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Sample records for monolithic carbon structures

  1. Structure and Electromagnetic Properties of Cellular Glassy Carbon Monoliths with Controlled Cell Size

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    Andrzej Szczurek

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic shielding is a topic of high importance for which lightweight materials are highly sought. Porous carbon materials can meet this goal, but their structure needs to be controlled as much as possible. In this work, cellular carbon monoliths of well-defined porosity and cell size were prepared by a template method, using sacrificial paraffin spheres as the porogen and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF resin as the carbon precursor. Physicochemical studies were carried out for investigating the conversion of RF resin into carbon, and the final cellular monoliths were investigated in terms of elemental composition, total porosity, surface area, micropore volumes, and micro/macropore size distributions. Electrical and electromagnetic (EM properties were investigated in the static regime and in the Ka-band, respectively. Due to the phenolic nature of the resin, the resultant carbon was glasslike, and the special preparation protocol that was used led to cellular materials whose cell size increased with density. The materials were shown to be relevant for EM shielding, and the relationships between those properties and the density/cell size of those cellular monoliths were elucidated.

  2. High-temperature oxidation behavior of dense SiBCN monoliths: Carbon-content dependent oxidation structure, kinetics and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Daxin; Yang, Zhihua; Jia, Dechang; Wang, Shengjin; Duan, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qishuai; Miao, Yang; Rao, Jiancun; Zhou, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The scale growth for all investigated monoliths at 1500 °C cannot be depicted by a linear or parabolic rate law. •The carbon-rich monoliths oxidize at 1500 °C according to a approximately linear weight loss equation. •The excessive carbon in SiBCN monoliths deteriorates the oxidation resistance. •The oxidation resistance stems from the characteristic oxide structures and increased oxidation resistance of BN(C). -- Abstract: The high temperature oxidation behavior of three SiBCN monoliths: carbon-lean SiBCN with substantial Si metal, carbon-moderate SiBCN and carbon-rich SiBCN with excessive carbon, was investigated at 1500 °C for times up to15 h. Scale growth for carbon-lean and −moderate monoliths at 1500 °C cannot be described by a linear or parabolic rate law, while the carbon-rich monoliths oxidize according to a approximately linear weight loss equation. The microstructures of the oxide scale compose of three distinct layers. The passivating layer of carbon and boron containing amorphous SiO 2 and increased oxidation resistance of BN(C) both benefit the oxidation resistance.

  3. Activated Carbon Fiber Monoliths as Supercapacitor Electrodes

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    Gelines Moreno-Fernandez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACF are interesting candidates for electrodes in electrochemical energy storage devices; however, one major drawback for practical application is their low density. In the present work, monoliths were synthesized from two different ACFs, reaching 3 times higher densities than the original ACFs’ apparent densities. The porosity of the monoliths was only slightly decreased with respect to the pristine ACFs, the employed PVDC binder developing additional porosity upon carbonization. The ACF monoliths are essentially microporous and reach BET surface areas of up to 1838 m2 g−1. SEM analysis reveals that the ACFs are well embedded into the monolith structure and that their length was significantly reduced due to the monolith preparation process. The carbonized monoliths were studied as supercapacitor electrodes in two- and three-electrode cells having 2 M H2SO4 as electrolyte. Maximum capacitances of around 200 F g−1 were reached. The results confirm that the capacitance of the bisulfate anions essentially originates from the double layer, while hydronium cations contribute with a mixture of both, double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance.

  4. Influence of different carbon monolith preparation parameters on pesticide adsorption

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    Vukčević Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of carbon monolith for pesticide removal from water, and the mechanism of pesticide interaction with carbon surface were examined. Different carbon monolith samples were obtained by varying the carbonization and activation parameters. In order to examine the role of surface oxygen groups in pesticide adsorption, carbon monolith surface was functionalized by chemical treatment in HNO3, H2O2 and KOH. The surface properties of the obtained samples were investigated by BET surface area, pore size distribution and temperature-programmed desorption. Adsorption of pesticides from aqueous solution onto activated carbon monolith samples was studied by using five pesticides belonging to different chemical groups (acetamiprid, dimethoate, nicosulfuron, carbofuran and atrazine. Presented results show that higher temperature of carbonization and the amount of activating agent allow obtaining microporous carbon monolith with higher amount of surface functional groups. Adsorption properties of the activated carbon monolith were more readily affected by the amount of the surface functional groups than by specific surface area. Results obtained by carbon monolith functionalisation showed that π-π interactions were the main force for adsorption of pesticides with aromatic structure, while acidic groups play an important role in adsorption of pesticides with no aromatic ring in the chemical structure.

  5. Development of monolith with a carbon-nanofiber-washcoat as a structured catalyst support in liquid phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarah nabeel abdul kareem amin, N.A.K.A.; Jarrah, Nabeel A.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2003-01-01

    Washcoats with improved mass transfer properties are necessary to circumvent concentration gradients in case of fast reactions in liquid phase, e.g. nitrate hydrogenation. A highly porous, high surface area (180 m2/g) and thin washcoat of carbon fibers, was produced on a monolith support by methane

  6. Acoustic of monolithic dome structures

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    Mostafa Refat Ismail

    2018-03-01

    The interior of monolithic domes have perfect, concave shapes to ensure that sound travels through the dome and perfectly collected at different vocal points. These dome structures are utilized for domestic use because the scale allows the focal points to be positioned across daily life activities, thereby affecting the sonic comfort of the internal space. This study examines the various acoustic treatments and parametric configurations of monolithic dome sizes. A geometric relationship of acoustic treatment and dome radius is established to provide architects guidelines on the correct selection of absorption needed to maintain the acoustic comfort of these special spaces.

  7. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  8. Relationship between structural properties and electrochemical characteristics of monolithic carbon xerogel-based electrochemical double-layer electrodes in aqueous and organic electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeller, Mario [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research e.V. (ZAE Bayern), Wuerzburg (Germany); Institute of Radiology, University Clinic, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Lorrmann, Volker; Reichenauer, Gudrun; Wiener, Matthias [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research e.V. (ZAE Bayern), Wuerzburg (Germany); Pflaum, Jens [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research e.V. (ZAE Bayern), Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Experimental Physics VI, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The impact of the micropore width, external surface area, and meso-/macropore size on the charging performance of electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes is systematically investigated. Nonactivated carbon xerogels are used as model electrodes in aqueous and organic electrolytes. Monolithic porous model carbons with different structural parameters are prepared using a resorcinol-formaldehyde-based sol-gel process and subsequent pyrolysis of the organic precursors. Electrochemical properties are characterized by utilizing them as EDLC half-cells operated in aqueous and organic electrolytes, respectively. Experimental data derived for organic electrolytes reveals that the respective ions cannot enter the micropores within the skeleton of the meso- and macroporous carbons. Therefore the total capacitance is limited by the external surface formed by the interface between the meso-/macropores and the microporous carbon particles forming the xerogel skeleton. In contrast, for aqueous electrolytes the total capacitance solely depends on the total surface area, including interfaces at the micropore scale. For both types of electrolytes the charging rate of the electrodes is systematically enhanced when increasing the diameter of the carbon xerogel particles from 10 to 75 nm and the meso-/macropore size from 10 to 121 nm. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Synthesis of Porous Carbon Monoliths Using Hard Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepel, Olaf; Danneberg, Nina; Dräger, Matti; Erlitz, Marcel; Taubert, Michael

    2016-03-21

    The preparation of porous carbon monoliths with a defined shape via template-assisted routes is reported. Monoliths made from porous concrete and zeolite were each used as the template. The porous concrete-derived carbon monoliths exhibited high gravimetric specific surface areas up to 2000 m²·g -1 . The pore system comprised macro-, meso-, and micropores. These pores were hierarchically arranged. The pore system was created by the complex interplay of the actions of both the template and the activating agent as well. On the other hand, zeolite-made template shapes allowed for the preparation of microporous carbon monoliths with a high volumetric specific surface area. This feature could be beneficial if carbon monoliths must be integrated into technical systems under space-limited conditions.

  10. Silver deposition on chemically treated carbon monolith

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    Jovanović Zoran M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monolith was treated with HNO3, KOH and H2O2. Effects of these treatments on the surface functional groups and on the amount of silver deposited on the CM surface were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. As a result of chemical treatment there was an increase in the amount of surface oxygen complexes. The increase in the amount of silver deposit is proportional to the amount of surface groups that produce CO under decomposition. However, the high amount of CO groups, decomposing above 600°C, induces the smaller Ag crystallite size. Therefore, the high temperature CO evolving oxides are, most likely, the initial centers for Ag deposition.

  11. Surface characteristics and antibacterial activity of a silver-doped carbon monolith

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    Marija Vukčević et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbon monolith with a silver coating was prepared and its antimicrobial behaviour in a flow system was examined. The functional groups on the surface of the carbon monolith were determined by temperature-programmed desorption and Boehm's method, and the point of zero charge was determined by mass titration. The specific surface area was examined by N2 adsorption using the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET method. As a test for the surface activity, the deposition of silver from an aqueous solution of a silver salt was used. The morphology and structure of the silver coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The resistance to the attrition of the silver deposited on the carbon monolith was tested. The antimicrobial activity of the carbon monolith with a silver coating was determined using standard microbiological methods. Carbon monolith samples with a silver coating showed good antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, and are therefore suitable for water purification, particularly as personal disposable water filters with a limited capacity.

  12. Monoliths of activated carbon from coconut shell and impregnation with nickel and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno, Juan

    2008-01-01

    A series of different monoliths of activated carbon were prepared from coconut shell By means of chemical activation with phosphoric acid at different concentrations Without using binders or plastics. The monolith that developed the biggest surface area was impregnated by humidic route with solutions of Ni and Cu at different molar relations. The structures were characterized by N2 adsorption at 77 K, and the morphology was explored by means of scanning electron microscopy. The carbonaceous materials obtained, Nickel-Copper-Monolith, were analyzed by Thermal Programmed Reduction (TPR). The experimental results indicated that the activation with the acid generated a micro porosity, with micropores volume between 0.40 and 0.81 cm 3 g-1 and surface areas between 703 and 1450 m 2 g-1, and a good mechanical properties. It shows that, both the copper and the nickel, are fixed to the monolith and TPR's results are interpreted when these molar relation are modified.

  13. The monolithic carbon aerogels and aerogel composites for electronics and thermal protection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Guo, Hui; Zhou, Yugui; Liu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Zhaoguo; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yingmin

    2017-09-01

    Monolithic carbon aerogels have been prepared by condensation polymerization and high temperature pyrolysis. The morphology of carbon aerogels are characterized by SEM. The pore structure is characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption technique. Monolithic carbon aerogels are mesoporous nanomaterials. Carbon fiber reinforced carbon aerogel composites are prepared by in-situ sol-gel process. Fiber reinforced carbon aerogel composites are of high mechanical strength. The thermal response of the fiber reinforced aerogel composite samples are tested in an arc plasma wind tunnel. Carbon aerogel composites show good thermal insulation capability and high temperature resistance in inert atmosphere even at ultrahigh temperature up to 1800 °C. The results show that they are suitable for applications in electrodes for supercapacitors/ Lithium-ion batteries and aerospace thermal protection area.

  14. On the correlation between the porous structure and the electrochemical response of powdered and monolithic carbon aerogels as electrodes for capacitive deionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macías, C., E-mail: carlosmacias@nanoquimia.com [Nanoquimia S.L., PCT Rabanales 21, Ed. Aldebarán M.4.3., 14014 Córdoba (Spain); Lavela, P. [Laboratorio de Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Córdoba, Marie Curie, Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Córdoba (Spain); Rasines, G. [Nanoquimia S.L., PCT Rabanales 21, Ed. Aldebarán M.4.3., 14014 Córdoba (Spain); Zafra, M.C.; Tirado, J.L. [Laboratorio de Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Córdoba, Marie Curie, Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Córdoba (Spain); Ania, C.O. [ADPOR Group, Instituto Nacional del Carbón (INCAR), CSIC, Apdo. 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    The combined effect of resorcinol/catalyst (100≤R/C≤800) and resorcinol/water (0.04≤R/W≤0.13) molar ratio on the textural and capacitive properties of carbon aerogels with potential application for capacitive deionization has been evaluated. Activated and pyrolyzed aerogels were synthesized by the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde mixtures and dried in supercritical conditions. Data show that high R/C and R/W molar ratios lead to materials with large pores in the mesopore range, whereas the surface area and micropore volumes remain somewhat the same. The activation of the aerogels increased the differences in the specific surface and micropore volumes due to the development of microporosity. This effect was more remarkable for the samples with low R/C whatever the R/W ratio, indicating that the carbon aerogel obtained using high amounts of catalyst are more prone to be activated. Regarding the electrochemical features of the aerogels, low capacitance values were measured in aerogels combining low R/W and high R/C and reciprocally low R/C and high R/W molar ratios, due to their higher resistance. Polarization resistances were found to be slightly higher for the pyrolyzed than for activated aerogels, and followed a decreasing trend with the mesoporosity, indicating the outstanding contribution of the mesoporous network to provide a good kinetic response. The desalting capacity of monolithic aerogels showed a simultaneous dependence with the surface area and the resistivity of the electrodes, pointing out the importance of performing electrochemical measurements in adequate cell configurations (i.e., desalting units) upon the intended application. - Graphical abstract: The textural properties of carbon aerogels are strongly influenced by the synthesis parameters precursor to catalyst (R/C) and water (R/C) ratios. The volumetric capacitance measured in a symmetric cell with monolithic electrodes of carbon aerogel strongly correlates with both

  15. Monolithic Parallel Tandem Organic Photovoltaic Cell with Transparent Carbon Nanotube Interlayer

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    Tanaka, S.; Mielczarek, K.; Ovalle-Robles, R.; Wang, B.; Hsu, D.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate an organic photovoltaic cell with a monolithic tandem structure in parallel connection. Transparent multiwalled carbon nanotube sheets are used as an interlayer anode electrode for this parallel tandem. The characteristics of front and back cells are measured independently. The short circuit current density of the parallel tandem cell is larger than the currents of each individual cell. The wavelength dependence of photocurrent for the parallel tandem cell shows the superposition spectrum of the two spectral sensitivities of the front and back cells. The monolithic three-electrode photovoltaic cell indeed operates as a parallel tandem with improved efficiency.

  16. Monolithic Carbide-Derived Carbon Films for Micro-Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiola, John; Largeot, Celine; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-04-01

    Microbatteries with dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers that are produced by common microfabrication techniques are poised to provide integration of power sources onto electronic devices, but they still suffer from poor cycle lifetime, as well as power and temperature range of operation issues that are alleviated with the use of supercapacitors. There have been a few reports on thin-film and other micro-supercapacitors, but they are either too thin to provide sufficient energy or the technology is not scalable. By etching supercapacitor electrodes into conductive titanium carbide substrates, we demonstrate that monolithic carbon films lead to a volumetric capacity exceeding that of micro- and macroscale supercapacitors reported thus far, by a factor of 2. This study also provides the framework for integration of high-performance micro-supercapacitors onto a variety of devices.

  17. Hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped partial graphitized carbon monoliths for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yifeng; Du, Juan; Liu, Lei; Wang, Guoxu; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Aibing, E-mail: chen-ab@163.com [Hebei University of Science and Technology, College of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Engineering (China)

    2017-03-15

    Porous carbon monoliths have attracted great interest in many fields due to their easy availability, large specific surface area, desirable electronic conductivity, and tunable pore structure. In this work, hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped partial graphitized carbon monoliths (N–MC–Fe) with ordered mesoporous have been successfully synthesized by using resorcinol-formaldehyde as precursors, iron salts as catalyst, and mixed triblock copolymers as templates via a one-step hydrothermal method. In the reactant system, hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) is used as nitrogen source and one of the carbon precursors under hydrothermal conditions instead of using toxic formaldehyde. The N–MC–Fe show hierarchically porous structures, with interconnected macroporous and ordered hexagonally arranged mesoporous. Nitrogen element is in situ doped into carbon through decomposition of HMT. Iron catalyst is helpful to improve the graphitization degree and pore volume of N–MC–Fe. The synthesis strategy is user-friendly, cost-effective, and can be easily scaled up for production. As supercapacitors, the N–MC–Fe show good capacity with high specific capacitance and good electrochemical stability.

  18. On the use of mesophase pitch for the preparation of hierarchical porous carbon monoliths by nanocasting

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    Philipp Adelhelm, Karin Cabrera and Bernd M Smarsly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study is given on the synthesis of a hierarchical porous carbon, possessing both meso- and macropores, using a mesophase pitch (MP as the carbon precursor. This carbon material is prepared by the nanocasting approach involving the replication of a porous silica monolith (hard templating. While this carbon material has already been tested in energy storage applications, various detailed aspects of its formation and structure are addressed in this study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hg porosimetry and N2 physisorption are used to characterize the morphology and porosity of the carbon replica. A novel approach for the detailed analysis of wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS from non-graphitic carbons is applied to quantitatively compare the graphene microstructures of carbons prepared using MP and furfuryl alcohol (FA. This WAXS analysis underlines the importance of the carbon precursor in the synthesis of templated porous carbon materials via the nanocasting route. Our study demonstrates that a mesophase pitch is a superior precursor whenever a high-purity, low-micropore-content and well-developed graphene structure is desired.

  19. A poly(vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate blend monolith with nanoscale porous structure

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A stimuli-responsive poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/sodium alginate (SA) blend monolith with nanoscale porous (mesoporous) structure is successfully fabricated by thermally impacted non-solvent induced phase separation (TINIPS) method. The PVA/SA blend monolith with different SA contents is conveniently fabricated in an aqueous methanol without any templates. The solvent suitable for the fabrication of the present blend monolith by TINIPS is different with that of the PVA monolith. The nanostructu...

  20. Photocatalytic Performance of Carbon Monolith/TiO2 Composite

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    Marina Maletić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The new and simple approach for deposition of catalytically active TiO2 coating on carbon monolith (CM carrier was presented. CM photocatalysts were impregnated with TiO2 using titanium solution and thermal treatment, and their photocatalytic activity was investigated in the process of methylene blue (MB photodegradation. For the purpose of comparison, CM composite photocatalysts were prepared by dip-coating method, which implies binder usage. The presence of TiO2 on CM carrier was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The sorption characteristics of CM and the role of adsorption in the overall process of MB removal were evaluated through amount of surface oxygen groups obtained by temperature-programmed desorption and specific surface area determined by BET method. CM has shown good adsorption properties toward MB due to high amount of surface oxygen groups and relatively high specific surface area. It was concluded that photocatalytic activity increases with CM disc thickness due to increase of MB adsorption and amount of deposited TiO2. Good photocatalytic activity achieved for samples obtained by thermal treatment is the result of better accessibility of MB solution to the TiO2 particles induced by binder absence.

  1. Determination of Energy Characteristic and Microporous Volume by Immersion Calorimetry in Carbon Monoliths

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    Juan Carlos Moreno-Piraján

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon monoliths disc and honeycomb type were prepared by chemical activation of coconut shell with zinc chloride at different concentrations, without using a binder. The structures were characterized by N2 adsorption at 77 K and immersion calorimetry into benzene. The experimental results showed that the activation with zinc chloride produces a wide microporous development, with micropore volume between 0,38 and 0,79 cm3g-1, apparent BET surface area between 725 and 1523 m2g-1 and immersion enthalpy between 73,5 and 164,2 Jg-1. We compared the experimental enthalpy with calculated enthalpy by equation Stoeckli-Kraehenbuehl finding a data dispersion from which can infer that the structures are not purely microporous; this fact is ratified with similar behavior that the evidence t the product EoWo.

  2. Peculiarities of Thermal Treatment of Monolithic Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchin, V. N.; Shilonosova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    A mathematical program has been developed that allows one to determine the parameters of heat treatment of monolithic structures. One of the quality indicators of monolithic reinforced concrete structures is the level of temperature stresses arising in the process of heat treatment and further operation of structures. In winter at heat treatment the distribution of temperatures along the cross-section of the structure is uneven. A favorable thermo-stressed state in a concrete massif occurs when using the preheating method, providing the concrete temperature in the center of the structure is greater than at the periphery. In this case, after the strength is set and the temperature is later equalized along the cross-section, the central part of the structure tends to decrease its dimensions more but the extreme zones prevent it. Therefore, the center is in a state of tension, and the extreme zones on the periphery are compressed. In compressed concrete there is a lesser chance of cracks or defects. The temperature gradient over the section of the structure, the stress in the concrete and its strength are determined. When calculating the temperature and strength fields, the stress level was determined - a value equal to the ratio of the tensile stresses in the section under consideration to the tensile strength of the concrete in this section at the same time. The nature of the change in stress level is determined by the massive structure and power of the formwork heaters. It is shown that under unfavorable conditions the stress level is close to the critical value. The greatest temperature gradient occurs in the outer layers adjacent to the heating formwork. A technology for concrete conditioning is proposed which makes it possible to reduce the temperature stresses along the cross-section of the structure. The time for concrete conditioning in the formwork is reduced. In its turn, it further reduces labor costs and the cost of concrete work along with the cost of

  3. Nitrogen-doped carbon monolith for alkaline supercapacitors and understanding nitrogen-induced redox transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Feng; Yin, Li-Chang; Lu, Xu; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Gentle, Ian R; Lu, Gao Qing; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-04-23

    A nitrogen-doped porous carbon monolith was synthesized as a pseudo-capacitive electrode for use in alkaline supercapacitors. Ammonia-assisted carbonization was used to dope the surface with nitrogen heteroatoms in a way that replaced carbon atoms but kept the oxygen content constant. Ammonia treatment expanded the micropore size-distributions and increased the specific surface area from 383 m(2) g(-1) to 679 m(2) g(-1). The nitrogen-containing porous carbon material showed a higher capacitance (246 F g(-1)) in comparison with the nitrogen-free one (186 F g(-1)). Ex situ electrochemical spectroscopy was used to investigate the evolution of the nitrogen-containing functional groups on the surface of the N-doped carbon electrodes in a three-electrode cell. In addition, first-principles calculations were explored regarding the electronic structures of different nitrogen groups to determine their relative redox potentials. We proposed possible redox reaction pathways based on the calculated redox affinity of different groups and surface analysis, which involved the reversible attachment/detachment of hydroxy groups between pyridone and pyridine. The oxidation of nitrogen atoms in pyridine was also suggested as a possible reaction pathway. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Non-oxidic nanoscale composites: single-crystalline titanium carbide nanocubes in hierarchical porous carbon monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Kirstin; Smarsly, Bernd M; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2009-05-07

    We report the preparation of nanoscale carbon-titanium carbide composites with carbide contents of up to 80 wt%. The synthesis yields single-crystalline TiC nanocubes 20-30 nm in diameter embedded in a hierarchical porous carbon matrix. These composites were generated in the form of cylindrical monoliths but can be produced in various shapes using modern sol-gel and nanocasting methods in conjunction with carbothermal reduction. The monolithic material is characterized by a combination of microscopy, diffraction and physisorption. Overall, the results presented in this work represent a concrete design template for the synthesis of non-oxidic nanoscale composites with high surface areas.

  5. A poly(vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate blend monolith with nanoscale porous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2013-10-04

    A stimuli-responsive poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/sodium alginate (SA) blend monolith with nanoscale porous (mesoporous) structure is successfully fabricated by thermally impacted non-solvent induced phase separation (TINIPS) method. The PVA/SA blend monolith with different SA contents is conveniently fabricated in an aqueous methanol without any templates. The solvent suitable for the fabrication of the present blend monolith by TINIPS is different with that of the PVA monolith. The nanostructural control of the blend monolith is readily achieved by optimizing the fabrication conditions. Brunauer Emmett Teller measurement shows that the obtained blend monolith has a large surface area. Pore size distribution plot for the blend monolith obtained by the non-local density functional theory method reveals the existence of the nanoscale porous structure. Fourier transform infrared analysis reveals the strong interactions between PVA and SA. The pH-responsive property of the blend monolith is investigated on the basis of swelling ratio in different pH solutions. The present blend monolith of biocompatible and biodegradable PVA and SA with nanoscale porous structure has large potential for applications in biomedical and environmental fields.

  6. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon monoliths from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and carbon nanotubes as electrodes for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Wang, Zhipeng; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Morimoto, Shingo; Hashimoto, Yoshio; Endo, Morinobu; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Terrones, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped porous activated carbon monoliths (NDP-ACMs) have long been the most desirable materials for supercapacitors. Unique to the conventional template based Lewis acid/base activation methods, herein, we report on a simple yet practicable novel approach to production of the three-dimensional NDP-ACMs (3D-NDP-ACMs). Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) contained carbon nanotubes (CNTs), being pre-dispersed into a tubular level of dispersions, were used as the starting material and the 3D-NDP-ACMs were obtained via a template-free process. First, a continuous mesoporous PAN/CNT based 3D monolith was established by using a template-free temperature-induced phase separation (TTPS). Second, a nitrogen-doped 3D-ACM with a surface area of 613.8 m2/g and a pore volume 0.366 cm3/g was obtained. A typical supercapacitor with our 3D-NDP-ACMs as the functioning electrodes gave a specific capacitance stabilized at 216 F/g even after 3000 cycles, demonstrating the advantageous performance of the PAN/CNT based 3D-NDP-ACMs. PMID:28074847

  7. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon monoliths from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and carbon nanotubes as electrodes for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Wang, Zhipeng; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Morimoto, Shingo; Hashimoto, Yoshio; Endo, Morinobu; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Terrones, Mauricio

    2017-01-11

    Nitrogen-doped porous activated carbon monoliths (NDP-ACMs) have long been the most desirable materials for supercapacitors. Unique to the conventional template based Lewis acid/base activation methods, herein, we report on a simple yet practicable novel approach to production of the three-dimensional NDP-ACMs (3D-NDP-ACMs). Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) contained carbon nanotubes (CNTs), being pre-dispersed into a tubular level of dispersions, were used as the starting material and the 3D-NDP-ACMs were obtained via a template-free process. First, a continuous mesoporous PAN/CNT based 3D monolith was established by using a template-free temperature-induced phase separation (TTPS). Second, a nitrogen-doped 3D-ACM with a surface area of 613.8 m 2 /g and a pore volume 0.366 cm 3 /g was obtained. A typical supercapacitor with our 3D-NDP-ACMs as the functioning electrodes gave a specific capacitance stabilized at 216 F/g even after 3000 cycles, demonstrating the advantageous performance of the PAN/CNT based 3D-NDP-ACMs.

  8. Design of ultra-lightweight concrete: towards monolithic concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qing Liang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the development of ultra-lightweight concrete. A moderate strength and an excellent thermal conductivity of the lightweight concrete are set as the design targets. The designed lightweight aggregates concrete is targeted to be used in monolithic concrete façade structure, performing as both load bearing element and thermal insulator. The developed lightweight concrete shows excellent thermal properties, with a low thermal conductivity of about 0.12 W/(m·K; and moderate mechanical properties, with 28-day compressive strengths of about 10-12 N/mm . This combination of values exceeds, to the researchers’ knowledge, the performance of all other lightweight building materials. Furthermore, the developed lightweight concrete possesses excellent durability properties.

  9. Characteristics of an activated carbon monolith for a helium adsorption compressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano-Castello, D.; Jorda-Beneyto, M.; Cazorla-Amoros, D.; Linares-Solano, A.; Burger, Johannes Faas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Holland, Herman J.

    2010-01-01

    An activated carbon monolith (ACM) with a high helium adsorption/desorption capacity, high density, low pressure drop, low thermal expansion and good mechanical properties was prepared and applied successfully in a helium adsorption compressor as a part of a 4.5 K sorption cooler. The activated

  10. A Monolithic Perovskite Structure for Use as a Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Clemens, Frank; Menon, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A La0.67Ca0.26Sr0.07Mn1.05O3 (LCSM) perovskite was prepared for the first time as a ceramic monolithic regenerator used in a regenerative magnetic refrigeration device. The parameters influencing the extrusion process and the performance of the regenerator, such as the nature of the monolith paste...

  11. A symmetric positive definite formulation for monolithic fluid structure interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Schroeder, Craig; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a strongly coupled (monolithic) fluid structure interaction framework for incompressible flow, as opposed to a loosely coupled (partitioned) method. This requires solving a single linear system that combines the unknown velocities of the structure with the unknown pressures of the fluid. In our previous work, we were able to obtain a symmetric formulation of this coupled system; however, it was also indefinite, making it more difficult to solve. In fact in practice there have been cases where we have been unable to invert the system. In this paper we take a novel approach that consists of factoring the damping matrix of deformable structures and show that this can be used to obtain a symmetric positive definite system, at least to the extent that the uncoupled systems were symmetric positive definite. We use a traditional MAC grid discretization of the fluid and a fully Lagrangian discretization of the structures for the sake of exposition, noting that our procedure can be generalized to other scenarios. For the special case of rigid bodies, where there are no internal damping forces, we exactly recover the system of Batty et al. (2007) [4]. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  12. A symmetric positive definite formulation for monolithic fluid structure interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we consider a strongly coupled (monolithic) fluid structure interaction framework for incompressible flow, as opposed to a loosely coupled (partitioned) method. This requires solving a single linear system that combines the unknown velocities of the structure with the unknown pressures of the fluid. In our previous work, we were able to obtain a symmetric formulation of this coupled system; however, it was also indefinite, making it more difficult to solve. In fact in practice there have been cases where we have been unable to invert the system. In this paper we take a novel approach that consists of factoring the damping matrix of deformable structures and show that this can be used to obtain a symmetric positive definite system, at least to the extent that the uncoupled systems were symmetric positive definite. We use a traditional MAC grid discretization of the fluid and a fully Lagrangian discretization of the structures for the sake of exposition, noting that our procedure can be generalized to other scenarios. For the special case of rigid bodies, where there are no internal damping forces, we exactly recover the system of Batty et al. (2007) [4]. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanohorns incorporated a monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyan; Wang, Yizhou; Cheng, Heyong; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns have received great interest for their unique properties and diverse potential applications. Herein, we demonstrated the feasibility of single-walled carbon nanohorns incorporated poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monolith as the stationary phase for capillary electrochromatography, which were prepared by one-step in situ copolymerization. Single-walled carbon nanohorns were dispersed in styrene to give a stable and homogeneous suspension. The monolithic column gave effective separation for a wide range of aromatic compounds, which was based on hydrophobicity and π-π electrostatic stacking of single-walled carbon nanohorns. The precisions of migration time and peak area varied in the ranges of 1.4-1.9% for intraday trials and 1.7-3.5% for interday trials, and 3.2-6.7% for intraday trials and 4.1-7.4% for interday trials, and 3.6-7.2% for inter-column trials and 5.2-21.3% for inter-column trials, respectively, indicating the good reproducibility of single-walled carbon nanohorns embedded monolithic columns. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fabrication of Monolithic Bridge Structures by Vacuum-Assisted Capillary-Force Lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Suh, Kahp Y.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic bridge structures were fabricated by using capillary-force lithography (CFL), which was developed for patterning polymers over a large area by combining essential features of nanoimprint lithography and capillarity. A patterned soft mold

  15. Preparation of Highly Porous Binderless Active Carbon Monoliths from Waste Aspen Sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste aspen sawdust was used as a precursor to prepare binderless active carbon monoliths (ACMs with high porosities. The ACMs were prepared by activation with H3PO4 at different activation temperatures (500 to 700 °C and retention times (1 to 3 h. Their morphologies, yields, textural properties, and microcrystalline structures were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, an analytical balance, N2 adsorption/desorption techniques, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results indicated that waste aspen sawdust could be successfully converted into highly porous binderless ACMs. The apparent specific surface area (SSA and yield of ACMs were in the range of 688 to 951 m2/g and 26.6 to 36.2%, respectively. Highly microporous ACMs with a micropore percentage of 91.1%, apparent specific surface area of 951 m2/g, pore volume of 0.481 mL/g, and bulk density of 0.56 g/mL could be produced by activation at 700 °C for 1 h. Increasing the activation temperature or retention time increased the specific surface area, pore volume, and turbostratic degree, but decreased the yield.

  16. Relation between textural and energetic parameters of activated carbon monoliths from coconut shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Diana Paola; Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Structural characteristics and the energetic parameters of five monoliths of activated carbon were compared. The samples were obtained from coconut shells by means of chemical activation using different concentrations of phosphoric acid. The samples are characterized by means of physical adsorption of N 2 at 77K, CO 2 at 273K, and immersion calorimetry in benzene. From the data obtained the volumes of micropore, mesopore, narrow micro porosity and energy parameters of immersion enthalpy were calculated. Also were calculated, K of the Langmuir model and characteristic energies, Eo, of the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The experimental results show that the activation with phosphoric acid develops micro porosity, giving a micropore volume between 0,36 and 0,45 cm 3 g-1, area BET between 975 and 1320 m 2 g-1 and immersion enthalpy between 112,9 and 147,7 Jg-1. It was found that for higher BET area, there is a greater immersion enthalpy in benzene, lower characteristic energy and smaller value of K.

  17. Brief review: Preparation techniques of biomass based activated carbon monolith electrode for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, Erman; Taslim, Rika

    2018-02-01

    The synthesis of activated carbon monolith electrode made from a biomass material using the hydrolytic pressure or the pelletization technique of pre-carbonized materials is one of standard reported methods. Several steps such as pre-carbonization, milling, chemical activation, hydraulic press, carbonization, physical activation, polishing and washing need to be accomplished in the production of electrodes by this method. This is relatively a long process that need to be simplified. In this paper we present the standard method and proceed with the introduction to several alternative methods in the synthesis of activated carbon monolith electrodes. The alternative methods were emphasized on the selection of suitable biomass materials. All of carbon electrodes prepared by different methods will be analyzed for physical and electrochemical properties. The density, degree of crystallinity, surface morphology are examples for physical study and specific capacitance was an electrochemical properties that has been analysed. This alternative method has offered a specific capacitance in the range of 10 to 171 F/g.

  18. A Symmetric Positive Definite Formulation for Monolithic Fluid Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    more likely to converge than simply iterating the partitioned approach to convergence in a simple Gauss - Seidel manner. Our approach allows the use of...conditions in a second step. These approaches can also be iterated within a given time step for increased stability, noting that in the limit if one... converges one obtains a monolithic (albeit expensive) approach. Other approaches construct strongly coupled systems and then solve them in one of several

  19. Monolithically Integrated, Mechanically Resilient Carbon-Based Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Jennings, Andrew T.; Greer, Julia R.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is an important tool for performing measurements at the nanoscale in imaging bacteria or proteins in biology, as well as in the electronics industry. An essential element of SPM is a sharp, stable tip that possesses a small radius of curvature to enhance spatial resolution. Existing techniques for forming such tips are not ideal. High-aspect-ratio, monolithically integrated, as-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been formed that show promise for SPM applications by overcoming the limitations present in wet chemical and separate substrate etching processes.

  20. Monolithic dual-band HgCdTe infrared detector structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parish, G

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic HgCdTe photoconductive device structure is presented that is suitable for dual-band optically registered infrared photodetection in the two atmospheric transmission windows of 3-5 mu m and 8-12 mu m, which correspond to the mid...

  1. Monolithic integration of nanoscale tensile specimens and MEMS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kysar, Jeffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale materials often have stochastic material properties due to a random distribution of material defects and an insufficient number of defects to ensure a consistent average mechanical response. Current methods to measure the mechanical properties employ MEMS-based actuators. The nanoscale specimens are typically mounted manually onto the load platform, so the boundary conditions have random variations, complicating the experimental measurement of the intrinsic stochasticity of the material properties. Here we show methods for monolithic integration of a nanoscale specimen co-fabricated with the loading platform. The nanoscale specimen is gold with dimensions of ∼40 nm thickness, 350 ± 50 nm width, and 7 μm length and the loading platform is an interdigitated electrode electrostatic actuator. The experiment is performed in a scanning electron microscope and digital image correlation is employed to measure displacements to determine stress and strain. The ultimate tensile strength of the nanocrystalline nanoscale specimen approaches 1 GPa, consistent with measurements made by other nanometer scale sample characterization methods on other material samples at the nanometer scale, as well as gold samples at the nanometer scale. The batch-compatible microfabrication method can be used to create nominally identical nanoscale specimens and boundary conditions for a broad range of materials. (paper)

  2. The Importance of Pressure Sampling Frequency in Models for Determination of Critical Wave Loadings on Monolithic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Meinert, Palle

    2008-01-01

    Wave induced pressures on model scale monolithic structures like caissons and concrete superstructures on rubble mound breakwaters show very peaky variations, even in cases without impacts from slamming waves....

