacrylates) were separated according to their molecular weights on both commercial poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) disks (12 id × 3 mm and 5 × 5 mm) and lab-made monolithic columns (4.6 id × 50 mm) filled with supports of different hydrophobicity. The experimental conditions were optimized to reach fast and highly efficient separation. It was observed that, similar to the separation of monoliths of other classes of (macro)molecules (proteins, DNA, oligonucleotides), the length of column did not affect the peak resolution. A comparison of the retention properties of the poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) disk-shaped monoliths with those based on poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate), poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate), and poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) supports demonstrated the obvious effect of surface chemistry on the resolution factor. Additionally, the results of the discussed chromatographic mode on the fast determination of the molecular weights of homopolymers used in this study were compared to those established by SEC on columns packed with sorbent beads of a similar nature to the monoliths. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Lee, James J.-W.; Srikanth, Ramanathan; Lawn, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass–ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass–ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics. PMID:24139756

  14. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  15. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  16. COMPUTER NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN HEAVY ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A microstructure model of tungsten heavy alloys has been developed. On the basis of the model and several assumptions, the macro-mechanical properties of 90 W heavy alloy under quasi-static tensile deformation and the effects of microstructural parameters (mechanical properties of the matrix phase and tungsten content) on them have been analyzed by computer numerical simulation. The mechanical properties of the alloy have been found to be dependent on the mechanical parameters of the matrix phase. As the elastic modulus and yield strength of the matrix phase increase, the tensile strength of the alloy increases, while the elongation decreases. If the mechanical parameters except the tensile strength of the matrix phase are constant, both the tensile strength and the elongation of the alloy increase linearly with the increase of tensile strength of the matrix phase. The properties of the alloy are very sensitive to the hardening modulus of the matrix phase. As the hardening modulus increases, both the tensile strength and the elongation of the alloy exponentially decrease. The elongation of the alloys monotonically decreases with the increase of tungsten content, while the decrease of tensile strength is not monotonic. When the tungsten content < 85 %, the strength of tungsten heavy alloys increases with the increase of tungsten content, while decreases when the tungsten content >85 %. The maximum of tensile strength of the alloys appears at the tungsten content of 85 %. The results showed that the binder phase with a higher strength and a lower hardening modulus is advantageous to obtaining an optimum combination of mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys.

  17. Monolithic View of Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Chiosi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We review and critically discuss the current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution limited to Early Type Galaxies (ETGs as inferred from the observational data and briefly contrast the hierarchical and quasi-monolithic paradigms of formation and evolution. Since in Cold Dark Matter (CDM cosmogony small scale structures typically collapse early and form low-mass haloes that subsequently can merge to assembly larger haloes, galaxies formed in the gravitational potential well of a halo are also expected to merge thus assembling their mass hierarchically. Mergers should occur all over the Hubble time and large mass galaxies should be in place only recently. However, recent observations of high redshift galaxies tell a different story: massive ETGs are already in place at high redshift. To this aim, we propose here a revision of the quasi-monolithic scenario as an alternative to the hierarchical one, in which mass assembling should occur in early stages of a galaxy lifetime and present recent models of ETGs made of Dark and Baryonic Matter in a Λ-CDM Universe that obey the latter scheme. The galaxies are followed from the detachment from the linear regime and Hubble flow at z ≥ 20 down to the stage of nearly complete assembly of the stellar content (z ∼ 2 − 1 and beyond.  It is found that the total mass (Mh = MDM + MBM and/or initial over-density of the proto-galaxy drive the subsequent star formation histories (SFH. Massive galaxies (Mh ~ _1012M⊙ experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates ≥ 103M⊙/yr at early epochs, consistently with observations, with a weak dependence on the initial over-density; intermediate mass haloes (Mh~_ 1010 − 1011M⊙ have star formation histories that strongly depend on their initial over-density; finally, low mass haloes (Mh ~_ 109M⊙ always have erratic, burst-like star forming histories. The present-day properties (morphology, structure, chemistry and photometry of the

  18. Obtaining of films of tungsten trioxide (WO3) by resistive heating of a tungsten filament

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Thin film of tungsten oxide (WO3) has been studied extensively as an electrochromic material and has numerous applications in electrochromic devices, smart windows, gas sensors and optical windows. In order to explore the possibility of using it in electrochromic devices, thorough study the optical properties of the WO3 is an important step. The WO3 layers have been grown by hot-filament metal oxide deposition technique under atmospheric pressure and an oxygen atmosphere. By FTIR and Raman sc...

  19. Dense Pure Tungsten Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianzheng Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing using tungsten, a brittle material, is difficult because of its high melting point, thermal conductivity, and oxidation tendency. In this study, pure tungsten parts with densities of up to 18.53 g/cm3 (i.e., 96.0% of the theoretical density were fabricated by selective laser melting. In order to minimize balling effects, the raw polyhedral tungsten powders underwent a spheroidization process before laser consolidation. Compared with polyhedral powders, the spherical powders showed increased laser absorptivity and packing density, which helped in the formation of a continuous molten track and promoted densification.

  20. The preparation, characterisation and catalytic activity of tungsten bronzes

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Sheena

    1987-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The structure and catalytic aspects of tungsten bronzes have been considered. A series of potassium tungsten bronzes, KxW03, 0.05 =< x =< 0.8, and the corresponding series of sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxW03, 0.05 =< x =< 0.8 were prepared by a thermal method. The thermal stability of the prepared samples was studied in the presence of both an oxidising and a reducing gas. The number and...

  1. Electrode potentials of tungsten in fused alkali chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. B.; Volkovich, V. A.; Poskryakov, D. A.; Vasin, B. D.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2016-09-01

    Anodic dissolution of tungsten was studied at 823-1173 K in the melts based on NaCl-CsCl, NaCl-KCl-CsCl and LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic mixtures. The process results in the formation of W(IV) ions. Prolonged contact with silica results in oxidation W(IV) ions and decreasing tungsten concentration in the electrolyte due to formation of volatile higher oxidation state chloro- and oxychloro-species. Tungsten electrode potentials were measured in NaCl-CsCl and NaCl-KCl-CsCl based melts using potentiometry.

  2. Preparation of nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode by swaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发展; 诸葛飞; 张晖; 丁秉钧

    2002-01-01

    By using the high energy ball milling method,the nanosized ThO2 powders were obtained.Through mixing powders,sintering and hot swaging processing,a nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode was fabricated.The relative density of the nanocomposite material is near 100%.The microstructure of nanocomposite cathode is quite different from that of conventional thoriated tungsten cathode.Most of thoria particles are less than 100 nm in diameter,and distribute on the boundaries of tungsten grains.The nanocomposite cathode shows a much lower arc starting field than that of conventional cathode,which will improve the performance of the cathode significantly.

  3. Tungsten Export Price Raised Due to Customs Tax Regulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Affected by the export tax rise, China’s tungsten export price rose by about 40 per cent in the first 10 months of 2006. The average price of Ammonium Paratungstate (APT) was US$23,000/MT, up by 43.5 per cent year-on-year, and that of ferro-tungsten, blue tungsten oxide as well as yellow oxide also increased by 32.4 per cent to US$24,000/MT, 27.4 per cent to US$25,000/MT and 42.6 per cent to US$26,000/MT respectively.

  4. Low-Temperature Strengths and Ductility of Various Tungsten Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Hiraoka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used three kinds of tungsten sheets in this study. First, we examined microstructure such as grain size distribution using an optical microscope. Secondly, we carried out three-point bend tests at temperatures between about 290 and 500 K. Then, we examined fracture surface of a failed specimen using a scanning electron microscope. Lastly, by analyzing all these results, we evaluated apparent intergranular and transgranular fracture strengths and discussed strengths and ductility of tungsten. Additionally, we compared mechanical properties of tungsten with those of molybdenum.

  5. Inspiration Was Just Floating in the Natural Air-Research in Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry of CAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sponsored by NSFC,CAS,and Ministry of Science and Technology,the Key Lab of Organic Solids in Institute of Chemistry of CAS developed tungsten oxide "light switch" membrane,which has wetting and discolorment abilities.

