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Sample records for monolithic ceramic materials

  1. Constitutive Theory Developed for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1998-01-01

    with these service conditions by developing a multiaxial viscoplastic constitutive model that accounts for time-dependent hereditary material deformation (such as creep and stress relaxation) in monolithic structural ceramics. Using continuum principles of engineering mechanics, we derived the complete viscoplastic theory from a scalar dissipative potential function.

  2. Viscoplastic Constitutive Theory Demonstrated for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1999-01-01

    Development of accurate three-dimensional (multiaxial) inelastic stress-strain models is critical in utilizing advanced ceramics for challenging 21st century high-temperature structural applications. The current state of the art uses elastic stress fields as a basis for both subcritical crack growth and creep life prediction efforts aimed at predicting the time dependent reliability response of ceramic components subjected to elevated service temperatures. However, to successfully design components that will meet tomorrow's challenging requirements, design engineers must recognize that elastic predictions are inaccurate for these materials when subjected to high-temperature service conditions such as those encountered in advanced heat engine components. Analytical life prediction methodologies developed for advanced ceramics and other brittle materials must employ accurate constitutive models that capture the inelastic response exhibited by these materials at elevated service temperatures. A constitutive model recently developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center helps address this issue by accounting for the time-dependent (inelastic) material deformation phenomena (e.g., creep, rate sensitivity, and stress relaxation) exhibited by monolithic ceramics exposed to high-temperature service conditions. In addition, the proposed formulation is based on a threshold function that is sensitive to hydrostatic stress and allows different behavior in tension and compression, reflecting experimental observations obtained for these material systems.

  3. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  4. Monolithic Integrated Ceramic Waveguide Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, IC; Sandhu, MY

    2014-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled TEM filters with the same unloaded Q-Factor. Designs for both chebyshev and asymmetric generalized chebyshev filter are presented, with experimental results for an 1800 MHz chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  5. Experimental and in silico investigations of organic phosphates and phosphonates sorption on polymer-ceramic monolithic materials and hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyńska, Monika; Zembrzuska, Joanna; Tomczak, Rafał; Mikołajczyk, Jakub; Rusińska-Roszak, Danuta; Voelkel, Adam; Buchwald, Tomasz; Jampílek, Josef; Lukáč, Miloš; Devínsky, Ferdinand

    2016-10-10

    A method based on experimental and in silico evaluations for investigating interactions of organic phosphates and phosphonates with hydroxyapatite was developed. This quick and easy method is used for determination of differences among organophosphorus compounds of various structures in their mineral binding affinities. Empirical sorption evaluation was carried out using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry or UV-VIS spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm sorption of organic phosphates and phosphonates on hydroxyapatite. Polymer-ceramic monolithic material and bulk hydroxyapatite were applied as sorbent materials. Furthermore, a Polymer-ceramic Monolithic In-Needle Extraction device was used to investigate both sorption and desorption steps. Binding energies were computed from the fully optimised structures utilising Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Potential pharmacologic and toxic effects of the tested compounds were estimated by the Prediction of the Activity Spectra of Substances using GeneXplain software. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Reactive and Non-Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering Routes for the Fabrication of Monolithic and Composite Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Orrù

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A wider utilization of ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC materials strongly depends on the availability of efficient techniques for their fabrication as dense bodies. Based on recent results reported in the literature, it is possible to state that Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS technology offers a useful contribution in this direction. Along these lines, the use of two different SPS-based processing routes for the preparation of massive UHTCs is examined in this work. One method, the so-called reactive SPS (R-SPS, consists of the synthesis and densification of the material in a single step. Alternatively, the ceramic powders are first synthesized by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS and then sintered by SPS. The obtained results evidenced that R-SPS method is preferable for the preparation of dense monolithic products, while the sintering of SHS powders requires relatively milder conditions when considering binary composites. The different kinetic mechanisms involved during R-SPS of the monolithic and composite systems, i.e., combustion-like or gradual solid-diffusion, respectively, provides a possible explanation. An important role is also played by the SHS process, particularly for the preparation of composite powders, since stronger interfaces are established between the ceramic constituents formed in situ, thus favoring diffusion processes during the subsequent SPS step.

  7. Optical properties of pre-colored dental monolithic zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2016-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the optical properties of recently marketed pre-colored monolithic zirconia ceramics and to compare with those of veneered zirconia and lithium disilicate glass ceramics. Various shades of pre-colored monolithic zirconia, veneered zirconia, and lithium disilicate glass ceramic specimens were tested (17.0×17.0×1.5mm, n=5). CIELab color coordinates were obtained against white, black, and grey backgrounds with a spectrophotometer. Color differences of the specimen pairs were calculated by using the CIEDE2000 (ΔE 00 ) formula. The translucency parameter (TP) was derived from ΔE 00 of the specimen against a white and a black background. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the crystalline phases of monolithic zirconia specimens. Data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, Scheffé post hoc, and Pearson correlation testing (α=0.05). For different shades of the same ceramic brand, there were significant differences in L * , a * , b * , and TP values in most ceramic brands. With the same nominal shade (A2), statistically significant differences were observed in L * , a * , b * , and TP values among different ceramic brands and systems (Pceramics of the corresponding nominal shades ranged beyond the acceptability threshold. Due to the high L * values and low a * and b * values, pre-colored monolithic zirconia ceramics can be used with additional staining to match neighboring restorations or natural teeth. Due to their high value and low chroma, unacceptable color mismatch with adjacent ceramic restorations might be expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  9. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  10. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  11. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  12. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  13. Evaluation of Monolithic Ceramics and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings for Diesel Engine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swab, Jeffrey J

    2001-01-01

    The Metals and Ceramics Research Branch (MCRB) of the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate is providing ceramic material characterization and evaluation to the Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC...

  14. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  15. New ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  16. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  18. Evaluation of unencapsulated ceramic monolithic and MOS thin-film capacitors (25 to 3000C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nance, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Several commercial monolithic ceramic and thin-film MOS chip capacitors were evaluated for use in high temperature (300 0 C) geothermal instrumentation. Characteristics of the commonly used dielectric materials (NPO, X7R, BX) and temperature dependence of the insulation resistance are briefly discussed. Some ceramic capacitors with NPO dielectric materials had insulation resistances above 10 megohms at 300 0 C and less than 2% change in capacitance from 25 0 C to 300 0 C, while the X7R and BX dielectric materials exhibited insulation resistances below 10 megohm and changes in capacitance greater then 50%. The thin-film capacitors showed good stability at 300 0 C. However, during aging, bonds and bond pads presented a problem causing intermittently open circuits for some of the devices

  19. Wear of human enamel opposing monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, and composite resin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripetchdanond, Jeerapa; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2014-11-01

    Demand is increasing for ceramic and composite resin posterior restorations. However, ceramics are recognized for their high abrasiveness to opposing dental structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear of enamel as opposed to dental ceramics and composite resin. Twenty-four test specimens (antagonists), 6 each of monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, composite resin, and enamel, were prepared into cylindrical rods. Enamel specimens were prepared from 24 extracted human permanent molar teeth. Enamel specimens were abraded against each type of antagonist with a pin-on-disk wear tester under a constant load of 25 N at 20 rpm for 4800 cycles. The maximum depth of wear (Dmax), mean depth of wear (Da), and mean surface roughness (Ra) of the enamel specimens were measured with a profilometer. All data were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). A paired t test was used to compare the Ra of enamel at baseline and after testing. The wear of both the enamel and antagonists was evaluated qualitatively with scanning electron microscopic images. No significant differences were found in enamel wear depth (Dmax, Da) between monolithic zirconia (2.17 ±0.80, 1.83 ±0.75 μm) and composite resin (1.70 ±0.92, 1.37 ±0.81 μm) or between glass ceramic (8.54 ±2.31, 7.32 ±2.06 μm) and enamel (10.72 ±6.31, 8.81 ±5.16 μm). Significant differences were found when the enamel wear depth caused by monolithic zirconia and composite resin was compared with that of glass ceramic and enamel (Pglass ceramic, and enamel (Pglass ceramic and enamel. All test materials except composite resin similarly increased the enamel surface roughness after wear testing. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  1. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  2. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  3. A comparative study of progressive wear of four dental monolithic, veneered glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Xuesong; Guo, Jiawen; Li, Ding; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the wear performance and wear mechanisms of four dental glass-ceramics, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the progressive wear process. Bar (N = 40, n = 10) and disk (N = 32, n = 8) specimens were prepared from (A) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LD), (B) leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LEU), (C) feldspathic glass-ceramic (FEL), and (D) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (FLU). The bar specimens were tested for three-point flexural strength, hardness, fracture toughness and elastic modulus. The disk specimens paired with steatite antagonists were tested in a pin-on-disk tribometer with 10N up to 1000,000 wear cycles. The wear analysis of glass-ceramics was performed using a 3D profilometer after every 200,000 wear cycles. Wear loss of steatite antagonists was calculated by measuring the weight and density using sensitive balance and Archimedes' method. Wear morphologies and microstructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phase compositions were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data. Multiple pair-wise comparison of means was performed by Tukey's post-hoc test. LD showed the highest fracture toughness, flexural strength, elastic modulus and crystallinity, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU showed the lowest. However, the hardness of LD was lower than all the other three types of ceramics. For steatite antagonists, LD produced the least wear loss of antagonist, followed by LEU and FEL, and FLU had the most wear loss. For glass-ceramic materials, LD exhibited similar wear loss as LEU, but more than FLU and FEL did. Moreover, fracture occurred on the wear surface of FLU. In the progressive wear process, veneering porcelains showed better wear resistance but fluorapatite veneering porcelains appeared fracture surface. Monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramics with higher mechanical properties showed more wear loss, however

  4. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas Hian da; Lima, Erick de; Miranda, Ranulfo Benedito de Paula; Favero, Stéphanie Soares; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-08-28

    The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I) monolithic zirconia restorations; II) multilayered dental prostheses; III) new glass-ceramics; IV) polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V) novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  5. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Hian da SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I monolithic zirconia restorations; II multilayered dental prostheses; III new glass-ceramics; IV polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  6. Dissolution of Ceramic Monolith of Spent Catalytic Converters by Using Hydrometallurgical Methods / Rozpuszczanie Monolitu Ceramicznego Zużytych Katalizatorów Na Drodze Hydrometalurgicznej

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willner J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic converters contain the catalytic substance in their structure, which is a mixture of Platinum Group Metals (PGMs: platinum, palladium and rhodium. The prices of these metals and a growing demand for them in the market, make it necessary to recycle spent catalytic converters and recovery of PGMs. The ceramic monolith of catalytic converters is still a predominant material in its construction among of multitude of catalytic converters which are in circulation. In this work attempts were made to leach additional metals (excluding Pt from comminuted ceramic monolith. Classic leachant oxidizing media 10M H2SO4, HCl and H3PO4 were used considering the possibility of dissolution of the ceramic monolith.

  7. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  8. Translucency and Strength of High Translucency Monolithic Zirconium Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Zirconium -Oxide Materials presented at/published to the Journal of General Dentistry with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local file #16208. 2...Zirconia-Oxide Materials 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...OBSOLETE 48. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials

  9. Effects of surface treatments on the translucency, opalescence, and surface texture of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Ha, Seung-Ryong

    2016-06-01

    Surface polishing or glazing may increase the appearance of depth of monolithic zirconia restorations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of surface treatments on the translucency, opalescence, and surface texture of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics. Forty-five monolithic zirconia specimens (16.3×16.4×2.0 mm) were divided into groups I to V, according to the number of colorings each received. Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups (n=3) according to the surface treatment: N=no treatment; P=polished; and G=glazed. CIElab color coordinates were obtained relative to D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer. The translucency parameter (TP) and opalescence parameter (OP) were calculated. One specimen per subgroups I and V was selected for evaluation of surface roughness (Ra) and was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and pairwise comparisons (α=.05). Statistical powers were verified to evaluate results (α=.05). The interaction effects of surface treatments combined with the number of colorings were significant for TP, OP, and Ra (P.05), whereas glazing significantly decreased OP and Ra in most groups. SEM images demonstrated that surface treatments affected the surface texture of monolithic zirconia ceramics. Surface treatments combined with coloring strongly affect the surface texture of dental monolithic zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavior of micro-particles in monolith ceramic membrane filtration with pre-coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, H; Tomita, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2004-01-01

    This paper is intended to clarify the characteristics unique to monolith ceramic membranes with pre-coagulation by referring to the behavior of micro-particles. Flow analysis and experiments have proved that monolith ceramic membranes show a unique flow pattern in the channels within the element, causing extremely rapid flocculation in the channel during dead-end filtration. It was assumed that charge-neutralized micro-particles concentrated near the membrane surface grow in size due to flocculation, and as a result, coarse micro-particles were taken up by the shearing force to flow out. As the dead end points of flow in all the channels are located near the end of the channels with higher filterability, most of the flocculated coarse particles are formed to a columnar cake intensively at the dead end point. Therefore cake layer forming on the membrane other than around the dead end point is alleviated. This behavior of particle flocculation and cake formation at the dead end point within the channels are unique characteristics of monolith ceramic membranes. This is why all monolith ceramic membrane water purification systems operating in Japan do not have pretreatment equipment for flocculation and sedimentation.

  11. Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium-Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    Capt Todd D. Church APPROVED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials C~t) Kraig/[ Vandewalle Date...copyrighted material in the thesis/dissertation manuscript entitled: "Translucency arid Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials manufacturers have developed more translucent monolithic zirconium oxide

  12. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Fatih; Secilmis, Asli; Simsek, Irfan; Ozsevik, Semih

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (Pcomposite material and monolithic zirconia.

  13. High-temperature nanoporous ceramic monolith prepared from a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brad H; Lodge, Timothy P

    2009-02-11

    Nanoporous ceramic with a unique pore structure was derived from an all-hydrocarbon polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BmuE). The BmuE was designed to allow facile removal of one phase, resulting in a nanoporous polymer monolith with BmuE-like structure. The pores were filled with a commercially available, polymeric precursor to nonoxide, Si-based ceramics. Pyrolysis resulted in a monolith of nanoporous ceramic, stable to at least 1000 degrees C, with a BmuE-like pore structure. The pore structure is disordered and 3-D continuous. Microscopy and gas sorption measurements suggest a well-defined pore size distribution spanning roughly 60-100 nm, sizes previously unattainable through related techniques.

  14. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation of irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  15. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation after irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  16. Acquisition of a Scanning Ultrasound Analyzer for Gelation and Drying Studies in Sol-Gel Ceramic Coatings and Monoliths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archer, Lynden

    1997-01-01

    The overall goal of this research project was to develop a fundamental understanding of how colloid chemistry influences structure and properties of ceramic monoliths fabricated by sol-gel synthesis...

  17. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  18. Nano-Doped Monolithic Materials for Molecular Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Acquah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoliths are continuous adsorbents that can easily be synthesised to possess tuneable meso-/macropores, convective fluid transport, and a plethora of chemistries for ligand immobilisation. They are grouped into three main classes: organic, inorganic, and hybrid, based on their chemical composition. These classes may also be differentiated by their unique morphological and physicochemical properties which are significantly relevant to their specific separation applications. The potential applications of monoliths for molecular separation have created the need to enhance their characteristic properties including mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and chemical and thermal stability. An effective approach towards monolith enhancement has been the doping and/or hybridization with miniaturized molecular species of desirable functionalities and characteristics. Nanoparticles are usually preferred as dopants due to their high solid phase dispersion features which are associated with improved intermolecular adsorptive interactions. Examples of such nanomaterials include, but are not limited to, carbon-based, silica-based, gold-based, and alumina nanoparticles. The incorporation of these nanoparticles into monoliths via in situ polymerisation and/or post-modification enhances surface adsorption for activation and ligand immobilisation. Herein, insights into the performance enhancement of monoliths as chromatographic supports by nanoparticles doping are presented. In addition, the potential and characteristics of less common nanoparticle materials such as hydroxyapatite, ceria, hafnia, and germania are discussed. The advantages and challenges of nanoparticle doping of monoliths are also discussed.

  19. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  20. Transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G C [OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    Transparent ceramic materials with optical qualities comparable to single crystals of similar compositions have been developed in recent years, as a result of the improved understanding of powder-processing-fabrication- sintering-property inter-relationships. These high-temperature materials with a range of thermal and mechanical properties are candidate envelopes for focused-beam, short-arc lamps containing various fills operating at temperatures higher than quartz. This paper reviews the composition, structure and properties of transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials including sapphire, small-grained polycrystalline alumina, aluminium oxynitride, yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria-lanthana. A satisfactory thermal shock resistance is required for the ceramic tube to withstand the rapid heating and cooling cycles encountered in lamps. Thermophysical properties, along with the geometry, size and thickness of a transparent ceramic tube, are important parameters in the assessment of its resistance to fracture arising from thermal stresses in lamps during service. The corrosive nature of lamp-fill liquid and vapour at high temperatures requires that all lamp components be carefully chosen to meet the target life. The wide range of new transparent ceramics represents flexibility in pushing the limit of envelope materials for improved beamer lamps.

  1. Immobilization of transuranic sludge in glass-ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Schuman, R.P.; Flinn, J.E.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effectiveness of glass-ceramic waste forms, particularly iron-enriched basalt, for immobilizing transuranic waste sludges from the Rocky Flats plant operations. Two sludges were used in the study - one was nonradioactive and the other contained approx. 2200 dps/mg of 241 Am. The glass-ceramic waste forms were produced from laboratory-scale melting operations with subsequent controlled cooling. The waste forms were examined to assess the microstructures which resulted from systematically varied compositions and controlled cooling sequences. Leach tests in deionized water were performed on small monolithic specimens of the various glass-ceramic materials. The test results showed a rather strong temperature dependence for leach rates. Also, for some of these materials, marked differences in the 241 Am leaching behavior were seen in measurements obtained on acidified versus neutral aliquots of the spent leachates. 8 figures, 12 tables

  2. Material Engineering for Monolithic Semiconductor Mode-Locked Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkova, Irina

    This thesis is devoted to the materials engineering for semiconductor monolithic passively mode-locked lasers (MLLs) as a compact energy-efficient source of ultrashort optical pulses. Up to the present day, the achievement of low-noise sub-picosecond pulse generation has remained a challenge...

  3. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Richard W.; Nieman, G. William; Weertman, Julia R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  4. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  5. Natural Radioactivity in Ceramic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khadra, S.A.; Kamel, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are one of the most important types of the industrial building materials. The raw materials of the ceramic are made of a mixture of clay, feldspar, silica, talc kaolin minerals together with zirconium silicates (ZrSiO4).The ceramic raw materials and the final products contain naturally occurring radionuclide mainly U-238 and, Th-232 series, and the radioactive isotope of potassium K-40. Six raw ceramic samples were obtained from the Aracemco Company at Egypt together with a floor tile sample (final product) for measuring radioactive concentration levels., The activity of the naturally U-238, Th-232, and K-40 were determined as (Bq/kg) using gamma spectroscopy (Hyperactive pure germanium detector). Concentration of U and Th were determined in (ppm) using spectrophotometer technique by Arsenazo 111 and Piridy l-Azo -Resorcinol (PAR) indicators. Sequential extraction tests were carried out in order to determine the quantity of the radionuclide associated with various fractions as exchangeable, carbonate, acid soluble and in the residue. The results evaluated were compared to the associated activity indices (AI) that were defined by former USSR and West Germany

  6. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  7. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  8. Influence of Abutment Design on Stiffness, Strength, and Failure of Implant-Supported Monolithic Resin Nano Ceramic (RNC) Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joda, Tim; Huber, Samuel; Bürki, Alexander; Zysset, Philippe; Brägger, Urs

    2015-12-01

    Recent technical development allows the digital manufacturing of monolithic reconstructions with high-performance materials. For implant-supported crowns, the fixation requires an abutment design onto which the reconstruction can be bonded. The aim of this laboratory investigation was to analyze stiffness, strength, and failure modes of implant-supported, computer-assisted design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-generated resin nano ceramic (RNC) crowns bonded to three different titanium abutments. Eighteen monolithic RNC crowns were produced and loaded in a universal testing machine under quasi-static condition according to DIN ISO 14801. With regard to the type of titanium abutment, three groups were defined: (1) prefabricated cementable standard; (2) CAD/CAM-constructed individualized; and (3) novel prefabricated bonding base. Stiffness and strength were measured and analyzed statistically with Wilcoxon rank sum test. Sections of the specimens were examined microscopically. Stiffness demonstrated high stability for all specimens loaded in the physiological loading range with means and standard deviations of 1,579 ± 120 N/mm (group A), 1,733 ± 89 N/mm (group B), and 1,704 ± 162 N/mm (group C). Mean strength of the novel prefabricated bonding base (group C) was 17% lower than of the two other groups. Plastic deformations were detectable for all implant-abutment crown connections. Monolithic implant crowns made of RNC seem to represent a feasible and stable prosthetic construction under laboratory testing conditions with strength higher than the average occlusal force, independent of the different abutment designs used in this investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mechanical behavior of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic restorations: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Silvestri, T.; Camargo, R.; Rippe, M.P.; Amaral, M.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of grinding with diamond burs and low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior (biaxial flexural strength and structural reliability), surface topography, and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic dental restorations. Disc-shaped

  10. High temperature fracture of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiederhorn, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of fracture mechanisms and methods of lifetime prediction in ceramic materials. Techniques of lifetime prediction are based on the science of fracture mechanics. Application of these techniques to structural ceramics is limited by our incomplete understanding of fracture mechanisms in these materials, and by the occurrence of flaw generation in these materials at elevated temperatures. Research on flaw generation and fracture mechanisms is recommended as a way of improving the reliability of structural ceramics

  11. Integrated Design Software Predicts the Creep Life of Monolithic Ceramic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Significant improvements in propulsion and power generation for the next century will require revolutionary advances in high-temperature materials and structural design. Advanced ceramics are candidate materials for these elevated-temperature applications. As design protocols emerge for these material systems, designers must be aware of several innate features, including the degrading ability of ceramics to carry sustained load. Usually, time-dependent failure in ceramics occurs because of two different, delayedfailure mechanisms: slow crack growth and creep rupture. Slow crack growth initiates at a preexisting flaw and continues until a critical crack length is reached, causing catastrophic failure. Creep rupture, on the other hand, occurs because of bulk damage in the material: void nucleation and coalescence that eventually leads to macrocracks which then propagate to failure. Successful application of advanced ceramics depends on proper characterization of material behavior and the use of an appropriate design methodology. The life of a ceramic component can be predicted with the NASA Lewis Research Center's Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) integrated design programs. CARES/CREEP determines the expected life of a component under creep conditions, and CARES/LIFE predicts the component life due to fast fracture and subcritical crack growth. The previously developed CARES/LIFE program has been used in numerous industrial and Government applications.

  12. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  13. Production of perovskite catalysts on ceramic monoliths with nanoparticles for dual fuel system automobiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanfekr, A.; Arzani, K.; Nemati, A.; Hosseini, M.

    2009-01-01

    (Lanthanum, Cerium)(Iron, Manganese, Cobalt, Palladium)(Oxygen) 3 ,-Perovskite catalyst was prepared by the citrate route and deposited on ceramic monoliths via dip coating procedure. The catalyst was applied on a car with X U 7 motors and the amount of emission was monitored with vehicle emission test systems in Sapco company. The results were compared with the imported catalyst with noble metals such as Palladium, Platinum and Rhodium by Iran Khodro company based on the Euro III standards. The catalysts were characterized by specific surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, line scan and map. In the results, obtained in the home made sample, the amount of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons were lower than imported catalyst with Iran Khodro company with nobel metals. The illustration shows nano particles size on coat. The microstructure evaluation showed that the improved properties can be related to the existence of nano particles on coating

  14. Microstructure and properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen Tungsheng

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics materials study is an important field in modern materials science. Each side presented 19 papers most of which were recent investigations giving rather extensive coverage of microstructure and properties of new materials. (Auth.)

  15. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  16. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  17. Heterogeneous Monolithic Integration of Single-Crystal Organic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Sun; Baek, Jangmi; Park, Yoonkyung; Lee, Lynn; Hyon, Jinho; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Kang, Youngjong; Sung, Myung Mo

    2017-02-01

    Manufacturing high-performance organic electronic circuits requires the effective heterogeneous integration of different nanoscale organic materials with uniform morphology and high crystallinity in a desired arrangement. In particular, the development of high-performance organic electronic and optoelectronic devices relies on high-quality single crystals that show optimal intrinsic charge-transport properties and electrical performance. Moreover, the heterogeneous integration of organic materials on a single substrate in a monolithic way is highly demanded for the production of fundamental organic electronic components as well as complex integrated circuits. Many of the various methods that have been designed to pattern multiple heterogeneous organic materials on a substrate and the heterogeneous integration of organic single crystals with their crystal growth are described here. Critical issues that have been encountered in the development of high-performance organic integrated electronics are also addressed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Microwave processing for ceramic materials in microsystem technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, S.

    2002-11-01

    In this study, the applicability of microwaves for sintering of monolithic ceramics and ceramic microcomponents was investigated. Experiments with 2.45 GHz and 30 GHz microwaves were conducted and contrasted to conventional thermal processing. The advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing were then assessed. Nanoscale zirconia and sub-micron lead-zirconate-titanate electroceramics were selected for the evaluation. (orig.)

  19. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  20. Surface characterization of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Salmeron, M.

    1976-01-01

    In recent years several techniques have become available to characterize the structure and chemical composition of surfaces of ceramic materials. These techniques utilize electron scattering and scattering of ions from surfaces. Low-energy electron diffraction is used to determine the surface structure, Auger electron spectroscopy and other techniques of electron spectroscopy (ultraviolet and photoelectron spectroscopies) are employed to determine the composition of the surface. In addition the oxidation state of surface atoms may be determined using these techniques. Ion scattering mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry are also useful in characterizing surfaces and their reactions. These techniques, their applications and the results of recent studies are discussed. 12 figures, 52 references, 2 tables

  1. High-temperature materials and structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report gives a survey of research work in the area of high-temperature materials and structural ceramics of the KFA (Juelich Nuclear Research Center). The following topics are treated: (1) For energy facilities: ODS materials for gas turbine blades and heat exchangers; assessment of the remaining life of main steam pipes, material characterization and material stress limits for First-Wall components; metallic and graphitic materials for high-temperature reactors. (2) For process engineering plants: composites for reformer tubes and cracking tubes; ceramic/ceramic joints and metal/ceramic and metal/metal joints; Composites and alloys for rolling bearing and sliding systems up to application temperatures of 1000deg C; high-temperature corrosion of metal and ceramic material; porous ceramic high-temperature filters and moulding coat-mix techniques; electrically conducting ceramic material (superconductors, fuel cells, solid electrolytes); high-temperature light sources (high-temperature chemistry); oil vapor engines with caramic components; ODS materials for components in diesel engines and vehicle gas turbines. (MM) [de

  2. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  3. Oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolitsch, A.; Richter, E.; Wolf, M.

    1978-10-01

    A survey is given on the published works to study oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials in the last years. In the first part methods are described for the measurement of oxygen diffusion coefficients and in the second part the published reports on oxygen diffusion in glasses, ceramic and other oxides are discussed. The most important results are summarized in different tables. (author)

  4. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  5. Marginal Vertical Discrepancies of Monolithic and Veneered Zirconia and Metal-Ceramic Three-Unit Posterior Fixed Dental Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Suarez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Pelaez, Jesus; Serrano, Benjamin; Suarez, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the marginal fit of posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of monolithic and veneered computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) zirconia ceramic with metal-ceramic posterior FDPs. Thirty standardized steel dies were prepared to receive posterior three-unit FDPs. Specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10): (1) metal-ceramic (control group), (2) veneered zirconia, and (3) monolithic zirconia. All FDPs were cemented using a glass-ionomer cement. The specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (5°C to 55°C). A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a magnification of ×500 was used for measurements. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and paired t test. Both zirconia groups showed similar vertical marginal discrepancies, and no significant differences (P = .661) in marginal adaptation were observed among the groups. No differences were observed in either group in marginal discrepancies between surfaces or abutments. Monolithic zirconia posterior FDPs exhibit similar vertical marginal discrepancies to veneered zirconia posterior FDPs. No influence of localization measurements was observed.

  6. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  7. An investigation of penetrant techniques for detection of machining-induced surface-breaking cracks on monolithic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, G.A.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this effort was to evaluate penetrant methods for their ability to detect surface-breaking cracks in monolithic ceramic materials with an emphasis on detection of cracks generated by machining. There are two basic penetrant types, visible and fluorescent. The visible penetrant method is usually augmented by powder developers and cracks detected can be seen in visible light. Cracks detected by fluorescent penetrant are visible only under ultraviolet light used with or without a developer. The developer is basically a powder that wicks up penetrant from a crack to make it more observable. Although fluorescent penetrants were recommended in the literature survey conducted early in this effort, visible penetrants and two non-standard techniques, a capillary gaseous diffusion method under development at the institute of Chemical Physics in Moscow, and the {open_quotes}statiflux{close_quotes} method which involves use of electrically charged particles, were also investigated. SiAlON ring specimens (1 in. diameter, 3/4 in. wide) which had been subjected to different thermal-shock cycles were used for these tests. The capillary gaseous diffusion method is based on ammonia; the detector is a specially impregnated paper much like litmus paper. As expected, visible dye penetrants offered no detection sensitivity for tight, surface-breaking cracks in ceramics. Although the non-standard statiflux method showed promise on high-crack-density specimens, it was ineffective on limited-crack-density specimens. The fluorescent penetrant method was superior for surface-breaking crack detection, but successful application of this procedure depends greatly on the skill of the user. Two presently available high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrants were then evaluated for detection of microcracks on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC from different suppliers. Although 50X optical magnification may be sufficient for many applications, 200X magnification provides excellent delectability.

  8. Toward Modeling Limited Plasticity in Ceramic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grinfeld, Michael; Schoenfeld, Scott E; Wright, Tim W

    2008-01-01

    The characteristic features of many armor-related ceramic materials are the anisotropy on the micro-scale level and the very limited, though non-vanishing, plasticity due to limited number of the planes for plastic slip...

  9. Identification of Technological Parameters of Ni-Alloys When Machining by Monolithic Ceramic Milling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czán, Andrej; Kubala, Ondrej; Danis, Igor; Czánová, Tatiana; Holubják, Jozef; Mikloš, Matej

    2017-12-01

    The ever-increasing production and the usage of hard-to-machine progressive materials are the main cause of continual finding of new ways and methods of machining. One of these ways is the ceramic milling tool, which combines the pros of conventional ceramic cutting materials and pros of conventional coating steel-based insert. These properties allow to improve cutting conditions and so increase the productivity with preserved quality known from conventional tools usage. In this paper, there is made the identification of properties and possibilities of this tool when machining of hard-to-machine materials such as nickel alloys using in airplanes engines. This article is focused on the analysis and evaluation ordinary technological parameters and surface quality, mainly roughness of surface and quality of machined surface and tool wearing.

  10. Mechanical behavior of a ceramic matrix composite material. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Paul P.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic materials have been used in industry for hundreds of years. These materials have proven their usefulness in many applications, yet, their potential for critical structural applications is limited. The existence of an imperfection in a monolithic ceramic on the order of several microns in size may be critical, resulting in catastrophic failure. To overcome this extreme sensitivity to small material imperfections, reinforced ceramic materials were developed. A ceramic matrix which has been reinforced with continuous fibers is not only less sensitive to microscopic flaws, but is also able to sustain significant damage without suffering catastrophic failure. A borosilicate glass reinforced with several layers of plain weave silicon carbide cloth (Nicalon) was studied. The mechanical testing which was performed included both flexural and tensile loading configurations. This testing was done not only to determine the material properties, but also to initiate a controlled amount of damage within each specimen. Several nondestructive testing techniques, including acousto-ultrasonics (AU), were performed on the specimens periodically during testing. The AU signals were monitored through the use of an IBM compatible personal computer with a high speed data acquisition board. Software was written which manipulates the AU signals in both the time and frequency domains, resulting in quantitative measures of the mechanical response of the material. The measured AU parameters are compared to both the mechanical test results and data from other nondestructive methods including ultrasonic C-scans and penetrant enhanced x ray radiography.

  11. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  12. Prospects of ceramic tritium breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Roux, N.; Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the prospects of the main ceramics proposed as breeder materials for fusion reactors, i.e. Li-2O, Li-2ZrO-3, LiAlO-2, Li-4SiO-4. To do so they review terms of reference of contemplated blankets for NET, ITER and DEMO, and the proposed blanket concepts and materials. Issues respective to the use of each breeder material are examined, and from this review it is concluded that ceramics are the most favorable breeder materials whose use can be contemplated as well for a driver blanket for NET or ITER and for a DEMO blanket. Ceramics are then compared between themselves and it is seen that, subject to the confirmation of recent experimental results, lithium zirconate could be used with advantage in any of the present blanket concepts, except in those employing lithium at its natural isotopic abundance, in which case only Li-2O can be used. However in specific cases, or in parts of a blanket, other ceramics may be profitably employed. As a general conclusion suggestions are made to further improve ceramic breeder performances, and it is recommended to intensify also work on problems that have to be solved in order to operate ceramic breeder blankets e.g. tritium extraction and recovery systems and conditions of beryllium use. (author). 37 refs.; 12 tabs

  13. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  14. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass-based materials for structural and functional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna; Bernardo, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass-based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass-ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica-rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron-rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass-based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste-derived glasses into glass-ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low-cost alternative for glass-ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up-to-date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste-derived, glass-based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass‐based materials for structural and functional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass‐based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass‐ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica‐rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron‐rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass‐based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste‐derived glasses into glass‐ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low‐cost alternative for glass‐ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up‐to‐date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste‐derived, glass‐based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27818564

  16. Use of sludge as ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, L.C.; Vianna, R.S.C.; Campos, V.; Rosa, A.H.; Buechler, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, with increase amounts of sludge derived from the treatment of domestic sewage put pressure into research on systems for the adequate use of these materials. The aim of the present work is to study the use of sludge ash, from sintering and calcinated process, as a raw material for the ceramic industry. Using the sewage sludge ashes as ceramic raw material there will be no contamination of soil and underground water. Metals and toxic compounds like Al, Fe, Ba, Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn oxides were analyzed and characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The leached material was chemically analyzed where the integration of oxides into the ceramic matrix of sludge ash was observed. Residual decomposition was analyzed by TG, DTG and DTA curves. (author)

  17. Photon CT scanning of advanced ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    Advanced ceramic materials are being developed for high temperature applications in advanced heat engines and high temperature heat recovery systems. Small size flaws (10 - 200 μm) and small nonuniformities in density distributions (0.1 -2%) present as long-range density gradients, are critical in most ceramics and their detection is of crucial importance. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging provides a means of obtaining a precise two-dimensional density map of a cross section through an object from which accurate information about small flaws and small density gradients can be obtained. With the use of high energy photon sources high contrast CT images can be obtained for both low and high density ceramics. In the present paper we illustrate the applicability of the photon CT technique to the examination of advanced ceramics. CT images of sintered alumina tiles are presented from which data on high-density inclusions, cracks and density gradients have been extracted

  18. Status quo of ceramic material for metal halide discharge lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappen, Theo G M M

    2005-01-01

    Polycrystalline alumina is an excellent ceramic material for use as the envelope for metal halide discharge lamps. Although this material was introduced in the mid-1960s, and is thus already known for several decades, recent years have seen considerable effort aimed at further development of these ceramic envelope materials. Developments are not only in the field of ceramic shaping technologies, but are also concentrated on the material properties of the ceramic material itself. Optical, mechanical as well as the chemical properties of the ceramic envelope are strongly controlled by the shape as well as the microstructure of the ceramics used

  19. Producing glass-ceramics from waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccaccini, A.R.; Rawlings, R.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    An overview is given of recent research at the Department of Materials of Imperial College, London, UK, concerning the production of useful glass-ceramic products from industrial waste materials. The new work, using controlled crystallisation to improve the properties of vitrified products, could help to solve the problem of what to do with increasing amounts of slag, fly ash and combustion dust. The results show, that it is possible to produce new materials with interesting magnetic and constructive properties.

  20. Radiometric measurement of ceramic material moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kominek, A.; Sojka, J.; Votava, P.

    1975-01-01

    Water content measurement using a neutron moisture meter has a long tradition in the CSSR. The method of water content determination using neutron and gamma radiation was developed by the Research Institute of Building Materials in Brno for a number of materials, as e.g. coke, brown coal semi-coke, anthracite, glass sand, dolomite, soda, gravel, aggregates, cement sludge, slag, brick clay, intermediate products of the ceramics industry, refractory building materials, etc. The water content measurement of ceramic materials for the manufacture of wall tiles was performed in a special equipment by detection of the slowed-down neutrons with an accuracy of +-0.6% water (within the range from 5 to 11%) and of materials for the manufacture of floor tiles by means of neutron and gamma radiation with an accuracy of +-0.4% water (within the range from 5 to 8%). (author)

  1. Ceramic materials on perovskite-type structure for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surowiak, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic materials exhibiting the perovskite-type structure constitute among others, resource base for many fields of widely understood electronics (i.e., piezoelectronics, accustoelectronics, optoelectronics, computer science, tele- and radioelectronics etc.). Most often they are used for fabrication of different type sensors (detectors), transducers, ferroelectric memories, limiters of the electronic current intensity, etc., and hence they are numbered among so-called intelligent materials. Prototype structure of this group of materials is the structure of the mineral called perovskite (CaTiO 3 ). By means of right choice of the chemical composition of ABO 3 and deforming the regular perovskite structure (m3m) more than 5000 different chemical compounds and solid solutions exhibiting the perovskite-type structure have been fabricated. The concept of perovskite functional ceramics among often things ferroelectric ceramics, pyroelectric ceramics, piezoelectric ceramics, electrostrictive ceramics, posistor ceramics, superconductive ceramics and ferromagnetic ceramics. New possibilities of application of the perovskite-type ceramics are opened by nanotechnology. (author)

  2. Ceramic nanostructure materials, membranes and composite layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Keizer, Klaas; van Hassel, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis methods to obtain nanoscale materials will be briefly discussed with a focus on sol-gel methods. Three types of nanoscale composites (powders, membranes and ion implanted layers) will be discussed and exemplified with recent original research results. Ceramic membranes with a thickness of

  3. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  4. Cordierite Glass-Ceramics for Dielectric Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Mazatul Azwa Saiyed Mohd Nurddin; Selamat, Malek; Ismail, Abdullah

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this project is to examine the potential of using Malaysian silica sand deposit as SiO2 raw material in producing cordierite glass-ceramics (2MgO-2Al2O3-5SiO2) for dielectric materials. Upgraded silica sands from Terengganu and ex-mining land in Perak were used in the test-works. The glass batch of the present work has a composition of 45.00% SiO2, 24.00% Al2O3, 15.00% MgO and 8.50% TiO2 as nucleation agent. From the differential thermal analysis results, the crystallization temperature was found to start around 900 deg. C. The glass samples were heat-treated at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results showed glass-ceramics from Terengganu samples containing mainly cordierite and minor β-quartz crystals. However, glass-ceramics from ex-mining land samples contained mainly α-quartz and minor cordierite crystals. Glass-ceramics with different crystal phases exhibit different mechanical, dielectric and thermal properties. Based on the test works, both silica sand deposits, can be potentially used to produce dielectric material component

  5. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Robert J.; Walls, Claudia A.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2006-11-14

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  6. Fluorine 18 in tritium generator ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Becerril, J.; Bosch, P.; Bulbulian, S.

    1992-01-01

    At present time, the ceramic materials generators of tritium are very interesting mainly by the necessity of to found an adequate product for its application as fusion reactor shielding. The important element that must contain the ceramic material is the lithium and especially the isotope with mass=6. The tritium in these materials is generated by neutron irradiation, however, when the ceramic material contains oxygen, then is generated too fluorine 18 by the action of energetic atoms of tritium in recoil on the 16 O, as it is showed in the next reactions: 1) 6 Li (n, α) 3 H ; 2) 16 O( 3 H, n) 18 F . In the present work was studied the LiAlO 2 and the Li 2 O. The first was prepared in the laboratory and the second was used such as it is commercially expended. In particular the interest of this work is to study the chemical behavior of fluorine-18, since if it would be mixed with tritium it could be contaminate the fusion reactor fuel. The ceramic materials were irradiated with neutrons and also the chemical form of fluorine-18 produced was studied. It was determined the amount of fluorine-18 liberated by the irradiated materials when they were submitted to extraction with helium currents and argon-hydrogen mixtures and also it was investigated the possibility about the fluorine-18 was volatilized then it was mixed so with the tritium. Finally it was founded that the liberated amount of fluorine-18 depends widely of the experimental conditions, such as the temperature and the hydrogen amount in the mixture of dragging gas. (Author)

  7. Ceramics for Molten Materials Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the main issues associated with molten materials transfer and handling on the lunar surface during the operation of a hig h temperature electrowinning cell used to produce oxygen, with molten iron and silicon as byproducts. A combination of existing technolog ies and purposely designed technologies show promise for lunar exploi tation. An important limitation that requires extensive investigation is the performance of refractory currently used for the purpose of m olten metal containment and transfer in the lunar environment associa ted with electrolytic cells. The principles of a laboratory scale uni t at a scale equivalent to the production of 1 metric ton of oxygen p er year are introduced. This implies a mass of molten materials to be transferred consistent with the equivalent of 1kg regolithlhr proces sed.

  8. Effect of Two Polishing Systems on Surface Roughness, Topography, and Flexural Strength of a Monolithic Lithium Disilicate Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadibassir, Mahshid; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Golzari, Hossein; Moravej Salehi, Elham; Fahimi, Mohammad Amin; Kharazi Fard, Mohammad Javad

    2017-03-08

    To evaluate the effect of overglazing and two polishing procedures on flexural strength and quality and quantity of surface roughness of a monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic computer-aided design (CAD) after grinding. This in vitro study was conducted on 52 partially crystalized bar-shaped specimens (16 × 4 × 1.6 mm) of monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic. The specimens were wet polished with 600-, 800-, and 1200-grit silicon carbide papers for 15 seconds using a grinding/polishing machine at a speed of 300 rpm. Then, the specimens were crystalized and glaze-fired in one step simultaneously and randomly divided into four groups of 13: (I) Glazing group (control); (II) Grinding-glazing group, subjected to grinding with red band finishing diamond bur (46 μm) followed by glazing; (III) Grinding-D+Z group, subjected to grinding and then polishing by coarse, medium, and fine diamond rubber points (D+Z); and (IV) Grinding-OptraFine group, subjected to grinding and then polishing with a two-step diamond rubber polishing system followed by a final polishing step with an OptraFine HP brush and diamond polishing paste. The surface roughness (Ra and Rz) values (μm) were measured by a profilometer, and the mean values were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (post hoc comparison). One specimen of each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for surface topography. The three-point flexural strength values of the bars were measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed and recorded. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (α = 0.05). Statistically significant differences were noted among the experimental groups for Ra, Rz (p SEM analysis of polished surfaces revealed regular morphology with some striations. The OptraFine system created smoother and more uniform surfaces in terms of quantity (p < 0.03 for Ra, p < 0.01 for Rz) and quality of roughness compared to glazing. The flexural

  9. Translucent zirconia in the ceramic scenario for monolithic restorations: A flexural strength and translucency comparison test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrabba, Michele; Keeling, Andrew J; Aziz, Aziz; Vichi, Alessandro; Fabian Fonzar, Riccardo; Wood, David; Ferrari, Marco

    2017-05-01

    To compare three different compositions of Yttria-Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramic and a lithium disilicate ceramic in terms of flexural strength and translucency. Three zirconia materials of different composition and translucency, Aadva ST [ST], Aadva EI [EI] and Aadva NT [NT](GC Tech, Leuven, Belgium) were cut with a slow speed diamond saw into beams and tabs in order to obtain, after sintering, dimensions of 1.2×4.0×15.0mm and 15.0×15.0×1.0mm respectively. Blocks of IPS e.max CAD LT were cut and crystallized in the same shapes and dimensions and used as a reference group [LD]. Beams (n=15) were tested in a universal testing machine for three-point bending strength. Critical fracture load was recorded in N, flexural strength (σ in MPa), Weibull modulus (m) and Weibull characteristic strength (σ 0 in MPa) were then calculated. Tabs (n=10) were measured with a spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere. Contrast Ratios were calculated as CR=Yb/Yw. SEM of thermally etched samples coupled with lineal line analysis (n=6) was used to measure the tested zirconia grain size. Data were statistically analyzed. Differences in translucency, flexural strength and grain size were found to be statistically significant. CR increased and flexural strength decreased in the following order ST(σ 1215±190MPa, CR 0.74±0.01)>EI(σ 983±182MPa, CR 0.69±0.01)>NT(σ 539±66MPa, CR 0.65±0.01)>LD (σ 377±39Mpa, CR 0.56±0.02). The average grain size was different for the three zirconia samples with NT(558±38nm)>ST(445±34nm)>EI(284±11nm). The zirconia composition heavily influenced both the flexural strength and the translucency. Different percentages of Yittria and Alumina result in new materials with intermediate properties in between the conventional zirconia and lithium disilicate. Clinical indications for Zirconia Aadva NT should be limited up to three-unit span bridges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  11. Boundary surface and microstructure analysis of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woltersdorf, J.; Pippel, E.