  3. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  4. A facile approach for the synthesis of monolithic hierarchical porous carbons – high performance materials for amine based CO2 capture and supercapacitor electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Estevez, Luis; Dua, Rubal; Bhandari, Nidhi; Ramanujapuram, Anirudh; Wang, Peng; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2013-01-01

    An ice templating coupled with hard templating and physical activation approach is reported for the synthesis of hierarchically porous carbon monoliths with tunable porosities across all three length scales (macro- meso- and micro), with ultrahigh

  5. The Importance of Pressure Sampling Frequency in Models for Determination of Critical Wave Loadingson Monolithic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Meinert, Palle

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of wave load sampling frequency on calculated sliding distance in an overall stability analysis of a monolithic caisson. It is demonstrated by a specific example of caisson design that for this kind of analyses the sampling frequency in a small scale model could...... be as low as 100 Hz in model scale. However, for design of structure elements like the wave wall on the top of a caisson the wave load sampling frequency must be much higher, in the order of 1000 Hz in the model. Elastic-plastic deformations of foundation and structure were not included in the analysis....

  6. THE ANALYSIS OF INTENSE-DEFORMED MONOLITHIC CONCRETE STRIP STATE OF UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES OF NONCIRCULAR OUTLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aleksandrovna Bauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research results of intense deformed state (IDS of the crepe and soil massif of un-derground structures having a non-circular outline with a depth of laying up to 50 m in unstable al-luvial rocks with dumps from 0.3 to 0.7 m are presented. The study was carried out by means of modeling the IDS of the soil massif and the hardening concrete of the monolithic support, erected after slaughter moving. To implement the proposed technological solutions ensuring the fixing of underground structures with monolithic concrete, it is necessary to use particularly fast solidifying compounds to exclude the use of temporary crepe. Based on the studies of a number of modifiers, various changes in mechanical properties of the most effective compositions have been established, which are used to simulate the concrete crepe of structures with time-varying characteristics. Purpose: the basis for using resource-saving technology for the construction of underground structures in a non-circular outline in a soil massif. Methods and methodology of the work: the studies were carried out by means of the finite element method (FEM using the optimal design of the experiment. Results: stress distributions were obtained in the hardening concrete crepe structures, stress concentration zones were established, displacement values in the soil massif and their spread on the surface were recieved. Areas of the result application: the results of research work can be used in the design of options for the construction of underground structures.

  7. New Structure for a Six-Port Reflectometer in Monolithic Microwave Integrated-Circuit Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Wiedmann , Frank; Huyart , Bernard; Bergeault , Eric; Jallet , Louis

    1997-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a new structure for a six-port reflectometer which due to its simplicity can be implemented very easily in monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology. It uses nonmatched diode detectors with a high input impedance which are placed around a phase shifter in conjunction with a power divider for the reference detector. The circuit has been fabricated using the F20 GaAs process of the GEC–Marconi foundry and operates between 1.3 GHz and 3...

  8. Isothermal structural evolution of SnO2 monolithic porous xerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, G.E.S.; Pulcinelli, S.H.; Santilli, C.V.; Craievich, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    Monolithic samples of SnO 2 xerogel were produced by careful control of the gelation and drying steps of material preparation. In these samples, small and nanoporous aggregates stick together, yielding a monolithic (nonpowdered) material. The material was analyzed by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) during isothermal treatment at temperatures ranging from 473 to 773 K. At 473 K, the SAXS intensity does not change significantly with time. All experimental scattering intensity functions for T > 473 K are composed of two wide peaks, which evolve with increasing time. Each of them was associated with one of the modes of a bimodal distribution of pore sizes corresponding to a fine (intra-aggregate) and a coarse (inter-aggregate) porosity. The SAXS intensities of the maxima of both peaks increase with increasing treatment time, while the position of their maxima, associated with an average correlation distance, decreases. The time dependences of the SAXS intensity corresponding to both families of pores qualitatively agree with those expected for a two-phase separating system exhibiting dynamic scaling properties. The time evolutions of the several moments of the structure function of samples heat treated at 773 K exhibit a good quantitative agreement with the theory of dynamic scaling for systems evolving by a coagulation mechanism. The kinetic parameters are the same for both peaks, indicating that the same mechanism is responsible for the structural evolution of both families of pores. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis of Porous and Mechanically Compliant Carbon Aerogels Using Conductive and Structural Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Macias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of conductive and mechanically compliant monolithic carbon aerogels prepared by sol-gel polycondensation of melamine-resorcinol-formaldehyde (MRF mixtures by incorporating diatomite and carbon black additives. The resulting aerogels composites displayed a well-developed porous structure, confirming that the polymerization of the precursors is not impeded in the presence of either additive. The aerogels retained the porous structure after etching off the siliceous additive, indicating adequate cross-linking of the MRF reactants. However, the presence of diatomite caused a significant fall in the pore volumes, accompanied by coarsening of the average pore size (predominance of large mesopores and macropores. The diatomite also prevented structural shrinkage and deformation of the as-prepared monoliths upon densification by carbonization, even after removal of the siliceous framework. The rigid pristine aerogels became more flexible upon incorporation of the diatomite, favoring implementation of binderless monolithic aerogel electrodes.

  10. Solid-phase microextraction of phthalate esters in water sample using different activated carbon-polymer monoliths as adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Stephen; Fu, Chung-Wei; Lin, Jhih-Yun; Hsu, Meng-Ju; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-07-13

    In this study, the application of different activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monoliths as adsorbents for the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of phthalate esters (PAEs) in water sample were investigated. The activated carbon (AC) was embedded in organic polymers, poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(BMA-EDMA)) or poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (poly(STY-DVB)), via a 5-min microwave-assisted or a 15-min water bath heating polymerization. Preliminary investigation on the performance of the native poly(BMA-EDMA) and poly(STY-DVB) demonstrated remarkable adsorption efficiencies for PAEs. However, due to the strong hydrophobic, π-π, and hydrogen bonding interactions between the analytes and polymers, low extraction recoveries were achieved. In contrast, the presence of AC in native polymers not only enhanced the adsorption efficiencies but also assisted the PAE desorption, especially for AC-poly(STY-DVB) with extraction recovery ranged of 76.2-99.3%. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction recoveries for intra-, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 76.5-100.8% (<3.7% RSDs), 77.2-97.6% (<5.6% RSDs) and 75.5-99.7% (<6.2% RSDs), respectively. The developed AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column showed good mechanical stability, which can be reused for more than 30 extraction times without any significant loss in the extraction recoveries of PAEs. The AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column was successfully applied in SPME of PAEs in water sample with extraction recovery ranged of 78.8%-104.6% (<5.5% RSDs). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and electronic structure of low-density monoliths of nanoporous nanocrystalline anatase TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S O; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y M; van Buuren, T; Satcher, J H

    2004-08-13

    Monolithic nanocrystalline anatase titania aerogels are synthesized by the epoxide sol-gel method followed by thermal annealing at 550 C. These aerogels are formed by {approx}10-20 nm size anatase nanoparticles which are randomly oriented and interconnected into an open-cell solid network. Aerogel monoliths have an apparent density of {approx}6% and a surface area of {approx} 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and soft x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy reveal good crystallinity of the anatase nanoparticles forming the aerogel skeleton.

  12. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  13. Ordered Mesoporous Titania/Carbon Hybrid Monoliths for Lithium-ion Battery Anodes with High Areal and Volumetric Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Tobias S; Fleischmann, Simon; Zeiger, Marco; Grobelsek, Ingrid; de Oliveira, Peter W; Presser, Volker

    2018-04-25

    Free-standing, binder-free, and conductive additive-free mesoporous titanium dioxide/carbon hybrid electrodes were prepared from co-assembly of a poly(isoprene)-block-poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer and a titanium alkoxide. By tailoring an optimized morphology, we prepared macroscopic mechanically stable 300 μm thick monoliths that were directly employed as lithium-ion battery electrodes. High areal mass loading of up to 26.4 mg cm -2 and a high bulk density of 0.88 g cm -3 were obtained. This resulted in a highly increased volumetric capacity of 155 mAh cm -3 , compared to cast thin film electrodes. Further, the areal capacity of 4.5 mAh cm -2 represented a 9-fold increase compared to conventionally cast electrodes. These attractive performance metrics are related to the superior electrolyte transport and shortened diffusion lengths provided by the interconnected mesoporous nature of the monolith material, assuring superior rate handling, even at high cycling rates. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A facile approach for the synthesis of monolithic hierarchical porous carbons – high performance materials for amine based CO2 capture and supercapacitor electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Estevez, Luis

    2013-05-03

    An ice templating coupled with hard templating and physical activation approach is reported for the synthesis of hierarchically porous carbon monoliths with tunable porosities across all three length scales (macro- meso- and micro), with ultrahigh specific pore volumes [similar]11.4 cm3 g−1. The materials function well as amine impregnated supports for CO2 capture and as supercapacitor electrodes.

  15. Nanoporous separators for supercapacitor using activated carbon monolith electrode from oil palm empty fruit bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor, N. S. M.; Deraman, M.; Omar, R.; Basri, N. H.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Taer, E.; Awitdrus,; Farma, R.

    2014-01-01

    Activated porous carbon electrode prepared from fibres of oil palm empty fruit bunches was used for preparing the carbon based supercapacitor cells. The symmetrical supercapacitor cells were fabricated using carbon electrodes, stainless steel current collector, H 2 SO 4 electrolyte, and three types of nanoporous separators. Cells A, B and C were fabricated using polypropylene, eggshell membrane, and filter paper, respectively. Electrochemical characterizations data from Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, and Galvanic Charge Discharge techniques showed that specific capacitance, specific power and specific energy for cell A were 122 F g −1 , 177 W kg −1 , 3.42 Wh kg −1 , cell B; 125 F g −1 , 179 W kg −1 , and 3.64 Wh kg −1 , and cell C; 180 F g −1 , 178 W kg −1 , 4.27 Wh kg −1 . All the micrographs from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that the different in nanoporous structure of the separators lead to a significant different in influencing the values of specific capacitance, power and energy of supercapacitors, which is associated with the mobility of ion into the pore network. These results indicated that the filter paper was superior than the eggshell membrane and polypropylene nanoporous separators. However, we found that in terms of acidic resistance, polypropylene was the best nanoporous separator for acidic medium

  16. Nanoporous separators for supercapacitor using activated carbon monolith electrode from oil palm empty fruit bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nor, N. S. M., E-mail: madra@ukm.my; Deraman, M., E-mail: madra@ukm.my; Omar, R., E-mail: madra@ukm.my; Basri, N. H.; Dolah, B. N. M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Taer, E.; Awitdrus,; Farma, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Riau, 28293 Pekanbaru, Riau (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    Activated porous carbon electrode prepared from fibres of oil palm empty fruit bunches was used for preparing the carbon based supercapacitor cells. The symmetrical supercapacitor cells were fabricated using carbon electrodes, stainless steel current collector, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte, and three types of nanoporous separators. Cells A, B and C were fabricated using polypropylene, eggshell membrane, and filter paper, respectively. Electrochemical characterizations data from Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, and Galvanic Charge Discharge techniques showed that specific capacitance, specific power and specific energy for cell A were 122 F g{sup −1}, 177 W kg{sup −1}, 3.42 Wh kg{sup −1}, cell B; 125 F g{sup −1}, 179 W kg{sup −1}, and 3.64 Wh kg{sup −1}, and cell C; 180 F g{sup −1}, 178 W kg{sup −1}, 4.27 Wh kg{sup −1}. All the micrographs from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that the different in nanoporous structure of the separators lead to a significant different in influencing the values of specific capacitance, power and energy of supercapacitors, which is associated with the mobility of ion into the pore network. These results indicated that the filter paper was superior than the eggshell membrane and polypropylene nanoporous separators. However, we found that in terms of acidic resistance, polypropylene was the best nanoporous separator for acidic medium.

  17. Fabrication of Monolithic Bridge Structures by Vacuum-Assisted Capillary-Force Lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Kwak, Rhokyun

    2009-04-06

    Monolithic bridge structures were fabricated by using capillary-force lithography (CFL), which was developed for patterning polymers over a large area by combining essential features of nanoimprint lithography and capillarity. A patterned soft mold was placed on a spin-coated UV-curable resin on a substrate. The polymer then moved into the cavity of the mold by capillary action and then solidified after exposure to UV radiation. The uncured resin was forced to migrate into the cavity of a micropatterned PDMS mold by capillarity, and then exposed to UV radiation under a high-energy mercury lamp with intensity. A rotary pump was then turned on, decreasing the air pressure in the chamber. SEM images were taken with a high-resolution SEM at an acceleration voltage greater than 15 kV. It was observed that when the air pressure was rapidly reduced to a low vacuum, the top layer moved into the nanochannels with a meniscus at the interface between the nanoscale PUA and the base structure.

  18. Mathematical Modelling of Optimization of Structures of Monolithic Coverings Based on Liquid Rubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgumbayeva, R. Kh; Abdikarimov, M. N.; Mussabekov, R.; Sartayev, D. T.

    2018-05-01

    The paper considers optimization of monolithic coatings compositions using a computer and MPE methods. The goal of the paper was to construct a mathematical model of the complete factorial experiment taking into account its plan and conditions. Several regression equations were received. Dependence between content components and parameters of rubber, as well as the quantity of a rubber crumb, was considered. An optimal composition for manufacturing the material of monolithic coatings compositions was recommended based on experimental data.

  19. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-01-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrog...

  20. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  1. Monolithic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kahl, William K. (Knoxville, TN); Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN); Evans, III, Boyd M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlar, Troy A. (Knoxville, TN); Cunningham, Joseph P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  2. Structure and properties of hybrid poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/SiO2 monoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Xiangling; Jiang, Shichun; Qiu, Xuepeng

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: Hybrid poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA)/SiO2 monoliths were synthesized via a sol-gel process of the precursor tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and the in situ free-radical polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The weight ratio of the starting chemicals, TEOS...

  3. A monolithic relativistic electron beam source based on a dielectric laser accelerator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeur, Josh; Carranza, Nestor; Travish, Gil; Yin Hairong; Yoder, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    Work towards a monolithic device capable of producing relativistic particle beams within a cubic-centimeter is detailed. We will discuss the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), an optical laser powered dielectric accelerator as the main building block of this chip-scale source along with a field enhanced emitter and a region for sub-relativistic acceleration.

  4. Hierarchically porous Ni monolith@branch-structured NiCo2O4 for high energy density supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjie Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of NiCo2O4 nanostrucutures ranging from nanowire to nanoplate and branched structures were successfully prepared via a simple hydrothermal process. The experimental results show that NiCo2O4 with branched structures possesses the best overall electrochemical performance. The improvement of energy density was explored in terms of hierarchically three-dimensional (3D metal substrates and a high specific area capacitance, and area energy density is obtained with hierarchically porous Ni monolith synthesized through a controlled combustion procedure.

  5. Thermo-mechanical cyclic testing of carbon-carbon primary structure for an SSTO vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croop, Harold C.; Leger, Kenneth B.; Lowndes, Holland B.; Hahn, Steven E.; Barthel, Chris A.

    1999-01-01

    An advanced carbon-carbon structural component is being experimentally evaluated for use as primary load carrying structure for future single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles. The component is a wing torque box section featuring an advanced, three-spar design. This design features 3D-woven, angle-interlock skins, 3D integrally woven spar webs and caps, oxidation inhibited matrix, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) oxidation protection coating, and ceramic matrix composite fasteners. The box spar caps are nested into the skins which, when processed together through the carbon-carbon processing cycle, resulted in monolithic box halves. The box half sections were then joined at the spar web intersections using ceramic matrix composite fasteners. This method of fabrication eliminated fasteners through both the upper and lower skins. Development of the carbon-carbon wing box structure was accomplished in a four phase design and fabrication effort, conducted by Boeing, Information, Space and Defense Systems, Seattle, WA, under contract to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The box is now set up for testing and will soon begin cyclic loads testing in the AFRL Structural Test Facility at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), OH. This paper discusses the latest test setup accomplishments and the results of the pre-cyclic loads testing performed to date.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of copper-infiltrated carbonized wood monoliths for supercapacitor electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Shiang; Siegel, Gene; Prestgard, Megan C.; Wang, Wei; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Copper nanoparticles were embedded in the highly porous carbonized wood electrodes. • Copper nanoparticle serves as the pseudocapacitive specie to increase the energy density. • The porous copper-wood electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performances with high capacitance, excellent rate capability and stability. - Abstract: Copper nanoparticle-loaded carbonized wood electrodes were synthesized and characterized for the use as supercapacitor electrodes. The electrodes were fabricated by soaking beech wood samples in Cu(NO 3 ) 2 solution followed by carbonization at 800 °C under a N 2 atmosphere. The copper nanoparticle content in the electrodes was controlled by varying the concentration of the Cu(NO 3 ) 2 solution from 0.5 to 2 M. Subsequent X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy measurements confirm that cubic copper was formed and the copper nanoparticles were anchored uniformly both on the surface as well as deep within the pores of the wood electrode. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that all of the electrodes had a typical pseudo-capacitive behavior, as indicated by the presence of redox reaction peaks. Charge–discharge testing also confirmed the pseudo-capacitive nature of the electrodes. The reversible oxidation of Cu into Cu 2 O and CuO was verified by performing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at different stages of the charge–discharge cycle. The Cu-loaded wood electrodes exhibited excellent cyclability and retaining 95% of their specific capacitance even after 2000 cycles. A maximum specific capacitance of 888 F/g was observed while discharging the 7 wt% Cu electrode at 200 mA/g in a 2 M KOH electrolyte solution. These results demonstrated the potential of the copper nanoparticle-loaded wood electrodes as cheap and high performance supercapacitor electrodes

  7. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  8. Effects of indirect bandgap top cells in a monolithic cascade cell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, H. B.; Godlewski, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of having a slightly indirect top cell in a three junction cascade monolithic stack is calculated. The minority carrier continuity equations are utilized to calculate individual junction performance. Absorption coefficient curves for general III-V compounds are calculated for a variety of direct and indirect gap materials. The results indicate that for a small excursion into the indirect region, (about 0.1 eV), the loss of efficiency is acceptably small (less than 2.5 percent) and considerably less than attempting to make the top junction a smaller direct bandgap.

  9. Paracrystalline structure of activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygielska, A.; Burian, A.; Dore, J. C.

    2001-06-01

    Structural studies by means of neutron diffraction of activated carbons, prepared from a polymer of phenol formaldehyde resin by carbonization and activation processes, with variable porosity, are presented. The neutron scattering data were recorded over the range of the scattering vector Q from 2.5 to 500 nm-1. The structure of activated carbons has been described in terms of disordered graphite-like layers with very weak interlayer correlations. The model has been generated by computer simulations and its validity has been tested by comparison of the experimental and calculated intensity functions. Modelling studies have shown that the model containing 3-4 layers each about 2 nm in diameter accounts for the experimental data and that graphite layers are randomly translated and rotated, according to the turbostratic structure. Near-neighbour carbon-carbon distances of about 0.139 nm and 0.154 nm have been determined. The Debye-Waller factor exp (-Q2σ2/2) with σ = σ0(r)1/2 suggests a paracrystalline structure within a single layer. The value of the interlayer spacing of 0.36 nm has been found from paracrystalline simulations of the layer arrangement in the c-axis direction. The high quality of the experimental data has enabled determination of the coordination numbers, the interatomic distances and their standard deviations using a curve-fitting procedure over the Q-range from 250 nm to 500 nm, providing structural information about short- and intermediate-range ordering.

  10. Lithographically defined microporous carbon structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Polsky, Ronen; Brozik, Susan M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2013-01-08

    A lithographic method is used to fabricate porous carbon structures that can provide electrochemical electrodes having high surface area with uniform and controllable dimensions, providing enormous flexibility to tailor the electrodes toward specific applications. Metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the porous carbon electrodes exhibit ultra small dimensions with uniform size distribution. The resulting electrodes are rugged, electrically conductive and show excellent electrochemical behavior.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Identification of a Monolithic Articulated Concentrated Strain Elastic Structure's (MACSES's) Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pollard, Eric L; Murphey, Thomas W; Sanford, Gregory E

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research is to identify the effective continuum properties of a recently developed, deployable hierarchical truss architecture composed of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP...

  12. Monolithic mode locked DBR laser with multiple-bandgap MQW structure realized by selective area growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, M.; Bouayad-Amine, J.; Feeser, T.; Haisch, H.; Kuehn, E.; Lach, E.; Satzke, K.; Weber, J.; Zielinski, E. [Alcatel Telecom, Stuttgart (Germany). Research Div.

    1996-12-31

    The realization of novel monolithically integrated multiple-segment pulse laser sources in InGaAsP MQW technology is reported. The MQW layers for all functional sections of these devices, the modulator, the active (gain) and the passive waveguide, as well as the Bragg section were grown in a single selective area growth (SAG) step by LP-MOVPE on SiO{sub 2} patterned 2 inch InP substrates. Due to a properly selected pattern geometry 3 different bandgap regions with smooth interfaces are thereby formed along the laser cavity. The more than 4 mm long DBR lasers which exhibit a threshold current as low as 30 mA were mode locked by an intra-cavity electroabsorption modulator applying a sinusoidal voltage at around 10 GHz. In this way an optical pulse train with pulse widths < 13 ps (measured with a streak camera) and high extinction ratio was generated. A time-bandwidth product of 0.5 close to the Fourier limit is obtained. This device is very attractive for signal generation in 40 Gb/s OTDM transmission systems at 1.55 {micro}m wavelength.

  13. Test of the carbonates structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Lidia

    1987-01-01

    Several samples of carbonates were analyzed by X-ray techniques for determining the crystalline structure of the members of the isomorphes groups of calcite (CaCO 3 ) and dolomite (CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 ). Considering the single crystal, the monocrystal method was used, collecting oscillation and Weissenberg data by means of photographic films. (Author) [es

  14. Determination of imidazole derivatives by micellar electrokinetic chromatography combined with solid-phase microextraction using activated carbon-polymer monolith as adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yung-Han; Lirio, Stephen; Li, Chih-Keng; Liu, Wan-Ling; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-01-08

    In this study, an effective method for the separation of imidazole derivatives 2-methylimidazole (2-MEI), 4- methylimidazole (4-MEI) and 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI) in caramel colors using cation-selective exhaustive injection and sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweeping-MEKC) was developed. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for the CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 4.3-80μgL(-1) and 14-270μgL(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, a rapid fabrication activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monolithic column as adsorbent for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of imidazole colors was developed. Under the optimized SPME condition, the extraction recoveries for intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 84.5-95.1% (<6.3% RSDs), 85.6-96.1% (<4.9% RSDs), and 81.3-96.1% (<7.1% RSDs), respectively. The LODs and LOQs of AC-polymer monolithic column combined with CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method were in the range of 33.4-60.4μgL(-1) and 111.7-201.2μgL(-1), respectively. The use of AC-polymer as SPME adsorbent demonstrated the reduction of matrix effect in food samples such as soft drink and alcoholic beverage thereby benefiting successful determination of trace-level caramel colors residues using CSEI-sweeping-MEKC method. The developed AC-polymer monolithic column can be reused for more than 30 times without any significant loss in the extraction recovery for imidazole derivatives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of CO2 activation temperature on the physical and electrochemical properties of activated carbon monolith from banana stem waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, E.; Susanti, Y.; Awitdrus, Sugianto, Taslim, R.; Setiadi, R. N.; Bahri, S.; Agustino, Dewi, P.; Kurniasih, B.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of CO2 activation on the synthesis of activated carbon monolith from banana stem waste has been studied. Physical characteristics such as density, degree of crystallinity, surface morphology and elemental content has been analyzed, supporting the finding of an excellent electrochemical properties for the supercapacitor. The synthesis of activated carbon electrode began with pre-carbonization process at temperature of 250°C for 2.5 h. Then the process was continued by chemical activation using KOH as activating agent with a concentration of 0.4 M. The pellets were formed with 8 ton hydrolic pressure. All the samples were carbonized at a temperature of 600°C, followed by physical activation using CO2 gas at a various temperatures ranging from 800°C, 850°C, 900°C and 950°C for 2 h. The carbon content was increased with increasing temperature and the optimum temperature was 900°C. The specific capacitance depends on the activation temperature with the highest specific capacitance of 104.2 F/g at the activation temperature of 900°C.

  16. Increasing the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble drug valsartan using novel hierarchical porous carbon monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhuo; Che, Erxi; Zhang, Miao; Sun, Baoxiang; Gao, Jian; Han, Jin; Song, Yaling

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, a novel hierarchical porous carbon monolith (HPCM) with three-dimensionally (3D) ordered macropores (∼ 400 nm) and uniform accessible mesopores (∼ 5.2 nm) was synthesized via a facile dual-templating technique using colloidal silica nanospheres and Poloxamer 407 as templates. The feasibility of the prepared HPCM for oral drug delivery was studied. Valsartan (VAL) was chosen as a poorly water-soluble model drug and loaded into the HPCM matrix using the solvent evaporation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and specific surface area analysis were employed to characterize the drug-loaded HPCM-based formulation, confirming the successful inclusion of VAL into the nanopores of HPCM. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) demonstrated that the incorporated drug in the HPCM matrix was in an amorphous state and the VAL formulation exhibited good physical stability for up to 6 months. In vitro tests showed that the dissolution rate of HPCM-based formulation was increased significantly compared with that of crystalline VAL or VAL-loaded 3D ordered macroporous carbon monoliths (OMCMs). Furthermore, a pharmacokinetic study in rats demonstrated about 2.4-fold increase in oral bioavailability of VAL in the case of HPCM-based formulation compared with the commercially available VAL preparation (Valzaar(®)). These results therefore suggest that HPCM is a promising carrier able to improve the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble drug VAL. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Antireflective sub-wavelength structures for improvement of the extraction efficiency and color rendering index of monolithic white light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Corell, Dennis Dan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    We have theoretically investigated the influence of antireflective sub-wavelength structures on a monolithic white light-emitting diode (LED). The simulation is based on the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) algorithm, and both cylinder and moth-eye structures have been studied in the work. Our...... simulation results show that a moth-eye structure enhances the light extraction efficiency over the entire visible light range with an extraction efficiency enhancement of up to 26 %. Also for the first time to our best knowledge, the influence of sub-wavelength structures on both the color rendering index...

  18. Origin, Development and Decline of Monolithic Pillars and the Continuity of the Tradition in Polylithic, Non-Lithic and Structural Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krishnamurthy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with one such creations of Man, i.e. the tradition of erecting free standing monolithic pillars - its origin, growth and decline and the continuity of the tradition of erecting such pillars in its changed polylithic (from Greek word polloi = many + lithic = stone, non-lithic and structural forms. No exact reason can be found, pointing it to be the exact cause for the decline in the tradition of erecting monolithic pillar and its transformation. In this paper the authors try to analyse various phenomenon likesocio-political, economic and technical aspects which may have lead to their decline and subsequently their continuity in a changed form in Indian context.

  19. High-density 3D graphene-based monolith and related materials, methods, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Kucheyev, Sergei; Montalvo, Elizabeth; Shin, Swanee; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-03-21

    A composition comprising at least one high-density graphene-based monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds and having a density of at least 0.1 g/cm.sup.3. Also provided is a method comprising: preparing a reaction mixture comprising a suspension and at least one catalyst, said suspension selected from a graphene oxide (GO) suspension and a carbon nanotube suspension; curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, said drying step is substantially free of supercritical drying and freeze drying; and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a high-density graphene-based monolith. Exceptional combinations of properties are achieved including high conductive and mechanical properties.

  20. Monoliths in Bioprocess Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh Rajamanickam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic columns are a special type of chromatography column, which can be used for the purification of different biomolecules. They have become popular due to their high mass transfer properties and short purification times. Several articles have already discussed monolith manufacturing, as well as monolith characteristics. In contrast, this review focuses on the applied aspect of monoliths and discusses the most relevant biomolecules that can be successfully purified by them. We describe success stories for viruses, nucleic acids and proteins and compare them to conventional purification methods. Furthermore, the advantages of monolithic columns over particle-based resins, as well as the limitations of monoliths are discussed. With a compilation of commercially available monolithic columns, this review aims at serving as a ‘yellow pages’ for bioprocess engineers who face the challenge of purifying a certain biomolecule using monoliths.

  1. Structure of nanoporous carbon materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volperts, A.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Sildos, I.; Vervikishko, D.; Shkolnikov, E.; Dobele, G.

    2012-08-01

    Activated carbons with highly developed porous structure and nanosized pores (8 - 11 Å) were prepared from alder wood using thermochemical activation method with sodium hydroxide. Properties of the obtained activated carbons were examined by benzene and nitrogen sorption, X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Tests of activated carbons as electrodes in supercapacitors were performed as well. It was found that specific surface area of above mentioned activated carbons was 1800 m2/g (Dubinin - Radushkevich). Raman spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of ordered and disordered structures of graphite origin. The performance of activated carbons as electrodes in supercapacitors have shown superior results in comparison with electrodes made with commercial carbon tissues.

  2. Structure of nanoporous carbon materials for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volperts, A; Dobele, G; Mironova-Ulmane, N; Sildos, I; Vervikishko, D; Shkolnikov, E

    2012-01-01

    Activated carbons with highly developed porous structure and nanosized pores (8 - 11 Å) were prepared from alder wood using thermochemical activation method with sodium hydroxide. Properties of the obtained activated carbons were examined by benzene and nitrogen sorption, X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Tests of activated carbons as electrodes in supercapacitors were performed as well. It was found that specific surface area of above mentioned activated carbons was 1800 m 2 /g (Dubinin - Radushkevich). Raman spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of ordered and disordered structures of graphite origin. The performance of activated carbons as electrodes in supercapacitors have shown superior results in comparison with electrodes made with commercial carbon tissues.

  3. Structural transformations of carbon chains inside nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, Jamie H.; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Buechner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    In situ aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the structural transformations of carbon chains that occur in the interior region of carbon nanotubes. We find electron-beam irradiation leads to the formation of two-dimensional carbon structures that are freely mobile inside the nanotube. The inner diameter of the nanotube influences the structural transformations of the carbon chains. As the diameter of the nanotube increases, electron-beam irradiation leads to curling of the chains and eventually the formation of closed looped structures. The closed looped structures evolve into spherical fullerenelike structures that exhibit translational motion inside the nanotubes and also coalesce to form larger nanotube structures. These results demonstrate the use of carbon nanotubes as test tubes for growing small carbon nanotubes within the interior by using only electron-beam irradiation at 80 kV.

  4. Processing and Structure of Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique concept of making nanocomposites from carbon nanofiber paper was explored in this study. The essential element of this method was to design and manufacture carbon nanofiber paper with well-controlled and optimized network structure of carbon nanofibers. In this study, carbon nanofiber paper was prepared under various processing conditions, including different types of carbon nanofibers, solvents, dispersants, and acid treatment. The morphologies of carbon nanofibers within the nanofiber paper were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the bulk densities of carbon nanofiber papers were measured. It was found that the densities and network structures of carbon nanofiber paper correlated to the dispersion quality of carbon nanofibers within the paper, which was significantly affected by papermaking process conditions.

  5. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  6. Hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong; Wu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is a structure, method of making and method of use for a novel macroscopic hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped, nano-porous carbon membrane (HNDCMs) with asymmetric and hierarchical pore architecture that can be produced

  7. Monolithic solid-state lasers for spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Stephen, Mark A.; Merritt, Scott; Glebov, Leonid; Glebova, Larissa; Ryasnyanskiy, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vadim; Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth

    2015-02-01

    A new solution for building high power, solid state lasers for space flight is to fabricate the whole laser resonator in a single (monolithic) structure or alternatively to build a contiguous diffusion bonded or welded structure. Monolithic lasers provide numerous advantages for space flight solid-state lasers by minimizing misalignment concerns. The closed cavity is immune to contamination. The number of components is minimized thus increasing reliability. Bragg mirrors serve as the high reflector and output coupler thus minimizing optical coatings and coating damage. The Bragg mirrors also provide spectral and spatial mode selection for high fidelity. The monolithic structure allows short cavities resulting in short pulses. Passive saturable absorber Q-switches provide a soft aperture for spatial mode filtering and improved pointing stability. We will review our recent commercial and in-house developments toward fully monolithic solid-state lasers.

  8. Hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-08-03

    The present invention is a structure, method of making and method of use for a novel macroscopic hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped, nano-porous carbon membrane (HNDCMs) with asymmetric and hierarchical pore architecture that can be produced on a large-scale approach. The unique HNDCM holds great promise as components in separation and advanced carbon devices because they could offer unconventional fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. Overall, the invention set forth herein covers a hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes and methods of making and using such a membranes.

  9. Binder-less activated carbon electrode from gelam wood for use in supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANDINI A. TRIBIDASARI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on the relation between the porous structure of activated carbon and its capacitive properties. Three types of activated carbon monoliths were used as the electrodes in a half cell electrochemical system. One monolith was produced from activated carbon and considered to be a binder-less electrode. Two others were produced from acid and high pressure steam oxidized activated carbon. The micrographs clearly indicate that three electrodes have different porous structures. Both porosity and surface area of carbons increased due to the formation of grains during oxidation. This fact specified that an acid oxidized carbon monolith will have relatively higher capacitance compared to non-oxidized and steam oxidized monoliths. Maximum capacitance values for acid, steam oxidized and non-oxidized electrodes were 27.68, 2.23 and 1.20 F g-1, respectively.

  10. Interaction of multiwalled carbon nanotube produces structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) has been found to produce structural changes in Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA). The interaction or binding of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated in order to discover if it brings about any significant changes of the DNA double helix using CD spectra ...

  11. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Infused Launch Vehicle Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For the past 5 years Orbital ATK has been investing in, prototyping, and testing carbon nanotube infused composite structures to evaluate their impact on launch...

  13. Topological Characterization of Carbon Graphite and Crystal Cubic Carbon Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Wei Gao Muhammad Kamran; Naeem, Muhammad; Rehman, Najma Abdul

    2017-09-07

    Graph theory is used for modeling, designing, analysis and understanding chemical structures or chemical networks and their properties. The molecular graph is a graph consisting of atoms called vertices and the chemical bond between atoms called edges. In this article, we study the chemical graphs of carbon graphite and crystal structure of cubic carbon. Moreover, we compute and give closed formulas of degree based additive topological indices, namely hyper-Zagreb index, first multiple and second multiple Zagreb indices, and first and second Zagreb polynomials.

  14. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  15. Mechanically stable, hierarchically porous Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1) monoliths via direct conversion of copper(II) hydroxide-based monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Nirmalya; Fukumoto, Shotaro; Reboul, Julien; Sumida, Kenji; Zhu, Yang; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-28

    The synthesis of highly crystalline macro-meso-microporous monolithic Cu3(btc)2 (HKUST-1; btc(3-) = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) is demonstrated by direct conversion of Cu(OH)2-based monoliths while preserving the characteristic macroporous structure. The high mechanical strength of the monoliths is promising for possible applications to continuous flow reactors.

  16. Carbon composites in space vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent developments in the technology of carbon or graphite filaments now provide the designer with greatly improved materials offering high specific strength and modulus. Besides these advantages are properties which are distinctly useful for space applications and which provide feasibility for missions not obtainable by other means. Current applications include major and secondary structures of communications satellites. A number of R & D projects are exploring carbon-fiber application to rocket engine motor cases, advanced antenna systems, and space shuttle components. Future system studies are being made, based on the successful application of carbon fibers for orbiting space telescope assemblies, orbital transfer vehicles, and very large deployable energy generation systems. Continued technology development is needed in analysis, material standards, and advanced structural concepts to exploit the full potential of carbon filaments in composite materials.

  17. Structure variations of carbonizing lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.; Polidoro, H.A.; Otani, S.; Craievich, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    The studied lignin is a by-product of the process of ethanol production from eucaliptus. It was heat-treated under inert atmosphere conditions at increasing temperatures from 300C up to 2400C. The structural variations were studied by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The bulk and 'real' density of the compacted materials have also been determined as functions of the final temperature. These experimental results enabled us to establish a mechanism of structure variation based on the formation of a turbostratic graphite-like and porous structure within the initially amorphous lignin matrix. (Author) [pt

  18. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2010-01-05

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  19. Structure and multiscale mechanics of carbon nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims at providing a broad overview on the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of carbon nanomaterials from world-leading scientists in the field. The main aim is to get an in-depth understanding of the broad range of mechanical properties of carbon materials based on their unique nanostructure and on defects of several types and at different length scales. Besides experimental work mainly based on the use of (in-situ) Raman and X-ray scattering and on nanoindentation, the book also covers some aspects of multiscale modeling of the mechanics of carbon nanomaterials.