  6. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Lucas; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Viloria, Carolina; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL) of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography. PMID:26811553

  7. Symmetrical, bi-electrode supported solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Thomas L. (Inventor); Sofie, Stephen W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is a symmetrical bi-electrode supported solid oxide fuel cell comprising a sintered monolithic framework having graded pore electrode scaffolds that, upon treatment with metal solutions and heat subsequent to sintering, acquire respective anodic and cathodic catalytic activity. The invention is also a method for making such a solid oxide fuel cell. The graded pore structure of the graded pore electrode scaffolds in achieved by a novel freeze casting for YSZ tape.

  8. Tensile behavior of tungsten and tungsten-alloy wires from 1300 to 1600 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Man Yun

    1988-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a 200-micrometer-diameter tungsten lamp (218CS-W), tungsten + 1.0 atomic percent (a/o) thoria (ST300-W), and tungsten + 0.4 a/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) wires was determined over the temperature range 1300 t0 1600 K at strain rates of 3.3 X 10 to the -2 to 3.3 X 10 to the -5/sec. Although most tests were conducted on as-drawn materials, one series of tests was undertaken on ST300-W wires in four different conditions: as-drawn and vacuum-annealed at 1535 K for 1 hr, with and without electroplating. Whereas heat treatment had no effect on tensile properties, electropolishing significantly increased both the proportional limit and ductility, but not the ultimate tensile strength. Comparison of the behavior of the three alloys indicates that the HfC-dispersed material possesses superior tensile properties. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength/ductility advantage of WHfC is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  9. Density-functional studies of tungsten trioxide, tungsten bronzes, and related systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ingham, B; Chong, S V; Tallon, J L

    2005-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide adopts a variety of structures which can be intercalated with charged species to alter the electronic properties, thus forming `tungsten bronzes'. Similar optical effects are observed upon removing oxygen from WO_3, although the electronic properties are slightly different. Here we present a computational study of cubic and hexagonal alkali bronzes and examine the effects on cell size and band structure as the size of the intercalated ion is increased. With the exception of hydrogen (which is predicted to be unstable as an intercalate), the behaviour of the bronzes are relatively consistent. NaWO_3 is the most stable of the cubic systems, although in the hexagonal system the larger ions are more stable. The band structures are identical, with the intercalated atom donating its single electron to the tungsten 5d valence band. Next, this was extended to a study of fractional doping in the Na_xWO_3 system (0 < x < 1). A linear variation in cell parameter, and a systematic change in the po...

  10. Monolithic series-connected gallium arsenide converter development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzer, M.B.; McClelland, R.W.; Dingle, B.D.; Dingle, J.E.; Hill, D.S. (Kopin Corp., Taunton, MA (United States)); Rose, B.H. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    We report the development of monolithic GaAs photovoltaic devices intended to convert light generated by a laser or other bright source to electricity. The converters described here can provide higher operating voltage than is possible using a single-junction converter, owing to use of a monolithic circuit that forms a planar series-connected string of single-junction sub-cells. This planar monolithic circuit is arranged to deliver the desired voltage and current during operation at the maximum power point. The paper describes two-, six-, and twelve-junction converters intended for illumination by a laser diode with a wavelength of 0.8 {mu}m. Design and characterization data are presented for optical power in the range of 100 mW to 1 W. The best conversion efficiency exceeds 50%. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Design of Monolithic Integrator for Strain-to-Frequency Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Mohd. Khairi Tuan Mat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Strain-to-Frequency converter (SFC is a one of the analog conditioner tools that converts any strain signal to the frequency signal. The basic concept of SFC is by detecting any changing of strains, then converting the strain to the voltage signal and converting the voltage signal to the frequency signal. This tool consists of 3 main  components which are strain gauge, differential integrator and comparator. This paper presents the designing and analysis of monolithic integrator that to be used in the Strain-toFrequency converter. The primary goal is to design and simulate the performance of monolithic integrator for SFC using GATEWAY Silvaco Electronic Design Automation (S EDA tools and EXPERT software. The performances of SFC using the designed monolithic integrator are also investigated.

  12. A Possible Astronomically Aligned Monolith at Gardom's Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel; Alder, Andy; Bemand, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    A unique triangular shaped monolith located within the Peak District National Park at Gardom's Edge could be intentionally astronomically aligned. It is set within a landscape rich in late Neolithic and Bronze Age remains. We show that the stone is most likely in its original orientation owing to its clear signs of erosion and associated to the time period of the late Neolithic. It is tilted towards south and its north side slopes at an angle equal to the maximum altitude of the Sun at mid-summer. This alignment emphasizes the changing declinations of the Sun during the seasons as well as giving an indication of mid-summers day. This functionality is achieved by an impressive display of light and shadow on the north facing side of the monolith. Together with other monuments in the close vicinity the monolith would have represented an ideal marker or social arena for seasonal gatherings for the otherwise dispersed small communities.

  13. A Possible Astronomically Aligned Monolith at Gardom's Edge

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, D; Bemand, E

    2012-01-01

    A unique triangular shaped monolith located within the Peak District National Park at Gardom's Edge could be intentionally astronomically aligned. It is set within a landscape rich in late Neolithic and Bronze Age remains. We show that the stone is most likely in its original orientation owing to its clear signs of erosion and associated to the time period of the late Neolithic. It is tilted towards South and its North side slopes at an angle equal to the maximum altitude of the Sun at mid-summer. This alignment emphasizes the changing declinations of the Sun during the seasons as well as giving an indication of mid-summers day. This functionality is achieved by an impressive display of light and shadow on the North-facing side of the Monolith. Together with other monuments in the close vicinity the monolith would have represented an ideal marker or social arena for seasonal gatherings for the else dispersed small communities.

  14. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

    2009-11-01

    Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

  15. Monolithic electrically injected nanowire array edge-emitting laser on (001) silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Frost, Thomas

    2014-08-13

    A silicon-based laser, preferably electrically pumped, has long been a scientific and engineering goal. We demonstrate here, for the first time, an edge-emitting InGaN/GaN disk-in-nanowire array electrically pumped laser emitting in the green (λ = 533 nm) on (001) silicon substrate. The devices display excellent dc and dynamic characteristics with values of threshold current density, differential gain, T0 and small signal modulation bandwidth equal to 1.76 kA/cm2, 3 × 10-17 cm2, 232 K, and 5.8 GHz respectively under continuous wave operation. Preliminary reliability measurements indicate a lifetime of 7000 h. The emission wavelength can be tuned by varying the alloy composition in the quantum disks. The monolithic nanowire laser on (001)Si can therefore address wide-ranging applications such as solid state lighting, displays, plastic fiber communication, medical diagnostics, and silicon photonics. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  16. Preparation of poly(γ-glutamic acid)/hydroxyapatite monolith via biomineralization for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Bin; Hasegawa, Urara; van der Vlies, André J; Sung, Moon-Hee; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid monolith of poly(γ-glutamic acid) and hydroxyapatite (PGA/HAp monolith) was prepared via biomineralization and used as a macroporous cell scaffold in bone tissue engineering. The PGA monolith having a bimodal pore size distribution was used as a substrate to induce biomineralization. The PGA/HAp monolith was obtained by immersing the PGA monolith in simulated body fluid. Pretreatment with CaCl2 enhanced the apatite-forming ability of the PGA monolith. Murine osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells efficiently attached and proliferated on the PGA/HAp monolith. MTT assay showed that both the PGA and PGA/HAp monolith did not have apparent cytotoxicity. Moreover, the PGA and PGA/HAp monoliths adsorbed bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) by electrostatic interaction which was slowly released in the medium during cell culture. The PGA/HAp monolith enhanced BMP-2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity compared to the PGA monolith and a polystyrene culture plate. Thus, these PGA/HAp monoliths may have potential in bone tissue engineering.

  17. Laser irradiation of carbon-tungsten materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Marin, A.; Lungu, C. P.; Grigorescu, C. E. A.; Demitri, N.; Ursescu, D.; Porosnicu, C.; Osiceanu, P.; Kizane, G.; Grigoriu, C.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp2-sp3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses.

  18. Magneto photoluminescence measurements of tungsten disulphide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Jan; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Heimbrodt, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides have attracted great interest in the last few years. Thinned down to the monolayer limit they change from an indirect band structure to a direct band gap in the visible region. Due to the monolayer thickness the inversion symmetry of the crystal is broken and spin and valley are coupled to each other. The degeneracy between the two equivalent valleys, K and K‧, respectively, can be lifted by applying an external magnetic field. Here, we present photoluminescence measurements of CVD-grown tungsten disulphide (WS2) monolayers at temperatures of 2 K. By applying magnetic fields up to 7 T in Faraday geometry, a splitting of the photoluminescence peaks can be observed. The magnetic field dependence of the A-exciton, the trion and three bound exciton states is discussed and the corresponding g-factors are determined.