    1992-01-01

    The article introduces the many possibilities of high voltage (HVEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) for boundary surface and microstructure analysis of ceramic materials. The investigations are limited to ceramic long fibre composites and a ceramic fibre/glass matrix system. (DG) [de

  12. [Research on the aging of all-ceramics restoration materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongjiao; Chen, Xinmin

    2011-10-01

    All-ceramic crowns and bridges have been widely used for dental restorations owing to their excellent functionality, aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, the premature clinical failure of all-ceramic crowns and bridges may easily occur when they are subjected to the complex environment of oral cavity. In the oral environment, all-ceramic materials are prone to aging. Aging can lead all-ceramic materials to change color, to lower bending strength, and to reduce anti-fracture toughness. There are many factors affecting the aging of the all-ceramic materials, for example, the grain size, the type of stabilizer, the residual stress and the water environment. In order to analyze the aging behavior, to optimize the design of all-ceramic crowns and bridges, and to evaluate the reliability and durability, we review in this paper recent research progress of aging behavior for all-ceramics restoration materials.

  13. Advanced ceramic materials and their potential impact on the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laren, M.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the types of advanced ceramic materials that are being used today and their potential for even greater utilization in the future. Market analysis and projections have been developed from a number of sources both foreign and domestic are referenced and given in the text. Projection on the future use of advanced ceramics to the year 2000 indicate a potential growth of the total world market approaching 187 billion dollars. This paper describes advanced ceramic materials by their functionality, i.e. structural, electronic, chemical, thermal, biological, nuclear, etc. It also refers to specific engineering uses of advanced ceramics and include automotive ceramic materials with physical data for the most likely ceramic materials to be used for engine parts. This family of materials includes silicon carbides, silicon nitride, partially stabilized zirconia and alumina. Fiber reinforced ceramic composites are discussed with recognition of the research on fiber coating chemistry and the compatibility of the coating with the fiber and the matrix. Another class of advanced ceramics is toughened ceramics. The transformation toughened alumina is recognized as an example of this technology. The data indicate that electronic ceramic materials will always have the largest portion of the advanced ceramic market and the critical concepts of a wide range of uses is reviewed. (Auth.)

  14. Effective Diffusivities and Pore-Transport Characteristics of Washcoated Ceramic Monolith for Automotive Catalytic Converter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starý, T.; Šolcová, Olga; Schneider, Petr; Marek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 18 (2006), s. 5934-5943 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/2616; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : effective diffusivity * monolith catalyst * chromatography Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.629, year: 2006

  15. Mechanical behavior of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic restorations: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Camargo, R; Rippe, M P; Amaral, M; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of grinding with diamond burs and low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior (biaxial flexural strength and structural reliability), surface topography, and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic dental restorations. Disc-shaped specimens (Zirlux FC, Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO 6872 (2008) and divided in accordance with two factors: "grinding - 3 levels" and "LTD - 2 levels". Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling with different grit-sizes (extra-fine and coarse diamond burs). LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C, under a pressure of 2 bar, over a period of 20h. Surface topography analysis showed an increase in roughness based on surface treatment grit-size (Coarse>Xfine>Ctrl), LTD did not influence roughness values. Both grinding and LTD promoted an increase in the amount of m-phase, although different susceptibilities to degradation were observed. According to existing literature the increase of m-phase content is a direct indicative of Y-TZP degradation. Weibull analysis showed an increase in characteristic strength after grinding (Coarse=Xfine>Ctrl), while for LTD, distinct effects were observed (Ctrlgrinding showed not to be detrimental to the mechanical properties of Zirlux FC Y-TZP ceramic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of Catalytic Material Effect on the Photovoltaic Properties of Monolithic Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalita Maulani Nursam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC are widely developed due to their attractive appearance and simple fabrication processes. One of the challenges that arise in the DSSC fabrication involves high material cost associated with the cost of conductive substrate. DSSC with monolithic configuration was then developed on the basis of this motivation. In this contribution, titanium dioxide-based monolithic type DSSCs were fabricated on a single fluorine-doped transparent oxide coated glass using porous ZrO2 as spacer. Herein, the catalytic material for the counter-electrode was varied using carbon composite and platinum in order to analyze their effect on the solar cell efficiency. Four-point probe measurement revealed that the carbon composite exhibited slightly higher conductivity with a sheet resistance of 9.8 Ω/sq and 10.9 Ω/sq for carbon and platinum, respectively. Likewise, the photoconversion efficiency of the monolithic cells with carbon counter-electrode almost doubled the efficiency of the cells with platinum counter-electrode. Our results demonstrate that carbon could outperform the performance of platinum as catalytic material in monolithic DSSC.

  17. Structural integrity of ceramic multilayer capacitor materials and ceramic multilayer capacitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    With, de G.

    1993-01-01

    An review with 61 refs. is given of the fracture of and stress situation in ceramic capacitor materials and ceramic multilayer capacitors. A brief introduction to the relevant concepts is given first. Next the data for capacitor materials and the data for capacitors are discussed. The materials data

  18. Monolithic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kahl, William K. (Knoxville, TN); Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN); Evans, III, Boyd M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlar, Troy A. (Knoxville, TN); Cunningham, Joseph P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  19. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  20. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  1. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  2. Field-Induced Texturing of Ceramic Materials for Unparalleled Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Texturing of Ceramic Materials for Unparalleled Properties by...influence over many properties , such as optical transparency, strength, electrical conductivity, and piezoelectricity .19 Highly textured materials are... Ceramic Materials for Unparalleled Properties by Raymond Brennan, Victoria Blair, Nicholas Ku, Krista Limmer, Tanya Chantawansri, Mahesh

  3. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  4. Application of ceramic and glass materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamnabard, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic and glass are high temperature materials that can be used in many fields of application in nuclear industries. First, it is known that nuclear fuel UO 2 is a ceramic material. Also, ability to absorb neutrons without forming long lived radio-nuclides make the non-oxide ceramics attractive as an absorbent for neutron radiation arising in nuclear power plants. Glass-ceramic materials are a new type of ceramic that produced by the controlled nucleation and crystallization of glass, and have several advantages such as very low or null porosity, uniformity of microstructure, high chemical resistance etc. over conventional powder processed ceramics. These ceramic materials are synthesized in different systems based on their properties and applications. In nuclear industries, those are resistant to leaching and radiation damage for thousands of years, Such as glass-ceramics designed for radioactive waste immobilization and machinable glass-ceramics are used. This article introduces requirements of different glass and ceramic materials used in nuclear power plants and have been focused on developments in properties and application of them

  5. Tough hybrid ceramic-based material with high strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shuqi; Kagawa, Yutaka; Nishimura, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a tough and strong hybrid ceramic material consisting of platelet-like zirconium compounds and metal. A mixture of boron carbide and excess zirconium powder was heated to 1900 °C using a liquid-phase reaction sintering technique to produce a platelet-like ZrB 2 -based hybrid ceramic bonded by a thin zirconium layer. The platelet-like ZrB 2 grains were randomly present in the as-sintered hybrid ceramic. Relative to non-hybrid ceramics, the fracture toughness and flexural strength of the hybrid ceramic increased by approximately 2-fold.

  6. Advanced ceramic matrix composite materials for current and future propulsion technology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Beyer, S.; Knabe, H.; Immich, H.; Meistring, R.; Gessler, A.

    2004-08-01

    Current rocket engines, due to their method of construction, the materials used and the extreme loads to which they are subjected, feature a limited number of load cycles. Various technology programmes in Europe are concerned, besides developing reliable and rugged, low cost, throwaway equipment, with preparing for future reusable propulsion technologies. One of the key roles for realizing reusable engine components is the use of modern and innovative materials. One of the key technologies which concern various engine manufacturers worldwide is the development of fibre-reinforced ceramics—ceramic matrix composites. The advantages for the developers are obvious—the low specific weight, the high specific strength over a large temperature range, and their great damage tolerance compared to monolithic ceramics make this material class extremely interesting as a construction material. Over the past years, the Astrium company (formerly DASA) has, together with various partners, worked intensively on developing components for hypersonic engines and liquid rocket propulsion systems. In the year 2000, various hot-firing tests with subscale (scale 1:5) and full-scale nozzle extensions were conducted. In this year, a further decisive milestone was achieved in the sector of small thrusters, and long-term tests served to demonstrate the extraordinary stability of the C/SiC material. Besides developing and testing radiation-cooled nozzle components and small-thruster combustion chambers, Astrium worked on the preliminary development of actively cooled structures for future reusable propulsion systems. In order to get one step nearer to this objective, the development of a new fibre composite was commenced within the framework of a regionally sponsored programme. The objective here is to create multidirectional (3D) textile structures combined with a cost-effective infiltration process. Besides material and process development, the project also encompasses the development of

  7. UV laser micromachining of ceramic materials: formation of columnar topographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.; Conde, O.

    2001-01-01

    Laser machining is increasingly appearing as an alternative for micromachining of ceramics. Using ceramic materials using excimer lasers can result in smooth surfaces or in the formation of cone-like or columnar topography. Potential applications of cone-shaped or columnar surface topography include, for example, light trapping in anti-reflection coatings and improvement of adhesion bonding between ceramic materials. In this communication results of a comparative study of surface topography change during micromachining of several ceramic materials with different ablation behaviors are reported. (orig.)

  8. Ceramic materials for SOFCs: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhukharov, V.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the main parts of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs are build from ceramic materials. Namely the ceramic materials and composites, used for SOFCs manufacturing, are objects of the overview in the present work. The analysis carried out covers the last current publications in the field discussed. Special attention and examination in details have been done on patents state-of-the-art. After a background and short classification of the ceramic SOFCs materials the attention is focused on cathode, electrolyte, anode, interconnection and sealing materials. Their requirements, structure, thermal stability, composition control and behavior, processing and performance are the object of overview. A correlation has been made between the phase diagrams oxygen incorporation and transport, and SOFC advantages, generally for materials of lanthanum- base perovskite family. In order to analyze the innovative investigations regarding the patent branch of the SOFCs development and application, an object of review was patents from Japan, USA, Germany and European Union. Some examples of the inventions with accent on the ceramic materials are shown. In addition the tendency regarding R & D activities of SOFCs development materials from the leading companies in the world is analyzed. On the base of the most important technological and economical parameters of cell cathode/electrolyte/anode materials an attempt for evaluation and correlation has been made and innovative conceptions are shown.

    Es bien sabido que los componentes principales de las celdas de combustible de óxido sólido (SOFCs estan constituidos por materiales cerámicos. Dichos materiales cerámicos y materiales compuestos que se utilizan en la fabricación de SOFCs son objeto de estudio en el presente trabajo. El análisis llevado a cabo incluye la revisión de las últimas publicaciones en la materia, con una especial atención y examen minucioso sobre las patentes m

  9. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  10. Elastic properties of various ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, H.

    1992-09-01

    The Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of various ceramics have been investigated at room temperature and compared with data from the literature. The ceramic materials investigated are Al 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 , MgAl 2 O 4 , LiAlO 2 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 , UO 2 , AlN, SiC, B 4 C, TiC, and TiB 2 . The dependence of the elastic moduli on porosity and temperature have been reviewed. Measurements were also performed on samples of Al 2 O 3 , AlN, and SiC, which had been irradiated to maximum neutron fluences of 1.6.10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at different temperatures. The Young's modulus is nearly unaffected at fluences up to about 4.10 24 n/m 2 . However, it decreases with increasing neutron fluence and seems to reach a saturation value depending upon the irradiation temperature. The reduction of the Young's modulus is lowest in SiC. (orig.) [de

  11. Clutches using engineering ceramics as friction material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, A.; Arslan, A.; Mitariu, M. [Universitaet Karlsruhe (T.H.), IPEK - Institut fuer Produktentwicklung, Kaiserstr. 10, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The experimental and constructive results illustrate that engineering ceramic materials have a high potential in the field of dry running friction systems. According to first estimations, it is possible to build the vehicle clutch 53 % smaller or to transmit up to 180 % higher torque with the same size by an appropriate selection of the system friction pairing and an adequate ceramic design [1, 2]. The friction coefficient characteristic (decreasing friction coefficient above sliding speed) is unfavourable with regard to comfort (self-induced grab oscillations [3]) of the vehicle clutch. Furthermore, it is important to select the test procedure of the experimental analyses to be as close to the system as possible in order to obtain exact information concerning the target system. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Die experimentellen und konstruktiven Ergebnisse haben gezeigt, dass ingenieurkeramische Werkstoffe ein hohes Potenzial im Bereich der trockenlaufenden Friktionssysteme haben. Durch geeignete Wahl der Systemreibpaarung und eine keramikgerechte Konstruktion ist es nach ersten Abschaetzungen moeglich, die Kfz-Kupplung um 53 % kleiner zu bauen bzw. bei gleicher Groesse bis zu 180 % hoehere Drehmomente zu uebertragen [1, 2]. Die Reibungszahlcharakteristik (fallende Reibungszahl ueber Gleitgeschwindigkeit) ist im Hinblick auf Komfort (selbsterregte Rupfschwingungen [3]) fuer die Kraftfahrzeugkupplung unguenstig. Des Weiteren ist es wichtig, die Versuchsfuehrung der experimentellen Untersuchungen so systemnah wie moeglich zu waehlen, um genauere Aussagen auf das Zielsystem zu erhalten. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  13. Glass-ceramics as building materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, J. María

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics are materials composed as any ceramic material by several crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous or vitreous matrix, but their manufacture process implies the controlled devitrification or nucleation and growth of phases from an original glass. The original shape of the original glass molded by conventional methods is carried out by using pressing and sintering followed by crystallization steps. By both processing routes are obtained transparent and/or opaque materials, with or without colours, which after adequate control and design of composition and microstructure have numerous domestic and architectonic applications. They can be used as pavements or wall coatings and in various decorative elements. In fact, their use is very extensive in east-European, American and Asian (Japan countries in constructions for covering large surfaces. The greater advantage of the glass-ceramic process is that due to the own process of vitrification allows the incorporation in their structure of a wide range of compositions from mining and industrial residues, such as red muds, ashes, fangos, scraps... which they can in this way not only be inertizated, but furthermore it be converted without risk for the environment into products useful in construction applications, offering to the architect and to the decorator a new range of "eco-materials" with multiple complementary possibilities of the already existing architectural materials in the market.

    Los productos o materiales vitrocerámicos se componen, como cualquier material de tipo cerámico, de una o varias fases cristalinas embebidas en una matriz amorfa o vítrea, pero cuyo proceso de fabricación implica la desvitrificación o nucleación y cristalización controlada de un vidrio original o de partida. En el proceso de obtención de estos materiales se puede conservar la forma original conferida al vidrio de partida por los métodos convencionales de moldeado de vidrios

  14. Monolithic silica aerogel - material design on the nano-scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    structure of aerogel could be used for gas filters in the 20 to 100 nm region. - The sound velocity within aerogel is in the range of 100 to 300 m/s, which should be one of lowest for an inorganic material. Due to the low density, low acoustic impedance of aerogel could help boost the efficiency...... of piezoelectric transducers. - Other applications could be; waste encapsulation, spacers for vacuum insulation panels, membranes, etc. Department of Civil Engineering is co-ordinator of a current EU FP5 research project1, which deals with the application of aerogel as transparent insulation materials in windows....... Due to the excellent optical and thermal properties of aerogel, it is possible to develop windows with both high insulation and high transmittance, which is impossible applying the conventional window techniques, i.e. extra layers of glass, low-e coatings and gas fillings. It can be shown...

  15. EXOTIC: Development of ceramic tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flipot, A.J.; Kennedy, P.; Conrad, R.

    1989-03-01

    As part of the joint European Programme on fusion blanket technology three laboratories, Northern Research Laboratories (NRL), Springfields in the UK, SCK/CEN-Mol in Belgium and ECN-Petten in conjunction with JRC-Petten in the Netherlands have worked closely together since 1983 on the development of ceramic breeder materials, the programme being codenamed EXOTIC. Lithium oxides, aluminates, silicates and zirconates have been produced, characterised and irradiated in the HFR-Petten in experiments EXOTIC-1, -2 and -3. EXOTIC-4 is in preparation. In this fourth annual progress report the work achieved in 1987 is reported. For EXOTIC-1 to -3 mainly post irradiation examinations have been carried out like: visual inspection, puncturing of closed capsules, tritium retention measurements and material characterisation. Moreover, tritium release experiments on small specimens have started. SCK/CEN performed a general study on lithium silicates, in particular on the thermal stability. Finally, the fabrication and the characterisation of the materials to be irradiated in experiment EXOTIC-4 are presented. The eight capsules of EXOTIC-4 will be loaed with samples of Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 2 O, Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 6 Zr 2 O 7 and Li 8 ZrO 6 . The irradiation will last 4 reactor cycles or about 100, Full Power Day, FPD. The main objective is to determine the tritium residence time of the various lithium zirconates. 18 figs., 8 refs., 15 tabs

  16. Lithium mass transport in ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, P.E.; Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this activity is to measure the lithium vaporization from lithium oxide breeder material under differing temperature and moisture partial pressure conditions. Lithium ceramics are being investigated for use as tritium breeding materials. The lithium is readily converted to tritium after reacting with a neutron. With the addition of 1000 ppM H 2 to the He purge gas, the bred tritium is readily recovered from the blanket as HT and HTO above 400 degree C. Within the solid, tritium may also be found as LiOT which may transport lithium to cooler parts of the blanket. The pressure of LiOT(g), HTO(g), or T 2 O(g) above Li 2 O(s) is the same as that for reactions involving hydrogen. In our experiments we were limited to the use of hydrogen. The purpose of this work is to investigate the transport of LiOH(g) from the blanket material. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Development of Ceramic Solid-State Laser Host Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Trivedi, Sudhir; Kutcher, Susan; Wang, Chen-Chia; Kim, Joo-Soo; Hommerich, Uwe; Shukla, Vijay; Sadangi, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline ceramic laser materials are gaining importance in the development of novel diode-pumped solid-state lasers. Compared to single-crystals, ceramic laser materials offer advantages in terms of ease of fabrication, shape, size, and control of dopant concentrations. Recently, we have developed Neodymium doped Yttria (Nd:Y2O3) as a solid-state ceramic laser material. A scalable production method was utilized to make spherical non agglomerated and monodisperse metastable ceramic powders of compositions that were used to fabricate polycrystalline ceramic material components. This processing technique allowed for higher doping concentrations without the segregation problems that are normally encountered in single crystalline growth. We have successfully fabricated undoped and Neodymium doped Yttria material up to 2" in diameter, Ytterbium doped Yttria, and erbium doped Yttria. We are also in the process of developing other sesquioxides such as scandium Oxide (Sc2O3) and Lutesium Oxide (Lu2O3) doped with Ytterbium, erbium and thulium dopants. In this paper, we present our initial results on the material, optical, and spectroscopic properties of the doped and undoped sesquioxide materials. Polycrystalline ceramic lasers have enormous potential applications including remote sensing, chem.-bio detection, and space exploration research. It is also potentially much less expensive to produce ceramic laser materials compared to their single crystalline counterparts because of the shorter fabrication time and the potential for mass production in large sizes.

  18. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics): An Eco-Friendly Route to Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2001-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). This technology provides an eco-friendly route to advanced ceramic materials. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches. Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented.

  19. Emerging ceramic-based materials for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I; Kelly, J R

    2014-12-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  20. Composite glass ceramics - a promising material for aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. В. Дмитрієв

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the technical and technological characteristics of the composite ceramic as a material for electrical and structural parts in aircraft. The economic and technological advantages compared to ceramic pottery and proposed options for development of production in Ukraine

  1. Tribology of ceramics and composites materials science perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Bikramjit

    2011-01-01

    This book helps students and practicing scientists alike understand that a comprehensive knowledge about the friction and wear properties of advanced materials is essential to further design and development of new materials. With important introductory chapters on the fundamentals, processing, and applications of tribology, the book then examines in detail the nature and properties of materials, the friction and wear of structural ceramics, bioceramics, biocomposites, and nanoceramics, as well as lightweight composites and the friction and wear of ceramics in a cryogenic environment.

  2. Mechanical properties of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldea, Andrea; Swain, Michael V; Thiel, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    To determine and identify correlations between flexural strength, strain at failure, elastic modulus and hardness versus ceramic network densities of a range of novel polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials. Four ceramic network densities ranging from 59% to 72% of theoretical density, resin infiltrated PICN as well as pure polymer and dense ceramic cross-sections were subjected to Vickers Indentations (HV 5) for hardness evaluation. The flexural strength and elastic modulus were measured using three-point-bending. The fracture response of PICNs was determined for cracks induced by Vickers-indentation. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the indented areas. Depending on the density of the porous ceramic the flexural strength of PICNs ranged from 131 to 160MPa, the hardness values ranged between 1.05 and 2.10GPa and the elastic modulus between 16.4 and 28.1GPa. SEM observations of the indentation induced cracks indicate that the polymer network causes greater crack deflection than the dense ceramic material. The results were compared with simple analytical expressions for property variation of two phase composite materials. This study points out the correlation between ceramic network density, elastic modulus and hardness of PICNs. These materials are considered to more closely imitate natural tooth properties compared with existing dental restorative materials. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of ancient ceramics reference material by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huhou; Sun Jingxin; Wang Yuqi; Lu Liangcai

    1986-01-01

    Contents of trace elements in the reference material of ancient ceramics (KPS-1) were determined by means of activation analysis, using thermal neutron irradiation produced in nuclear reactor. KPS-1 favoured the analysis of ancient ceramics because it had not only many kinds of element but also appropriate contents of composition. The values presented here are reliable within the experimental precision, and have shown that the reference material had a good homogeneity. So KPS-1 can be used as a suitable reference material for the ancient ceramics analysis

  4. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Ramanathan, S.; Hubli, R.C.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2012-10-01

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  5. Effects of different etching methods and bonding procedures on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different CAD/CAM ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, S Kutalmış; Kucukekenci, Ahmet Serkan

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different types of ceramic surfaces treated with different etching procedures and bonding agents. Monolithic CAD/CAM ceramic specimens (N = 120; n = 40 each group) of feldspathic ceramic Vita Mark II, resin nanoceramic Lava Ultimate, and hybrid ceramic Vita Enamic were fabricated (14 × 12 × 3 mm). Ceramic specimens were separated into four subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface treatment and bonding onto the ceramic surface. Within each group, four subgroups were prepared by phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, Transbond XT primer, and Clearfill Ceramic primer. Mandibular central incisor metal brackets were bonded with light-cure composite. The SBS data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The highest SBS was found in the Vita Enamic group, which is a hybrid ceramic, etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Transbond XT Adhesive primer (7.28 ± 2.49 MPa). The lowest SBS was found in the Lava Ultimate group, which is a resin nano-ceramic etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Clearfill ceramic primer (2.20 ± 1.21 MPa). CAD/CAM material types and bonding procedures affected bond strength ( P .05). The use of Transbond XT as a primer bonding agent resulted in higher SBS.

  6. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  7. Acoustic emission during fracture of ceramic superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woźny, L; Kisiel, A; Łysy, K

    2016-01-01

    In the ceramic materials acoustic emission (AE) is associated with a rapid elastic energy release due to the formation and expansion of cracks, which causes generation and propagation of the elastic wave. AE pulses measurement allows monitoring of internal stresses changes and the development of macro- and micro-cracks in ceramic materials, and that in turn allows us to evaluate the time to failure of the object. In presented work the acoustic signals generated during cracking of superconducting ceramics were recorded. Results obtained were compared with other ceramic materials tested the same way. An analysis of the signals was carried out. The characteristics of the AE before destruction of the sample were determined, that allow the assessment of the condition of the material during operation and its expected lifetime. (paper)

  8. Effect of Ti and Si interlayer materials on the joining of SiC ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang Il; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Gil; Park, Dong Jun; Park, Jeong Yong; Kim, Weon Ju [LWR Fuel Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    SiC-based ceramic composites are currently being considered for use in fuel cladding tubes in light-water reactors. The joining of SiC ceramics in a hermetic seal is required for the development of ceramic-based fuel cladding tubes. In this study, SiC monoliths were diffusion bonded using a Ti foil interlayer and additional Si powder. In the joining process, a very low uniaxial pressure of ∼0.1 MPa was applied, so the process is applicable for joining thin-walled long tubes. The joining strength depended strongly on the type of SiC material. Reaction-bonded SiC (RB-SiC) showed a higher joining strength than sintered SiC because the diffusion reaction of Si was promoted in the former. The joining strength of sintered SiC was increased by the addition of Si at the Ti interlayer to play the role of the free Si in RB-SiC. The maximum joint strength obtained under torsional stress was ∼100 MPa. The joint interface consisted of TiSi{sub 2}, Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}, and SiC phases formed by a diffusion reaction of Ti and Si.

  9. Ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft material: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S R; Passi, D; Singh, P; Bhuibhar, A

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of dental, craniofacial and orthopedic defects with bone graft substitutes has shown promising result achieving almost complete bone regeneration depending on product resorption similar to human bone's physicochemical and crystallographic characteristics. Among these, non-ceramic and ceramic hydroxyapatite being the main inorganic salt of bone is the most studied calcium phosphate material in clinical practices ever since 1970s and non-ceramic since 1985. Its "chemical similarity" with the mineralized phase of biologic bone makes it unique. Hydroxyapatite as an excellent carrier of osteoinductive growth factors and osteogenic cell populations is also useful as drug delivery vehicle regardless of its density. Porous ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite is osteoconductive, biocompatible and very inert. The need for bone graft material keeps on increasing with increased age of the population and the increased conditions of trauma. Recent advances in genetic engineering and doping techniques have made it possible to use non-ceramic hydroxyapatite in larger non-ceramic crystals and cluster forms as a successful bone graft substitute to treat various types of bone defects. In this paper we have mentioned some recently studied properties of hydroxyapatite and its various uses through a brief review of the literatures available to date.

  10. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are ceramic materials, such as SiC, that have been reinforced by high strength fibers, such as carbon. Designers are interested in using ceramic matrix composites because they have the capability of withstanding significant loads while at relatively high temperatures (in excess of 1,000 C). Ceramic matrix composites retain the ceramic materials ability to withstand high temperatures, but also possess a much greater ductility and toughness. Their high strength and medium toughness is what makes them of so much interest to the aerospace community. This work concentrated on two different tasks. The first task was to do an extensive literature search into the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composite materials. This report contains the results of this task. The second task was to use this understanding to help interpret the ceramic matrix composite mechanical test results that had already been obtained by NASA. Since the specific details of these test results are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), they are reported in a separate document (Jordan, 1997).

  11. Wear characteristics of polished and glazed lithium disilicate ceramics opposed to three ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Kodaira, Akihisa; Okamura, Kentaro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the wear characteristics of a heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic material opposed to feldspathic porcelain, a lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and zirconia materials. Ceramic plate specimens were prepared from feldspathic porcelain (EX-3 nA1B), lithium disilicate glass ceramics (e.max CAD MO1/C14), and zirconia (Katana KT 10) and then ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens were fabricated from heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max press LT A3) and then glazed or polished. A sliding wear testing apparatus was used for wear testing. Wear of glazed rods was greater than that of polished rods when they were abraded with ground zirconia, ground porcelain, polished porcelain, or polished lithium disilicate ceramics. For both glazed and polished rods, wear was greater when the rods were abraded with ground plates. The findings indicate that application of a polished surface rather than a glazed surface is recommended for single restorations made of heat-pressed lithium disilicate material. In addition, care must be taken when polishing opposing materials, especially those used in occlusal contact areas. (J Oral Sci 58, 117-123, 2016).

  12. preparation, characterization and formulation of nano-ceramic materials to be used for the separation of some heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    the synthesis of asymmetric composite and monolithic ceramic filters, with high performance quality, to be used in heavy metals separation is the aim of this study. asymmetric composite ceramic filter consisted of a macroporous or mesoporous substrate coated with several layers having lower pore size than the substrate usually microporous film. on the other hand, asymmetric monolithic ceramic filter is monolithic system having dual pore size distribution. ceramic filters synthesis was performed using polymeric sol-gel process. the optimization of synthesis parameters as well as the characterization was achieved to obtain ceramic filters with high separative properties. the synthesized ceramic filters were characterized using mercury porosimeter for pore size distribution analysis, BET method for specific surface areas measurements and BJH pore size distribution analysis, XRD analysis for crystalline phase identification and SEM for microstructure and morphology studies

  13. Updating Classifications of Ceramic Dental Materials: A Guide to Material Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Edward A; Figueira, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The indications for and composition of today's dental ceramic materials serve as the basis for determining the appropriate class of ceramics to use for a given case. By understanding the classifications, composition, and characteristics of the latest all-ceramic materials, which are presented in this article in order of most to least conservative, dentists and laboratory technicians can best determine the ideal material for a particular treatment.

  14. Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Ku, Qunyin

    1993-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

  15. Fundamental properties of monolithic bentonite buffer material formed by cold isostatic pressing for high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, S.; Yamanaka, Y.; Kato, K.; Asano, H.; Ueda, H.

    1999-01-01

    The methods of fabrication, handling, and emplacement of engineered barriers used in a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste should be planned as simply as possible from the engineering and economic viewpoints. Therefore, a new concept of a monolithic buffer material around a waste package have been proposed instead of the conventional concept with the use of small blocks, which would decrease the cost for buffer material. The monolithic buffer material is composed of two parts of highly compacted bentonite, a cup type body and a cover. As the forming method of the monolithic buffer material, compaction by the cold isostatic pressing process (CIP) has been employed. In this study, monolithic bentonite bodies with the diameter of about 333 mm and the height of about 455 mm (corresponding to the approx. 1/5 scale for the Japanese reference concept) were made by the CIP of bentonite powder. The dry densities: ρd of the bodies as a whole were measured and the small samples were cut from several locations to investigate the density distribution. The swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity as function of the monolithic body density for CIP-formed specimens were also measured. High density (ρd: 1.4--2.0 Mg/m 3 ) and homogeneous monolithic bodies were formed by the CIP. The measured results of the swelling pressure (3--15 MPa) and hydraulic conductivity (0.5--1.4 x 10 -13 m/s) of the specimens were almost the same as those for the uniaxial compacted bentonite in the literature. It is shown that the vacuum hoist system is an applicable handling method for emplacement of the monolithic bentonite

  16. Characterization of mechanical damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials. Technical report, 23 May 1987-24 May 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankford, J.

    1988-09-01

    High-strain-rate compressive failure mechanisms in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials were characterized. These are contrasted with composite damage development at low-strain rates, and with the dynamic failure of monolithic ceramics. It is shown that it is possible to derive major strain-rate strengthening benefits if a major fraction of the fiber reinforcement is aligned with the load axis. This effect considerably exceeds the inertial microfracture strengthening observed in monolithic ceramics, and non-aligned composites. Its basis is shown to be the trans-specimen propagation time period for heterogeneously-nucleated, high-strain kink bands. A brief study on zirconia focused on the remarkable inverse strength-strain rate result previously observed for both fully and partially-stabilized zirconia single crystals, whereby the strength decreased with increasing strain rate. Based on the hypothesis that the suppression of microplastic flow, hence, local stress relaxation, might be responsible for this behavior, fully stabilized (i.e., non-transformable) specimens were strain-gaged and subjected to compressive microstrain. The rather stunning observation was that the crystals are highly microplastic, exhibiting plastic yield on loading and anelasticity and reverse plasticity upon unloading. These results clearly support the hypothesis that with increasing strain rate, microcracking is favored at the expense of microplasticity.

  17. Failure analysis of various monolithic posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Liliana; Topală, Florin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of material stiffness and load on the biomechanical performance of the monolithic full-coverage posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element analysis. Three restorative materials for monolithic dental crowns were selected for the study: zirconia; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, and resin-based composite. Stresses were calculated in the crowns for all materials and in the teeth structures, under different load values. The experiments show that dental crowns made from all this new aesthetic materials processed by CAD/CAM technologies would be indicated as monolithic dental crowns for posterior areas.

  18. Capillary electrochromatography immunoassay for alpha-fetoprotein based on poly(guanidinium ionic liquid) monolithic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuicui; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Dang, Meng; Wang, Shuo

    2017-08-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is widely used as a tumor marker for the serum diagnosis of primary hepatoma. Sensitive detection of AFP level plays an important role in the early diagnosis of disease and highly reliable prediction. In this study, a novel non-competitive immunoassay (IA) based on poly(guanidinium ionic liquid) monolithic material was developed for detecting ultra trace levels of AFP in capillary electrochromatography (CEC) mode. The AFP was mixed with an excess amount of fluorescently labeled antibody. After incubation, the immunocomplex was separated from the free labeled antibody and detected by CEC coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detector. Under the optimized conditions, the developed CEC-IA performed a low detection limit of 0.05 μg L -1  (S/N = 3) and a wide linearity ranging from 0.1 to 1000 μg L -1 for AFP, which can be largely attributed to the high separation and enrichment efficiency of poly(guanidinium ionic liquid) monolithic material for the targets. The application of this method was demonstrated by determining AFP in human serum. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. ROMP-Derived cyclooctene-based monolithic polymeric materials reinforced with inorganic nanoparticles for applications in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Weichelt

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous monolithic inorganic/polymeric hybrid materials have been prepared via ring-opening metathesis copolymerization starting from a highly polar monomer, i.e., cis-5-cyclooctene-trans-1,2-diol and a 7-oxanorborn-2-ene-derived cross-linker in the presence of porogenic solvents and two types of inorganic nanoparticles (i.e., CaCO3 and calcium hydroxyapatite, respectively using the third-generation Grubbs initiator RuCl2(Py2(IMesH2(CHPh. The physico-chemical properties of the monolithic materials, such as pore size distribution and microhardness were studied with regard to the nanoparticle type and content. Moreover, the reinforced monoliths were tested for the possible use as scaffold materials in tissue engineering, by carrying out cell cultivation experiments with human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

  20. Multilayer Ceramic Regenerator Materials for 4 K Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numazawa, T.; Kamiya, K.; Satoh, T.; Nozawa, H.; Yanagitani, T.

    2006-01-01

    The ceramics oxide magnetic materials have shown excellent properties for use as regenerator materials used in 4 K crycoolers. Currently four kinds of oxide magnetic materials GdVO4, GAP=GdAlO3, GOS=Gd2O2S and Tb2O2S are available for applications for regenerators or thermal anchors from 2 K to 8 K. This paper focused on controlling the heat capacity of the (GdxTb1-x)2O2S system to cover the refrigeration temperatures between 6 K and 8 K. A concept of multilayer regenerator material consisting of multicomponent magnetic materials has been proposed and investigated. Two-layer ceramic material including two kinds of magnetic materials (Gd0.1Tb0.9)2O2S+Tb2O2S was successfully fabricated in the form of regenerator particles with an average diameter of 0.25 mm. Measured heat capacity data showed that it had twin peaks relating to those of (Gd0.1Tb0.9)2O2S and Tb2O2S, and the entire curve became broader and wider. The mechanical properties of strength and hardness of the two-layer ceramic material were the same as other ceramic regenerator materials like GOS. Thus, it is concluded that the multilayer ceramic material is very useful to control the heat capacity of the regenerator particles. The cooling tests using the two-layer ceramic material with HoCu2 and GOS have been done to investigate the 2nd stage regenerator configuration

  1. Surface Characteristics and Biofilm Development on Selected Dental Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung H. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoral adjustment and polishing of dental ceramics often affect their surface characteristics, promoting increased roughness and consequent biofilm growth. This study correlated surface roughness to biofilm development with four commercially available ceramic materials. Methods. Four ceramic materials (Vita Enamic®, Lava™ Ultimate, Vitablocs Mark II, and Wieland Reflex® were prepared as per manufacturer instructions. Seventeen specimens of each material were adjusted and polished to simulate clinical intraoral procedures and another seventeen remained unaltered. Specimens were analysed by SEM imaging, confocal microscopy, and crystal violet assay. Results. SEM images showed more irregular surface topography in adjusted specimens than their respective controls. Surface roughness (Ra values were greater in all materials following adjustments. All adjusted materials with the exception of Vitablocs Mark II promoted significantly greater biofilm growth relative to controls. Conclusion. Simulated intraoral polishing methods resulted in greater surface roughness and increased biofilm accumulation.

  2. Confocal examination of subsurface cracking in ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etman, Maged K

    2009-10-01

    The original ceramic surface finish and its microstructure may have an effect on crack propagation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between crack propagation and ceramic microstructure following cyclic fatigue loading, and to qualitatively evaluate and quantitatively measure the surface and subsurface crack depths of three types of ceramic restorations with different microstructures using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Twenty (8 x 4 x 2 mm(3)) blocks of AllCeram (AC), experimental ceramic (EC, IPS e.max Press), and Sensation SL (SSL) were prepared, ten glazed and ten polished of each material. Sixty antagonist enamel specimens were made from the labial surfaces of permanent incisors. The ceramic abraders were attached to a wear machine, so that each enamel specimen presented at 45 degrees to the vertical movement of the abraders, and immersed in artificial saliva. Wear was induced for 80K cycles at 60 cycles/min with a load of 40 N and 2-mm horizontal deflection. The specimens were examined for cracks at baseline, 5K, 10K, 20K, 40K, and 80K cycles. Twenty- to 30-microm deep subsurface cracking appeared in SSL, with 8 to 10 microm in AC, and 7 microm close to the margin of the wear facets in glazed EC after 5K cycles. The EC showed no cracks with increasing wear cycles. Seventy-microm deep subsurface cracks were detected in SSL and 45 microm in AC after 80K cycles. Statistically, there was significant difference among the three materials (p 0.05) in crack depth within the same ceramic material with different surface finishes. The ceramic materials with different microstructures showed different patterns of subsurface cracking.

  3. Monolitni katalizatori i reaktori: osnovne značajke, priprava i primjena (Monolith catalysts and reactors: preparation and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašić, V.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic (honeycomb catalysts are continuous unitary structures containing many narrow, parallel and usually straight channels (or passages. Catalytically active components are dispersed uniformly over the whole porous ceramic monolith structure (so-called incorporated monolithic catalysts or are in a layer of porous material that is deposited on the walls of channels in the monolith's structure (washcoated monolithic catalysts. The material of the main monolithic construction is not limited to ceramics but includes metals, as well. Monolithic catalysts are commonly used in gas phase catalytic processes, such as treatment of automotive exhaust gases, selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides, catalytic removal of volatile organic compounds from industrial processes, etc. Monoliths continue to be the preferred support for environmental applications due to their high geometric surface area, different design options, low pressure drop, high temperature durability, mechanical strength, ease of orientation in a reactor and effectiveness as a support for a catalytic washcoat. As known, monolithic catalysts belong to the class of the structured catalysts and/or reactors (in some cases the distinction between "catalyst" and "reactor" has vanished. Structured catalysts can greatly intensify chemical processes, resulting in smaller, safer, cleaner and more energy efficient technologies. Monolith reactors can be considered as multifunctional reactors, in which chemical conversion is advantageously integrated with another unit operation, such as separation, heat exchange, a secondary reaction, etc. Finally, structured catalysts and/or reactors appear to be one of the most significant and promising developments in the field of heterogeneous catalysis and chemical engineering of the recent years. This paper gives a description of the background and perspectives for application and development of monolithic materials. Different methods and techniques

  4. Aerospace Ceramic Materials: Thermal, Environmental Barrier Coatings and SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2018-01-01

    Ceramic materials play increasingly important roles in aerospace applications because ceramics have unique properties, including high temperature capability, high stiffness and strengths, excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance. Ceramic materials also generally have lower densities as compared to metallic materials, making them excellent candidates for light-weight hot-section components of aircraft turbine engines, rocket exhaust nozzles, and thermal protection systems for space vehicles when they are being used for high-temperature and ultra-high temperature ceramics applications. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), including non-oxide and oxide CMCs, are also recently being incorporated in gas turbine engines for high pressure and high temperature section components and exhaust nozzles. However, the complexity and variability of aerospace ceramic processing methods, compositions and microstructures, the relatively low fracture toughness of the ceramic materials, still remain the challenging factors for ceramic component design, validation, life prediction, and thus broader applications. This ceramic material section paper presents an overview of aerospace ceramic materials and their characteristics. A particular emphasis has been placed on high technology level (TRL) enabling ceramic systems, that is, turbine engine thermal and environmental barrier coating systems and non-oxide type SiC/SiC CMCs. The current status and future trend of thermal and environmental barrier coatings and SiC/SiC CMC development and applications are described.

  5. Glass-ceramic material and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-13

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  6. Valorization of sugarcane bagasse ash: producing glass-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, S R; Magalhães, R S; Arenales, A; Souza, A E; Romero, M; Rincón, J M

    2014-02-15

    Some aluminosilicates, for example mullite and wollastonite, are very important in the ceramic and construction industries. The most significant glass-ceramic for building applications has wollastonite as the main crystal phase. In this work we report on the use of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) to produce glass-ceramics with silicates as the major crystalline phases. The glasses (frits) were prepared by mixing ash, limestone (calcium and magnesium carbonates) and potassium carbonate as the fluxing agent. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine the chemical composition of the glasses and their crystallization was assessed by using thermal analysis (DTA/DSC/TGA) and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that glass-ceramic material can be produced with wollastonite as the major phase, at a temperature lower than 900 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination Of Work Indexes Of Basic Ceramic Raw Materials

    OpenAIRE

    İPEK, Halil; UÇBAŞ, Yaşar

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the grindability of basic ceramic raw materials have been investigated by using Bond grindability test and the results have been compared. Bond grindability test results show that work indexes of raw materials are dependent on their hardnesses.

  8. Ceramic materials based on synthetic calcium phosphate for medical uses

    OpenAIRE

    Toropkov, N. E.; Antonkin, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the different methods of synthesis of hydroxyapatite and receiving on its base of ceramic materials in various ways. We have also developed our own technology. The conditions of compatibility and saddle the assumption and the suitability of the material for implantation.

  9. Growth kinetics of dislocation loops in irradiated ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Kinoshita, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic materials are expected to be applied in the future fusion reactor as radio frequency (RF) windows, toroidal insulating breaks and diagnostic probes. The radiation resistance of ceramic materials, degradation of the electrical properties and radiation induced conductivity of these materials under neutron irradiation are determined by the kinetics of the accumulation of point defects in the matrix and point defect cluster formation (dislocation loops, voids, etc.). Under irradiation, due to the ionization process, excitation of electronic subsystem and covalent type of interaction between atoms the point defects in ceramic materials are characterized by the charge state (e.g. an F + center, an oxygen vacancy with a single trapped electron) and the effective charge. For the investigation of radiation resistance of ceramic materials for future fusion applications it is very important to understand the physical mechanisms of formation and growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation taking into account in this system the effective charge of point defects. In the present paper the physical mechanisms of dislocation loop growth in ceramic material are investigated. For this aim a theoretical model is suggested for the description of the kinetics of point defect accumulation in the matrix taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of an electric field on diffusion migration process of charged point defects. A self-consistent system of kinetic equations describing the generation of electrical fields near dislocation loops and diffusion migration of charged point defects in elastic and electrical fields is formulated. The solution of the kinetic equations allows to find the growth rate of dislocation loops in ceramic materials under irradiation taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of electric and elastic stress fields near dislocation loop on the diffusion processes

  10. Temperature Measurement of Ceramic Materials Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    1999-01-01

    The surface temperatures of several pure ceramic materials (alumina, beryllia, magnesia, yittria and spinel) in the shape of pellets were measured using a multiwavelength pyrometer. In one of the measurements, radiation signal collection is provided simply by an optical fiber. In the other experiments, a 4.75 inch (12 cm) parabolic mirror collects the signal for the spectrometer. Temperature measurement using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer for these ceramic materials is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which varies with both temperature and wavelength. In at least one of the materials, yittria, the detected optical emission increased as the temperature was decreased due to such emissivity variation. The reasons for such changes are not known. The multiwavelength pyrometer has demonstrated its ability to measure surface temperatures under such conditions. Platinum electrodes were embedded in the ceramic pellets for resistance measurements as the temperature changed.