  20. Graphene: A wonder-Structure of Carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraci, S.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional diamond and graphite; one-dimensional carbon nanotubes and carbon chains; zero dimensional bucky balls: these structures of carbon have dominated science in different periods of time. The dimensionality of these structures has played a prime rol in determining their mechanical and electronic properties. In particular, carbon nanotubes with their unusual properties depending on their diameter and chirality have been one of the most studied nanostructures in the last decade. For a long time, the missing two-dimensional structure of carbon has been considered to be unstable. Recently, the synthesis of graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice of carbon disproved the earlier theories conjecturing the instability in two-dimension. Not only the unexpected stability and very high strength, but also its unusual electronic and magnetic properties have made graphene a wonder-structure. Because of linear electron and hole bands crossing at the Fermi level the electrons in graphene have very high mobility and behave as if a massless Dirac Fermion. This behavior makes us to expect to observe the Klein paradox, it is perhaps the most unusual quantum behavior. Graphene pieces may serve as a framework for functionalized structures, such as high capacity hydrogen storage medium. Quasi-one dimensional graphene nanoribbons, which can be produced down to sub nanometer width exhibit exceptional physical properties. Depending on their chirality, graphene nanoribbons can be nonmagnetic or antiferromagnetic semiconductor. However, antiferromagnetic semiconductor by itself can be modified to be ferrimagnetic metal through periodic vacancies or to be half-metal through applied electric field. If one modulates their width in direct space, confined states are generated even with a local spin direction. Quantum structures made by nanoribbons of different width or composition exhibit a wide range of electrical and magnetic properties to be exploited in nanoelectronics and

  1. Structure and properties of carbon black particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei

    Structure and properties of carbon black particles were investigated using atomic force microscopy, gas adsorption, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Supplementary information was obtained using TEM and neutron scattering. The AFM imaging of carbon black aggregates provided qualitative visual information on their morphology, complementary to that obtained by 3-D modeling based on TEM images. Our studies showed that carbon black aggregates were relatively flat. The surface of all untreated carbon black particles was found to be rough and its fractal dimension was 2.2. Heating reduced the roughness and fractal dimension for all samples heat treated at above 1300 K to 2.0. Once the samples were heat treated rapid cooling did not affect the surface roughness. However, rapid cooling reduced crystallite sizes, and different Raman spectra were obtained for carbon blacks of various history of heat treatment. By analyzing the Raman spectra we determined the crystallite sizes and identified amorphous carbon. The concentration of amorphous carbon depends on hydrogen content. Once hydrogen was liberated at increased temperature, the concentration of amorphous carbon was reduced and crystallites started to grow. Properties of carbon blacks at high pressure were also studied. Hydrostatic pressure did not affect the size of the crystallites in carbon black particles. The pressure induced shift in Raman frequency of the graphitic component was a result of increased intermolecular forces and not smaller crystallites. Two methods of determining the fractal dimension, the FHH model and the yardstick technique based on the BET theory were used in the literature. Our study proved that the FHH model is sensitive to numerous assumptions and leads to wrong conclusions. On the other hand the yardstick method gave correct results, which agreed with the AFM results.

  2. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass-based materials for structural and functional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna; Bernardo, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass-based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass-ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica-rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron-rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass-based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste-derived glasses into glass-ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low-cost alternative for glass-ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up-to-date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste-derived, glass-based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass‐based materials for structural and functional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass‐based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass‐ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica‐rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron‐rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass‐based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste‐derived glasses into glass‐ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low‐cost alternative for glass‐ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up‐to‐date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste‐derived, glass‐based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27818564

  4. Fullerenes, nanotubes, onions and related carbon structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, C N.R.; Seshadri, Ram; Govindaraj, A; Sen, Rahul [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, CSIR Centre of Excellence in Chemistry and Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    1995-12-01

    Fullerenes, containing five- and six-membered carbon rings, of which C{sub 6}0 and C{sub 7}0 are the prominent members, exhibit phase transitions associated with orientational ordering. When C{sub 6}0 is suitably doped with electrons, it shows novel superconducting and magnetic properties. We review these and other properties of fullerenes in bulk or in film form along with the preparative and structural aspects. Carbon nanotubes and onions (hyperfullerenes) are the other forms of carbon whose material properties have aroused considerable interest. Besides discussing these new forms of carbon, we briefly introduce other possible forms, such as those involving five-, six- and seven-membered rings and hybrids between diamond and graphite

  5. Poly(ethylenimine)-Functionalized Monolithic Alumina Honeycomb Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Yoo, Chun-Jae; Tan, Shuai; Rashidi, Fereshteh; Jones, Christopher W

    2016-07-21

    The development of practical and effective gas-solid contactors is an important area in the development of CO2 capture technologies. Target CO2 capture applications, such as postcombustion carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from power plant flue gases or CO2 extraction directly from ambient air (DAC), require high flow rates of gas to be processed at low cost. Extruded monolithic honeycomb structures, such as those employed in the catalytic converters of automobiles, have excellent potential as structured contactors for CO2 adsorption applications because of the low pressure drop imposed on fluid moving through the straight channels of such structures. Here, we report the impregnation of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), an effective aminopolymer reported commonly for CO2 separation, into extruded monolithic alumina to form structured CO2 sorbents. These structured sorbents are first prepared on a small scale, characterized thoroughly, and compared with powder sorbents with a similar composition. Despite consistent differences observed in the filling of mesopores with PEI between the monolithic and powder sorbents, their performance in CO2 adsorption is similar across a range of PEI contents. A larger monolithic cylinder (1 inch diameter, 4 inch length) is evaluated under conditions closer to those that might be used in large-scale applications and shows a similar performance to the smaller monoliths and powders tested initially. This larger structure is evaluated over five cycles of CO2 adsorption and steam desorption and demonstrates a volumetric capacity of 350 molCO2  m-3monolith and an equilibration time of 350 min under a 0.4 m s(-1) linear flow velocity through the monolith channels using 400 ppm CO2 in N2 as the adsorption gas at 30 °C. This volumetric capacity surpasses that of a similar technology considered previously, which suggested that CO2 could be removed from air at an operating cost as low as $100 per ton. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag

  6. Fire resistance of prefabricated monolithic slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravit Marina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A prefabricated monolithic slab (PMS has a number of valuable advantages, they allow to significantly decrease the weight of construction keeping the necessary structural-load capacity, to speed up and cheapen work conduction, to increase the heat isolating properties of an enclosure structure [1]. In order to create a design method of prefabricated monolithic slab fire-resistance, it's necessary to perform a series of PMS testing, one of which is being described in this article. Subjected to the test is a fragment of prefabricated monolithic slab with polystyrene concrete inserts along the beams with bent metal profile 250 mm thick, with a 2.7 m span loaded with evenly spread load equal to 600 kg/m2. After 3 hour testing for fire-resistance [2] no signs of construction ultimate behavior were detected.

  7. Carbon-carbon primary structure for SSTO vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croop, Harold C.; Lowndes, Holland B.

    1997-01-01

    A hot structures development program is nearing completion to validate use of carbon-carbon composite structure for primary load carrying members in a single-stage-to-orbit, or SSTO, vehicle. A four phase program was pursued which involved design development and fabrication of a full-scale wing torque box demonstration component. The design development included vehicle and component selection, design criteria and approach, design data development, demonstration component design and analysis, test fixture design and analysis, demonstration component test planning, and high temperature test instrumentation development. The fabrication effort encompassed fabrication of structural elements for mechanical property verification as well as fabrication of the demonstration component itself and associated test fixturing. The demonstration component features 3D woven graphite preforms, integral spars, oxidation inhibited matrix, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC oxidation protection coating, and ceramic matrix composite fasteners. The demonstration component has been delivered to the United States Air Force (USAF) for testing in the Wright Laboratory Structural Test Facility, WPAFB, OH. Multiple thermal-mechanical load cycles will be applied simulating two atmospheric cruise missions and one orbital mission. This paper discusses the overall approach to validation testing of the wing box component and presents some preliminary analytical test predictions.

  8. Carbon nanotube-based benzyl polymethacrylate composite monolith as a solid phase extraction adsorbent and a stationary phase material for simultaneous extraction and analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rifai, Asma'a; Aqel, Ahmad; Wahibi, Lamya Al; ALOthman, Zeid A; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed-Yacine

    2018-02-02

    A composite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes incorporated into a benzyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate porous monolith was prepared, characterized and used as solid phase adsorbent and as stationary phase for simultaneous extraction and separation of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, followed by nano-liquid chromatography analysis. The extraction and chromatographic parameters were optimized with regard to the extraction efficiency and the quality of chromatographic analytes separation. Under the optimized conditions, all PAHs were separated in 13 min with suitable resolution values (Rs = 1.74-3.98). Addition of a small amount of carbon nanotubes (0.1% with respect to monomers) to the polymerization mixture increased the efficiency for the separation column to over 41,700 plates m -1 for chrysene at flow rate of 0.5 μL min -1 . The method showed a wide linear range (1-500 μg L -1 with R 2 more than 0.9938), acceptable extraction repeatability (RSDs extraction cartridges) and satisfactory detection limits (0.02-0.22 μg L -1 ). Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples. After a simple extraction procedure with preconcentration factor equal to 100, the average recovery values in ultra-pure, tap and sea water samples were found to be in the range 81.3-95.4% with %RSD less than 6.4. Again, the presence of carbon nanotubes (0.3% relatively to monomers) in native polymer enhanced the extraction performance for the solid phase adsorbent up to 78.4%. The application of the monoliths modified with CNTs in extraction and nano-scale liquid chromatography for analysis of environmental samples offered several advantages; it demonstrated an acceptable precision, low detection limits, good reproducibility, satisfying recoveries and wide dynamic linear ranges. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Method of making improved gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Knoxville, TN

    2002-11-05

    A method of making an adsorbent carbon fiber based monolith having improved methane gas storage capabilities is disclosed. Additionally, the monolithic nature of the storage carbon allows it to exhibit greater thermal conductivity than conventional granular activated carbon or powdered activated carbon storage beds. The storage of methane gas is achieved through the process of physical adsorption in the micropores that are developed in the structure of the adsorbent monolith. The disclosed monolith is capable of storing greater than 150 V/V of methane [i.e., >150 STP (101.325 KPa, 298K) volumes of methane per unit volume of storage vessel internal volume] at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi).

  10. New structural concept for carbonized coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzec, A. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Gliwice (Poland). Inst. of Coal Chemistry

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study was to present a model of structure for solid products of bituminous coal carbonization carried out at end temperatures (ETCs) in the 600-750{degree}C range. The products are of interest since they are used as raw materials for production of activated carbons. Moreover a layer of such products occurring in coke ovens seems to play a crucial role in generation of excessive coking pressure in industrial coking. The experimental data used in modeling were derived from the following: carbonization studies of coals and individual aromatic hydrocarbons, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry, and electrical resistivity measurements. The final step of model preparation relied on application of computational chemistry for search of stable conformers and for calculations of molecular orbitals. According to the model, semicokes contain two structural components: (1) oligomers that form nonplanar 3D networks of aromatic clusters (an extended system of conjugated {pi}-orbitals unites clusters of the networks despite the fact they are not coplanar) and (2) planar aggregates that arise from products of dehydrocyclization reaction (the aggregates fill space between oligomeric networks). The two structural components represent optically isotropic and anisotropic phases, respectively. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Structural researches of carbonic fluid nanosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyzyma, O.A.; Tomchuk, A.V.; Avdeev, M.V.; Tropin, T.V.; Aksenov, V.L.; Korobov, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    The results of researches concerning the cluster state in a number of disperse carbonic materials that are widely used in modern applications, including fullerenes and detonation nanodiamonds, are reported. With the help of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) method, some basic aspects of clustering in such systems are elucidated. At the same time, for the most effective and reliable description of a cluster structure under various conditions, a complex analysis involving complementary experimental and calculation techniques is applied. The experimental aspects of SANS applications are emphasized, and a qualitatively new idea of the structure of analyzed systems is formulated

  12. Reinforcement of RC structure by carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissi B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, rehabilitation has been the subject of extensive research due to the increased spending on building maintenance work and restoration of built works. In all cases, it is essential to carry out methods of reinforcement or maintenance of structural elements, following an inspection analysis and methodology of a correct diagnosis. This research focuses on the calculation of the necessary reinforcement sections of carbon fiber for structural elements with reinforced concrete in order to improve their load bearing capacity and rigidity. The different results obtained reveal a considerable gain in resistance and deformation capacity of reinforced sections without significant increase in the weight of the rehabilitated elements.

  13. The chromospheric structure of cool carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luttermoser, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The temperature-density structure of the outer atmospheres of the N-type carbon stars are investigated through computer generated synthetic spectra from model atmospheres. The synthetic spectra are compared to spectra obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spacecraft and ground-based photometry. The nature of the severe violet flux falloff seen in cool carbon stars is investigated through photospheric synthetic flux calculations with the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). A new candidate for the unknown opacity source that causes this flux falloff is proposed-a preponderance of neutral metal bound-bound and bound-free transitions from low energy states. The chromospheric structure of these stars is also investigated through a semi-empirical modeling technique. Such a technique involves attaching a chromospheric temperature rise to a radiative equilibrium model photosphere and generating a synthetic spectrum of chromospheric spectral lines using non-LTE radiative transfer. The chromospheric temperature-density structure is then altered until the synthetic spectrum matches the IUE observations of the singly ionized magnesium resonance lines and the intercombination lines of singly ionized carbon. Through the above mentioned non-LTE analysis of the atmospheric structure of these stars, the excitation and ionization equilibria are investigated. The excited levels of H I, C I, Na I, Mg I, and Ca I are over-populated with respect to LTE in the middle and upper photosphere of these stars, and all are over-ionized with respect to LTE. Photons from the chromosphere greatly influence the excitation and ionization of H I, C I, and Mg I

  14. Structurally uniform and atomically precise carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Yasutomo; Ito, Hideto; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Nanometre-sized carbon materials consisting of benzene units oriented in unique geometric patterns, hereafter named nanocarbons, conduct electricity, absorb and emit light, and exhibit interesting magnetic properties. Spherical fullerene C60, cylindrical carbon nanotubes and sheet-like graphene are representative forms of nanocarbons, and theoretical simulations have predicted several exotic 3D nanocarbon structures. At present, synthetic routes to nanocarbons mainly lead to mixtures of molecules with a range of different structures and properties, which cannot be easily separated or refined into pure forms. Some researchers believe that it is impossible to synthesize these materials in a precise manner. Obtaining ‘pure’ nanocarbons is a great challenge in the field of nanocarbon science, and the construction of structurally uniform nanocarbons, ideally as single molecules, is crucial for the development of functional materials in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and biomedical applications. This Review highlights the organic chemistry approach — more specifically, bottom-up construction with atomic precision — that is currently the most promising strategy towards this end.

  15. Energy structure of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byszewski, P.; Kowalska, E.

    1997-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of C 60 can be reasonably well reproduced theoretically with the use of the quantum chemistry calculation methods. It allows investigation of the influence of a deformation of C 60 on the absorption spectrum. The deformation of the electronic density on C 60 can occur under the influence of molecules of good solvent. Similar calculations of the energetic structure of carbon nanotubes does not support the idea that their chirality may strongly influence the energy levels distribution, in particular that it may open the energy gap of nanotubes. (author). 40 refs, 13 figs, 1 tab

  16. Determining the structure of Carbon-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wif, D.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon-60 is the most stable and best known of the carbon cage structures known collectively as the fullerenes. It is a remarkable molecule that forms a fascinating solid. Although the molecular shape of C sub 6 sub 0 is familiar - it is simply the shape of a soccer ball with 12 pentagons and 20 hexagons - the manner in which it forms a crystal structure is by no means obvious. This talk will focus on the insights which neutron scattering at ISIS has brought to our understanding of solid C sub6 sub 0. At room temperature, the structure may be regarded as forming as essentially ideal cubic-close packed molecular b ubble-raft : each molecule is reorienting so rapidly that a time-averaged picture, over as little as a nanosecond, reveals a closely spherical shell of atomic density. At 260 K, a rather unusual structural transition occurs. The molecules order but still retain cubic symmetry. Although this may not appear to be a rather dramatic change, detailed considerations show that a profound transition has occurred that bears close similarities to a solid-liquid phase transition but in two dimensions. Below 260 K, reorientation still occurs but at a dramatically reduced rate as the temperature is lowered. Indeed at around 90 K, The reorientation is so slow that thermodynamic equilibrium cannot be achieved in a reasonable timescale an orientational glass transition occurs. Although the behaviour of solid C sub 6 sub 0 undergoes dramatic changes as a function of temperature, a coherent description has evolved in which neutron scattering plays a central role. Close analogies are to be found in the study of systems as diverse as solid H sub 2 and human-rhinovirus structures. These analogies and the central role played by neutron scattering at ISIS will be emphasised in this paper. 5 figs., 10 refs. (author)

  17. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-01-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also. ((orig.))

  18. Safety characteristics of the monolithic CFC divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-09-01

    The main distinguishing feature of the monolithic CFC divertor is the use of a single material, a carbon fibre reinforced carbon, for the protective armour, the heat sink and the cooling channels. This removes joint interface problems which are one of the most important concerns related to the reference solutions of the ITER CDA divertor. An activation analysis of the different coolant options for this concept is presented. It turns out that neither short-term nor long-term activation are a concern for any coolants investigated. Therefore the proposed concept proves to be attractive from a safety stand-point also.

  19. Monolith electroplating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarrwal, Rajev R.

    2001-01-01

    An electroplating process for preparing a monolith metal layer over a polycrystalline base metal and the plated monolith product. A monolith layer has a variable thickness of one crystal. The process is typically carried in molten salts electrolytes, such as the halide salts under an inert atmosphere at an elevated temperature, and over deposition time periods and film thickness sufficient to sinter and recrystallize completely the nucleating metal particles into one single crystal or crystals having very large grains. In the process, a close-packed film of submicron particle (20) is formed on a suitable substrate at an elevated temperature. The temperature has the significance of annealing particles as they are formed, and substrates on which the particles can populate are desirable. As the packed bed thickens, the submicron particles develop necks (21) and as they merge into each other shrinkage (22) occurs. Then as micropores also close (23) by surface tension, metal density is reached and the film consists of unstable metal grain (24) that at high enough temperature recrystallize (25) and recrystallized grains grow into an annealed single crystal over the electroplating time span. While cadmium was used in the experimental work, other soft metals may be used.

  20. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using ... The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental ... ordinary mechanical strength.

  1. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO 2 and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N 2 . The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO 4 , I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the 2 durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form

  2. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  3. Nano-Doped Monolithic Materials for Molecular Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Acquah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoliths are continuous adsorbents that can easily be synthesised to possess tuneable meso-/macropores, convective fluid transport, and a plethora of chemistries for ligand immobilisation. They are grouped into three main classes: organic, inorganic, and hybrid, based on their chemical composition. These classes may also be differentiated by their unique morphological and physicochemical properties which are significantly relevant to their specific separation applications. The potential applications of monoliths for molecular separation have created the need to enhance their characteristic properties including mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and chemical and thermal stability. An effective approach towards monolith enhancement has been the doping and/or hybridization with miniaturized molecular species of desirable functionalities and characteristics. Nanoparticles are usually preferred as dopants due to their high solid phase dispersion features which are associated with improved intermolecular adsorptive interactions. Examples of such nanomaterials include, but are not limited to, carbon-based, silica-based, gold-based, and alumina nanoparticles. The incorporation of these nanoparticles into monoliths via in situ polymerisation and/or post-modification enhances surface adsorption for activation and ligand immobilisation. Herein, insights into the performance enhancement of monoliths as chromatographic supports by nanoparticles doping are presented. In addition, the potential and characteristics of less common nanoparticle materials such as hydroxyapatite, ceria, hafnia, and germania are discussed. The advantages and challenges of nanoparticle doping of monoliths are also discussed.

  4. Microwaves integrated circuits: hybrids and monolithics - fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Pinto, J.K. da

    1983-01-01

    Several types of microwave integrated circuits are presented together with comments about technologies and fabrication processes; advantages and disadvantages in their utilization are analysed. Basic structures, propagation modes, materials used and major steps in the construction of hybrid thin film and monolithic microwave integrated circuits are described. Important technological applications are revised and main activities of the microelectronics lab. of the University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) in the field of hybrid and monolithic microwave integrated circuits are summarized. (C.L.B.) [pt

  5. Structural properties of water around uncharged and charged carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfoli, Amir Reza Ansari; Mehrabian, Mozaffar Ali; Rafsanjani, Hassan Hashemipour

    2013-01-01

    Studying the structural properties of water molecules around the carbon nanotubes is very important in a wide variety of carbon nanotubes applications. We studied the number of hydrogen bonds, oxygen and hydrogen density distributions, and water orientation around carbon nanotubes. The water density distribution for all carbon nanotubes was observed to have the same feature. In water-carbon nanotubes interface, a high-density region of water molecules exists around carbon nanotubes. The results reveal that the water orientation around carbon nanotubes is roughly dependent on carbon nanotubes surface charge. The water molecules in close distances to carbon nanotubes were found to make an HOH plane nearly perpendicular to the water-carbon nanotubes interface for carbon nanotubes with negative surface charge. For uncharged carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes with positive surface charge, the HOH plane was in tangential orientation with water-carbon nanotubes interface. There was also a significant reduction in hydrogen bond of water region around carbon nanotubes as compared with hydrogen bond in bulk water. This reduction was very obvious for carbon nanotubes with positive surface charge. In addition, the calculation of dynamic properties of water molecules in water-CNT interface revealed that there is a direct relation between the number of Hbonds and self-diffusion coefficient of water molecules

  6. Tunable compact mechanical monolithic sensors for linear and angular large band low-frequency monitoring and characterization of sites and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present monolithic implementations of tunable mechanical seismometers and accelerometers (horizontal, vertical and angular) based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum configuration, characterized by large measurement band 10-7 ÷ 1 kHz, sensitivity down to ≈ 10-15 m/√ Hz, high directivity > 104 , low weight engineering, seismology, geophysics, civil engineering (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.), space (inertial guide).

  7. Porous polymer monolithic col

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Terborg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new approach has been developed for the preparation of mixed-mode stationary phases to separate proteins. The pore surface of monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate capillary columns was functionalized with thiols and coated with gold nanoparticles. The final mixed mode surface chemistry was formed by attaching, in a single step, alkanethiols, mercaptoalkanoic acids, and their mixtures on the free surface of attached gold nanoparticles. Use of these mixtures allowed fine tuning of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. The amount of attached gold nanoparticles according to thermal gravimetric analysis was 44.8 wt.%. This value together with results of frontal elution enabled calculation of surface coverage with the alkanethiol and mercaptoalkanoic acid ligands. Interestingly, alkanethiols coverage in a range of 4.46–4.51 molecules/nm2 significantly exceeded that of mercaptoalkanoic acids with 2.39–2.45 molecules/nm2. The mixed mode character of these monolithic stationary phases was for the first time demonstrated in the separations of proteins that could be achieved in the same column using gradient elution conditions typical of reverse phase (using gradient of acetonitrile in water and ion exchange chromatographic modes (applying gradient of salt in water, respectively.

  8. Plant oil-based shape memory polymer using acrylic monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsujimoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the synthesis of a plant oil-based material using acrylic monolith. An acrylic monolith bearing oxirane groups was prepared via simple technique that involved the dissolution of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-comethyl methacrylate (PGMA in ethanolic – aqueous solution by heating and subsequent cooling. The PGMA monolith had topologically porous structure, which was attributed to the phase separation of the polymer solution. The PGMA monolith was impregnated by epoxidized soybean oil (ESO containing thermally-latent catalyst, and the subsequent curing produced a crosslinked material with relatively good transparency. The Young’s modulus and the tensile strength of polyESO/PGMA increased compared with the ESO homopolymer. The strain at break of polyESO/PGMA was larger than that of the ESO homopolymer and crosslinked PGMA. Furthermore, polyESO/PGMA exhibited good shape memory-recovery behavior.

  9. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  10. Fracture-resistant monolithic dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self-consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  11. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF PATENTED HIGH-CARBON WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ju. Borisenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of bainite structure on mechanical characteristics of wire of steel 80 after patenting is studied. The quantity and structure state of bainite, providing high complex of mechanical characteristics of high-carbon wire, is determined.

  12. Test of the TRAPPISTe monolithic detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung Yee, L.; Álvarez, P.; Martin, E.; Cortina, E.; Ferrer, C.

    2013-12-01

    A monolithic pixel detector named TRAPPISTe-2 has been developed in Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. A p-n junction is implanted in the bottom handle wafer and connected to readout electronics integrated in the top active layer. The two parts are insulated from each other by a buried oxide layer resulting in a monolithic detector. Two small pixel matrices have been fabricated: one containing a 3-transistor readout and a second containing a charge sensitive amplifier readout. These two readout structures have been characterized and the pixel matrices were tested with an infrared laser source. The readout circuits are adversely affected by the backgate effect, which limits the voltage that can be applied to the metal back plane to deplete the sensor, thus narrowing the depletion width of the sensor. Despite the low depletion voltages, the integrated pixel matrices were able to respond to and track a laser source.

  13. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites: Structure and property effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation tokamak reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require high thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites and other materials, such as beryllium, to protect their plasma facing components from the anticipated high heat fluxes. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce a large neutron flux. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HAIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORAL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (da) at an irradiation temperature of ∼600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated here included unidirectional, two- directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Irradiation induced dimensional changes are reported for the materials and related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, carbon-carbon composite material dimensional changes are discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. Neutron irradiation induced reductions in the thermal conductivity of two, three-directional carbon-carbon composites are reported, and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is demonstrated. Irradiation induced strength changes are reported for several carbon-carbon composite materials and are explained in terms of in-crystal and composite structural effects

  14. Carbon nano structures: Production and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig Agha, Rosa

    L'objectif de ce memoire est de preparer et de caracteriser des nanostructures de carbone (CNS -- Carbon Nanostructures, en licence a l'Institut de recherche sur l'hydrogene, Quebec, Canada), un carbone avec un plus grand degre de graphitisation et une meilleure porosite. Le Chapitre 1 est une description generale des PEMFCs (PEMFC -- Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell) et plus particulierement des CNS comme support de catalyseurs, leur synthese et purification. Le Chapitre 2 decrit plus en details la methode de synthese et la purification des CNS, la theorie de formation des nanostructures et les differentes techniques de caracterisation que nous avons utilises telles que la diffraction aux rayons-X (XRD -- X-ray diffraction), la microscopie electronique a transmission (TEM -- transmission electron microscope ), la spectroscopie Raman, les isothermes d'adsorption d'azote a 77 K (analyse BET, t-plot, DFT), l'intrusion au mercure, et l'analyse thermogravimetrique (TGA -- thermogravimetric analysis). Le Chapitre 3 presente les resultats obtenus a chaque etape de la synthese des CNS et avec des echantillons produits a l'aide d'un broyeur de type SPEXRTM (SPEX/CertiPrep 8000D) et d'un broyeur de type planetaire (Fritsch Pulverisette 5). La difference essentielle entre ces deux types de broyeur est la facon avec laquelle les materiaux sont broyes. Le broyeur de type SPEX secoue le creuset contenant les materiaux et des billes d'acier selon 3 axes produisant ainsi des impacts de tres grande energie. Le broyeur planetaire quant a lui fait tourner et deplace le creuset contenant les materiaux et des billes d'acier selon 2 axes (plan). Les materiaux sont donc broyes differemment et l'objectif est de voir si les CNS produits ont les memes structures et proprietes. Lors de nos travaux nous avons ete confrontes a un probleme majeur. Nous n'arrivions pas a reproduire les CNS dont la methode de synthese a originellement ete developpee dans les laboratoires de l'Institut de

  15. Monolitni katalizatori i reaktori: osnovne značajke, priprava i primjena (Monolith catalysts and reactors: preparation and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašić, V.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic (honeycomb catalysts are continuous unitary structures containing many narrow, parallel and usually straight channels (or passages. Catalytically active components are dispersed uniformly over the whole porous ceramic monolith structure (so-called incorporated monolithic catalysts or are in a layer of porous material that is deposited on the walls of channels in the monolith's structure (washcoated monolithic catalysts. The material of the main monolithic construction is not limited to ceramics but includes metals, as well. Monolithic catalysts are commonly used in gas phase catalytic processes, such as treatment of automotive exhaust gases, selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides, catalytic removal of volatile organic compounds from industrial processes, etc. Monoliths continue to be the preferred support for environmental applications due to their high geometric surface area, different design options, low pressure drop, high temperature durability, mechanical strength, ease of orientation in a reactor and effectiveness as a support for a catalytic washcoat. As known, monolithic catalysts belong to the class of the structured catalysts and/or reactors (in some cases the distinction between "catalyst" and "reactor" has vanished. Structured catalysts can greatly intensify chemical processes, resulting in smaller, safer, cleaner and more energy efficient technologies. Monolith reactors can be considered as multifunctional reactors, in which chemical conversion is advantageously integrated with another unit operation, such as separation, heat exchange, a secondary reaction, etc. Finally, structured catalysts and/or reactors appear to be one of the most significant and promising developments in the field of heterogeneous catalysis and chemical engineering of the recent years. This paper gives a description of the background and perspectives for application and development of monolithic materials. Different methods and techniques

  16. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  17. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  18. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  19. Polyurea-Based Aerogel Monoliths and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je Kyun

    2012-01-01

    aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection for government and commercial applications. The rubbery polyureabased aerogel exhibits little dustiness, good flexibility and toughness, and durability typical of the parent polyurea polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with aerogels. The thermal conductivity values of polyurea-based aerogels at lower temperature under vacuum pressures are very low and better than that of silica aerogels. Flexible, rubbery polyurea-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogels, including polyisocyanurate aerogels, which are generally prepared with the one similar component to polyurethane rubber aerogels. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structures, the polyurea rubber-based aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. The aerogel materials also demonstrate good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven to be one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible, silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain application environments. Although the cross - linked organic aerogels, such as resorcinol- formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels, show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient radiation shielding materials due

  20. New Insight into Carbon Nanotube Electronic Structure Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental role of aryl diazonium salts for post synthesis selectivity of carbon nanotubes is investigated using extensive electronic structure calculations. The resulting understanding for diazonium salt based selective separation of conducting and semiconducting carbon nanotubes shows how the primary contributions come from the interplay between the intrinsic electronic structure of the carbon nanotubes and that of the anion of the salt. We demonstrate how the electronic transport properties change upon the formation of charge transfer complexes and upon their conversion into covalently attached functional groups. Our results are found to correlate well with experiments and provide for the first time an atomistic description for diazonium salt based chemical separation of carbon nanotubes

  1. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mina, Aziz N; Awadallah, Attia A; Ahmed, Riham R; Phillips, Adel H

    2012-01-01

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model and LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  2. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed

  3. Observation of carbon growth and interface structures in methanol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Kimio

    2015-11-01

    In the deposition of carbon on the surface of a tungsten tip in methanol solution by electrolysis, the growth structure of the carbon films, the interface state, and the dissolution of carbon atoms into the tungsten matrix of the substrate have been investigated with the atomic events by field ion microscopy (FIM). The carbon films preferentially condense on the W{111} plane. The interfacial reaction at the carbon atom-tungsten substrate interface is vigorous and the carbon atoms also readily dissolve into the substrate matrix to form a tungsten-carbon complex. The reaction depth of the deposited carbon depends on the magnitude of electrolytic current and the treatment duration in the methanol solution. In this work, the resolution depth of carbon was found to be approximately 270 atomic layers below the top layer of the tungsten substrate by a field evaporation technique. In the case of a low electrolytic current, the tungsten substrate surface is entirely covered with carbon atoms having a pseudomorphic structure. The field-electron emission characteristics were also evaluated for various coverages of the carbon film formed on the substrate.

  4. Fabrication of C60/amorphous carbon superlattice structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2001-01-01

    The nitrogen doping effects in C 60 films by RF plasma source was investigated, and it was found that the nitrogen ion bombardment broke up C 60 molecules and changed them into amorphous carbon. Based on these results, formation of C 60 /amorphous carbon superlattice structure was proposed. The periodic structure of the resulted films was confirmed by XRD measurements, as the preliminary results of fabrication of the superlattice structure

  5. Characterization of SOI monolithic detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Rengifo, P. L.; Soung Yee, L.; Martin, E.; Cortina, E.; Ferrer, C.

    2013-12-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor for charged particle tracking was developed. This research is performed within the framework of an R&D project called TRAPPISTe (Tracking Particles for Physics Instrumentation in SOI Technology) whose aim is to evaluate the feasibility of developing a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) with Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. Two chips were fabricated: TRAPPISTe-1 and TRAPPISTe-2. TRAPPISTe-1 was produced at the WINFAB facility at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Belgium, in a 2 μm fully depleted (FD-SOI) CMOS process. TRAPPISTe-2 was fabricated with the LAPIS 0.2 μm FD-SOI CMOS process. The electrical characterization on single transistor test structures and of the electronic readout for the TRAPPISTe series of monolithic pixel detectors was carried out. The behavior of the prototypes’ electronics as a function of the back voltage was studied. Results showed that both readout circuits exhibited sensitivity to the back voltage. Despite this unwanted secondary effect, the responses of TRAPPISTe-2 amplifiers can be improved by a variation in the circuit parameters.

  6. Structure and Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Deposited by PACVD Technique on Light Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tański T.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations presented in this paper describe surface treatment performed on samples of heat-treated cast magnesium and aluminium alloy. The structure and chemical composition as well as the functional and mechanical properties of the obtained gradient/monolithic films were analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, the ball-on-disk tribotester and scratch testing. Moreover, investigation of the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of the samples was carried out by means of potentiodynamic polarisation curves in 1-M NaCl solution. The coatings produced by chemical vapour deposition did not reveal any delamination or defects and they adhere closely to the substrate. The coating thickness was in a range of up to 2.5 microns. Investigations using Raman spectra of the DLC films confirmed a multiphase character of the diamond-like carbon layer, revealing the sp2 and sp3 electron hybridisation responsible for both the hardness and the friction coefficient. The best wear resistance test results were obtained for the magnesium alloy substrate - AZ61, for which the measured value of the friction path length was equal to 630 m.

  7. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-12-22

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

  8. Structure and photoluminescence of films composed of carbon nanoflakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi, E-mail: wangyi@cqut.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd, Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054, P R China (China); Li, Lin [College of Chemistry, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing 401331, P R China (China); Cheng, Qijin [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, P R China (China); He, Chunlin [Liaoning Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Shenyang University, Shenyang 110044, P R China (China)

    2015-05-15

    Carbon nanoflake films (CNFFs) were directly synthesized by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The results of field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, micro-Raman spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope indicate that the CNFFs are composed of bending carbon nanoflakes with the hydrocarbon and hydroxyl functional groups, and the carbon nanoflakes become thin in a long deposition time. The structural change of carbon nanoflakes is related to the formation of structural units and the aggregation of hydrocarbon radicals near the carbon nanoflakes. Moreover, the photoluminescence (PL) properties of CNFFs were studied in a Ramalog system and a PL spectroscope. The PL results indicate that the PL intensity of CNFFs is lowered with the increase of thickness of CNFFs. The lowering of PL intensity for the thick CNFFs originates from the effect of more dangling bonds in the CNFFs. In addition, we studied the structural difference of carbon nanoflakes grown by different CVD systems and the PL difference of carbon nanoflakes in different measurement systems. The results achieved here are important to control the growth and structure of graphene-based materials and fabricate the optoelectronic devices related to carbon-based materials. - Highlights: • Carbon nanoflake films (CNFFs) were synthesized by PEHFCVD. • The structure of CNFFs is related to the aggregation of carbon hydrocarbon radicals. • The PL intensity of CNFFs is lowered with the thickness increase of CNFFs. • The change of PL intensity of CNFFs is due to the dangling bonds in CNFFs. • The widening of PL bands of CNFFs results from the diversity of carbon nanofalkes.

  9. Preparation of porous carbon particle with shell/core structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous carbon particles with a shell/core structure have been prepared successfully by controlled precipitation of the polymer from droplets of oil-in-water emulsion, followed by curing and carbonization. The droplets of the oil phase are composed of phenolic resin (PFR, a good solvent (ethyl acetate and porogen (Poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA. The microstructure was characterized in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nitrogen adsorption, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The obtained carbon particles have a capsular structure with a microporous carbon shell and a mesoporous carbon core. The BET surface area and porous volume are calculated to be 499 m2g-1 and 0.56 cm3g-1, respectively. The effects of the amount of porogen (PMMA, co-solvent (acetone and surfactant on the resultant structure were studied in detail.

  10. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study ...

  11. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Robbins, J.M.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  12. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of radial heat transfer of monoliths in small-scale steam methane reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Xiaoti; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2018-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts have received increasing attention for application in the small-scale steam methane reforming process. The radial heat transfer behaviors of monolith reformers were analyzed by two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. A parameter study was conducted...... by a large number of simulations focusing on the thermal conductivity of the monolith substrate, washcoat layer, wall gap, radiation heat transfer and the geometric parameters (cell density, porosity and diameter of monolith). The effective radial thermal conductivity of the monolith structure, kr......,eff, showed good agreement with predictions made by the pseudo-continuous symmetric model. This influence of the radiation heat transfer is low for highly conductive monoliths. A simplified model has been developed to evaluate the importance of radiation for monolithic reformers under different conditions...