  19. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  20. Controlling the hydrogenolysis of silica-supported tungsten pentamethyl leads to a class of highly electron deficient partially alkylated metal hydrides

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Niladri

    2015-11-30

    The well-defined single-site silica-supported tungsten complex [([triple bond, length as m-dash]Si–O–)W(Me)5], 1, is an excellent precatalyst for alkane metathesis. The unique structure of 1 allows the synthesis of unprecedented tungsten hydrido methyl surface complexes via a controlled hydrogenolysis. Specifically, in the presence of molecular hydrogen, 1 is quickly transformed at −78 °C into a partially alkylated tungsten hydride, 4, as characterized by 1H solid-state NMR and IR spectroscopies. Species 4, upon warming to 150 °C, displays the highest catalytic activity for propane metathesis yet reported. DFT calculations using model systems support the formation of [([triple bond, length as m-dash]Si–O–)WH3(Me)2], as the predominant species at −78 °C following several elementary steps of hydrogen addition (by σ-bond metathesis or α-hydrogen transfer). Rearrangement of 4 occuring between −78 °C and room temperature leads to the formation of an unique methylidene tungsten hydride [([triple bond, length as m-dash]Si–O–)WH3([double bond, length as m-dash]CH2)], as determined by solid-state 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies and supported by DFT. Thus for the first time, a coordination sphere that incorporates both carbene and hydride functionalities has been observed.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Dynamics in a Monolithic Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As for the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC is used for PAH identification and densitometry. However, when a solvent containing a substance to be identified passes through a column of UPLC, a dedicated high-pressure-proof device is required. Recently, a liquid chromatography instrument using a monolithic column technology has been proposed to reduce the pressure of UPLC. The present study tested five types of monolithic columns produced in experiments. To simulate the flow field, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM was used. The velocity profile was discussed to decrease the pressure drop in the ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC system.

  2. A Monolithic Oxide-Based Transversal Thermoelectric Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, S.; Bochmann, A.; Reimann, T.; Schulz, T.; Dreßler, C.; Udich, S.; Töpfer, J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication and properties of a monolithic transversal thermoelectric energy harvester based on the combination of a thermoelectric oxide and a metal. The fabrication of the device is done with a ceramic multilayer technology using printing and co-firing processes. Five transversal devices were combined to a meander-like thermoelectric generator. Electrical measurements and finite element calculations were performed to characterize the resulting thermoelectric generator. A maximum experimental electrical power output of 30.2 mW at a temperature difference of {Δ }T = 208 K was found. The prepared monolithic thermoelectric generator provides at {Δ }T = 35 K sufficient energy to drive a simple electronic sensor application.

  3. Monolithic Michelson Interferometer as ultra stable wavelength reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian

    2010-07-01

    Ultra-stable Monolithic Michelson interferometer can be an ideal reference for highprecision applications such as RV measurement in planet searching and orbit study. The advantages include wide wavelength range, simple sinusoidal spectral format, and high optical efficiency. In this paper, we report that a monolithic Michelson interferometers has been in-house developed with minimized thermal sensitivity with compensation tuning. With a scanning white light interferometer, the thermal sensitivity is measured ~ 6x10-7/°C at 550 nm and it decreases to zero near 1000 nm. We expect the wideband wavelength reference source to be stabilized better than 0.3 m/s for RV experiments

  4. Synthesis of ZSM-5 Monoliths with Hierarchical Porosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Yangchuan; Zhao Tianbo; Li Fengyan; Zong Baoning; Wang Yue

    2006-01-01

    A new route to synthesize ZSM-5 monoliths with hierarchical pore structure has been referred to in this stud y. The successful incorporation of the macropores and mesopores within the ZSM-5 structure was achieved through transforming the skeleton of the macroporous silica gel into zeolite ZSM-5 using carbon materials as the transitional template. The ZSM-5 crystal covered part of the macroporous material, and provided micropores to the macroporous silica gel. The structure of carbon monolith was studied after dissolving the silica contained in the carbon/silica composite.

  5. Lectin-carbohydrate interactions on nanoporous gold monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yih Horng; Fujikawa, Kohki; Pornsuriyasak, Papapida; Alla, Allan J; Ganesh, N Vijaya; Demchenko, Alexei V; Stine, Keith J

    2013-07-01

    Monoliths of nanoporous gold (np-Au) were modified with self-assembled monolayers of octadecanethiol (C18-SH), 8-mercaptooctyl α-D-mannopyranoside (αMan-C8-SH), and 8-mercapto-3,6-dioxaoctanol (HO-PEG2-SH), and the loading was assessed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Modification with mixed SAMs containing αMan-C8-SH (at a 0.20 mole fraction in the SAM forming solution) with either octanethiol or HO-PEG2-SH was also investigated. The np-Au monoliths modified with αMan-C8-SH bind the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), and the additional mass due to bound protein was assessed using TGA analysis. A comparison of TGA traces measured before and after exposure of HO-PEG2-SH modified np-Au to Con A showed that the non-specific binding of Con A was minimal. In contrast, np-Au modified with octanethiol showed a significant mass loss due to non-specifically adsorbed Con A. A significant mass loss was also attributed to binding of Con A to bare np-Au monoliths. TGA revealed a mass loss due to the binding of Con A to np-Au monoliths modified with pure αMan-C8-SH. The use of mass losses determined by TGA to compare the binding of Con A to np-Au monoliths modified by mixed SAMs of αMan-C8-SH and either octanethiol or HO-PEG2-SH revealed that binding to mixed SAM modified surfaces is specific for the mixed SAMs with HO-PEG2-SH but shows a significant contribution from non-specific adsorption for the mixed SAMs with octanethiol. Minimal adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and peanut agglutinin (PNA) towards the mannoside modified np-Au monoliths was demonstrated. A greater mass loss was found for Con A bound onto the monolith than for either IgG or PNA, signifying that the mannose presenting SAMs in np-Au retain selectivity for Con A. TGA data also provide evidence that Con A bound to the αMan-C8-SH modified np-Au can be eluted by flowing a solution of methyl α-D-mannopyranoside through the structure. The presence of Con A proteins on the modified np-Au surface was

  6. Paladin Enterprises: Monolithic particle physics models global climate.

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Paladin Enterprises presents a monolithic particle model of the universe which will be used by them to build an economical fusion energy system. The model is an extension of the work done by James Clerk Maxwell. Essentially, gravity is unified with electro-magnetic forces and shown to be a product of a closed loop current system, i.e. a particle - monolithic or sub atomic. This discovery explains rapid global climate changes which are evident in the geological record and also provides an explanation for recent changes in the global climate.

  7. Xiamen Tungsten Co.,Ltd Verified the Largest Tungsten Mine Worldwide with a Potential Value Topping 300 Billion Yuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>On June 5,the Ministry of Land and Resources announced that,in Dahutang area of Wuning County,Jiujiang City.Jiangxi Province,a tungsten mine with a reserve of 1.06 million tonnes has been prospected;it is the largest tungsten mine in the world today.One of the investors of this prospecting activity is Xiamen Tungsten Co.,Ltd,a public listed company from Fujian Province.According to data of The Ministry of Land and Resources,

  8. Enhanced toughness and stable crack propagation in a novel tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite produced by chemical vapour infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten is a promising candidate for the plasma-facing components of a future fusion reactor, but its use is strongly restricted by its inherent brittleness. An innovative concept to overcome this problem is tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite. In this paper we present the first mechanical test of such a composite material using a sample containing multiple fibres. The in situ fracture experiment was performed in a scanning electron microscope for close observation of the propagating crack. Stable crack propagation accompanied with rising load bearing capacity is observed. The fracture toughness is estimated using the test results and the surface observation.