  11. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  12. Leaching behaviour of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: From granular material to monolithic concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Abbà, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the leaching behaviour of the bottom ash derived from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) used in concrete production. In particular, the release of pollutants was evaluated by the application of different leaching tests, both on granular materials and monolithic samples (concrete mixtures cast with bottom ash). The results confirmed that, according to Italian regulations, unwashed bottom ashes present critical issues for the use as alternative aggregates in the construction sector due to the excessive release of pollutants; instead, the leachate from washed bottom ashes was similar to natural aggregates. The concentration of pollutants in the leachate from concrete mixtures was lower than regulation limits for reuse. The crushing process significantly influenced the release of pollutants: this behaviour was due both to the increase in surface area and the release of contaminants from cement. Moreover, the increase in contact time (up to 64 days) involved more heavy metals to be released.

  13. Cathodic electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic materials. Fundamental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitomirsky, I

    2002-03-29

    Electrodeposition of ceramic materials can be performed by electrophoretic (EPD) or electrolytic (ELD) deposition. Electrophoretic deposition is achieved via motion of charged particles towards an electrode under an applied electric field. Electrolytic deposition produces colloidal particles in cathodic reactions for subsequent deposition. Various electrochemical strategies and deposition mechanisms have been developed for electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic films, and are discussed in the present article. Electrode-position of ceramic and organoceramic materials includes mass transport, accumulation of particles near the electrode and their coagulation to form a cathodic deposit. Various types of interparticle forces that govern colloidal stability in the absence and presence of processing additives are discussed. Novel theoretical contributions towards an interpretation of particle coagulation near the electrode surface are reviewed. Background information is given on the methods of particle charging, stabilization of colloids in aqueous and non-aqueous media, electrophoretic mobility of ceramic particles and polyelectrolytes, and electrode reactions. This review also covers recent developments in the electrodeposition of ceramic and organoceramic materials.

  14. Ceramic/polymer functionally graded material (FGM) lightweight armor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Functionally graded material is an enabling technology for lightweight body armor improvements. The objective was to demonstrate the ability to produce functionally graded ceramic-polymer and ceramic-metal lightweight armor materials. This objective involved two aspects. The first and key aspect was the development of graded-porosity boron-carbide ceramic microstructures. The second aspect was the development of techniques for liquid infiltration of lightweight metals and polymers into the graded-porosity ceramic. The authors were successful in synthesizing boron-carbide ceramic microstructures with graded porosity. These graded-porosity boron-carbide hot-pressed pieces were then successfully liquid-infiltrated in vacuum with molten aluminum at 1,300 C, and with liquid polymers at room temperature. Thus, they were able to demonstrate the feasibility of producing boron carbide-aluminum and boron carbide-polymer functionally graded materials.

  15. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Test Methods on the Flexural Strength Results of Monolithic Zirconia Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Christine; Strickstrock, Monika; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Zylla, Isabella-Maria; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of specimen preparation and test method on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia. Different monolithic zirconia materials (Ceramill Zolid (Amann Girrbach, Koblach, Austria), Zenostar ZrTranslucent (Wieland Dental, Pforzheim, Germany), and DD Bio zx² (Dental Direkt, Spenge, Germany)) were tested with three different methods: 3-point, 4-point, and biaxial flexural strength. Additionally, different specimen preparation methods were applied: either dry polishing before sintering or wet polishing after sintering. Each subgroup included 40 specimens. The surface roughness was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a profilometer whereas monoclinic phase transformation was investigated with X-ray diffraction. The data were analyzed using a three-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with respect to the three factors: zirconia, specimen preparation, and test method. One-way ANOVA was conducted for the test method and zirconia factors within the combination of two other factors. A 2-parameter Weibull distribution assumption was applied to analyze the reliability under different testing conditions. In general, values measured using the 4-point test method presented the lowest flexural strength values. The flexural strength findings can be grouped in the following order: 4-point strength values than prepared before sintering. The Weibull moduli ranged from 5.1 to 16.5. Specimens polished before sintering showed higher surface roughness values than specimens polished after sintering. In contrast, no strong impact of the polishing procedures on the monoclinic surface layer was observed. No impact of zirconia material on flexural strength was found. The test method and the preparation method significantly influenced the flexural strength values.

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Porous Monolithic Materials from Melamine-Formaldehyde for Selective Trapping of Phosphopeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Mingquan; Tran, Tri Minh; Abbas Elhaj, Ahmed Awad

    2017-01-01

    monoliths, chosen based on the combination of meso- and macropores providing optimal percolative flow and accessible surface area, was synthesized in the presence of N-Fmoc and O-Et protected phosphoserine and phosphotyrosine to prepare molecularly imprinted monoliths with surface layers selective...... for phosphopeptides. These imprinted monoliths were characterized alongside nonimprinted monoliths by a variety of techniques and finally evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in the capillary format to assess their abilities to trap and release phosphorylated amino acids and peptides from partly...

  17. Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology Project bibliography, 1984--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology [for Advanced Heat Engines] Project was begun in 1983 to meet the ceramic materials needs of the companion DOE automotive engine program, the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) project, and the Heavy Duty Transport (low-heat-rejection, heavy-duty diesel) project. Goal is to develop an industry technology base for reliable and cost effective ceramics for applications in advanced automotive gas turbine and diesel engines. Research areas were identified following extensive input from industry and academia. Majority of research is done by industry (60%); work is also done at colleges and universities, in-house, and at other national laboratories and government agencies. In the beginning, reliability of ceramic components was the key issue. The reliability issues have largely been met and, at the present time, cost is the driving issue, especially in light of the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. Emphasis of the program has now been shifted toward developing cost-effective ceramic components for high-performance engines in the near-term. This bibliography is a compilation of publications done in conjunction with the Ceramic Technology Project since its beginning. Citations were obtained from reports done by participants in the project. We have tried to limit citations to those published and easily located. The end date of 1992 was selected.

  18. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  19. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  20. Mechanical properties of resin-ceramic CAD/CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Abdallah; Nathanson, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The recent development of polymer-based computer-aided design and computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) milling blocks and the limited availability of independent studies on these materials make it pertinent to evaluate their properties and identify potential strengths and limitations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine and compare mechanical properties (flexural strength, flexural modulus, modulus of resilience) and compare the margin edge quality of recently introduced polymer-based CAD/CAM materials with some of their commercially available composite resin and ceramic counterparts. The materials studied were Lava Ultimate Restorative (LVU; 3M ESPE), Enamic (ENA; Vita Zahnfabrik), Cerasmart (CES; GC Dental Products), IPS Empress CAD (EMP; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), Vitablocs Mark II (VM2; Vita Zahnfabrik), and Paradigm MZ100 Block (MZ1; 3M ESPE). Polished 4×1×13.5 mm bars (n=25) were prepared from standard-sized milling blocks of each tested material. The bars were subjected to a 3-point flexural test on a 10-mm span with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. In addition, 42 conventional monolithic crowns (7 per material) were milled. Margin edge quality was observed by means of macrophotography and optical microscopy, providing a qualitative visual assessment and a measurement of existing roughness. The results were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The mean flexural strength of the tested materials ranged from 105 ±9 MPa (VM2) to 219 ±20 MPa (CES). The mean flexural modulus ranged from 8 ±0.25 GPa (CES) to 32 ±1.9 GPa (EMP). The mean modulus of resilience ranged from 0.21 ±0.02 MPa (VM2) to 3.07 ±0.45 MPa (CES). The qualitative assessment of margin edge roughness revealed visible differences among the tested materials, with mean roughness measurements ranging from 60 ±16 μm (CES) to 190 ±15 μm (EMP). The material factor had a significant effect on the mean flexural strength (Pmaterials tested in this study exhibited

  1. Interpenetrating network ceramic-resin composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M V; Coldea, A; Bilkhair, A; Guess, P C

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and some properties of resin infiltrated ceramic network structure materials suitable for CAD/CAM dental restorative applications. Initially the basis of interpenetrating network materials is defined along with placing them into a materials science perspective. This involves identifying potential advantages of such structures beyond that of the individual materials or simple mixing of the components. Observations from a number of recently published papers on this class of materials are summarized. These include the strength, fracture toughness, hardness and damage tolerance, namely to pointed and blunt (spherical) indentation as well as to burr adjustment. In addition a summary of recent results of crowns subjected to simulated clinical conditions using a chewing simulator are presented. These results are rationalized on the basis of existing theoretical considerations. The currently available ceramic-resin IPN material for clinical application is softer, exhibits comparable strength and fracture toughness but with substantial R-curve behavior, has lower E modulus and is more damage tolerant than existing glass-ceramic materials. Chewing simulation observations with crowns of this material indicate that it appears to be more resistant to sliding/impact induced cracking although its overall contact induced breakage load is modest. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultra low and negative expansion glass–ceramic materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultra low and negative expansion glass–ceramic materials have been obtained from pyrophyllite and blast furnace slag. The batch composition was modified with the addition of lithium carbonate, hydrated alumina, boric acid and nucleating agent (titania). The batch was melted at 1400°C followed by casting in the form of ...

  3. 3rd Workshop on metal ceramic materials for functional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korb, G [Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    1998-12-31

    This workshop contains contributions about materials and processing, characterization and modeling of properties and applications of metallic ceramics and composite structures. It was held on behalf of the Taiwan-Austrian scientific collaboration in Vienna, June 4{sup th} - 6{sup th} 1997. (Suda)

  4. 3rd Workshop on metal ceramic materials for functional applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korb, G.

    1997-01-01

    This workshop contains contributions about materials and processing, characterization and modeling of properties and applications of metallic ceramics and composite structures. It was held on behalf of the Taiwan-Austrian scientific collaboration in Vienna, June 4 th - 6 th 1997. (Suda)

  5. Opalescence of all-ceramic core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Sang; Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-06-01

    The enamel of natural teeth is opalescent, where there is light scattering of the shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum, giving a tooth a bluish appearance in the reflected color and an orange/brown appearance in the transmitted color. The objective of this study was to determine the opalescence of all-ceramic core, veneer and layered specimens with a color measuring spectrophotometer. Colors of core (A2-corresponding shade), veneer (A2- and A3-corresponding shades) and layered (A2- and A3-layered) ceramics for all-ceramic restorations in clinically relevant thicknesses were measured in the reflectance and transmittance modes. The opalescence parameter (OP), which was calculated as the difference in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and red-green coordinate (Deltaa(*)), and the differences in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and in color (DeltaE(ab)(*)) between the reflected and transmitted colors were calculated. One-way ANOVA was performed for the OP values of the core, veneer and layered specimens by the kind of materials. Regression analysis was performed between the OP and Deltab(*), and the OP and DeltaE(ab)(*) values. The range of the OP value was 1.6-6.1, 2.0-7.1, 1.3-5.0 and 1.6-4.2 for the core, veneer, A2- and A3-layered specimens, respectively, all of which were significantly influenced by the kind of materials (pOpalescence varied by kind of ceramics. The OP values of ceramics were lower than those of tooth enamel. All-ceramic materials that can simulate the opalescence of natural teeth should be developed.

  6. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  7. Aluminium nitrate ceramics: A potential UV dosemeter material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Berzina, B.

    2002-01-01

    The ceramic material AIN-Y2O3 is proposed as a potential ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dosemeter using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermally stimulated luminescence (TL). Experimental studies have shown that AIN ceramics exhibit attractive characteristics suitable for practical UV...... dosimetry applications. The features are: (1) the spectral sensitivity covers the 200-350 nm range, in the UV-B region it is similar to that of human skin: (2) the angular dependence of the incident radiation follows the cosine law; (3) high yields of both UVR-induced OSL and TL signals compared to those...

  8. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.; Sutaria, M.; Kurokawa, S.; Mayberry, J.

    1994-04-01

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  9. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Kim, Anthony Y.; Virden, Jud W.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors.

  10. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR DENTAL APPLICATIONS SINTERED BY MICROWAVE HEATING

    OpenAIRE

    Presenda Barrera, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Zirconia has become a widely utilized structural ceramic material with important applications in dentistry due to its superb mechanical properties, biocompatibility, aesthetic characteristics and durability. Zirconia needs to be stabilized in the t-phase to obtain improved mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture toughness. Fully dense yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) materials are normally consolidated through the energy-intensive processing of po...

  11. Addition of alternative materials to ceramic slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Nara,E. O. B.; Moraes,J. A. R.; Freitas,A. M. V. de; Rediske,G.; Benitez,G. B.

    2014-01-01

    The construction market is very growing, leading to the emergence of new technologies and materials, and a growing need for sustainable products for the construction process, and the call for quality of life we present the description of a new option alternative materials for environments that require careful with the acoustics. The research covers the development and incorporation of new material in construction, with the potential acoustic, from tests and measurements with calibrated decibe...

  12. Determination of crystallinity of ceramic materials from the Ruland Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Gomes Junior, J.C.; Lima, J.C. de; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    Some methods found in literature approach the different characteristics between crystalline and amorphous phases by X ray diffraction technique. These methods use the relation between the intensities of the crystalline peaks and background amorphous or the absolute intensity of one of these to determine the relative amount of crystalline and amorphous material. However, a crystalline substance presents shows coherent diffuse scattering and a loss in the intensity of the peaks of diffraction in function of thermal vibrations of atoms and imperfections in the crystalline structure. A correct method for the determination of the crystallinity must take in account these effects. This work has as objective to determine the crystallinity of ceramic materials obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ashes, using the X ray diffraction technique and the Ruland Method, that considers the diminution of the intensity of the crystalline peak because of the disorder affects. The Ruland Method shows adequate for the determination of the crystallinity of the ceramic materials. (author)

  13. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  14. New approach to design of ceramic/polymer material compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, A; Nestler, D; Trautmann, M; Wagner, G

    2016-01-01

    The damage tolerance of carbon fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials depends on their porosity and can be rather significant. Complex structures are difficult to produce. The integration of simple geometric structures of ceramic-matrix composite materials in complex polymer-based hybrid structures is a possible approach of realising those structures. These hybrid material compounds, produced in a cost-efficient way, combine the different advantages of the individual components in one hybrid material compound. In addition the individual parts can be designed to fit a specific application and the resulting forces. All these different advantages result in a significant reduction of not only the production costs and the production time, but also opens up new areas of application, such as the large-scale production of wear-resistant and chemically inert, energy dampening components for reactors or in areas of medicine. The low wettability of the ceramic component however is a disadvantage of this approach. During the course of this contribution, different C/C composite materials with a specific porosity were produced, while adjusting the resin/hardening agent-ratio, as well as the processing parameters. After the production, different penetration tests were conducted with a polymer component. The final part of the article is comprised of the microstructural analysis and the explanation of the mechanical relationships. (paper)

  15. Perspectives of development of ceramic materials with luminescent applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado E, A.; Fernandez M, J.L.; Diaz G, J.L.I.; Rivera M, T.

    2005-01-01

    The science and technology of materials believes and it applies the knowledge that allow to relate the composition, it structures and the one processed with those properties that those they make capable for each one of the applications. The ceramic materials are inorganic materials not metallic, constituted by metallic elements and not metallic. In general, they usually behave, as good insulating electric and thermal due to the absence of conductive electrons. Usually, they possess relatively high coalition temperatures and, also, a chemical stability relatively high. Due to these properties, they are indispensable for many of those designs in engineering. The ceramic materials for luminescent applications are constituted typically by pure compounds (Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 , SiO 2 and ZrO 2 ) or cocktails with some sludges giving as a result (Al 2 O 3 :TR, TiO 2 :Eu, Si:ZrO 2 , ZrO 2 :TR). Presently work describes the panorama to big features on the development of ceramic materials in the CICATA Unit it would Bequeath, which can be characterized by the photoluminescence techniques and thermoluminescence mainly. (Author)

  16. Advanced ceramic material for high temperature turbine tip seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, N. G.; Vogan, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic material systems are being considered for potential use as turbine blade tip gas path seals at temperatures up to 1370 1/4 C. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride structures were selected for study since an initial analysis of the problem gave these materials the greatest potential for development into a successful materials system. Segments of silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials over a range of densities, processed by various methods, a honeycomb structure of silicon nitride and ceramic blade tip inserts fabricated from both materials by hot pressing were tested singly and in combination. The evaluations included wear under simulated engine blade tip rub conditions, thermal stability, impact resistance, machinability, hot gas erosion and feasibility of fabrication into engine components. The silicon nitride honeycomb and low-density silicon carbide using a selected grain size distribution gave the most promising results as rub-tolerant shroud liners. Ceramic blade tip inserts made from hot-pressed silicon nitride gave excellent test results. Their behavior closely simulated metal tips. Wear was similar to that of metals but reduced by a factor of six.

  17. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John

    2011-10-01

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  18. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John [Savannah River National Laboratory Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2011-10-29

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme

  19. The monolithic multicell: a tool for testing material components in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, H.; Gruszecki, T. [IVF Industrial Research and Development Corporation, Moelndal (Sweden); Bernhard, R. [IVF Industrial Research and Development Corporation, Moelndal (Sweden); The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Center of Molcular Devices, Department of Chemistry; Haeggman, L.; Gorlov, M.; Boschloo, G.; Edvinsson, T.; Kloo, L.; Hagfeldt, A. [The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Center of Molcular Devices, Department of Chemistry

    2006-07-01

    A multicell is presented as a tool for testing material components in encapsulated dye-sensitized solar cells. The multicell is based on a four-layer monolithic cell structure and an industrial process technology. Each multicell plate includes 24 individual well-encapsulated cells. A sulfur lamp corrected to the solar spectrum has been used to characterize the cells. Efficiencies up to 6.8% at a light-intensity of 1000 W/m{sup su2} (up to 7.5% at 250 W/m{sup 2}) have been obtained with an electrolyte solution based on {upsilon}-butyrolactone. Additionally, a promising long-term stability at cell efficiencies close to 5% at 1000 W/m{sup 2} has been obtained with an electrolyte based on glutaronitrile. The reproducibility of the cell performance before and after exposure to accelerated testing has been high. This means that the multicell can be used as an efficient tool for comparative performance and stability tests. (author)

  20. The possibility of giant dielectric materials for multilayer ceramic capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tatsuya; Endo, Makoto; Masuda, Kenichiro; Ishida, Keisuke

    2013-02-11

    There have been numerous reports on discovery of giant dielectric permittivity materials called internal barrier layer capacitor in the recent years. We took particular note of one of such materials, i.e., BaTiO 3 with SiO 2 coating. It shows expressions of giant electric permittivity when processed by spark plasma sintering. So we evaluated various electrical characteristics of this material to find out whether it is applicable to multilayer ceramic capacitors. Our evaluation revealed that the isolated surface structure is the sole cause of expressions of giant dielectric permittivity.

  1. Estimation of local mechanical properties of highly porous ceramic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcián, P.; Majer, Z.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Florian, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 3 (2012), S476-S477 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/1821 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : cellular structures * tensile test * microCT * image processing * FEM Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.453, year: 2012 http://chemicke-listy.cz/docs/full/2012_s3_s405-s441.pdf

  2. Impact studies of five ceramic materials and pyrex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, B.J.; Holt, A.C.; Hord, B.L.; Kusubov, A.S.; Reaugh, J.E.; Wilkins, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    We measured the ballistic performance of five ceramic materials (alumina, silicon carbide, boron carbide, aluminum nitride, and titanium diboride) and Pyrex, when they are backed by thick steel plates. The projectile for all tests was a right-circular cylinder of tungsten sinter-alloy W2 with length 25.4 mm and diameter 6.35 mm, fired at velocities from 1.35 to 2.65 km/s. For this threat we determined the minimum areal density of each material that is needed to keep the projectile from penetrating the backup steel. For all of the facing materials studied here, this performance measure increases approximately linearly with projectile velocity. However, the rate of increase is significantly lower for aluminum nitride than for the other materials studied. Indeed, aluminum nitride is a poor performer at the lowest velocity tested, but is clearly the best at the highest velocity. Our computer simulations show the significant influence of the backing material on ceramic performance, manifested by a transition region extending two projectile diameters upstream from the material interface. Experiments with multiple material layers show that this influence also manifests itself through a significant dependence of ballistic performance on the ordering of the material

  3. Preparation of ceramic materials for surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipperian, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how microstructural preparation permits a microscopic analysis of a material's internal structure, which is related to the physical properties of the material. Today, numerous microstructural quantitative and qualitative measurements are commonly utilized. Several of these include phase determination, phase hardness, phase distribution, grain size and shape, and porosity and size distribution. The most widely used surface characterization techniques are optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and x-ray microscopy. Optical microscopy includes both transmitted-and reflected-light techniques and requires a surface preparation prior to analysis. Transmitted-light microscopy samples require thinning and polishing of both sides of the sample, whereas reflected light techniques require polishing of only one side of the sample

  4. Recycling ceramic industry wastes in sound absorbing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arenas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this investigation is to develop a material mainly composed (80% w/w of ceramic wastes that can be applied in the manufacture of road traffic noise reducing devices. The characterization of the product has been carried out attending to its acoustic, physical and mechanical properties, by measuring the sound absorption coefficient at normal incidence, the open void ratio, density and compressive strength. Since the sound absorbing behavior of a porous material is related to the size of the pores and the thickness of the specimen tested, the influence of the particle grain size of the ceramic waste and the thickness of the samples tested on the properties of the final product has been analyzed. The results obtained have been compared to a porous concrete made of crushed granite aggregate as a reference commercial material traditionally used in similar applications. Compositions with coarse particles showed greater sound absorption properties than compositions made with finer particles, besides presenting better sound absorption behavior than the reference porous concrete. Therefore, a ceramic waste-based porous concrete can be potentially recycled in the highway noise barriers field.

  5. Manufacturing technologies for nanocomposite ceramic structural materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadow, R. [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Fertigungstechnik keramischer Bauteile, D-70569 Stuttgart, Allmandring 7b (Germany)], E-mail: rainer.gadow@ifkb.uni-stuttgart.de; Kern, F.; Killinger, A. [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Fertigungstechnik keramischer Bauteile, D-70569 Stuttgart, Allmandring 7b (Germany)

    2008-02-25

    The new material class of ceramic nanocomposites, containing at least one phase in nanometric dimension, has achieved special interest in previous years. While earlier research was focused on materials science and microstructural details in laboratory scale the subject of developing suitable manufacturing technologies in technical scale is the challenge for the manufacturing engineer. The same high-performance features which make the nanocomposite materials so interesting in their properties are absolutely detrimental if it comes to production of these materials. Extreme hardness, toughness and abrasion resistance make the state of the art cutting-and-machining operations extremely cost intensive so that, from a manufacturing point of view, true near-net-shape manufacturing is mandatory to accomplish reasonable cost targets. Ceramic feedstocks with both, high solid content to reduce shrinkage and warping and stable processing conditions are required to accomplish this aim of near-net-shape processing. Stable and reproducible processing conditions, e.g. favourable rheological properties for injection moulding are essentials for the manufacturing engineer. These prerequisites of ceramic production technologies cannot be reached with pure nanopowders in the 10-20 nm range but materials with a micro-nano architecture can fulfill these requirements, using a mixture of a submicron-sized matrix in the 100-200 nm range and smaller nanosized additives in <20% content which contribute the desired functionality. By using these micro-nanocomposites near-net-shape ceramic forming technologies such as injection moulding, gel casting and slip casting have been developed which lead to high-performance materials at affordable production cost. Advanced surface technologies include nanoceramic coatings made by thermokinetic deposition processes. Modern ceramic processing, i.e. spray drying leads to fine granulated nanopowders with appropriate flowability for subsequent APS plasma or

  6. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm-3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm-1, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  7. Compression deformation of WC: atomistic description of hard ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qing; Song, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xuemei; Liang, Shuhua; Wang, Haibin; Nie, Zuoren

    2017-11-01

    The deformation characteristics of WC, as a typical hard ceramic material, were studied on the nanoscale using atomistic simulations for both the single-crystal and polycrystalline forms under uniaxial compression. In particular, the effects of crystallographic orientation, grain boundary coordination and grain size on the origin of deformation were investigated. The deformation behavior of the single-crystal and polycrystalline WC both depend strongly on the orientation towards the loading direction. The grain boundaries play a significant role in the deformation coordination and the potential high fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC. In contrast to conventional knowledge of ceramics, maximum strength was obtained at a critical grain size corresponding to the turning point from a Hall-Petch to an inverse Hall-Petch relationship. For this the mechanism of the combined effect of dislocation motion within grains and the coordination of stress concentration at the grain boundaries were proposed. The present work has moved forward our understanding of plastic deformability and the possibility of achieving a high strength of nanocrystalline ceramic materials.

  8. Novel sintered ceramic materials incorporated with EAF carbon steel slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V.; Ntampegliotis, K.; Lamprakopoulos, S.; Papapolymerou, G.; Spiliotis, X.

    2017-01-01

    In the present research, novel sintered clay-based ceramic materials containing electric arc furnace carbon steel slag (EAFC) as a useful admixture were developed and characterized. The environmentally safe management of steel industry waste by-products and their valorization as secondary resources into value-added materials towards circular economy have attracted much attention in the last years. EAF Carbon steel slag in particular, is generated during the manufacture of carbon steel. It is a solid residue mainly composed of rich-in- Fe, Ca and Si compounds. The experimental results show that the beneficial incorporation of lower percentages of EAFC up to 6%wt. into ceramics sintered at 950 °C is attained without significant variations in sintering behavior and physico-mechanical properties. Further heating up to 1100 °C strongly enhances the densification of the ceramic microstructures, thus reducing the porosity and strengthening their mechanical performance. On the other side, in terms of thermal insulation behavior as well as energy consumption savings and production cost alleviation, the optimum sintering temperature appears to be 950 °C.

  9. Materials analyses of ceramics for glass furnace recuperators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G.W.; Tennery, V.J.

    1979-11-01

    The use of waste heat recuperation systems offers significant promise for meaningful energy conservation in the process heat industries. This report details the analysis of candidate ceramic recuperator materials exposed to simulated industrial glass furnace hot flue gas environments. Several candidate structural ceramic materials including various types of silicon carbide, several grades of alumina, mullite, cordierite, and silicon nitride were exposed to high-temperature flue gas atmospheres from specially constructed day tank furnaces. Furnace charging, operation, and batch composition were selected to closely simulate industrial practice. Material samples were exposed in flues both with and without glass batch in the furnace for times up to 116 d at temperatures from 1150 to 1550/sup 0/C (2100 to 2800/sup 0/F). Exposed materials were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence to identify material degradation mechanisms. The materials observations were summarized as: Silicon carbide exhibited enhanced corrosion at lower temperatures (1150/sup 0/C) when alkalies were deposited on the carbide from the flue gas and less corrosion at higher temperatures (1550/sup 0/C) when alkalies were not deposited on the carbide; alumina corrosion depended strongly upon purity and density and alumina contents less than 99.8% were unsatisfactory above 1400/sup 0/C; and mullite and cordierite are generally unacceptable for application in soda-lime glass melting environments at temperatures above 1100/sup 0/C.

  10. High-density 3D graphene-based monolith and related materials, methods, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Kucheyev, Sergei; Montalvo, Elizabeth; Shin, Swanee; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-03-21

    A composition comprising at least one high-density graphene-based monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds and having a density of at least 0.1 g/cm.sup.3. Also provided is a method comprising: preparing a reaction mixture comprising a suspension and at least one catalyst, said suspension selected from a graphene oxide (GO) suspension and a carbon nanotube suspension; curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, said drying step is substantially free of supercritical drying and freeze drying; and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a high-density graphene-based monolith. Exceptional combinations of properties are achieved including high conductive and mechanical properties.

  11. Encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel in ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forberg, S.; Westermark, T.

    1983-03-01

    The international situation with regard to deposition of spent nuclear fuel is surveyed, with emphasis on encapsulation in ceramic materials. The feasibility and advantages of ceramic containers, thermodynamic stable in groundwater, are discussed as well as the possibility to ensure that stability for longevity by engineered measures. The design prerequisite are summarized and suggestions are made for a conceptual design, comprising rutile containers with stacks of coiled fuel pins. A novel technique is suggested for the homogeneous sealing of rutile containers at low temperatures. acceptable also for the fuel pin package. Key points are given for research, demonstration and verifications of the design foundations and for future improvements. Of which a few ideas are exemplified. (author)

  12. Ceramic luminescent radiographic materials for medicine and tool construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnacker, A.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray recording luminescent materials form the basis of a new concept for X ray imaging. Essential advantages as compared to the conventional film systems are the digitalisation of the X ray as well as the high dynamics of registration. Modern methods of image processing and video recording can be applied. Advantages also show where a very extensive video material must be filed. Compared to the films used up to now, one expects higher sensitivity, higher homogeneity and higher spatial resolution of pictures taken with ceramic films. (BaFBr:Eu, RbJ:Tl). (orig.) [de

  13. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  14. Mechanical behaviour of new zirconia-hydroxyapatite ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, J.A.; Morejon, L. [La Habana Univ. (Cuba). Centro de Biomateriales; Martinez, S. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. Cristallografia, Mineralogia; Ginebra, M.P.; Carlsson, N.; Fernandez, E.; Planell, J.A. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). CREB; Clavaguera-Mora, M.T.; Rodriguez-Viejo, J. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Fisica

    2001-07-01

    In this work a new zirconia-hydroxyapatite ceramic material was obtained by uniaxial pressing and sintering in humid environment. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and infrared spectra (FT-IR) showed that the hydroxyapatite (HA) is the only calcium phosphate phase present. The fracture toughness for HA with 20 wt.% of magnesia partially stabilised zirconia (Mg-PSZ) was around 2.5 times higher than those obtained for HA pure, also the highest value of bending strength (160 MPa) was obtained for material reinforced with Mg-PSZ. For the MgPSZ-HA (20%) the fracture mechanism seems to be less transgranular. (orig.)

  15. In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength between Ceramic Repair Systems and Ceramic Materials and Evaluation of the Wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaağaoğlu, Hasan; Manav, Taha; Albayrak, Haydar

    2017-04-01

    When fracture of an all-ceramic restoration occurs, it can be necessary to repair without removing the restoration. Although there are many studies about the repair of metal-ceramic restorations, there are few about all-ceramic restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between ceramic repair systems and esthetic core materials and to evaluate the wettability of all-ceramic core materials. Disk-like specimens (N = 90) made of three dental ceramic infrastructure materials (zirconia ceramic, alumina ceramic, glass ceramic) were polished with silicon carbide paper, prepared for bonding (abrasion with 30 μm diamond rotary cutting instrument). Thirty specimens of each infrastructure were obtained. Each infrastructure group was divided into three subgroups; they were bonded using 3 repair systems: Bisco Intraoral Repair Kit, Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System, and Clearfil Repair System. After 1200 thermocycles, shear bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. In addition, the contact angle values of the infrastructures after surface treatments were examined for wettability. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Although there were no significant differences among the repair systems (p > 0.05) in the glass ceramic and zirconia groups, a significant difference was found among the repair systems in alumina infrastructure (p 0.05); however, a statistically significant difference was found among the repair systems (p < 0.05). No difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems in terms of contact angle values. Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System had higher bond strength values than the other repair systems. Although no difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems, contact wettability angle was decreased by surface treatments compared with polished surfaces. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Contributions to the R-curve behaviour of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, T.

    1994-12-01

    Several ceramic materials show an increase in crack growth resistance with increasing crack extension. Especially, in case of coarse-grained alumina this ''R-curve effect'' is caused by crack-face interactions in the wake of the advancing crack. Similar effects occur for whisker reinforced ceramics. Due to the crack-face interactions so-called ''bridging stresses'' are generated which transfer forces between the two crack surfaces. A second reason for an increase of crack-growth resistance are stress-induced phase transformations in zirconia ceramics with the tetragonal phase changing to the monoclinic phase. These transformations will affect the stress field in the surroundings of crack tips. The transformation generates a crack-tip transformation zone and, due to the stress balance, also residual stresses in the whole crack region which result in a residual stress intensity factor. This additional stress intensity factor is also a reason for the R-curve behaviour. In this report both effects are outlined in detail. (orig.) [de

  17. Use of basaltic waste as red ceramic raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Mendes

    Full Text Available Abstract Nowadays, environmental codes restrict the emission of particulate matters, which result in these residues being collected by plant filters. This basaltic waste came from construction aggregate plants located in the Metropolitan Region of Londrina (State of Paraná, Brazil. Initially, the basaltic waste was submitted to sieving (< 75 μm and the powder obtained was characterized in terms of density and particle size distribution. The plasticity of ceramic mass containing 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of basaltic waste was measured by Atterberg method. The chemical composition of ceramic formulations containing 0% and 20% of basaltic waste was determined by X-ray fluorescence. The prismatic samples were molded by extrusion and fired at 850 °C. The specimens were also tested to determine density, water absorption, drying and firing shrinkages, flexural strength, and Young's modulus. Microstructure evaluation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Basaltic powder has similar physical and chemical characteristics when compared to other raw materials, and contributes to ceramic processing by reducing drying and firing shrinkage. Mechanical performance of mixtures containing basaltic powder is equivalent to mixtures without waste. Microstructural aspects such as pore size distribution were modified by basaltic powder; albite phase related to basaltic powder was identified by X-ray diffraction.

  18. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Silvestri, T.; Amaral, M.; Rippe, M.P.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to

  19. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  20. Interfacial characterization of ceramic core materials with veneering porcelain for all-ceramic bi-layered restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagmatarchis, Alexander; Tripodakis, Aris-Petros; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the elemental distribution at the interface between all-ceramic core and veneering porcelain materials. Three groups of all-ceramic cores were selected: A) Glass-ceramics (Cergo, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, e-max Press, Finesse); B) Glass-infiltrated ceramics (Celay Alumina, Celay Zirconia) and C) Densely sintered ceramics (Cercon, Procera Alumina, ZirCAD, Noritake Zirconia). The cores were combined with compatible veneering porcelains and three flat square test specimens were produced for each system. The core-veneer interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. The glass-ceramic systems showed interfacial zones reach in Si and O, with the presence of K, Ca, Al in core and Ca, Ce, Na, Mg or Al in veneer material, depending on the system tested. IPS Empress and IPS Empress 2 demonstrated distinct transitional phases at the core-veneer interface. In the glassinfiltrated systems, intermixing of core (Ce, La) with veneer (Na, Si) elements occurred, whereas an abrupt drop of the core-veneer elemental concentration was documented at the interfaces of all densely sintered ceramics. The results of the study provided no evidence of elemental interdiffusion at the core-veneer interfaces in densely sintered ceramics, which implies lack of primary chemical bonding. For the glass-containing systems (glassceramics and glass-infiltrated ceramics) interdiffusion of the glass-phase seems to play a critical role in establishing a primary bonding condition between ceramic core and veneering porcelain.

  1. Micro Electro Discharge Machining for Nonconductive Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yeakub Ali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In micro-electro discharge machining (micro-EDM of nonconductive ceramics, material is removed mainly by spalling due to the dominance of alternating thermal load. The established micro-EDM models established for single spark erosion are not applicable for nonconductive ceramics because of random spalling. Moreover, it is difficult to create single spark on a nonconductive ceramic workpiece when the spark is initiated by the assisting electrode. In this paper, theoretical model of material removal rate (MRR as the function of capacitance and voltage is developed for micro-EDM of nonconductive zirconium oxide (ZrO2. It is shown that the charging and discharging duration depend on the capacitance and resistances of the circuit. The number of sparks per unit time is estimated from the single spark duration s derived from heat transfer fundamentals. The model showed that both the capacitance and voltage are significant process parameters where any increase of capacitance and voltage increases the MRR. However, capacitance was found to be the dominating parameter over voltage. As in case of higher capacitances, the creation of a conductive carbonic layer on the machined surface was not stable; the effective window of machining 101 - 103 pF capacitance and 80 - 100 V gap voltage or 10 - 470 pF capacitance and 80 - 110 V gap voltage. This fact was confirmed EDX analysis where the presence of high carbon content was evident. Conversely, the spark was found to be inconsistent using parameters beyond these ranges and consequently insignificant MRR. Nevertheless, the effective number of sparks per second were close to the predicted numbers when machining conductive copper material. In addition, higher percentage of ineffective pulses was observed during the machining which eventually reduced the MRR. In case of validation, average deviations between the predicted and experimental values were found to be around 10%. Finally, micro-channels were machined on

  2. Assessment of the Possibility of Applying Ceramic Materials in Common Rail Injection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Bor

    2018-03-01

    The second part concerns analysis conduct by means of the finite element method and a specialized simulation environment, based on comparing ceramic materials and bearing steel. This comparison was conducted by using a CAD strength model of a piston in a specific application, being a pump with CP3 design. Simulation results confirmed the beneficial qualities of ceramic materials – the level of material deformation is lower for ceramics in comparison to steel.

  3. Raw materials for advanced ceramics: rare earths separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, D.R.; Nobre, J.S.M.; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of obtaining purified rare earths oxidesis related, mainly to the increasing use of these compounds as raw materials for advanced ceramics. Processes of rare earths separation and purification are almost always based on the solvent extraction, fractional precipitation and ion exchange chromatography techniques, whose association depends on the initial concentrate and on the desired purity. This paper describes some steps of fractionation of didymium carbonate by using the solvent extraction and fractional precipitation techniques. The experimental conditions presented here have enable the production of lantanium, neodimium - praseodimium, samarium - gadolinium and ytrium concentrates, which constitute the intermediate fractions of the overall process to obtain high purity rare earths. (author) [pt

  4. The effect of core material, veneering porcelain, and fabrication technique on the biaxial flexural strength and weibull analysis of selected dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Ercoli, Carlo; Feng, Changyong; Morton, Dean

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of veneering porcelain (monolithic or bilayer specimens) and core fabrication technique (heat-pressed or CAD/CAM) on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus of leucite-reinforced and lithium-disilicate glass ceramics. In addition, the effect of veneering technique (heat-pressed or powder/liquid layering) for zirconia ceramics on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus was studied. Five ceramic core materials (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.max ZirCAD) and three corresponding veneering porcelains (IPS Empress Esthetic Veneer, IPS e.max Ceram, IPS e.max ZirPress) were selected for this study. Each core material group contained three subgroups based on the core material thickness and the presence of corresponding veneering porcelain as follows: 1.5 mm core material only (subgroup 1.5C), 0.8 mm core material only (subgroup 0.8C), and 1.5 mm core/veneer group: 0.8 mm core with 0.7 mm corresponding veneering porcelain with a powder/liquid layering technique (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VL). The ZirCAD group had one additional 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroup with 0.7 mm heat-pressed veneering porcelain (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VP). The biaxial flexural strengths were compared for each subgroup (n = 10) according to ISO standard 6872:2008 with ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (p≤ 0.05). The reliability of strength was analyzed with the Weibull distribution. For all core materials, the 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroups (0.8C-0.7VL, 0.8C-0.7VP) had significantly lower mean biaxial flexural strengths (p Empress and e.max groups, regardless of core thickness and fabrication techniques. Comparing fabrication techniques, Empress Esthetic/CAD, e.max Press/CAD had similar biaxial flexural strength (p= 0.28 for Empress pair; p= 0.87 for e.max pair); however, e.max CAD/Press groups had significantly higher flexural strength (p Empress Esthetic/CAD groups. Monolithic core

  5. Gamma and proton induced degradation in ceramics materials - A proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.

    2001-01-01

    Ceramic materials will play very important roles in developing fusion reactors, where they will be used under heavy irradiation environments (neutrons, gamma-rays, protons, helium and other ions) for substantial periods for the first time. The programme at the Institute of Atomic Physics in Bucharest forms a part of the on going ceramics programmes to assess the suitability of SiO2 based materials for both diagnostic and remote handling application. The authors' proposal focuses on comparison of the ionization and displacement induced damage (influence on the UV and visible optical transmission properties) and on radiation enhanced hydrogen isotope diffusion in these materials; the work is performed in cooperation with CIEMAT Madrid and SCK/CEN Mol. The irradiation facilities are: IRASM - 200 kCi Co-60 source, minimum 2kGy/h, ethanol chlorine benzene and ESR dosimetry; HVEC 8 MV TANDEM - protons up to 16 MeV and 200 nA; and 600 kV DISKTRON - H isotopes up to 600 keV, tens of microamperes. (author)

  6. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report, October 1986-March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report contains four subelements: (1) Monolithics, (2) Ceramic Composites, (3) Thermal and Wear Coatings, and (4) Joining. Ceramic research conducted within the Monolithics subelement currently includes work activities on green state ceramic fabrication, characterization, and densification and on structural, mechanical, and physical properties of these ceramics. Research conducted within the Ceramic Composites subelement currently includes silicon carbide and oxide-based composites, which, in addition to the work activities cited for Monolithics, include fiber synthesis and characterization. Research conducted in the Thermal and Wear Coatings subelement is currently limited to oxide-base coatings and involves coating synthesis, characterization, and determination of the mechanical and physical properties of the coatings. Research conducted in the Joining subelement currently includes studies of processes to produce strong stable joints between zirconia ceramics and iron-base alloys. A major objective of the research in the Materials and Processing project element is to systematically advance the understanding of the relationships between ceramic raw materials such as powders and reactant gases, the processing variables involved in producing the ceramic materials, and the resultant microstructures and physical and mechanical properties of the ceramic materials. Success in meeting this objective will provide US companies with new or improved ways for producing economical highly reliable ceramic components for advanced heat engines.

  7. Immobilization of INEL low-level radioactive wastes in ceramic containment materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, W.C.; Kelsey, P.V.

    1978-11-01

    INEL low-level radioactive wastes have an overall chemical composition that lends itself to self-containment in a ceramic-based material. Fewer chemical additives would be needed to process the wastes than to process high-level wastes or use a mixture containment method. The resulting forms of waste material could include a basalt-type glass or glass ceramic and a ceramic-type brick. Expected leach resistance is discussed in relationshp to data found in the literature for these materials and appears encouraging. An overview of possible processing steps for the ceramic materials is presented

  8. Calcium phosphate nuclear materials: apatitic ceramics for separated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpena, J.; Lacout, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Is it feasible to elaborate conditioning materials for separated high activity nuclear wastes, as actinides or fission products? Specific materials have been elaborated so that the waste is incorporated within the crystalline structure of the most stable calcium phosphate, i.e. apatite. This mineral is able to sustain high irradiation doses assuming a well chosen chemical composition. Mainly two different ways of synthesis have been developed to produce hard apatite ceramics that can be used to condition nuclear wastes. Here we present a data synthesis regarding the elaboration of these apatite nuclear materials that includes experiments on crystallo-chemistry, chemical analysis, leaching and irradiation tests performed for the past fifteen years. (authors)

  9. High temperature structural ceramic materials manufactured by the CNTD process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiglich, J.J. Jr.; Bhat, D.G.; Holzl, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Controlled Nucleation Thermochemical Deposition (CNTD) has emerged from classical chemical deposition (CVD) technology. This paper describes the techniques of thermochemical grain refinement. The effects of such refinement on mechanical properties of materials at room temperature and at elevated temperatures are outlined. Emphasis is given to high temperature structural ceramic materials such as SiC, Si 3 N 4 , AlN, and TiB 2 and ZrB 2 . An example of grain refinement accompanied by improvements in mechanical properties is SiC. Grain sizes of 500 to 1000 A have been observed in CNTD SiC with room temperature MOR of 1380 to 2070 MPa (4 pt bending) and MOR of 3450 to 4140 MPa (4 pt bending) at 1350 0 C. Various applications of these materials to the solution of high temperature structural problems are described. (author)

  10. Density determination of sintered ceramic nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Medek, J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility was tested of using solids for pycnometric determination of the density of uranium dioxide-based sintered ceramic fuel materials manufactured by the sol-gel method in the shape of spherical particles of 0.7 to 1.0 mm in size and of particles smaller than 200 μm. For fine particles, this is the only usable method of determining their density which is a very important parameter of the fine fraction when it is employed for the manufacture of fuel elements by vibration compacting. The method consists in compacting a mixture of pycnometric material and dispersed particles of uranium dioxide, determining the size and weight of the compact, and in calculating the density of the material measured from the weight of the oxide sample in the mixture. (author)

  11. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  12. Modeling of tritium behavior in ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J.P.; Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1988-11-01

    Computer models are being developed to predict tritium release from candidate ceramic breeder materials for fusion reactors. Early models regarded the complex process of tritium release as being rate limited by a single slow step, usually taken to be tritium diffusion. These models were unable to explain much of the experimental data. We have developed a more comprehensive model which considers diffusion and desorption from the grain surface. In developing this model we found that it was necessary to include the details of the surface phenomena in order to explain the results from recent tritium release experiments. A diffusion-desorption model with a desorption activation energy which is dependent on the surface coverage was developed. This model provided excellent agreement with the results from the CRITIC tritium release experiment. Since evidence suggests that other ceramic breeder materials have desorption activation energies which are dependent on surface coverage, it is important that these variations in activation energy be included in a model for tritium release. 17 refs., 12 figs

  13. Understanding and control of optical performance from ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbour, J.C.; Knapp, J.A.; Potter, B.G.; Jennison, D.R.; Verdozzi, C.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Bendale, R.D.; Simmons, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to gain understanding and control of the important parameters which govern the optical performance of rare-earth (RE) doped ceramics. This LDRD developed the capability to determine stable atomic arrangements in RE doped alumina using local density functional theory, and to model the luminescence from RE-doped alumina using molecular dynamic simulations combined with crystal-field calculations. Local structural features for different phases of alumina were examined experimentally by comparing their photoluminescence spectra and the atomic arrangement of the amorphous phase was determined to be similar to that of the gamma phase. The luminescence lifetimes were correlated to these differences in the local structure. The design of both high and low-phonon energy host materials was demonstrated through the growth of Er-doped aluminum oxide and lanthanum oxide. Multicomponent structures of rare-earth doped telluride glass in an alumina and silica matrix were also prepared. Finally, the optical performance of Er-doped alumina was determined as a function of hydrogen content in the host matrix. This LDRD is the groundwork for future experimentation to understand the effects of ionizing radiation on the optical properties of RE-doped ceramic materials used in space and other radiation environments

  14. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.molpeceres@upm.es; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J. [Dept. de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J. [CeRMAE Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  15. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molpeceres, C.; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L.; Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J.; Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  16. Characterization of the raw-materials used in ceramic tiles in the state of Paraiba - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, Rosa Maria; Pontes, Luiz Renato de; Lira, Belarmino B.