  13. Development of high-throughput analysis system using highly-functional organic polymer monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemura, Tomonari; Kojima, Norihisa; Ueki, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    The growing demand for high-throughput analysis in the current competitive life sciences and industries has promoted the development of high-speed HPLC techniques and tools. As one of such tools, monolithic columns have attracted increasing attention and interest in the last decade due to the low flow-resistance and excellent mass transfer, allowing for rapid separations and reactions at high flow rates with minimal loss of column efficiency. Monolithic materials are classified into two main groups: silica- and organic polymer-based monoliths, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Organic polymer monoliths have several distinct advantages in life-science research, including wide pH stability, less irreversible adsorption, facile preparation and modification. Thus, we have so far tried to develop organic polymer monoliths for various chemical operations, such as separation, extraction, preconcentration, and reaction. In the present paper, recent progress in the development of organic polymer monoliths is discussed. Especially, the procedure for the preparation of methacrylate-based monoliths with various functional groups is described, where the influence of different compositional and processing parameters on the monolithic structure is also addressed. Furthermore, the performance of the produced monoliths is demonstrated through the results for (1) rapid separations of alklybenzenes at high flow rates, (2) flow-through enzymatic digestion of cytochrome c on a trypsin-immobilized monolithic column, and (3) separation of the tryptic digest on a reversed-phase monolithic column. The flexibility and versatility of organic polymer monoliths will be beneficial for further enhancing analytical performance, and will open the way for new applications and opportunities both in scientific and industrial research. (author)

  14. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.; Babaa, M.-R.; Bouhrara, M.; Kim, Y.; Saih, Y.; Dennler, S.; Mauri, F.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Goze-Bac, C.; Wå gberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled

  15. Industrial structural transformation and carbon dioxide emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Junpeng

    2013-01-01

    Using provincial panel data from the period 1995–2009 to analyze the relationship between the industrial structural transformation and carbon dioxide emissions in China, we find that the first-order lag of industrial structural adjustment effectively reduced the emissions; technical progress itself did not reduce the emissions, but indirectly led to decreasing emissions through the upgrading and optimization of industrial structure. Foreign direct investment and intervention by local governments reduced carbon dioxide emissions, but urbanization significantly increased the emissions. Thus, industrial structural adjustment is an important component of the development of a low-carbon economy. In the context of industrial structural transformation, an effective way to reduce a region’s carbon dioxide emissions is to promote the upgrading and optimization of industrial structure through technical progress. Tighter environmental access policies, selective utilization of foreign direct investment, and improvements in energy efficiency can help to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. - Highlights: ► Relationship between the transformation of industrial structure and CO 2 emissions in China. ► Dynamic panel data model. ► Industrial structural adjustments can effectively reduce current CO 2 emissions. ► Technical progress leads to decreasing CO 2 emissions through upgrading of industrial structure

  16. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube cross-bar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, William J; Keblinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) to compute the thermal conductivity (κ) of orthogonally ordered cross-bar structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Such structures exhibit extremely low thermal conductivity in the range of 0.02-0.07 W m -1 K -1 . These values are five orders of magnitude smaller than the axial thermal conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes, and are comparable to the thermal conductivity of still air.

  17. Electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doore, Keith; Cook, Matthew; Clausen, Eric; Lukashev, Pavel V; Kidd, Tim E; Stollenwerk, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Despite an enormous amount of research on carbon based nanostructures, relatively little is known about the electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes, also known as carbon onions. In part, this is due to the very high computational expense involved in estimating electronic structure of large molecules. At the same time, experimentally, the exact crystal structure of the carbon onion is usually unknown, and therefore one relies on qualitative arguments only. In this work we present the results of a computational study on a series of multi-walled fullerenes and compare their electronic structures to experimental data. Experimentally, the carbon onions were fabricated using ultrasonic agitation of isopropanol alcohol and deposited onto the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using a drop cast method. Scanning tunneling microscopy images indicate that the carbon onions produced using this technique are ellipsoidal with dimensions on the order of 10 nm. The majority of differential tunneling spectra acquired on individual carbon onions are similar to that of graphite with the addition of molecular-like peaks, indicating that these particles span the transition between molecules and bulk crystals. A smaller, yet sizable number exhibited a semiconducting gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) levels. These results are compared with the electronic structure of different carbon onion configurations calculated using first-principles. Similar to the experimental results, the majority of these configurations are metallic with a minority behaving as semiconductors. Analysis of the configurations investigated here reveals that each carbon onion exhibiting an energy band gap consisted only of non-metallic fullerene layers, indicating that the interlayer interaction is not significant enough to affect the total density of states in these structures. (paper)

  18. Carbon-carbon mirrors for exoatmospheric and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumweide, Duane E.; Wonacott, Gary D.; Woida, Patrick M.; Woida, Rigel Q.; Shih, Wei

    2007-09-01

    The cost and leadtime associated with beryllium has forced the MDA and other defense agencies to look for alternative materials with similar structural and thermal properties. The use of carbon-carbon material, specifically in optical components has been demonstrated analytically in prior SBIR work at San Diego Composites. Carbon-carbon material was chosen for its low in-plane and through-thickness CTE (athermal design), high specific stiffness, near-zero coefficient of moisture expansion, availability of material (specifically c-c honeycomb for lightweight substrates), and compatibility with silicon monoxide (SiO) and silicon dioxide (SiO II) coatings. Subsequent development work has produced shaped carbon-carbon sandwich substrates which have been ground, polished, coated and figured using traditional optical processing. Further development has also been done on machined monolithic carbon-carbon mirror substrates which have also been processed using standard optical finishing techniques.

  19. Mixed structures in continuously cooled low-carbon automotive steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, F.A.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1993-01-01

    Mixed microstructures have been studied in low- carbon microalloyed steels suitable for automotive applications, after continuous cooling from the hot-rolled condition. Microstructural features such as polygonal ferrite, bainitic and acicular ferrite and microphase constituent are identified using transmission electron microscopy. The influence of these mixed structures on the tensile strength, impact toughness and fracture behaviour is examined. It is found that improvements in impact toughness as compared with microalloyed medium- carbon ferrite/pearlite steels can be achieved from these predominantly acicular structures developed by controlling alloy composition and continuous cooling of these lower carbon steels. (orig.)

  20. Effect of Population Structure Change on Carbon Emission in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper expanded the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI model through the introduction of urbanization, residents’ consumption, and other factors, and decomposed carbon emission changes in China into carbon emission factor effect, energy intensity effect, consumption inhibitory factor effect, urbanization effect, residents’ consumption effect, and population scale effect, and then explored contribution rates and action mechanisms of the above six factors on change in carbon emissions in China. Then, the effect of population structure change on carbon emission was analyzed by taking 2003–2012 as a sample period, and combining this with the panel data of 30 provinces in China. Results showed that in 2003–2012, total carbon emission increased by 4.2117 billion tons in China. The consumption inhibitory factor effect, urbanization effect, residents’ consumption effect, and population scale effect promoted the increase in carbon emissions, and their contribution ratios were 27.44%, 12.700%, 74.96%, and 5.90%, respectively. However, the influence of carbon emission factor effect (−2.54% and energy intensity effect (−18.46% on carbon emissions were negative. Population urbanization has become the main population factor which affects carbon emission in China. The “Eastern aggregation” phenomenon caused the population scale effect in the eastern area to be significantly higher than in the central and western regions, but the contribution rate of its energy intensity effect (−11.10 million tons was significantly smaller than in the central (−21.61 million tons and western regions (−13.29 million tons, and the carbon emission factor effect in the central area (−3.33 million tons was significantly higher than that in the eastern (−2.00 million tons and western regions (−1.08 million tons. During the sample period, the change in population age structure, population education structure, and population occupation structure

  1. Calculation on uranium carbon oxygen system molecular structure by DFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangfeng; Wang Xiaolin; Zou Lexi; Sun Ying; Xue Weidong; Zhu Zhenghe; Wang Hongyan

    2001-01-01

    The authors study on the possible molecular structures U-C-O, U-O-C, C-U-O (angular structure C a nd linear structure C ∞υ ) of carbon monoxide interacting on uranium metal surface by Density functional theory (DFT). The uranium atom is used RECP (Relativistic Effective Core Potential) and contracted valence basis sets (6s5p2d4f)/[3s3p2d2f], and for carbon and oxygen atoms all are 6-311G basis sets. The author presents the results of energy optimum which shows that triple and quintuple state are more stable. The authors get the electronic state, geometry structure, energy, harmonic frequency, mechanical property, etc. of these twelve triple and quintuple state relative stable structures. The normal vibrational analytical figure of angular structure (C s ) and linear structure (C ∞υ ) is given at the same time. It is indicated that angular structure has lower energy than linear structure, moreover the angular structure of U-C-O( 3 A ) has the lowest energy. The bond strength between uranium atom and carbon monoxide is weak and between uranium atom and oxygen atom is slightly stronger than between uranium atom and carbon atom which the authors can know by superposition population and bond energy analysis among atoms

  2. Structure of Carbon Nanotube-dendrimer composite

    OpenAIRE

    Vasumathi, V.; Pramanik, Debabrata; Sood, A. K.; Maiti, Prabal K

    2012-01-01

    Using all atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we report the microscopic picture of the nanotube-dendrimer complex for PAMAM dendrimer of generation 2 to 4 and carbon nanotube of chirality (6,5). We find compact wrapping conformations of dendrimer onto the nanotube surface for all the three generations of PAMAM dendrimer. The degree of wrapping is more for non-protonated dendrimer compared to the protonated dendrimer. For comparison we also study the interaction of another dendrimer,...

  3. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Rutledge

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. The SMCF structure revealed agglomerates of swollen starch granules connected by a web of starch with pores in the 50-200 nanometer range. Heating the SMCF-fiber in a nitrogen atmosphere to temperatures between 350-700˚C produced carbon foams with a three-dimensional closed cell foam structure with cell diameters around 50 microns and pore walls around 1-3 microns. The stress versus strain compression data for carbonized samples displayed a linear elastic region and a plateau indicative of brittle crushing, typical of an elastic-brittle foam. The carbon foam products from these renew-able precursors are promising carbon structures with moderate strength and low density.

  4. Electronic and molecular structure of carbon grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almloef, Jan; Luethi, Hans-Peter

    1990-01-01

    Clusters of carbon atoms have been studied with large-scale ab initio calculations. Planar, single-sheet graphite fragments with 6 to 54 atoms were investigated, as well as the spherical C(sub 60) Buckminsterfullerene molecule. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have also been considered. Thermodynamic differences between diamond- and graphite-like grains have been studied in particular. Saturation of the peripheral bonds with hydrogen is found to provide a smooth and uniform convergence of the properties with increasing cluster size. For the graphite-like clusters the convergence to bulk values is much slower than for the three-dimensional complexes.

  5. Principles for structure analysis of carbon nanotubes by HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xudong, Fan; Bursill, L A

    1995-10-01

    An efficient algorithm is derived for generating all possible seamless carbon nanotube structure models. This makes use of multijugate helical lattices, a concept borrowed from some biological structures. Principles for helicity and structure analysis of carbon nanotubes using high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing techniques are then developed. Applicability is tested on experimentally obtained images. The limitations of this approach are examined. Provided the tubules contain less than three to five layers the individual component layer helicities and the order of assembly may be obtained from the high-resolution many-beam bright - and dark-field image reconstructions. 16 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Principles for structure analysis of carbon nanotubes by HRTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xudong; Bursill, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is derived for generating all possible seamless carbon nanotube structure models. This makes use of multijugate helical lattices, a concept borrowed from some biological structures. Principles for helicity and structure analysis of carbon nanotubes using high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing techniques are then developed. Applicability is tested on experimentally obtained images. The limitations of this approach are examined. Provided the tubules contain less than three to five layers the individual component layer helicities and the order of assembly may be obtained from the high-resolution many-beam bright - and dark-field image reconstructions. 16 refs., 11 figs

  7. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional carbon structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    by the packing density of the packed natural protein containing fibre structure (3) is obtained. The carbon structure (4) is well suited for use as a scaffold for tissue engineering, or for material for batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, sorbents for separation processes, gas storage, supports for many...

  8. Hierarchically structured nanoporous carbon tubes for high pressure carbon dioxide adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Patzsch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscopic, nanoporous carbon tubes were synthesized by a combination of the Stoeber process and the use of electrospun macrosized polystyrene fibres as structure directing templates. The obtained carbon tubes have a macroporous nature characterized by a thick wall structure and a high specific surface area of approximately 500 m²/g resulting from their micro- and mesopores. The micropore regime of the carbon tubes is composed of turbostratic graphitic areas observed in the microstructure. The employed templating process was also used for the synthesis of silicon carbide tubes. The characterization of all porous materials was performed by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The adsorption of carbon dioxide on the carbon tubes at 25 °C at pressures of up to 30 bar was studied using a volumetric method. At 26 bar, an adsorption capacity of 4.9 mmol/g was observed. This is comparable to the adsorption capacity of molecular sieves and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. The high pressure adsorption process of CO2 was found to irreversibly change the microporous structure of the carbon tubes.

  9. Monolithic Integrated Ceramic Waveguide Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, IC; Sandhu, MY

    2014-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled TEM filters with the same unloaded Q-Factor. Designs for both chebyshev and asymmetric generalized chebyshev filter are presented, with experimental results for an 1800 MHz chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  10. Bioinspired Synthesis of Monolithic and Layered Aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Hassan, Khalil T; Harvey, Alan; Kulijer, Dejan; Oila, Adrian; Hunt, Michael R C; Šiller, Lidija

    2018-04-25

    Aerogels are the least dense and most porous materials known to man, with potential applications from lightweight superinsulators to smart energy materials. To date their use has been seriously hampered by their synthesis methods, which are laborious and expensive. Taking inspiration from the life cycle of the damselfly, a novel ambient pressure-drying approach is demonstrated in which instead of employing low-surface-tension organic solvents to prevent pore collapse during drying, sodium bicarbonate solution is used to generate pore-supporting carbon dioxide in situ, significantly reducing energy, time, and cost in aerogel production. The generic applicability of this readily scalable new approach is demonstrated through the production of granules, monoliths, and layered solids with a number of precursor materials. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. All carbon coaxial supercapacitors based on hollow carbon nanotube sleeve structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Xiaobei; Xu, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Yangyang; Zhang, Li; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Xinming

    2015-01-01

    All carbon coaxial supercapacitors based on hollow carbon nanotube (CNT) sleeve structure are assembled and tested. The key advantage of the structure is that the inner core electrode is variable from CNT sleeve sponges, to CNT fibers, reduced graphene oxide fibers, and graphene woven fabrics. By changing core electrodes from sleeve sponges to CNT fibers, the electrochemical performance has been significantly enhanced. The capacitance based on sleeve sponge + CNT fiber double the capacitances of double-sleeve sponge supercapacitors thanks to reduction of the series and internal resistances. Besides, the coaxial sleeve structure possesses many other features, including high rate capacitance, long cycle life, and good flexibility. (paper)

  12. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Cao Juexian; Yang Wei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressures based on molecular dynamics simulations and first principles band structure calculations. It is found that carbon nanotubes experience a hard-to-soft transition as external pressure increases. The bulk modulus of soft phase is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of hard phase. The band structure calculations show that band gap of (10, 0) nanotube increases with the increase of pressure at low pressures. Above a critical pressure (5.70GPa), band gap of (10, 0) nanotube drops rapidly and becomes zero at 6.62GPa. Moreover, the calculated charge density shows that a large pressure can induce an sp 2 -to-sp 3 bonding transition, which is confirmed by recent experiments on deformed carbon nanotubes

  13. Neutron scattering analysis of rubber carbon black composite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Wampler, W.A.; Gerspacher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the uses of small-angle neutron scattering to dissect component form, structure and distribution in carbon black-reinforced rubber by varying the contrast of the system relative to some fluid by changing the fluid scattering-length density. This is the method of contrast variation. Contrast variation allows us to separate scattering contributions from the different components. Here, we extend our studies on high surface area (HSA) carbon black suspended in cyclohexane/deuterocyclohexane to HSA mixed with polyisoprene as a gel of ''bound'' rubber swollen with the same solvent mixtures. Contrast variation of swollen composite gels shows that there are two length scales in the gel structure. Above 1 nm fluctuations in the carbon black predominate. Interactions with elastomer hold the HSA aggregates appart. Below 1 nm the scattering is largely from the elastomer. The smooth surface structure of the carbon black is unaltered by the interactions with elastomer and appears smooth over length scales above about 1 nm. These results show that contrast variation can provide information on composite structure that is not available by other means. This information relates to the reinforcement mechanism of elastomers by carbon blacks

  14. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  15. Influence of chemical structure on carbon isotope composition of lignite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdenetsogt, Bat-Orshikh; Lee, Insung; Ko, Yoon-Joo; Mungunchimeg, Batsaikhan

    2017-04-01

    During the last two decades, a number of studies on carbon isotopes in terrestrial organic matter (OM) have been carried out and used to determine changes in paleoatmospheric δ13C value as well as assisting in paleoclimate analysis. Coal is abundant terrestrial OM. However, application of its δ13C value is very limited, because the understanding of changes in isotopic composition during coalification is relatively insufficient. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the chemical structure on the carbon isotope composition of lignite. Generally, lignite has more complex chemical structures than other higher rank coal because of the existence of various types of oxygen-containing functional groups that are eliminated at higher rank level. A total of sixteen Lower Cretaceous lignite samples from Baganuur mine (Mongolia) were studied by ultimate, stable carbon isotope and solid-state 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses. The carbon contents of the samples increase with increase in depth, whereas oxygen content decreases continuously. This is undoubtedly due to normal coalification process and also consistent with solid state NMR results. The δ13C values of the samples range from -23.54‰ to -21.34‰ and are enriched in 13C towards the lowermost samples. Based on the deconvolution of the NMR spectra, the ratios between carbons bonded to oxygen (60-90 ppm and 135-220 ppm) over carbons bonded to carbon and hydrogen (0-50 ppm and 90-135 ppm) were calculated for the samples. These correlate well with δ13C values (R2 0.88). The results indicate that the δ13C values of lignite are controlled by two mechanisms: (i) depletion in 13C as a result of loss of isotopically heavy oxygen-bounded carbons and (ii) enrichment in 13C caused by a loss of isotopically light methane from aliphatic and aromatic carbons. At the rank of lignite, coal is enriched in 13C because the amount of isotopically heavy CO2 and CO, released from coal as a result of changes in the chemical

  16. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  17. Structural evolution of Eucalyptus tar pitch-based carbons during carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prauchner, Marcos J.; Pasa, Vanya M.D.; Molhallem, Nelcy D.S.; Otani, Choyu; Otani, Satika; Pardini, Luiz C.

    2005-01-01

    Wood tar pitches are generated as by-products by the charcoal manufacturing industry. They have a macromolecular structure constituted mainly by phenolic, guaiacylic, and siringylic units common to lignin. Due to their characteristics, biopitches are been investigated as precursors of carbon materials such as carbon fibers, bioelectrodes and activated carbons. In the present work the structural evolution of Eucalyptus tar pitches under carbonization is investigated, which is important for the improvement of planning and control of pitch processing and end-product properties during carbon material production. The studies involve X-ray diffraction and infrared analyses, besides helium density, BET surface area and BJH pore volume measurements. The results showed that the conversion of pitch into carbon basically involves three steps: (1) Up to around 600 deg C the material has an highly disordered structure, being the release of aliphatic side chains and volatiles the main events taking place. (2) Between 600 deg C and 800 deg C, condensation of aromatic rings occurs to form bi-dimensional hexagonal networks so that micro- and mesoporosity are developed. The 800 deg C-coke is constituted by two phases: one highly disordered and another more crystalline. (3) Over 800 deg C, both phases are gradually ordered. As defects are gradually removed, surface area and porosity decrease, approaching zero for the 2100 deg C-coke

  18. Implications of urban structure on carbon consumption in metropolitan areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, Jukka; Junnila, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    Urban structure influences directly or indirectly the majority of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in cities. The prevailing belief is that dense metropolitan areas produce less carbon emissions on a per capita basis than less dense surrounding rural areas. Consequently, density targets have a major role in low-carbon urban developments. However, based on the results of this study, the connection seems unclear or even nonexistent when comprehensive evaluation is made. In this letter, we propose a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) method for calculating the consumption-based carbon footprints in metropolitan areas, i.e. carbon consumption, with the emphasis on urban structures. The method is input-output-based hybrid LCA, which operates with the existing data from the region. The study is conducted by performing an analysis of the carbon consumption in two metropolitan areas in Finland, including 11 cities. Both areas consist of a dense city core and a less dense surrounding suburban area. The paper will illustrate that the influence of urban density on carbon emissions is insignificant in the selected metropolitan areas. In addition, the utilized consumption-based method links the climate effects of city-level development to the global production of emissions.

  19. Pore Structure Characterization in Concrete Prepared with Carbonated Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sanjukta

    2018-03-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a technique to address the global concern of continuously rising CO2 level in the atmosphere. Fly ash is considered as a suitable medium for CCS due to presence of metal oxides. The fly ash which has already sequestered carbon dioxide is referred to as carbonated fly ash. Recent research reveals better durability of concretes using carbonated fly ash as part replacement of cement. In the present research pore structure characterization of the carbonated fly ash concrete has been carried out. Mercury Intrusion porosimetry test has been conducted on control concrete and concrete specimens using fly ash and carbonated fly ash at replacement levels of 25% and 40%. The specimens have been water cured for 28 days and 90 days. It is observed that porosity reduction rate is more pronounced in carbonated fly ash concrete compared to control concrete at higher water curing age. Correlation analysis is also carried out which indicates moderately linear relationship between porosity % and pore distribution with particle size and water curing.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of electrical conducting nanoporous carbon structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mir, L.; Kraiem, S.; Bengagi, M.; Elaloui, E.; Ouederni, A.; Alaya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoporous organic xerogel compounds were prepared by sol-gel method from pyrogallol-formaldehyde (PF) mixtures in water using perchloric acid as catalyst. The preparation conditions of electrical conducting carbon (ECC) structures were explored by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The effect of this preparation parameters on the structural and electrical properties of the obtained ECCs were studied, respectively, by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption isotherms, IR spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements. The analysis of the obtained results revealed that, the polymeric insulating phase was transformed progressively with pyrolysis temperature into carbon conducting phase; this means the formation of long continuous conducting path for charge carriers when the carbon microparticles inside the structure agglomerated with thermal treatment and the samples exhibited tangible percolation behaviour where the percolation threshold can be determined by pyrolysis temperature. The temperature-dependent conductivity and the I(V) characteristics of the obtained ECC structures show a non-ohmic behaviour. The results obtained from TGA and differential thermal analyser (DTA) thermograms, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that, the obtained ECC structures consist of amorphous and nanoporous electrical conducting carbon materials

  1. A distributed dynamic model of a monolith hydrogen membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelsen, Finn Are; Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Zhao, Lei; Aasen, Knut Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model a rigorous distributed dynamic model for a HMR unit. ► The model includes enough complexity for steady-state and dynamic analysis. ► Simulations show that the model is non-linear within the normal operating range. ► The model is useful for studying and handling disturbances such as inlet changes and membrane leakage. - Abstract: This paper describes a distributed mechanistic dynamic model of a hydrogen membrane reformer unit (HMR) used for methane steam reforming. The model is based on a square channel monolith structure concept, where air flows adjacent to a mix of natural gas and water distributed in a chess pattern of channels. Combustion of hydrogen gives energy to the endothermic steam reforming reactions. The model is used for both steady state and dynamic analyses. It therefore needs to be computationally attractive, but still include enough complexity to study the important steady state and dynamic features of the process. Steady-state analysis of the model gives optimum for the steam to carbon and steam to oxygen ratios, where the conversion of methane is 92% and the hydrogen used as energy for the endothermic reactions is 28% at the nominal optimum. The dynamic analysis shows that non-linear control schemes may be necessary for satisfactory control performance

  2. Structural Insights Into The Bacterial Carbon-Phosphorus Lyase Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    the proteins encoded in the phn operon act in concert to catabolise phosphonate remain unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of a 240 kDa Escherichia coli carbon-phosphorus lyase core complex at 1.7 Å and show that it comprises a highly intertwined network of subunits with several unexpected......Phosphonate compounds act as a nutrient source for some microorganisms when phosphate is limiting but require a specialised enzymatic machinery due to the presence of the highly stable carbon-phosphorus bond. Despite the fundamental importance to microbial metabolism, the details of how...... structural features. The complex contains at least two different active sites and suggest a revision of current models of carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage. Using electron microscopy, we map the binding site of an additional protein subunit, which may use ATP for driving conformational changes during...

  3. Effect of curvature on structures and vibrations of zigzag carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    tronic structures, full phonon dispersions and thermal properties of zigzag single wall carbon nanotubes. (SWCNTs) are presented. ... estimate thermal expansion coefficient of nanotubes within a quasiharmonic approximation and identify the modes that ... the linear scaling mode, we used an option of explicit. *Author for ...

  4. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  5. Structural and adsorptive properties of activated carbons prepared by carbonization and activation of resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboda, R; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J; Tomaszewski, W; Gun'ko, V M

    2003-07-15

    Four activated carbons (S1-S4) possessing different structural characteristics were prepared by carbonization of commercial resins (used for ion exchange) and subsequent activation. Their textural parameters were determined on the basis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption at 77.4 K, analyzed by applying several local and overall adsorption isotherm equations. The nature of carbon surface functionalities was analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. The GC and solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques were applied to study the influence of the texture of carbonaceous materials on their adsorptive properties. The adsorption efficiency of synthesized carbons with respect to alkylhalides used as probe compounds in the GC measurements varied over a range from 28% (C(2)H(3)Cl(3)/S2) to 85% (CHBr(3)/S1) depending on the type of adsorbates and adsorbents. The concentrating efficiency of these carbons in SPE of explosive materials changed over a larger range from 12% (trinitroglycerin/S4) and 13% (trinitrotoluene/S2) up to 100% (octogen/S1). Active carbon prepared using Zerolite 225x8 as a precursor demonstrated better results than other carbons in two types of adsorption with average values of the efficiency of 75.4% for explosives and 60.8% for alkylhalides.

  6. Strength of normal sections of NPP composite monolithic constructions with ribbed reinforced panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyashitskij, V.I.; Kirillov, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Strength characteristics and recommendations on designing composite-monolytic structures of NPP with ribbed reinforced panels are considered. Ribbed reinforced panel consists of a system of cross ribs joined with a comparatively thin (25 mm thick) plate. The investigations were carried on using models representing columns symmetrically reinforced with reinforced panels with a low percent of reinforcing. The monolithic structures consisting of ribbed reinforced panels and cast concrete for making monoliths as well as monolithic having analogous strength characteristics of extended and compressed zones have similar strengths. It is shown that calculation of supporting power of composite-monolithic structures is performed according to techniques developed for monolithic structures. Necessity of structural transverse fittings no longer arises in case of corresponding calculational substitution of stability of compressed parts of fittings. Supporting power of a structure decreases not more than by 10% in the presence of cracks in the reinforced panels of the compressed zone. Application of composite-monolithic structures during the construction of the Kursk, Smolensk and Chernobylskaya NPPs permitted to decrease labour content and reduce periods of accomplishment of these works which saves over 6 million roubles

  7. Structural Evolution of Q-Carbon and Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Siddharth; Bhaumik, Anagh; Sachan, Ritesh; Narayan, Jagdish

    2018-04-01

    This article provides insights pertaining to the first-order phase transformation involved in the growth of densely packed Q-carbon and nanodiamonds by nanosecond laser melting and quenching of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films. DLC films with different sp 3 content were melted rapidly in a controlled way in super-undercooled state and quenched, leading to formation of distinct nanostructures, i.e., nanodiamonds, Q-carbon, and Q-carbon nanocomposites. This analysis provides direct evidence of the dependence of the super-undercooling on the structural evolution of Q-carbon. Finite element heat flow calculations showed that the super-undercooling varies monotonically with the sp 3 content. The phenomenon of solid-liquid interfacial instability during directional solidification from the melt state is studied in detail. The resulting lateral segregation leads to formation of cellular filamentary Q-carbon nanostructures. The dependence of the cell size and wavelength at the onset of instability on the sp 3 content of DLC thin films was modeled based on perturbation theory.

  8. Structural, electronic and optical properties of carbon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M L [California Univ., Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-01

    Carbon nitride was proposed as a superhard material and a structural prototype, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, was examined using several theoretical models. Some reports claiming experimental verifications have been made recently. The current status of the theory and experiment is reviewed, and a detailed discussion is presented of calculations of the electronic and optical properties of this material. These calculations predict that {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} will have a minimum gap which is indirect at 6.4{+-}0.5 eV. A discussion of the possibility of carbon nitride nanotubes is also presented. (orig.)

  9. Surface structure and adsorption properties of ultrafine porous carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Xiaofeng; Wang Ce; Zhang Dejiang

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafine porous carbon fibers (UPCFs) were successfully synthesized by chemical activation of electrospun polyacrylonitrile fibers. In the current approach, potassium hydroxide was adopted as activation reagent. UPCFs were systematically evaluated by scanning electron microscope and nitrogen adsorption. The mass ratio of potassium hydroxide to preoxidized fibers, activation temperature and activation time are crucial for producing high quality UPCFs. The relationships between porous structure and process parameters are explored. UPCFs were applied as adsorbent for nitrogen monoxide to be compared with commercial porous carbon fibers.

  10. A novel approach for the fabrication of carbon nanofibre/ceramic porous structures

    KAUST Repository

    Walter, Claudia; Barg, Suelen; Ni, Na; Maher, Robert C.; Garcίa-Tuñ ó n, Esther; Zaiviji Ismail, Muhammad Muzzafar; Babot, Flora; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of hybrid ceramic/carbon scaffolds in which carbon nanofibres and multi-walled carbon nanotubes fully cover the internal walls of a microporous ceramic structure that provides mechanical stability. Freeze casting

  11. Failure analysis of various monolithic posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Liliana; Topală, Florin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of material stiffness and load on the biomechanical performance of the monolithic full-coverage posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element analysis. Three restorative materials for monolithic dental crowns were selected for the study: zirconia; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, and resin-based composite. Stresses were calculated in the crowns for all materials and in the teeth structures, under different load values. The experiments show that dental crowns made from all this new aesthetic materials processed by CAD/CAM technologies would be indicated as monolithic dental crowns for posterior areas.

  12. Dopamine-imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşır, Süleyman; Sarı, Duygu; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yılmaz, Fatma; Şarkaya, Koray; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    A dopamine-imprinted monolithic column was prepared and used in capillary electrochromatography as stationary phase for the first time. Dopamine was selectively separated from aqueous solution containing the competitor molecule norepinephrine, which is similar in size and shape to the template molecule. Morphology of the dopamine-imprinted column was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the organic solvent content of mobile phase, applied pressure and pH of the mobile phase on the recognition of dopamine by the imprinted monolithic column has been evaluated, and the imprinting effect in the dopamine-imprinted monolithic polymer was verified. Developed dopamine-imprinted monolithic column resulted in excellent separation of dopamine from structurally related competitor molecule, norepinephrine. Separation was achieved in a short period of 10 min, with the electrophoretic mobility of 5.81 × 10 -5  m 2 V -1 s -1 at pH 5.0 and 500 mbar pressure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Crystal structure of a diaryl carbonate: 1,3-phenylene bis(phenyl carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina A. Solomos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The whole molecule of the title compound, C20H14O6, is generated by mirror symmetry, the mirror bisecting the central benzene ring. The carbonate groups adopt an s-cis-s-cis conformation, with torsion angles of 58.7 (2 and 116.32 (15°. The crystal structure of 1,3-phenylene bis(phenyl carbonate contains no strong hydrogen bonds, though weak C—H...O and offset π–π interactions are observed, forming layers parallel to the ac plane.

  14. Thermo-mechanical evaluation of carbon-carbon primary structure for SSTO vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croop, Harold C.; Lowndes, Holland B.; Hahn, Steven E.; Barthel, Chris A.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced development program to demonstrate carbon-carbon composite structure for use as primary load carrying structure has entered the experimental validation phase. The component being evaluated is a wing torque box section for a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle. The validation or demonstration component features an advanced carbon-carbon design incorporating 3D woven graphite preforms, integral spars, oxidation inhibited matrix, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) oxidation protection coating, and ceramic matrix composite fasteners. The validation component represents the culmination of a four phase design and fabrication development effort. Extensive developmental testing was performed to verify material properties and integrity of basic design features before committing to fabrication of the full scale box. The wing box component is now being set up for testing in the Air Force Research Laboratory Structural Test Facility at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. One of the important developmental tests performed in support of the design and planned testing of the full scale box was the fabrication and test of a skin/spar trial subcomponent. The trial subcomponent incorporated critical features of the full scale wing box design. This paper discusses the results of the trial subcomponent test which served as a pathfinder for the upcoming full scale box test.

  15. Determining leach rates of monolithic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Dole, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provides a conservative means of predicting long-term release from monolithic waste forms, offering a simple and relatively quick means of determining effective solid diffusion coefficients. As presented here, these coefficients can be used in a simple model to predict maximum release rates or be used in more complex site-specific models to predict actual site performance. For waste forms that pass the structural integrity test, this model also allows the prediction of EP-Tox leachate concentrations from these coefficients. Thus, the results of the ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provide a powerful tool that can be used to predict the waste concentration limits in order to comply with the EP-Toxicity criteria for characteristically nonhazardous waste. 12 refs., 3 figs

  16. High Gradient Accelerating Structures for Carbon Therapy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Faillace, L.; Goel, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.; Plastun, A.; Savin, E.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon therapy is the most promising among techniques for cancer treatment, as it has demonstrated significant improvements in clinical efficiency and reduced toxicity profiles in multiple types of cancer through much better localization of dose to the tumor volume. RadiaBeam, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, are developing an ultra-high gradient linear accelerator, Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL), for the delivery of ion-beams with end-energies up to 450 MeV/u for 12C6+ ions and 250 MeV for protons. In this paper, we present a thorough comparison of standing and travelling wave designs for high gradient S-Band accelerating structures operating with ions at varying velocities, relative to the speed of light, in the range 0.3-0.7. In this paper we will compare these types of accelerating structures in terms of RF, beam dynamics and thermo-mechanical performance.

  17. Electronic structure and physical properties of 13C carbon composite

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Author was focused on the properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. Generally, the review relies on the original results and concentrates...

  18. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Gámez-Corrales, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  19. Future device applications of low-dimensional carbon superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2005-03-01

    We observe superior transport properties in low-dimensional amorphous carbon (a-C) and superlattice structures fabricated by a number of different techniques. Low temperature conductivity of these materials is explained using argument based on the crossover of dimensionality of weak localization and electron-electron interactions along with a change of sign of the magneto-resistance. These trends are significantly different from many other well characterized ordered or oriented carbon structures, and, show direct evidence of high correlation length, mobility and an effect of the dimensionality in low-dimensional a-C films. We show routes to prepare bespoke features by tuning the phase relaxation time in order to make high-speed devices over large areas. The artificially grown multi-layer superlattice structures of diamond-like amorphous carbon films show high-frequency resonance and quantum conductance suggesting sufficiently high values of phase coherence length in the present disordered a-C system that could lead to fast switching multi-valued logic.

  20. A monolithic silicon detector telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, G.; Amorini, F.; Cabibbo, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Fallica, G.; Franzo, G.; Figuera, P.; Papa, M.; Pappalardo, G.; Percolla, G.; Priolo, F.; Privitera, V.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrathin silicon detector (1 μm) thick implanted on a standard 400 μm Si-detector has been built to realize a monolithic telescope detector for simultaneous charge and energy determination of charged particles. The performances of the telescope have been tested using standard alpha sources and fragments emitted in nuclear reactions with different projectile-target colliding systems. An excellent charge resolution has been obtained for low energy (less than 5 MeV) light nuclei. A multi-array lay-out of such detectors is under construction to charge identify the particles emitted in reactions induced by low energy radioactive beams. (orig.)

  1. Imaging monolithic silicon detector telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorini, F.; Sipala, V.; Cardella, G.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, B.; Cosentino, L.; Costa, E.; Di Pietro, A.; Emanuele, U.; Fallica, G.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; La Guidara, E.; Marchetta, C.; Pappalardo, A.; Piazza, A.; Randazzo, N.; Rizzo, F.; Russo, G.V.; Russotto, P.