  9. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang, E-mail: bambang-ariwahjoedi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar (Malaysia); Ginta, Turnad Lenggo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tro (Malaysia); Parman, Setyamartana [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad [Kebabangan Petroleum Operating Company Sdn Bhd, Lvl. 52, Tower 2, PETRONAS Twin Towers, KLCC, 50088 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm{sup −3} respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm{sup −1}, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  10. Underwater explosive welding of thin tungsten foils and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, P., E-mail: manikandan_exp@yahoo.com [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Lee, J.O.; Mizumachi, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Mori, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Raghukandan, K. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Cuddalore District, Tamilnadu 608 002 (India); Hokamoto, K. [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Underwater explosive welding was used to clad tungsten and copper. > The preset inclination was varied and the microstructure was observed. > Microstructure reveals a clear wavy interface for higher preset inclination. > High pressure and high strain rate leads to plastic flow of tungsten. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the ability to clad pure tungsten foils on copper plate using underwater shock waves generated by the detonation of explosive. Microstructural characterization revealed that a higher preset inclination results in wavy morphology. Weld formed at lower inclination exhibit a planar interfacial layer comprising fine grained particles of both components. The plastic flow of tungsten is ascribed to the synergistic influence of high pressure and high strain rate at the collision point.

  11. Advances in Thermionic Cathode of Tungsten and Molybdenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several kinds of tungsten thermonic cathodes have been introduced. As a promising alternative for thoriated tungsten, rare earth doped molybdenum cathode has been studied. Compared with the traditional thoriated tungsten, La-Mo cathode has higher emission current density at lower temperature, but it has poor emission stability. In order to improve the emission stability, systematical study on the emission mechanism of La-Mo cathode has been carried out. The life of La-Mo cathode has been improved and has achieved 1400 h, which exceeds the minimum life for practical uses (1000 h). As another alternative for thoriated tungsten cathode, Y-Mo cathode has shown better performance. The thermionic emission capability of Y-Mo cathode is between that of La-Mo cathode and Th-W cathode.

  12. Preparation and catalytic properties of tungsten oxides with different morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Yunfei, E-mail: beiyf2003@yahoo.com.cn [Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, 18 Xue Yuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Li Dadong; Nie Hong [Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, 18 Xue Yuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China)

    2010-09-01

    Tungsten oxides with different morphologies including platelet-like sheets, nanobelts, and nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by changing the ions in the synthetic solution. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared analysis and N{sub 2} adsorption were employed to reveal the morphological evolution, and results show that the morphological evolution can be attributed to the alteration of coordination environment of tungstenic cations contained in the synthetic solution. Furthermore, these products have been applied into hydrodesulfurization measurement to investigate the relationship between the morphologies of tungsten oxides and their catalytic properties. It is concluded that the catalysts originating from nanobelt-like tungsten oxides have highest catalytic activity and excellent selectivity due to their scrolled character and strong metallic edges.

  13. Calibration and temperature profile of a tungsten filament lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Izarra, Charles [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Gitton, Jean-Michel, E-mail: Charles.De_Izarra@univ-orleans.f [College Littre, 10 rue Littre, Bourges (France)

    2010-07-15

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament lamp (lamp used in automotive lighting) and then tested on a standard tungsten ribbon lamp. The calibration procedure developed was checked by determining the calibration point of the tungsten ribbon lamp with an accuracy of 2%. In addition, for low current intensity, it was observed that the temperature of the filament was not uniform; an explanation is proposed by considering a simple heat transfer model.

  14. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  15. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  16. INDUCTION PLASMA REACTIVE DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTENCARBIDE FROM TUNGSTEN METAL POWDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.L. Jiang; M.I. Boulos

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results are reported on the primary carburization reaction between the tungsten powder and methane in the induction plasma, and the secondary carburization of the deposit on substrate at high temperature. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructures of starting tungsten powder, carburized powder, and deposit. X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and microhardness measurement were used to characterize the structures and properties of the powder and the deposit. It is found that the primary carburization reaction in the induction plasma starts from the surface of tungsten particles when the particles are melted. Tungsten particles are partially carburized inside the reactive plasma. Complete carburization is achieved through the secondary carburization reaction of the deposit on substrate at high temperature.``

  17. Polyurea-Based Aerogel Monoliths and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je Kyun

    2012-01-01

    aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection for government and commercial applications. The rubbery polyureabased aerogel exhibits little dustiness, good flexibility and toughness, and durability typical of the parent polyurea polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with aerogels. The thermal conductivity values of polyurea-based aerogels at lower temperature under vacuum pressures are very low and better than that of silica aerogels. Flexible, rubbery polyurea-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogels, including polyisocyanurate aerogels, which are generally prepared with the one similar component to polyurethane rubber aerogels. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structures, the polyurea rubber-based aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. The aerogel materials also demonstrate good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven to be one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible, silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain application environments. Although the cross - linked organic aerogels, such as resorcinol- formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels, show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient radiation shielding materials due

  18. Constitutive Theory Developed for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1998-01-01

    with these service conditions by developing a multiaxial viscoplastic constitutive model that accounts for time-dependent hereditary material deformation (such as creep and stress relaxation) in monolithic structural ceramics. Using continuum principles of engineering mechanics, we derived the complete viscoplastic theory from a scalar dissipative potential function.

  19. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.; de Jong, M.M.; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric pressures

  20. Underwater explosive welding of thin tungsten foils and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, P.; Lee, J. O.; Mizumachi, K.; Mori, A.; Raghukandan, K.; Hokamoto, K.

    2011-11-01

    This study demonstrates the ability to clad pure tungsten foils on copper plate using underwater shock waves generated by the detonation of explosive. Microstructural characterization revealed that a higher preset inclination results in wavy morphology. Weld formed at lower inclination exhibit a planar interfacial layer comprising fine grained particles of both components. The plastic flow of tungsten is ascribed to the synergistic influence of high pressure and high strain rate at the collision point.

  1. Hydrodynamic Analysis to Process of Hydrostatic Extrusion for Tungsten Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuchi WANG; Zhaohui ZHANG; Shukui LI

    2001-01-01

    The hydrodynamic analysis to the process of the hydrostatic extrusion for tungsten alloy is carried through the hydrodynamic lubrication theory and Reynolds equation in this paper. The critical velocity equation when the hydrodynamic lubrication conditions appear between the surfaces of the work- piece and the die is obtained, and the relationship between the critical velocity and the extrusion parameters is discussed, which build the theoretical bases to the application of the hydrostatic extrusion for tungsten alloy.

  2. China Limits the Mining Quantity of Tungsten and Rare Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Based on a notice issued by the Ministry of Land Resources, China’s tungsten mining quantity in 2006 will be controlled to 59,060 tons in concentrates form, which include 4,250 tons of recycled tungsten. And the rare earth mining quantity in 2006 will also be controlled to 86,620 tons (REO) including 8,320 tons of heavy rare earth and 78,200 tons of light rare earth.

  3. Chromatographic comparison of bupivacaine imprinted polymers prepared in crushed monolith, microsphere, silica-based composite and capillary monolith formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxelbark, Joakim; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Aureliano, Carla S A; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Schillinger, Eric; Sellergren, Börje; Courtois, Julien; Irgum, Knut; Dambies, Laurent; Cormack, Peter A G; Sherrington, David C; De Lorenzi, Ersilia

    2007-08-10

    A comprehensive comparison of five chromatographic stationary phases based on molecularly imprinted polymers is presented. Efficiency, imprinting factors, water compatibility and batch-to-batch reproducibility are discussed for crushed monolith, microspheres, two silica-based composites and capillary monoliths, all imprinted with the local anaesthetic bupivacaine. Synthesis protocol and chromatographic test conditions have been kept fixed within certain limits, in order to provide further insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the different formats. Excluding microparticles, all formats give satisfactory performance, especially in aqueous mobile phases. An assessment of batch-to-batch reproducibility in different mobile phases adds further value to this comparison study.

  4. Effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Klimenkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two grades of pure tungsten, single and polycrystalline, were irradiated for 282 days in the HFR reactor, Petten, at 900 °C to an average damage level of 1.6dpa. Each grade of tungsten was investigated using the transmission electron microscope (TEM to assess the effect of neutron irradiation on tungsten microstructure. Investigations revealed the formation of faceted cavities, whose diameter varies from 4 to 14nm in both materials. The cavities are homogeneously distributed only inside single crystalline tungsten. The local distribution of cavities in polycrystalline tungsten is strongly influenced by grain boundaries. The number densities of cavities were measured to be 4×1021 m−3 for polycrystalline and 2.5×1021 m−3 for single crystalline tungsten. This corresponds to volumetric densities of 0.45% and 0.33% respectively. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM revealed that faces of cavities are oriented in (110 plane. Analytical investigations showed precipitation of rhenium and osmium produced by a transmutation reaction around cavities and at grain boundaries.