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of ceramics basic materials may provide valuable information for their proper application. This work searches for characterization of basic materials (plastic and not plastic) used for optimization of ceramic tiles, classified as monoporosa production in Paraiba State. The further study will be conducted on basis of ceramic material characterization in order to develop a new mass for production of ceramic tiles. The study will be done on basis of X-ray diffraction, chemical, physical and mineralogical analysis. (author)

  17. Nanoporous ceramic hybrid materials synthesized by organically modified ceramic precursor with terminal amine group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikova, Nina E.; Vueva, Yuliya E.; Abdallah, Mohammed E.; Ivanova, Yordanka Y.; Dimitriev, Yanko B. [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Salvado, Isabel M.; Fernandes, Maria H. [Ceramic and Glass Engineering Department CICECO, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    Nanoporous ceramic materials was functionalized by co-condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and different 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) amounts in the presence of amphiphilic triblock copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (EO{sub 20}PO{sub 70}EO{sub 20} ), who was previously dissolved in acid solution with different acid concentrations. Pluronic P123 was used as structure-directing agent and xylene as a swelling agent. Inorganic salt was introduced in order to improve structure ordering and to tailor framework porosity. The synthesized materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance ( {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and {sup 13}C CP MAS NMR), Fourier –transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and elemental analysis. The results from NMR and FT-IR show that the organic functional group is successfuly incorporated in the silica framework and P123 was successfully extracted. The results from all analyzes prove that the acid concentration has significant influence on the materials morphology and properties. Kay words: sol-gel, mesoporous materials, hybrid materials, as structure-directing agent.

  18. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  19. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report for October 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work is organized into the following elements: materials and processing (monolithics [SiC, SiN], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining), materials design methodology, data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE), and technology transfer. Individual abstracts were prepared for the individual contributions.

  20. Ultra low and negative expansion glass–ceramic materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Clay and Traditional Ceramics Division, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India ... The batch composition was modified with the addition of lithium carbonate, hydrated ... dustrial waste due to their great technological advantage ..... applications of glass ceramic the present glass composi-.

  1. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  2. Method for selecting raw materials to preparing ceramic masses: application to raw material for red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Maria Margarita Torres; Rocha, Rogers Raphael da; Zanard, Antenor

    2012-01-01

    We studied the raw materials used in a factory building blocks, located in Cesario Lange city (SP). It extracts raw materials from various sources in the region to make the dough. The mixtures were prepared from dry milled powders based on data related to the plasticity of the raw materials. It was obtained with the apparatus Vicat-cone in order to obtain similar levels of water absorption of the samples burned at 900 deg C for all compositions. To quantify the proportion of each clay was used the Lever Rule. In this firing temperature, where sintering is mainly by diffusion from a solid state, different compositions of the same set of four raw materials resulted in similar values. (author)

  3. Flotation tailings as a raw material for ceramic building materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmistrov, V N; Karpunina, T I; Smolin, V N

    1986-02-01

    The VNIIstrom research institute developed a method for utilizing flotation tailings for production of bricks. Tailings are dewatered using filter presses. After dewatering, moisture content in the tailings ranges from 25 to 26%. Tailings are mixed with chamotte with a grain size to 2 mm. Using 30% chamotte improves mechanical and physical properties of the bricks and reduces energy consumption of brick firing. Tailings mixed with chamotte are granulated and dried on a conveyor. Granules with moisture content reduced to the optimum level are mixed a second time and formed in a press. The bricks are fired in a tunnel kiln with modified design. The bricks made of flotation tailings mixed with 30% chamotte are characterized by mechanical properties comparable to those of high quality bricks made of conventional materials.

  4. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  5. Quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials utilizing the Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Lima, J.C. de; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Maliska, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic materials have properties defined by their chemical and micro-structural composition. The quantification of the crystalline phases is a fundamental stage in the determination of the structure, properties and applications of a ceramic material. Within this context, this study aims is the quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials developed with addition of mineral coal bottom ash, utilizing the X ray diffraction technique, through the method proposed by Rietveld. For the formulation of the ceramic mixtures a {3,3} simplex-lattice design was used, giving ten formulations of three components (two different types of clays and coal bottom ash). The crystalline phases identified in the ceramic materials after sintering at 1150 deg C during two hours are: quartz, tridimite, mullite and hematite. The proposed methodology utilizing the Rietveld method for the quantification relating to crystalline phases of the materials was shown to be adequate and efficient. (author)

  6. Influence of Material Properties on the Ballistic Performance of Ceramics for Personal Body Armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kaufmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In support of improved personal armour development, depth of penetration tests have been conducted on four different ceramic materials including alumina, modified alumina, silicon carbide and boron carbide. These experiments consisted of impacting ceramic tiles bonded to aluminum cylinders with 0.50 caliber armour piercing projectiles. The results are presented in terms of ballistic efficiency, and the validity of using ballistic efficiency as a measure of ceramic performance was examined. In addition, the correlation between ballistic performance and ceramic material properties, such as elastic modulus, hardness, spall strength and Hugoniot Elastic Limit, has been considered.

  7. Influence of implant abutment material on the color of different ceramic crown systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Armağanci, Arzu; Ceylan, Gözlem; Celik, Ersan; Cankaya, Soner; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-11-01

    Ceramics are widely used for anterior restorations; however, clinical color reproduction still constitutes a challenge particularly when the ceramic crowns are used on titanium implant abutments. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of implant abutment material on the color of different ceramic material systems. Forty disks (11×1.5 mm, shade A2) were fabricated from medium-opacity (mo) and high-translucency (ht) lithium disilicate (IPS e.max) blocks, an aluminous ceramic (VITA In-Ceram Alumina), and a zirconia (Zirkonzahn) ceramic system. Disks were fabricated to represent 3 different implant abutments (zirconia, gold-palladium, and titanium) and dentin (composite resin, A2 shade) as background (11×2 mm). Disk-shaped composite resin specimens in A2 shade were fabricated to represent the cement layer. The color measurements of ceramic specimens were made on composite resin abutment materials using a spectrophotometer. CIELab color coordinates were recorded, and the color coordinates measured on composite resin background served as the control group. Color differences (ΔE 00 ) between the control and test groups were calculated. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and compared with the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The ceramics system, abutment material, and their interaction were significant for ΔE 00 values (P2.25) were observed for lithium disilicate ceramics on titanium abutments (2.46-2.50). The ΔE 00 values of lithium disilicate ceramics for gold-palladium and titanium abutments were significantly higher than for other groups (P2.25) of an implant-supported lithium disilicate ceramic restoration may be clinically unacceptable if it is fabricated over a titanium abutment. Zirconia may be a more suitable abutment material for implant-supported ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  9. Influence of Material Properties on the Ballistic Performance of Ceramics for Personal Body Armour

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, Christian; Cronin, Duane; Worswick, Michael; Pageau, Gilles; Beth, Andre

    2003-01-01

    In support of improved personal armour development, depth of penetration tests have been conducted on four different ceramic materials including alumina, modified alumina, silicon carbide and boron carbide. These experiments consisted of impacting ceramic tiles bonded to aluminum cylinders with 0.50 caliber armour piercing projectiles. The results are presented in terms of ballistic efficiency, and the validity of using ballistic efficiency as a measure of ceramic performance was examined. In...

  10. Antagonist wear of monolithic zirconia crowns after 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of wear on the antagonist occlusal surfaces of clinically placed monolithic zirconia premolar and molar crowns (LAVA Plus, 3M ESPE). Fourteen in situ monolithic zirconia crowns and their opposing antagonists (n = 26) are the subject of an ongoing clinical trial and have been clinically examined at baseline and after 24 months. Silicone impressions were taken and epoxy replicas produced for qualitative SEM analysis and quantitative analysis using optical profilometry. Based on the baseline replicas, the follow-up situation has been scanned and digitally matched with the initial topography in order to calculate the mean volume loss (in mm 3 ) as well as the mean maximum vertical loss (in mm) after 2 years in service. The mean volume loss for enamel antagonist contacts (n = 7) was measured to 0.361 mm 3 and the mean of the maximum vertical loss to 0.204 mm. The mean volume loss for pure ceramic contacts (n = 10) was measured to 0.333 mm 3 and the mean of the maximum vertical loss to 0.145 mm. The wear rates on enamel contacts were not significantly different from those measured on ceramic antagonists. Based on the limitations of this study, it can be concluded for the monolithic zirconia material LAVA Plus that the measured wear rates are in consensus with other in vivo studies on ceramic restorations. Further, that no significant difference was found between natural enamel antagonists and ceramic restorations as antagonists. The monolithic zirconia restorations do not seem to be affected by wear within the first 2 years. The monolithic zirconia crowns (LAVA Plus) show acceptable antagonist wear rates after 2 years in situ, regardless of natural enamel or ceramics as antagonist materials.

  11. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  12. Ceramic bar impact experiments for improved material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, N.S.; Proud, W.G.; Rajendran, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic bar-on-bar (uniaxial stress) experiments are performed to extend uniaxial strain deformation states imposed in flyer plate impact experiments. A number of investigators engaged in modeling the bar-on-bar experiments have varying degrees of success in capturing the observed fracture modes in bars and correctly simulating the measured in-situ axial stress or free surface velocity histories. The difficulties encountered are related to uncertainties in understanding the dominant failure mechanisms as a function of different stress states imposed in bar impacts. Free surface velocity of the far end of the target AD998 bar were measured using a VISAR in a series of bar-on-bar impact experiments at nominal impact speeds of 100 m/s, 220 m/s, and 300 m/s. Velocity history data at an impact of 100 m/s show the material response as elastic. At higher impact velocities of 200 m/s and 300 m/s the velocity history data suggest an inelastic material response. A high-speed (Imacon) camera was employed to examine the fracture and failure of impactor and target bars. High speed photographs provide comprehensive data on geometry of damage and failure patterns as a function of time to check the validity of a particular constitutive material model for AD998 alumina used in numerical simulations of fracture and failure of the bars on impact

  13. Corundum ceramic materials modified with silica nanopowders: structure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostytsyn, M. A.; Muratov, D. S.; Lysov, D. V.; Chuprunov, K. O.; Yudin, A. G.; Leybo, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Filtering elements are often used in the metallurgy of rare earth metals. Corundum ceramic is one of the most suitable materials for this purpose. The process of formation and the properties of nanomodified ceramic materials, which are proposed as filtering materials with tunable effective porosity, are described. A silica nanopowder is used as a porosity-increasing agent. Vortex layer apparatus is used for mixing of precursor materials. The obtained results show that nanomodification with the vortex layer apparatus using 0.04 wt. % silica nanopowder as a modifying agent leads to an increase in the compression strength of corundum ceramic by the factor of 1.5. (paper)

  14. Analysis of neutron irradiation effects on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, G.E.; Senor, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    After irradiation of a variety of SiC-based materials to 33 or 43 dpa-SiC at 1000{degrees}C, their thermal conductivity values were degraded and became relatively temperature independent, which indicates that the thermal resistivity was dominated by point defect scattering. The magnitude of irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures and typically was larger for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. From these data, a K{sub irr}/K{sub unirr} ratio map which predicts the expected equilibrium thermal conductivity for most SiC-based materials as a function of irradiation temperature was derived. Due to a short-term EOC irradiation at 575{degrees} {+-} 60{degrees}C, a duplex irradiation defect structure was established. Based on an analysis of the conductivity and swelling recovery after post-irradiation anneals for these materials with the duplex defect structure, several consequences for irradiating SiC at temperatures of 1000{degrees}C or above are given. In particular, the thermal conductivity degradation in the fusion relevant 800{degrees}-1000{degrees}C temperature range may be more severe than inferred from SiC swelling behavior.

  15. Analysis of neutron irradiation effects on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, G.E.; Senor, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    After irradiation of a variety of SiC-based materials to 33 or 43 dpa-SiC at 1000 degrees C, their thermal conductivity values were degraded and became relatively temperature independent, which indicates that the thermal resistivity was dominated by point defect scattering. The magnitude of irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures and typically was larger for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. From these data, a K irr /K unirr ratio map which predicts the expected equilibrium thermal conductivity for most SiC-based materials as a function of irradiation temperature was derived. Due to a short-term EOC irradiation at 575 degrees ± 60 degrees C, a duplex irradiation defect structure was established. Based on an analysis of the conductivity and swelling recovery after post-irradiation anneals for these materials with the duplex defect structure, several consequences for irradiating SiC at temperatures of 1000 degrees C or above are given. In particular, the thermal conductivity degradation in the fusion relevant 800 degrees-1000 degrees C temperature range may be more severe than inferred from SiC swelling behavior

  16. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioh, E L; Tok, A I Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  17. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part I: core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    All-ceramic restorations have been advocated for superior esthetics. Various materials have been used to improve ceramic core strength, but it is unclear whether they affect the opacity of all-ceramic systems. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic system core materials at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Disc specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.49 +/- 0.01 mm in thickness were fabricated from the following materials (n = 5 per group): IPS Empress dentin, IPS Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina core, In-Ceram Spinell core, In-Ceram Zirconia core, and Procera AllCeram core. Empress and Empress 2 dentin specimens also were fabricated and tested at a thickness of 0.77 +/- 0.02 mm (the manufacturer's recommended core thickness is 0.8 mm). A high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) served as the control, and Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin was used as a standard. Sample reflectance (ratio of the intensity of reflected light to that of the incident light) was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white (Yw) backing to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P In-Ceram Spinell > Empress, Procera, Empress 2 > In-Ceram Alumina > In-Ceram Zirconia, 52 SF alloy.

  18. An overview of monolithic zirconia in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Malkondu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia restorations have been used successfully for years in dentistry owing to their biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Because of their lack of translucency, zirconia cores are generally veneered with porcelain, which makes restorations weaker due to failure of the adhesion between the two materials. In recent years, all-ceramic zirconia restorations have been introduced in the dental sector with the intent to solve this problem. Besides the elimination of chipping, the reduced occlusal space requirement seems to be a clear advantage of monolithic zirconia restorations. However, scientific evidence is needed to recommend this relatively new application for clinical use. This mini-review discusses the current scientific literature on monolithic zirconia restorations. The results of in vitro studies suggested that monolithic zirconia may be the best choice for posterior fixed partial dentures in the presence of high occlusal loads and minimal occlusal restoration space. The results should be supported with much more in vitro and particularly in vivo studies to obtain a final conclusion.

  19. Mechanism of interaction of Co-B and Fe-B melts with ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filonov, M.R.; Anikin, D.Yu.; Pecherkin, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stability of ceramic materials has been studied in the medium of melts being rendered amorphous. Measurements of limiting wetting angle for these materials were carried out on the ceramic surface. Two conclusions were made from the results of the experiments: melt-ceramics interaction takes place mainly through the slag phase; boron nitride is the most stable ceramics for melting and pouring of melts being rendered amorphous in the air. Materials on the basis of BN were synthesized by the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Other refractory compounds were introduced in the ceramics composition for the purpose of improving such service properties as fire resistance, thermal resistance, mechanical strength, stability of compounds to the effect of reaction-active melts. The most promising refractory compositions were determined from the results of the studies [ru

  20. Development of new ceramic materials from the waste of serpentinite and red clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presotto, P.; Mymrine, V.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop new ceramic materials using serpentine and glass waste and clay red. The raw materials were characterized through morphological, granulometric, mineralogical and chemical analysis. Six formulations have been developed based on the serpentine and red clay, which three of the six compositions have been adjusted with the addition of residual glass. The ceramic bodies were formed by uniaxial pressing and subjected to burn in an electric oven at temperatures of 1100 ° C, 1200 ° C, 1250 ° C and 1300 ° C. The ceramic samples obtained this way were characterized according to their physical properties (specific mass and linear retraction) and the mechanical (three points bending strength). The final properties varied according to the proportions of raw materials and firing temperature. In general, the different formulations fit the standards for traditional ceramics such as tiles and ceramic blocks. (author)

  1. Validation of new ceramic materials from tungsten mining wastes. Mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Suarez, J. A.; Montoya Herrera, J.; Silva, A. P.; Peralbo Cano, R.; Castro-Gomes, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    New ceramic materials obtained from tungsten mining wastes, from region of Beira Interior in Portugal, with no commercial use, responsible for landscape and environmental problems are presented. These preshaped new ceramic products, prepared in a wide thermal range (800 degree centigrade to 1300 degree centigrade) was evaluated by mechanical test, but also was characterized the starting raw materials: tungsten wastes mining and industrial kaolin. Results, which also include a mineralogical characterization of ceramic products and morphologic evaluation of neoformed by scanning electron microscopy, show firstly, the feasibility of converting a large number of these wastes in marketable ceramics. Thanks to the experimentation carried out, the ability to generate ceramic materials is emphasized, without the presence of mineral clay, due to the particular composition of these waste of mining with content of acid, neutral and basic oxides. (Author)

  2. Thermoluminescence study of materials (natural minerals) used in ceramic tiles industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, K V R, E-mail: drmurthykvr@yahoo.com [Display Materials Laboratory Applied Physics Department Faculty of Technology and Engineering M.S. University of Baroda, Baroda-390 001 (India)

    2009-07-15

    Mother earth is giving many materials in the natural form as well as in mineral form. Among them the marbles, granites and other variety of slabs for house hold flooring purposes. The people demand for variety of flooring materials leads to develop various types of ceramic tile. In India ceramic tiles industry is one of the fast growing one. More than two hundred units are manufacturing the ceramic tiles situated around Morbi, Rajkot, Gujarat, India. The basic raw materials required for manufacturing the various types of ceramic tiles are natural minerals. The following are the minerals used to manufacture the ceramic tiles i.e. quartz, feldspar, zircon, china clay, talc, grok, Aluminum oxide etc.,

  3. Thermoluminescence study of materials (natural minerals) used in ceramic tiles industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, K V R

    2009-01-01

    Mother earth is giving many materials in the natural form as well as in mineral form. Among them the marbles, granites and other variety of slabs for house hold flooring purposes. The people demand for variety of flooring materials leads to develop various types of ceramic tile. In India ceramic tiles industry is one of the fast growing one. More than two hundred units are manufacturing the ceramic tiles situated around Morbi, Rajkot, Gujarat, India. The basic raw materials required for manufacturing the various types of ceramic tiles are natural minerals. The following are the minerals used to manufacture the ceramic tiles i.e. quartz, feldspar, zircon, china clay, talc, grok, Aluminum oxide etc.,

  4. Solubilization of advanced ceramic materials controlled by chemical analysis by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarante Junior, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper purpose is to show the techniques used in chemical analysis laboratory at Escola SENAI Mario Amato in the ceramic nucleus for opening and solubilization of Advanced Ceramic materials, where the elements in its majority are determined for atomic absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  5. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMACC) contractors meeting on problems and opportunities in structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This report consists mainly of viewographs and summaries of DOE and other programs on structural ceramics. Applications include heat engines, fusion reactors, solar absorbers, heat exchangers, coal conversion, turbines, material substitution, etc. Research centers and their capabilities are described. Panel discussions on fabrication reliability, market, ceramic producers and engine manufacturers, and conclusions are summarized

  6. Ceramics for Molten Materials Containment, Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a project on Molten Materials Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface, molten materials containment samples of various ceramics were tested to determine their performance in contact with a melt of lunar regolith simulant. The test temperature was 1600 C with contact times ranging from 0 to 12 hours. Regolith simulant was pressed into cylinders with the approximate dimensions of 1.25 dia x 1.25cm height and then melted on ceramic substrates. The regolith-ceramic interface was examined after processing to determine the melt/ceramic interaction. It was found that the molten regolith wetted all oxide ceramics tested extremely well which resulted in chemical reaction between the materials in each case. Alumina substrates were identified which withstood contact at the operating temperature of a molten regolith electrolysis cell (1600 C) for eight hours with little interaction or deformation. This represents an improvement over alumina grades currently in use and will provide a lifetime adequate for electrolysis experiments lasting 24 hours or more. Two types of non-oxide ceramics were also tested. It was found that they interacted to a limited degree with the melt resulting in little corrosion. These ceramics, Sic and BN, were not wetted as well as the oxides by the melt, and so remain possible materials for molten regolith handling. Tests wing longer holding periods and larger volumes of regolith are necessary to determine the ultimate performance of the tested ceramics.

  7. A facile approach for the synthesis of monolithic hierarchical porous carbons – high performance materials for amine based CO2 capture and supercapacitor electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Estevez, Luis

    2013-05-03

    An ice templating coupled with hard templating and physical activation approach is reported for the synthesis of hierarchically porous carbon monoliths with tunable porosities across all three length scales (macro- meso- and micro), with ultrahigh specific pore volumes [similar]11.4 cm3 g−1. The materials function well as amine impregnated supports for CO2 capture and as supercapacitor electrodes.

  8. Composite elements with superconducting ceramic materials and preparation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drifford, M.; Lambard, J.

    1990-01-01

    Supraconducting ceramic powder is introduced in a ductile metal with an open porosity, then the tube is sealed at both ends and necked to form a composite element which is sintered and the ceramic becomes superconductive by gaseous diffusion. Then the composite element can be placed into a gasproof cladding [fr

  9. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  11. Method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials using spherical indenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The invention pertains a method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramics, intermetallics, metals, plastics and other hard, brittle materials which fracture prior to plastically deforming when loads are applied. Elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials are determined using spherical indenters. The method is most useful for measuring and calculating the plastic and elastic deformation of hard, brittle materials with low values of elastic modulus to hardness.

  12. Metal-ceramic materials. Study and prediction of effective mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakulov, Valerii V.; Smolin, Igor Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of stochastic metal-ceramic composite materials was numerically simulated on mesoscopic scale level. Deformation of mesoscopic volumes of composites, whose structure consists of a metal matrix and randomly distributed ceramic inclusions, was numerically simulated. The results of the numerical simulation were used for evaluation of the effective elastic and strength properties of metal-ceramic materials with different parameters of the structure. The values of the effective mechanical properties of investigated materials were obtained, and the character of the dependence of the effective elastic and strength properties on the structure parameters of composites was determined.

  13. Tests with ceramic waste form materials made by pressureless consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Hash, M. C.; Hebden, A. S.; Ebert, W. L.

    2002-01-01

    A multiphase waste form referred to as the ceramic waste form (CWF) will be used to immobilize radioactively contaminated salt wastes recovered after the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. The CWF is made by first occluding salt in zeolite and then encapsulating the zeolite in a borosilicate binder glass. A variety of surrogate CWF materials were made using pressureless consolidation (PC) methods for comparison with CWF consolidated using a hot isostatic press (HIP) method and to study the effects of glass/zeolite batching ratio and processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of the resulting materials. The data summarized in this report will also be used to support qualification of the PC CWF for disposal in the proposed federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The phase composition and microstructure of HIP CWF and PC CWF are essentially identical: both are composed of about 70% sodalite, 25% binder glass, and a 5% total of inclusion phases (halite, nepheline, and various oxides and silicates). The primary difference is that PC CWF materials have higher porosities than HIP CWFs. The product consistency test (PCT) that was initially developed to monitor homogeneous glass waste forms was used to measure the chemical durabilities of the CWF materials. Series of replicate tests with several PC CWF materials indicate that the PCT can be conducted with the same precision with CWF materials as with borosilicate glasses. Short-term (7-day) PCTs were used to evaluate the repeatability of making the PC CWF and the effects of the glass/zeolite mass ratio, process temperature, and processing time on the chemical durability. Long-term (up to 1 year) PCTs were used to compare the durabilities of HIP and PC CWFs and to estimate the apparent solubility limit for the PC CWF that is needed for modeling. The PC and HIP CWF materials had similar disabilities, based on the release of silicon in long

  14. Investigation of the thermophysical properties of oxide ceramic materials at liquid-helium temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranov, A. V.; Khazanov, E. N.

    2008-01-01

    The main regularities in the transport of thermal phonons in oxide ceramic materials are investigated at liquid-helium temperatures. The dependences of the thermophysical characteristics of ceramic materials on their structural parameters (such as the grain size R, the grain boundary thickness d, and the structure of grain boundaries) are analyzed. It is demonstrated that, in dense coarse-grained ceramic materials with qR>>1 (where q is the phonon wave vector), the grain boundaries and the grain size are the main factors responsible for the thermophysical characteristics of the material at liquid-helium temperatures. A comparative analysis of the thermophysical characteristics of optically transparent ceramic materials based on the Y 3 Al 5 O 12 (YAG) and Y 2 O 3 cubic oxides synthesized under different technological conditions is performed using the proposed criterion

  15. Ceramic on ceramic arthroplasty of the hip: new materials confirm appropriate use in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentuerk, U; von Roth, P; Perka, C

    2016-01-01

    The leading indication for revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains aseptic loosening owing to wear. The younger, more active patients currently undergoing THA present unprecedented demands on the bearings. Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings have consistently shown the lowest rates of wear. The recent advances, especially involving alumina/zirconia composite ceramic, have led to substantial improvements and good results in vitro. Alumina/zirconia composite ceramics are extremely hard, scratch resistant and biocompatible. They offer a low co-efficient of friction and superior lubrication and lower rates of wear compared with other bearings. The major disadvantage is the risk of fracture of the ceramic. The new composite ceramic has reduced the risk of fracture of the femoral head to 0.002%. The risk of fracture of the liner is slightly higher (0.02%). Assuming that the components are introduced without impingement, CoC bearings have major advantages over other bearings. Owing to the superior hardness, they produce less third body wear and are less vulnerable to intra-operative damage. The improved tribology means that CoC bearings are an excellent choice for young, active patients requiring THA. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  16. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.

  18. Microanalytical investigation of fibre-reinforced ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, B.; Grathwohl, G.

    1989-01-01

    Microanalytical investigations have been made on samples of ceramic fibres (SiC fibres, (Nicalon) C fibre coated with TiN) and fibre-reinforced ceramics (SiC-and glass-matrices). High resolution Auger electron spectroscopy (HRAES), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy were employed for these examinations. Analysis was best performed with HRAES on account of its lateral and depth resolution. Some of the problems involved in this technique are discussed e.g. electron beam effects. AES depth profiles of ceramic fibres are reported and compared with the surface analysis of fibres in the composites after being broken in situ. (orig.)

  19. Effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and preliminary exploration of possible molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and the possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: Fibroblast cell lines L929 were cultured, extracting solution of diatomite ceramic, casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain was prepared and used to process L929 cells, and then cell apoptosis, percentages of cell cycle as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 were detected. Results: Cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G1 phase, S phase and G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group had no differences from those of control group; cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group were lower than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group, and percentages of G1 phase and S phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2 were significantly higher than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group. Conclusion: The effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts has no differences and is weaker than that of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain crown, and biocompatibility of diatomite ceramic is equivalent to that of casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain; mechanisms of different materials of all-ceramic crowns to regulate cell viability include Bcl-2/Bax pathway and Caspase pathway.

  20. Flexural resistance of Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks. Part 2: Outsourcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedda, Maurizio; Vichi, Alessandro; Del Siena, Francesco; Louca, Chris; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-02-01

    To test different Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks, comparing mean flexural strength (sigma), Weibull modulus (m), and Weibull characteristic strength (sigma0) in an ISO standardized set-up. Following the recent ISO Standard (ISO 6872:2008), 11 types of ceramic blocks were tested: IPS e.max CAD MO, IPS e.max CAD LT and IPS e.max CAD HT (lithium disilicate glass-ceramic); In-Ceram SPINELL, In-Ceram Alumina and In-Ceram Zirconia (glass-infiltrated materials); inCoris AL and In-Ceram AL (densely sintered alumina); In-Ceram YZ, IPS e.max Zir-CAD and inCoris ZI (densely sintered zirconia). Specimens were cut out from ceramic blocks, finished, crystallized/infiltrated/sintered, polished, and tested in a three-point bending test apparatus. Flexural strength, Weibull characteristic strength, and Weibull modulus were obtained. A statistically significant difference was found (P ceramic (sigma = 272.6 +/- 376.8 MPa, m = 6.2 +/- 11.3, sigma0 = 294.0 +/- 394.1 MPa) and densely sintered alumina (sigma = 441.8 +/- 541.6 MPa, m = 11.9 +/- 19.0, sigma0 = 454.2 +/- 565.2 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found (P = 0.254) in glass infiltrated materials (sigma = 376.9 +/- 405.5 MPa, m = 7.5 +/- 11.5, sigma0 = 393.7 +/- 427.0 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found (P = 0.160) in densely sintered zirconia (sigma = 1,060.8 +/- 1,227.8 MPa, m = 5.8 +/- 7.4, sigma0 = 1,002.4 +/- 1,171.0 MPa). Not all the materials tested fulfilled the requirements for the clinical indications recommended by the manufacturer.

  1. Raw-materials mixtures from waste of the coal industry for production of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galpern, E I [Scientific-Manufacturing Enterprise ` ` Ceramics` ` , Donetsk (Ukraine); Pashchenko, L V [Inst. of Physical, Organic and Coal Chemistry of NASU, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    1998-09-01

    The liquidation of waste dumps on the surface of mining enterprises and realization of measures by environment protection of air and aquatic basins are connected to the complex processing of mining mass. The main directions of utilization of mining rocks and coal wastes realized in Ukraine industry are: - filling of mines worked-out area by grouting solutions; - ceramic brick, porous filling materials and binding materials production; - road-making, construction of hydrostructures and industrial objects; - output of concrete items predominantly for using in mining conditions. The peculiarity of wastes using in above-mentioned fields is the possibility of their mass application in quantities commensurable with valumes of their yields. The experience of enterprises work which process mining rocks into building materials by burning method (ceramic brick, porous aggregates of concretes as aggloporite, expanded clay aggregate) has shown that unconstant and, as the rule, exceeding norms content of carbon and sulphur in the rock results to deterioration of products quality and technological factors of production. Unstability of carbon content in raw material makes the burning process hardly operated. Obtained products having residual carbon in the view of coke residue are often characterized by lower physical-mechanical characteristics. (orig./SR)

  2. Effect of additional materials on the properties of glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T W

    2004-07-01

    There are 21 Metro-waste incinerators in Taiwan under construction and are expected to be finished at year 2003. It is estimated that these incinerators will produce about two million tons of incinerator ash. In order to reduce the volume and eliminate contamination problems, high temperature molten technology studies have been conducted. The purpose of this research was that of trying to control the chemical composition of the glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ash, in order to improve the characteristics of the glass-ceramic. The experimental results showed that the additional materials, Mg(OH)2 and waste glass cullet, can change glass-ceramic phases from gehlenite to augite, pigeonite, and diopside. The physical, mechanical and chemical resistance properties of the glass-ceramic also showed much better characteristics than prepared glass-ceramic using incinerator fly ash alone.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of glass–ceramics materials developed from steel slag waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Feng; Fang, Yu; Xie, Junlin; Xie, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Steelmaking slag (SS) is one of the most common industrial wastes. ► Glass–ceramics produced from SS is observed to have good properties. ► A large volume of raw SS can be recycled. ► The utilization of SS could reduce solid waste pollution. -- Abstract: In this study, glass–ceramic materials were produced from SS (steel slag) obtained from Wuhan Iron and Steel Corporation in China. The amount of SS used in glass batch was about 31–41 wt.% of the total batch mixture. On basis of differential thermal analysis (DTA) results, the nucleation and crystallization temperature of the parent glass samples were identified, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that multiple crystalline phases coexisted in the glass–ceramics, and the main crystalline phase was wollastonite (CaSiO 3 ). SEM observation indicated that there was an increase in the amount of crystalline phase in the glass–ceramics when the CaO content and crystallization time increased. It was also found that the glass–ceramics with fine microstructure enhance mechanical properties and erosion wear resistance. The obtained glass–ceramics showed a maximum bending strength of 145.6 MPa and very nice wear resistance. Therefore, it is feasible to produce nucleated glass–ceramics materials for building and decorative materials from SS.

  4. Analysis of ceramic materials for impact members in isotopic heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, F.A.; Duckworth, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Of the available high strength ceramics, silicon nitride offers the most promise followed by silicon carbide and aluminum oxide, and stress analyses show severe limitations on allowable velocities for impact with granite following reentry for these ceramics. Impact velocities in the 100 to 200 fps regime can be achieved only by the addition of an additional layer to distribute the high contact stress. Besides impact limitations, application of ceramic materials in heat sources would present problems both in terms of weight and fabrication. The required thickness of a ceramic impact member would be comparable to that for a carbon-carbon composite material, but the least dense of the high strength ceramics are 2 to 3 times more dense than the carbon-carbon composites. Fabrication of a ceramic heat source would require a high strength bond between the fuel and the impact member if reasonable impact velocities are to be achieved. Formation of such a bond in ceramic materials is a difficult task under normal circumstances, and would be more difficult under the restrictions imposed on the processing and handling of the 238 PuO 2 fuel. 16 fig

  5. Modified PZT ceramics as a material that can be used in micromechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariasz, Radosław; Bochenek, Dariusz

    2015-11-01

    Results on investigations of the PZT type ceramics with the following chemical composition: Pb0.94Sr0.06(Zr0.50 Ti0.50)0.99 Cr0.01O3 (PSZTC) which belongs to a group of multicomponent ceramic materials obtained on basis of the PZT type solid solution, are presented in this work. Ceramics PSZTC was obtained by a free sintering method under the following conditions: Tsint = 1250 °C and tsint = 2 h. Ceramic compacts of specimens for the sintering process were made from the ceramic mass consisting of a mixture of the synthesized PSZTC powder and 3% polyvinyl alcohol while wet. The PSZTC ceramic specimens were subjected to poling by two methods: low temperature and high temperature. On the basis of the examinations made it has been found that the ceramics obtained belongs to ferroelectric-hard materials and that is why it may be used to build resonators, filters and ultrasonic transducers. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Materials for Dielectric Applications" edited by Maciej Jaroszewski and Sabu Thomas.

  6. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  7. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Daniel; Peña, Jose I

    2013-11-19

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth, removed volume and ablation yields reached their maximum, placing the sample out of focus. It was shown that these characteristics do not depend on the processing conditions, the wavelength or the optical configuration, and that this is intrinsic behavior of the processing method. Furthermore, the existence of a close relation between material hardness and ablation yields was demonstrated.

  8. Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, S R; Bonner, B P; Ryerson, F J; Hart, M M

    2006-01-01

    Pressure-volume relationships were measured at room temperature for eight granular materials and one specimen of epoxy foam. The granular materials included hollow ceramic microspheres, spherical molybdenum powder, Ottawa sand, aluminum, copper, titanium and silicon carbide powders and glassy carbon spheres. Measurements were made to 0.9 GPa in a liquid medium press for all of the granular materials and to 3 GPa in a solid medium press for the ceramic microspheres and molybdenum powder. A single specimen of epoxy foam was compressed to 30 MPa in the liquid medium press. Bulk moduli were calculated as a function of pressure for the ceramic microspheres, the molybdenum powder and three other granular materials. The energy expended in compacting the granular materials was determined by numerically integrating pressure-volume curves. More energy was expended per unit volume in compacting the molybdenum powder to 1 GPa than for the other materials, but compaction of the ceramic microspheres required more energy per gram due to their very low initial density. The merge pressure, the pressure at which all porosity is removed, was estimated for each material by plotting porosity against pressure on a semi-log plot. The pressure-volume curves were then extrapolated to the predicted merge pressures and numerically integrated to estimate the energy required to reach full density for each material. The results suggest that the glassy carbon spheres and the ceramic microspheres would require more energy than the other materials to attain full density

  9. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm −3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm −1 , linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively

  10. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang, E-mail: bambang-ariwahjoedi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar (Malaysia); Ginta, Turnad Lenggo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tro (Malaysia); Parman, Setyamartana [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad [Kebabangan Petroleum Operating Company Sdn Bhd, Lvl. 52, Tower 2, PETRONAS Twin Towers, KLCC, 50088 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm{sup −3} respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm{sup −1}, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  11. Radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials and end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruthagiri, G; Rajamannan, B; Suresh Jawahar, K

    2013-12-01

    Studies have been planned to obtain activity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials (quartz, feldspar, clay, zircon, kaolin, grog, alumina bauxite, baddeleyite, masse, dolomite and red mud) and end products (ceramic brick, glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) as the activity concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium vary from material to material. The primordial radionuclides in ceramic raw materials and end products are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the activity level in these materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in ceramic raw materials and end products. The activity of these materials has been measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry, which contains an NaI(Tl) detector connected to multichannel analyser (MCA). Radium equivalent activity, alpha-gamma indices and radiation hazard indices associated with the natural radionuclides are calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplace and industrial buildings is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  12. Radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials and end products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viruthagiri, G.; Rajamannan, B.; Suresh Jawahar, K.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have been planned to obtain activity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials (quartz, feldspar, clay, zircon, kaolin, grog, alumina bauxite, baddeleyite, masse, dolomite and red mud) and end products (ceramic brick, glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) as the activity concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium vary from material to material. The primordial radionuclides in ceramic raw materials and end products are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the activity level in these materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the activity concentration of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in ceramic raw materials and end products. The activity of these materials has been measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry, which contains an NaI(Tl) detector connected to multichannel analyser (MCA). Radium equivalent activity, alpha-gamma indices and radiation hazard indices associated with the natural radionuclides are calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplace and industrial buildings is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants. (authors)

  13. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part II: core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM All-ceramic core materials with various strengthening compositions have a range of translucencies. It is unknown whether translucency differs when all-ceramic materials are fabricated similarly to the clinical restoration with a veneered core material. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic materials veneered and glazed at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Core specimens (n = 5 per group) of Empress dentin, Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Spinell, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera AllCeram were fabricated as described in Part I of this study and veneered with their corresponding dentin porcelain to a final thickness of 1.47 +/- 0.01 mm. These specimens were compared with veneered Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin (as a standard), a clear glass disc (positive control), and a high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) veneered with Vitadur Omega dentin (negative control). Specimen reflectance was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Measurements were repeated after a glazing cycle. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white backing (Yw) to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P<.05). Significant differences in contrast ratios were found among the ceramic systems tested when they were veneered (P<.0001) and after the glazing cycle (P<.0001). Significant changes in contrast ratios (P<.0001) also were identified when the veneered specimens were glazed. Within the limitations of this study, a range of translucency was identified in the veneered all-ceramic systems tested. Such variability may affect their ability to match natural teeth. The glazing cycle resulted

  14. Ceramic materials for porcelain veneers: part II. Effect of material, shade, and thickness on translucency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barizon, Karine T L; Bergeron, Cathia; Vargas, Marcos A; Qian, Fang; Cobb, Deborah S; Gratton, David G; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2014-10-01

    Information regarding the differences in translucency among new ceramic systems is lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative translucency of the different types of ceramic systems indicated for porcelain veneers and to evaluate the effect of shade and thickness on translucency. Disk specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.7-mm thick were fabricated for the following 9 materials (n=5): VITA VM9, IPS Empress Esthetic, VITA PM9, Vitablocks Mark II, Kavo Everest G-Blank, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.maxPress, and Lava Zirconia. VITA VM9 served as the positive control and Lava as the negative control. The disks were fabricated with the shade that corresponds to A1. For IPS e.maxPress, additional disks were made with different shades (BL2, BL4, A1, B1, O1, O2, V1, V2, V3), thickness (0.3 mm), and translucencies (high translucency, low translucency). Color coordinates (CIE L∗ a∗ b∗) were measured with a tristimulus colorimeter. The translucency parameter was calculated from the color difference of the material on a black versus a white background. One-way ANOVA, the post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference, and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range tests were used to analyze the data (α=.05). Statistically significant differences in the translucency parameter were found among porcelains (PPM9, Empress Esthetic>Empress CAD>Mark II, Everest, e.max CAD>e.max Press>Lava. Significant differences also were noted when different shades and thickness were compared (Pceramic systems designed for porcelain veneers present varying degrees of translucency. The thickness and shade of lithium disilicate ceramic affect its translucency. Shade affects translucency parameter less than thickness. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial profile on metallic and ceramic bracket materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhoury, Patrick; Nathanson, Dan; Hughes, Christopher V; Socransky, Sigmund; Feres, Magda; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2002-08-01

    The placement of orthodontic appliances creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of a microbiota and food residues, which, in time, may cause caries or exacerbate any pre-existing periodontal disease. The purpose of the present study was to compare the total bacterial counts present on metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets in order to clarify which bracket type has a higher plaque retaining capacity and to determine the levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp on both types of brackets. Thirty-two metallic brackets and 24 ceramic brackets were collected from orthodontic patients at the day of debonding. Two brackets were collected from each patient; one from a maxillary central incisor and another from a maxillary second premolar. Sixteen patients who used metallic brackets and 12 patients who used ceramic brackets were sampled. Bacterial populations were studied using "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, which uses DNA probes to identify species in complex microbial samples. The significance of differences between groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results showed no significant differences between metallic and ceramic brackets with respect to the caries-inducing S mutans and L acidophilus spp counts. Mean counts of 8 of 35 additional species differed significantly between metallic and ceramic brackets with no obvious pattern favoring one bracket type over the other. This study showed higher mean counts of Treponema denticola, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii, Streptococcus anginosus, and Eubacterium nodatum on metallic brackets while higher counts of Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter showae, and Selenomonas noxia were found on ceramic brackets.

  16. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  17. Considerations on Dop (Depth Of Penetration) Test for Evaluation of Ceramics Materials Used in Ballistic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Ioan-Dan; Dobriţa, Florin

    2017-12-01

    Tremendous amount of funds and other resorces were invested in studying the response of ceramic materials under ballistic impact, the main goal being to find a way to increase the protection of soldiers and the vehicles used in the modern battlespace. Using of ceramic materials especially carbon based (carbides), nitrogen based (nitrides) and oxygen based (oxides) ceramics in order to increase the protection level of ballistic equipment could be, sometimes, a big challenge when trying to use the proper test in order to evaluate and compare their performances. The role of the tests is to provide a better understanding of their response in different situations and, as a consequence, to make them more efficient as armour components through future improvements. The paper presents shortly the main tests which are used and eventually standardised for evaluating the ballistic behaviour of the ceramics and other armour components, with a special focus to DOP (Depth of Penetration) Tests.