    2008-01-01

    We show the results of some test beams performed on a new monolithic strip silicon detector telescope developed in collaboration with the INFN and ST-microelectronics. Using an appropriate design, the induction on the ΔE stages, generated by the charge released in the E stage, was used to obtain the position of the detected particle. The position measurement, together with the low threshold for particle charge identification, allows the new detector to be used for a large variety of applications due to its sensitivity of only a few microns measured in both directions

  2. Simulation and Assessment of Whole Life-Cycle Carbon Emission Flows from Different Residential Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikun Wen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To explore the differences in carbon emissions over the whole life-cycle of different building structures, the published calculated carbon emissions from residential buildings in China and abroad were normalized. Embodied carbon emission flows, operations stage carbon emission flows, demolition and reclamation stage carbon emission flows and total life-cycle carbon emission flows from concrete, steel, and wood structures were obtained. This study is based on the theory of the social cost of carbon, with an adequately demonstrated social cost of carbon and social discount rate. Taking into consideration both static and dynamic situations and using a social discount rate of 3.5%, the total life-cycle carbon emission flows, absolute carbon emission and building carbon costs were calculated and assessed. The results indicated that concrete structures had the highest embodied carbon emission flows and negative carbon emission flows in the waste and reclamation stage. Wood structures that started the life-cycle with stored carbon had the lowest carbon emission flows in the operations stage and relatively high negative carbon emission flows in the reclamation stage. Wood structures present the smallest carbon footprints for residential buildings.

  3. Analysis of Catalytic Material Effect on the Photovoltaic Properties of Monolithic Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalita Maulani Nursam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC are widely developed due to their attractive appearance and simple fabrication processes. One of the challenges that arise in the DSSC fabrication involves high material cost associated with the cost of conductive substrate. DSSC with monolithic configuration was then developed on the basis of this motivation. In this contribution, titanium dioxide-based monolithic type DSSCs were fabricated on a single fluorine-doped transparent oxide coated glass using porous ZrO2 as spacer. Herein, the catalytic material for the counter-electrode was varied using carbon composite and platinum in order to analyze their effect on the solar cell efficiency. Four-point probe measurement revealed that the carbon composite exhibited slightly higher conductivity with a sheet resistance of 9.8 Ω/sq and 10.9 Ω/sq for carbon and platinum, respectively. Likewise, the photoconversion efficiency of the monolithic cells with carbon counter-electrode almost doubled the efficiency of the cells with platinum counter-electrode. Our results demonstrate that carbon could outperform the performance of platinum as catalytic material in monolithic DSSC.

  4. Nanohashtag structures based on carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Connor W.; Rybolt, Thomas R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular mechanics was used to study the noncovalent interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers. Groups of nanotubes have the tendency to form tight, parallel bundles (||||). Molecular linkers were introduced into our models to stabilize nanostructures with carbon nanotubes held in perpendicular orientations. Molecular mechanics makes it possible to estimate the strength of noncovalent interactions holding these structures together and to calculate the overall binding energy of the structures. A set of linkers were designed and built around a 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene tether with two corannulene containing pincers that extend in opposite directions from the central cyclooctatetraene portion. Each pincer consists of a pairs of "arms." These molecular linkers were modified so that the "hand" portions of each pair of "arms" could close together to grab and hold two carbon nanotubes in a perpendicular arrangement. To illustrate the possibility of more complicated and open perpendicular CNTs structures, our primary goal was to create a model of a nanohashtag (#) CNT conformation that is more stable than any parallel CNT arrangements with bound linker molecules forming clumps of CNTs and linkers in non-hashtag arrangements. This goal was achieved using a molecular linker (C280H96) that utilizes van der Waals interactions to two perpendicular oriented CNTs. Hydrogen bonding was then added between linker molecules to augment the stability of the hashtag structure. In the hashtag structure with hydrogen bonding, four (5,5) CNTs of length 4.46 nm (18 rings) and four linkers (C276H92N8O8) stabilized the hashtag so that the average binding energy per pincer was 118 kcal/mol.

  5. Structural consequences of carbon taxes: An input-output analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Yuhu.

    1992-01-01

    A model system is provided for examining for examining the structural consequences of carbon taxes on economic, energy, and environmental issues. The key component is the Iterative Multi-Optimization (IMO) Process model which describes, using an Input-Output (I-O) framework, the feedback between price changes and substitution. The IMO process is designed to assure this feedback process when the input coefficients in an I-O table can be changed while holding the I-O price model. The theoretical problems of convergence to a limit in the iterative process and uniqueness (which requires all IMO processes starting from different initial prices to converge to a unique point for a given level of carbon taxes) are addressed. The empirical analysis also examines the effects of carbon taxes on the US economy as described by a 78 sector I-O model. Findings are compared with those of other models that assess the effects of carbon taxes, and the similarities and differences with them are interpreted in terms of differences in the scope, sectoral detail, time frame, and policy assumptions among the models

  6. The effects of neutron irradiation on the structure of carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Hollenberg, G. W.; Slagle, O.D.; Watson, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper irradiation behavior of carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites are discussed in terms on simple microstructural models. Previous data are discussed in terms of these models. New data are presented for the irradiation-induced dimensional changes of selected carbon-carbon composites. The influence of fiber precursor on carbon- carbon irradiation performance is discussed

  7. Crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate monoliths synthesized by directed soft template method for highly sensitive NO2 gas sensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Duy, Nguyen Van; Hieu, Nguyen Van

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Mesoporous WO 3 nanoplate monoliths were obtained by direct templating synthesis. ► Enable effective accession of the analytic molecules for the sensor applications. ► The WO 3 sensor exhibited a high performance to NO 2 gas at low temperature. -- Abstract: Controllable synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors with nanocrystalline size, porous structure, and large specific surface area is one of the key issues for effective gas sensor applications. In this study, crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate-like monoliths with high specific surface areas were obtained through instant direct-templating synthesis for highly sensitive nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) sensor applications. The copolymer soft template was converted into a solid carbon framework by heat treatment in an inert gas prior to calcinations in air to sustain the mesoporous structure of tungsten oxide. The multidirectional mesoporous structures of tungsten oxide with small crystalline size, large specific surface area, and superior physical characteristics enabled the rapid and effective accession of analytic gas molecules. As a result, the sensor response was enhanced and the response and recovery times were reduced, in which the mesoporous tungsten oxide based gas sensor exhibited a superior response of 21,155% to 5 ppm NO 2 . In addition, the developed sensor exhibited selective detection of low NO 2 concentration in ammonia and ethanol at a low temperature of approximately 150 °C.

  8. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    F. Inam; B. R. Bhat; N. Luhyna; T. Vo

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB) and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by...

  9. Thermal measurement a requirement for monolithic microwave integrated circuit design

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Richard; Oxley, C. H.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal management of structures such as Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) is important, given increased circuit packing densities and RF output powers. The paper will describe the IR measurement technology necessary to obtain accurate temperature profiles on the surface of semiconductor devices. The measurement procedure will be explained, including the device mounting arrangement and emissivity correction technique. The paper will show how the measurement technique has be...

  10. π -Plasmon model for carbon nano structures: Application to porphyrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dao Thu; Anh, Chu Thuy; Nga, Do Thi; Thanh, Le Minh; Van, Tran Thi Thanh; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-01-01

    In traditional concept, the optical properties of semiconductors and semimetals near their fundamental optical band gaps are attributed to single excitations (such electron-hole pairs, excitons...). In our earlier article, we proposed the collective mechanism of π -plasmons for optical properties of low dimensional carbon nano structures. A simple way to calculate the peak positions of UV-vis absorption spectra was pointed out and gave a good agreement with experimental data. In this work we analyze different schemas to calculate the UV-vis absorption peaks. A new parameter k which characterizes the dependence of schema on geometry and number of carbon sites is defined. As an example, the case of porphyrin was investigated. (paper)

  11. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  12. Fabrication of interfacial functionalized porous polymer monolith and its adsorption properties of copper ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jiaxi; Du, Zhongjie; Zou, Wei; Li, Hangquan; Zhang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Interface functionalized PGMA porous monolith was fabricated. • The adsorption capacity of Cu 2+ was 35.3 mg/g. • The effects of porous structure on the adsorption of Cu 2+ were studied. • The adsorption behaviors of porous monolith were studied. - Abstract: The interfacial functionalized poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) porous monolith was fabricated and applied as a novel porous adsorbent for copper ions (Cu 2+ ). PGMA porous material with highly interconnected pore network was prepared by concentrated emulsion polymerization template. Then polyacrylic acid (PAA) was grafted onto the interface of the porous monolith by the reaction between the epoxy group on PGMA and a carboxyl group on PAA. Finally, the porous monolith was interfacial functionalized by rich amount of carboxyl groups and could adsorb copper ions effectively. The chemical structure and porous morphology of the porous monolith were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the effects of pore size distribution, pH value, co-existing ions, contacting time, and initial concentrations of copper ions on the adsorption capacity of the porous adsorbents were studied

  13. Fabrication of interfacial functionalized porous polymer monolith and its adsorption properties of copper ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jiaxi; Du, Zhongjie; Zou, Wei; Li, Hangquan; Zhang, Chen, E-mail: zhangch@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Interface functionalized PGMA porous monolith was fabricated. • The adsorption capacity of Cu{sup 2+} was 35.3 mg/g. • The effects of porous structure on the adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} were studied. • The adsorption behaviors of porous monolith were studied. - Abstract: The interfacial functionalized poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) porous monolith was fabricated and applied as a novel porous adsorbent for copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}). PGMA porous material with highly interconnected pore network was prepared by concentrated emulsion polymerization template. Then polyacrylic acid (PAA) was grafted onto the interface of the porous monolith by the reaction between the epoxy group on PGMA and a carboxyl group on PAA. Finally, the porous monolith was interfacial functionalized by rich amount of carboxyl groups and could adsorb copper ions effectively. The chemical structure and porous morphology of the porous monolith were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the effects of pore size distribution, pH value, co-existing ions, contacting time, and initial concentrations of copper ions on the adsorption capacity of the porous adsorbents were studied.

  14. Mechanical Properties for Reliability Analysis of Structures in Glassy Carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Despite its good physical properties, the glassy carbon material is not widely used, especially for structural applications. Nevertheless, its transparency to particles and temperature resistance are interesting properties for the applications to vacuum chambers and components in high energy physics. For example, it has been proposed for fast shutter valve in particle accelerator [1] [2]. The mechanical properties have to be carefully determined to assess the reliability of structures in such a material. In this paper, mechanical tests have been carried out to determine the elastic parameters, the strength and toughness on commercial grades. A statistical approach, based on the Weibull’s distribution, is used to characterize the material both in tension and compression. The results are compared to the literature and the difference of properties for these two loading cases is shown. Based on a Finite Element analysis, a statistical approach is applied to define the reliability of a structural component in gl...

  15. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Rogers, Michael Ray; Judkins, Roddie R.

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  16. Carprofen-imprinted monolith prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization in room temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Lu; Han, Xu; Wang, Xian-Hua; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    To obtain fast separation, ionic liquids were used as porogens first in combination with reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization to prepare a new type of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolith. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized using a mixture of carprofen (template), 4-vinylpyridine, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, [BMIM]BF4, and chain transfer agent (CTA). Some polymerization factors, such as template-monomer molar ratio, the degree of crosslinking, the composition of the porogen, and the content of CTA, on the column efficiency and imprinting effect of the resulting MIP monolith were systematically investigated. Affinity screening of structurally similar compounds with the template can be achieved in 200 s on the MIP monolith due to high column efficiency (up to 12,070 plates/m) and good column permeability. Recognition mechanism of the imprinted monolith was also investigated.

  17. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  18. Carbon nanotube on Si(001): structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, W.; Fazzio, A.; Miwa, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The promising nanoscale technology based on carbon nanotubes has attracted much attention due to the unique electronic, chemical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) provide an ideal atomically uniform one dimensional (1D) conductors, having a strong electronic confinement around its circumference, which can be retained up to room temperature[1]. This interesting property may lead one to consider SWCNs as 1D conductors for the development of nanoscale electronic devices. In this work the structural and electronic properties of the contact between a metallic (6,6) SWCN adsorbed on a silicon (001) surface are studied from first-principles total-energy calculations. We consider two adsorption sites for the tube on the Si(001) surface: on the top of the Si-dimer rows and on the surface 'trench' between two consecutive dimer rows. Our results show a chemical bond between the nanotube and Si(001) when the tube is located along the 'trench', which corresponds to the only bound structure. We find a binding energy per tube length of 0.21 eV/angstrom. We also verified that the binding energy depends on the rotation of the tube. Typically, a rotation of 15 deg can reduce the binding energy up to 0.07 eV/angstrom. Our calculated electronic properties indicate that the most stable structure shows a subband associated to the tube/surface bond that cross the Fermi level. This result indicates an enhanced metallic behavior along the tube/surface contact characterizing a 1D quantum wire. The charge transfer between the Si surface and the tube is also discussed. [1] Z. Yao, C. Dekker, and P. Avouris in Carbon Nanotubes, M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris Eds., (Springer, Berlin 2001), p. 147. (author)

  19. Structural insights into the bacterial carbon - phosphorus lyase machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seweryn, Paulina; Van, Lan Bich; Kjeldgaard, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus is required for all life and microorganisms can extract it from their environment through several metabolic pathways. When phosphate is in limited supply, some bacteria are able to use phosphonate compounds, which require specialized enzymatic machinery to break the stable carbon......–phosphorus (C–P) bond. Despite its importance, the details of how this machinery catabolizes phosphonates remain unknown. Here we determine the crystal structure of the 240-kilodalton Escherichia coli C–P lyase core complex (PhnG–PhnH–PhnI–PhnJ; PhnGHIJ), and show that it is a two-fold symmetric hetero...

  20. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  1. Effect of processing on carbon molecular sieve structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Mita; Perry, John D.; Koros, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Sub-micron sized carbon molecular sieve (CMS) materials were produced via ball milling for subsequent use in hybrid material formation. A detailed analysis of the effects of the milling process in the presence of different milling environments is reported. The milling process apparently alters the molecular scale structure and properties of the carbon material. Three cases: unmilled, air milled and nitrogen milled, were analyzed in this work. The property changes were probed using equilibrium sorption experiments with different gases. Furthermore, WAXD and BET results also showed differences between milling processes. Finally in order to improve the interfacial polymer-sieve region of hybrid membranes, the CMS surface was chemically modified with a linkage unit capable of covalently bonding the polymer to the sieve. A published single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) modification method was adopted to attach a primary aromatic amine to the surface. Several aspects including rigidity, chemical composition, bulky groups and length were considered in selecting the preferred linkage unit. Fortunately kinetic and equilibrium sorption properties of the modified sieves showed very little difference from unmodified samples, suggesting that the linkage unit is not excessively filling or obstructing access to the pores of the CMSs during the modification process. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure, spectra and stability of solid bismuth carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Peter; Sunder, S.; Lopata, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    A previously unreported basic bismuth carbonate, (BiO)sub(4)(OH)sub(2)COsub(3), has been identified as an intermediate product in the interconversion of α-Bisub(2)Osub(3) and synthetic bismutite, (BiO)sub(2)COsub(3), in aqueous carbonate solutions. It has a narrow stability field between COsub(2) partial pressures of 10sup(-5.5+-1.0) Pa, in the presence of dilute aqueous solution at 25 degrees C. Gibbs energies of formation, calculated from these partial pressures, are Δsub(f)Gsup(0)((BiO)sub(4)(OH)sub(2)COsub(3),s,298.15 K)-1678 +- 9 kJ molsup(-1) and Δsub(f)Gsup(0)((BiO)sub(2)COsub(3),s,298.15 K)=-945 +- 7 kJ molsup(-1). The two carbonates have been compared by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray powder diffractometry, and infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The unit cell of (BiO)sub(4)(OH)sub(2)COsub(3) is dimensionally orthorhombic, with a=10.772(1), b=5.4898(5), c=14.757(1)angstrom,Z=4, but its true symmetry is probably triclinic. A structural model for (BiO)sub(4)(OH)sub(2)COsub(3), and two modified models for (BiO)sub(2)COsub(3), are proposed. The possible natural occurrence of (BiO)sub(4)(OH)sub(2)COsub(3) is discussed

  3. Effect of processing on carbon molecular sieve structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Mita

    2010-11-01

    Sub-micron sized carbon molecular sieve (CMS) materials were produced via ball milling for subsequent use in hybrid material formation. A detailed analysis of the effects of the milling process in the presence of different milling environments is reported. The milling process apparently alters the molecular scale structure and properties of the carbon material. Three cases: unmilled, air milled and nitrogen milled, were analyzed in this work. The property changes were probed using equilibrium sorption experiments with different gases. Furthermore, WAXD and BET results also showed differences between milling processes. Finally in order to improve the interfacial polymer-sieve region of hybrid membranes, the CMS surface was chemically modified with a linkage unit capable of covalently bonding the polymer to the sieve. A published single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) modification method was adopted to attach a primary aromatic amine to the surface. Several aspects including rigidity, chemical composition, bulky groups and length were considered in selecting the preferred linkage unit. Fortunately kinetic and equilibrium sorption properties of the modified sieves showed very little difference from unmodified samples, suggesting that the linkage unit is not excessively filling or obstructing access to the pores of the CMSs during the modification process. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A unified monolithic approach for multi-fluid flows and fluid-structure interaction using the Particle Finite Element Method with fixed mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.; Idelsohn, S. R.; Oñate, E.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a strategy to solve multi-fluid and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems using Lagrangian particles combined with a fixed finite element (FE) mesh. Our approach is an extension of the fluid-only PFEM-2 (Idelsohn et al., Eng Comput 30(2):2-2, 2013; Idelsohn et al., J Numer Methods Fluids, 2014) which uses explicit integration over the streamlines to improve accuracy. As a result, the convective term does not appear in the set of equations solved on the fixed mesh. Enrichments in the pressure field are used to improve the description of the interface between phases.

  5. Morphology, molecular structure, and stable carbon isotopic composition of black carbon (BC) in urban topsoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yutong; Xiao, Qing; Lu, Shenggao

    2018-02-01

    Urban soils contain significant amounts of black carbon (BC) from biomass and fossil fuel combustion and regard to be a pool of BC. BC in urban soils has multiple effects on environmental processes in urban system, such as global climate change, air quality, and public health. Urban topsoil samples (0-10 cm) were collected from Anshan, Liaoning Province, northeast China, which is one of the most important old steel industrial bases in China. The BC in urban topsoils was extracted using the density method. Their chemical composition, morphology, molecular structure, and stable carbon isotopic composition were examined using elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C). Elemental analysis shows that carbon content in the BC of studied soils ranged from 64.5 to 78.4%, with the average more than 70%. The O/C atomic ratio of BC is on average 0.18. The BC particle displays different morphology, including porous spherical, irregular porous fragmentary, and blocky shapes. The porous spherical BC particles has atomic molar O/C ratio determined by SEM-EDS ranging from 0.04 to 0.37. XRD indicates that BC exists in mainly combining with mineral phases hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ), kaolinite (Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 ), quartz (SiO 2 ), and calcite (CaCO 3 ). The FTIR spectra of BC particles show major bands at approximately 3400 cm -1 (O-H), 2920 cm -1 (C = H), 1600 cm -1 (C = C), 1230 cm -1 (C = O), and 1070 cm -1 (C = O). The stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C) of BC ranges from -24.48 to -23.18‰ with the average of -23.79 ± 0.39‰. The concentration of BC in the industrial area is significantly (p fuel combustion. Results indicated that a combination of atomic O/C ratio, porous structure, and stable carbon isotopic (δ 13 C) of BC could reflect effectively the origin of BC

  6. Preparation of epoxy-based macroporous monolithic columns for the fast and efficient immunofiltration of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Sonja; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Macroporous epoxy-based monolithic columns were used for immunofiltration of bacteria. The prepared monolithic polymer support is hydrophilic and has large pore sizes of 21 μm without mesopores. A surface chemistry usually applied for immobilization of antibodies on glass slides is successfully transferred to monolithic columns. Step-by-step, the surface of the epoxy-based monolith is hydrolyzed, silanized, coated with poly(ethylene glycol diamine) and activated with the homobifunctional crosslinker di(N-succinimidyl)carbonate for immobilization of antibodies on the monolithic columns. The functionalization steps are characterized to ensure the coating of each monolayer. The prepared antibody-immobilized monolithic column is optimized for immunofiltration to enrich Staphylococcus aureus as an important food contaminant. Different kinds of geometries of monolithic columns, flow rates and elution buffers are tested with the goal to get high recoveries in the shortest enrichment time as possible. An effective capture of S. aureus was achieved at a flow rate of 7.0 mL/min with low backpressures of 20.1±5.4 mbar enabling a volumetric enrichment of 1000 within 145 min. The bacteria were quantified by flow cytometry using a double-labeling approach. After immunofiltration the sensitivity was significantly increased and a detection limit of the total system of 42 S. aureus/mL was reached. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Tannin-based monoliths from emulsion-templating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczurek, A.; Martinez de Yuso, A.; Fierro, V.; Pizzi, A.; Celzard, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Efficient preparation procedures are presented for new and “green” tannin-based organic polyHIPEs. • Highest homogeneity and strength are obtained at an oil fraction near the close-packing value. • Structural and mechanical properties abruptly change above such critical value. - Abstract: Highly porous monoliths prepared by emulsion-templating, frequently called polymerised High Internal Phase Emulsions (polyHIPEs) in the literature, were prepared from “green” precursors such as Mimosa bark extract, sunflower oil and ethoxylated castor oil. Various oil fractions, ranging from 43 to 80 vol.%, were used and shown to have a dramatic impact on the resultant porous structure. A critical oil fraction around 70 vol.% was found to exist, close to the theoretical values of 64% and 74% for random and compact sphere packing, respectively, at which the properties of both emulsions and derived porous monoliths changed. Such change of behaviour was observed by many different techniques such as viscosity, electron microscopy, mercury intrusion, and mechanical studies. We show and explain why this critical oil fraction is the one leading to the strongest and most homogeneous porous monoliths

  8. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  9. Fabrication of Monolithic Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Using Ionic Liquid Electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seigo Ito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the durability of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs, monolithic DSCs with ionic liquid electrolyte were studied. Deposited by screen printing, a carbon layer was successfully fabricated that did not crack or peel when annealing was employed beforehand. Optimized electrodes exhibited photovoltaic characteristics of 0.608 V open-circuit voltage, 6.90 cm−2 mA short-circuit current, and 0.491 fill factor, yielding 2.06% power conversion efficiency. The monolithic DSC using ionic liquid electrolyte was thermally durable and operated stably for 1000 h at 80°C.

  10. Elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogiso, Hisato; Yoshida, Mikiko; Nakano, Shizuka; Yasui, Haruyuki; Awazu, Kaoru

    2006-01-01

    This research discusses the elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. Two DLC film samples deposited by plasma based ion implantation (PBII) were prepared. The plasma generated by microwave (MW) was applied to one sample and the plasma by radio frequency (RF) to the other sample. The samples were evaluated for the elastic property image with nanometer resolution using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The film surface deposited by RF-PBII was very flat and homogeneous in elastic property. In contrast, the film surface by MW-PBII was more uneven than that by RF-PBII and both the locally hard and the locally soft regions were found at the film surface. The size of the structure in elastic property is several tens nanometer. We conclude that the film probably contains nano-scale diamond phase

  11. Elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiso, Hisato [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Yoshida, Mikiko [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Nakano, Shizuka [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Yasui, Haruyuki [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa (IRII), Ro-1, Tomizu-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0233 (Japan); Awazu, Kaoru [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa (IRII), Ro-1, Tomizu-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0233 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    This research discusses the elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. Two DLC film samples deposited by plasma based ion implantation (PBII) were prepared. The plasma generated by microwave (MW) was applied to one sample and the plasma by radio frequency (RF) to the other sample. The samples were evaluated for the elastic property image with nanometer resolution using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The film surface deposited by RF-PBII was very flat and homogeneous in elastic property. In contrast, the film surface by MW-PBII was more uneven than that by RF-PBII and both the locally hard and the locally soft regions were found at the film surface. The size of the structure in elastic property is several tens nanometer. We conclude that the film probably contains nano-scale diamond phase.

  12. Structural deformation and intertube conductance of crossed carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S.C.; Choi, Hyoung J.; Ihm, Jisoon; Louie, Steven G.

    2000-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the structure and quantum electronic conductance of junctions consisting of two crossed (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. The structures are determined by constrained minimization of total energy at a given force between the two tubes, simulating the effects of substrate-tube attraction or an applied force. We find that the intertube contact distance is very sensitive to the applied force in the range of 0-10 nN. The intertube conductance is sizable for realistic deformation expected from substrate interaction. The results explain the recent transport data on crossed nanotubes and show that these systems may be potentially useful as electromechanical devices

  13. Structural Deformation and Intertube Conductance of Crossed Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S. C.; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Ihm, Jisoon; Louie, Steven G.

    2001-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the structure and quantum electronic conductance of junctions consisting of two crossed (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. The structures are determined by constrained minimization of total energy at a given force between the two tubes, simulating the effects of substrate-tube attraction or an applied force. We find that the intertube contact distance is very sensitive to the applied force in the range of 0--10nN. The intertube conductance is sizable for realistic deformation expected from substrate interaction. The results explain the recent transport data on crossed nanotubes and show that these systems may be potentially useful as electromechanical devices

  14. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  15. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  16. Contrasting bonding behavior of thiol molecules on carbon fullerene structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixteco-Sanchez, J.C.; Guirado-Lopez, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed semiempirical as well as ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations at T=0 to analyze the equilibrium configurations and electronic properties of spheroidal C 60 as well as of cylindrical armchair (5,5) and (8,8) fullerenes passivated with SCH 3 and S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 thiols. Our structural results reveal that the lowest-energy configurations of the adsorbates strongly depend on their chain length and on the structure of the underlying substrate. In the low-coverage regime, both SCH 3 and S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 molecules prefer to organize into a molecular cluster on one side of the C 60 surface, providing thus a less protective organic coating for the carbon structure. However, with increasing the number of adsorbed thiols, a transition to a more uniform distribution is obtained, which actually takes place for six and eight adsorbed molecules when using S(CH 2 ) 2 CH 3 and SCH 3 chains, respectively. In contrast, for the tubelike arrangements at the low-coverage regime, a quasi-one-dimensional zigzag organization of the adsorbates along the tubes is always preferred. The sulfur-fullerene bond is considerably strong and is at the origin of outward and lateral displacements of the carbon atoms, leading to the stabilization of three-membered rings on the surface (spheroidal structures) as well as to sizable nonuniform radial deformations (cylindrical configurations). The electronic spectrum of our thiol-passivated fullerenes shows strong variations in the energy difference between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals as a function of the number and distribution of adsorbed thiols, opening thus the possibility to manipulate the transport properties of these compounds by means of selective adsorption mechanisms

  17. Hierarchically structured carbon nanotubes for energy conversion and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Feng

    As the world population continues to increase, large amounts of energy are consumed. Reality pushes us to find new energy or use our current energy more efficiently. Researches on energy conversion and storage have become increasingly important and essential. This grand challenge research has led to a recent focus on nanostructured materials. Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play a critical role in all of these nanotechnology challenges. CNTs have a very large surface area, a high electrochemical accessibility, high electronic conductivity and strong mechanical properties. This combination of properties makes them promising materials for energy device applications, such as FETs, supercapacitors, fuel cells, and lithium batteries. This study focuses on exploring the possibility of using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) as the electrode materials in these energy applications. For the application of electrode materials, electrical conductive, vertically aligned CNTs with controllable length and diameter were synthesized. Several CVD methods for VA-CNT growth have been explored, although the iron / aluminum pre-coated catalyst CVD system was the main focus. A systematic study of several factors, including growth time, temperature, gas ratio, catalyst coating was conducted. The mechanism of VA-CNTs was discussed and a model for VA-CNT length / time was proposed to explain the CNT growth rate. Furthermore, the preferential growth of semiconducting (up to 96 atom% carbon) VA-SWNTs by using a plasma enhanced CVD process combined with fast heating was also explored, and these semiconducting materials have been directly used for making FETs using simple dispersion in organic solvent, without any separation and purification. Also, by inserting electron-accepting nitrogen atoms into the conjugated VA-CNT structure during the growth process, we synthesized vertically aligned nitrogen containing carbon nanotubes (VA-NCNTs). After purification of

  18. Acquisition of a Scanning Ultrasound Analyzer for Gelation and Drying Studies in Sol-Gel Ceramic Coatings and Monoliths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archer, Lynden

    1997-01-01

    The overall goal of this research project was to develop a fundamental understanding of how colloid chemistry influences structure and properties of ceramic monoliths fabricated by sol-gel synthesis...

  19. Monolithically integrated 8-channel WDM reflective modulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopinski, S.T.; Malinowski, M.; Piramidowicz, R.; Smit, M.K.; Leijtens, X.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the design and characterization of a monolithically integrated photonic circuit acting as a reflective modulator for eight WDM channels is presented. The chip was designed and fabricated in a generic integration technology

  20. A monolithically fabricated gas chromatography separation column with an integrated high sensitivity thermal conductivity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaanta, Bradley C; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Hua

    2010-01-01

    The monolithic integration of a high sensitivity detector with a gas chromatography (GC) separation column creates many potential advantages over the discrete components of a traditional chromatography system. In miniaturized high-speed GC systems, component interconnections can cause crucial errors and loss of fidelity during detection and analysis. A monolithically integrated device would eliminate the need to create helium-tight interconnections, which are bulky and labor intensive. Additionally, batch fabrication of integrated devices that no longer require expensive and fragile detectors can decrease the cost of micro GC systems through economies of scale. We present the design, fabrication and operation of a monolithic GC separation column and detector. Our device is able to separate nitrogen, methane and carbon dioxide within 30 s. This method of device integration could be applied to the existing wealth of column geometries and chemistries designed for specialized applications.

  1. Development of activated carbon pore structure via physical and chemical activation of biomass fibre waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Paul T.; Reed, Anton R.

    2006-01-01

    Biomass waste in the form of biomass flax fibre, produced as a by-product of the textile industry was processed via both physical and chemical activation to produce activated carbons. The surface area of the physically activated carbons were up to 840 m 2 g -1 and the carbons were of mesoporous structure. Chemical activation using zinc chloride produced high surface area activated carbons up to 2400 m 2 g -1 and the pore size distribution was mainly microporous. However, the process conditions of temperature and zinc chloride concentration could be used to manipulate the surface area and porosity of the carbons to produce microporous, mesoporous and mixed microporous/mesoporous activated carbons. The physically activated carbons were found to be a mixture of Type I and Type IV carbons and the chemically activated carbons were found to be mainly Type I carbons. The development of surface morphology of physically and chemically activated carbons observed via scanning electron microscopy showed that physical activation produced activated carbons with a nodular and pitted surface morphology whereas activated carbons produced through chemical activation had a smooth surface morphology. Transmission electron microscopy analysis could identify mesopore structures in the physically activated carbon and microporous structures in the chemically activated carbons

  2. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/ribbon structures in bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Hideo, E-mail: kohno.hideo@kochi-tech.ac.jp [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Kami, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Masuda, Yusuke [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2015-05-11

    When the direction of flattening of a carbon nanotube changes during growth mediated by a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotetrahedron is formed in the middle of the carbon nanoribbon. We report the bending properties of the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure using a micro-manipulator system in a transmission electron microscope. In many cases, bending occurs at an edge of the carbon nanotetrahedron. No significant change is observed in the tetrahedron's shape during bending, and the bending is reversible and repeatable. Our results show that the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure has good durability against mechanical bending.

  3. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing [Daly City, CA; Yang, Peidong [Kensington, CA; Kim, Woong [Seoul, KR; Fan, Rong [Pasadena, CA

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  4. Decomposition of monolithic web application to microservices

    OpenAIRE

    Zaymus, Mikulas

    2017-01-01

    Solteq Oyj has an internal Wellbeing project for massage reservations. The task of this thesis was to transform the monolithic architecture of this application to microservices. The thesis starts with a detailed comparison between microservices and monolithic application. It points out the benefits and disadvantages microservice architecture can bring to the project. Next, it describes the theory and possible strategies that can be used in the process of decomposition of an existing monoli...

  5. Structures and properties of fluorinated amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K. P.; Lin, P.; Shih, H. C.

    2004-07-01

    Fluorinated amorphous carbon (a-C:F) films were deposited by radio frequency bias assisted microwave plasma electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition with tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and acetylene (C2H2) as precursors. The deposition process was performed at two flow ratios R=0.90 and R=0.97, where R=CF4/(CF4+C2H2). The samples were annealed at 300 °C for 30 min. in a N2 atmosphere. Both Fourier transform infrared and electron spectroscopy for chemical analyzer were used to characterize the a-C:F film chemical bond and fluorine concentration, respectively. A high resolution electron energy loss spectrometer was applied to detect the electronic structure. The higher CF4 flow ratio (R=0.97) produced more sp3 linear structure, and it made the a-C:F film smoother and softer. A lifetime of around 0.34 μs and an energy gap of ˜2.75 eV were observed in both the as-deposited and after annealing conditions. The short carriers lifetime in the a-C:F film made the photoluminescence peak blueshift. The annealing changed both the structure and composition of the a-C:F film. The type of fluorocarbon bond and electronic structure characterized the mechanical and physical properties of a-C:F film.

  6. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winarto,; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate

  7. Cholesterol-imprinted macroporous monoliths: Preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Mariia А; Kinziabulatova, Lilia R; Nikitina, Anna A; Korzhikova-Vlakh, Evgenia G; Tennikova, Tatiana B

    2017-11-01

    The development of sorbents for selective binding of cholesterol, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has a great importance for analytical science and medicine. In this work, two series of macroporous cholesterol-imprinted monolithic sorbents differing in the composition of functional monomers (methacrylic acid, butyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate), amount of a template (4, 6 and 8 mol%) used for molecular imprinting, as well as mean pore size were synthesized by in situ free-radical process in stainless steel housing of 50 mm × 4.6 mm i.d. All prepared materials were characterized regarding to their hydrodynamic permeability and porous properties, as well as examined by BET and SEM methods. Imprinting factors, apparent dynamic dissociation constants, the maximum binding capacity, the number of theoretical plates and the height equivalent to a theoretical palate of MIP monoliths at different mobile phase flow rates were determined. The separation of a mixture of structural analogues, namely, cholesterol and prednisolone, was demonstrated. Additionally, the possibility of using the developed monoliths for cholesterol solid-phase extraction from simulated biological solution was shown. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Predicting Reactive Transport Dynamics in Carbonates using Initial Pore Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, H. P.; Nunes, J. P. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding rock-fluid interaction at the pore-scale is imperative for accurate predictive modelling of carbon storage permanence. However, coupled reactive transport models are computationally expensive, requiring either a sacrifice of resolution or high performance computing to solve relatively simple geometries. Many recent studies indicate that initial pore structure many be the dominant mechanism in determining the dissolution regime. Here we investigate how well the initial pore structure is predictive of distribution and amount of dissolution during reactive flow using particle tracking on the initial image. Two samples of carbonate rock with varying initial pore space heterogeneity were reacted with reservoir condition CO2-saturated brine and scanned dynamically during reactive flow at a 4-μm resolution between 4 and 40 times using 4D X-ray micro-tomography over the course of 1.5 hours using μ-CT. Flow was modelled on the initial binarized image using a Navier-Stokes solver. Particle tracking was then run on the velocity fields, the streamlines were traced, and the streamline density was calculated both on a voxel-by-voxel and a channel-by-channel basis. The density of streamlines was then compared to the amount of dissolution in subsequent time steps during reaction. It was found that for the flow and transport regimes studied, the streamline density distribution in the initial image accurately predicted the dominant pathways of dissolution and gave good indicators of the type of dissolution regime that would later develop. This work suggests that the eventual reaction-induced changes in pore structure are deterministic rather than stochastic and can be predicted with high resolution imaging of unreacted rock.

  9. Hydrology and landscape structure control subalpine catchment carbon export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent Jerald Pacific

    2009-01-01

    Carbon export from high elevation ecosystems is a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Ecosystems in northern latitudes have become the focus of much research due to their potential as large sinks of carbon in the atmosphere. However, there exists limited understanding of the controls of carbon export from complex mountain catchments due to strong spatial and...

  10. Structural Modification in Carbon Nanotubes by Boron Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handuja Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have synthesized boron-incorporated carbon nanotubes (CNTs by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene in a thermal chemical vapor deposition set up using boric acid as the boron source. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies of the synthesized CNT samples showed that there was deterioration in crystallinity and improvement in alignment of the CNTs as the boron content in precursor solution increased from 0% to 15%. Raman analysis of these samples showed a shift of ~7 cm−1in wave number to higher side and broadening of the G band with increasing boron concentration along with an increase in intensity of the G band. Furthermore, there was an increase in the intensity of the D band along with a decrease in its wave number position with increase in boron content. We speculate that these structural modifications in the morphology and microstructure of CNTs might be due to the charge transfer from boron to the graphite matrix, resulting in shortening of the carbon–carbon bonds.