  5. Degradation of tungsten under the action of a plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. V.; Sud'enkov, Yu. V.; Semenov, B. N.; Atroshenko, S. A.; Naumova, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of the surface and structure of single-crystal tungsten and sintered powder tungsten during the action of a pulsed plasma jet is studied. It is shown that the degradation of a tungsten target during the action of a plasma jet with an energy flux density of 0.25-1 MJ/m2 is accompanied by surface evaporation and melting and the fracture of surface layers on scales of 150-250 μm. The results of a numerical simulation of the thermomechanical processes that occur in a tungsten target during the action of a plasma jet are presented. The degradation of tungsten during the action of a plasma jet is shown to proceed almost continuously from the action (evaporation, melting) to the times that are more than three orders of magnitude longer than the action time, which is caused by the thermomechanical processes occurring in the tungsten target. Moreover, the action of thermal stresses leads to structural and morphological changes throughout the sample volume, and these changes are accompanied by recrystallization in adiabatic shear bands.

  6. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  7. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780°C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0×1025 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22°C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22°C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  8. Refining Tungsten Purification by Electron Beam Melting Based on the Thermal Equilibrium Calculation and Tungsten Loss Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Luping; Liu, Wensheng; Ma, Yunzhu; Liu, Ye; Liu, Shuhua

    2015-10-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) technology has been considered as one of the key steps for preparing high purity tungsten, and reasonable setting of process parameters is the premise. In this paper, the optimum process parameters obtained from thermal equilibrium calculation and evaporation loss control of tungsten are presented. Effective power is closely related to melting temperature, and the required power for maintaining the superheating melt linearly increases with the increase of melt superheat temperature. The evaporation loss behavior of tungsten is significantly influenced by melting rate and melting temperature. Analysis of experiments show that the best results are realized at melting rate of 1.82 g/s, melting temperature of 4200 K, and the corresponding melting power of 130 kW, in which the main impurity elements in tungsten, such as As, Cd, Mg and Sn, present high removal ratio of 90%, 95%, 85.7% and 90%, respectively.

  9. Faster oxygen atom transfer catalysis with a tungsten dioxo complex than with its molybdenum analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumuganathan, T; Mayilmurugan, Ramasamy; Volpe, Manuel; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2011-08-21

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of molybdenum ([MoO(2)Cl(L(n))]; L(1) (1), L(2) (3)) and tungsten ([WO(2)Cl(L(n))]; L(1) (2), L(2) (4)) dioxo complexes (L(1) = 1-methyl-4-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,4-diazepane and L(2) = 1-methyl-4-(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl)-1,4-diazepane) of tridentate aminomonophenolate ligands HL(1) and HL(2) are reported. The ligands were obtained by reductive amination of 1-methyl-1,4-diazepane with the corresponding aldehyde. Complexes 3 and 4 were obtained by the reaction of [MO(2)Cl(2)(dme)(n)] (M = Mo, n = 0; W, n = 1) with the corresponding ligand in presence of a base, whereas for the preparation of 1 and 2 the ligands were deprotonated by KH prior to the addition to the metal. They were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, by cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Solid-state structures of the molybdenum and tungsten cis-dioxo complexes reveal hexa-coordinate metal centers surrounded by two oxo groups, a chloride ligand and by the tridentate monophenolate ligand which coordinates meridionally through its [ONN] donor set. In the series of compounds 1-4, complexes 3 and 4 have been used as catalysts for the oxygen atom transfer reaction between dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl phosphine (PMe(3)). Surprisingly, faster oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactivity has been observed for the tungsten complex [WO(2)Cl(L(2))] (4) in comparison to its molybdenum analog [MoO(2)Cl(L(2))] (3) at room temperature. The kinetic results are discussed and compared in terms of their reactivity. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  10. The Influence of Impurities in Tungsten and Matrix Composition on the Tungsten-Matrix Interfacial Properties of Heavy Metal Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Impurities in Tungsten and Nov 79 - Nov 82 Matrix Composition on the Tungsten-Matrix Interfacial Properties of Heavy Metal Alloys 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...fundamental change both in structure of the heavy metal and in fracture behaviour: The samples which were merely pre-reduced or sintered for very short...features of a satisfactory heavy metal : mainly transgranular fracture, considerable binder deformation and only rather few and small sintering necks in

  11. Jiangxi Discovered a Large Tungsten Mine Which May Create the World’s Largest Tungsten Mineral Deposit Reserve Record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    It has been learned from the Jiangxi Province Geological and Mineral Resource Bureau Work Conference for 2015 held on January 21 that,the Zhuxi Tungsten and Copper Mine Project confirmed by the bureau at Fuliang County in Jingdezhen,Jiangxi in 2014 might create the world’s largest tungsten deposit reserve record.According to Peng Zezhou,Director of Jiangxi Province Geological and Mineral Resource

  12. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. A radiation hard bipolar monolithic front-end readout

    CERN Document Server

    Baschirotto, A; Cappelluti, I; Castello, R; Cermesoni, M; Gola, A; Pessina, G; Pistolesi, E; Rancoita, P G; Seidman, A

    1999-01-01

    A fast bipolar monolithic charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP), implemented in the monolithic 2 mu m BiCMOS technology (called HF2CMOS) was designed and built in a quad monolithic chip. Studies of radiation effects in the CSP $9 performance, from non-irradiated and up to neutron irradiation of 5.3*10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2/, have confirmed that the use of bipolar npn transistors is suitable for the radiation level of the future LHC collider environment. The CSP $9 presents a new circuit solution for obtaining adequate slew rate performances which results in an integral linearity better than 0.8554330n 5 V at 20 ns of shaping time, regardless of the bias current selected for the CSP. This way $9 the bias current of the CSP can be set for optimizing the power dissipation with respect to series and parallel noise, especially useful when the CSP is put in a radiation environment. A prototype test with a novel monolithic 20 ns $9 time constant RC-CR shaper, capable to sum up four inputs has been also realized, featurin...

  14. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia. PMID:27555895

  15. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Monolithic natural gas storage delivery system based on sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2016-09-27

    The invention provides methods for producing a strong, light, sorbent-based storage/dispenser system for gases and fuels. The system comprises a porous monolithic material with an adherent strong impervious skin that is capable of storing a gas under pressure in a safe and usable manner.

  17. Monolithic natural gas storage delivery system based on sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc; Krishnan, Gopala N.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2016-09-27

    The invention provides methods for producing a strong, light, sorbent-based storage/dispenser system for gases and fuels. The system comprises a porous monolithic material with an adherent strong impervious skin that is capable of storing a gas under pressure in a safe and usable manner.

  18. Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) Devices For Monolithic Integrated Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas H.

    1988-05-01

    Semiconductor MQWs represent a new technology for opto-electronics. These MQWs have an electroabsorption effect approximately 50 times larger than conventional semiconductors. They are compatible with existing source and detector material systems and produce devices that are compact and high speed, which makes them useful for monolithic integrated optoelectronic devices.

  19. Morphosynthesis of cubic silver cages on monolithic activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Hong; Lai, Yijian; Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Binyuan; Ning, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2013-11-14

    Cubic silver cages were prepared on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) pre-absorbed with Cl(-), SO4(2-), or PO4(3-) anions. Silver insoluble salts served as templates for the morphosynthesis of silver cages. The silver ions were reduced by reductive functional groups on MAC micropores through a galvanic cell reaction mechanism.

  20. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.

  1. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; /UCLA; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab; Heppelmann, Steven; /Penn State U.; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics

  2. DYNAMIC STRENGTH AND STRAIN RATE EFFECTS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF TUNGSTEN AND TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Zurek, A; G. Gray

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the stress-strain response as a function of strain rate, spall strength, and dynamic fracture behavior of pure W, W-26Re, W-Ni- Fe and W-Ni-Fe-Co has been performed. Spall strength measurements, obtained in symmetric-impact tests, showed an increase in spall strength from 0.4 GPa for pure tungsten to 3.8 GPa for 90W-7Ni-3Fe. Concurrent with the increase in spall strength was a change in fracture mode from cleavage (for pure W) to a mixture of transgranular and intergranula...