  18. Study on ceramic breeder and related materials by means of work function measurement under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, G.N.; Terai, T.; Yamawaki, M.; Yamaguchi, K.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic breeder materials, Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 and Li 4 SiO 4 , under irradiation have been studied using a Kelvin probe that measures work function changes of materials. Surface charging was observed to influence greatly the probe output, which can be explained qualitatively employing a model concerning induction electric field due to external field and free charges on ceramic surface. It is found that the insulating ceramics could not be studied properly with the Kelvin probe. A probable solution is to heat the ceramics, so as to raise their electric conductivities high enough to root out the surface charging. Also briefly discussed is the application of the probe to metals under ion irradiation. (orig.)

  19. Translucency and masking properties of two ceramic materials for heat-press technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Șoim, Alexandra; Strîmbu, Maria; Burde, Alexandru V; Culic, Bogdan; Dudea, Diana; Gasparik, Cristina

    2018-03-01

    To assess the translucency of two pressable ceramics and to analyze their masking property when placed on different tooth-shaded backgrounds. Thirty discs (1-mm thickness) were fabricated using two pressable ceramics (shade/translucency): 1M1T/HT, 1M2T/HT, 2M2T (VITA PM9), and A1LT/HT, B1LT/HT, A2LT (e.max Press). Color measurements of discs were performed with a dental spectrophotometer on tooth-colored backgrounds (A1/A2/A3/A3.5/A4), and black and white backings. The masking property was calculated as the color difference (CIEDE2000) between parameters of discs on control (A1, A2) and test backgrounds (A3, A3.5, A4). One-way ANOVA was used for assessing differences in translucency parameter (TP) between ceramics. Two-way ANOVA was used for detecting differences among groups when measured over tooth-shaded backgrounds (α = 0.05, Bonferroni correction). TP ranged between 14.96 (B1LT) and 25.18 (1M1HT). A significant difference in TP was found between tested ceramics (F = 949.949, P  .05), 1M1T, A1HT and B1HT (P > .05), 1M2T, 2M2T, and A2HT (P > .05). A significant interaction effect of underlying background on color of ceramic discs was found (F = 107.994, P ceramics. Except A1LT, all ceramic materials evaluated showed poor masking properties on A4 background. Highly translucent ceramics should be wisely used for restoring the appearance of dental structures since background color has a large effect upon these materials. The more recently introduced pressable ceramics showed high levels of translucency. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Development of tools for radiographic defects scanning in ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipnik, Boris.

    1994-03-01

    This work is concentrated on implementation of the most used non-destructive technique - radiography to quality control of structural ceramics. The present thesis deals with microfocus radiographic evaluation of ceramics produced by slip casting method. Radiographic processes are examined relying on image processing by algorithms expanded from others developed for tomographic images of non ceramics objects. At the first stage experiments aimed for characterization of a real-time microfocus radiographic system were carried out. The question of signal-to-noise ratio referring to a defect's detection limit was explored. Arithmetic image operations were used to correct for the background variations. At the second stage microfocus radiographs of: ceramics were systematically processed and analyzed by means of regularization and 'weak membrane' algorithms. The images were considerably improved and it resulted in identification and dimension extraction of defects as small as 40 pico meter . The usefulness of pseudocoloring methods was explored to obtain a fast assessment of gray level variations and to detect more details in the initial digital image. The potential for practical application was found to be very reasonable. The problems experienced were discussed along with suggestions for further studies and improvement

  1. On possibility of fabrication of monolith composite materials on niobium carbide base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploshkin, V.V.; Ul'yanina, I.Yu.; Filonenko, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made to fabricate the composite material on niobium carbide base possessing the elevated heat resistance, erosion and chemical resistance in special media, as well as capable of withstanding sufficient thermal shocks. Powder of niobium carbide of 10 μm fraction was used as base material, the powder of pure copper of 10...12 μm fraction - as binder. It was shown that samples of composite mateiral on niobium carbide base fabricated by the method of hydrostatic pressing possessed the minimal porosity as compared to samples fabricated by usual methods of powder metallurgy. The basic phases of composite material-copper and niobium carbide - distribute uniformly over sample cross-section and don't interact with each other under any conditions. The fabricated composite material possesses sufficient thermal shock resistance and isn't subjected to brittle fracture

  2. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Refractory Ceramics Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Stephen; Whitten, Mary C.; Trejo, David; Zidek, Jason; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Ceramics can be defmed as a material consisting of hard brittle properties produced from inorganic and nonmetallic minerals made by firing at high temperatures. These materials are compounds between metallic and nonmetallic elements and are either totally ionic, or predominately ionic but having some covalent character. This definition allows for a large range of materials, not all applicable to refractory applications. As this report is focused on potential ceramic materials for high temperature, aggressive exposure applications, the ceramics reviewed as part of this report will focus on refractory ceramics specifically designed and used for these applications. Ceramic materials consist of a wide variety of products. Callister (2000) 1 characterized ceramic materials into six classifications: glasses, clay products, refractories, cements, abrasives, and advanced ceramics. Figure 1 shows this classification system. This review will focus mainly on refractory ceramics and cements as in general, the other classifications are neither applicable nor economical for use in large structures such as the flame trench. Although much work has been done in advanced ceramics over the past decade or so, these materials are likely cost prohibitive and would have to be fabricated off-site, transported to the NASA facilities, and installed, which make these even less feasible. Although the authors reviewed the literature on advanced ceramic refractories 2 center dot 3 center dot 4 center dot 5 center dot 6 center dot 7 center dot 8 center dot 9 center dot 10 center dot 11 center dot 12 after the review it was concluded that these materials should not be ' the focus of this report. A review is in progress on materials and systems for prefabricated refractory ceramic panels, but this review is focusing more on typical refractory materials for prefabricated systems, which could make the system more economically feasible. Refractory ceramics are used for a wide variety of applications

  3. EXAFS and XANES analysis of plutonium and cerium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Bakel, A. J.; Hash, M. C.; Aase, S. B.; Buck, E. C.; Chamerlain, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    We report x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra from the plutonium L III edge and XANES from the cerium L II edge in prototype titanate ceramic hosts. The titanate ceramics studied are based upon the hafnium-pyrochlore and zirconolite mineral structures and will serve as an immobilization host for surplus fissile materials, containing as much as 10 weight % fissile plutonium and 20 weight % (natural or depleted) uranium. Three ceramic formulations were studied: one employed cerium as a ''surrogate'' element, replacing both plutonium and uranium in the ceramic matrix, another formulation contained plutonium in a ''baseline'' ceramic formulation, and a third contained plutonium in a formulation representing a high-impurity plutonium stream. The cerium XANES from the surrogate ceramic clearly indicates a mixed III-IV oxidation state for the cerium. In contrast, XANES analysis of the two plutonium-bearing ceramics shows that the plutonium is present almost entirely as Pu(IV) and occupies the calcium site in the zirconolite and pyrochlore phases. The plutonium EXAFS real-space structure shows a strong second-shell peak, clearly distinct from that of PuO 2 , with remarkably little difference in the plutonium crystal chemistry indicated between the baseline and high-impurity formulations

  4. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr, E-mail: gryshkov@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Klyui, Nickolai I., E-mail: klyuini@ukr.net [College of Physics, Jilin University, 130012 Changchun (China); V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Temchenko, Volodymyr P., E-mail: tvp@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kyselov, Vitalii S., E-mail: kyselov@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Chatterjee, Anamika, E-mail: chatterjee@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Belyaev, Alexander E., E-mail: belyaev@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Lauterboeck, Lothar, E-mail: lauterboeck@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Iarmolenko, Dmytro, E-mail: iarmolenko.dmytro@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Glasmacher, Birgit, E-mail: glasmacher@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO{sub 2}) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO{sub 2} using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO{sub 2} to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO{sub 2} coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO{sub 2} coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of porous biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from wood • Successful deposition of bioactive calcium phosphate coatings using gas detonation deposition • Porosity and pore size of Si

  5. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I.; Temchenko, Volodymyr P.; Kyselov, Vitalii S.; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E.; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO 2 ) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO 2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO 2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO 2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO 2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of porous biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from wood • Successful deposition of bioactive calcium phosphate coatings using gas detonation deposition • Porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on wood

  6. Homogeneity test of the ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Fong Songlin; Zhu Jihao; Feng Xiangqian; Xie Guoxi; Yan Lingtong

    2010-01-01

    In order to study elemental composition of ancient porcelain samples, we developed a set of ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative analysis. In this paper,homogeneity of Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe contents in the ceramic reference materials is investigated by EDXRF. The F test and the relative standard deviation are used to treat the normalized net counts by SPSS. The results show that apart from the DY2 and JDZ4 reference materials, to which further investigation would be needed, homogeneity of the DH, DY3, JDZ3, JDZ6, GY1, RY1, LQ4, YJ1, YY2 and JY2 meets the requirements of ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative analysis. (authors)

  7. Fabrication and characterisation of a novel biomimetic anisotropic ceramic/polymer-infiltrated composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawoosh, Sara; Ireland, Anthony; Su, Bo

    2018-04-10

    To fabricate and characterise a novel biomimetic composite material consisting of aligned porous ceramic preforms infiltrated with polymer. Freeze-casting was used to fabricate and control the microstructure and porosity of ceramic preforms, which were subsequently infiltrated with 40-50% by volume UDMA-TEGDMA polymer. The composite materials were then subjected to characterisation, namely density, compression, three-point bend, hardness and fracture toughness testing. Samples were also subjected to scanning electron microscopy and computerised tomography (Micro-CT). Three-dimensional aligned honeycomb-like ceramic structures were produced and full interpenetration of the polymer phase was observed using micro-CT. Depending on the volume fraction of the ceramic preform, the density of the final composite ranged from 2.92 to 3.36g/cm 3 , compressive strength ranged from 206.26 to 253.97MPa, flexural strength from 97.73 to 145.65MPa, hardness ranged from 1.46 to 1.62GPa, and fracture toughness from 3.91 to 4.86MPam 1/2 . Freeze-casting provides a novel method to engineer composite materials with a unique aligned honeycomb-like interpenetrating structure, consisting of two continuous phases, inorganic and organic. There was a correlation between the ceramic fraction and the subsequent, density, strength, hardness and fracture toughness of the composite material. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal-ceramic

  10. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  11. UTILIZATION OF BASALT FIBERS AS A RAW MATERIAL FOR CLAY CERAMIC PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supawan Vichaphund

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to investigate the possibility of utilization basalt fibers as a raw material for ceramic production. Both quartz and feldspar were replaced partially or entirely by basalt fiber in the range of 10-25 wt%. The mixture of ceramic powders and basalt fibers were uniaxially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 1000 and 1200°C for 1 h. The substitution of basalt fibers in ceramic compositions demonstrated the positive effect on the physical and mechanical properties. The addition of basalt fibers in an appropriate amount enhance the densification and reduce sintering temperature of clay-based ceramics (CB-0 from 1200 to 1150°C. The highest density and strength were 2.40 g/cm³ and 116 MPa, respectively, when replacing feldspar and quartz with basalt up to 20 wt% (CB-20 and sintering at 1150°C.

  12. Cleanability evaluation of ceramic glazes with nanometer far-infrared materials using contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Liang, Jinsheng; Di, Xingfu; Tang, Qingguo

    2014-05-01

    The cleanability of easy-to-clean ceramic glazes doped with nanometer far-infrared materials was compared with that of some high-quality household ceramic glazes from the market. The cleanability was evaluated by the contact angle measurement using a sessile drop method with a Dataphysics OCA-30 contact angle analyzer. The results showed that the difference of contact angles of water on the glazes before soiling and after cleaning could be used as a parameter for evaluating the cleanability of the glazes. The relationship between cleanability and surface properties, such as surface free energy and surface topography, was investigated. The surface free energy of the samples and their components were calculated using van Oss acid-base approach. By measuring advancing and receding contact angles, the contact angle hysteresis of the ceramic glazes due to the surface topography was investigated. It was shown that the cleanability of ceramic glazes containing nanometer far-infrared materials (NFIM) is better than that of household ceramic glazes from market, due to a higher ratio of electron-acceptor parameter to electron-donor parameter, which led to the effect of water hydration as well as better hydrophilic property and increased smoothness. The contact angle measurement not only accurately evaluates the cleanability of the ceramic glazes, but also has a contribution to the study of cleanability theory. Moreover, this method is simple, convenient and less sample-consumption.

  13. Application of the final flotation waste for obtaining the glass-ceramic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocić Mira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the investigation of the final flotation waste (FFW, originating from the RTB Bor Company (Serbia, as the main component for the production of glass-ceramic materials. The glass-ceramics was synthesized by the sintering of FFW, mixtures of FFW with basalt (10%, 20%, and 40%, and mixtures of FFW with tuff (20% and 40%. The sintering was conducted at the different temperatures and with the different time duration in order to find the optimal composition and conditions for crystallization. The increase of temperature, from 1100 to 1480°C, and sintering time, from 4 to 6h resulted in a higher content of hematite crystal in the obtained glass-ceramic (up to 44%. The glass-ceramics sintered from pure FFW (1080°C/36h has good mechanical properties, such as high propagation speed (4500 m/s and hardness (10800 MPa, as well as very good thermal stability. The glass-ceramics obtained from mixtures shows weaker mechanical properties compared to that obtained from pure FFW. The mixtures of FFW with tuff have a significantly lower bulk density compared to other obtained glass-ceramics. Our results indicate that FFW can be applied as a basis for obtaining the construction materials. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 176010: Composition, genesis, application, and contribution to the environmental sustainability

  14. Characterization of composite materials based on cement-ceramic powder blended binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of newly developed composite mortars with incorporated ceramic powder coming from precise brick cutting as partial Portland cement replacement up to 40 mass% is presented in the paper. Fine ceramic powder belongs to the pozzolanic materials. Utilization of pozzolanic materials is accompanied by lower request on energy needed for Portland clinker production which generally results in lower production costs of blended binder and lower CO2 emission. In this paper, the ceramic powder is used in cement based mortar composition in amount of 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 mass% of cement. Chemical composition of ceramic powder is analyzed by X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction. The particle size distribution of ceramics is accessed on laser diffraction principle. For 28 days cured mortar samples, basic physical and mechanical properties are experimentally determined. The obtained results demonstrate that ceramic powder has potential to replace a part of Portland cement in composition of cement based composites and to reduce negative environmental impact of their production.

  15. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Fabrication of Porous Ceramic-Geopolymer Based Material to Improve Water Absorption and Retention in Construction Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, N. H.; Ibrahim, W. M. A. W.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Sandu, A. V.; Tahir, M. F. M.

    2017-06-01

    Porous ceramic nowadays has been investigated for a variety of its application such as filters, lightweight structural component and others due to their specific properties such as high surface area, stability and permeability. Besides, it has the properties of low thermal conductivity. Various formation techniques making these porous ceramic properties can be tailored or further fine-tuned to obtain the optimum characteristic. Porous materials also one of the good candidate for absorption properties. Conventional construction materials are not design to have good water absorption and retention that lead to the poor performance on these criteria. Temperature is a major driving force for moisture movement and influences sorption characteristics of many constructions materials. The effect of elevated temperatures on the water absorption coefficient and retention remain as critical issue that need to be investigated. Therefore, this paper will review the process parameters in fabricating porous ceramic for absorption properties.

  17. Effect of Contact Damage on the Strength of Ceramic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    variables that are important to erosion, and a multivariate , linear regression analysis is used to fit the data to the dimensional analysis. The...of Equations 7 and 8 by a multivariable regression analysis (room tem- perature data) Exponent Regression Standard error Computed coefficient of...1980) 593. WEAVER, Proc. Brit. Ceram. Soc. 22 (1973) 125. 39. P. W. BRIDGMAN, "Dimensional Analaysis ", (Yale 18. R. W. RICE, S. W. FREIMAN and P. F

  18. Bioinspired hybrid materials from spray-formed ceramic templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Flynn, Katherine; Resnick, Michael; Sampath, Sanjay; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2015-05-20

    Thermally sprayed ceramics, when infiltrated with polymer, exhibit synergistic increases in strength and toughness. The structure of such composites-a dense, brick-mortar arrangement-is strikingly similar to that of nacre, as are the mechanisms underlying the robust mechanical behavior. This industrial-scale process thus presents an exciting tool for bio-mimetic exploration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A novel photocatalytic monolith reactor for multiphase heterogeneous photocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, P.; Carneiro, J.T.; Moulijn, J.A.; Mul, Guido

    2008-01-01

    A novel reactor for multi-phase photocatalysis is presented, the so-called internally illuminated monolith reactor (IIMR). In the concept of the IIMR, side light emitting fibers are placed inside the channels of a ceramic monolith, equipped with a TiO2 photocatalyst coated on the wall of each

  20. A Monolithic Perovskite Structure for Use as a Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Clemens, Frank; Menon, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A La0.67Ca0.26Sr0.07Mn1.05O3 (LCSM) perovskite was prepared for the first time as a ceramic monolithic regenerator used in a regenerative magnetic refrigeration device. The parameters influencing the extrusion process and the performance of the regenerator, such as the nature of the monolith paste...

  1. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams and Their Potential as TPS Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams with compositions that have potential as a thermal protection material. The use of pre-ceramic polymers with the addition of sacrificial blowing agents or sacrificial fillers offers a viable approach to form either open or closed cell insulation. Our work demonstrates that this is a feasible method to form refractory ceramic foams at relatively low processing temperatures. It is possible to foam complex shapes then pyrolize the system to form a ceramic while retaining the shape of the unfired foam. Initial work focused on identifying suitable pre-ceramic polymers with desired properties such as ceramic yield and chemical make up of the pyrolysis product after firing. We focused on making foams in the Si system (Sic, Si02, Si-0-C), which is in use in current acreage TPS systems. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies and the characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties are presented. We have conducted preliminary arc jet testing on selected foams with the materials being exposed to typical re-entry conditions for acreage TPS and these results will be discussed. Foams processed using these approaches have bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g/cm3 and cell sizes ranging from 5 to 500 pm. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these systems. Finally, preliminary oxidation studies have been conducted on selected systems and will be discussed.

  2. Challenges and Opportunities in Reactive Processing and Applications of Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the research, development, and commercialization of innovative synthesis and processing technologies for advanced ceramics and composite materials. Reactive processing approaches have been actively considered due to their robustness, flexibility, and affordability. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based advanced ceramics and composites are currently being fabricated using the processing approaches involving reactive infiltration of liquid and gaseous species into engineered fibrous or microporous carbon performs. The microporous carbon performs have been fabricated using the temperature induced phase separation and pyrolysis of two phase organic (resin-pore former) mixtures and fiber reinforcement of carbon and ceramic particulate bodies. In addition, pyrolyzed native plant cellulose tissues also provide unique carbon templates for manufacturing of non-oxide and oxide ceramics. In spite of great interest in this technology due to their affordability and robustness, there is a lack of scientific basis for process understanding and many technical challenges still remain. The influence of perform properties and other parameters on the resulting microstructure and properties of final material is not well understood. In this presentation, mechanism of silicon-carbon reaction in various systems and the effect of perform microstructure on the mechanical properties of advanced silicon carbide based materials will be discussed. Various examples of applications of reactively processed advanced silicon carbide ceramics and composite materials will be presented.

  3. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  4. Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Frank A; Horvath, Sebastian D; Guess, Petra C; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-01-01

    Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites. The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage. Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials. This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Shade evaluation of ceramic laminates according to different try-in materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Vaz, Maysa Magalhaes; de Magalhaes, Ana Paula Rodrigues; Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; de Souza, Joao Batista; de Torres, Erica Miranda

    2014-01-01

    The porcelain laminate replaces the visible portion of enamel with a ceramic, which is attached to the dental surface. To enhance cosmetic results, a preliminary color matching procedure is performed prior to cementing the veneers. This procedure can be performed using water, water-soluble gel, or try-in paste. The different shades of cement and try-in pastes are intended to obtain better color and esthetics of the final restoration. This study sought to evaluate the shade of ceramic veneers produced by different try-in materials. Forty bovine teeth and 40 ceramic discs (0.6 mm thick) were prepared. The samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 10). For Group 1 samples, no material was used between the tooth and the ceramic, Group 2 interposed samples with water, Group 3 used a water-soluble gel, and Group 4 used try-in paste (value 0). The color was measured with a spectrophotometer, obtaining L*, a*, and b* values to calculate the color difference (ΔE*). The data were subjected to normality tests and 1-way ANOVA. No significant statistical differences were found among the groups, indicating that the different try-in materials had similar effects on the color of the ceramic laminates.

  6. Natural radionuclides in ceramic building materials available in Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamannan, B; Viruthagiri, G; Suresh Jawahar, K

    2013-10-01

    The activity concentrations of radium, thorium and potassium can vary from material to material and they should be measured as the radiation is hazardous for human health. Thus, studies have been planned to obtain the radioactivity of ceramic building materials used in Cuddalore District, Tamilnadu, India. The radioactivity of some ceramic materials used in this region has been measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry, which contains an NaI(Tl) detector connected to multichannel analyzer. The specific activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, from the selected ceramic building materials, were in the range of 9.89-30.75, 24.68-70.4, 117.19-415.83 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radium equivalent activity, absorbed gamma dose rate (D) and annual effective dose rate associated with the natural radionuclides are calculated to assess the radiation hazards of the natural radioactivity in the ceramic building materials. It was found that none of the results exceeds the recommended limit value.

  7. Tritium transport and release from lithium ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Kopasz, J.P.; Tam, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    In an operating fusion reactor,, the tritium breeding blanket will reach a condition in which the tritium release rate equals the production rate. The tritium release rate must be fast enough that the tritium inventory in the blanket does not become excessive. Slow tritium release will result in a large tritium inventory, which is unacceptable from both economic and safety viewpoints As a consequence, considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the tritium release mechanism from ceramic breeders and beryllium neutron multipliers through theoretical, laboratory, and in-reactor studies. This information is being applied to the development of models for predicting tritium release for various blanket operating conditions

  8. Materials and ceramics on the base of aluminium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulamova, D.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the doping and technological parameters on the thermodynamical stability of the aluminium titanate is investigated. The condition necessary to make aluminium titanate stable and established. it is shown, how the condition of the synthesis and the content of the admixture phases affect the stability of the solid solutions. The technology of obtaining the ceramics stable with respect to decay (with thermal expansion coefficient CTE = 26x10/sup -6/ grad/sup -1/ and thermoresistancy > 80 heating cycles, sigma curve equal or greater than 80 Mpa) is worked out. (author)

  9. Rotating bending fatigue strength evaluation of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govila, R.K.; Swank, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Cyclic fatigue under rotary bending tests were conducted on partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) from NGK and Nilsen, and silicon nitride from NGK and Norton. Fractography was performed on the failed specimens to determine the fracture structure and morphology. The results showed that the cyclic fatigue fracture was the same as the fracture structure previously observed in bending tests. The cyclic fatigue data indicated that structural ceramic could function in fatigue stress levels at a higher percentage of their average fast fracture strength than the fifty percent of ultimate strength used for wrought steels

  10. Grinding model and material removal mechanism of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongkun; Li, Changhe; Jia, Dongzhou; Wang, Sheng; Li, Runze; Qi, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Many patents have been devoted to developing medical nanometer zirconia ceramic grinding techniques that can significantly improve both workpiece surface integrity and grinding quality. Among these patents is a process for preparing ceramic dental implants with a surface for improving osseo-integration by sand abrasive finishing under a jet pressure of 1.5 bar to 8.0 bar and with a grain size of 30 µm to 250 µm. Compared with other materials, nano-zirconia ceramics exhibit unmatched biomedical performance and excellent mechanical properties as medical bone tissue and dentures. The removal mechanism of nano-zirconia materials includes brittle fracture and plastic removal. Brittle fracture involves crack formation, extension, peeling, and chipping to completely remove debris. Plastic removal is similar to chip formation in metal grinding, including rubbing, ploughing, and the formation of grinding debris. The materials are removed in shearing and chipping. During brittle fracture, the grinding-led transverse and radial extension of cracks further generate local peeling of blocks of the material. In material peeling and removal, the mechanical strength and surface quality of the workpiece are also greatly reduced because of crack extension. When grinding occurs in the plastic region, plastic removal is performed, and surface grinding does not generate grinding fissures and surface fracture, producing clinically satisfactory grinding quality. With certain grinding conditions, medical nanometer zirconia ceramics can be removed through plastic flow in ductile regime. In this study, we analyzed the critical conditions for the transfer of brittle and plastic removal in nano-zirconia ceramic grinding as well as the high-quality surface grinding of medical nanometer zirconia ceramics by ELID grinding.

  11. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  12. Influence of implant abutment material and ceramic thickness on optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirajariyavej, Bundhit; Wanapirom, Peeraphorn; Anunmana, Chuchai

    2018-05-01

    Anterior shade matching is an essential factor influencing the esthetics of a ceramic restoration. Dentists face a challenge when the color of an implant abutment creates an unsatisfactory match with the ceramic restoration or neighboring teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of abutment material and ceramic thickness on the final color of different ceramic systems. Four experimental and control ceramic specimens in shade A3 were cut from IPS e.max CAD, IPS Empress CAD, and VITA Suprinity PC blocks. These specimens had thicknesses of 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, and 2.5 mm, respectively, for the experimental groups, and 4 mm for the controls. Background abutment specimens were fabricated to yield 3 different shades: white zirconia, yellow zirconia, and titanium at a 3-mm thickness. All 3 ceramic specimens in each thickness were placed in succession on different abutment backgrounds with glycerin optical fluid in between, and the color was measured. A digital spectrophotometer was used to record the specimen color value in the Commission Internationale De L'éclairage (CIELab) color coordinates system and to calculate the color difference (ΔE) between the control and experimental groups. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to analyze the effect of ceramic thickness on different abutments, and the pair-wise test was used to evaluate within the group (α=.05). The color differences between the test groups and the control decreased with increasing ceramic thickness for every background material. In every case, significant differences were found between 1.0- and 2.5-mm ceramic thicknesses. Only certain 2.5-mm e.max CAD, VITA Suprinity PC, and Empress CAD specimens on yellow-shade zirconia or VITA Suprinity PC on titanium were identified as clinically acceptable (ΔEabutment background decreased the color mismatch. Increasing the thickness of ceramic on a yellow-shaded zirconia abutment rather than on titanium or white zirconia yielded a more

  13. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  14. Quality assurance in ceramic materials and components. High-resolution non-destructive testing especially of ceramic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, H.; Hoffmann, B.; Morsch, A.; Arnold, W.; Schneider, E.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the influence of defects on the failure behavior of ceramic materials under four-point bending stress. In this connection various Si 3 N 4 and SiC materials with and without artificially introduced defect particles (Fe, WC, Si, pores) were examined by the following non-destructive test methods: photoacoustic microscopy, scanning laser acoustic microscopy, microfocus roentgenoscopy and ultrasound transit-time measurements. Finally, a four-point bending test and a fracture-mechanical evaluation of the fracture-incuding defects were carried out at the Institute for reliability and failure studies in mechanical engineering of the University of Karlsruhe. According to the type of stress the samples predominantly failed in the case of defects in the surface zone of the side in tension. Among the ndt methods applied the photoacoustic microscopy as a typical surface testing method could predict most of the fracture-inducing defects (30-50 %) without causing destruction. In this connection a different detection sensitivity which corresponds to the thermal reflection factors became apparent according to the type of defect. Furthermore the reports describes the results of some preliminary tests on ndt of green ceramics. In these investigations both the microfocus roentgenoscopy test and the roentgen computed tomography showed a high potential of detecting inhomogeneities and defects in green Si 3 N 4 and SiC components. (orig.) [de

  15. Basaltic scorias from Romania - complex building material us for concrete, glazing tiles, ceramic glazes, glass ceramics, mineral wool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marica, S.; Cetean, V. [PROCEMA S.A., Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The most spectacular deposit of basaltic scoria from Romania is the Heghes Hill from Racos, locality situated in the central part of country. This deposit emerged as grains of various dimensions, as volcanic ash with specific porosity up to 30% and vacuolar basaltic rocks. All types of basaltic scorias have specific vacuolar appearance, red- brick or blackish - grey coloured, scoria textures and similar chemical composition with others basalts of the world. The physical and mechanical characteristics determined included the scorias in the Heghes Hill in the following categories : light rocks (2,98 g/ dmc), porous(11,04%), similar to expanded slag, slightly absorbing rocks (3,86%), with low compression strengths (1700 daN/cmp). Basaltic scoria from Heghes is a very good row material for the manufacture of concrete, for obtain decorative cutting tiles glazing with ceramic and basaltic glazes (up to 40%) varied the range of colours and for obtaining glass ceramic, mineral wool, crushing sand for road maintenance, heat -insulating bricks and shid -proof material. (orig.)

  16. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.; Peterson, S.

    1978-09-01

    Topics covered include: structure of materials, theoretical research; x-ray diffraction research; fundamental ceramics studies; preparation and synthesis of high-temperature and special service materials; physical metallurgy; grain boundary segregation and fracture; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; superconducting materials; radiation effects; facility and technique development; nuclear microanalysis; cooperative studies with universities and other research organizations; and fundamentals of welding and joining

  18. Morphological characterization of ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand as restorative dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlina, E.; Susra, S.; Fatmala, Y.; Hartoyo, H. M.; Takarini, V.; Usri, K.; Febrida, R.; Djustiana, N.; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    Dental composite as restorative dental materials can be reinforced using ceramic fillers. Homogeneous distribution of filler particles shall improve its mechanical properties. This paper presents the results of the preliminary study on the ZrO2-Al2O3-SiO2 ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand that can increase the mechanical properties of dental composite. The synthesis was done using zirconium silicate sand (ZrSiO4) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3) precursors, which dissolved together with 70:30 weight ratios. Two types of sand were used: (1) manufactured sand (mesh #80) and (2) natural sand (mesh #400). The samples then heated in the furnace at 1100 °C for 8 hours. The morphological characterization was then evaluated using JEOL Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for the surface structure that analyze particles size and distribution. Ceramic fillers made from natural sand is homogenous, well distributed with average particle size of 5-10 µm. Comparably, ceramic filler made from the manufactured sand is heterogeneous, poorly distributed and appear as agglomerates with average particle size are 30-50 µm. The results suggest that ceramic fillers made from natural sand demonstrate better character to represent as a functional restorative dental material.

  19. Development of a material property database on selected ceramic matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Kamala

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites, with fiber/whisker/particulate reinforcement, possess the attractive properties of ceramics such as high melting temperature, high strength and stiffness at high temperature, low density, excellent environmental resistance, combined with improved toughness and mechanical reliability. These unique properties have made these composites an enabling technology for thermomechanically demanding applications in high temperature, high stress and aggressive environments. On a broader scale, CMC's are anticipated to be applicable in aircraft propulsion, space propulsion, power and structures, in addition to ground based applications. However, it is also true that for any serious commitment of the material toward any of the intended critical thermo-mechanical applications to materialize, vigorous research has to be conducted for a thorough understanding of the mechanical and thermal behavior of CMC's. The high technology of CMC'S is far from being mature. In view of this growing need for CMC data, researchers all over the world have found themselves drawn into the characterization of CMC's such as C/SiC, SiC/SiC, SiC/Al203, SiC/Glass, SiC/C, SiC/Blackglas. A significant amount of data has been generated by the industries, national laboratories and educational institutions in the United States of America. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center intends to collect the 'pedigreed' CMC data and store those in a CMC database within MAPTIS (Materials and Processes Technical Information System). The task of compilation of the CMC database is a monumental one and requires efforts in various directions. The project started in the form of a summer faculty fellowship in 1994 and has spilled into the months that followed and into the summer faculty fellowship of 1995 and has the prospect of continuing into the future for a healthy growth, which of course depends to a large extent on how fast CMC data are generated. The 10-week long summer fellowship has concentrated

  20. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described

  1. Characterization of ceramic materials - Some methods employed in quality control of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, P.E.; Ferraz, W.B.; Lameiras, F.S.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, A.M.M. dos; Ferreira, R.A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Measuring methods are presented for specific surface, density, open porosity and microstructure, such as bulk density of particles in form of nicrospheres, for characterization of ceramic materials used as nuclear fuels. Some of these methods are alternatives to those usually employed, and they present some advantages, such as economy, speed of execution, and accuracy. (Author) [pt

  2. The crack-initiation threshold in ceramic materials subject to elastic/plastic indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, J.; Davidson, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The threshold for indentation cracking is established for a range of ceramic materials, using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and acoustic emission. It is found that by taking into account indentation plasticity, current theories may be successfully combined to predict threshold indentation loads and crack sizes. Threshold cracking is seen to relate to radial rather than median cracking. (author)

  3. Composite metal-ceramic material for high temperature energy conversion applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    At Eindhoven Universitu of technology a composite metal-ceramic material is being developed. It will serve as a protective confinement for a combustion heated Thermionic Energy Converter (TEC). This protective confinement of 'hot shell' consists of a composite W-TiN-SiC layer structure. The outer

  4. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model

  5. Micrometer and nanometer-scale parallel patterning of ceramic and organic-inorganic hybrid materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.; Khan, Sajid; Göbel, Ole

    2010-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the progress made in recent years in the development of low-cost parallel patterning techniques for ceramic materials, silica, and organic–inorganic silsesquioxane-based hybrids from wet-chemical solutions and suspensions on the micrometer and nanometer-scale. The

  6. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  7. Strength characterization of tubular ceramic materials by flexure of semi-cylindrical specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Kiesel, Lutz; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical strength at elevated temperatures and operating atmospheres needs to be characterized during development of tubular ceramic components for advanced energy technologies. Typical procedures are time-consuming because a large number of tests are required for a reliable statistical strength...... characterization and every specimen has to be subjected to the process conditions individually. This paper presents an efficient strength characterization methodology for tubular ceramics. The methodology employs flexure of semi-cylindrical specimens as the strength test and implements the tests within a facility...... conducted on oxygen transport membrane materials at room temperature and 850°C....

  8. The use of luminescence techniques with ceramic materials for retrospective dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailiff, I.K.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence techniques are being used with ceramic materials to provide evaluations of integrated external gamma dose for dose reconstruction in populated areas contaminated by Chernobyl fallout. A range of suitable ceramics can be found associated with buildings: on the exterior surfaces (tiles), within walls (bricks) and within the interiors (porcelain fittings and tiles). Dose evaluations obtained using such samples provide information concerning the time-averaged incident gamma radiation field, average shielding factors and, with the aid of computational modelling techniques, dose estimates at external reference positions

  9. XRF analysis of ceramics, minerals and allied materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, H.; Oliver, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This book is a compilation of practical information on the X-ray fluorescence analysis by the fused, cast bead method of mineral type materials and products. A range of general information about equipment and apparatus and its use and care is given and particular attention is devoted to the spectrometer and the topic of line selection. Experimental details of the method, including calibration, are presented. In the final section of the book, analytical procedures for a wide range of materials are described. This includes sampling, drying, weighing, loss on ignition, fusion, casting, constituents to be determined, calibration ranges and reporting of results. The materials covered are silica/alumina range materials, calcium-rich materials, magnesium rich materials, zircon-bearing materials, various oxides and titanates, reduced materials and samples of unknown composition. The appendices contain data on loss on ignition techniques, specific fusion techniques, problem elements or oxides, certified references materials and details on laboratory accreditation. (UK)

  10. Efficacy of ceramic repair material on the bond strength of composite resin to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Kapdan, Alper; Harorli, Osman Tolga; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Ozarslan, Mehmet Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin in five different repair systems. Sixty specimens (7 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height) of zirconia ceramic were fabricated. All specimen surfaces were prepared with a 30 µm fine diamond rotary cutting instrument with water irrigation for 10 s and dried with oil-free air. Specimens were then randomly divided into six groups for the following different intra-oral repair systems (n = 10): Group 1, control group; Group 2, Cojet system (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany); Group 3, Cimara® System (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany); Group 4, Z-Prime Plus System (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL); Group 5, Clearfil™ System (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan); and Group 6, Z-Bond System (Danville, CA). After surface conditioning, a composite resin Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) was applied to the zirconia surface using a cylindrical mold (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length) and incrementally filled up, according to the manufacturer's instructions of each intra-oral system. Each specimen was subjected to a shear load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until fracture. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the bond strength values. There were significant differences between Groups 2-6 and Group 1. The highest bond strength values were obtained with Group 2 (17.26 ± 3.22) and Group 3 (17.31 ± 3.62), while the lowest values were observed with Group 1 (8.96 ± 1.62) and Group 6 (12.85 ± 3.95). All repair systems tested increased the bond strength values between zirconia and composite resin that used surface grinding with a diamond bur.

  11. The Influence of Tool Composite's Structure During Process of Diamond Grinding of Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlik Józef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the tests performed during the grinding process of the ceramic materials: – polycrystalline ceramics (Zirconium ZrO2 and mono-crystalline ceramics (sapphire α-Al2O3 by the diamond tools. Studies have shown that the concentration (thickening of the tool composite changes the tool's pore structure when using suitable wetted adamantine additives. Such modified composite has positive impact on tribological properties of the subsurface layer of the machined components. This is manifested by the reduction of the surface roughness and reduction of the vibration amplitude of the coefficient of friction. The possibilities of the positive effects when using wetted additives on the tool's composite during the pressing (briquetting stage confirm the study results.

  12. Non-destructive testing of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. C.; Qi, Hong; An, X. Y.; Ren, Y. T.; Qiao, Y. B.; Ruan, Liming M.

    2018-04-01

    The non-destructive testing (NDT) of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser is investigated in this study. The discrete ordinate method is applied to solve the transient radiative transfer equation in 2D semitransparent medium and the emerging radiative intensity on boundary serves as input for the inverse analysis. The sequential quadratic programming algorithm is employed as the inverse technique to optimize objective function, in which the gradient of objective function with respect to reconstruction parameters is calculated using the adjoint model. Two reticulated porous ceramics including partially stabilized zirconia and oxide-bonded silicon carbide are tested. The retrieval results show that the main characteristics of defects such as optical properties, geometric shapes and positions can be accurately reconstructed by the present model. The proposed technique is effective and robust in NDT of ceramics even with measurement errors.

  13. Architectural integration of energy solar collectors made with ceramic materials and suitable for the Mediterranean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roviras

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here aims to demonstrate the technical, architectural and energy viability of solar thermal collectors made with ceramic materials and the Mediterranean climate suitable for the production of domestic hot water (DHW and for heating systems in buildings. The design of a ceramic shell formed by panels collectors and panels no sensors, which are part of the same building system that is capable of responding to the basic requirements of a building envelope and capture solar energy is proposed. Ceramics considerably reduced the final cost of the sensor system and offers the new system a variety of compositional and chromatic since, with reduced performance compared to a conventional metallic collector, can occupy the entire surface of front and get a high degree of architectural integration. A tool for assessing the new ceramic solar collector has been defined from a multi-criteria perspective: economic, environmental and social. The tool enables the comparison of the ceramic solar collector with solar collectors on the market under different climatic and demand conditions.

  14. Origin and type of flaws in heat engine ceramic materials and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govila, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    A number of ceramic materials such as Silicon Nitrides and Carbides, Sialons, Whisker-Reinforced Ceramic Composites and Partially-Stabilized Zirconias (PSZs) have been developed for use as structural components in heat engine applications. The reliability and durability of a structural engine component is critically dependent on the size, density of distribution and location of flaws. This information is critical for the processing and design engineers in order to design structural components using suitable materials and thus minimize stress intensity. In general, the failure initiating flaws are associated or produced due to material impurity, processing methods and parameters, and fabrication techniques (machining and grinding). Examples of each type of flaws associated with material impurity, processing methods and fabrication techniques are illustrated

  15. Characterization of solid wastes from kraft pulp industry for ceramic materials development purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, L.R.; Francisco, M.A.C.O.; Sagrillo, V.P.D.; Louzada, D.M.; Entringer, J.M.S.

    2016-01-01

    The Kraft pulp industry generates a large amount of solid wastes. Due this large quantity, the target of this study is characterize inorganic solid wastes, dregs, grits and lime mud, from the step of reagents recovery of Kraft process, aiming evaluate the potentiality of their use as alternative raw material on development of ceramic materials. Initially, the wastes were dried and ground, then they were subjected to the following characterization techniques: pH analysis, particle size analysis, X ray fluorescence, X ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. According to the results, it may be concluded that these wastes could be used as raw material in production of red ceramic and luting materials. (author)

  16. Evaluation of fracture toughness for metal/ceramics composite materials by means of miniaturized specimen technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hideaki; Jeong, Hee-Don; Kawasaki, Akira; Watanabe, Ryuzo

    1991-01-01

    In order to evaluate fracture strength for Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 , 3 mol% Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 (PSZ)/SUS 304 composite materials, Macor as a machinable ceramics and comercially available ceramics (SiC, Si 3 N 4 , PSZ, Al 2 O 3 ), fracture toughness tests were carried out by use of RCT or bending specimens. On the other hand, the fracture strength of these materials was evaluated and inspected the correlation between fracture toughness and fracture stress of small punch (SP) or modified small punch (MSP) test data to predict the fracture toughness value by using miniaturized specimens. Characteristic of the MSP testing method is the ability to evaluate elastic modulus (Young's modulus), fracture strength, yield strength, fracture strain, and fracture energy, etc., with high accuracy and good reproducibility for brittle materials. For a series of metal/ ceramics composites which from ductile to brittle, this paper clarified clear the applicable range for SP and MSP testing methods, which suggested that the simultaneous use of SP and MSP test methods can evaluate the fracture strength of metal/ ceramics composites. (author)

  17. Effects of Ceramic Density and Sintering Temperature on the Mechanical Properties of a Novel Polymer-Infiltrated Ceramic-Network Zirconia Dental Restorative (Filling) Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyan; Sun, Jian

    2018-05-10

    BACKGROUND Polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) dental material is a new and practical development in orthodontics. Sintering is the process of forming a stable solid mass from a powder by heating without melting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of a PICN zirconia dental material. MATERIAL AND METHODS A dense zirconia ceramic and four PICN zirconia dental materials, with varying porosities, were sintered at three different temperatures; 12 PICN zirconia dental materials based on these porous ceramics were prepared, as well as a pure polymer. After the specimen preparation, flexural strength and elastic modulus values were measured using the three-point bending test, and fracture toughness were determined by the single-edge notched beam (SENB) method. The Vickers hardness test method was used with an indentation strength (IS) test. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the microstructure of the ceramic surface and the fracture surface. RESULTS Mechanical properties of the PICN dental materials, including flexural strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and hardness, were more similar to the properties of natural teeth when compared with traditional dental ceramic materials, and were affected by the density and sintering temperature. SEM showed that the porous ceramic network became cohesive and that the length of cracks in the PICN dental material was reduced. CONCLUSIONS PICN zirconia dental materials were characterized by similar mechanical properties to natural dental tissues, but further studies are required continue to improve the similarities with natural human enamel and dentin.

  18. Development of aircraft brake materials. [evaluation of metal and ceramic materials in sliding tests simulation of aircraft braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, T. L.; Peterson, M. B.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements of brake materials were outlined and a survey made to select materials to meet the needs of high temperature brakes. A number of metals and ceramic materials were selected and evaluated in sliding tests which simulated aircraft braking. Nickel, molybdenum tungsten, Zr02, high temperature cements and carbons were tested. Additives were then incorporated into these materials to optimize their wear or strength behavior with particular emphasis on nickel and molybdenum base materials and a high temperature potassium silicate cement. Optimum materials were developed which improved wear behavior over conventional brake materials in the simulated test. The best materials are a nickel, aluminum oxide, lead tungstate composition containing graphite or molybdenum disulphite; a molybdenum base material containing LPA100 (an intermetallic compound of cobalt, molybdenum, and silicon); and a carbon material (P5).

  19. Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    also have been shown to have higher enamel wear rates than composite-resin CAD/CAM restorations (Mӧrmann et al, 2013). As material choices, cost, and...although the longevity of these repairs has not been validated by clinical studies. Paradigm MZ100 showed the least amount of opposing enamel wear...ability to absorb shock, resist staining and stop crack propagation. Further manufacturer claims are that ceramic/polymer materials are easily

  20. Control and characterization of ceramics materials by photothermic radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egee, P.