  11. Electric-Arc Plasma Installation for Preparing Nanodispersed Carbon Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, P.; Garlanov, D.; Vissokov, G.

    2008-01-01

    An electric-arc plasma installation operated in the hidden anode arrangement is constructed and used for the preparation of carbon nanostructures. A contracted plasma arc generated by a plasma torch using an inert gas is used as heat source. The average mass temperature of arc is higher than 10 4 K, while its power density, which is directly transferred onto the electrode (anode), is ∼ 2 kW/mm 2 . The anode contact area formed on the electrode moves against the arc by way of shifting the electrode and is hidden completely in the interior of plasma gas stream moving towards it. As a result of both the direct plasma attack and the opposite movement of streams in the hidden anode contact area, a temperature higher than 6000 K is reached. Thus, intensive vaporization takes place, which forms a saturated plasma-gas-aerosol phase of the initial material of electrode (anode). This gas phase is mixed in and carried by the plasma stream. Over that mixed plasma stream, a controlled process of quenching (fixation) is carried out by twisted turbulent fluid streams. After the fixation, the resultant carbon nano-structures are caught by a filter and collected in a bunker.

  12. Synthesis of carbon nano structures by plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez L, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the great quantity of applications of carbon neocarcinostatin (NEC) in diverse areas like: synthesis of super-resistant materials, hydrogen storage, nano sensors generation and nano catalysts, one has seen the necessity to generate new synthesis processes of these materials as well as to already improve those existent. The present work has as objective to optimize the NEC synthesis process by means of the electric arc method which uses alternating current to high frequencies (HF), obtaining relatively clean products; that is to say, it hardly presents amorphous material neither impurities. They stand out the obtaining of carbon nano fibers (NFC) by means of a luminescent-arc discharge, in a gas mixture He-CH 4 with 34% at.Ni/10.32%at.Y like catalyst; to a frequency of 42 k Hz and low power (300 W). This method benefits the agglomeration of the particles in both electrodes due to the high frequencies. The time of duration of the process oscillates between 5 and 20 minutes. The obtained product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (MEB), transmission electron microscopy (MET) to determine the type of obtained NEC and by X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy to determine the purity of the samples. The NFC are relatively free of amorphous coal. The surface and structural analysis indicates that the fibers have a half diameter of 80 nm. It is also made, a study by optical emission spectroscopy of the plasma using the Swan band to determine the temperature. (Author)

  13. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Cicero, Giancarlo; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  14. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Cicero, Giancarlo [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bernardi, Marco [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grossman, Jeffrey C., E-mail: jcg@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  15. Synthesis of Carbon nano structures by plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez L, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the great quantity of applications of the carbon nano structures (NEC) in diverse areas like: synthesis of super-resistant materials, hydrogen storage, nano sensors generation and nano catalysts, it has seen the necessity to generate new processes of synthesis of this materials as well as to already improve those existent. The present work has as objective to optimize the NEC synthesis process by means of the electric arc method which uses alternating current to high frequencies (HF), obtaining relatively clean products; that is to say, it hardly presents amorphous material neither sludges. They stand out the obtaining of carbon nano fibers (NFC) by means of a luminescent-arch discharge, in a gas mixture of He-CH 4 with 34% at. Ni/10.32% at.Y like catalyst; at a frequency of 42 kHz and low power (300 W). This method benefits the amass of the particles in both electrodes due to the high frequencies. The time of duration of the process oscillates between 5 and 20 minutes. The obtained product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (MEB), transmission electron microscopy (MET) to determine the NEC type obtained and by X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy for determining the purity of the samples. The NFC is relatively free of amorphous coal. The surface and structural analysis indicates that the fibers have a half diameter of 80 nm. It is also made, a study by optical emission spectroscopy of plasma using the Swan band for determining the temperature. (Author)

  16. Modelling of structure and properties of soft carbons with application to carbon anode baking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundersen, Oeyvind

    1998-11-01

    This work deals with topics related to modelling and control of ring furnaces for the baking of carbon anodes used in aluminium electrolysis. Anodes made of a granular coke and coal tar pitch are used in aluminium electrolysis. The anode properties are imperative for successful operation of the aluminium smelters. After mixing and forming the anode paste, heat treatment of the carbon blocks takes place in so-called ring furnaces. A ring furnace consists of a series of heat treatment sections where each section is loaded with a batch of anodes. The heat treatment of the anodes in a section consumes a lot of energy, and the anode properties partly depend on the heat treatment program. Previous work in the field of ring furnace modelling, operation and control is shortly reviewed. Both petroleum coke and coal tar pitch belong to the group of soft carbons. Models for structural parameters and porosity of soft carbons are developed. Furthermore, a new model for pyrolysis of coal tar pitch is proposed. Based on the models for pyrolysis, structure and porosity, new models for properties of single phase carbons and composite anodes are developed. These models are suitable for use in optimization of the baking process. A detailed mathematical model of a part of the heat treatment process is formulated in three spatial dimensions. The model is based on first principle descriptions of fundamental physical and chemical phenomena and the resulting model appears as a set of partial differential equations. The spatial differential operators are discretized by using the finite volume approach. In this way, a high dimensional nonlinear state space model is obtained. The model has been simulated using the method of lines. A vector of quantities which describes the anode properties is defined. This property vector constitutes a systematic definition of anode quality where the quality parameters are calculated as nonlinear transformations of the state space vector. Models are derived

  17. Modelling of structure and properties of soft carbons with application to carbon anode baking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundersen, Oeyvind

    1998-11-01

    This work deals with topics related to modelling and control of ring furnaces for the baking of carbon anodes used in aluminium electrolysis. Anodes made of a granular coke and coal tar pitch are used in aluminium electrolysis. The anode properties are imperative for successful operation of the aluminium smelters. After mixing and forming the anode paste, heat treatment of the carbon blocks takes place in so-called ring furnaces. A ring furnace consists of a series of heat treatment sections where each section is loaded with a batch of anodes. The heat treatment of the anodes in a section consumes a lot of energy, and the anode properties partly depend on the heat treatment program. Previous work in the field of ring furnace modelling, operation and control is shortly reviewed. Both petroleum coke and coal tar pitch belong to the group of soft carbons. Models for structural parameters and porosity of soft carbons are developed. Furthermore, a new model for pyrolysis of coal tar pitch is proposed. Based on the models for pyrolysis, structure and porosity, new models for properties of single phase carbons and composite anodes are developed. These models are suitable for use in optimization of the baking process. A detailed mathematical model of a part of the heat treatment process is formulated in three spatial dimensions. The model is based on first principle descriptions of fundamental physical and chemical phenomena and the resulting model appears as a set of partial differential equations. The spatial differential operators are discretized by using the finite volume approach. In this way, a high dimensional nonlinear state space model is obtained. The model has been simulated using the method of lines. A vector of quantities which describes the anode properties is defined. This property vector constitutes a systematic definition of anode quality where the quality parameters are calculated as nonlinear transformations of the state space vector. Models are derived

  18. Neutron spectrometry with a monolithic silicon telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S; D'Angelo, G; Fazzi, A; Para, A Foglio; Pola, A; Zotto, P

    2007-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was set-up by coupling a polyethylene converter with a monolithic silicon telescope, consisting of a DeltaE and an E stage-detector (about 2 and 500 microm thick, respectively). The detection system was irradiated with monoenergetic neutrons at INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Legnaro, Italy). The maximum detectable energy, imposed by the thickness of the E stage, is about 8 MeV for the present detector. The scatter plots of the energy deposited in the two stages were acquired using two independent electronic chains. The distributions of the recoil-protons are well-discriminated from those due to secondary electrons for energies above 0.350 MeV. The experimental spectra of the recoil-protons were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. An analytical model that takes into account the geometrical structure of the silicon telescope was developed, validated and implemented in an unfolding code. The capability of reproducing continuous neutron spectra was investigated by irradiating the detector with neutrons from a thick beryllium target bombarded with protons. The measured spectra were compared with data taken from the literature. Satisfactory agreement was found.

  19. Uncooled monolithic ferroelectric IRFPA technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, James F.; Hanson, Charles M.; Beratan, Howard R.; Udayakumar, K. R.; Soch, Kevin L.

    1998-10-01

    Once relegated to expensive military platforms, occasionally to civilian platforms, and envisioned for individual soldiers, uncooled thermal imaging affords cost-effective solutions for police cars, commercial surveillance, driving aids, and a variety of other industrial and consumer applications. System prices are continuing to drop, and swelling production volume will soon drive prices substantially lower. The impetus for further development is to improve performance. Hybrid barium strontium titanate (BST) detectors currently in production are relatively inexpensive, but have limited potential for improved performance. The MTF at high frequencies is limited by thermal conduction through the optical coating. Microbolometer arrays in development at Raytheon have recently demonstrated performance superior to hybrid detectors. However, microbolometer technology lacks a mature, low-cost system technology and an abundance of upgradable, deployable system implementations. Thin-film ferroelectric (TFFE) detectors have all the performance potential of microbolometers. They are also compatible with numerous fielded and planned system implementations. Like the resistive microbolometer, the TFFE detector is monolithic; i.e., the detector material is deposited directly on the readout IC rather than being bump bonded to it. Imaging arrays of 240 X 320 pixels have been produced, demonstrating the feasibility of the technology.

  20. Cost-Effective Fabrication of Inner-Porous Micro/Nano Carbon Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shulan; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Xi, Shuang

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of a new micro/nano carbon architecture array which owns the characteristics of inner-porous, desired conductivity and large effective surface area. The micro/nano inner-porous carbon structures were fabricated for the first time, with ordinary and cost-effective processes, including photolithography, oxygen plasma etching and pyrolysis. Firstly, micro/nano hierarchical photoresist structures array was generated through photolithography and oxygen plasma etching processes. By introducing a critical thin-film spin-coating step, and followed with carefully pyrolyzing process, the micro/nano photoresist structures were converted into innerporous carbon architectures with good electric connection which connected the carbon structures array together. Probably the inner-porous property can be attributed to the shrinkage difference between positive thin film and negative photoresist structures during pyrolyzing process. It is demonstrated that the simple method is effective to fabricate inner-porous carbon structures with good electric connection and the carbon structures can be used as electrochemical electrodes directly and without the addition of other pyrolysis or film coating processes. The electrochemical property of the carbon structures has been explored by cyclic voltammetric measurement. Compared with solid carbon microstructures array, the cyclic voltammetry curve of inner-porous carbon structures shows greatly enhanced current and improved charge-storage capability, indicating great potential in micro energy storage devices and bio-devices.

  1. How Well Does Carbon Handle Stress? - A Brief Overview of Carbons in Structural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-09

    strong-- PAN fibers… or weak-- aerogel be stiff—pitch carbon fibers...or flexible--Grafoil 4 A2705V2004. Approved for public release; distribution...distribution unlimited Carbon Fiber Reinforcement Aeronautics • Carbon-epoxy and carbon-phenolic are used in military aircraft . 39 A2705V2004. Approved...performance aircraft Gossamer Albatross Gossamer Penguin Voyager 40 A2705V2004. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Carbon Fiber

  2. Carbon nanotubes : their synthesis and integration into nanofabricated structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druzhinina, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The field of nanotechnology has experienced constantly increasing interest over the past decades both from industry and academy. Commonly used nanomaterials include: nanoparticles, nanowires, quantum dots, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes, in particular, are promising building

  3. Pore-Structure-Optimized CNT-Carbon Nanofibers from Starch for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjin Jeong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous carbon materials are used for many electrochemical applications due to their outstanding properties. However, research on controlling the pore structure and analyzing the carbon structures is still necessary to achieve enhanced electrochemical properties. In this study, mesoporous carbon nanotube (CNT-carbon nanofiber electrodes were developed by heat-treatment of electrospun starch with carbon nanotubes, and then applied as a binder-free electrochemical electrode for a lithium-ion battery. Using the unique lamellar structure of starch, mesoporous CNT-carbon nanofibers were prepared and their pore structures were controlled by manipulating the heat-treatment conditions. The activation process greatly increased the volume of micropores and mesopores of carbon nanofibers by etching carbons with CO2 gas, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET specific area increased to about 982.4 m2·g−1. The activated CNT-carbon nanofibers exhibited a high specific capacity (743 mAh·g−1 and good cycle performance (510 mAh·g−1 after 30 cycles due to their larger specific surface area. This condition presents many adsorption sites of lithium ions, and higher electrical conductivity, compared with carbon nanofibers without CNT. The research suggests that by controlling the heat-treatment conditions and activation process, the pore structure of the carbon nanofibers made from starch could be tuned to provide the conditions needed for various applications.

  4. Iminodiacetic acid functionalised organopolymer monoliths: application to the separation of metal cations by capillary high-performance chelation ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyna, Áine; Connolly, Damian; Nesterenko, Ekaterina; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2013-03-01

    Lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate monoliths were polymerised within fused silica capillaries and subsequently photo-grafted with varying amounts of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The grafted monoliths were then further modified with iminodiacetic acid (IDA), resulting in a range of chelating ion-exchange monoliths of increasing capacity. The IDA functional groups were attached via ring opening of the epoxy group on the poly(GMA) structure. Increasing the amount of attached poly(GMA), via photo-grafting with increasing concentrations of GMA, from 15 to 35%, resulted in a proportional and controlled increase in the complexation capacity of the chelating monoliths. Scanning capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (sC(4)D) was used to characterise and verify homogenous distribution of the chelating ligand along the length of the capillaries non-invasively. Chelation ion chromatographic separations of selected transition and heavy metals were carried out, with retention factor data proportional to the concentration of grafted poly(GMA). Average peak efficiencies of close to 5,000 N/m were achieved, with the isocratic separation of Na, Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) possible on a 250-mm-long monolith. Multiple monolithic columns produced to the same recipes gave RSD data for retention factors of ions). The monolithic chelating ion-exchanger was applied to the separation of alkaline earth and transition metal ions spiked in natural and potable waters.

  5. Assessment of the Grouted IXC Monolith in Support of K East Basin Hazard Categorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, Steven M.; Dodson, Michael G.; Alzheimer, James M.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-10-12

    Addendum to original report updating the structural analysis of the I-beam accident to reflect a smaller I-beam than originally assumed (addendum is 2 pages). The K East Basin currently contains six ion exchange columns (IXCs) that were removed from service over 10 years ago. Fluor Hanford plans to immobilize the six ion exchange columns (IXCs) in place in a concrete monolith. PNNL performed a structural assessment of the concrete monolith to determine its capability to absorb the forces imposed by postulated accidents and protect the IXCs from damage and thus prevent a release of radioactive material. From this assessment, design specifications for the concrete monolith were identified that would prevent a release of radioactive material for any of the postulated hazardous conditions.

  6. The Influence of Calcium Carbonate Composition and Activated Carbon in Pack Carburizing Low Carbon Steel Process in The Review of Hardness and Micro Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafni; Hadi, Syafrul; Edison

    2017-12-01

    Carburizing is a way of hardening the surface by heating the metal (steel) above the critical temperature in an environment containing carbon. Steel at a temperature of the critical temperature of affinity to carbon. Carbon is absorbed into the metal form a solid solution of carbon-iron and the outer layer has high carbon content. When the composition of the activator and the activated charcoal is right, it will perfect the carbon atoms to diffuse into the test material to low carbon steels. Thick layer of carbon Depending on the time and temperature are used. Pack carburizing process in this study, using 1 kg of solid carbon derived from coconut shell charcoal with a variation of 20%, 10% and 5% calcium carbonate activator, burner temperature of 950 0C, holding time 4 hours. The test material is low carbon steel has 9 pieces. Each composition has three specimens. Furnace used in this study is a pack carburizing furnace which has a designed burner box with a volume of 1000 x 600 x 400 (mm3) of coal-fired. Equipped with a circulation of oxygen from the blower 2 inches and has a wall of refractory bricks. From the variation of composition CaCO3, microstructure formed on the specimen with 20% CaCO3, better diffusion of carbon into the carbon steel, it is seen by the form marten site structure after quenching, and this indicates that there has been an increase of or adding carbon to in the specimen. This led to the formation of marten site specimen into hard surfaces, where the average value of hardness at one point side (side edge) 31.7 HRC

  7. Preparation and structure of carbon encapsulated copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Chuncheng; Xiao Feng; Cui Zuolin

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-encapsulated copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified arc plasma method using methane as carbon source. The particles were characterized in detail by transmission electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry. The encapsulated copper nanoparticles were about 30 nm in diameter with 3-5 nm graphitic carbon shells. The outside graphitic carbon layers effectively prevented unwanted oxidation of the copper inside. The effect of the ratio of He/CH 4 on the morphologies and the formation of the carbon shell were investigated

  8. Carbon structures formation in low current high voltage electrical discharge in hydrocarbon vapours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobczyk, A T; Jaworek, A

    2011-01-01

    The properties of carbon fibers and other carbon structures produced from hydrocarbon vapours decomposed in electrically generated plasma at atmospheric pressure are studied in this paper. The electrical discharge was generated between a stainless steel needle and a plate made of nickel alloy. The carbon fiber has grown at the tip of the needle electrode, while other microflower-like deposits were built at the plate. The physical properties of carbon fibers were investigated by SEM, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, and EDS methods.

  9. Boron ion irradiation induced structural and surface modification of glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalijadis, Ana; Jovanović, Zoran; Cvijović-Alagić, Ivana; Laušević, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of boron into glassy carbon was achieved by irradiating two different types of targets: glassy carbon polymer precursor and carbonized glassy carbon. Targets were irradiated with a 45 keV B 3+ ion beam in the fluence range of 5 × 10 15 –5 × 10 16 ions cm −2 . For both types of targets, the implanted boron was located in a narrow region under the surface. Following irradiation, the polymer was carbonized under the same condition as the glassy carbon samples (at 1273 K) and examined by Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, hardness and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Structural analysis showed that during the carbonization process of the irradiated polymers, boron is substitutionally incorporated into the glassy carbon structure, while for irradiated carbonized glassy carbon samples, boron irradiation caused an increase of the sp 3 carbon fraction, which is most pronounced for the highest fluence irradiation. Further analyses showed that different nature of boron incorporation, and thus changed structural parameters, are crucial for obtaining glassy carbon samples with modified mechanical, chemical and electrochemical properties over a wide range

  10. Preparation and characterization of poly-(methacrylatoethyl trimethylammonium chloride-co-vinylbenzyl chloride-co-ethylene dimethacrylate monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Malis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A polymer monolithic column, poly-(methacrylatoethyltrimethylammonium chloride-co-vinylbenzyl chloride-co-ethylene dimethacrylate or poly-(MATE-co-VBC-co-EDMA was successfully prepared in the current study by one-step thermally initiated in situ polymerization, confined in a steel tubing of 0.5 mm i.d. and 1/16” o.d. The monoliths were prepared from methacrylatoethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MATE and vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC as monomer and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA as crosslinker using a binary porogen system of 1-propanol and 1,4-butanediol. The inner wall of steel tubing was pretreated with 3-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (MAPS. In order to obtain monolith with adequate column efficiency and low flow resistance, some parameters such as total monomer concentration (%T and crosslinker concentration (%C were optimized. The morphology of this monolith was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The properties of the monolithic column, such as permeability, binding capacity, and pore size distribution were also characterized in detail. From the results of the characterization of all monolith variation, monolith with %T 30 %C 50 and %T 35 %C 50 give the best characteristic. These monoliths have high permeability, adequate molecular recognition sites (represented with binding capacity value of over 20 mg/mL, and have over 80% flow through pores in their pore structure contribute to low flow resistance. The resulted monolithic columns have promising potential for dual mode liquid chromatography. MATE may contribute for anion-exchange while VBC may responsible for reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

  11. Operational factors influence on service life characteristics of structural carbon fiber-reinforced plastic

    OpenAIRE

    Борозенець, Григорій; Павлов, Віктор; Семак, Інна

    2013-01-01

    The nature of strength changing of aircraft structural carbon fiber-reinforced plastic under influence of water saturation after static preloading and mode changing of structural elements forming process pressure is considered.

  12. Structured catalyst bed and method for conversion of feed materials to chemical products and liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong , Liu; Wei, [Richland, WA

    2012-01-24

    The present invention is a structured monolith reactor and method that provides for controlled Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The invention controls mass transport limitations leading to higher CO conversion and lower methane selectivity. Over 95 wt % of the total product liquid hydrocarbons obtained from the monolithic catalyst are in the carbon range of C.sub.5-C.sub.18. The reactor controls readsorption of olefins leading to desired products with a preselected chain length distribution and enhanced overall reaction rate. And, liquid product analysis shows readsorption of olefins is reduced, achieving a narrower FT product distribution.

  13. Lightweight, Ultra-High-Temperature, CMC-Lined Carbon/Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Matthew J.; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) is an established engineering material used extensively in aerospace. The beneficial properties of C/C include high strength, low density, and toughness. Its shortcoming is its limited usability at temperatures higher than the oxidation temperature of carbon . approximately 400 C. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are used instead, but carry a weight penalty. Combining a thin laminate of CMC to a bulk structure of C/C retains all of the benefits of C/C with the high temperature oxidizing environment usability of CMCs. Ultramet demonstrated the feasibility of combining the light weight of C/C composites with the oxidation resistance of zirconium carbide (ZrC) and zirconium- silicon carbide (Zr-Si-C) CMCs in a unique system composed of a C/C primary structure with an integral CMC liner with temperature capability up to 4,200 F (.2,315 C). The system effectively bridged the gap in weight and performance between coated C/C and bulk CMCs. Fabrication was demonstrated through an innovative variant of Ultramet fs rapid, pressureless melt infiltration processing technology. The fully developed material system has strength that is comparable with that of C/C, lower density than Cf/SiC, and ultra-high-temperature oxidation stability. Application of the reinforced ceramic casing to a predominantly C/C structure creates a highly innovative material with the potential to achieve the long-sought goal of long-term, cyclic high-temperature use of C/C in an oxidizing environment. The C/C substructure provided most of the mechanical integrity, and the CMC strengths achieved appeared to be sufficient to allow the CMC to perform its primary function of protecting the C/C. Nozzle extension components were fabricated and successfully hot-fire tested. Test results showed good thermochemical and thermomechanical stability of the CMC, as well as excellent interfacial bonding between the CMC liner and the underlying C/C structure. In particular, hafnium-containing CMCs on

  14. An analysis of burn-off impact on the structure microporous of activated carbons formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Mirosław; Kopac, Türkan

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the results on the application of the LBET numerical method as a tool for analysis of the microporous structure of activated carbons obtained from a bituminous coal. The LBET method was employed particularly to evaluate the impact of the burn-off on the obtained microporous structure parameters of activated carbons.

  15. Fabrication of periodical surface structures by picosecond laser irradiation of carbon thin films: transformation of amorphous carbon in nanographite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania); Bita, B. [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, Voluntari RO-077190 (Romania); Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania); Besleaga, C.; Zgura, I. [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105bis Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania); Himcinschi, C. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg D-09596 (Germany); Popescu, A.C., E-mail: andrei.popescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Magurele RO-077125 (Romania)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Ripples obtained on carbon films after irradiation with visible ps laser pulses. • Amorphous carbon was transformed in nanographite following irradiation. • Ripples had a complex morphology, being made of islands of smaller ripples. • Hydrophilic carbon films became hydrophobic after surface structuring. - Abstract: Thin films of carbon were synthesized by ns pulsed laser deposition in vacuum on silicon substrates, starting from graphite targets. Further on, the films were irradiated with a picosecond laser source emitting in visible at 532 nm. After tuning of laser parameters, we obtained a film surface covered by laser induced periodical surface structures (LIPSS). They were investigated by optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. It was observed that changing the irradiation angle influences the LIPSS covered area. At high magnification it was revealed that the LIPSS pattern was quite complex, being composed of other small LIPSS islands, interconnected by bridges of nanoparticles. Raman spectra for the non-irradiated carbon films were typical for a-C type of diamond-like carbon, while the LIPSS spectra were characteristic to nano-graphite. The pristine carbon film was hydrophilic, while the LIPSS covered film surface was hydrophobic.

  16. Chiral monolithic absorbent constructed by optically active helical-substituted polyacetylene and graphene oxide: preparation and chiral absorption capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifei; Wang, Bo; Yang, Wantai; Deng, Jianping

    2015-02-01

    Chiral monolithic absorbent is successfully constructed for the first time by using optically active helical-substituted polyacetylene and graphene oxide (GO). The preparative strategy is facile and straightforward, in which chiral-substituted acetylene monomer (Ma), cross-linker (Mb), and alkynylated GO (Mc) undergo copolymerization to form the desired monolithic absorbent in quantitative yield. The resulting monoliths are characterized by circular dichroism, UV-vis absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR, Raman, energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), XPS, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. The polymer chains derived from Ma form chiral helical structures and thus provide optical activity to the monoliths, while GO sheets contribute to the formation of porous structures. The porous structure enables the monolithic absorbents to demonstrate a large swelling ratio in organic solvents, and more remarkably, the helical polymer chains provide optical activity and further enantio-differentiating absorption ability. The present study establishes an efficient and versatile methodology for preparing novel functional materials, in particular monolithic chiral materials based on substituted polyacetylene and GO. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinek, Marek [Warszawa, PL; Kostecki, Robert [Lafayette, CA

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  18. Structure of hydrated calcium carbonates: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demichelis, Raffaella; Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D.

    2014-09-01

    The structures of both ikaite (CaCO3 · 6H2 O) and monohydrocalcite (CaCO3 ·H2 O) were computed at the PBE0 level of theory, using all electron Gaussian type basis sets. Correction for the long-range dispersion contribution was included for the oxygen-oxygen interactions by using an additive pairwise term with the atomic coefficients fitted against the calcite vs aragonite enthalpy difference. The potential chirality of monohydrocalcite is discussed, as well as the helical motifs created by the three-fold rototranslational axes parallel to the [001] direction. These elements represent a significant link between monohydrocalcite and vaterite, both appearing as intermediate species during CaCO3 crystallization from amorphous calcium carbonate. The hydrogen bond pattern, never fully discussed for monohydrocalcite, is here described and compared to the available experimental data. Both phases are characterized by the presence of hydrogen bonds of moderate to high strength. Water molecules in monohydrocalcite interact quite strongly with 2 CO32- units through such hydrogen bonds, whereas their interaction with each other is minor. On the contrary, water molecules in ikaite create a complex network of hydrogen bonds, where each water molecule is strongly hydrogen bonded to one CO32- anion and to one or two other water molecules.

  19. Monolithic JFET preamplifier for ionization chamber calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Manfredi, P.F.; Speziali, V.

    1990-10-01

    A monolithic charge sensitive preamplifier using exclusively n-channel diffused JFETs has been designed and is now being fabricated by INTERFET Corp. by means of a dielectrically isolated process which allows preserving as much as possible the technology upon which discrete JFETs are based. A first prototype built by means of junction isolated process has been delivered. The characteristics of monolithically integrated JFETs compare favorably with discrete devices. First results of tests of a preamplifier which uses these devices are reported. 4 refs

  20. Technology development for SOI monolithic pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczewski, J.; Domanski, K.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Jaroszewicz, B.; Kociubinski, A.; Kucharski, K.; Tomaszewski, D.; Caccia, M.; Kucewicz, W.; Niemiec, H.

    2006-01-01

    A monolithic detector of ionizing radiation has been manufactured using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers with a high-resistivity substrate. In our paper the integration of a standard 3 μm CMOS technology, originally designed for bulk devices, with fabrication of pixels in the bottom wafer of a SOI substrate is described. Both technological sequences have been merged minimizing thermal budget and providing suitable properties of all the technological layers. The achieved performance proves that fully depleted monolithic active pixel matrix might be a viable option for a wide spectrum of future applications

  1. Crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate monoliths synthesized by directed soft template method for highly sensitive NO{sub 2} gas sensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoa, Nguyen Duc, E-mail: ndhoa@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam); Duy, Nguyen Van [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam); Hieu, Nguyen Van, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Mesoporous WO{sub 3} nanoplate monoliths were obtained by direct templating synthesis. ► Enable effective accession of the analytic molecules for the sensor applications. ► The WO{sub 3} sensor exhibited a high performance to NO{sub 2} gas at low temperature. -- Abstract: Controllable synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors with nanocrystalline size, porous structure, and large specific surface area is one of the key issues for effective gas sensor applications. In this study, crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate-like monoliths with high specific surface areas were obtained through instant direct-templating synthesis for highly sensitive nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sensor applications. The copolymer soft template was converted into a solid carbon framework by heat treatment in an inert gas prior to calcinations in air to sustain the mesoporous structure of tungsten oxide. The multidirectional mesoporous structures of tungsten oxide with small crystalline size, large specific surface area, and superior physical characteristics enabled the rapid and effective accession of analytic gas molecules. As a result, the sensor response was enhanced and the response and recovery times were reduced, in which the mesoporous tungsten oxide based gas sensor exhibited a superior response of 21,155% to 5 ppm NO{sub 2}. In addition, the developed sensor exhibited selective detection of low NO{sub 2} concentration in ammonia and ethanol at a low temperature of approximately 150 °C.

  2. Calcium silicate structure and carbonation shrinkage of a tobermorite-based material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Fumiaki; Aono, Yoshimichi; Shibata, Sumio

    2004-01-01

    Carbonated autoclaved aerated concretes (AACs) show no shrinkage at a degree of carbonation approximately less than 20%. The 29 Si MAS NMR spectrum showed that at a degree of carbonation less than 25%, the typical double-chain silicate anion structure of tobermorite-11A was well maintained and interlayer Ca ions were exchanged with protons. This corresponded to the absence of carbonation shrinkage at a degree of carbonation less than 20%. When the degree of carbonation increased from 25% to 50% up to 60%, the double-chain silicate anion structure of tobermorite-11A was decomposed and Ca ions in the Ca-O layers were dissolved, showing a possible mechanism of carbonation shrinkage

  3. Estimating the Contribution of Industry Structure Adjustment to the Carbon Intensity Target: A Case of Guangdong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Industry structure adjustment is an effective measure to achieve the carbon intensity target of Guangdong Province. Accurately evaluating the contribution of industry structure adjustment to the carbon intensity target is helpful for the government to implement more flexible and effective policies and measures for CO2 emissions reduction. In this paper, we attempt to evaluate the contribution of industry structure adjustment to the carbon intensity target. Firstly, we predict the gross domestic product (GDP with scenario forecasting, industry structure with the Markov chain model, CO2 emissions with a novel correlation mode based on least squares support vector machine, and then we assess the contribution of industry structure adjustment to the carbon intensity target of Guangdong during the period of 2011–2015 under nine scenarios. The obtained results show, in the ideal scenario, that the economy will grow at a high speed and the industry structure will be significantly adjusted, and thus the carbon intensity in 2015 will decrease by 25.53% compared to that in 2010, which will make a 130.94% contribution to the carbon intensity target. Meanwhile, in the conservative scenario, the economy will grow at a low speed and the industry structure will be slightly adjusted, and thus the carbon intensity in 2015 will decrease by 23.89% compared to that in 2010, which will make a 122.50% contribution to the carbon intensity target.

  4. Template-free fabrication and morphology regulation of Ag@carbon composite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenyan, E-mail: zhangwenyan8531@gmail.com [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Hao, Lingyun; Lin, Qin [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Technology University, Nanjing (China); Chen, Xiaoyu [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A simple and low-cost method to prepare Ag@C composite material. • AgNO{sub 3} plays an important role in tuning size and functional groups of products. • HTC reaction time is also a key factor for regulating the Ag@C structure. - Abstract: Ag–carbon composite materials were prepared without any template by hydrothermal carbonization of solvable starch. The composite materials are composed of Ag cores and carbonaceous shell to form a core–shell (Ag@carbon) structure. During the hydrothermal carbonization process, the aromatization and carbonization of solvable starch endowed the Ag@carbon composite structure with abundant aromatic, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. The AgNO{sub 3} concentration and HTC reaction time are two important factors for regulating the size, morphology and functional groups of the composite material. With the increasing of AgNO{sub 3} concentration, morphologies of the composite material turned from spheres to wires.

  5. Pore structure and carbonation in blended lime-cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez, J. I.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to gain a fuller understandingof the curing process in lime pastes (100, 90, 80, 70,60, 50 and 40% lime blended with cement by analyzingcarbonation in these materials. A hydrated, airslaked lime powder and CEM II A/L 32.5 Portlandcement were used for the blends. These materialswere singled out for research primarily because theymay be used in the restoration of heritage monuments.Variation in weight was used as an indicator for carbonation.A new parameter, A, was found to vary inverselywith the percentage of the cement because of theprevalence of Knudsen diffusion in the paste, in turndue to the characteristics of the pore structure, whichwas studied by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP.The hygroscopic study conducted on the different pastesprovided information on water content at a givenhumidity and its location, i.e., adsorbed on the surfaceof the pores or condensed inside them, obstructing thediffusion of CO2. The conclusion drawn from this studyof the curing process was that neither drying nor C3Shydration retarded lime carbonation.En este trabajo se estudia el proceso de carbonatacionen pastas mixtas de cal y cemento (100, 90, 80, 70, 60,50 y 40% de cal con el objeto de obtener un mejorconocimiento del proceso de curado en estos materiales.Para ello se ha empleado una cal aerea hidratada en polvoy un cemento Portland del tipo CEM II A/L 32,5. Enparticular, este estudio investiga estos materiales ya quepueden ser utilizados en la restauracion del PatrimonioCultural. Se ha utilizado la variacion de peso como indicadordel proceso de carbonatacion. Se ha establecidoun nuevo parametro, A, que varia inversamente con elporcentaje de cemento en la pasta, debido al predominiode la difusion de Knudsen como consecuencia de laestructura porosa, que ha sido estudiada por medio deporosimetria de intrusion de mercurio (PIM. El estudiohigroscopico realizado sobre las diversas pastas permiteconocer el contenido en agua a una

  6. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Inam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by indentation. For comprehensive comparison, fracture toughness and percolation threshold were analysed as well. Because of the systematically induced indentation damage, a sharp decrease of 89% was observed in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CNT nanocomposite as compared to 25% in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CB nanocomposite. CNTs impart superior damage sensing capability in brittle nanocomposite structures, in comparison to CB, due to their high aspect ratio (fibrous nature and high electrical conductivity.

  7. Fractionation separation of human plasma proteins using HPLC with a homemade iron porphyrin based monolithic column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Doudou; Zhao, Yu; Lan, Dandan; Pang, Xiaomin; Bai, Ligai; Liu, Haiyan; Yan, Hongyuan

    2017-11-15

    In this work a polymer monolithic column was fabricated within the confines of a stainless steel column (50×4.6mm i.d.) via radical polymerization by using iron porphyrin and butyl methacrylate as co-monomers, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as crosslinking agent, ethylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol and N, N-dimethylformamide as tri-porogens, benzoyl peroxide and N,N-dimethylaniline as initiators. The resulting monolithic column was characterized by elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption BET surface area, and mercury intrusion porosimetry, respectively. Results showed that the homemade monolith occupied relatively uniform pore structure, low back pressure, and enhanced selectivity for proteins in complex bio-samples. The present work described a simple and efficient method for "fractionation separation" of human plasma proteins, and it is a promising separation method for complex bio-samples in proteomic research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation and characterization of Au/CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawel, Bartlomiej; Lambrechts, Kalle [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Oye, Gisle, E-mail: gisle.oye@chemeng.ntnu.no [Ugelstad Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile method for preparing Au/CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monoliths with hierarchical porosity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous-flow testing of the monoliths in liquid-phase oxidation of glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased catalytic activity in the presence of cerium oxide (stirred-batch tests). - Abstract: Porous CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monoliths with hierarchical pore structure were prepared by mixing boehmite particles with solutions containing different amounts of cerium chloride and aluminum nitrate. The monoliths were functionalized with gold nanoparticles using the incipient wetness method. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, mercury porosimetry, UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The catalysts were tested in liquid phase glucose oxidation, comparing continuously stirred batch reactor and continuous-flow fix-bed reactor setups.