  3. SOMC-Designed Silica Supported Tungsten Oxo Imidazolin-2-iminato Methyl Precatalyst for Olefin Metathesis Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin S.

    2017-01-05

    Synthesis, structure, and olefin metathesis activity of a surface complex [(≡Si-O-)W(═O)(CH3)2-ImDippN] (4) (ImDipp = 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-iminato) supported on silica by a surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) approach are reported. The reaction of N-silylated 2-iminoimidazoline with tungsten(VI) oxytetrachloride generated the tungsten oxo imidazolin-2-iminato chloride complex [ImDippNW(═O)Cl3] (2). This was grafted on partially dehydroxylated silica pretreated at 700 °C (SiO2-700) to afford a well-defined monopodal surface complex [(≡Si-O-)W(═O)Cl2-ImDippN] (3). 3 underwent alkylation by ZnMe2 to produce [(≡Si-O-)W(═O)(CH3)2-ImDippN] (4). The alkylated surface complex was thoroughly characterized by solid-state NMR, elemental microanalysis, Raman, FT-IR spectroscopies, and XAS analysis. 4 proved to be an active precatalyst for self-metathesis of terminal olefins such as propylene and 1-hexene.

  4. Mineralogy and Trace Element Chemistry of Ferberite/Reinite from Tungsten Deposits in Central Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Muchez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten mineralization in hydrothermal quartz veins from the Nyakabingo,Gifurwe and Bugarama deposits in central Rwanda occurs as the iron-rich endmember ofthe wolframite solid solution series (ferberite and in the particular form of reinite, whichrepresents a pseudomorph of ferberite after scheelite. Primary ferberite, reinite and latesecondary ferberite are characterized by their trace element chemistry and rare earthelement patterns. The replacement of scheelite by ferberite is also documented in the traceelement composition. Primary ferberite shows high Mg, Zn, Sc, V, Nb, In and Snconcentrations, but very low Ca, Pb, Sr and Ba contents. Reinite and late secondaryferberite display an uncommon trace element composition containing high concentrationsof Ca, Pb, Sr, Ba, As and Ga, but very low levels in Sn, Zr, Hf, In, Ti, Sc, Nb, Ta, Mg andZn. Late secondary ferberite replacing primary ferberite is characterized by additionalenrichments in Bi, Pb, As and Sb. The rare earth element patterns of reinite and secondaryferberite are also similar to hydrothermal scheelite. The formation of the tungsten depositsin central Rwanda is interpreted to be epigenetic in origin, and the hydrothermalmineralizing fluids are related to the intrusion of the G4-granites.

  5. Process optimization for diffusion bonding of tungsten with EUROFER97 using a vanadium interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuki, Widodo Widjaja; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state diffusion bonding is a selected joining technology to bond divertor components consisting of tungsten and EUROFER97 for application in fusion power plants. Due to the large mismatch in their coefficient of thermal expansions, which leads to serious thermally induced residual stresses after bonding, a thin vanadium plate is introduced as an interlayer. However, the diffusion of carbon originated from EUROFER97 in the vanadium interlayer during the bonding process can form a vanadium carbide layer, which has detrimental influences on the mechanical properties of the joint. For optimal bonding results, the thickness of this layer and the residual stresses has to be decreased sufficiently without a significant reduction of material transport especially at the vanadium/tungsten interface, which can be achieved by varying the diffusion bonding temperature and duration. The investigation results show that at a sufficiently low bonding temperature of 700 °C and a bonding duration of 4 h, the joint reaches a reasonable high ductility and toughness especially at elevated test temperature of 550 °C with elongation to fracture of 20% and mean absorbed Charpy impact energy of 2 J (using miniaturized Charpy impact specimens). The strength of the bonded materials is about 332 MPa at RT and 291 MPa at 550 °C. Furthermore, a low bonding temperature of 700 °C can also help to avoid the grain coarsening and the alteration of the grain structure especially of the EUROFER97 close to the bond interface.

  6. The DAMPE silicon–tungsten tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarello, P., E-mail: philipp.azzarello@unige.ch [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Ambrosi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Asfandiyarov, R. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cadoux, F. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Caprai, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Domenjoz, M. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Dong, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Duranti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Fan, R. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV–10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon–tungsten tracker–converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m{sup 2}. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  7. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  8. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  9. Tungsten Oxides for Photocatalysis, Electrochemistry, and Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen-Feng; Song, Jiajia; Pan, Lun; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li; Zou, Ji-Jun

    2015-09-23

    The conversion, storage, and utilization of renewable energy have all become more important than ever before as a response to ever-growing energy and environment concerns. The performance of energy-related technologies strongly relies on the structure and property of the material used. The earth-abundant family of tungsten oxides (WOx ≤3 ) receives considerable attention in photocatalysis, electrochemistry, and phototherapy due to their highly tunable structures and unique physicochemical properties. Great breakthroughs have been made in enhancing the optical absorption, charge separation, redox capability, and electrical conductivity of WOx ≤3 through control of the composition, crystal structure, morphology, and construction of composite structures with other materials, which significantly promotes the efficiency of processes and devices based on this material. Herein, the properties and synthesis of WOx ≤3 family are reviewed, and then their energy-related applications are highlighted, including solar-light-driven water splitting, CO2 reduction, and pollutant removal, electrochromism, supercapacitors, lithium batteries, solar and fuel cells, non-volatile memory devices, gas sensors, and cancer therapy, from the aspect of function-oriented structure design and control.

  10. Growth of silicon on tungsten diselenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qirong; van Bremen, Rik; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Here, we report a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of the growth of silicon on a tungsten diselenide (WSe2) substrate. We have found convincing experimental evidence that silicon does not remain on the WSe2 substrate but rather intercalates between the top layers of WSe2. Upon silicon deposition, the flat WSe2 surface converts into a surface with a hill-and-valley structure. The lattice constant of the hill-and-valley structure is identical to the lattice constant of WSe2 and the transition from hills to valleys is very gradual, suggesting that the top layer is composed of pristine WSe2. In order to verify this conjecture, we have removed the height information from our scanning tunneling microscopy signal and obtained chemical contrast of the surface by recording dI/dz, rather than the conventional regulation voltage of the z-piezo. The spatially resolved dI/dz maps provide compelling evidence that the deposited silicon does indeed not reside on top of the WSe2 substrate.

  11. 3 MW solid rotating target design

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManamy, T.; Rennich, M.; Gallmeier, F.; Ferguson, P.; Janney, J.

    2010-03-01

    A rotating solid target design concept is being developed for potential use at the second SNS target station (STS). A long pulse beam (˜1 ms) at 1.3 GeV and 20 Hz is planned with power levels at or above 1 MW. Since the long pulse may give future opportunities for higher power, this study is looking at 3 MW to compare the performance of a solid rotating target to a mercury target. Unlike the case for stationary solid targets at such powers this study indicates that a rotating solid target, when used with large coupled hydrogen moderators, has neutronic performance equal to or better than that with a mercury target, and the solid target has a greatly increased lifetime. Design studies have investigated water cooled tungsten targets with tantalum cladding approximately 1.2 m in diameter, and 70 mm thick. Operating temperatures are low (plane, top and bottom surface cooling. In case of cooling system failure, the diameter gives enough surface area to remove the decay heat by radiation to the surrounding reflector assemblies while keeping the peak temperatures below approximately 700 °C. This temperature should mitigate potential loss of coolant accidents and subsequent steam, tungsten interaction which has a threshold of approximately 800 °C. Design layouts for the sealing systems and potential target station concepts have been developed.