    1993-01-01

    This work studies, by photothermal radiometry, semi-transparent and scattering ceramic coatings with a model in an axisymetrical geometry. The equation of the radiative transfer is solved thanks to a ten flux-model in order to calculate the luminance field, the radiative flux and the source term with a method by finite differences or the Fourier transform. The term of the source is introduced into the heat equation to calculate the temperature field. Theoretical simulations show the influence of the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the sample. The optical properties, which are necessary for the preceding model, are determined by adjusting measures of hemispherical directional reflectivity and transmissivity. The samples are then analyzed by photothermal radiometry under random noise excitation, which allows us to determine their harmonic response (amplitude and phase) in a large range of modulation frequencies. The confrontation between theory and experimental presents a good agreement. The process allows us to characterize the properties of the coating, and to determine the thermal resistance equivalent to a flaw at the interface. (author). 105 refs., 112 figs., 11 annexes

  1. Development of a ceramic material to cover walls to be applied in diagnostic radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frimaio, Audrew

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to formulate a ceramic composition for wall coating seeking to contribute to the optimization of diagnosis rooms' shielding. The work was based on experimental measures of X-radiation attenuation (80 and 100 kV) using ceramic coating materials containing different ceramic bases (red, white, gres, stoneware porcelain tiles, etc). Among the appraised ceramic bases, the white gres presented better attenuation properties and it was considered the most suitable material for the targets of this work. Different formulations of white gres were studied and altered in order to obtain better attenuation properties. Simulations of ceramic compositions using gres coating were made maintaining the percentages of 12-20% clay; 6-18% kaolin; 12-25% phyllite; 8-14% quartz; 1018% feldspar; 32-40% pegmatite and 6-8% talc in the composition of the necessary raw-material. The quantitative and qualitative chemical compositions of these materials were also evaluated and the most common representative elements are SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , CaO and Ti 2 O 3 . Formulations containing Pb and Ba oxides were studied, considering that CaO can be replaced by PbO or BaO. The attenuation properties for X-radiation were investigated by computer simulations considering the incident and transmitted X-ray spectra for the different studied compositions and they were compared to the properties of the reference materials Pb, Ba and BaSO 4 (barite). The results obtained with the simulations indicated the formulated composition of gres ceramic base that presented better attenuation properties considering the X-ray energies used in diagnosis (80, 100 and 150 kV). Ceramic plates based on the formulated compositions that presented lower percentage differences related to Pb were experimentally produced and physically tested as wall coating and protecting barrier. Properties as flexion resistance module, density, load rupture, water absorption and X radiation attenuation were evaluated for

  2. Material Technologies Developments for Solar Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrafiotis, C.; Pagkoura, C.; Lorentzou, S.; Hoguet, J.C.; Konstandopoulos, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    The present work presents recent activities of our Laboratory in the field of solar-aided hydrogen production materials and reactor technologies that can be fully integrated into solar thermal power plants. Emphasis is given on structured monolithic solar reactors where ceramic supports optimized to absorb solar radiation and develop sufficiently high temperatures, are coated with active materials to perform a variety of 'solar-aided' reactions such as water splitting or natural gas reforming. Particular examples discussed include properties'' assessment of monolithic ceramic honeycombs used as volumetric solar thermal reactors/receivers, synthesis of active water-splitting redox materials for the production of hydrogen and their tailored deposition upon porous supports and design, operation simulation and performance optimization of structured monolithic solar hydrogen production reactors. (authors)

  3. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Edge chipping and flexural resistance of monolithic ceramics☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Lee, James J.-W.; Srikanth, Ramanathan; Lawn, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that monolithic ceramics can be developed with combined esthetics and superior fracture resistance to circumvent processing and performance drawbacks of traditional all-ceramic crowns and fixed-dental-prostheses consisting of a hard and strong core with an esthetic porcelain veneer. Specifically, to demonstrate that monolithic prostheses can be produced with a much reduced susceptibility to fracture. Methods Protocols were applied for quantifying resistance to chipping as well as resistance to flexural failure in two classes of dental ceramic, microstructurally-modified zirconias and lithium disilicate glass–ceramics. A sharp indenter was used to induce chips near the edges of flat-layer specimens, and the results compared with predictions from a critical load equation. The critical loads required to produce cementation surface failure in monolithic specimens bonded to dentin were computed from established flexural strength relations and the predictions validated with experimental data. Results Monolithic zirconias have superior chipping and flexural fracture resistance relative to their veneered counterparts. While they have superior esthetics, glass–ceramics exhibit lower strength but higher chip fracture resistance relative to porcelain-veneered zirconias. Significance The study suggests a promising future for new and improved monolithic ceramic restorations, with combined durability and acceptable esthetics. PMID:24139756

  5. Characterization of ceramic materials for electrochemical hydrogen sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serret, P.; Colominas, S. [Electrochemical Methods Laboratory - Analytical Chemistry Department ETS Institut Quimic de Sarria, Universitat Ramon Llull, Via Augusta, 390, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Reyes, G. [Industrial Engineering Department ETS Institut Quimic de Sarria, Universitat Ramon Llull, Via Augusta, 390, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Abella, J., E-mail: jordi.abella@iqs.es [Electrochemical Methods Laboratory - Analytical Chemistry Department ETS Institut Quimic de Sarria, Universitat Ramon Llull, Via Augusta, 390, 08017 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Accurate and reliable tritium management is of basic importance for the correct operation conditions of the blanket tritium cycle. The Electrochemical Methods Lab at Institut Quimic de Sarria (IQS) is working in the design and development of tritium sensors, based on proton solid state electrolytes to be used in molten lithium-lead eutectic. Different solid electrolyte proton conductors have been synthesized (Sr{sub 3}CaZr{sub 0.9}Ta{sub 1.1}O{sub 8.55}, SrCe{sub 0.95}Yb{sub 0.05}O{sub 3-{alpha}}, CaZr{sub 0.9}In{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{alpha}}, Ba{sub 3}(Ca{sub 1.18}Nb{sub 1.82})O{sub 9-{alpha}}) in order to be evaluated in a testing apparatus for hydrogen gas. Potentiometric measurements of the synthesized ceramic elements have been performed. In all experiments the working temperature was 500 {sup o}C. The sensors constructed using the proton conductor element Sr{sub 3}CaZr{sub 0.9}Ta{sub 1.1}O{sub 8.55} exhibited stable output potential and its value was close to the theoretical value calculated with the Nernst equation. When the proton conductor elements SrCe{sub 0.95}Yb{sub 0.05}O{sub 3-{alpha}} and CaZr{sub 0.9}In{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{alpha}} and Ba{sub 3}(Ca{sub 1.18}Nb{sub 1.82})O{sub 9-{alpha}} were used a deviation higher than 100 mV between theoretical and experimental data was obtained.

  6. Structural ceramic coatings in composite microtruss cellular materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bele, E.; Bouwhuis, B.A.; Codd, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hibbard, G.D., E-mail: glenn.hibbard@utoronto.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The compressive strength increase per unit sleeve thickness of Al cores reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sleeves is lower than the corresponding strength increase when the same cores are reinforced with nanocrystalline Ni (n-Ni) sleeves (left). However, because anodizing is a transformative surface treatment, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was able to achieve this performance increase with little overall weight penalty (right). Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} A new type of metal/ceramic microtruss cellular composite has been created. {yields} Reinforcing sleeves of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on low density Al microtruss cores. {yields} Significant compressive strength increases were seen at virtually no weight penalty. {yields} Failure mechanisms were studied by electron microscopy and finite element analysis. {yields} Buckling, sleeve wrinkling, and coating fracture dictated the compressive strength. - Abstract: In the present study, anodizing was used to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings in a conventional 3003 aluminum alloy microtruss core; a 38.5 {mu}m thick anodic coating provided a 143% increase in compressive strength. Finite-element analyses were used to illustrate the dependence of the compressive strength and failure mechanism on the thickness of the anodic coating. At low thicknesses the microtruss strength is dictated by global bucking of the internal struts. However, at higher thicknesses the compressive strength is controlled by coating fracture and local deformation in the hinge region of the struts. Regardless of the failure mechanism, the compressive strength of the composite microtruss increased with increasing anodic coating thickness, with very little corresponding weight penalty.

  7. Structural ceramic coatings in composite microtruss cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bele, E.; Bouwhuis, B.A.; Codd, C.; Hibbard, G.D.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The compressive strength increase per unit sleeve thickness of Al cores reinforced with Al 2 O 3 sleeves is lower than the corresponding strength increase when the same cores are reinforced with nanocrystalline Ni (n-Ni) sleeves (left). However, because anodizing is a transformative surface treatment, the Al 2 O 3 coating was able to achieve this performance increase with little overall weight penalty (right). Display Omitted Highlights: → A new type of metal/ceramic microtruss cellular composite has been created. → Reinforcing sleeves of Al 2 O 3 were deposited on low density Al microtruss cores. → Significant compressive strength increases were seen at virtually no weight penalty. → Failure mechanisms were studied by electron microscopy and finite element analysis. → Buckling, sleeve wrinkling, and coating fracture dictated the compressive strength. - Abstract: In the present study, anodizing was used to produce Al 2 O 3 coatings in a conventional 3003 aluminum alloy microtruss core; a 38.5 μm thick anodic coating provided a 143% increase in compressive strength. Finite-element analyses were used to illustrate the dependence of the compressive strength and failure mechanism on the thickness of the anodic coating. At low thicknesses the microtruss strength is dictated by global bucking of the internal struts. However, at higher thicknesses the compressive strength is controlled by coating fracture and local deformation in the hinge region of the struts. Regardless of the failure mechanism, the compressive strength of the composite microtruss increased with increasing anodic coating thickness, with very little corresponding weight penalty.

  8. Prepare of microanalysis reference material for nuclear analysis of Chinese ancient ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Songlin; Xu Qing; Feng Xiangqian; Fan Dongyu; Lei Yong; Cheng Lin

    2005-01-01

    Some analytic technique can play important role for identifying the provenance and age of ceramic ware. However, it is usually not allowed to destructive analyze for a valuable intact porcelain ware. These analysis methods such as X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence (SRXRF) are suitable for nondestructive analysis of ancient ceramic wares. In order to compare the analytic data obtained by different measuring method and identify the provenance and age accurately, the effective way is to calibrate elemental concentration in body and glaze of ceramic ware. Microanalysis reference material (MRM) of ancient ceramic has to be prepared for achieving quantitative analysis. A solid powder 99% in size of 500 mesh for microanalysis reference material (MRM) has being prepared in institute of high energy physics. The minimum analytic masses of 1 mg were determined by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) for these elements (Sc, Cr, Co, Rb: Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Yb, Lu; Hf, Ta, Th, U), and by SRXRF for elements (K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Zn; Rb, Sr).

  9. Development of glass/glass-ceramics materials and devices and their micro-structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Madhumita; Sarkar, Arjun; Shingarvelan, Shobha; Kumar, Rakesh; Ananathanarayan, Arvind; Shrikhande, V.K.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Materials and devices based on glass and glass-ceramics (GCs) find applications in various high pressure and vacuum applications. We have prepared different glasses/glass-ceramics with requisite thermal expansion coefficient, electrical, vacuum and wetting characteristics to fabricate hermetic seals with different metals/alloys as well as components for these applications. Some of these are, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -B 2O3 (BS) for matched type of seal fabricated with Kovar alloy, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-BaO-PbO(LS) for fabrication of compressive type seals with stainless steel and SS 446 alloys, P 2 O 5 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -BaO-PbO(NAP) for fabrication of matched type of seal with relatively low melting metals/alloys like AI/Cu-Be and Li 2 O-ZnO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O (LZS) and Lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics to fabricate matched and compression types feedtroughs/conductivity probes Magnesium aluminium silicate (MAS) machinable glass-ceramics is another development for high voltage and ultra high vacuum applications. Micro-structural studies have been carried out on these materials to understand the mechanism of their behaviour and have also been deployed in various systems and plants in DAE. (author)

  10. Preparation and Photocatalytic Property of TiO2/Diatomite-Based Porous Ceramics Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuilin Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diatomite-based porous ceramics was made by low-temperature sintering. Then the nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials were prepared by hydrolysis deposition method with titanium tetrachloride as the precursor of TiO2 and diatomite-based porous as the supporting body of the nano-TiO2. The structure and microscopic appearance of nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials was characterized by XRD and SEM. The photocatalytic property of the composite was investigated by the degradation of malachite green. Results showed that, after calcination at 550°C, TiO2 thin film loaded on the diatomite-based porous ceramics is anatase TiO2 and average grain size of TiO2 is about 10 nm. The degradation ratio of the composite for 5 mg/L malachite green solution reached 86.2% after irradiation for 6 h under ultraviolet.

  11. Radiometric analysis of raw materials and end products in the Turkish ceramics industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, Ş.; Arıkan, İ. H.; Demirel, H.; Güngör, N.

    2011-05-01

    This study presents the findings of radiometric analysis carried out to determine the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in raw materials (clay, kaolin, quartz, feldspar, dolomite, alumina, bauxite, zirconium minerals, red mud and frit) and end products (glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) in the Turkish ceramics industry. Hundred forty-six samples were obtained from various manufacturers and suppliers throughout the country and analyzed using gamma-ray spectrometer with HPGe detectors. Radiological parameters such as radium equivalent activity, activity concentration index and alpha index were calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant national and international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplaces and industrial buildings in Turkey is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  12. Radiometric analysis of raw materials and end products in the Turkish ceramics industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turhan, S.; Arikan, I.H.; Demirel, H.; Guengoer, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the findings of radiometric analysis carried out to determine the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in raw materials (clay, kaolin, quartz, feldspar, dolomite, alumina, bauxite, zirconium minerals, red mud and frit) and end products (glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) in the Turkish ceramics industry. Hundred forty-six samples were obtained from various manufacturers and suppliers throughout the country and analyzed using gamma-ray spectrometer with HPGe detectors. Radiological parameters such as radium equivalent activity, activity concentration index and alpha index were calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant national and international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplaces and industrial buildings in Turkey is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  13. Experimental Investigation on the Material Removal of the Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Abrasive Water Jet Machining Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic vibration activated in the abrasive water jet nozzle is used to enhance the capability of the abrasive water jet machinery. The experiment devices of the ultrasonic vibration assisted abrasive water jet are established; they are composed of the ultrasonic vibration producing device, the abrasive supplying device, the abrasive water jet nozzle, the water jet intensifier pump, and so on. And the effect of process parameters such as the vibration amplitude, the system working pressure, the stand-off, and the abrasive diameter on the ceramics material removal is studied. The experimental result indicates that the depth and the volume removal are increased when the ultrasonic vibration is added on abrasive water jet. With the increase of vibration amplitude, the depth and the volume of material removal are also increased. The other parameters of the ultrasonic vibration assisted abrasive water jet also have an important role in the improvement of ceramic material erosion efficiency.

  14. Characterization of ceramic materials using ultrasonic technique in the frequency domain and artificial networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroni, D.B.; Bittencourt, M.S.Q.; Pereira, C.M.N.A.

    2008-01-01

    The ceramic material characterization is very important to guarantee its mechanical properties. In the case of nuclear fuel (UO 2 ) the adequate porosity ensures its thermal efficiency and its structural integrity that contribute to the safety at nuclear power plants. The Ultrasound Laboratory of the Nuclear Engineering Institute (LABUS/IEN) has developed a technique to measure the porosity in ceramic materials. This technique uses ultrasound signal in the frequency domain and creates spectrum patterns related to the material porosity. Trained artificial neural networks recognizes these patterns and associates them to the porosities. In this work 20 pellets of Alumina were used with porosities in the same range used in the nuclear fuel (0.70% to 4.25%). In this case the used network was able to recognize the patterns of the pellets and to associate to the porosities with 100% of precision. It was possible to distinguished pellets with a difference of 0.01% of the porosity. (author)

  15. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  16. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorni, Giulio; Velázquez, Jose J; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-30

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF₄ glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO₂ precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  17. Influence of the supporting die structures on the fracture strength of all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Munir Tolga; Yondem, Isa; Aykent, Filiz; Eraslan, Oğuz

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the elastic modulus of supporting dies on the fracture strengths of all-ceramic materials used in dental crowns. Four different types of supporting die materials (dentin, epoxy resin, brass, and stainless steel) (24 per group) were prepared using a milling machine to simulate a mandibular molar all-ceramic core preparation. A total number of 96 zirconia cores were fabricated using a CAD/CAM system. The specimens were divided into two groups. In the first group, cores were cemented to substructures using a dual-cure resin cement. In the second group, cores were not cemented to the supporting dies. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05). The geometric models of cores and supporting die materials were developed using finite element method to obtain the stress distribution of the forces. Cemented groups showed statistically higher fracture strength values than non-cemented groups. While ceramic cores on stainless steel dies showed the highest fracture strength values, ceramic cores on dentin dies showed the lowest fracture strength values among the groups. The elastic modulus of the supporting die structure is a significant factor in determining the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns. Using supporting die structures that have a low elastic modulus may be suitable for fracture strength tests, in order to accurately reflect clinical conditions.

  18. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gorni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  19. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorni, Giulio; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications. PMID:29385706

  20. Exploring high-strength glass-ceramic materials for upcycling of industrial wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Gu-Seul; Park, Hyun Seo; Seo, Sung Mo; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2015-11-01

    To promote the recycling of industrial waste and to develop value-added products using these resources, the possibility of manufacturing glass-ceramic materials of SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 system has been investigated by various heat treatment processes. Glass-ceramic materials with six different chemical compositions were prepared using steel industry slags and power plant waste by melting, casting and heat treatment. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that diopside and anorthite were the primary phases in the samples. The anorthite phase was formed in SiO2-rich material (at least 43 wt%). In CaO-rich material, the gehlenite phase was formed. By the differential scanning calorimetry analyses, it was found that the glass transition point was in the range of 973-1023 K, and the crystallization temperature was in the range of 1123-1223 K. The crystallization temperature increased as the content of Fe2O3 decreased. By the multi-step heat treatment process, the formation of the anorthite phase was enhanced. Using FactSage, the ratio of various phases was calculated as a function of temperature. The viscosities and the latent heats for the samples with various compositions were also calculated by FactSage. The optimal compositions for glass-ceramics materials were discussed in terms of their compressive strength, and micro-hardness.

  1. Thermodynamic considerations for the use of vanadium alloys with ceramic breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.E.; Johnson, I.; Kopasz, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Fusion energy is considered to be an attractive energy form because of its minimal environmental impact. In order to maintain this favorable status, every effort needs to be made to use low activation materials wherever possible. The tritium breeder blanket is a focal point of system design engineers who must design environmentally attractive blankets through the use of low activation materials. Of the several candidate lithium-containing ceramics being considered for use in the breeder blanket, Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, are attractive choices because of their low activation. Also, low activation materials like the vanadium alloys are being considered for use as structural materials in the blanket. The suitability of vanadium alloys for containment of lithium ceramics is the subject of this study. Thermodynamic evaluations are being used to estimate the compatibility and stability of candidate ceramic breeder materials (Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) with vanadium and vanadium alloys. This thermodynamic evaluation will focus first on solid-solid interactions. As a tritium breeding blanket will use a purge gas for tritium recovery, gas-solid systems will also receive attention.

  2. Thermodynamic considerations for the use of vanadium alloys with ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Johnson, I.; Kopasz, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion energy is considered to be an attractive energy form because of its minimal environmental impact. In order to maintain this favorable status, every effort needs to be made to use low activation materials wherever possible. The tritium breeder blanket is a focal point of system design engineers who must design environmentally attractive blankets through the use of low activation materials. Of the several candidate lithium-containing ceramics being considered for use in the breeder blanket, Li 2 O, Li 2 TiO 3 , are attractive choices because of their low activation. Also, low activation materials like the vanadium alloys are being considered for use as structural materials in the blanket. The suitability of vanadium alloys for containment of lithium ceramics is the subject of this study. Thermodynamic evaluations are being used to estimate the compatibility and stability of candidate ceramic breeder materials (Li 2 O, Li 2 TiO 3 , and Li 2 ZrO 3 ) with vanadium and vanadium alloys. This thermodynamic evaluation will focus first on solid-solid interactions. As a tritium breeding blanket will use a purge gas for tritium recovery, gas-solid systems will also receive attention

  3. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P materials.

  4. Advanced Material-Ordered Nanotubular Ceramic Membranes Covalently Capped with Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Al-Gharabli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramic materials with a well-defined nano-architecture of their surfaces were formed by applying a two-step procedure. Firstly, a primary amine was docked on the ordered nanotubular ceramic surface via a silanization process. Subsequently, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were covalently grafted onto the surface via an amide building block. Physicochemical (e.g., hydrophobicity, and surface free energy (SFE, mechanical, and tribological properties of the developed membranes were improved significantly. The design, preparation, and extended characterization of the developed membranes are presented. Tools such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, single-area electron diffraction (SAED analysis, microscopy, tribology, nano-indentation, and Raman spectroscopy, among other techniques, were utilized in the characterization of the developed membranes. As an effect of hydrophobization, the contact angles (CAs changed from 38° to 110° and from 51° to 95° for the silanization of ceramic membranes 20 (CM20 and CM100, respectively. SWCNT functionalization reduced the CAs to 72° and 66° for ceramic membranes carbon nanotubes 20 (CM-CNT-20 and CM-CNT-100, respectively. The mechanical properties of the developed membranes improved significantly. From the nanotribological study, Young’s modulus increased from 3 to 39 GPa for CM-CNT-20 and from 43 to 48 GPa for pristine CM-CNT-100. Furthermore, the nanohardness increased by about 80% after the attachment of CNTs for both types of ceramics. The proposed protocol within this work for the development of functionalized ceramic membranes is both simple and efficient.

  5. The effect of casting conditions on the biaxial flexural strength of glass-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Shareef, M Y; Walsh, J M; Hatton, P V; van Noort, R; Hill, R G

    1998-11-01

    To assess the effect of mould and glass casting temperatures on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of two different types of castable glass-ceramic, using existing laboratory equipment and techniques. Two castable glass-ceramic materials were evaluated. One glass (LG3) is based on SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-CaO-CaF2, and is similar in composition to glasses used in the manufacture of glass-ionomer cements. The other glass (SG3) is based on SiO2-K2O-Na2O-CaO-CaF2, and is a canasite-based material. Both materials were used to produce discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness using the same lost-wax casting process as used for metal castings. Mould temperatures of between 500 degrees C and 1000 degrees C and glass casting temperatures of between 1100 degrees C and 1450 degrees C were evaluated. The cast discs were cerammed and the biaxial flexural strength determined with a Lloyd 2000 R tester. A significant difference was found for the BFS in the range of mould temperatures evaluated, with the optimum investment mould temperature being 590 degrees C for LG3 and 610 degrees C for SG3 (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.019, respectively). No significant differences were seen between any of the glass casting temperatures evaluated. The mould temperature for castable glass-ceramic materials produced using the lost-wax casting process can have a significant effect on BFS. The optimum mould temperature may differ slightly depending on the type of material being used. The glass casting temperature of these materials does not appear to have a significant effect on BFS.

  6. Analysis of waste coal from the enterprises of Kemerovo region as raw materials for production of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolboushkin, A. Yu; Akst, D. V.; Fomina, O. A.; Ivanov, A. I.; Syromyasov, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of waste coal from mining enterprises of Kemerovo region as raw materials for production of building ceramics is given. The results of studies of material, chemical and mineralogical compositions of waste coal from Abashevskaya processing plant (Novokuznetsk) are presented. It was established that the chemical composition of waste coal refers to aluminosilicate raw materials with a high content of alumina and coloring oxides, the residual carbon content in the wastes is 12-25 %. According to the granulometric composition the waste coal is basically a sandy-dusty fraction with a small amount of clay particles (1-3 %). Additional grinding of coal waste and the introduction of a clay additive in an amount of up to 30 % are recommended. The results of the study of the mineral composition of waste coal are presented. Clay minerals are represented in the descending order by hydromuscovite, montmorillonite and kaolinite, minerals-impurities consist of quartz, feldspar fine-dispersed carbonates. The results of the investigation of ceramic-technological properties of waste coal, which belong to the group of moderately plastic low-melting raw materials, are given. As a result of a comprehensive study it was been established that with chemical, granulometric and mineralogical compositions waste coal with the reduced residual carbon can be used in the production of ceramic bricks.

  7. Effect of silica fiber on the mechanical and chemical behavior of alumina-based ceramic core material

    OpenAIRE

    Weiguo Jiang; Kaiwen Li; Jiuhan Xiao; Langhong Lou

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the chemical leachability, the alumina-based ceramic core material with the silica fiber was injected and sintered at 1100 °C/4 h, 1200 °C/4 h, 1300 °C/4 h and 1400 °C/4 h, respectively. The micrographs of ceramic core materials at sintered and leached state were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The phase composition of ceramic core material after sintering and the leaching product after leaching were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The porosity, r...

  8. Glass and glass–ceramic coatings, versatile materials for industrial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    such as abrasion, impact etc as compared to other coating materials applied by thermal spraying in its different forms viz. ... in some systematic way information on glass and glass– ... the industries by proper maintenance of the machinery/.

  9. Cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy in ceramic laminate veneering materials: A SEM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Ranganathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Marginal discrepancy influenced by the choice of processing material used for the ceramic laminate veneers needs to be explored further for better clinical application. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the amount of cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy associated with different ceramic laminate veneering materials. Settings and Design: This was an experimental, single-blinded, in vitro trial. Subjects and Methods: Ten central incisors were prepared for laminate veneers with 2 mm uniform reduction and heavy chamfer finish line. Ceramic laminate veneers fabricated over the prepared teeth using four different processing materials were categorized into four groups as Group I - aluminous porcelain veneers, Group II - lithium disilicate ceramic veneers, Group III - lithium disilicate-leucite-based veneers, Group IV - zirconia-based ceramic veneers. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy was measured using a scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA and post hoc Tukey honest significant difference (HSD tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy for four groups was Group I - 114.6 ± 4.3 μm, 132.5 ± 6.5 μm, Group II - 86.1 ± 6.3 μm, 105.4 ± 5.3 μm, Group III - 71.4 ± 4.4 μm, 91.3 ± 4.7 μm, and Group IV - 123.1 ± 4.1 μm, 142.0 ± 5.4 μm. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD tests observed a statistically significant difference between the four test specimens with regard to cervical marginal discrepancy. The cervical and incisal marginal discrepancy scored F = 243.408, P < 0.001 and F = 180.844, P < 0.001, respectively. Conclusion: This study concluded veneers fabricated using leucite reinforced lithium disilicate exhibited the least marginal discrepancy followed by lithium disilicate ceramic, aluminous porcelain, and zirconia-based ceramics. The marginal discrepancy was more in the incisal region than in the cervical region in all the groups.

  10. "Ultra"-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Structural Ceramic Materials Studied at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate determination of inert strength is important in reliable life prediction of structural ceramic components. At ambient temperature, the inert strength of a brittle material is typically regarded as free of the effects of slow crack growth due to stress corrosion. Therefore, the inert strength can be determined either by eliminating active species, especially moisture, with an appropriate inert medium, or by using a very high test rate. However, at elevated temperatures, the concept or definition of the inert strength of brittle ceramic materials is not clear, since temperature itself is a degrading environment, resulting in strength degradation through slow crack growth and/or creep. Since the mechanism to control strength is rate-dependent viscous flow, the only conceivable way to determine the inert strength at elevated temperatures is to utilize a very fast test rate that either minimizes the time for or eliminates slow crack growth. Few experimental studies have measured the elevated-temperature, inert (or "ultra"-fast fracture) strength of advanced ceramics. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, an experimental study was initiated to better understand the "ultra"-fast fracture strength behavior of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures. Fourteen advanced ceramics - one alumina, eleven silicon nitrides, and two silicon carbides - have been tested using constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing in flexure with a series of stress rates including the "ultra"-fast stress rate of 33 000 MPa/sec with digitally controlled test frames. The results for these 14 advanced ceramics indicate that, notwithstanding possible changes in flaw populations as well as flaw configurations because of elevated temperatures, the strength at 33 000 MPa/sec approached the room-temperature strength or reached a higher value than that determined at the conventional test rate of 30 MPa/sec. On the basis of the experimental data, it can be stated that the elevated

  11. Edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of polymer infiltrated ceramic network and resin nanoceramic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrou, Renos; Thompson, Geoffrey A; Cho, Seok-Hwan; Berzins, David W

    2016-09-01

    Two novel restorative materials, a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) and a resin nanoceramic (RNC), for computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) applications have recently become commercially available. Little independent evidence regarding their mechanical properties exists to facilitate material selection. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of the PICN and RNC materials and compare them with 2 commonly used feldspathic ceramic (FC) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LRGC) CAD-CAM materials that share the same clinical indications. PICN, RNC, FC, and LRGC material specimens were obtained by sectioning commercially available CAD-CAM blocks. Edge chipping test specimens (n=20/material) were adhesively attached to a resin substrate before testing. Edge chips were produced using a 120-degree, sharp, conical diamond indenter mounted on a universal testing machine and positioned 0.1 to 0.7 mm horizontally from the specimen's edge. The chipping force was plotted against distance to the edge, and the data were fitted to linear and quadratic equations. One-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) in edge chipping toughness. Beam specimens (n=22/material) were tested for determining flexural strength using a 3-point bend test. Weibull statistics determined intergroup differences (α=.05). Flexural modulus and work of fracture were also calculated, and 1-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) RESULTS: Significant (Pmaterials for the 4 mechanical properties. Specifically, the material rankings were edge chipping toughness: RNC>LRGC=FC>PICN; flexural strength: RNC=LRGC>PICN>FC; flexural modulus: RNCLRGC=PICN>FC. The RNC material demonstrated superior performance for the mechanical properties tested compared with the other 3 materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Mineral-modeled ceramics for long-term storage of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    Over the past ten years, Penn State's Materials Research Laboratory has done extensive work on mineral-modeled ceramics for high-level nuclear waste storage. These ceramics are composed of several mineral analogues that form a monolithic polycrystalline aggregate. Mineral-modeling can be made in a similar fashion to nuclear waste glasses, and their naturally occurring analogues are known to last millions, and even billions, of years in hot, wet conditions. It is believed that such ceramics could reduce dispersal of radionuclides by leaching to a minimum

  13. Numerical Simulation of the Dynamic Performance of the Ceramic Material Affected by Different Strain Rate and Porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhen; Mei, H; Lai, X; Liu, L S; Zhai, P C; Cao, D F

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic materials are frequently used in protective armor applications for its low-density, high elastic modulus and high strength. It may be subject to different ballistic impacts in many situations, thus many studies have been carried out to explore the approach to improve the mechanical properties of the ceramic material. However, the materials manufactured in real world are full of defects, which would involve in variable fractures or damage. Therefore, the defects should be taken into account while the simulations are performed. In this paper, the dynamic properties of ceramic materials (Al 2 O 3 ) affected by different strain rate (500–5000) and porosity (below 5%) are investigated. Foremost, the effect of strain rate was studied by using different load velocities. Then, compression simulations are performed by setting different porosities and random distribution of pores size and location in ceramic materials. Crack extensions and failure modes are observed to describe the dynamic mechanical behavior.

  14. Ceramic-polylactide composite material used in a model of healing of osseous defects in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myciński, Paweł; Zarzecka, Joanna; Skórska-Stania, Agnieszka; Jelonek, Agnieszka; Okoń, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Maria

    The growing demand for various kinds of bone regeneration material has in turn increased the desire to find materials with optimal physical, chemical, and biological properties. The objective of the present study was to identify the proportions of ceramic and polylactide components in a bone substitute material prepared in collaboration with the Crystal Chemistry of Drugs Team of the Faculty of Chemistry at the Jagiellonian University, which would be optimal for bone regeneration processes. Another goal was to provide a histological analysis of the influence of a ceramic-polylactide composite on the healing of osseous defects in rabbits. The study was performed on laboratory animals (18 New Zealand White rabbits). The following study groups were formed: - group A (study group, 9 animals) - in this group we performed a histological analysis of healing with a ceramic-polylactide composite based on an 80/20 mix of hydroxyapatite and polylactide; - group B (study group, 9 animals) - in this group we performed a histological analysis of healing with a ceramic-polylactide composite with a reduced amount of hydroxyapatite compared to the previous group, i.e. in a ratio of 61/39; - group K (control, 18 animals) - the control group comprised self-healing, standardised osseous defects prepared in the calvarial bone of the rabbits on the contralateral side. In the assessment of histological samples, we were also able to eliminate individual influences that might have led to differentiation in wound healing. The material used in the histological analysis took the form of rabbit bone tissue samples, containing both defects, with margins of around 0.5 cm, taken 1, 3, and 6 months after the experiment. The osseous defects from groups A and B filled with ceramic-polylactide material healed with less inflammatory infiltration than was the case with control group K. They were also characterised by faster regression, and no resorption or osteonecrosis, which allowed for better

  15. An investigation of neutron irradiation test on superplastic zirconia-ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Ishihara, Masahiro; Baba, Shinichi; Hayashi, Kimio

    2000-05-01

    A neutron irradiation test on superplastic ceramic materials at high temperature has been proposed as an innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). For the effective execution of the test, we reviewed the superplastic deformation mechanism of ceramic materials and discussed neutron irradiation effects on the superplastic deformation process of stabilized Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystal (TZP), which is a representative superplastic ceramic material. As a result, we pointed out that the decrease in the activation energy for superplastic deformation is expected by the radiation-enhanced diffusion. We selected a fast neutron fluence of 5x10 20 n/cm 2 and an irradiation temperature of about 600degC as test conditions for the first irradiation test on TZP and decided to perform a preliminary irradiation test by the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Moreover, we estimated the radioactivity of irradiated TZP and indicated that it is in the order of 10 10 Bq/g (about 0.3 Ci/g) immediately after irradiation to a thermal neutron fluence of 3x10 20 n/cm 2 and that it decays to about 1/100 in a year. (author)

  16. On the influence of particle morphology on the post-impact ballistic response of ceramic armour materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Amer; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Jaansalu, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence that the ballistic-resistance of fragmented (comminuted) ceramics is independent of the original strength of the material. In particular, experimental investigations into the ballistic behaviour of such fragmented ceramics have indicated that this response is correlated to shattered ceramic morphology. This suggests that careful control of ceramic microstructure - and therefore failure paths - might provide a route to optimise post-impact ballistic performance, thereby enhancing multi-hit capability. In this study, building on previous in-house work, ballistic tests were conducted using pre-formed `fragmented-ceramic' analogues based around three morphologically differing (but chemically identical) alumina feedstock materials compacted into target `pucks. In an evolution of previous work, variation of target thickness provided additional insight into an apparent morphology-based contribution to ballistic response.

  17. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  18. Influence of different post core materials on the color of Empress 2 full ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Wang, Xin-zhi; Feng, Hai-lan

    2006-10-20

    For esthetic consideration, dentin color post core materials were normally used for all-ceramic crown restorations. However, in some cases, clinicians have to consider combining a full ceramic crown with a metal post core. Therefore, this experiment was conducted to test the esthetical possibility of applying cast metal post core in a full ceramic crown restoration. The color of full ceramic crowns on gold and Nickel-Chrome post cores was compared with the color of the same crowns on tooth colored post cores. Different try-in pastes were used to imitate the influence of a composite cementation on the color of different restorative combinations. The majority of patients could not detect any color difference less than DeltaE 1.8 between the two ceramic samples. So, DeltaE 1.8 was taken as the objective evaluative criterion for the evaluation of color matching and patients' satisfaction. When the Empress 2 crown was combined with the gold alloy post core, the color of the resulting material was similar to that of a glass fiber reinforced resin post core (DeltaE = 0.3). The gold alloy post core and the try-in paste did not show a perceptible color change in the full ceramic crowns, which indicated that the color of the crowns might not be susceptible to change between lab and clinic as well as during the process of composite cementation. Without an opaque covering the Ni-Cr post core would cause an unacceptable color effect on the crown (DeltaE = 2.0), but with opaque covering, the color effect became more clinically satisfactory (DeltaE = 1.8). It may be possible to apply a gold alloy post core in the Empress 2 full ceramic crown restoration when necessary. If a non-extractible Ni-Cr post core exists in the root canal, it might be possible to restore the tooth with an Empress 2 crown after covering the labial surface of the core with one layer of opaque resin cement.

  19. Environmental and economic aspects of using marble fine waste in the manufacture of facing ceramic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemlyanushnov Dmitriy Yur'evich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work considers economic expediency of using marble fine waste in facing ceramic materials manufacture by three-dimensional coloring method. Adding marble fine waste to the charge mixture reduces the production cost of the final product. This waste has a positive impact on the intensification of drying clay rocks and raw as a whole, which increases production efficiency. Using marble fine waste as a coloring admixture makes it possible to manufacture more environmentally friendly construction material with the use of wastes of hazard class 3 instead of class 4. At the same time, disposal areas and environmental load in the territories of mining and marble processing reduce significantly. Replacing ferrous pigments with manganese oxide for marble fine waste reduces the cost of the final product and the manufacture of facing ceramic brick of a wide range of colors - from dark brown to yellow.

  20. The Effect of Plasma Surface Treatment on a Porous Green Ceramic Film with Polymeric Binder Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun Jeong Woo

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and energy during thermal binder removal in the ceramic process, plasma surface treatment was applied before the lamination process. The adhesion strength in the lamination films was enhanced by oxidative plasma treatment of the porous green ceramic film with polymeric binding materials. The oxygen plasma characteristics were investigated through experimental parameters and weight loss analysis. The experimental results revealed the need for parameter analysis, including gas material, process time, flow rate, and discharge power, and supported a mechanism consisting of competing ablation and deposition processes. The weight loss analysis was conducted for cyclic plasma treatment rather than continuous plasma treatment for the purpose of improving the film's permeability by suppressing deposition of the ablated species. The cyclic plasma treatment improved the permeability compared to the continuous plasma treatment.

  1. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  2. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T; Padipatvuthikul, P

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si 3 N 4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si 3 N 4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si 3 N 4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si 3 N 4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder ( 2 O 3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si 3 N 4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10 -6 deg. C -1 , rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  3. Mechanical and trybological characterization of ceramic materials obtained of mine solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto T, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    A discussion of the physical, mechanical and tribological characterization of the ceramics Jaar, Jaca and Vijaar is presented in this work. They have been obtained from the industrial residuals, coming from metals and sand of the mining industry in Pachuca Hidalgo, Mexico. The methodology followed for the obtention and characterization of these ceramics consists on eliminating the cyanides from the tailings through columns coupled with a system controlled with thermostats. Then, the chemical composition is analysed with spectrometry emission of plasma and scanning electronic microscopy. Then the ceramics are produced. The base material is agglutinated with clay or kaolin. For this purpose, it was used a sintering processes and isothermal compacting in hot condition. Finally, the physical, chemical, mechanical and tribological properties of these new products are determined. Carbon, oxygen, sodium, magnesium, aluminium, manganese, silicon, potassium, phosphor, calcium, titanium, iron, molybdenum, silver and gold are in the chemical composition or ceramic analysed. Also these are heterogeneous mixture of clay and kaolin. The cyanide was eliminated. The results show that Vijaar has better wear resistances to the waste; this was demonstrated in tribology tests. They were not perforated with the abrasive particles. Also, they have high hardness and they can to support more loads in compression than Jaar and the Jaca. Consequently, they are less fragile and, therefore, they can tolerate bending stresses and bigger impact loading. (Author)

  4. Low-temperature setting phosphate ceramics for stabilization of DOE problem low level mixed-waste: I. Material and waste form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.; Knox, L.; Mayberry, J.

    1994-03-01

    Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics are proposed as candidates for solidification and stabilization of some of the open-quotes problemclose quotes DOE low-level mixed wastes at low-temperatures. Development of these materials is crucial for stabilization of waste streams which have volatile species and any use of high-temperature technology leads to generation of off-gas secondary waste streams. Several phosphates of Mg, Al, and Zr have been investigated as candidate materials. Monoliths of these phosphates were synthesized using chemical routes at room or slightly elevated temperatures. Detailed physical and chemical characterizations have been conducted on some of these phosphates to establish their durability. Magnesium ammonium phosphate has shown to possess excellent mechanical and as well chemical properties. These phosphates were also used to stabilize a surrogate ash waste with a loading ranging from 25-35 wt.%. Characterization of the final waste forms show that waste immobilization is due to both chemical stabilization and physical encapsulation of the surrogate waste which is desirable for waste immobilization

  5. Processing and characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kander, R.G.; Namboodri, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    One way to more easily process a brittle high-temperature ceramic superconductor into a useful structure is to combine it with a polymer to form a composite material. Processing of polymer-based composites into complex shapes is well established and relatively easy when compared with traditional ceramic processing unit operations. In addition, incorporating a ceramic superconductor into a polymer matrix can improve mechanical performance as compared with a monolithic ceramic. Finally, because ceramic superconductors are susceptible to attack by moisture, a polymer-based composite structure can also provide protection from deleterious environmental effects. This paper focuses on the processing and subsequent characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites designed primarily for electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic applications. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x [YBCO] ceramic superconductor is combined with poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] to form novel composite structures. Composite structures have been molded with both a discontinuous superconducting phase (i.e., ceramic particulate reinforced polymers) and with a continuous superconducting phase (i.e., polymer infiltrated porous ceramics). Characterization of these composite structures includes the determination of diamagnetic strength, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, mechanical performance, and environmental resistance. The goal of this program is to produce a composite structure with increased mechanical integrity and environmental resistance at liquid nitrogen temperatures without compromising the electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic properties of the superconducting phase. Composites structures of this type are potentially useful in numerous magnetic applications including electromagnetic shielding, magnetic sensors, energy storage, magnetic levitation, and motor windings

  6. Piezoelectric ceramic material, containing PbNb2O6, K2Nb2O6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, E.G.; Filip'ev, V.S.; Razumovskaya, O.N.; Cherner, Ya.E.; Rudkovskaya, L.M.; Zav'yalov, V.P.; Molchanova, R.A.; Kryshtop, V.G.; Panich, A.E.; Servuli, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new piezoelectric ceramic material including PbNb 2 O 6 , K 2 Nb 2 O 6 is prepared. Above the new material contains Nb 2 O 5 . The invention relates to piezotechnique. The principal advantage of this material for acoustic converters is high anisotropy of piezoelectric properties as well as high Curie temperature (T C =539-553 deg C). The composition containing 93.96 mole% PbNb 2 O 6 ; 2.48 mole% K 2 Nb 2 O 6 and 3.56 mole% Nb 2 O 5 has optimum content of parameters

  7. Clinical performance - a reflection of damage accumulation in ceramic dental crowns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekow, D.E. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Orthodontics; Thompson, V.P. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). New Jersey Dental School

    2001-07-01

    All-ceramic dental crowns have tremendous appeal for patients - their esthetics nearly match those of natural teeth. Unfortunately, the most esthetic materials are brittle and, consequently, are vulnerable to damage relating to shaping which is exacerbated during cyclic loading during normal chewing. Clinical performance of all-ceramic dental prostheses are directly dependent on damage introduced during fabrication and during fatigue loading associated with function. The accumulation of damage results in unacceptably high failure rates (where failure is defined as a complete fracture requiring replacement of the prosthesis). The relation between shaping damage and fatigue damage on clinical performance of all-ceramic dental crowns was investigated. Materials used commercially for all-ceramic crowns and investigated in this study included a series of different microstructures of machinable glass ceramics (Corning), aluminas and porcelains (Vita Zahnfabrik), and zirconia (Norton). As monolithic materials, strong, tough, fatigue-resistant materials are not sufficiently esthetic for crowns. Crowns fabricated from monolithic esthetic materials have high failure rates. Layering ceramics could provide acceptable strength through management of damage accumulation. (orig.)

  8. Dense and porous glass and glass ceramics from natural and waste raw materials

    OpenAIRE

    Marangoni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of the herewith presented research activities was to develop innovative processes and materials for building applications adapted to the needs of Saudi Arabia according to the information exchanged with the partners from KACST (King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology). The research activity focused on the development of a wide range of ceramic components via sinter-crystallization of glasses produced from waste (fly ash, slag, sludge) with or without the addition of vit...

  9. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation.

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation

  11. Lithium ceramics as the solid breeder material in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Reuther, T.C.; Johnson, C.E.

    1982-03-01

    Fusion blanket designs have for almost a decade considered the use of a solid breeder relying on available data and assumed performance. The conclusion from these studies is that acceptable neutronic and thermal hydraulic performance can be achieved. In the future, it will be necessary to establish that a particular material can tolerate the thermal and irradiation environment of the fusion blanket while still providing the required functions of tritium recovery, power production and neutron shielding

  12. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project. Semiannual progress report, April-September 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: management and coordination; materials and processing (monolithics, ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining); materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts); data base and life prediction (time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE development); and technology transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants.