  9. Monolithic View of Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Chiosi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We review and critically discuss the current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution limited to Early Type Galaxies (ETGs as inferred from the observational data and briefly contrast the hierarchical and quasi-monolithic paradigms of formation and evolution. Since in Cold Dark Matter (CDM cosmogony small scale structures typically collapse early and form low-mass haloes that subsequently can merge to assembly larger haloes, galaxies formed in the gravitational potential well of a halo are also expected to merge thus assembling their mass hierarchically. Mergers should occur all over the Hubble time and large mass galaxies should be in place only recently. However, recent observations of high redshift galaxies tell a different story: massive ETGs are already in place at high redshift. To this aim, we propose here a revision of the quasi-monolithic scenario as an alternative to the hierarchical one, in which mass assembling should occur in early stages of a galaxy lifetime and present recent models of ETGs made of Dark and Baryonic Matter in a Λ-CDM Universe that obey the latter scheme. The galaxies are followed from the detachment from the linear regime and Hubble flow at z ≥ 20 down to the stage of nearly complete assembly of the stellar content (z ∼ 2 − 1 and beyond.  It is found that the total mass (Mh = MDM + MBM and/or initial over-density of the proto-galaxy drive the subsequent star formation histories (SFH. Massive galaxies (Mh ~ _1012M⊙ experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates ≥ 103M⊙/yr at early epochs, consistently with observations, with a weak dependence on the initial over-density; intermediate mass haloes (Mh~_ 1010 − 1011M⊙ have star formation histories that strongly depend on their initial over-density; finally, low mass haloes (Mh ~_ 109M⊙ always have erratic, burst-like star forming histories. The present-day properties (morphology, structure, chemistry and photometry of the

  10. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati; Jiang, Qiu; Kurra, Narendra; Buttner, Ulrich; Wang, Xianbin; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  11. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  12. Structure in nascent carbon nanotubes revealed by spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landois, Périne [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Pinault, Mathieu [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Huard, Mickaël [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Reita, Valérie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Rouzière, Stéphan; Launois, Pascale [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Mayne-L' Hermite, Martine [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bendiab, Nedjma, E-mail: nedjma.bendiab@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth is crucial for the control of their production. In particular, the identification of structural changes of carbon possibly occurring near the catalyst particle in the very early stages of their formation is of high interest. In this study, samples of nascent CNT obtained during nucleation step and samples of vertically aligned CNT obtained during growth step are analysed by combined spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy reveals that iron-based phases and carbon phases are co-localized at the same position, and indicates that sp{sup 2} carbon nucleates preferentially on iron-based particles during this nucleation step. Depth scan Raman spectroscopy analysis, performed on nascent CNT, highlights that carbon structural organisation is significantly changing from defective graphene layers surrounding the iron-based particles at their base up to multi-walled nanotube structures in the upper part of iron-based particles. - Highlights: • Spatial co-localization of iron and carbon structures in nascent carbon nanotubes • Imaging local carbon structure changes along catalyst particles by Raman spectroscopy. • In nascent nanotubes, significant structural changes occur along catalyst particle.

  13. Forest structure and carbon dynamics in Amazonian tropical rain forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Simone; de Camargo, Plinio Barbosa; Selhorst, Diogo; da Silva, Roseana; Hutyra, Lucy; Chambers, Jeffrey Q; Brown, I Foster; Higuchi, Niro; dos Santos, Joaquim; Wofsy, Steven C; Trumbore, Susan E; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio

    2004-08-01

    Living trees constitute one of the major stocks of carbon in tropical forests. A better understanding of variations in the dynamics and structure of tropical forests is necessary for predicting the potential for these ecosystems to lose or store carbon, and for understanding how they recover from disturbance. Amazonian tropical forests occur over a vast area that encompasses differences in topography, climate, and geologic substrate. We observed large differences in forest structure, biomass, and tree growth rates in permanent plots situated in the eastern (near Santarém, Pará), central (near Manaus, Amazonas) and southwestern (near Rio Branco, Acre) Amazon, which differed in dry season length, as well as other factors. Forests at the two sites experiencing longer dry seasons, near Rio Branco and Santarém, had lower stem frequencies (460 and 466 ha(-1) respectively), less biodiversity (Shannon-Wiener diversity index), and smaller aboveground C stocks (140.6 and 122.1 Mg C ha(-1)) than the Manaus site (626 trees ha(-1), 180.1 Mg C ha(-1)), which had less seasonal variation in rainfall. The forests experiencing longer dry seasons also stored a greater proportion of the total biomass in trees with >50 cm diameter (41-45 vs 30% in Manaus). Rates of annual addition of C to living trees calculated from monthly dendrometer band measurements were 1.9 (Manaus), 2.8 (Santarém), and 2.6 (Rio Branco) Mg C ha(-1) year(-1). At all sites, trees in the 10-30 cm diameter class accounted for the highest proportion of annual growth (38, 55 and 56% in Manaus, Rio Branco and Santarém, respectively). Growth showed marked seasonality, with largest stem diameter increment in the wet season and smallest in the dry season, though this may be confounded by seasonal variation in wood water content. Year-to-year variations in C allocated to stem growth ranged from nearly zero in Rio Branco, to 0.8 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1) in Manaus (40% of annual mean) and 0.9 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1) (33% of

  14. Fluorescence monitoring of capillary electrophoresis separation of biomolecules with monolithically integrated optical waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongre, C.; Dekker, R.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Martinez-Vazquez, R.; Osellame, R.; Ramponi, R.; Cerullo, G.; van Weeghel, R.; Besselink, G.A.J.; van den Vlekkert, H.H.; Pollnau, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic integration of optical waveguides in a commercial lab-on-a-chip by femtosecond-laser material processing enables arbitrary 3D geometries of optical sensing structures in combination with fluidic microchannels. Integrated fluorescence monitoring of molecular separation, as applicable in

  15. Monolithic Concrete vs Precast Concrete for the Construction of Bridge by Th Cantilever Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morlova Dumitru Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article "Monolithic Concrete vs Precast Concrete for the Construction of Bridges by the Cantilever Method", there are approached a number of issues that come out in the design and execution of prestressed concrete bridge structures using the cantilever method.

  16. Carbon taxation and market structure: A CGE analysis for Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, Anton; Grethe, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Russia is one of the world's major sources of carbon based energy as well as one its most intensive users. Introducing carbon taxes can lead to a reduction in emissions and encourage investment in energy efficiency. We investigate the economic effects of carbon taxes on the Russian economy under perfect competition and a Cournot oligopoly in output markets. The main findings are: (i) substituting carbon taxes for labour taxes can yield a strong double dividend in Russia; however, welfare gains strongly depend on the labour supply elasticity and elasticities of substitution between capital, labour, and energy. (ii) Under the assumption of a Cournot oligopoly with homogenous products and symmetric firms in the markets for natural gas, petroleum and chemical products, metals, and minerals, welfare costs of the environmental tax reform can be higher than under perfect competition. This is because introducing carbon taxes leads to a reduction in already sub-optimal output, thereby exacerbating pre-existing distortions arising from imperfect competition. (iii) Furthermore, increases in energy costs can result in higher mark-ups in some markets because of less competition resulting from firms' exit. - Highlights: ► Substituting carbon taxes for labour taxes in Russia can yield a double dividend. ► The labour supply elasticity and substitution possibilities between factors are crucial. ► Introducing carbon taxes can exacerbate distortions from imperfect competition. ► Increases in energy costs result in higher mark-ups because of less competition.

  17. Package Holds Five Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Decker, D. Richard; Olson, Hilding M.

    1996-01-01

    Packages protect and hold monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) chips while providing dc and radio-frequency (RF) electrical connections for chips undergoing development. Required to be compact, lightweight, and rugged. Designed to minimize undesired resonances, reflections, losses, and impedance mismatches.

  18. Application of a Fast Separation Method for Anti-diabetics in Pharmaceuticals Using Monolithic Column: Comparative Study With Silica Based C-18 Particle Packed Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, A; Abdel-Aziz, Omar

    2018-04-01

    Run time is a predominant factor in HPLC for quality control laboratories especially if there is large number of samples have to be analyzed. Working at high flow rates cannot be attained with silica based particle packed column due to elevated backpressure issues. The use of monolithic column as an alternative to traditional C-18 column was tested for fast separation of pharmaceuticals, where the results were very competitive. The performance comparison of both columns was tested for separation of anti-diabetic combination containing Metformin, Pioglitazone and Glimepiride using Gliclazide as an internal standard. Working at high flow rates with less significant backpressure was obtained with the monolithic column where the run time was reduced from 6 min in traditional column to only 1 min in monolithic column with accepted resolution. The structure of the monolith contains many pores which can adapt the high flow rate of the mobile phase. Moreover, peak symmetry and equilibration time were more efficient with monolithic column.

  19. Fiber-based monolithic columns for liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladisch, Michael; Zhang, Leyu

    2016-10-01

    Fiber-based monoliths for use in liquid chromatographic separations are defined by columns packed with aligned fibers, woven matrices, or contiguous fiber structures capable of achieving rapid separations of proteins, macromolecules, and low molecular weight components. A common denominator and motivating driver for this approach, first initiated 25 years ago, was reducing the cost of bioseparations in a manner that also reduced residence time of retained components while achieving a high ratio of mass to momentum transfer. This type of medium, when packed into a liquid chromatography column, minimized the fraction of stagnant liquid and resulted in a constant plate height for non-adsorbing species. The uncoupling of dispersion from eluent flow rate enabled the surface chemistry of the stationary phase to be considered separately from fluid transport phenomena and pointed to new ways to apply chemistry for the engineering of rapid bioseparations. This paper addresses developments and current research on fiber-based monoliths and explains how the various forms of this type of chromatographic stationary phase have potential to provide new tools for analytical and preparative scale separations. The different stationary phases are discussed, and a model that captures the observed constant plate height as a function of mobile phase velocity is reviewed. Methods that enable hydrodynamically stable fiber columns to be packed and operated over a range of mobile phase flow rates, together with the development of new fiber chemistries, are shown to provide columns that extend the versatility of liquid chromatography using monoliths, particularly at the preparative scale. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of a sample mixture being separated by a rolled-stationary phase column, resulting separated peaks shown in the chromatogram.

  20. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical

  1. Methacrylate monolithic columns functionalized with epinephrine for capillary electrochromatography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Correa, Enrique Javier; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel

    2013-07-12

    Epinephrine-bonded polymeric monoliths for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) were developed by nucleophilic substitution reaction of epoxide groups of poly(glycidyl-methacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate) (poly(GMA-co-EDMA)) monoliths using epinephrine as nucleophilic reagent. The ring opening reaction under dynamic conditions was optimized. Successful chemical modification of the monolith surface was ascertained by in situ Raman spectroscopy characterization. In addition, the amount of epinephrine groups that was bound to the monolith surface was evaluated by oxidation of the catechol groups with Ce(IV), followed by spectrophotometric measurement of unreacted Ce(IV). About 9% of all theoretical epoxide groups of the parent monolith were bonded to epinephrine. The chromatographic behavior of the epinephrine-bonded monolith in CEC conditions was assessed with test mixtures of alkyl benzenes, aniline derivatives and substituted phenols. In comparison to the poly(GMA-co-EDMA) monoliths, the epinephrine-bonded monoliths exhibited a much higher retention and slight differences in selectivity. The epinephrine-bonded monolith was further modified by oxidation with a Ce(IV) solution and compared with the epinephrine-bonded monoliths. The resulting monolithic stationary phases were evaluated in terms of reproducibility, giving RSD values below 9% in the parameters investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Monolithic Active Pixel Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) ASIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Farah F.; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12 keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC 2 shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using μ-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 (micro)m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  3. Monolithic Active Pixel Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) ASIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Farah F.; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond J.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12 keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  4. The Influence of GI and GII on the Compression After Impact Strength of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates and Sandwich Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Scharber, L. L.

    2017-01-01

    This study measured the compression after impact strength of IM7 carbon fiber laminates made from epoxy resins with various mode I and mode II toughness values to observe the effects of these toughness values on the resistance to damage formation and subsequent residual compression strength-carrying capabilities. Both monolithic laminates and sandwich structure were evaluated. A total of seven different epoxy resin systems were used ranging in approximate GI values of 245-665 J/sq m and approximate GII values of 840-2275 J/sq m. The results for resistance to impact damage formation showed that there was a direct correlation between GII and the planar size of damage, as measured by thermography. Subsequent residual compression strength testing suggested that GI had no influence on the measured values and most of the difference in compression strength was directly related to the size of damage. Thus, delamination growth assumed as an opening type of failure mechanism does not appear to be responsible for loss of compression strength in the specimens examined in this study.

  5. Graphitic Carbon Foam Structural Cores and Multifunctional Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphitic carbon foams include a family of material forms and products with mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties that are tailor-able over a wide range....

  6. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  7. Structural characterization and frictional properties of carbon nanotube/alumina composites prepared by precursor method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Go [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-707 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: gyamamoto@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp; Omori, Mamoru; Yokomizo, Kenji; Hashida, Toshiyuki [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-707 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Adachi, Koshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites with MWCNTs content up to 10 mass% were prepared by precursor method. XRD analysis revealed that MWCNT/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were successfully synthesized by the dehydration of aluminum hydroxide-MWCNTs mixture at 1500 deg. C in vacuum. The steady-state friction coefficient ({mu}) of the composites decreased with increasing up to 4 mass% MWCNT and stayed constant ({mu} = 0.33) with further addition of MWCNT, which value was substantially lower than that of MWCNT-free monolithic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ({mu} = 0.57). Microstructural observations showed that resultant friction behavior may be related to the smearing of transferred film over the contact area, which was expected to permit easy shear and then help to achieve a lubricating effect during sliding. However, fracture property tests have shown that no improvement of the fracture strength and fracture toughness of the composites was achieved by addition of MWCNTs. It may be mainly due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs and the weak interface between MWCNTs and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix.

  8. Structural characterization and frictional properties of carbon nanotube/alumina composites prepared by precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Go; Omori, Mamoru; Yokomizo, Kenji; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Adachi, Koshi

    2008-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Al 2 O 3 composites with MWCNTs content up to 10 mass% were prepared by precursor method. XRD analysis revealed that MWCNT/Al 2 O 3 composites were successfully synthesized by the dehydration of aluminum hydroxide-MWCNTs mixture at 1500 deg. C in vacuum. The steady-state friction coefficient (μ) of the composites decreased with increasing up to 4 mass% MWCNT and stayed constant (μ = 0.33) with further addition of MWCNT, which value was substantially lower than that of MWCNT-free monolithic Al 2 O 3 (μ = 0.57). Microstructural observations showed that resultant friction behavior may be related to the smearing of transferred film over the contact area, which was expected to permit easy shear and then help to achieve a lubricating effect during sliding. However, fracture property tests have shown that no improvement of the fracture strength and fracture toughness of the composites was achieved by addition of MWCNTs. It may be mainly due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs and the weak interface between MWCNTs and the Al 2 O 3 matrix

  9. Comparison of Novel Carboneous Structures to Treat Nitroaromatic Impacted Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Perfluorinated Compounds from Groundwater using Granular Activated Carbon. University of Colorado. Li, L., Quinlivan, P. A, and Knappe, D. R. U. (2002...and Owens, G. (2009). "Kinetics and thermodynamics of sorption of nitroaromatic compounds to as-grown and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes...used as adsorbents to treat water contaminated by a model nitroaromatic compound , 2,4- dinitrotoluene (DNT). The DNT adsorption capacity of pristine

  10. Porous polymer monoliths functionalized through copolymerization of a C60 fullerene-containing methacrylate monomer for highly efficient separations of small molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chambers, Stuart D.

    2011-12-15

    Monolithic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) and poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) capillary columns, which incorporate the new monomer [6,6]-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate ester, have been prepared and their chromatographic performance have been tested for the separation of small molecules in the reversed phase. While addition of the C60-fullerene monomer to the glycidyl methacrylate-based monolith enhanced column efficiency 18-fold, to 85 000 plates/m at a linear velocity of 0.46 mm/s and a retention factor of 2.6, when compared to the parent monolith, the use of butyl methacrylate together with the carbon nanostructured monomer afforded monolithic columns with an efficiency for benzene exceeding 110 000 plates/m at a linear velocity of 0.32 mm/s and a retention factor of 4.2. This high efficiency is unprecedented for separations using porous polymer monoliths operating in an isocratic mode. Optimization of the chromatographic parameters affords near baseline separation of 6 alkylbenzenes in 3 min with an efficiency of 64 000 plates/m. The presence of 1 wt % or more of water in the polymerization mixture has a large effect on both the formation and reproducibility of the monoliths. Other factors such as nitrogen exposure, polymerization conditions, capillary filling method, and sonication parameters were all found to be important in producing highly efficient and reproducible monoliths. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Nickel–carbon nanocomposites: Synthesis, structural changes and strengthening mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, D.; Vilarigues, M.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The present work investigates Ni–nanodiamond and Ni–graphite composites produced by mechanical synthesis and subsequent heat treatments. Processing of nickel–carbon nanocomposites by this powder metallurgy route poses specific challenges, as carbon phases are prone to carbide conversion and amorphization. The processing window for carbide prevention has been established through X-ray diffraction by a systematic variation of the milling parameters. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the absence of carbide and showed homogeneous particle distributions, as well as intimate bonding between the metallic matrix and the carbon phases. Ring diffraction patterns of chemically extracted carbon phases demonstrated that milled nanodiamond preserved crystallinity, while an essentially amorphous nature could be inferred for milled graphite. Raman spectra confirmed that nanodiamond particles remained largely unaffected by mechanical synthesis, whereas the bands of milled graphite were significantly changed into the typical amorphous carbon fingerprint. The results on the annealed nanocomposites showed that milling with Ni accelerated graphitization of the carbon phases during heat treatments at 973 and 1073 K in both composites. At the finer scales, the nanocomposites exhibited a remarkable microhardness enhancement (∼70%) compared with pure nanostructured nickel. The Hall–Petch relation and the Orowan–Ashby equation are used to discuss strengthening mechanisms and the load transfer ability to the reinforcing particles.

  12. Functional Biomass Carbons with Hierarchical Porous Structure for Supercapacitor Electrode Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Duo; Shen, Zhehong; Bao, Binfu; Zhao, Shuyan; Wu, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We successfully prepared bamboo-derived porous carbon with B and N co-doping. • This novel carbon exhibits significantly enhanced specific capacitance and energy density. • The highest specific capacitance exceeds those of most similar carbon materials. • Asymmetric supercapacitor based on this carbon shows satisfactory capacitive performance. - Abstract: This paper presents nitrogen and boron co-doped KOH-activated bamboo-derived carbon as a porous biomass carbon with utility as a supercapacitor electrode material. Owing to the high electrochemical activity promoted by the hierarchical porous structure and further endowed by boron and nitrogen co-doping, electrodes based on the as-obtained material exhibit significantly enhanced specific capacitance and energy density relative to those based on most similar materials. An asymmetric supercapacitor based on this novel carbon material demonstrated satisfactory energy density and electrochemical cycling stability.

  13. Exceptionally stable and hierarchically porous self-standing zeolite monolith based on a solution-mediated and solid-state transformation synergistic mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Manh Huy [Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Chemical Technology, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, 01 Mac Dinh Chi, District 1, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Cheng, Dang-guo, E-mail: dgcheng@zju.edu.cn [College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Chen, Fengqiu [Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Zhan, Xiaoli [College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-11-15

    Although many strategies exist for fabricating hierarchical zeolite monolith, it is still challenging to synthesize pure hierarchical zeolite monolith with intracrystalline meso-/macropores and stability suitable for industrial application in a general and efficient process. Here we describe a simple quasi-solid gel crystallization route to prepare hierarchical self-standing ZSM-5 zeolite monolith via the use of Na{sup +} and OH{sup −} as counterions to modify the breaking and remaking of T–O–T (T = Si or Al) bonds. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microcopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser scan confocal microscopy (LSCM), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, mercury porosimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and compression mechanical testing were applied to elucidate the structure and mechanical stability of the obtained monolith. The self-standing monolith is composed of self-interconnected meso-/macroporous MFI crystals with tunable intracrystalline meso-/macropores and possesses an unusually mechanical stability with a crushing strength of 5.01 MPa. Combined with controllable structure of the defect-free membrane layer on the monolith top, the self-standing zeolite monolith should widen their potential applications. - Highlights: • Hierarchical self-standing MFI zeolite monoliths were synthesized via a facile method. • Na{sup +} and OH{sup −} are used as counterions for breaking and remaking of T–O–T (T = Si or Al) bonds. • Hierarchical self-standing MFI zeolite monoliths result from zeolite crystal intergrowth. • Self-standing zeolite monolith has an excellent mechanical stability with tunable intracrystalline meso-/macropores.

  14. Anatomy and origin of carbonate structures in a Miocene cold-seep field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Ivano W.; Garrison, Robert E.; Moore, J. Casey; Kastner, Miriam; Stakes, Debra S.

    2001-12-01

    Miocene calcite concretions resembling modern carbonate structures that form at cold seeps are present in fractured opal- CT porcelanites that are interbedded with mudstones in coastal cliffs at Santa Cruz, California. The morphologies of the carbonate structures differ markedly from conventional concretions and are spatially aligned with orthogonal joints in the porcelanites. The structures contain tubular holes that are identical to fluid and gas conduits in modern carbonate seep structures; the orientations of these tubes suggest that fluid and gas flow was both vertical and horizontal, the latter along extensional joints that formed preferentially in the brittle, silica-rich layers that had enhanced bedding- parallel permeability. Petrographic and isotopic characteristics of the carbonate structures indicate that calcite precipitation occurred in a shallow, subseafloor environment in either the zone of microbial sulfate reduction or of methanogenesis, prior to or possibly simultaneously with the silica phase transformation of opal- A in diatom shells to opal-CT.

  15. A novel approach for the fabrication of carbon nanofibre/ceramic porous structures

    KAUST Repository

    Walter, Claudia

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of hybrid ceramic/carbon scaffolds in which carbon nanofibres and multi-walled carbon nanotubes fully cover the internal walls of a microporous ceramic structure that provides mechanical stability. Freeze casting is used to fabricate a porous, lamellar ceramic (Al2O3) structure with aligned pores whose width can be controlled between 10 and 90μm. Subsequently, a two step chemical vapour deposition process that uses iron as a catalyst is used to grow the carbon nanostructures inside the scaffold. This catalyst remains in the scaffold after the growth process. The formation of the alumina scaffold and the influence of its structure on the growth of nanofibres and tubes are investigated. A set of growth conditions is determined to produce a dense covering of the internal walls of the porous ceramic with the carbon nanostructures. The limiting pore size for this process is located around 25μm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  17. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A R; McCulloch, D; McKenzie, D R; Yin, Y; Gerstner, E G [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  18. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp 2 bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into 'rings' to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C 3 N 4 , or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  19. Detailed Structural Analyses of KOH Activated Carbon from Waste Coffee Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Tomokazu; Toda, Ikumi; Ono, Hiroki; Ohshio, Shigeo; Akasaka, Hiroki; Himeno, Syuji; Kokubu, Toshinori; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2009-11-01

    The relationship of the detailed structural change of KOH activated carbon and hydrogen storage ability was investigated in activated carbon materials fabricated from waste coffee beans. The specific surface area of porous carbon materials calculated from N2 adsorption isotherms stood at 2070 m2/g when the weight ratio of KOH to carbon materials was 5:1, and pore size was in the range of approximately 0.6 to 1.1 nm as micropores. In the structural analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy indicated structural change in these carbon materials through KOH activation. The order of the graphite structure changed to a smaller scale with this activation. It is theorized that specific surface area increased using micropores provided by carbon materials developed from the descent of the graphite structure. Hydrogen storage ability improved with these structural changes, and reached 0.6 wt % at 2070 m2/g. These results suggest that hydrogen storage ability is conferred by the chemical effect on graphite of carbon materials.

  20. Preparation of polymer monolithic column functionalized by arsonic acid groups for mixed-mode capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhang-Na; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Wang, Ren-Qi; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2018-04-27

    A mixed-mode polymer monolithic column functionalized by arsonic acid groups was prepared by single-step in situ copolymerization of monomers p-methacryloylaminophenylarsonic acid (p-MAPHA) and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA). The prepared poly(p-MAPHA-co-PETA) monolithic column has a homogeneous monolithic structure with good permeability and mechanical stability. Zeta potential measurements reveal that the monolithic stationary phase holds a negative surface charge when the mobile phase resides in the pH range of 3.0-8.0. The retention mechanisms of prepared monolithic column are explored by the separation of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nucleosides, and three basic compounds. The results indicate that the column functions in three different separation modes associated with reversed-phase chromatography based on hydrophobic interaction, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, and cation-exchange chromatography. The column efficiency of prepared monolithic column is estimated to be 70,000 and 76,000 theoretical plates/m for thiourea and naphthalene, respectively, at a linear flow velocity of 0.85 mm/s using acetonitrile/H 2 O (85/15, v/v) as the mobile phase. Furthermore, an analysis of the retention factors obtained for the PAHs indicates that the prepared monolithic column exhibits good reproducibility with relative standard deviations of 2.9%, 4.0%, and 4.7% based on run-to-run injections, column-to-column preparation, and batch-to-batch preparation, respectively. Finally, we investigate the separation performance of the proposed monolithic column for select phenols, sulfonamides, nucleobases and nucleosides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Facile preparation of organic-silica hybrid monolith for capillary hydrophilic liquid chromatography based on "thiol-ene" click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Luan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zheng; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2013-04-05

    In this work, a one-step approach to facile preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid monoliths was successfully developed. After vinyl-end organic monomers and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) were mixed with hydrolyzed tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS), the homogeneous mixture was introduced into a fused-silica capillary for simultaneous polycondensation and "thiol-ene" click reaction to form the organic-silica hybrid monoliths. By employing this strategy, two types of organic-silica hybrid monoliths with positively charged quaternary ammonium and amide groups were prepared, respectively. The functional groups were successfully introduced onto the monoliths during the sol-gel process with "thiol-ene" click reaction, which was demonstrated by ζ-potential assessment, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The porous structure of the prepared monolithic columns was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. These results indicate the prepared organic-silica hybrid monoliths possess homogeneous column bed, large specific surface area, good mechanical stability, and excellent permeability. The prepared monolithic columns were then applied for anion-exchange/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Different types of analytes, including benzoic acids, inorganic ions, nucleosides, and nucleotides, were well separated with high column efficiency around 80,000-130,000 plates/m. Taken together, we present a facile and universal strategy to prepare organic-silica hybrid monoliths with a variety of organic monomers using one-step approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Constitutive Theory Developed for Monolithic Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1998-01-01

    with these service conditions by developing a multiaxial viscoplastic constitutive model that accounts for time-dependent hereditary material deformation (such as creep and stress relaxation) in monolithic structural ceramics. Using continuum principles of engineering mechanics, we derived the complete viscoplastic theory from a scalar dissipative potential function.

  3. CAISSON TYPE HOLLOW FLOOR SLABS OF MONOLITHIC MULTI-STOREYED BUILDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Malakhova Anna Nikolaevna

    2016-01-01

    One of the disadvantages of building structures made of reinforced concrete is their considerable weight. One of the trends to decrease the weight of concrete structures, including floor slabs, is the arrangement of voids in the cross-sectional building structures. In Russian and foreign practice paper, cardboard and plastic tubes has been used for creation of voids in the construction of monolithic floor slabs. Lightweight concretes were also used for production of precast hollow core floor ...

  4. Relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Peng; Le, Jiawei; Wang, Lanlan; Pan, Tieying; Lu, Xilan; Zhang, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. • Effect of carbon structure in coal with different rank on formation of pyrolysis tar was studied. • Numerical interrelation between carbon types in coal structure and tar yield is elaborated. • Effect of carbon structure on formation of liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis is discussed. - Abstract: The relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis were discussed extensively. The pyrolysis tests were carried out in a tube reactor at 873 K and keep 15 min. The carbon distribution in coals was investigated by solid state "1"3C nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). The curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. The alkanes in coal tar were analyzed by Gas Chromatograph–Mass Spectrometer (GC–MS). The results show that oxygen-linked aromatic carbon decreases with the increasing of coal rank. The aliphatic carbon contents of Huainan (HN) coal are 44.20%, the highest among the four coals. The carbon types in coal structure have a significant influence on the formation of tar and liquid alkane. The coal tar yields are related to the aliphatic substituted aromatic carbon, CH_2/CH_3 ratio and oxygen-linked carbon in coal so that the increasing order of tar yield is Inner Mongolia lignite (IM, 6.30 wt.%) < Sinkiang coal (SK, 7.55 wt.%) < Shenmu coal (SM, 12.84 wt.%) < HN (16.29 wt.%). The highest contents of oxygen-linked aromatic carbon in IM lead to phenolic compound of 41.06% in IM-tar. The contents of alkane in SM-tar are the highest because the appropriate CH_2/CH_3 ratio and the highest aliphatic side chains on aromatic rings in SM leading to generate aliphatic hydrocarbon with medium molecular weight easily. The mechanism on formation of tar and liquid alkane plays an important role in guiding the industrialization of pyrolysis-based poly-generation producing tar with high

  5. Holographic sol-gel monoliths: optical properties and application for humidity sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilatovskii, Daniil A.; Milichko, Valentin; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Vinogradov, Vladimir V.

    2018-05-01

    Sol-gel monoliths based on SiO2, TiO2 and ZrO2 with holographic colourful diffraction on their surfaces were obtained via a sol-gel synthesis and soft lithography combined method. The production was carried out without any additional equipment at near room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The accurately replicated wavy structure with nanoscale size of material particles yields holographic effect and its visibility strongly depends on refractive index (RI) of materials. Addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in systems increases their RI and lends absorbing properties due to extremely high light absorption constant. Further prospective and intriguing applications based on the most successful samples, MWCNTs-doped titania, were investigated as reversible optical humidity sensor. Owing to such property as reversible resuspension of TiO2 nanoparticles while interacting with water, it was proved that holographic xerogels can repeatedly act as humidity sensors. Materials which can be applied as humidity sensors in dependence on holographic response were discovered for the first time.

  6. Holographic sol–gel monoliths: optical properties and application for humidity sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milichko, Valentin; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Vinogradov, Vladimir V.

    2018-01-01

    Sol–gel monoliths based on SiO2, TiO2 and ZrO2 with holographic colourful diffraction on their surfaces were obtained via a sol–gel synthesis and soft lithography combined method. The production was carried out without any additional equipment at near room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The accurately replicated wavy structure with nanoscale size of material particles yields holographic effect and its visibility strongly depends on refractive index (RI) of materials. Addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in systems increases their RI and lends absorbing properties due to extremely high light absorption constant. Further prospective and intriguing applications based on the most successful samples, MWCNTs-doped titania, were investigated as reversible optical humidity sensor. Owing to such property as reversible resuspension of TiO2 nanoparticles while interacting with water, it was proved that holographic xerogels can repeatedly act as humidity sensors. Materials which can be applied as humidity sensors in dependence on holographic response were discovered for the first time.

  7. Structural Features of Carbons Produced Using Glucose, Lactose, and Saccharose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myronyuk, Ivan F.; Mandzyuk, Volodymyr I.; Sachko, Volodymyr M.; Gun'ko, Volodymyr M.

    2016-11-01

    Glucose, lactose, and saccharose were used as precursors to prepare chars at 400 °C then activated at 800 °C or 1000 °C in closed vessels with controlled amounts of oxygen penetrating through nanopores in the vessel walls. There are correlations between the porosity, amounts of residual O- and H-containing functionalities, and electroconductivity of amorphous carbons studied. The pore size distributions calculated using the nitrogen adsorption isotherms and TEM images show that all carbons are mainly nanoporous with certain contribution of narrow mesopores (at pore half-width x < 5 nm). Oxidizing activation by oxygen penetrating into the closed vessels with chars through nanopores can more strongly change the outer layers of char particles than the inner pores. Therefore, despite relatively great burn-off degree, the textural characteristics are relatively low for activated carbons.

  8. Transferrable monolithic III-nitride photonic circuit for multifunctional optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zheng; Gao, Xumin; Yuan, Jialei; Zhang, Shuai; Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Fenghua; Jiang, Yuan; Zhu, Hongbo; Wang, Yongjin

    2017-12-01

    A monolithic III-nitride photonic circuit with integrated functionalities was implemented by integrating multiple components with different functions into a single chip. In particular, the III-nitride-on-silicon platform is used as it integrates a transmitter, a waveguide, and a receiver into a suspended III-nitride membrane via a wafer-level procedure. Here, a 0.8-mm-diameter suspended device architecture is directly transferred from silicon to a foreign substrate by mechanically breaking the support beams. The transferred InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well diode (MQW-diode) exhibits a turn-on voltage of 2.8 V with a dominant electroluminescence peak at 453 nm. The transmitter and receiver share an identical InGaN/GaN MQW structure, and the integrated photonic circuit inherently works for on-chip power monitoring and in-plane visible light communication. The wire-bonded monolithic photonic circuit on glass experimentally demonstrates in-plane data transmission at 120 Mb/s, paving the way for diverse applications in intelligent displays, in-plane light communication, flexible optical sensors, and wearable III-nitride optoelectronics.

  9. Monolithically Integrated Ge-on-Si Active Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifeng Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically integrated, active photonic devices on Si are key components in Si-based large-scale electronic-photonic integration for future generations of high-performance, low-power computation and communication systems. Ge has become an interesting candidate for active photonic devices in Si photonics due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS processing. In this paper, we present a review of the recent progress in Ge-on-Si active photonics materials and devices for photon detection, modulation, and generation. We first discuss the band engineering of Ge using tensile strain, n-type doping, Sn alloying, and separate confinement of Γ vs. L electrons in quantum well (QW structures to transform the material towards a direct band gap semiconductor for enhancing optoelectronic properties. We then give a brief overview of epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials growth, followed by a summary of recent investigations towards low-temperature, direct growth of high crystallinity Ge and GeSn alloys on dielectric layers for 3D photonic integration. Finally, we review the most recent studies on waveguide-integrated Ge-on-Si photodetectors (PDs, electroabsorption modulators (EAMs, and laser diodes (LDs, and suggest possible future research directions for large-scale monolithic electronic-photonic integrated circuits on a Si platform.

  10. Formation of carbon nano- and micro-structures on C+1 irradiated copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Shoaib

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments has identified mechanisms of carbon nano- and micro-structure formation at room temperature, without catalyst and in the environment of immiscible metallic surroundings. The structures include threaded nano fibres, graphitic sheets and carbon onions. Copper as substrate was used due to its immiscibility with carbon. Energetic carbon ions (C + 1 ) of 0.2–2.0 MeV irradiated Cu targets. Cu substrates, apertures and 3 mm dia TEM Cu grids were implanted with the carbon. We observed wide range of μm-size structures formed on Cu grids and along the edges of the irradiated apertures. These are shown to be threaded nano fibers (TNF) of few μm thicknesses with lengths varying from 10 to 3000 μm. Secondary electron microscopy (SEM) identifies the μm-size structures while Confocal microscopy was used to learn about the mechanisms by which C + 1 irradiated Cu provides the growth environment. Huge carbon onions of diameters ranging from hundreds of nm to μm were observed in the as-grown and annealed samples. Transformations of the nanostructures were observed under prolonged electron irradiations of SEM and TEM. A mechanism for the formation of carbon nano- and micro-structures is proposed.

  11. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2013-01-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron

  12. Studies on structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits in algae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kerkar, V.; Untawale, A.G.

    The structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits is studied in species of Halimeda, Udotea, Neomeris (Chlorophyta) and Padina (Phaeophyta). It was found that in Halimeda aragonite deposition takes place outside the cell wall...

  13. Structural transformations in thermal treatment of carbon material based on Slantsy coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyumentsev, V.A.; Semenov, P.V.; Podkopaev, S.A.; Noneshneva, N.P.; Golovin, A.V. [Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Structural transformations occurring in a carbon material based on high-sulfur Slantsy coke during isothermal treatment (1200-2400{degree}C) under normal pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere were studied.

  14. Structure carbon materials: clusters, nanotubes, ion-implant polymers and diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapchuk, N.M.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Poklonskij, N.A.; Sviridov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the series of research works dealing with the physics of nanostructured carbon materials, which were awarded a Sevchenko Prize in 2008. The paper considers the mechanism of synthesis of 3D carbon nanospecies and their nanomechanics, magnetic properties of ion-implanted diamonds, as well as the regularities of formation of novel forms of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and metal-carbon nanocomposites via ion bombardment of polymers, as well as electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of ion-implanted polymers an their possible applications in micro- and nanoelectronics. (authors)

  15. Studies of CoSn grains in the carbon matrix structure of nanostructured tin–cobalt–carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.P.; Fleischauer, M.D.; LaForge, J.M.; Todd, A.D.W.; Li, P.; Dahn, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sn–Co–C alloys as negative electrode for Li-ion batteries. ► Sn–Co–C alloys prepared by mechanical alloying and by sputtering. ► CoSn grains embedded in carbon matrix structure was observed from SANS and TEM. ► SANS quickly characterized Sn–Co–C alloys equivalently to TEM. - Abstract: Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to qualitatively analyze the structure of Sn 30 Co 30 C 40 alloys produced by vertical axis mechanical attriting to those produced by magnetron sputter deposition. From SANS and TEM, CoSn grains embedded in a carbon matrix structure were observed for all samples. The size of CoSn grains in the attrited samples was approximately 10 ± 3 nm by both TEM and SANS, while that of the sputtered samples was about 7 times smaller.