  12. VARIATION OF RESOLVED PROPORTIONAL LIMIT WITH MOSAIC ANGLE FROM 77K TO 973K IN ZONE REFINED TUNGSTEN,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUNGSTEN, *FRACTOGRAPHY), (*CRYSTAL SUBSTRUCTURE, TUNGSTEN), ZONE MELTING, DISLOCATIONS, GRAIN BOUNDARIES, ELECTRON BEAM MELTING , STRAIN(MECHANICS), IMPURITIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYOGENICS, HIGH TEMPERATURE

  13. Tungsten Contact and Line Resistance Reduction with Advanced Pulsed Nucleation Layer and Low Resistivity Tungsten Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Anand; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jasmine; Humayun, Raashina; Wongsenakhum, Panya; Chang, Sean; Danek, Michal; Itou, Takamasa; Nakayama, Tomoo; Kariya, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Masazumi; Hizume, Shunichi

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes electrical testing results of new tungsten chemical vapor deposition (CVD-W) process concepts that were developed to address the W contact and bitline scaling issues on 55 nm node devices. Contact resistance (Rc) measurements in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices indicate that the new CVD-W process for sub-32 nm and beyond - consisting of an advanced pulsed nucleation layer (PNL) combined with low resistivity tungsten (LRW) initiation - produces a 20-30% drop in Rc for diffused NiSi contacts. From cross-sectional bright field and dark field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, such Rc improvement can be attributed to improved plugfill and larger in-feature W grain size with the advanced PNL+LRW process. More experiments that measured contact resistance for different feature sizes point to favorable Rc scaling with the advanced PNL+LRW process. Finally, 40% improvement in line resistance was observed with this process as tested on 55 nm embedded dynamic random access memory (DRAM) devices, confirming that the advanced PNL+LRW process can be an effective metallization solution for sub-32 nm devices.

  14. Monolithic glass block lasercom terminal: hardware proof of concept and test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert T.; Drake, Marvin D.; Jaeger, Jerold L.

    1995-04-01

    We summarize a compact lasercom terminal implementation based on a previously described system concept, and report on measurements made on a prototype optical system built on internal MITRE funds. This paper discusses the fabrication and test of an innovative hardware proof-of-concept for an advanced satellite lasercom terminal with a ten-fold size, weight, and production cost reduction over current practice. We have built and tested a proof-of-concept of the optics portion of a full duplex `monolithic glass block' (MGB) lasercom terminal. The complete MGB optical system is only 6' X 4' X 0.5' and weighs less than a pound. A complete terminal which includes a 3 - 4 inch telescope and gimbal could be implemented for as little as 15 - 30 pounds. The optical system test results are reported. Our approach uses emerging technologies and a highly integrated system design, based on representative system requirements for satellite crosslinks. Technology evaluation and system trades led to a novel optics design for a lasercom terminal, based on thin film coatings and half-inch glass cubes. The emerging photonic technologies employed include liquid crystals for solid state switching, automatic gain control, and microradian alignment; multi-layer dielectric films for optical bandpass filters, dichroic separation, and polarization control; semiconductor lasers with microlens optics; and an original design where all the optics are realized in planar thin films incorporated on small glass substrates, nominally one-half inch in size. These glass cubes are permanently bonded together to form a monolithic ensemble. Hence, we have coined this implementation the monolithic glass block (MGB) approach. Fused silica is used throughout for reasons of superb radiation resistance and thermal stability. The thin film filters, switches, and polarizers perform all the necessary functions in collimated light. This approach is feasible because the optical paths have been dramatically reduced to

  15. Chemically deposited tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten – The way to a mock-up for divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Riesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced materials is essential for sophisticated energy systems like a future fusion reactor. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W utilize extrinsic toughening mechanisms and therefore overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and its sensitivity to operational embrittlement. This material has been successfully produced and tested during the last years and the focus is now put on the technological realisation for the use in plasma facing components of fusion devices. In this contribution, we present a way to utilize Wf/W composites for divertor applications by a fabrication route based on the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of tungsten. Mock-ups based on the ITER typical design can be realized by the implementation of Wf/W tiles. A concept based on a layered deposition approach allows the production of such tiles in the required geometry. One fibre layer after the other is positioned and ingrown into the W-matrix until the final sample size is reached. Charpy impact tests on these samples showed an increased fracture energy mainly due to the ductile deformation of the tungsten fibres. The use of Wf/W could broaden the operation temperature window of tungsten significantly and mitigate problems of deep cracking occurring typically in cyclic high heat flux loading. Textile techniques are utilized to optimise the tungsten wire positioning and process speed of preform production. A new device dedicated to the chemical deposition of W enhances significantly, the available machine time for processing and optimisation. Modelling shows that good deposition results are achievable by the use of a convectional flow and a directed temperature profile in an infiltration process.

  16. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics studies of He Bubble Growth in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberuaga, Blas; Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how materials respond to extreme environments is critical for predicting and improving performance. In materials such as tungsten exposed to plasmas for nuclear fusion applications, novel nanoscale fuzzes, comprised of tendrils of tungsten, form as a consequence of the implantation of He into the near surface. However, the detailed mechanisms that link He bubble formation to the ultimate development of fuzz are unclear. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into the He implantation process, but are necessarily performed at implantation rates that are orders of magnitudes faster than experiment. Here, using accelerated molecular dynamics methods, we examine the role of He implantation rates on the physical evolution of He bubbles in tungsten. We find that, as the He rate is reduced, new types of events involving the response of the tungsten matrix to the pressure in the bubble become competitive and change the overall evolution of the bubble as well as the subsequent morphology of the tungsten surface. We have also examined how bubble growth differs at various microstructural features. These results highlight the importance of performing simulations at experimentally relevant conditions in order to correctly capture the contributions of the various significant kinetic processes and predict the overall response of the material.

  17. Ambient Pressure Synthesis of Nanostructured Tungsten Oxide Crystalline Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures of the obtained samples have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and Raman scattering, respectively. Different morphologies were observed for different substrate temperatures, but otherwise identical growth conditions. The experimental measurements reveal the evolutions of the crystalline states and bond structures following the substrate temperatures. Besides, different substrate materials also affected the tungsten oxide nanostructures. Bundles of wire-type tungsten oxide nanowires with a length of up to 5 mm were obtained on Al2O3 substrate. Furthermore, the sensitive properties of the super long nanowires to the gas and different temperature were investigated. The dependence of the sensitivity of tungsten oxide nanowires to the methane as a function of the time was obtained. The sensitive properties of the tungsten oxide nanowires have almost linear relationship with the temperature.

  18. Measurements and modelling of hydrogen dynamics in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Schmid, Klaus; Toussaint, Udo von; Jacob, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Although hydrogen retention in defect free tungsten is low it can be significantly altered by plasma wetting. Thus understanding the interaction and dynamics of hydrogen in tungsten becomes an important issue. Present understanding distinguishes between solute and trapped hydrogen inventory. The solute hydrogen is located in the tetrahedral interstitial sites of bbc tungsten and can diffuse rapidly due to the low activation energy of 0.2-0.4 eV. The trapped hydrogen inventory resides at defects like vacancies, grain boundaries or dislocations, with de-trapping energies between 0.8-2.0 eV and is therefore less mobile. Common ex-situ experiments only allow the investigation of hydrogen retained in traps, while the solute is out of experimental reach due to its fast out-gassing at ambient temperatures. In this study the dynamics of the solute hydrogen in tungsten is measured in-situ for the first time. Diffusion/trapping simulations reveal that for low temperature e.g. 200 K, the solute hydrogen dominates the total inventory and its out-gassing after implantation is slowed down to the timescale of hours. Therefore in-situ hydrogen implantation and nuclear reaction analysis of tungsten samples are conducted at temperatures down to 140 K investigating experimentally the dynamics of solute hydrogen.

  19. 75 FR 75694 - Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing... United States after importation of certain semiconductor integrated circuits using tungsten metallization... following six respondents ] remained in the investigation: Tower Semiconductor, Ltd. of Israel;...

  20. Mechanical-property evaluation of a series of commercial tungsten alloys. Memorandum report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchey, W.J.; Montiel, D.M.

    1987-06-01

    A series of commercially available tungsten alloys ranging in tungsten content from 75% to 95% were evaluated. Typical tensile and compressive engineering properties are reported. These tests were conducted in support of penetrator ballistic-test programs.

  1. Largest domestic tungsten and molybdenum deep processing project finding its home in Luan-chuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Recently, a tungsten and molybdenum deep processing project was formally executed with a joint investment of 300 million yuan from Luanchuan Molybdenum Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd, Beijing Tian-Long Tungsten & Mo-

  2. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba6-xSrxNb10O30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodiazhnyi, T.; Sakurai, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Borodianska, H.; Mozharivskyj, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Ba6-xSrxNb10O30 solid solution with 0 ≤ x ≤ 6 crystallizes in centrosymmetric tetragonal "tungsten bronze" structure (space group P4/mbm). We report on the x dependence of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline samples measured in the 2-400 K temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x ≥ 3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature (T ≈ 10-30 K) "plateau" region reminiscent of a glass-like compounds. We explain this behaviour based on a size-driven site occupancy and atomic displacement parameters associated with an alkaline earth atomic positions in the title compounds.