  13. Monoliths in Bioprocess Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Rajamanickam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic columns are a special type of chromatography column, which can be used for the purification of different biomolecules. They have become popular due to their high mass transfer properties and short purification times. Several articles have already discussed monolith manufacturing, as well as monolith characteristics. In contrast, this review focuses on the applied aspect of monoliths and discusses the most relevant biomolecules that can be successfully purified by them. We describe success stories for viruses, nucleic acids and proteins and compare them to conventional purification methods. Furthermore, the advantages of monolithic columns over particle-based resins, as well as the limitations of monoliths are discussed. With a compilation of commercially available monolithic columns, this review aims at serving as a ‘yellow pages’ for bioprocess engineers who face the challenge of purifying a certain biomolecule using monoliths.

  14. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  15. Mechanical Failure of Endocrowns Manufactured with Different Ceramic Materials: An In Vitro Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Guliz; Yerlikaya, Hatice; Akca, Kivanc

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of different silica-based ceramic materials on the mechanical failure behavior of endocrowns used in the restoration of endodontically treated mandibular molar teeth. Thirty-six intact mandibular molar teeth extracted because of a loss of periodontal support received root canal treatment. The teeth were prepared with a central cavity to support the endocrowns, replacing the occlusal surface with mesial-lingual-distal walls. Data acquisition of the prepared tooth surfaces was carried out digitally with a powder-free intraoral scanner. Restoration designs were completed on manufactured restorations from three silicate ceramics: alumina-silicate (control), zirconia-reinforced (Zr-R), and polymer-infiltrated (P-I). Following adhesive cementation, endocrowns were subjected to thermal aging, and then, each specimen was obliquely loaded to record the fracture strength and define the mechanical failure. For the failure definition, the fracture type characteristics were identified, and further analytic measurements were made on the fractured tooth and ceramic structure. Load-to-fracture failure did not differ significantly, and the calculated mean values were 1035.08 N, 1058.33 N, and 1025.00 N for control, Zr-R, and P-I groups, respectively; however, the stiffness of the restoration-tooth complex was significantly higher than that in both test groups. No statistically significant correlation was established in paired comparisons of the failure strength, restorative stiffness, and fractured tooth distance parameters. The failure mode for teeth restored with zirconia-reinforced glass ceramics was identified as non-restorable. The resin interface in the control and P-I groups presented similar adhesive failure behavior. Mechanical failure of endocrown restorations does not significantly differ for silica-based ceramics modified either with zirconia or polymer. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Biocompatibility of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials with Human Gingival Fibroblasts (HGFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenade, Charlotte; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Gailly, Patrick; Vanheusden, Alain; Mainjot, Amélie

    2016-09-01

    Polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials constitute an innovative class of CAD-CAM materials offering promising perspectives in prosthodontics, but no data are available in the literature regarding their biological properties. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of PICNs with human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) in comparison with materials typically used for implant prostheses and abutments. HGF attachment, proliferation and spreading on discs made of PICN, grade V titanium (Ti), yttrium zirconia (Zi), lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (eM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (negative control), were evaluated using a specific insert-based culture system (IBS-R). Sample surface properties were characterized by XPS, contact angle measurement, profilometry and SEM. Ti and Zi gave the best results regarding HGF viability, morphology, number and coverage increase with time in comparison with the negative control, while PICN and eM gave intermediate results, cell spreading being comparable for PICN, Ti, Zi and eM. Despite the presence of polymers and their related hydrophobicity, PICN exhibited comparable results to glass-ceramic materials, which could be explained by the mode of polymerization of the monomers. The results of the present study confirm that the currently employed materials, i.e. Ti and Zi, can be considered to be the gold standard of materials in terms of HGF behavior, while PICN gave intermediate results comparable to eM. The impact of the present in vitro results needs to be further investigated clinically, particularly in the view of the utilization of PICNs for prostheses on bone-level implants. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of ceramic and polymeric materials for use in engineered barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullam, H.T.; Skiens, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    Ceramic materials evaluated in the screening studies were Al 2 O 3 (99.8%), mullite, vitreous silica, BaTiO 3 , CaTiO 3 , CaZrO 3 , CaTiSiO 5 , TiO 2 , ZrSiO 4 , basalt, Pyroceram 9617, and Marcor code 9658 machinable glass ceramic. One grade of graphite (Toyotanso IB-11) was also evaluated. Demineralized water, a synthetic Hanford groundwater, and a synthetic NaCl brine solution were used in the screening tests. Demineralized water was used in all five of the leach tests, but the other solutions were only used in the static leach tests at 150 and 250 0 C. Based on the results obtained, graphite appears to be the most leach resistant of the materials tested with the two grades of alumina being the best of the ceramic materials. Titanium dioxide and ZrO 2 are the most leach resistant of the remaining materials. Candidate materials from all three general classes of polymers (thermoplastics, thermosets, and elastomers) were considered in the selection of materials. Selected groups of polymers were tested in the flowing autoclave at 150, 200, and 250 0 C with some polymers being further tested at the next higher temperature. Next, selected samples were exposed to gamma radiation. These samples were then submitted for tensile and elongation measurements. Selected samples which appeared promising from both autoclave and radiation testing were further evaluated by impact tests. The materials that appeared most promising after autoclave testing were the EPDM rubbers, polyphenylene sulfide, poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) copolymer, and polyfurfuryl alcohol. The radiation dose had little effect on polyfurfuryl alcohol and polyphenylene sulfide samples; very significant decreases in elongation were observed for the fluorocarbon copolymer and the EPDM rubbers. While the polyphenylene sulfide and polyfurfuryl alcohol showed little change in impact strength, poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) decreased in impact strength

  18. Experimental and Modeling Study of Liquid-Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining of Smart Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Parmar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Smart ceramic materials are next generation materials with the inherent intelligence to adapt to change in the external environment. These materials are destined to play an essential role in several critical engineering applications. Machining these materials using traditional machining processes is a challenge. The laser beam micromachining (LBMM process has the potential to machine such smart materials. However, laser machining when performed in air induces high thermal stress on the surface, often leading to crack formation, recast and re-deposition of ablated material, and large heat-affected zones (HAZ. Performing laser beam machining in the presence of a liquid medium could potentially resolve these issues. This research investigates the possibility of using a Liquid Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining (LA-LBMM process for micromachining smart ceramic materials. Experimental studies are performed to compare the machining quality of laser beam machining process in air and in a liquid medium. The study reveals that the presence of liquid medium helps in controlling the heat-affected zone and the taper angle of the cavity drilled, thereby enhancing the machining quality. Analytical modeling is developed for the prediction of HAZ and cavity diameter both in air and underwater conditions, and the model is capable of predicting the experimental results to within 10% error.

  19. Theoretical analysis of material removal mechanisms in pulsed laser fusion cutting of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, F [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Varas, F [Dpto Matematica Aplicada II, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Pou, J [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Lusquinos, F [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Boutinguiza, M [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Soto, R [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Perez-Amor, M [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2005-02-21

    It is well known that the efficiency of material removal mechanisms has a crucial influence on the performance and quality of the laser cutting process. However, they are very difficult to study since the physical processes and parameters which govern them are quite complicated to observe and measure experimentally. For this reason, the development of theoretical models to analyse the material removal mechanisms is very important for understanding the characteristics and influence of these processes. In this paper, a theoretical model of the pulsed laser fusion cutting of ceramics is presented. The material removal mechanisms from the cutting front are modelled under the assumption that the ceramic material may be, simultaneously, melted and evaporated by the laser radiation. Therefore, three ejection mechanisms are investigated together: ejection of molten material by the assist gas, evaporation of the liquid and ejection of molten material due to the recoil pressure generated by the evaporation from the cutting front. The temporal evolution of the material removal mechanisms and the thickness of the molten layer are solved for several laser pulse modes. Theoretical results are compared with experimental observations to validate the conclusions regarding the influence of frequency and pulse length on the cutting process.

  20. Creep performance of oxide ceramic fiber materials at elevated temperature in air and in steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armani, Clinton J.

    Structural aerospace components that operate in severe conditions, such as extreme temperatures and detrimental environments, require structural materials that have superior long-term mechanical properties and that are thermochemically stable over a broad range of service temperatures and environments. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) capable of excellent mechanical performance in harsh environments are prime candidates for such applications. Oxide ceramic materials have been used as constituents in CMCs. However, recent studies have shown that high-temperature mechanical performance of oxide-oxide CMCs deteriorate in a steam-rich environment. The degradation of strength at elevated temperature in steam has been attributed to the environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in the oxide fibers. Furthermore, oxide-oxide CMCs have shown significant increases in steady-state creep rates in steam. The present research investigated the effects of steam on the high-temperature creep and monotonic tension performance of several oxide ceramic materials. Experimental facilities were designed and configured, and experimental methods were developed to explore the influence of steam on the mechanical behaviors of ceramic fiber tows and of ceramic bulk materials under temperatures in the 1100--1300°C range. The effects of steam on creep behavior of Nextel(TM)610 and Nextel(TM)720 fiber tows were examined. Creep rates at elevated temperatures in air and in steam were obtained for both types of fibers. Relationships between creep rates and applied stresses were modeled and underlying creep mechanisms were identified. For both types of fiber tows, a creep life prediction analysis was performed using linear elastic fracture mechanics and a power-law crack velocity model. These results have not been previously reported and have critical design implications for CMC components operating in steam or near the recommended design limits. Predictions were assessed and validated via

  1. Fatigue failure load of two resin-bonded zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramics: Effect of ceramic thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Jaiane Bandoli; Riquieri, Hilton; Prochnow, Catina; Guilardi, Luís Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; de Melo, Renata Marques; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of ceramic thickness on the fatigue failure load of two zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) glass-ceramics, adhesively cemented to a dentin analogue material. Disc-shaped specimens were allocated into 8 groups (n=25) considering two study factors: ZLS ceramic type (Vita Suprinity - VS; and Celtra Duo - CD), and ceramic thickness (1.0; 1.5; 2.0; and 2.5mm). A trilayer assembly (ϕ=10mm; thickness=3.5mm) was designed to mimic a bonded monolithic restoration. The ceramic discs were etched, silanized and luted (Variolink N) into a dentin analogue material. Fatigue failure load was determined using the Staircase method (100,000 cycles at 20Hz; initial fatigue load ∼60% of the mean monotonic load-to-failure; step size ∼5% of the initial fatigue load). A stainless-steel piston (ϕ=40mm) applied the load into the center of the specimens submerged in water. Fractographic analysis and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were also performed. The ceramic thickness influenced the fatigue failure load for both ZLS materials: Suprinity (716N up to 1119N); Celtra (404N up to 1126N). FEA showed that decreasing ceramic thickness led to higher stress concentration on the cementing interface. Different ZLS glass-ceramic thicknesses influenced the fatigue failure load of the bonded system (i.e. the thicker the glass ceramic is, the higher the fatigue failure load will be). Different microstructures of the ZLS glass-ceramics might affect the fatigue behavior. FEA showed that the thicker the glass ceramic is, the lower the stress concentration at the tensile surface will be. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  3. A study on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregates and ceramic as materials replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, N. B.; Khalid, F. S.; Irwan, J. M.; Anting, N.; Mazenan, P. N.

    2017-11-01

    Natural fine aggregate materials are commonly used in development and commercial construction in Malaysia. In fact, concrete production was increased as linear with the growing Malaysia economy. However, an issue was production of concrete was to locate adequate sources of natural fine aggregates. There lot of studies have been conducted in order to replace the fine aggregate in which natural fine aggregate replace with the waste material in concrete preparation. Therefore, this study aims to utilize the Recycled Concrete Aggregate (RCA) and ceramic waste which has great potential to replace the natural aggregate in concrete mix with different type of method, admixture, and parameters. This research were focused on compressive strength and water absorption test to determine the optimum mix ratio of concrete mix. The concrete aggregate was chosen due to improvement capillary bonding mechanisms and ceramic presented similar strength compared to the conventional concrete using natural aggregate. Percent of replacement have been used in this study was at 25%, 35% and 45% of the RCA and 5%, 10% and 15% for ceramic, respectively. Furthermore, this research was conduct to find the optimum percentage of aggregate replacement, using water-cement ratio of 0.55 with concrete grade 25/30. The best percentage of replacement was the RCA35% C15% with the compressive strength of 34.72 MPa and the water absorption was satisfied.

  4. Thermodynamics of ceramic breeder materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, O.

    1989-05-01

    Based on known or deduced phase relationships in ternary lithium oxygen systems such as Li-Al-O, Li-Si-O and Li-Zr-O, the unknown free enthalpy of formation values of ternary compounds are calculated starting from the known data of the compounds of the binary border systems. Criterion for the data assessment is interconsistency of the data of all the compounds within a given multi-component system. With the help of these data the development of partial pressures during the breeding process can be calculated for all the compounds of interest. In order to facilitate a compatibility assessment the quaternary systems Cr-Li-Si-O, Fe-Li-Si-O and Be-Li-Si-O were also investigated and thermodynamic data of pertinent ternary and quaternary compounds determined. Both the partial pressure development and the compatibility behaviour of a lithium containing compound are criteria for its qualification as a breeder material for a fusion reactor. (orig.) [de

  5. Microstructural Characterization of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Ceramics. Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructural characterization of two reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics has been carried out by interference layering, plasma etching, and microscopy. These specimens contained free silicon and niobium disilicide as minor phases with silicon carbide as the major phase. In conventionally prepared samples, the niobium disilicide cannot be distinguished from silicon in optical micrographs. After interference layering, all phases are clearly distinguishable. Back scattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the results obtained by interference layering. Plasma etching with CF4 plus 4% O2 selectively attacks silicon in these specimens. It is demonstrated that interference layering and plasma etching are very useful techniques in the phase identification and microstructural characterization of multiphase ceramic materials.

  6. Detection of ionizing radiations by studying ceramic tiles materials using thermoluminescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandavia, H. C.; Murthy, K. V. R.; Purohit, R. U.

    2017-05-01

    Natural background radiation comes from two primary sources: cosmic radiation and terrestrial sources. Our natural environment has both livings and non-livings like - Sun, Moon, Sky, Air, Water, Soil, Rivers, Mountains, Forests, besides plants and animals. The worldwide average background dose for a human being is about 2.4 millisievert (mSv) per year. This exposure is mostly from cosmic radiation and natural radionuclides in the environment. The Earth, and all living things on it, are constantly bombarded by radiation from outer space. This radiation primarily consists of positively charged ions from protons to iron and larger nuclei derived sources outside our solar system. This radiation interacts with atoms in the atmosphere to create secondary radiation, including X-rays, muons, protons, alpha particles, pions, electrons, and neutrons. The present study discusses the utility of ceramic tiles as radiation dosimeters in case of nuclear fallout. Many flooring materials most of them are in natural form are used to manufacture floor tiles for household flooring purpose. Many natural minerals are used as the raw materials required for the manufacturing ceramic ware. The following minerals are used to manufacturing the ceramic tiles i.e. Quartz, Feldspar, Zircon, Talc, Grog, Alumina oxide, etc. Most of the minerals are from Indian mines of Gujarat and Rajasthan states, some of are imported from Russian subcontinent. The present paper reports the thermoluminescence dosimetry Study of Feldspar and Quartz minerals collected from the ceramic tiles manufacturing unit, Morbi. The main basis in the Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) is that TL output is directly proportional to the radiation dose received by the phosphor and hence provides the means of estimating unknown radiations from environment.

  7. Life Prediction/Reliability Data of Glass-Ceramic Material Determined for Radome Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Brittle materials, ceramics, are candidate materials for a variety of structural applications for a wide range of temperatures. However, the process of slow crack growth, occurring in any loading configuration, limits the service life of structural components. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine the slow crack growth parameters required for component life prediction using an appropriate test methodology. This test methodology also should be useful in determining the influence of component processing and composition variables on the slow crack growth behavior of newly developed or existing materials, thereby allowing the component processing and composition to be tailored and optimized to specific needs. Through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the authors recently developed two test methods to determine the life prediction parameters of ceramics. The two test standards, ASTM 1368 for room temperature and ASTM C 1465 for elevated temperatures, were published in the 2001 Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 15.01. Briefly, the test method employs constant stress-rate (or dynamic fatigue) testing to determine flexural strengths as a function of the applied stress rate. The merit of this test method lies in its simplicity: strengths are measured in a routine manner in flexure at four or more applied stress rates with an appropriate number of test specimens at each applied stress rate. The slow crack growth parameters necessary for life prediction are then determined from a simple relationship between the strength and the applied stress rate. Extensive life prediction testing was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center using the developed ASTM C 1368 test method to determine the life prediction parameters of a glass-ceramic material that the Navy will use for radome applications.

  8. Advanced Ceramic Materials For Next-Generation Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.

    2010-01-01

    proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  9. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  10. Lightweight Ablative and Ceramic Thermal Protection System Materials for NASA Exploration Systems Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Lawrence, Timothy W.; Gubert, Michael K.; Milos, Frank S.; Kiser, James D.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Koenig, John R.

    2006-01-01

    As a collaborative effort among NASA Centers, the "Lightweight Nonmetallic Thermal Protection Materials Technology" Project was set up to assist mission/vehicle design trade studies, to support risk reduction in thermal protection system (TPS) material selections, to facilitate vehicle mass optimization, and to aid development of human-rated TPS qualification and certification plans. Missions performing aerocapture, aerobraking, or direct aeroentry rely on advanced heatshields that allow reductions in spacecraft mass by minimizing propellant requirements. Information will be presented on candidate materials for such reentry approaches and on screening tests conducted (material property and space environmental effects tests) to evaluate viable candidates. Seventeen materials, in three classes (ablatives, tiles, and ceramic matrix composites), were studied. In additional to physical, mechanical, and thermal property tests, high heat flux laser tests and simulated-reentry oxidation tests were performed. Space environmental effects testing, which included exposures to electrons, atomic oxygen, and hypervelocity impacts, was also conducted.

  11. Surface properties of ceramic/metal composite materials for thermionic converter applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.R.; Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ceramic/metal composite electrode materials are of interest for thermionic energy conversion (TEC) applications for several reasons. These materials consist of submicron metal fibers or islands in an oxide matrix and therefore provide a basis for fabricating finely structured electrodes, with projecting or recessed metallic regions for more efficient electron emission or collection. Furthermore, evaporation and surface diffusion of matrix oxides may provide oxygen enhancement of cesium adsorption and work function lowering at both the collecting and emitting electrode surfaces of the TEC. Finally, the high work function oxide matrix or oxide-metal interfaces may provide efficient surface ionization of cesium for space-charge reduction in the device. The authors are investigating two types of ceramic/metal composite materials. One type is a directionally solidified eutectic consisting of a bulk oxide matrix such as UO 2 or stabilized ZrO 2 with parallel metal fibers (W) running through the oxide being exposed at the surface by cutting perpendicular to the fiber direction. The second type of material, called a surface eutectic, consists of a refractory substrate (Mo) with a thin layer of deposited and segregated material (Mo-Cr 2 O 3 -A1 2 O 3 ) on the surface. The final configuration of this layer is an oxide matrix with metallic islands scattered throughout

  12. Effects of Surface Morphology ZnAl2O4 of Ceramic Materials on Osteoblastic Cells Responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez-Franco, J.L.; Fernandez-Pedrero, J.A.; Ivarez-Perez, M.A.; Garcia-Hipolito, M.; Surarez-Rosales, M.; Fregoso, O.; Juarez-Islas, J.A.; Ivarez-Perez, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic scaffolds are widely studied in the tissue engineering field due to their potential in medical applications as bone substitutes or as bone-filling materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surface morphology of nano structure thin films of ZnAl 2 O 4 prepared by spray pyrolysis and bulk pellets of polycrystalline ZnAl 2 O 4 prepared by chemical coprecipitation reaction on the in vitro cell adhesion, viability, and cell-material interactions of osteoblastic cells. Our result showed that cell attachment was significantly enhanced from 60 to 80% on the ZnAl 2 O 4 nano structured material surface when compared with bulk ceramic surfaces. Moreover, our results showed that the balance of morphological properties of the thin film nano structure ceramic improves cell-material interaction with enhanced spreading and filopodia with multiple cellular extensions on the surface of the ceramic and enhancing cell viability/proliferation in comparison with bulk ceramic surfaces used as control. Altogether, these results suggest that zinc aluminate nano structured materials have a great potential to be used in dental implant and bone substitute applications.Ceramic scaffolds are widely studied in the tissue engineering field due to their potential in medical applications as bone substitutes or as bone-filling materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surface morphology of nano structure thin films of ZnAl 2 O 4 prepared by spray pyrolysis and bulk pellets of polycrystalline ZnAl 2 O 4 prepared by chemical coprecipitation reaction on the in vitro cell adhesion, viability, and cell-material interactions of osteoblastic cells. Our result showed that cell attachment was significantly enhanced from 60 to 80% on the ZnAl 2 O 4 nano structured material surface when compared with bulk ceramic surfaces. Moreover, our results showed that the balance of morphological properties of the thin film nano structure ceramic improves

  13. An investigation into the relationship between thermal shock resistance and ballistic performance of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Robert

    Currently, there are no reliable methods for screening potential armour materials and hence full-scale ballistic trials are needed. These are both costly and time-consuming in terms of the actual test and also in the materials development that needs to take place to produce sufficient material to give a meaningful result. Whilst it will not be possible to dispense with ballistic trials before material deployment in armour applications, the ability to shorten the development cycle would be advantageous. The thermal shock performance of ceramic armour materials has been highlighted as potential marker for ballistic performance. Hence the purpose of this study was to investigate this further. A new thermal shock technique that reproduced features relevant to ballistic testing was sought. As it would be beneficial to have a simple test that did not use much material, a water-drop method was adopted. This was combined with a variety of characterisation techniques, administered pre- and post-shock. The methods included measurement of the amplitude of ultrasonic wave transmission through the sample alongside residual strength testing using a biaxial ball-on-ball configuration and reflected light and confocal microscopy. Once the protocols had been refined the testing regime was applied to a group of ceramic materials. The materials selected were from two broad groups: alumina and carbide materials. Carbide ceramics show superior performance to alumina ceramics in ballistic applications so it was essential that any screening test would be easily able to differentiate the two groups. Within the alumina family, two commercially available materials, AD995 and Sintox FA, were selected. These were tested alongside three developmental silicon carbide-boron carbide composites, which had identical chemical compositions but different microstructures and thus presented more of a challenge in terms of differentiation. The results from the various tests were used to make predictions

  14. Improvement of microstructure and mechanical properties of high dense SiC ceramics manufactured by high-speed hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voyevodin, V.; Sayenko, S.; Lobach, K.; Tarasov, R.; Zykova, A.; Svitlychnyi, Ye.; Surkov, A.; Abelentsev, V.; Ghaemi, H.; Szkodo, M.; Gajowiec, G.; Kmiec, M.; Antoszkiewicz, M.

    2017-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics possess high physical-mechanical properties, corrosion and radiation resistance, which can be used as a protective materials for radioactive wastes disposal. The aim of the present study was the manufacturing of high density SiC ceramics with advanced physical and mechanical parameters. The high performance on the properties of produced ceramics was determined by the dense and monolithic structure. The densified silicon carbide samples possessed good mechanical strength, with a high Vickers micro hardness up to 28.5 GPa.

  15. Elaboration of porous gehlenite and anorthite based ceramics using low price raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zenikheri

    Full Text Available Abstract Porous ceramics of good quality cost a lot in the world market, which has limited their use in developing countries. This is why this work was mainly devoted to prepare low-cost and good quality ceramics, using kaolin (DD2 type and calcite (CaCO3 available in abundance in Algeria. Based on previous results, 28 wt% CaCO3 ceramic was selected. The presence of CaCO3 favors to achieve porous samples characterized by a high percentage of porosity due to the CO2 release and CaO formation during its calcination at about 700 °C. The choice of these raw materials is based on their natural abundance (low price. It has been found that the samples had interesting characteristics: average pore size between 2.87 and 6.50 μm and porosity between 53 and 57%. It has also been found that the manufactured membrane supports are mainly constituted of gehlenite and anorthite phases. Moreover, the pore size distribution was mono-modal type. The surface and cross-section morphologies observed through a scanning electron microscope were also homogeneous and do not present any possible macro-defects (cracks, etc..

  16. Characterization of ceramic masses using raw material of Para, Brazil: kaolin in natura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vida, T.A.; Facury Neto, E.; Rabelo, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation rejects to the mixtures has if shown viable in the reduction of the environmental liability and for the obtaining of a better quality of the ceramic mass. In the present work, is tried to study the potentiality of the use of ceramic formulations with the addition of kaolin in natura to the clays. Formulations with two clays of the area of the municipal district of Maraba with addition of up to 60% in kaolin weight were prepared and characterized. For the determination of the physical and mechanical properties proof bodies were made by prensagem uniaxial and later burned in temperature from 900 to 1200 deg C with landing of 3 hours. The raw materials were characterized through diffraction of rays X (DRX) and thermogravimetric analysis. The proof bodies prepared were used for determination of the lineal retraction (RL), absorption of water, apparent porosity, apparent density, loss to the fire and rupture module the flexing. The results were satisfactory for the smallest kaolin tenors in the ceramic mass, and the mass with 20% presented rupture module elevated, in the temperature of 1200 deg C. (author)

  17. Removal of bacteriophages with different surface charges by diverse ceramic membrane materials in pilot spiking tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambsch, B; Bösl, M; Eberhagen, I; Müller, U

    2012-01-01

    This study examines mechanisms for removal of bacteriophages (MS2 and phiX174) by ceramic membranes without application of flocculants. The ceramic membranes considered included ultra- and microfiltration membranes of different materials. Phages were spiked into the feed water in pilot scale tests in a waterworks. The membranes with pore sizes of 10 nm provided a 2.5-4.0 log removal of the phages. For pore sizes of 50 nm, the log removal dropped to 0.96-1.8. The membrane with a pore size of 200 nm did not remove phages. So, the removal of both MS2- and phiX174-phages depended on the pore size of the membranes. But apart from pore size also other factors influence the removal of phages. Removal was 0.5-0.9 log higher for MS2-phages compared with phiX174-phages. Size exclusion seems to be the major but not the only mechanism which influences the efficiency of phage removal by ceramic membranes.

  18. Viability of utilization of waste materials from ceramic products in precast concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Rojas, M. I.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The recycled and re-valuation process of waste materials involves studies lead to a deep acknowledges of them, finding applications for their intended use. The waste materials from ceramic products can be recycled into the construction sector, as arid or pozzolanic materials. The current work deals with the incorporation of ceramic materials in these two different ways, checking the behaviour of the elaborated mortar by mean of laboratory tests. Also, tests are developed in factory, using these as components for precast concrete tiles.

    Todo proceso de reciclado y revalorización de residuos implica estudios encaminados a un conocimiento profundo de los mismos, de forma que se busquen aplicaciones concretas de uso. Los materiales de desecho procedentes de productos cerámicos pueden ser reciclados dentro del sector de la construcción, ya sea como áridos o como materiales puzolánicos. El presente trabajo aborda la incorporación de materiales cerámicos desde estas dos vertientes, comprobando, en cada caso, el comportamiento de los morteros elaborados mediante ensayos de laboratorio. También se llevan a cabo pruebas en fábrica, siendo utilizados como componentes en prefabricados de hormigón.

  19. Radioactivity reference levels in ceramics tiles as building materials for different countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Josefina; Ballesteros, Luisa; Serradell, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Measurements campaigns of ceramic tiles and raw materials used in them, shows that natural radionuclides of uranium ( 238 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) series, together with the radioactive isotope of potassium ( 40 K ), are presents. Uranium series contain radium, which decays to radon ( 222 Rn), an inert gas that can be released from materials and inhaled by individuals. Limits of 226 Ra concentrations are established by different countries in order to control Radon levels (200 Bq.m -3 in European Union). Potassium -40 and others gamma emitters of 226 Ra and 232 Th descendent, can cause an external dose. Therefore, with the purpose that individual doses due to building materials doesn't exceed a certain level recommendations or regulations have been established. A maximum value of 1 mSv.y -1 is recommended in European Union. In practice an easy way to avoid ceramic tiles provide doses to individuals over the reference level is to introduce an index, depending on activities concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K, defined so that the dose limits due, exclusively, to building materials, will never be exceeded. These limits and indexes present differences between countries. In this paper indexes are compared and differences are discussed. (author)

  20. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives

  1. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T [Research Unit of Advanced Ceramic, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Padipatvuthikul, P, E-mail: raayaa_chula@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1}, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  2. Fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM glass-ceramic materials used for single-tooth implant crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sahin, Erdal; Gürbüz, Riza; Akça, Kivanç

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM in-office monoceramic materials with single-tooth implant-supported crowns in functional area. A metal experimental model with a dental implant was designed to receive in-office CAD/CAM-generated monoceramic crowns. Laterally positioned axial dynamic loading of 300 N at 2 Hz was applied to implant-supported crowns machined from 2 different glass materials for 100,000 cycle. Failures in terms of fracture, crack formation, and chipping were macroscopically recorded and microscopically evaluated. Four of 10 aluminasilicate glass-ceramic crowns fractured at early loading cycles, the rest completed loading with a visible crack formation. Crack formation was recorded for 2 of 10 leucite glass-ceramic crowns. Others completed test without visible damage but fractured upon removal. Lack in chemical adhesion between titanium abutment and dental cement likely reduces the fatigue resistance of machinable glass-ceramic materials. However, relatively better fractural strength of leucite glass-ceramics could be taken into consideration. Accordingly, progress on developmental changes in filler composition of glass-ceramics may be promising. Machinable glass-ceramics do not possess sufficient fatigue resistance for single-tooth implant crowns in functional area.

  3. Glass-ceramic coating material for the CO2 laser based sintering of thin films as caries and erosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilandžić, Marin Dean; Wollgarten, Susanne; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Poprawe, Reinhart; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Fischer, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The established method of fissure-sealing using polymeric coating materials exhibits limitations on the long-term. Here, we present a novel technique with the potential to protect susceptible teeth against caries and erosion. We hypothesized that a tailored glass-ceramic material could be sprayed onto enamel-like substrates to create superior adhesion properties after sintering by a CO 2 laser beam. A powdered dental glass-ceramic material from the system SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-CaO-Al 2 O 3 -MgO was adjusted with individual properties suitable for a spray coating process. The material was characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), heating microscopy, dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain size analysis, biaxial flexural strength measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gas pycnometry. Three different groups of samples (each n=10) where prepared: Group A, powder pressed glass-ceramic coating material; Group B, sintered hydroxyapatite specimens; and Group C, enamel specimens (prepared from bovine teeth). Group B and C where spray coated with glass-ceramic powder. All specimens were heat treated using a CO 2 laser beam process. Cross-sections of the laser-sintered specimens were analyzed using laser scanning microscopy (LSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and SEM. The developed glass-ceramic material (grain size d50=13.1mm, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)=13.310 -6 /K) could be spray coated on all tested substrates (mean thickness=160μm). FTIR analysis confirmed an absorption of the laser energy up to 95%. The powdered glass-ceramic material was successfully densely sintered in all sample groups. The coating interface investigation by SEM and EDX proved atomic diffusion and adhesion of the glass-ceramic material to hydroxyapatite and to dental enamel. A glass-ceramic material with suitable absorption properties was successfully sprayed and laser-sintered in thin films on hydroxyapatite as well as on

  4. Obtaining of dense and highly porous ceramic materials from metallurgical slag

    OpenAIRE

    Fidancevska E.; Mangutova B.; Milosevski D.; Milosevski M.; Bossert J.

    2003-01-01

    Glass-ceramics in a dense and highly porous form can be obtained from metallurgical slag and waste glass of TV monitors. Using polyurethane foam as pore creator, a highly porous system with porosity of 65 ± 5 %, E-modulus and flexural strength of 8 ± 3 GPa and 13 ± 3.5 MPa respectively can be obtained. This porous material had durability (mass loss) of 0.03 % in 0.1 M HCl that is identical with the durability of a dense composite.

  5. Obtaining of dense and highly porous ceramic materials from metallurgical slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidancevska E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics in a dense and highly porous form can be obtained from metallurgical slag and waste glass of TV monitors. Using polyurethane foam as pore creator, a highly porous system with porosity of 65 ± 5 %, E-modulus and flexural strength of 8 ± 3 GPa and 13 ± 3.5 MPa respectively can be obtained. This porous material had durability (mass loss of 0.03 % in 0.1 M HCl that is identical with the durability of a dense composite.

  6. Alumina composites for oxide/oxide fibrous monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Polzin, B. J.; Picciolo, J. J.; Singh, D.; Tsaliagos, R. N.; Goretta, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    Most work on ceramic fibrous monoliths (FMs) has focused on the Si 3 N 4 /BN system. In an effort to develop oxidation-resistant FMs, several oxide systems have recently been examined. Zirconia-toughened alumina and alumina/mullite appear to be good candidates for the cell phase of FMs. These composites offer higher strength and toughness than pure alumina and good high-temperature stability. By combining these oxides, possibly with a weaker high-temperature oxide as the cell-boundary phase, it should be possible to product a strong, resilient FM that exhibits graceful failure. Several material combinations have been examined. Results on FM fabrication and microstructural development are presented

  7. Advances in X-ray powder diffraction profile analysis and its application in ceramic material studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the following major aspects: (1) the development of necessary computer codes to carry out X-ray powder diffraction profile analysis (XPDPA) calculations; (2) the establishment of a general reference material (GRM) which greatly extends the application of XPDPA and the study of the application of the GRM in profile analysis; (3) the determination of the coherent diffracting domain size and the lattice residual microstrain for some shock-modified and jet-milled materials. A computer code for diffraction profile refinement, XRAYL, fits a diffraction profile with any one of five mathematical functions, either as symmetric or asymmetric (split mode) forms. The resulting patterns meet the requirements for successful profile analysis of microstrain and crystallite size. Powder diffraction profile analysis requires an instrument calibration standard to correct data for instrumental profiles due to the system optics. A general reference material, LaB 6 , has been established. The pattern of this LaB 6 powder can be used to generate a reference pattern for any other substance. Through three applications, it has been shown that this LaB 6 sample can be used to remove the instrumental broadenings and gives reasonable size and strain estimates in the profile analysis of other materials. Many previous studies have shown that the solid state reactivity and physical properties of some ceramic materials can be substantially enhanced. XPDPA techniques have been used to study the plastic deformation and the reduction of crystallite size for eight shock-modified ceramic materials. The size and strain values of these materials are correlated with shock parameters

  8. Cell response of calcium phosphate based ceramics, a bone substitute material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize calcium phosphate ceramics with different Ca/P ratios and evaluate cell response of these materials for use as a bone substitute. Bioceramics consisting of mixtures of hydroxyapatite (HAp and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP powders in different proportions were pressed and sintered. The physical and chemical properties of these bioceramics were then characterized. Characterization of the biological properties of these materials was based on analysis of cell response using cultured fibroblasts. The number of cells attached to the samples was counted from SEM images of samples exposed to cell culture solution for different periods. These data were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA complemented by the Tukey's test. The TCP sample had higher surface roughness and lower density. The adherence and growth of FMM1 cells on samples from all groups was studied. Even though the different calcium based ceramics exhibited properties which made them suitable as bone substitutes, those with higher levels of β-TCP revealed improved cell growth on their surfaces. These observations indicated two-phase calcium phosphate based materials with a β-TCP surface layer to be a promising bone substitute.

  9. Thermally induced outdiffusion studies of deuterium in ceramic breeder blanket materials after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Maria, E-mail: maria.gonzalez@ciemat.es [LNF-CIEMAT, Materials for Fusion Group, Madrid (Spain); Carella, Elisabetta; Moroño, Alejandro [LNF-CIEMAT, Materials for Fusion Group, Madrid (Spain); Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Knitter, Regina [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Surface defects in Lithium-based ceramics are acting as trapping centres for deuterium. • Ionizing radiation affects the deuterium sorption and desorption processes. • By extension, the release of the tritium produced in a fusion breeder will be effective. - Abstract: Based on a KIT–CIEMAT collaboration on the radiation damage effects of light ions sorption/desorption in ceramic breeder materials, candidate materials for the ITER EU TBM were tested for their outgassing behavior as a function of temperature and radiation. Lithium orthosilicate based pebbles with different metatitanate contents and pellets of the individual oxide components were exposed to a deuterium atmosphere at room temperature. Then the thermally induced release of deuterium gas was registered up to 800 °C. This as-received behavior was studied in comparison with that after exposing the deuterium-treated samples to 4 MGy total dose of gamma radiation. The thermal desorption spectra reveal differences in deuterium sorption/desorption behavior depending on the composition and the induced ionizing damage. In these breeder candidates, strong desorption rate at approx. 300 °C takes place, which slightly increases with increasing amount of the titanate second phase. For all studied materials, ionizing radiation induces electronic changes disabling a number of trapping centers for D{sub 2} adsorption.

  10. The modelling and control of failure in bi-material ceramic laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, A.J.; Howard, S.J.; Clegg, W.J.; Clyne, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work on simple, single phase, laminated systems has indicated that failure resistant ceramics can be produced using an elegant method that avoids many of the problems and limitations of comparable fibrous ceramic composites. Theoretical work on these laminated systems has shown good agreement with experiment and simulated the effects of material properties and laminate structure on the composite performance. This work has provided guidelines for optimised laminate performance. In the current study, theoretical work has been simply extended to predict the behaviour of bi-material laminates with alternating layers of weak and strong material with different stiffnesses. Expressions for the strain energy release rates of internal advancing cracks are derived and combined with existing criteria to predict the failure behaviour of these laminates during bending. The modelling indicates three modes of failure dictated by the relative proportions, thicknesses and interfacial properties of the weak and strong phases. A critical percentage of strong phase is necessary to improve failure behaviour, in an identical argument to that for fibre composites. Incorporation of compliant layers is also investigated and implications for laminate design discussed. (orig.)

  11. Mineralogical and technology characterization of raw materials of clay used for ceramic blocks fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, N.Q.; Tapajos, N.S.

    2012-01-01

    In the state of Para, the red ceramic industry has several segments highly generators of jobs and a strong social appeal. With so many companies focused on this productive sector emerge, but many without any administration quality. Therefore, this study focused the technological and mineralogical characterization of the raw material used in the manufacture of ceramic blocks, by Ceramica Vermelha Company, located in the district of Inhangapi-PA. The raw material was obtained by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine the present crystalline phases through an accurate and efficient procedure, where it was possible to identify the peaks relating to montmorillonite, illite and kaolinite clay in the sample, and kaolinite and quartz in the sample laterite. Another important result was the absorption of water, with average satisfactory according to the standards. According to a sieve analysis, the laterite the sand fraction showed a greater extent compared to the other, while the clay silt exceeding 80% was found to be too plastic material. The resistance to compression, the results were below the required by the standard, suggesting more accurate test methods. (author)

  12. Mechanical and tribological properties of ceramic-matrix friction materials with steel fiber and mullite fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fahui; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Interaction of mixing the steel and mullite fibers can improve the mechanical properties. • Mixing the steel and mullite fibers can also improve friction stability. • Friction coefficient increases with increasing additional mullite fiber content. • Ceramic-matrix friction material shows sever fade due to mullite fibers agglomerated. - Abstract: The purpose of the present work was to investigate and compare the mechanical and tribological behaviors of ceramic-matrix friction material (CMFM) with steel fiber (SF), mullite fiber (MF), and mixing SF and MF. The CMFM was prepared by hot-pressing sintering, and the tribological behaviors were determined using a constant speed friction tester. The worn surfaces and wear debris were observed by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experiment results show that the combination of SF and MF can improve the mechanical properties that each single fiber does not have. The sever fade for the specimen reinforced by single MF during the whole friction testing can be attributed to the poor interface cohesive strength between MF and matrix. Mixing the SF and MF can improve the friction stability, and the friction coefficients for friction material with a mixture of the SF and MF increases with increasing MF content. For all specimens, increasing in the friction temperatures result in the increase of wear rates

  13. Effect of Luting Cements On the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-Ceramic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al–Makramani, Bandar M. A.; Razak, Abdul A. A.; Abu–Hassan, Mohamed I.; Al–Sanabani, Fuad A.; Albakri, Fahad M.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The selection of the appropriate luting cement is a key factor for achieving a strong bond between prepared teeth and dental restorations. AIM: To evaluate the shear bond strength of Zinc phosphate cement Elite, glass ionomer cement Fuji I, resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji Plus and resin luting cement Panavia-F to Turkom-Cera all-ceramic material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Turkom-Cera was used to form discs 10mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness (n = 40). The ceramic discs were wet ground, air - particle abraded with 50 - μm aluminium oxide particles and randomly divided into four groups (n = 10). The luting cement was bonded to Turkom-Cera discs as per manufacturer instructions. The shear bond strengths were determined using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analysed using the tests One Way ANOVA, the nonparametric Kruskal - Wallis test and Mann - Whitney Post hoc test. RESULTS: The shear bond strength of the Elite, Fuji I, Fuji Plus and Panavia F groups were: 0.92 ± 0.42, 2.04 ± 0.78, 4.37 ± 1.18, and 16.42 ± 3.38 MPa, respectively. There was the statistically significant difference between the four luting cement tested (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: the phosphate-containing resin cement Panavia-F exhibited shear bond strength value significantly higher than all materials tested. PMID:29610618

  14. Study of parameters of heat treatment in obtaining glass ceramic materials with addition of the industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Martins, G.J.M.; Riella, H.G.; Matsinhe, Jonas; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    The production of materials from crystallization of glass, called glass ceramic, have proved interesting by the possibility of development of different microstructures, with reduced grain size and the presence of residual amorphous phase in different quantities. The method that uses the differential thermal analysis (DTA) provides research on the material properties over a wide temperature range, it's widely applied to crystallization processes of glass ceramic materials. Within this context, this paper aims to study the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in glass ceramic materials in the system SiO 2 - Al 2 O 3 -Li 2 O, obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ash as source of aluminosilicates, through the technique of differential thermal analysis. (author)

  15. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  16. Development of Advanced Materials for Electro-Ceramic Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1331-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McMillan, L. [Symetrix International, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Tulupov, A. [Soliton-NTT, Moscow (Russia)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to further develop and characterize the electrochemical methods originating in Russia for producing ultra high purity organometallic compounds utilized as precursors in the production of high quality electro-ceramic materials. Symetrix planned to use electro-ceramic materials with high dielectric constant for microelectronic memory circuit applications. General Atomics planned to use the barium titanate type ceramics with low loss tangent for producing a high power ferroelectric tuner used to match radio frequency power into their Dill-D fusion machine. Phase I of the project was scheduled to have a large number of organometallic (alkoxides) chemical samples produced using various methods. These would be analyzed by LLNL, Soliton and Symetrix independently to determine the level of chemical impurities thus verifying each other's analysis. The goal was to demonstrate a cost-effective production method, which could be implemented in a large commercial facility to produce high purity organometallic compounds. In addition, various compositions of barium-strontium-titanate ceramics were to be produced and analyzed in order to develop an electroceramic capacitor material having the desired characteristics with respect to dielectric constant, loss tangent, temperature characteristics and non-linear behavior under applied voltage. Upon optimizing the barium titanate material, 50 capacitor preforms would be produced from this material demonstrating the ability to produce, in quantity, the pills ultimately required for the ferroelectric tuner (approx 2000-3000 ceramic pills).