  3. Effect of tungsten dissolution on the mechanical properties of Ti-W composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Heeman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Abkowitz, Susan M. [Dynamet Technology Inc., Eight A Street, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States); Abkowitz, Stanley [Dynamet Technology Inc., Eight A Street, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States); Dunand, David C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)]. E-mail: dunand@northwestern.edu

    2005-03-22

    Blends of 90 wt.% Ti and 10 wt.% W powders were consolidated by powder metallurgy, using an initial W powder size that was very fine (0.7 and 2 {mu}m) or very coarse (<250 {mu}m). Dissolution of W powders in the Ti matrix during consolidation was almost complete for the former blends (thus forming Ti-10W 'alloys') but very limited for the latter blend (thus forming a Ti-10W 'composite'). The Ti-10W alloys exhibit much higher yield and tensile strengths than the Ti-10W composite, indicating that tungsten strengthens titanium more efficiently as a solute atom (solid-solution strengthening) than as a second phase (composite strengthening by load transfer). The Ti-10W alloys also exhibit much higher ductility than the Ti-10W composite, whose brittle W particles exhibit fracture or pull-out from the matrix.

  4. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Brendakov Roman; Shvab Alexander; Brendakov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create ...

  5. Recovery of tungsten from wolframite from the Igarape Manteiga mine (Rondonia - Brazil) via acidic leaching; Isolamento do tungstenio da volframita da mina de Igarape Manteiga (Rondonia - Brasil) por lixiviacao acida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulino, Jessica Frontino; Afonso, Julio Carlos [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mantovano, Jose Luiz; Vianna, Claudio Augusto; Cunha, Jose Waldemar Silva Dias da [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    We report results of the efficiency of tungsten extraction from wolframite concentrate (containing 61.5 wt % WO{sub 3}) from the Igarape Manteiga mine (state of Rondonia, Brazil) through acid leaching with strong mineral acids at 100 deg C and 400 rpm for 2-4 h. HCl yielded insoluble matter containing the highest WO{sub 3} content (90 wt %). This solid was dissolved in concentrated NH{sub 3(aq)} at 25 deg C and the insoluble matter filtrated. The filtrate was slowly evaporated. 70 wt % of the tungsten present in the starting concentrate material was recovered as ammonium paratungstate (APT). (author)

  6. Parallel BDD-based monolithic approach for acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Satsuki; Kawai, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    2012-12-01

    Parallel BDD-based monolithic algorithms for acoustic fluid-structure interaction problems are developed. In a previous study, two schemes, NN-I + CGC-FULL and NN-I + CGC-DIAG, have been proven to be efficient among several BDD-type schemes for one processor. Thus, the parallelization of these schemes is discussed in the present study. These BDD-type schemes consist of the operations of the Schur complement matrix-vector (Sv) product, Neumann-Neumann (NN) preconditioning, and the coarse problem. In the present study, the Sv product and NN preconditioning are parallelized for both schemes, and the parallel implementation of the solid and fluid parts of the coarse problem is considered for NN-I + CGC-DIAG. The results of numerical experiments indicate that both schemes exhibit performances that are almost as good as those of single solid and fluid analyses in the Sv product and NN preconditioning. Moreover, NN-I + CGC-DIAG appears to become more efficient as the problem size becomes large due to the parallel calculation of the coarse problem.

  7. Properties of drawn W wire used as high performance fibre in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Fuhr, M.; Gietl, H.; Han, Y.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Travitzky, N.; Zhao, P.; Neu, R.

    2016-07-01

    High strength and creep resistance also at high temperature, combined with a high thermal conductivity and high melting point make tungsten (W) an ideal material for highly loaded areas in future fusion reactors. However, as a typical bcc metal tungsten features an intrinsic brittleness up to very high temperature and is prone to operational embrittlement. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite (Wf/W) utilizes extrinsic toughening mechanisms similar to ceramic fibre-reinforced ceramics and therefore overcomes the brittleness problem. The properties of the composite are to a large extend determined by the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as reinforcement fibres. W wire exhibits a superior strength and shows ductile behaviour with exceptional local plasticity. Beside the typical mechanisms observed for ceramic composites the ductile deformation of the fibres is therefore an additional very effective toughening mechanism. Tension tests were used to investigate this phenomenon in more detail. Results show that there is a region of enhanced localized plastic deformation. The specific energy consumption in this region was estimated and used to suggest optimisation options for Wf/W composites.

  8. Piezoresistive Sensors Development Using Monolithic CMOS MEMS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chaehoi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a monolithic CMOS-MEMS platform under the iDesign and SemeMEMS projects with the aim of jointly providing an open access “one-stop-shop” design and prototyping facility for integrated CMOS-MEMS. This work addresses the implementation of a 3-axis accelerometer and a pressure sensor using Semefab’s in-house 2-poly 1-metal CMOS process on a 380/4/15 μm SOI wafer; the membrane and the proof mass being micromachined using double-sided Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE. This monolithic approach promises, in high volume production and using low complexity processes, a dramatic cost reduction over hybrid sensors. Furthermore, the embedded signal conditioning and the low-noise level in polysilicon gauges enables high performance to be achieved by implementing dedicated on-chip amplification and filtering circuitry.

  9. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-08

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  10. Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

  11. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  12. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-05

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  13. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-08

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  14. Low-bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    2016-03-22

    Low bandgap, monolithic, multi-bandgap, optoelectronic devices (10), including PV converters, photodetectors, and LED's, have lattice-matched (LM), double-heterostructure (DH), low-bandgap GaInAs(P) subcells (22, 24) including those that are lattice-mismatched (LMM) to InP, grown on an InP substrate (26) by use of at least one graded lattice constant transition layer (20) of InAsP positioned somewhere between the InP substrate (26) and the LMM subcell(s) (22, 24). These devices are monofacial (10) or bifacial (80) and include monolithic, integrated, modules (MIMs) (190) with a plurality of voltage-matched subcell circuits (262, 264, 266, 270, 272) as well as other variations and embodiments.

  15. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-01

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10-6/° C near 550nm, which corresponds to ˜800m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations.

  16. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations.

  17. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture.

  18. Synthesis of Tungsten Diselenide Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Condensation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Tolochko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline tungsten diselenide (WSe2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a gas phase reaction using tungsten hexacarbonyl and elemental selenium as precursors. The WSe2 nanoparticle morphology varies from the spherical shape to flake-like layered structures. Mean size in smaller dimension are less than 5 nm and the number of layers decreased linearly with decreasing of reaction time and concentration of carbonyl in the gas phase. The mean value of interlayer distance in <0001> direction is comparable with the microscopic values. The selenium-to-tungsten atomic ratios of 2.07, 2.19 and 2.19 were determined respectively, approach to the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1. Main impurities are oxygen and carbon and strongly interrelated with carbonyl concentration in the gas phase.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7356

  19. 3D-microscopy of hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeper, K., E-mail: katrin.peeper@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Moser, M.; Reichart, P. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Markina, E.; Mayer, M.; Lindig, S.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The mapping of hydrogen distributions in 3 dimensions and its correlation with structural features allow further insight into mechanisms of hydrogen trapping in tungsten. We studied hydrogen distributions in 25 μm thick polycrystalline tungsten foils by 3D hydrogen microscopy using a proton–proton-scattering method. Two types of tungsten samples were prepared: (i) at 1200 K annealed foils and using 1.8 MeV implantation energy (ii) at 2000 K annealed foils using 200 eV implantation energy. It has been found that large variations of surface hydrogen contamination occur within different samples. Nevertheless, a statistically significant variation of the hydrogen content across grain boundaries has been observed.

  20. Field-emission spectroscopy of beryllium atoms adsorbed on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, J.J.; Grzesiak, W.; Krajniak, J. (Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Field emission energy distributions (FEED) have been measured for the beryllium-tungsten (023) adsorption system over the 78-450 K temperature range. A temperature dependence of the normalized half-width, ..delta../d, of FEED peaks changed significantly due to beryllium adsorption; and the curve, ..delta../d vs p, for the Be/W adsorption system was identical in character to the calculated curve based on the free electron model in contrast to the curve for the clean tungsten surface. In the last part of this paper Gadzuk's theory of the resonance-tunneling effect is applied to the beryllium atom on tungsten. Experimental and theoretical curves of the enhancement factor as a function of energy have been discussed.