  17. On the improvement of mechanical properties of monolithic silica aerogels (for transparent insulating material); Silica aerogel (tomei dannetsu zairyo) kyodo no kaizen ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajiri, K; Igarashi, K; Tanemura, S [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Study was made on improvement of the strength of silica aerogel as transparent insulating material. Silica aerogel is a low-density porous material with high heat insulation and transparency. To develop a insulating material with high transparency, monolithic silica aerogel was studied. For direct use of it for windows, its strength improvement was attempted. The aerogel was prepared by supercritical drying (alcohol or CO2) of silica wet gel obtained by hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxide solution. To prepare the aerogel bonded on plate glass for strength improvement, the aerogel was bonded to alkoxide by exposing active silanol radical through F-etching of plate glass surface. However, to obtain the practical large-area bonded aerogel, shrinkage control of the aerogel in supercritical drying was necessary. Addition of Laponite into a silica network for strength improvement by polymer increased the bending strength by 50%. Although some reduction of its transparency was observed because of clouding, its heat insulation was stable. Further strength improvement is necessary for its practical use. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Data on post irradiation experiments of heat resistant ceramic composite materials. PIE for 97M-13A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shin-ichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Souzawa, Shizuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Sekino, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The research on the radiation damage mechanism of heat resistant ceramic composite materials is one of the research subjects of the innovative basic research in the field of high temperature engineering, using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Three series of irradiation tests on the heat resistant ceramic composite materials, first to third irradiation test program, were carried out using the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR). This is a summary report on the first irradiation test program; irradiation induced dimensional change, thermal expansion coefficient, X-ray diffraction and {gamma}-ray spectrum are reported. (author)

  19. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felisberto, R.; Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  20. An investigation of structural design methodology for HTGR reactor internals with ceramic materials (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-03-01

    To advance the performance and safety of HTGR, heat-resistant ceramic materials are expected to be used as reactor internals of HTGR. C/C composite and superplastic zirconia are the promising materials for this purpose. In order to use these new materials as reactor internals in HTGR, it is necessary to establish a structure design method to guarantee the structural integrity under environmental and load conditions. Therefore, C/C composite expected as reactor internals of VHTR is focused and an investigation on the structural design method applicable to the C/C composite and a basic applicability of the C/C composite to representative structures of HTGR were carried out in this report. As the results, it is found that the competing risk theory for the strength evaluation of the C/C composite is applicable to design method and C/C composite is expected to be used as reactor internals of HTGR. (author)

  1. Low-activation structural ceramic composites for fusion power reactors: materials development and main design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, A.S.; Le Bars, N.; Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.; Salavy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Development of advanced Low-Activation Materials (LAMs) with favourable short-term activation characteristics is discussed, for the use as structural materials in a fusion power reactor (in order to reduce the risk associated with a major accident, in particular those related with radio-isotopes release in the environment), and to try to approach the concept of an inherently safe reactor. LA Ceramics Composites (LACCs) are the most promising LAMs because of their relatively good thermo-mechanical properties. At present, SiC/SiC composite is the only LACC considered by the fusion community, and therefore is the one having the most complete data base. The preliminary design of a breeding blanket using SiC/SiC as structural material indicated that significant improvement of its thermal conductivity is required. (author) 11 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Finite element modeling of deposition of ceramic material during SLM additive manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A three dimensional model for material deposition in Selective Laser Melting (SLM with application to Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic ceramic is presented. As the material is transparent to laser, dopants are added to increase the heat absorption efficiency. Based on Beer-Lambert law, a volumetric heat source model taking into account the material absorption is derived. The Level Set method with multiphase homogenization is used to track the shape of deposed bead and the thermodynamic is coupled to calculate the melting-solidification path. The shrinkage during consolidation from powder to compact medium is modeled by a compressible Newtonian constitutive law. A semi-implicit formulation of surface tension is used, which permits a stable resolution to capture the gas-liquid interface. The formation of droplets is obtained and slight waves of melt pool are observed. The influence of different process parameters on temperature distribution, melt pool profiles and bead shapes is discussed.

  3. Theoretical Studies on the Electronic Structures and Properties of Complex Ceramic Crystals and Novel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2012-01-14

    This project is a continuation of a long program supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science in the Office of Science of DOE for many years. The final three-year continuation started on November 1, 2005 with additional 1 year extension to October 30, 2009. The project was then granted a two-year No Cost Extension which officially ended on October 30, 2011. This report covers the activities within this six year period with emphasis on the work completed within the last 3 years. A total of 44 papers with acknowledgement to this grant were published or submitted. The overall objectives of this project are as follows. These objectives have been evolved over the six year period: (1) To use the state-of-the-art computational methods to investigate the electronic structures of complex ceramics and other novel crystals. (2) To further investigate the defects, surfaces/interfaces and microstructures in complex materials using large scale modeling. (3) To extend the study on ceramic materials to more complex bioceramic crystals. (4) To initiate the study on soft condensed matters including water and biomolecules. (5) To focus on the spectroscopic studies of different materials especially on the ELNES and XANES spectral calculations and their applications related to experimental techniques. (6) To develop and refine computational methods to be effectively executed on DOE supercomputers. (7) To evaluate mechanical properties of different crystals and those containing defects and relate them to the fundamental electronic structures. (8) To promote and publicize the first-principles OLCAO method developed by the PI (under DOE support for many years) for applications to large complex material systems. (9) To train a new generation of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in modern computational materials science and condensed matter physics. (10) To establish effective international and domestic collaborations with both experimentalists and theorists in materials

  4. Light transmittance and surface roughness of a feldspathic ceramic CAD-CAM material as a function of different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Çağrı; Duran, İbrahim; Evmek, Betül; Kavut, İdris; Cengiz, Seda; Yuzbasioglu, Emir

    2016-07-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of different surface treatments on light transmission of aesthetic feldspathic ceramics used in CAD-CAM chairside restorations. Forty eight feldspatic ceramic test specimens were prepared from prefabricated CAD-CAM blocks by using a slow speed diamond saw. Test specimens were prepared and divided into 4 groups (n = 12). In the control group, no surface treatments were applied on the feldspathic ceramic surfaces. In the hydrofluoric acid group, the bonding surfaces of feldspathic ceramics were etched with 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid. In the sandblasting group the feldspathic ceramic surfaces were air-abraded with 30-μm alumium oxide (Al2O3) particles and Er:YAG laser was used to irradiate the ceramic surfaces. The incident light power given by the LED device and the transmitted light power through each ceramic sample was registered using a digital LED radiometer device. Each polymerization light had a light guide with 8-mm-diameter tips. Light transmission of feldspathic ceramic samples was determined by placing it on the radiometer and irradiating the specimen for 10 s at the highest setting for each light polymerization. All specimens were coated with gold using a sputter coater and examined under a field emission scanning electron microscope. Surface roughness measurement each group were evaluated with 3D optical surface and tactile profilometers. One-way ANOVA test results revealed that both surface conditioning method significantly affect the light transmittance (F:412.437; p ceramic material below the value of 400 mW/cm(2) which is critical limit for safe polymerization.

  5. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  6. A mesomechanical analysis of the deformation and fracture in polycrystalline materials with ceramic porous coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokhonov, R. R.; Zinoviev, A. V.; Romanova, V. A.; Batukhtina, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    The special features inherent in the mesoscale mechanical behavior of a porous ceramic coating-steel substrate composite are investigated. Microstructure of the coated material is accounted for explicitly as initial conditions of a plane strain dynamic boundary-value problem solved by the finite difference method. Using a mechanical analogy method, a procedure for generating a uniform curvilinear finite difference computational mesh is developed to provide a more accurate description of the complex grain boundary geometry. A modified algorithm for generation of polycrystalline microstructure of the substrate is designed on the basis of the cellular automata method. The constitutive equations for a steel matrix incorporate an elastic-plastic model for a material subjected to isotropic hardening. The Hall-Petch relation is used to account for the effect of the grain size on the yield stress and strain hardening history. A brittle fracture model for a ceramic coating relying on the Huber criterion is employed. The model allows for crack nucleation in the regions of triaxial tension. The complex inhomogeneous stress and plastic strain patterns are shown to be due to the presence of interfaces of three types: coating-substrate interface, grain boundaries, and pore surfaces.

  7. ADM guidance-Ceramics: guidance to the use of fractography in failure analysis of brittle materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Susanne S; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Della Bona, Alvaro; Vichi, Alessandro; Tholey, Michael J; Kelly, J Robert; van Noort, Richard; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-06-01

    To provide background information and guidance as to how to use fractography accurately, a powerful tool for failure analysis of dental ceramic structures. An extended palette of qualitative and quantitative fractography is provided, both for in vivo and in vitro fracture surface analyses. As visual support, this guidance document will provide micrographs of typical critical ceramic processing flaws, differentiating between pre- versus post sintering cracks, grinding damage related failures and occlusal contact wear origins and of failures due to surface degradation. The documentation emphasizes good labeling of crack features, precise indication of the direction of crack propagation (dcp), identification of the fracture origin, the use of fractographic photomontage of critical flaws or flaw labeling on strength data graphics. A compilation of recommendations for specific applications of fractography in Dentistry is also provided. This guidance document will contribute to a more accurate use of fractography and help researchers to better identify, describe and understand the causes of failure, for both clinical and laboratory-scale situations. If adequately performed at a large scale, fractography will assist in optimizing the methods of processing and designing of restorative materials and components. Clinical failures may be better understood and consequently reduced by sending out the correct message regarding the fracture origin in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  8. Studies on properties of low atomic number ceramics as limiter materials for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, B.A.; Hoven, H.; Koizlik, K.; Linke, J.; Wallure, E.

    1986-01-01

    The present study deals with thermal shock and erosion-redeposition behaviour of low-Z-bulk-ceramics: SiC, SiC + Si, SiC + 3% Al, SiC + 2% AlN, AlN, Si 3 N 4 , BN with graphite as reference material. Also included are substrate-coating systems: TiC coated graphite, Cr 2 C 3 coated graphite and TiN on Inconel. The properties are being investigated by electron beam and in-pile fusion machine tests in the KFA-Tokamak machine Textor. The electron-beam tests showed that sublimation was the dominant damaging effect for graphite, BN and SiN 4 . Materials with mediocre thermo-mechanical properties, such as SiC and AlN, showed cracks. The highest energy density values were tolerated by specimens of SiC alloyed with 2% AlN. In general, the in pile behaviour of the ceramics was comparable with the electron beam tests: BN and SiC + 2% AlN are at present regarded as the prime candidates for future irradiation tests. (author)

  9. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, M; Baba, A [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawamura, Y; Nishi, M

    1998-03-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}O or that between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  10. Low Cost CaTiO3 Perovskite Synthesized from Scallop (Anadara granosa) Shell as Antibacterial Ceramic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Is; Nur Ilahi, Rico; Pratami, Rismayanti

    2018-01-01

    Research on perovskite CaTiO3 synthesis from scallop (Anadara granosa) shell and its test as material for antibacterial ceramic application have been conducted. The synthesis was performed by calcium extraction from the scallop shell followed by solid-solid reaction of obtained calcium with TiO2. Physicochemical character of the perovskite wasstudied by measurement of crystallinity using x-ray diffraction (XRD), diffuse-reflectance UV Visible spectrophotometry, scanning electrone microscope-energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-Transform InfraRed. Considering the future application of the perovskite as antibacterial agent, laboratory test of the peroskite as material in antibacterial ceramic preparation was also conducted. Result of research indicated that perovskite formation was obtained and the material demonstrated photocatalytic activity as identified by band gap energy (Eg) value. The significant activity was also reflected by the antibacterial action of formed ceramic.

  11. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-09

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm². On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm². 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm²). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties.

  12. Effect of self-glazing on reducing the radioactivity levels of red mud based ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shuo [College of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Wu, Bolin, E-mail: wubolin3211@gmail.com [College of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Self-glazing red mud based ceramic materials (RMCM) were produced by normal pressure sintering process using the main raw materials of red mud. The properties of the RMCM samples were investigated by the measurements of mechanical properties, radiation measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the self-glazing RMCM have good mechanical properties (water absorption and apparent porosity approached zero; bulk density, 2.94 g/cm{sup 3}; compressive strength, 78.12 MPa). The radiation level has clear change regularity that the radioactivity levels of red mud (6360 Bq) are obvious declined, and can be reduced to that of the natural radioactive background of Guilin Karst landform, China (3600 Bq). It will not only consume large quantities of red mud, but also decrease the production cost of self-glazing RMCM. And the statement of this paper will offer effective ways to reduce the radioactivity level of red mud. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The self-glazing phenomenon in red mud system was first discovered in our research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation levels of red mud can be reduced efficiently by self-glazing layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red mud based ceramic materials will not cause harm to environment and humans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This research possesses important economic significances to aluminum companies. - Abstract: Self-glazing red mud based ceramic materials (RMCM) were produced by normal pressure sintering process using the main raw materials of red mud. The properties of the RMCM samples were investigated by the measurements of mechanical properties, radiation measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the self-glazing RMCM have good mechanical properties (water absorption and apparent porosity approached zero; bulk density, 2.94 g/cm{sup 3}; compressive strength, 78.12 MPa). The radiation

  13. Recent developments in piezoelectric ceramic materials and deterioration of their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha, R.A.; Khan, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years in piezoelectric ceramic materials because of their excellent dielectric, sensing, actuating and efficient process control applications. Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT), Barium Titanate (BaTi O/sub 3/) and Lead Metaniobate (PbNb/sub 2/ O/sub 6/) and PVDF Polymers and generally favored as smart sensing materials. These materials are being used in critical engineering systems and smart structure. Fatigue failure due to electrical and thermal shocking is a major issue in degradation of these materials. Lot of work has been done in this area but still various issues need to investigate. Recent developments and current issues in piezoelectric materials and deterioration of their properties in different working conditions are discussed. The development of Finite Element codes incorporating smart material element has provided an opportunity to solve some practical problems. The new piezoelectric finite element capability available in some commercial package like ANSYS makes it convenient to perform static dynamic and thermal analysis for the fully coupled piezoelectric and structural response. Researchers have a great scope to uncover the various properties of these smart materials in different environmental conditions. In present work an overall review of the title is presented. (author)

  14. The slag from ELCOGAS IGCC thermal power plant as raw material for the synthesis of glass-ceramic materials. Part 2: Synthesis and characterization of the glass-ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aineto, M.; Acosta, A.; Rincon, J.M.A.; Romero, M. [University of Castilla La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    There are here reported the result of the second phase of the investigation on the melting behavior of the slag and the process followed to synthesize glass-ceramic materials using this slag as raw component. Starting from a vitrifying mixture based on slag, glass cullet and precipitated calcium carbonate coming from sugar refining, we have obtained the parent glass named ECSCP, which exhibit a surface tendency of crystallization. Pressed specimens of 40 mm diameter and 7 mm height were conformed with the powdered ECSCP glass. The specimens were heat treated for crystalline phases development at temperatures between 800 and 1100{sup o}C during time intervals from 5 to 60 minutes. A series of wollastonite-anorthite-gehlenite glass-ceramics has been synthesized of different characteristics depending on the time and temperature of devitrification.

  15. Optimisation of oxygen ion transport in materials for ceramic membrane devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, J A

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen transport in ceramic oxide materials has received much attention over the past few decades. Much of this interest has stemmed from the desire to construct high temperature electrochemical devices for energy conversion, an example being the solid oxide fuel cell. In order to achieve high performance for these devices, insights are needed in how to achieve optimum performance from the functional components such as the electrolytes and electrodes. This includes the optimisation of oxygen transport through the crystal lattice of electrode and electrolyte materials and across the homogeneous (grain boundary) and heterogeneous interfaces that exist in real devices. Strategies are discussed for the optimisation of these quantities and current problems in the characterisation of interfacial transport are explored.

  16. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui; Singh, Raman P.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  17. Polymer-Ceramic Composite Materials for Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D; Currie, J. R.; Penn, B. G.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    Ferroelectrics:Polymer composites can be considered an established substitute for conventional electroceramics and ferroelectric polymers. The composites have a unique blend of polymeric properties such as mechanical flexibility, high strength, formability, and low cost, with the high electro-active properties of ceramic materials. They have attracted considerable interest because of their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detecting devices and piezoelectric transducers. These flexible sensors and transducers may eventually be useful for their health monitoring applications for NASA crew launch vehicles and crew exploration vehicles being developed. In the light of many technologically important applications in this field, it is worthwhile to present an overview of the pyroelectric infrared detector theory, models to predict dielectric behavior and pyroelectric coefficient, and the concept of connectivity and fabrication techniques of biphasic composites. An elaborate review of Pyroelectric-Polymer composite materials investigated to date for their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detectors is presented.

  18. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Zhang; Raman P. Singh

    2008-11-30

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor componets is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  19. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  20. Biocompatibility of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials with Human Gingival Keratinocytes (HGKs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenade, Charlotte; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Pirard, Catherine; Bertrand, Virginie; Charlier, Corinne; Vanheusden, Alain; Mainjot, Amélie

    2017-03-01

    Biocompatibility of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network (PICN) materials, a new class of CAD-CAM composites, is poorly explored in the literature, in particular, no data are available regarding Human Gingival Keratinocytes (HGK). The first objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of PICNs with HGKs in comparison with other materials typically used for implant prostheses. The second objective was to correlate results with PICN monomer release and indirect cytotoxicity. HGK attachment, proliferation and spreading on PICN, grade V titanium (Ti), yttrium zirconia (Zi), lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (eM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (negative control) discs were evaluated using a specific insert-based culture system. For PICN and eM samples, monomer release in the culture medium was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and indirect cytotoxicity tests were performed. Ti and Zi exhibited the best results regarding HGK viability, number and coverage. eM showed inferior results while PICN showed statistically similar results to eM but also to Ti regarding cell number and to Ti and Zi regarding cell viability. No monomer release from PICN discs was found, nor indirect cytotoxicity, as for eM. The results confirmed the excellent behavior of Ti and Zi with gingival cells. Even if polymer based, PICN materials exhibited intermediate results between Ti-Zi and eM. These promising results could notably be explained by PICN high temperature-high pressure (HT-HP) innovative polymerization mode, as confirmed by the absence of monomer release and indirect cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Antimicrobial effect of a new bio-ceramic material iRoot FM on Porphyromonas endodontalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jing; Liu, Yao; Chen, Xu

    2017-10-01

    To compare the antimicrobial effect of a new bio-ceramic material iRoot FM with traditional intracanal medicaments including calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH) 2 ] and triple antibiotic paste (TAP), on Porphyromonas endodontalis (P. endodontalis), and to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of iRoot FM, providing reference for clinical use of intracanal medicaments. P. endodontalis ATCC 35406 were used in this study. The study was divided into 3 experimental groups including iRoot FM, Ca(OH) 2 and TAP group. Sterile water was used as blank control. Frozen P. endodontalis were seeded and grown overnight in the liquid medium, then P. endodontalis were seeded on BHI-blood agar plates. After the plates were dried, the materials were filled on the plates which were made by a punching machine. Zones of inhibition (mm) were measured after 72 h of anaerobic incubation at 37degrees centigrade. The experimental data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 17.0 software package. The zones of inhibition in the 3 experimental groups: iRoot FM, Ca(OH) 2 and TAP group were (20.74±4.35)mm, (24.89±3.84)mm and (34.51±1.20)mm, respectively. The zones of inhibition of the iRoot FM group and Ca(OH) 2 group were significantly smaller compared with the TAP group (P0.05). There were no zone of inhibition in the control group. As a new bio-ceramic material, iRoot FM shows a good antimicrobial activity against P. endodontalis and may be a promising intracanal material.

  2. Corrosion Resistance of a Cast-Iron Material Coated With a Ceramic Layer Using Thermal Spray Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, C. D.; Bejinariu, C.; Munteanu, C.; Istrate, B.; Toma, S. L.; Alexandru, A.; Cimpoesu, R.

    2018-06-01

    Cast-iron 250 used for breake systems present many corrosion signs after a mean usage time based on the environment conditions they work. In order to improve them corrosion resistance we propose to cover the active part of the material using a ceramic material. The deposition process is an industrial deposition system based on thermal spraying that can cover high surfaces in low time. In this articol we analyze the influence of a ceramic layer (40-50 µm) on the corrosion resistance of FC250 cast iron. The results were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive (EDS) and linear and cyclic potentiometry.

  3. Characterization of a wollastonite glass-ceramic material prepared using sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) as one of the raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Silvio R., E-mail: rainho@fct.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia — FCT, 19060-900 Presidente Prudente — SP (Brazil); Souza, Agda E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia — FCT, 19060-900 Presidente Prudente — SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Claudio L.; Reynoso, Victor C.S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira — FEIS, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira – SP (Brazil); Romero, Maximina; Rincón, Jesús Ma. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja — IETCC, CSIC, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Glass-ceramic material prepared with sugar cane bagasse ash as one of the raw materials was characterized to determine some important properties for its application as a coating material. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that wollastonite-2M (CaSiO{sub 3}) was the major glass-ceramic phase. The Rietveld method was used to quantify the crystalline (60 wt.%) and vitreous (40 wt.%) phases in the glass-ceramic. The microstructure (determined by scanning electron microscopy) of this material had a marble appearance, showing a microporous network of elongated crystals with some areas with dendritic, feather-like ordering. Microhardness data gave a mean hardness value of 564.4 HV (Vickers-hardness), and light microscopy disclosed a greenish brown colored material with a vitreous luster. - Highlights: • We studied the properties of a glass-ceramic material obtained from sugarcane ash. • This material has the appearance and hardness of natural stones. • A refining method gave information about its amorphous and crystalline phases. • This material has potential to be used as coating plates for buildings.

  4. Characterization of a wollastonite glass-ceramic material prepared using sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) as one of the raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Silvio R.; Souza, Agda E.; Carvalho, Claudio L.; Reynoso, Victor C.S.; Romero, Maximina; Rincón, Jesús Ma.

    2014-01-01

    Glass-ceramic material prepared with sugar cane bagasse ash as one of the raw materials was characterized to determine some important properties for its application as a coating material. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that wollastonite-2M (CaSiO 3 ) was the major glass-ceramic phase. The Rietveld method was used to quantify the crystalline (60 wt.%) and vitreous (40 wt.%) phases in the glass-ceramic. The microstructure (determined by scanning electron microscopy) of this material had a marble appearance, showing a microporous network of elongated crystals with some areas with dendritic, feather-like ordering. Microhardness data gave a mean hardness value of 564.4 HV (Vickers-hardness), and light microscopy disclosed a greenish brown colored material with a vitreous luster. - Highlights: • We studied the properties of a glass-ceramic material obtained from sugarcane ash. • This material has the appearance and hardness of natural stones. • A refining method gave information about its amorphous and crystalline phases. • This material has potential to be used as coating plates for buildings

  5. A facile approach for the synthesis of monolithic hierarchical porous carbons – high performance materials for amine based CO2 capture and supercapacitor electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Estevez, Luis; Dua, Rubal; Bhandari, Nidhi; Ramanujapuram, Anirudh; Wang, Peng; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2013-01-01

    An ice templating coupled with hard templating and physical activation approach is reported for the synthesis of hierarchically porous carbon monoliths with tunable porosities across all three length scales (macro- meso- and micro), with ultrahigh

  6. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  7. High Temperature Deformation Behavior of YBa2Cu3O6+x Superconducting Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-15

    Mocellin , High Tech. Ceramics, ed P. Vinvinzini, Pub. Elsevier Science Publisher (1986). 15. F. Wakai, S. Sakaguchi and M. Matsuno, Adv. Ceram. Mater...Soc., 68r101, 552 (1985). 18. C. Carry and A. Mocellin , J. Amer. Ceram. Soc., 69f91, C215 (1986). 19. P. C. Panda, E. R. Seydal and R. Raj, US Patent

  8. New ceramic material specially designed to optimise the output of the heating systems; Nuevo material ceramico disenado especificamente para optimizar el rendimiento de los sistemas de calefaccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This article sets out the main features of Dual Kherr, its development and uses. Dual Kherr(reg.) is a ceramic composite based on porcelain clay. It has been specially designed to work as a storage heater and a radiant heating system. Jointly developed by the R and D departments of both companies, PAMESA and CLIMASTAR, this new material optimises the output of any heating system and it has been specially conceived to save energy. It is a great revolution, mainly due to the following: On the one hand, Dual Kherr incorporates ceramic to the heating business, opening a new and important market. On the other hand, this new material adds the aesthetics proper of the ceramic material to the design of the heating systems. It even allows the development of artistic collections. (Author)

  9. Crystallization kinetics of magnetic glass-ceramics prepared by the processing of waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the feasibility of conversion of an intimate mixture of blast furnace slag and blast furnace flue dust generated by a single industrial company into magnetic glass-ceramic product. Blast furnace slag (BFS) and blast furnace flue dust (BFD) are generated at a rate of 300,000 and 30,000 tons/year, respectively, from iron and steel factory. The crystallization mechanisms of a composition containing BFS and BFD in a 50/50 proportion were investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystallization temperature was found to vary from 900 to 1100 deg. C and two phases appeared in the crystallized samples: pyroxene Ca(Mg, Fe, Al)(Si, Al) 2 O 6 and magnetite/maghemite. Heating rate and particle sizes effects on crystal growth of powdered samples were studied by DTA. The apparent activation energy of crystal growth using the particle size 180-315 μm was determined to be 355 and 329 kJ/mol for the first and second peak, respectively. The presence of sharp and broad crystallization peaks indicate simultaneous surface and internal crystallization mechanism. Good wear resistance and chemical durability particularly in alkaline environment, combine with good hardness and magnetic properties make this glass-ceramic material potentially useful for various industrial applications

  10. Material interactions between system components and glass product melts in a ceramic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knitter, R.

    1989-07-01

    The interactions of the ceramic and metallic components of a ceramic melter for the vitrification of High Active Waste were investigated with simulated glass product melts in static crucible tests at 1000 0 C and 1150 0 C. Corrosion of the fusion-cast Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 - and Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 -Cr 2 O 3 -refractories (ER 1711 and ER 2161) is characterized by homogeneous chemical dissolution and diffusion through the glass matrix of the refractory. The resulting boundary compositions lead to characteristic modification and formation of phases, not only inside the refractory but also in the glass melt. The attack of the electrode material, a Ni-Cr-Fe-alloy Inconel 690, by the glass melt takes place via grain boundaries and leads to the oxidation of Cr and growth of Cr 2 O 3 -crystals at the boundary layer. Noble metals, added to the glass melt can form solid solutions with the alloy with varying compositions. (orig.) [de

  11. Synthesis and properties of nickel-doped nanocrystalline barium hexaferrite ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqar, Moaz; Rafiq, Muhammad Asif; Mirza, Talha Ahmed; Khalid, Fazal Ahmad; Khaliq, Abdul; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh; Saleem, Murtaza

    2018-04-01

    M-type barium hexaferrite ceramics have emerged as important materials both for technological and commercial applications. However, limited work has been reported regarding the investigation of nanocrystalline Ni-doped barium hexaferrites. In this study, nanocrystalline barium hexaferrite ceramics with the composition BaFe12- x Ni x O19 (where x = 0, 0.3 and 0.5) were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and precision impedance analyzer. All the synthesized samples had single magnetoplumbite phase having space group P63/mmc showing the successful substitution of Ni in BaFe12O19 without the formation of any impurity phase. Average grain size of undoped samples was around 120 nm which increased slightly with the addition of Ni. Saturation magnetization ( M s) and remnant magnetization ( M r) increased with the addition of Ni, however, coercivity ( H c) decreased with the increase in Ni from x = 0 to x = 0.5. Real and imaginary parts of permittivity decreased with the increasing frequency and increased with Ni content. Dielectric loss and conductivity showed slight variation with the increase in Ni concentration.

  12. Sacrificial Paste for Fabrication of Ceramic Materials by Layer-By-Layer Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkowski P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to develop a sacrificial paste suitable for securing channels during shaping of ceramic materials with internal structures via combination of tape casting and soft lithography. Poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether and polyethylene glycols with different molecular weight were selected as a main components of a sacrificial paste due to their compatibility to UV curable dispersion. The research shows that sacrificial paste should be characterized by proper melting point. This goal was achieved by using a composition of PEG600 with 15wt.%PEG20000 and 10wt.% carbon. The invented sacrificial paste solidify beyond 27°C (melting point. After heating up to 80°C the viscosity of paste is low enough and easily fills the channels with diameter of 150-300μm. What is more, the operational time during free cooling from 80°C to solidification is around 8 minutes what gives enough time for application. Carbon was added as a modifier of rheological properties and as a black dye that helps in visual evaluation of a degree of filling channel. The first test proved that proposed method of preparation of ceramic samples with application of invented sacrificial paste is reliable and can be practically applied.

  13. Applications of advanced electron microscopy techniques to the studies of radiation effects in ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes some recent results from the application of several advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to the studies of radiation effects in insulators with the main focus on radiation-induced amorphization. These techniques include in situ TEM during ion-beam irradiation at cryogenic and elevated temperatures, cross-sectional TEM, high-resolution TEM, and image simulation on partially damaged materials, as well as digital TEM with image processing and analysis. The combination of these techniques may often provide very detailed information about the microstructure evolution during energetic particle irradiation, especially at the early stages, which is unobtainable with any other analytical methods. These techniques have been successfully applied to the analysis of a large group of ion-beam-irradiated ceramics, including quartz, silicon carbides, uranium oxide, apatite, spinel and other complex mineral phases. The advantages and limitations of each technique, as well as some important technical details for the analysis of radiation damage in ceramics are presented. (orig.)

  14. Design and preliminary analysis of in-vessel core catcher made of high-temperature ceramics material in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hong; Ma Li; Wang Junrong; Zhou Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    In order to protect the interior wall of pressure vessel from melting, as an additional way to external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC), a kind of in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) made of high-temperature ceramics material was designed. Through the high-temperature and thermal-resistance characteristic of IVCC, the distributing of heat flux was optimized. The results show that the downward average heat flux from melt in ceramic layer reduces obviously and the interior wall of pressure vessel doesn't melt, keeping its integrity perfectly. Increasing of upward heat flux from metallic layer makes the upper plenum structure's temperature ascend, but the temperature doesn't exceed its melting point. In conclusion, the results indicate the potential feasibility of IVCC made of high-temperature ceramics material. (authors)

  15. Comparing Titanium Release from Ceramic Tiles using a waste material characterization test - Influence of Calcium and Organic Matter concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heggelund, Laura Roverskov; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are beneficial in the building industry to enhance or add certain features to commonly used materials. One example is the use of nano-titanium dioxide in the surface coating of ceramic tiles, to make the tiles surface self-cleaning. At the end of life stage, ceramic tiles might...... to assess if nano-titanium dioxide coated ceramic tiles are suitable for depositing in a landfill or not. Specifically, we used compliance batch test method, which is a simple test evaluating the release from a solid material to an aqueous media during 24 hrs. If nano-Ti particles are released from solid...... immediately after the 24 hrs. test using single particle ICPMS and Transmission Electron Microscopy imaging. The preliminary results suggest that nanoparticulate titanium is released from both tiles – with and without nano-titanium dioxide coating. The size distributions of the released particles are similar...

  16. Lessons learned from the development and manufacture of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials for the space shuttle orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, R. P.; Elgin, D. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Nickel, K. N.; Gzowski, E. R.; Aguiler, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three ceramic, reusable surface insulation materials and two borosilicate glass coatings were used in the fabrication of tiles for the Space Shuttle orbiters. Approximately 77,000 tiles were made from these materials for the first three orbiters, Columbia, Challenger, and Discovery. Lessons learned in the development, scale up to production and manufacturing phases of these materials will benefit future production of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials. Processing of raw materials into tile blanks and coating slurries; programming and machining of tiles using numerical controlled milling machines; preparing and spraying tiles with the two coatings; and controlling material shrinkage during the high temperature (2100-2275 F) coating glazing cycles are among the topics discussed.

  17. Long-term Bond Strength between Layering Indirect Composite Material and Zirconia Coated with Silicabased Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, Ryosuke; Komine, Futoshi; Honda, Junichi; Kamio, Shingo; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the long-term shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and a zirconia framework coated with silica-based ceramics, taking the effect of different primers into account. A total of 165 airborne-particle abraded zirconia disks were subjected to one of three pretreatments: no pretreatment (ZR-AB), airborne-particle abrasion of zirconia coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-AB), and 9.5% hydrofluoric acid etching of zirconia coated with feldspathic porcelain (ZR-PO-HF). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the zirconia disks after they were treated with one of the following primers: Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB + Activator), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), Porcelain Liner M Liquid B (PLB), or no priming (CON, control group). Shear bond strength was tested after 100,000 thermocycles, and the data were analyzed using the Steel-Dwass U-test (α = 0.05). For ZR-PO-AB and ZR-PO-HF specimens, bond strength was highest in the CPB+Activator group (25.8 MPa and 22.4 MPa, respectively). Bond strengths were significantly lower for ZR-AB specimens in the CON and PLB groups and for ZR-PO-AB specimens in the CON, CPB, and EOP groups. Combined application of a hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) and silane coupling agent enhanced the long-term bond strength of indirect composite material to a zirconia coated with silica-based ceramics.

  18. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  19. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. (Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States))

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  20. Simple and sensitive monitoring of sulfonamide veterinary residues in milk by stir bar sorptive extraction based on monolithic material and high performance liquid chromatography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojia; Qiu, Ningning; Yuan, Dongxing

    2009-11-13

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the quantitative monitoring of five sulfonamide antibacterial residues (SAs) in milk was developed by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupling to high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The analytes were concentrated by SBSE based on poly (vinylimidazole-divinylbenzene) monolithic material as coating. The extraction procedure was very simple, milk was diluted with water then directly sorptive extraction without elimination of fats and protein in samples was required. To achieve optimum extraction performance for SAs, several parameters, including extraction and desorption time, desorption solvent, ionic strength and pH value of sample matrix were investigated. Under the optimized experimental conditions, low detection limits (S/N=3) quantification limits (S/N=10) of the proposed method for the target compounds were achieved within the range of 1.30-7.90 ng/mL and 4.29-26.3 ng/mL from spiked milk, respectively. Good linearities were obtained for SAs with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) above 0.996. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of SAs compounds in different milk samples and satisfied recoveries of spiked target compounds in real samples were obtained.

  1. Modeling of material properties of piezoelectric ceramics taking into account damage development under static compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, M; Nishikata, T; Okayasu, M

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out static compression tests in the poling direction for PZT ceramics and evaluated the material properties by measuring the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and electrostatic capacity at regular intervals. Then the variation in the material properties up to fracture was clarified. Also, the development of internal damage was also clarified quantitatively by evaluating a damage variable on the basis of the continuum damage mechanics. The damage variable was calculated from the ratio of the elastic coefficient to its initial value. In the present paper, the development of internal damage was formulated as an evolution equation of the damage variable. In the formulation, a threshold stress leading to the onset of damage was considered. Moreover, the variation in material properties was related to the damage variable and formulated as material functions of the damage variable. The development of internal damage and the variation in material properties were simulated by the equations proposed in the present paper and the validity of the equations was verified by comparing the predictions with experimental results. (paper)

  2. A new iron calcium phosphate material to improve the osteoconductive properties of a biodegradable ceramic: a study in rabbit calvaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchón, Angel; Hamdan Alkhraisat, Mohammad; Rueda-Rodriguez, Carmen; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Torres, Jesús; Lucas-Aparicio, Julia; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; López-Cabarcos, Enrique

    2015-10-20

    β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive and biodegradable material used in bone regeneration procedures, while iron has been suggested as a tool to improve the biological performance of calcium phosphate-based materials. However, the mechanisms of interaction between these materials and human cells are not fully understood. In order to clarify this relationship, we have studied the iron role in β-TCP ceramics. Iron-containing β-TCPs were prepared by replacing CaCO3 with C6H5FeO7 at different molar ratios. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the occurrence of β-TCP as the sole phase in the pure β-TCP and iron-containing ceramics. The incorporation of iron ions in the β-TCP lattice decreased the specific surface area as the pore size was shifted toward meso- and/or macropores. Furthermore, the human osteoblastlike cell line MG-63 was cultured onto the ceramics to determine cell proliferation and viability, and it was observed that the iron-β-TCP ceramics have better cytocompatibility than pure β-TCP. Finally, in vivo assays were performed using rabbit calvaria as a bone model. The scaffolds were implanted for 8 and 12 weeks in the defects created in the skullcap with pure β-TCP as the control. The in vivo behavior, in terms of new bone formed, degradation, and residual graft material were investigated using sequential histological evaluations and histomorphometric analysis. The in vivo implantation of the ceramics showed enhanced bone tissue formation and scaffold degradation for iron-β-TCPs. Thus, iron appears to be a useful tool to enhance the osteoconductive properties of calcium phosphate ceramics.

  3. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  4. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  5. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material is disclosed. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy

  6. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    1999-01-01

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy.

  7. Contact Resistance of Ceramic Interfaces Between Materials Used for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren

    The contact resistance can be divided into two main contributions. The small area of contact between ceramic components results in resistance due to current constriction. Resistive phases or potential barriers at the interface result in an interface contribution to the contact resistance, which may....... The influence of the mechanical load on the contact resistance was ascribed to an area effect. The contact resistance of the investigated materials was dominated by current constric-tion at high temperatures. The measured contact resistance was comparable to the resis-tance calculated on basis of the contact...... areas found by optical and electron microscopy. At low temperatures, the interface contribution to the contact resistance was dominating. The cobaltite interface could be described by one potential barrier at the contact interface, whereas the manganite interfaces required several consecutive potential...

  8. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors. 1. Analysis of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucandio, M.I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the aluminium oxide considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1-0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Mg, Ta, Ti, V and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precissions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author). 7 refs

  9. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors III. Analysis of magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melon, A. M.; Roca, M.; Rucandio, M. I.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium oxide, considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3% for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current are excitation and photographic detection has been employed. In order to eliminate the effect due to the differences in density between standards and samples, which are a source of errors, a chemical treatment of both is carried out. Likewise, for attaining conditions more suitable for the volatilization of certain impurities, these are determined with the sample in fluoride form. (Author) 11 refs

  10. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors III. Analysis of magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melon, A.M.; Roca, M.; Rucandio, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium oxide, considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. In order to eliminated the effect due to the differences in density between standards and samples, which are a source of errors, a chemical treatment of both is carried out. Likewise, for attaining conditions more suitable for the volatilization of certain impurities, these are determined with the sample in fluoride form. (author)

  11. Development of Hi-Tech ceramics fabrication technologies - Development of advanced nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Thae Kap; Park, Ji Youn; Kim, Sun Jae; Kim, Kyong Ho; Jung, Choong Hwan; Oh, Seok Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    The objective of the present work is to prepare the foundation of hi-tech ceramics fabrication technologies through developing important processes i.e., tape casting, sol-gel, single crystal growing, compacting and sintering, and grinding and machining processes. Tape casting process is essential to manufacture hard and functional thin plates and structural elements for some composite materials. For the fabrication of spherical mono-sized micropowders of oxides, sol-gel process has widely been used. Piezoelectric elements that are the core parts of the sensors of LPMS (loose part monitoring system) and ALMS (acoustic leakage monitoring system) are used in single crystal forms. Compacting and sintering processes are general methods for fabricating structural parts using powders. Grinding and machining processes are important to achieve the final dimensions and surface properties of the parts. (Author).

  12. A Thermodamage Strength Theoretical Model of Ceramic Materials Taking into Account the Effect of Residual Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermodamage strength theoretical model taking into account the effect of residual stress was established and applied to each temperature phase based on the study of effects of various physical mechanisms on the fracture strength of ultrahigh-temperature ceramics. The effects of SiC particle size, crack size, and SiC particle volume fraction on strength corresponding to different temperatures were studied in detail. This study showed that when flaw size is not large, the bigger SiC particle size results in the greater effect of tensile residual stress in the matrix grains on strength reduction, and this prediction coincides with experimental results; and the residual stress and the combined effort of particle size and crack size play important roles in controlling material strength.

  13. Novel precursor-derived Si-C-N ceramic material for purification application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Changhyun; Lee, Sea-Hoon; Francois, Villatte

    2008-02-01

    Metagenomic DNA (gDNA) is an important research topic because uncultivated microorganisms represent an interesting reservoir of genes with potential biotechnological applications. Here we describe a novel Si-C-N chromatography approach of gDNA extraction from environmental samples. Amorphous Si-C-N ceramic was obtained by the pyrolysis of a polymer precursor (polycarbosilazane) at 1350 degrees C in Ar. The purified gDNA fragments were at least 12 kilo base pairs in size and were sufficiently free of contaminants, thus were applicable to both restriction enzyme digestion using five different enzymes and polymerase chain reaction amplification for detecting phylogenetic groups of native microorganisms in environmental samples. This Si-C-N material produces pure gDNA that can be utilized in some of the most common molecular biological procedures applied in the purification step.

  14. Characterization of sugar cane bagasse ash as raw material for the production of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredericci, C.; Indelicato, R.L.; Ferreira Neto, J.B.; Ribeiro, T.R.; Landgraf, F.J.G.; Silva, G.F.B. Lenz e

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze the sugar cane bagasse ash from three Sugar and Alcohol Plant of the State of Sao Paulo - Brazil. We intend to show the discrepancies between them, so that this raw material could be used with greater quality control in ceramic industries. The bagasse were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscopy. The ashes were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and granulometric separation. The results indicated that the content of SiO 2 ranging from 50-80% by weight depends on the granulometry of the bagasse and on the region where it was collected. The analyses of X-ray diffraction indicate SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , K 2 SO 4 and Mg 2 P 2 O 7 as crystalline phases. (author)

  15. Spectrographic Determination of Impurities in Ceramic Materials for Nuclear Fusion Reactors. I. Analysis of Alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucandio, M. I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the aluminium oxide considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 * for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current ore excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Mg, Ta, Ti, V and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as lnternal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precessions, while for the rest of elements the bent results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author) 7 refs

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  17. Growth and instability of charged dislocation loops under irradiation in ceramic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazanov, A I; Kinoshita, C; Klaptsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the physical mechanisms of the growth and stability of charged dislocation loops in ceramic materials with very strong different mass of atoms (stabilized cubic zirconia) under different energies and types of irradiation conditions: 100-1000 keV electrons, 100 keV He sup + and 300 keV O sup + ions. The anomalous formation of extended defect clusters (charged dislocation loops) has been observed by TEM under electron irradiation subsequent to ion irradiation. It is demonstrated that very strong strain field (contrast) near charged dislocation loops is formed. The dislocation loops grow up to a critical size and after then become unstable. The instability of the charged dislocation loop leads to the multiplication of dislocation loops and the formation of dislocation network near the charged dislocation loops. A theoretical model is suggested for the explanation of the growth and stability of the charged dislocation loop, taking the charge state of point defects. The calculated distribution...

  18. Contact resistance of ceramic interfaces between materials used for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, S.

    2002-01-01

    The contact resistance can be divided into two main contributions. The small area of contact between ceramic components results in resistance due to current constriction. Resistive phases or potential barriers at the interface result in an interface contribution to the contact resistance, which may be smaller or larger than the constriction resistance. The contact resistance between pairs of three different materials were analysed (strontium doped lanthanum manganite, yttria stabilised zirconia and strontium and nickel doped lanthanum cobaltite), and the effects of temperature, atmosphere, polarisation and mechanical load on the contact resistance were investigated. The investigations revealed that the mechanical load of a ceramic contact has a high influence on the contact resistance, and generally power law dependence between the contact resistance and the mechanical load was found. The influence of the mechanical load on the contact resistance was ascribed to an area effect. The contact resistance of the investigated materials was dominated by current constriction at high temperatures. The measured contact resistance was comparable to the resistance calculated on basis of the contact areas found by optical and electron microscopy. At low temperatures, the interface contribution to the contact resistance was dominating. The cobaltite interface could be described by one potential barrier at the contact interface, whereas the manganite interfaces required several consecutive potential barriers to model the observed behaviour. The current-voltage behaviour of the YSZ contact interfaces was only weakly non-linear, and could be described by 22{+-}1 barriers in series. Contact interfaces with sinterable contact layers were also investigated, and the measured contact resistance for these interfaces were more than 10 times less than for the other interfaces. (au)

  19. Electrolytic in process dressing (ELID) applied to double side grinding of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, Cristian E.

    The objective of the present work is to design, optimize, and validate an electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID)-assisted double side grinding process for finishing advanced ceramic components. To attain this objective, an original ELID double side grinding system was designed, fabricated, and operated at Precision Micro-Machining Center at The University of Toledo, Ohio. The ELID technique was selected from among other options to assure the in-situ dressing of the metal-bonded superabrasive grinding wheel and to maintain its cutting ability throughout the operation, which is, otherwise, a challenging enterprise. Optimizing the ELID double side grinding process parameters is an important goal of the present study. To achieve this goal, a complex integrated model was developed and validated through extensive experimental testing. Four analytical computerized models were developed and integrated: (1) an improved kinematic model of double side grinding accounting for workpiece rotation, which is used to simulate the grinding trajectories; (2) a microscopic model of the interaction between a single diamond grit and the work surface, which is used to predict the volume of material removed; (3) a stochastic model for the topographical characterization of the superabrasive wheel, which leads to a new prediction method of depth of indentation; and (4) an electrolytic oxidation model, which explains the dynamics of the oxide layer. In order to validate the models and to confirm the optimized process, experimental tests were conducted under different conditions: with vitrified and metallic bond grinding wheels, with various average grain sizes of diamond grits, with different superabrasive concentrations, with different grinding fluids, with and without ELID assistance. Our findings show that an optimized ceramic double side grinding process using fine diamond grit is more efficient than lapping in producing very fine surfaces. The experiments confirmed the superiority of

  20. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951 through June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Gardner, K.

    1987-08-01

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining Group (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1987. It is a registry of about 400 documents as nearly as possible in the order in which they were issued