  16. Monitoring structural defects and crystallinity of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the influence of catalyst formulation and reaction temperature on the formation of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. Thin films of CNTs were grown on Fe–Mo/Al2O3-coated silicon wafer by thermal decomposition of methane at different temperatures ranging from ...

  17. Storing in carbon nano structures for hybrid systems solar hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marazzi, R.; Zini, G.; Tartarini, P.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a hybrid energy system for converting energy from renewable sources and its storage in the form of hydrogen. The storage uses activated carbon and the methodology was modelled mathematically and simulated in numerical software. The results show that storage compression is cheaper storage for liquefaction. [it

  18. Carbonate substitution in the mineral component of bone: Discriminating the structural changes, simultaneously imposed by carbonate in A and B sites of apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madupalli, Honey; Pavan, Barbara; Tecklenburg, Mary M. J.

    2017-11-01

    The mineral component of bone and other biological calcifications is primarily a carbonate substituted calcium apatite. Integration of carbonate into two sites, substitution for phosphate (B-type carbonate) and substitution for hydroxide (A-type carbonate), influences the crystal properties which relate to the functional properties of bone. In the present work, a series of AB-type carbonated apatites (AB-CAp) having varying A-type and B-type carbonate weight fractions were prepared and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and carbonate analysis. A detailed characterization of A-site and B-site carbonate assignment in the FTIR ν3 region is proposed. The mass fractions of carbonate in A-site and B-site of AB-CAp correlate differently with crystal axis length and crystallite domain size. In this series of samples reduction in crystal domain size correlates only with A-type carbonate which indicates that carbonate in the A-site is more disruptive to the apatite structure than carbonate in the B-site. High temperature methods were required to produce significant A-type carbonation of apatite, indicating a higher energy barrier for the formation of A-type carbonate than for B-type carbonate. This is consistent with the dominance of B-type carbonate substitution in low temperature synthetic and biological apatites.

  19. A monolithic integrated photonic microwave filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño, Javier S.; Muñoz, Pascual; Doménech, David; Capmany, José

    2017-02-01

    Meeting the increasing demand for capacity in wireless networks requires the harnessing of higher regions in the radiofrequency spectrum, reducing cell size, as well as more compact, agile and power-efficient base stations that are capable of smoothly interfacing the radio and fibre segments. Fully functional microwave photonic chips are promising candidates in attempts to meet these goals. In recent years, many integrated microwave photonic chips have been reported in different technologies. To the best of our knowledge, none has monolithically integrated all the main active and passive optoelectronic components. Here, we report the first demonstration of a tunable microwave photonics filter that is monolithically integrated into an indium phosphide chip. The reconfigurable radiofrequency photonic filter includes all the necessary elements (for example, lasers, modulators and photodetectors), and its response can be tuned by means of control electric currents. This is an important step in demonstrating the feasibility of integrated and programmable microwave photonic processors.

  20. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  1. The electronic fine structure of 4-nitrophenyl functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K; Coleman, Karl S; Dhanak, Vinod R

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance to various CNT based applications. Herein the electronic fine structure of single-walled carbon nanotube films modified with 4-nitrophenyl groups, produced following reaction with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate, was investigated for the first time. Various techniques such as x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies were used to explore the electronic structure, and the results were compared with the measured electrical resistances. A reduction in number of the π electronic states in the valence band consistent with the increased resistance of the functionalized nanotube films was observed.

  2. An overview of monolithic zirconia in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Malkondu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia restorations have been used successfully for years in dentistry owing to their biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Because of their lack of translucency, zirconia cores are generally veneered with porcelain, which makes restorations weaker due to failure of the adhesion between the two materials. In recent years, all-ceramic zirconia restorations have been introduced in the dental sector with the intent to solve this problem. Besides the elimination of chipping, the reduced occlusal space requirement seems to be a clear advantage of monolithic zirconia restorations. However, scientific evidence is needed to recommend this relatively new application for clinical use. This mini-review discusses the current scientific literature on monolithic zirconia restorations. The results of in vitro studies suggested that monolithic zirconia may be the best choice for posterior fixed partial dentures in the presence of high occlusal loads and minimal occlusal restoration space. The results should be supported with much more in vitro and particularly in vivo studies to obtain a final conclusion.

  3. High-temperature nanoporous ceramic monolith prepared from a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brad H; Lodge, Timothy P

    2009-02-11

    Nanoporous ceramic with a unique pore structure was derived from an all-hydrocarbon polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BmuE). The BmuE was designed to allow facile removal of one phase, resulting in a nanoporous polymer monolith with BmuE-like structure. The pores were filled with a commercially available, polymeric precursor to nonoxide, Si-based ceramics. Pyrolysis resulted in a monolith of nanoporous ceramic, stable to at least 1000 degrees C, with a BmuE-like pore structure. The pore structure is disordered and 3-D continuous. Microscopy and gas sorption measurements suggest a well-defined pore size distribution spanning roughly 60-100 nm, sizes previously unattainable through related techniques.

  4. Electronic Structure of Single- and Multiple-shell Carbon Fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yeong-Lieh; Nori, Franco

    1993-01-01

    We study the electronic states of giant single-shell and the recently discovered nested multi-shell carbon fullerenes within the tight-binding approximation. We use two different approaches, one based on iterations and the other on symmetry, to obtain the $\\pi$-state energy spectra of large fullerene cages: $C_{240}$, $C_{540}$, $C_{960}$, $C_{1500}$, $C_{2160}$ and $C_{2940}$. Our iteration technique reduces the dimensionality of the problem by more than one order of magnitude (factors of $\\...

  5. Influence of pore structure on carbon retention/loss in soil macro-aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Michelle; Kravchenko, Alexandra; Rivers, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Carbon protection within soil macro-aggregates is an important component of soil carbon sequestration. Pores, as the transportation network for microorganisms, water, air and nutrients within macro-aggregates, are among the factors controlling carbon protection through restricting physical accessibility of carbon to microorganisms. The understanding of how the intra-aggregate pore structure relates to the degree of carbon physical protection, however, is currently lacking. This knowledge gap can lead to potentially inaccurate models and predictions of soil carbon's fate and storage in future changing climates. This study utilized the natural isotopic difference between C3 and C4 plants to trace the location of newly added carbon within macro-aggregates before and after decomposition and explored how location of this carbon relates to characteristics of intra-aggregate pores. To mimic the effect of decomposition, aggregates were incubated at 23˚ C for 28 days. Computed micro-tomographic images were used to determine pore characteristics at 6 μm resolution before and after incubation. Soil (0-10 cm depth) from a 20 year continuous corn (C4 plant) experiment was used. Two soil treatments were considered: 1) "destroyed-structure", where 1 mm sieved soil was used and 2) "intact-structure", where intact blocks of soil were used. Cereal rye (Secale cereale L.) (C3 plant) was grown in the planting boxes (2 intact, 3 destroyed, and one control) for three months in a greenhouse. From each box, ˜5 macro-aggregates of ˜5 mm size were collected for a total of 27 macro-aggregates. Half of the aggregates were cut into 5-11 sections, with relative positions of the sections within the aggregate recorded, and analyzed for δ13C. The remaining aggregates were incubated and then subjected to cutting and δ13C analysis. While there were no significant differences between the aggregate pore size distributions of the two treatments, the roles that specific pores sizes played in

  6. In-Space Repair of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Thermal Protection System Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2006-01-01

    Advanced repair and refurbishment technologies are critically needed for the thermal protection system of current space transportation system as well as for future Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV). The damage to these components could be caused by impact during ground handling or due to falling of ice or other objects during launch. In addition, in-orbit damage includes micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact as well as different factors (weather, launch acoustics, shearing, etc.) during launch and re-entry. The GRC developed GRABER (Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair) material has shown multiuse capability for repair of small cracks and damage in reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. The concept consists of preparing an adhesive paste of desired ceramic with appropriate additives and then applying the paste to the damaged/cracked area of the RCC composites with adhesive delivery system. The adhesive paste cures at 100-120 C and transforms into a high temperature ceramic during simulated entry conditions. A number of plasma torch and ArcJet tests were carried out to evaluate the crack repair capability of GRABER materials for Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) composites. For the large area repair applications, integrated system for tile and leading edge repair (InSTALER) have been developed. In this presentation, critical in-space repair needs and technical challenges as well as various issues and complexities will be discussed along with the plasma performance and post test characterization of repaired RCC materials.

  7. Carbon emissions mapping at Unilever Europe : implementing a structural method to map and reduce carbon emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the CEO of Unilever committed to a 25% reduction of CO2 emissions from global manufacturing operations in 2012. Unilever Europe Logistics has aligned to this target. To achieve this objective, the management of European logistics department decided to build a carbon emission estimation

  8. Dynamic adsorption properties of xenon on activated carbons and their structure characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Suiqing; Liu Jing; Qian Yuan; Zeng Youshi; Du Lin; Pi Li; Liu Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background: In recent years, adsorption of radioactive xenon by activated carbon has been increasingly applied to the treatment of off-gas in nuclear power project. Though pore structure of activated carbon has a great impact on its dynamic adsorption coefficients for xenon, the concerned research is rare. Purpose: It is very necessary to figure out the relationship between the pore structure and the dynamic adsorption coefficients for the purpose of the selection and development of activated carbon. Methods: In this study, the dynamic adsorption coefficients of xenon on four kinds of activated carbons were measured on a dynamic adsorption platform under the condition of 25℃, OMPa (gauge pressure). And these four kinds of activated carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SEM. Results: The results show that the activated carbon of JH12-16 with the specific surface area of 991.9 m 2 ·g -1 has the largest xenon dynamic adsorption coefficient among these activated carbons. Conclusions: The dynamic adsorption coefficient of xenon on activated carbon doesn't increase with the specific surface area or the pore volume. The mesopore and macropore only play the role of passageway for xenon adsorption. The most suitable pore for xenon adsorption is the pore with the pore size ranged from 0.55 to 0.6 nm. (authors)

  9. New 'monolithic' templates and improved protocols for soft lithography and microchip fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallandre, Antoine; Pal, Debjani; Lambert, Bertrand de; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Fuetterer, Claus

    2006-01-01

    We report a new method for fast prototyping and fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and plastic microfluidic chips. These methods share in common the preparation of monolithic masters which includes the fabrication of the planar support, the 'negative pattern' of the microchannels and the fluidic connectors. The monolithic templates are extremely robust compared to conventional ones made of silicon and SU-8, and easier to produce and cheaper than all-silicon or electroplated templates. In contrast to the above-mentioned methods, our process allows one to cast both micrometre- (e.g. the microchannel) and millimetre-sized structures (e.g. the fluidic connection to the outer world) in a single fabrication step. The 'monolithic template' strategy can be used to fabricate both elastomeric (e.g. poly(dimethyl siloxane (PDMS)) polyester thermoset masters and glassy polymeric (e.g. cyclic olefin copolymer (COC)) devices. In this study we also report on one step fabrication of elastomer chips and on surface modifications of the above mentioned monolithically fabricated masters in order to improve separation of the chip from the template

  10. Preparation and evaluation of a novel hybrid monolithic column based on pentafluorobenzyl imidazolium bromide ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yuanhong; Qiao, Lizhen; Shi, Xianzhe; Xu, Guowang

    2015-01-02

    To develop a novel hybrid monolithic column based on pentafluorobenzyl imidazolium bromide ionic liquid, a new ionic liquid monomer was synthesized from 1-vinylimidazole and pentafluorobenzyl bromide. By employing a facile one-step copolymerization of polyhedral-oligomeric-silsesquioxane-type (POSS) cross-linking agent and the home-made ionic liquid monomer, the hybrid monolithic columns were in situ fabricated in fused-silica capillary. The morphology of monolithic column was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the chemical composition was confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and elemental analysis. Excellent mechanical stability and slight swelling propensity were exhibited which was ascribed to the rigid hybrid monolithic skeleton. Reproducibility results of run-to-run, column-to-column, batch-to-batch and day-to-day were investigated and the RSDs were less than 0.46%, 1.84%, 3.96% and 3.17%, respectively. The mixed-mode retention mechanism with hydrophobic interaction, π-π stacking, ion-exchange, electrostatic interaction and dipole-dipole interaction was explored systematically using analytes with different structure types. Satisfied separation capability and column efficiency were achieved for the analysis of small molecular compounds such as alkylbenzenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nucleosides and halogenated compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure aggregation of carbon black in ethylene-propylene diene polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulus of filled and unfilled Ethylene-propylene diene rubber (EPDM vulcanizates was used to predict the shape-factor of carbon black aggregation in the polymer. Four types of carbon black that vary in particle size and structure were used in this study. Quadratic curves relating the carbon black volume concentration and the modulus ratio of filled and unfilled rubber vulcanizates were used to adopt the shape factor of certain carbon black type. The shape factor of MT, HAF, SRF and Lampblack were 3, 3.75, 4 and 4.25 respectively. X-ray diffraction technique (XRD was also used to evaluate the relative size of crystallite on the filler surface to that of the rubber and correlating it to the shape factor of carbon black aggregation in the polymer. Effect of the pH values and structure of carbon blacks used on the shape factor of filler aggregates were also studied. It was found that the shape factor is independent on the particle size while it is dependent on the pH value and structure of carbon black. Also the crystallites size of the filler is proportional to the shape factor.

  12. Study of Structural Properties of Mesoporous Carbon From Fructose with Zinc Borosilicate Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Setianingsih

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Structural properties, including pore structure, functional group of carbon surface, and crystal structure of carbon built by zinc borosilicate (ZBS and ZnCl2 (Z have been investigated in this work. Physically, ZBS and ZnCl2 may act as template of carbon, whereas the Zn(II cation act as chemical activator of carbonization. All precursors of ZBS (silicagel, boric acid, and ZnCl2 may act as catalysts of caramelization. The caramelization was conducted hydrothermally at 85oC and thermally 130oC. The carbonization was conducted at 450oC. The resulted carbons were washed by using HF 48% solution, 1M HCl solution, and aquadest respectively. The solid products were characterized by using nitrogen gas adsorption, infrared spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction, and Transmition Electron Microscopy. Result of research showed that ZBS built larger mesopore volume, larger pore domination of pore size, more hydrophobic carbon, and more amorf than ZnCl2.

  13. III-Vs on Si for photonic applications-A monolithic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhechao, E-mail: Zhechao.Wang@intec.ugent.be [School of ICT, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, Isafjordsgatan 22, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Junesand, Carl; Metaferia, Wondwosen; Hu, Chen; Wosinski, Lech [School of ICT, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, Isafjordsgatan 22, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Lourdudoss, Sebastian, E-mail: slo@kth.se [School of ICT, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, Isafjordsgatan 22, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monolithic evanescently coupled silicon laser (MECSL) structure treated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical mode profiles and thermal resistivity of MECSL optimized by simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MECSL through epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) of InP on Si exemplified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Passive waveguide in MECSL also acts as the defect filtering mask in ELOG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth of dislocation free thin InP layer on Si by ELOG for MECSL demonstrated. - Abstract: Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) technology is demonstrated as a viable technology to realize monolithic integration of III-Vs on silicon. As an alternative to wafer-to-wafer bonding and die-to-wafer bonding, ELOG provides an attractive platform for fabricating discrete and integrated components in high volume at low cost. A possible route for monolithic integration of III-Vs on silicon for silicon photonics is exemplified by the case of a monolithic evanescently coupled silicon laser (MECSL) by combining InP on Si/SiO{sub 2} through ELOG. Passive waveguide in MECSL also acts as the defect filtering mask in ELOG. The structural design of a monolithic evanescently coupled silicon laser (MECSL) and its thermal resistivity are established through simulations. Material studies to realize the above laser through ELOG are undertaken by studying appropriate ELOG pattern designs to achieve InP on narrow regions of silicon. We show that defect-free InP can be obtained on SiO{sub 2} as the first step which paves the way for realizing active photonic devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} waveguides, e.g. an MECSL.

  14. III–Vs on Si for photonic applications—A monolithic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhechao; Junesand, Carl; Metaferia, Wondwosen; Hu, Chen; Wosinski, Lech; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Monolithic evanescently coupled silicon laser (MECSL) structure treated. ► Optical mode profiles and thermal resistivity of MECSL optimized by simulation. ► MECSL through epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) of InP on Si exemplified. ► Passive waveguide in MECSL also acts as the defect filtering mask in ELOG. ► Growth of dislocation free thin InP layer on Si by ELOG for MECSL demonstrated. - Abstract: Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) technology is demonstrated as a viable technology to realize monolithic integration of III-Vs on silicon. As an alternative to wafer-to-wafer bonding and die-to-wafer bonding, ELOG provides an attractive platform for fabricating discrete and integrated components in high volume at low cost. A possible route for monolithic integration of III–Vs on silicon for silicon photonics is exemplified by the case of a monolithic evanescently coupled silicon laser (MECSL) by combining InP on Si/SiO 2 through ELOG. Passive waveguide in MECSL also acts as the defect filtering mask in ELOG. The structural design of a monolithic evanescently coupled silicon laser (MECSL) and its thermal resistivity are established through simulations. Material studies to realize the above laser through ELOG are undertaken by studying appropriate ELOG pattern designs to achieve InP on narrow regions of silicon. We show that defect-free InP can be obtained on SiO 2 as the first step which paves the way for realizing active photonic devices on Si/SiO 2 waveguides, e.g. an MECSL.

  15. Low-Carbon Transportation Oriented Urban Spatial Structure: Theory, Model and Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyao Ye

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimising the spatial structure of cities to promote low-carbon travel is a primary goal of urban planning and construction innovation in the low-carbon era. There is a need for basic research on the structural characteristics that help to reduce motor traffic, thereby promoting energy conservation. We first review the existing literature on the influence of urban spatial structure on transport carbon dioxide emissions and summarise the influence mechanisms. We then present two low-carbon transportation oriented patterns of urban spatial structure including the traditional walking city and the modern transit metropolis, illustrated by case studies. Furthermore, we propose an improved model Green Transportation System Oriented Development (GTOD, which is an extension of traditional transit-oriented development (TOD and includes the additional features of a walking city and an emphasis on the integration of land use with a green transportation system, consisting of the public transportation and non-auto travel system. A compact urban form, effective mix of land use and appropriate scale of block are the basic structural features of a low-carbon transportation city. However, these features are only effective at promoting low-carbon transportation when integrated with the green traffic systems. Proper integration of the urban structural system with the green space system is also required. The optimal land use/transportation integration strategy is to divide traffic corridors with wedge-shaped green spaces and limit development along the transit corridors. This strategy forms the basis of the proposed urban structural model to promote low-carbon transportation and sustainable urban growth management.

  16. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Monolithic adsorbents based on isotropic pitch fibers have been developed jointly by ORNL and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research. The monoliths are attractive for gas separation and storage applications because of their unique combination of physical properties and microporous structure. Currently at ORNL the monoliths are produced in billets that are 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. The monolithic adsorbent material is being considered for guard bed applications on a natural gas (NG) powered device. In order for the material to be successful in this application, one must attain a uniform activation to modest micropore volumes throughout the large monoliths currently being produced. Here the authors report the results of a study directed toward attaining uniform activation in these billets.

  17. Microwave plasma chemical synthesis of nanocrystalline carbon film structures and study their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuev, N.; Yafarov, R.; Timoshenkov, V.; Orlov, S.; Starykh, D.

    2015-08-01

    The self-organization effect of diamond nanocrystals in polymer-graphite and carbon films is detected. The carbon materials deposition was carried from ethanol vapors out at low pressure using a highly non-equilibrium microwave plasma. Deposition processes of carbon film structures (diamond, graphite, graphene) is defined. Deposition processes of nanocrystalline structures containing diamond and graphite phases in different volume ratios is identified. The solid film was obtained under different conditions of microwave plasma chemical synthesis. We investigated the electrical properties of the nanocrystalline carbon films and identified it's from various factors. Influence of diamond-graphite film deposition mode in non-equilibrium microwave plasma at low pressure on emission characteristics was established. This effect is justified using the cluster model of the structure of amorphous carbon. It was shown that the reduction of bound hydrogen in carbon structures leads to a decrease in the threshold electric field of emission from 20-30 V/m to 5 V/m. Reducing the operating voltage field emission can improve mechanical stability of the synthesized film diamond-graphite emitters. Current density emission at least 20 A/cm2 was obtained. Nanocrystalline carbon film materials can be used to create a variety of functional elements in micro- and nanoelectronics and photonics such as cold electron source for emission in vacuum devices, photonic devices, cathodoluminescent flat display, highly efficient white light sources. The obtained graphene carbon net structure (with a net size about 6 μm) may be used for the manufacture of large-area transparent electrode for solar cells and cathodoluminescent light sources

  18. Carbon based nanostructures: diamond clusters structured with nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Shenderova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of designing composites from carbon nanotubes and nanodiamond clusters is discussed based on atomistic simulations. Depending on nanotube size and morphology, some types of open nanotubes can be chemically connected with different facets of diamond clusters. The geometrical relation between different types of nanotubes and different diamond facets for construction of mechanically stable composites with all bonds saturated is summarized. Potential applications of the suggested nanostructures are briefly discussed based on the calculations of their electronic properties using environment dependent self-consistent tight-binding approach.

  19. Porous structure evolution of cellulose carbon fibres during heating in the initial activation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babel, Krzysztof [Institute of Chemical Wood Technology, Agricultural Academy of Poznan, Ul. Wojska Polskiego 38/42, 60-637 Poznan (Poland)

    2004-01-15

    This paper is focused on the description of changes in the porous structure during fast heating to the activation temperature of the viscose fibres, pyrolysed to different final temperatures. Standard regenerated cellulose fibre structures were tested. Fabrics were subjected to pyrolysis, the samples being heated to final temperatures of 400, 600 and 850 C. Carbon fibres were subsequently heated to activation temperature (850 C) at a rate of 100 C/min, and then the samples were cooled down. The characteristics of obtained carbon preparations were examined. We have defined a level of restructuring and internal ordering of fibres which originated during slow pyrolysis as well as the range of temperature differences of pyrolysis and activation where fast increase of carbon fibre temperature before activation is advantageous for the development of porous structure. It allows for partial release of pores and fast rebuilding of structure accompanied by a considerable number of defects in the carbon matrix with higher reactivity to oxidiser which, in turn, promotes the development of pores in active carbon during oxidation. Temperature difference for viscose carbon fibres is approximately 150-300 C at pyrolysis temperature of 550-700 C.

  20. Self-diagnosis of structures strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. S.; Yang, C. Q.; Harada, T.; Ye, L. P.

    2005-06-01

    The correlation of mechanical and electrical properties of concrete beams strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (HCFRP) sheets is studied in this paper. Two types of concrete beams, with and without reinforcing bars, are strengthened with externally bonded HCFRP sheets, which have a self-structural health monitoring function due to the electrical conduction and piezoresistivity of carbon fibers. Parameters investigated include the volume fractions and types of carbon fibers. According to the investigation, it is found that the hybridization of uniaxial HCFRP sheets with several different types of carbon fibers is a viable method for enhancing the mechanical properties and obtaining a built-in damage detection function for concrete structures. The changes in electrical resistance during low strain ranges before the rupture of carbon fibers are generally smaller than 1%. Nevertheless, after the gradual ruptures of carbon fibers, the electrical resistance increases remarkably with the strain in a step-wise manner. For the specimens without reinforcing bars, the electrical behaviors are not stable, especially during the low strain ranges. However, the electrical behaviors of the specimens with reinforcing bars are relatively stable, and the whole range of self-sensing function of the HCFRP-strengthened RC structures has realized the conceptual design of the HCFRP sensing models and is confirmed by the experimental investigations. The relationships between the strain/load and the change in electrical resistance show the potential self-monitoring capacity of HCFRP reinforcements used for strengthening concrete structures.

  1. Fabrication of a novel hemin-based monolithic column and its application in separation of protein from complex bio-matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoya; Zhang, Doudou; Li, Xueying; Wang, Xixi; Bai, Ligai; Liu, Haiyan; Yan, Hongyuan

    2017-05-10

    A novel polymer-based monolithic column was prepared via redox initiation system within the confines of a stainless steel column with 4.6mm i.d. In the processes, hemin and lauryl methacrylate were used as co-monomers; ethylene dimethacrylate as crosslinking agent; n-butyl alcohol, ethanediol, and N, N-dimethylformamide as tri-porogens; benzoyl peroxide and N, N-dimethyl aniline as redox initiation system. The resulting polymer-based monolithic columns were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption instrument, and mercury intrusion porosimeter, respectively. The results illustrated that the improved monolith had relative uniform porous structure, good permeability, and low back pressure. Aromatic compounds were used to test the chromatographic behavior of the monolith, resulting in highest column efficiency of 19 880 plates per meter with reversed-phase mechanism. Furthermore, the homemade monolith was used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography to separate proteins from complex bio-matrix, including human plasma, egg white, and snailase. The results showed that the monolithic column occupied good separation ability with these complex bio-samples. Excellent specific character of the homemade hemin-based monolith was that it could simultaneously remove high-abundance proteins (including human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, and human fibrinogen) from human plasma and separate other proteins to different fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bending analyses for 3D engineered structural panels made from laminated paper and carbon fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinghao Li; John F. Hunt; Zhiyong Cai; Xianyan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of a 3-dimensional engineered structural panel (3DESP) having a tri-axial core structure made from phenolic impregnated laminated-paper composites with and without high strength composite carbon-fiber fabric laminated to the outside of both faces. Both I-beam equations and finite element method were used to analyze four-point bending of the...

  3. Surface complexation of carbonate on goethite: IR spectroscopy, structure & charge distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Rahnemaie, R.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of carbonate on goethite has been evaluated, focussing on the relation between the structure of the surface complex and corresponding adsorption characteristics, like pH dependency and proton co-adsorption. The surface structure of adsorbed CO3-2 has been assessed with (1) a

  4. Carbon Microfibers with Hierarchical Porous Structure from Electrospun Fiber-Like Natural Biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yeru; Wu, Dingcai; Fu, Ruowen

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning offers a powerful route for building one-dimensional (1D) micro/nanostructures, but a common requirement for toxic or corrosive organic solvents during the preparation of precursor solution has limited their large scale synthesis and broad applications. Here we report a facile and low-cost way to prepare 1D porous carbon microfibers by using an electrospun fiber-like natural product, i.e., silk cocoon, as precursor. We surprisingly found that by utilizing a simple carbonization treatment, the cocoon microfiber can be directly transformed into 1D carbon microfiber of ca. 6 μm diameter with a unique three-dimensional porous network structure composed of interconnected carbon nanoparticles of 10~40 nm diameter. We further showed that the as-prepared carbon product presents superior electrochemical performance as binder-free electrodes of supercapacitors and good adsorption property toward organic vapor.

  5. Investigation of the structure of multiwall carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, A Adamne; Belina, K

    2013-01-01

    In the last ten years carbon nanotube composites are in the focus of the researchers. Concentration series were prepared using carbon nanotube containing master blend by IDMX mixer. In the experiments polypropylene, polycarbonate and ABS polymers were used as matrix materials. The prepared materials were characterised by scanning electron microscopy. The carbon nanotubes can be seen on the fractured surfaces. We did not find any sign of agglomerates in the materials. The nanocomposites were investigated by LP-FTIR method. The specimens were irradiated with 1 W for 1 minute by CO 2 laser. The polymer matrix was burnt or charred by the CO 2 laser; the structure of the carbon nanotubes in the matrix was studied. The carbon nanotubes create a physical network in the polymers we used

  6. Monolithic Controlled Delivery Systems: Part I. Basic Characteristics and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiana Blagoeva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The article considers contemporary systems for controlled delivery of active agents, such as drugs, agricultural chemicals, pollutants and additives in the environment. A useful classification of the available controlled release systems (CRS is proposed according to the type of control (passive, active or self-preprogrammed and according to the main controlling mechanism (diffusion, swelling, dissolution or erosion. Special attention is given to some of the most used CRS - polymer monoliths. The structural and physical-chemical characteristics of CRS as well as the basic approaches to their production are examined. The basic mechanisms of controlled agent release are reviewed in detail and factors influencing the release kinetics are classified according to their importance. The present study can be helpful for understanding and applying the available mathematical models and for developing more comprehensive ones intended for design of new controlled delivery systems.

  7. Fast preparation of hybrid monolithic columns via photo-initiated thiol-yne polymerization for capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shujuan; Zhang, Haiyang; Li, Ya; Li, Yanan; Zhang, Na; Ou, Junjie; Ye, Mingliang; Wei, Yinmao

    2018-02-23

    Although several approaches have been developed to fabricate hybrid monoliths, it would still take a few hours to finish the formation of monoliths. Herein, photo-initiated thiol-yne polymerization was first adopted to in situ fabricate hybrid monoliths within the confines of UV-transparent fused-silica capillary. A silicon-containing diyne (1,3-diethynyltetramethyl-disiloxane, DYDS) was copolymerized with three multithiols, 1,6-hexanedithiol, trimethylolpropane tris(3-mercaptopropionate) and pentaerythriol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate), by using a binary porogenic system of diethylene glycol diethyl ether (DEGDE)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG200) within 10 min. Several characterizations of three hybrid monoliths (assigned as I, II and III, respectively) were performed. The results showed that these hybrid monoliths possessed bicontinuous porous structure, which was remarkably different from that via typical free-radical polymerization. The highest column efficiency of 76,000 plates per meter for butylbenzene was obtained on the column I in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). It was observed that the efficiencies for strong-retained butylbenzene were almost close to those of weak-retained benzene, indicating a retention-independent efficient performance of small molecules on hybrid column I. The surface area of this hybrid monolith was very small in the dry state (less than 10.0 m 2 /g), and the chromatographic behavior of hybrid monolithic columns would be possibly explained by radical-mediated step-growth process of thiol-yne polymerization. Finally, the column I was applied for separation of BSA tryptic digest by cLC-MS/MS, indicating satisfactory separation ability for complicated samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolution of structural and electrical properties of carbon films from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphene on quartz glass by HFCVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zihao; Shen, Honglie; Chen, Jieyi; Li, Xuemei; Jiang, Ye

    2018-04-25

    Direct growth of graphene films on glass is of great importance but has so far met with limited success. The non-catalytic property of glass results in the low decomposition ability of hydrocarbon precursors, especially at reduced temperatures (structural and electrical properties of carbon films deposited on quartz glass at 850 °C by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). The results revealed that the obtained a-C films were all graphite-like carbon films. Structural transition of the deposited films from a-C to nanocrystalline graphene was achieved by raising the hydrogen dilution ratios from 10 % to over 80 %. Based on systematically structural and chemical characterizations, a schematic process with three steps including sp2 chains aggregation, aromatic rings formation and sp3 bonds etch was proposed to interpret the structural evolution. The nanocrystalline graphene films grown on glass by HFCVD exhibited good electrical performance with a carrier mobility of 36.76 cm2/(V·s) and a resistivity of 5.24×10-3 Ω·cm over an area of 1 cm2. Temperature-dependent electrical characterizations revealed that the electronic transport in carbon films was dominated by defect, localised and extended states respectively when increasing the temperature from 75 K to 292 K. The nanocrystalline graphene films presented higher carrier mobility and lower carrier concentration than a-C films, which was mainly attributed to their smaller conductive activation energy. The present investigation provides an effective way for direct growth of graphene films on glass at reduced temperatures and also offers useful insights into the understanding of structural and electrical relationship between a-C and graphene.

  9. Influence factors and forecast of carbon emission in China: structure adjustment for emission peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Cui, C. Q.; Li, Z. P.

    2018-02-01

    This paper introduced Principal Component Analysis and Multivariate Linear Regression Model to verify long-term balance relationships between Carbon Emissions and the impact factors. The integrated model of improved PCA and multivariate regression analysis model is attainable to figure out the pattern of carbon emission sources. Main empirical results indicate that among all selected variables, the role of energy consumption scale was largest. GDP and Population follow and also have significant impacts on carbon emission. Industrialization rate and fossil fuel proportion, which is the indicator of reflecting the economic structure and energy structure, have a higher importance than the factor of urbanization rate and the dweller consumption level of urban areas. In this way, some suggestions are put forward for government to achieve the peak of carbon emissions.

  10. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langohr, D.

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  11. Pore-Fractal Structure in Porous Carbons Made from Corn and Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Y. M.; Schmidt, P. W.; Rice, Randall D.; Shulse, Laural; Voss, D. J.; Venkatraman, A.; Fan, L. T.; Walawender, W. P.; Rieker, T. P.

    1998-03-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering has been used in a study of the pore structure of some porous and activated carbons on length scales between about 5 and 10^4 ÅThe carbons were obtained by pyrolysis and activation of wheat and American corn (maize). The scattering data showed that in each carbon there are at least two of the following four types of pores: (1) pores with diameters of at least 10^4 Åpores with smooth or fractal surfaces and diameters of at least 5 x 10^3 Åpore-fractals with diameters of no more than about 10^3 Åand (4) pores with diameters no larger than 100 ÅThe relation between the pore structure and the procedure used to obtain the carbon and will be discussed.

  12. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poudel, P.R.; Poudel, P.P.; Paramo, J.A.; Strzhemechny, Y.M.; Rout, B.; McDaniel, F.D.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C - ) at a fluence of 3 x 10 17 atoms/cm 2 was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H 2 + 96 % Ar) at 900 C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main contributors to the observed

  13. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poudel, P.R. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States); Intel Corporation, Rio Rancho, NM (United States); Poudel, P.P. [University of Kentucky, Department of Chemistry, Lexington, KY (United States); Paramo, J.A.; Strzhemechny, Y.M. [Texas Christian University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Rout, B. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States); University of North Texas, Center for Advanced Research and Technology, Denton, TX (United States); McDaniel, F.D. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C{sup -}) at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2} was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H{sub 2} + 96 % Ar) at 900 C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main

  14. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  15. Synthesis and structure of new lanthanoid carbonate "lanthaballs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesman, Anthony S R; Turner, David R; Langley, Stuart K; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Deacon, Glen B; Batten, Stuart R

    2015-02-02

    New insights into the synthesis of high-nuclearity polycarbonatolanthanoid complexes have been obtained from a detailed investigation of the preparative methods that initially yielded the so-called "lanthaballs" [Ln(13)(ccnm)(6)(CO(3))(14)(H(2)O)(6)(phen)(18)] Cl(3)(CO(3))·25H(2)O [α-1Ln; Ln = La, Ce, Pr; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; ccnm = carbamoylcyanonitrosomethanide]. From this investigation, we have isolated a new pseudopolymorph of the cerium analogue of the lanthaball, [Ce(13)(ccnm)(6)(CO(3))(14)(H(2)O)(6)(phen)(18)]·C(l3)·CO(3) (β-1Ce). This new pseudopolymorph arose from a preparation in which fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide generated the carbonate, and the ccnm ligand was formed in situ by the nucleophilic addition of water to dicyanonitrosomethanide. From a reaction of cerium(III) nitrate, instead of the previously used chloride salt, with (Et4N)(ccnm), phen, and NaHCO(3) in aqueous methanol, the new complex Na[Ce(13)(ccnm)(6)(CO(3))(14)(H(2)O)(6)(phen)(18)](NO(3))(6)·20H(2)O (2Ce) crystallized. A variant of this reaction in which sodium carbonate was initially added to Ce(NO(3))(3), followed by phen and (Et(4)N)(ccnm), also gave 2Ce. However, an analogous preparation with (Me4N)(ccnm) gave a mixture of crystals of 2Ce and the coordination polymer [CeNa(ccnm)4(phen)3]·MeOH (3), which were manually separated. The use of cerium(III) acetate in place of cerium nitrate in the initial preparation did not give a high-nuclearity complex but a new coordination polymer, [Ce(ccnm)(OAc)(2)(phen)] (4). The first lanthaball to incorporate neodymium, namely, [Nd(13)(ccnm)(4)(CO(3))14(NO(3))(4)(H(2)O)(7)(phen)(15)](NO(3))(3)·10H(2)O (5Nd), was isolated from a preparation similar to that of the second method used for 2Ce, and its magnetic properties showed an antiferromagnetic interaction. The identity of all products was established by X-ray crystallography.

  16. Structure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of Alcohols

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Daniel Neal

    2010-01-01

    AbstractStructure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of AlcoholsbyDaniel Neal BriggsDoctor of Philosophy in Chemical EngineeringUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Alexis T. Bell, Chair The oxidative carbonylation of alcohols to produce dialkyl carbonates is a process that takes place commercially in a slurry of cuprous chloride in the appropriate alcohol. While this process is chemically efficient, it incurs costs in terms of ene...

  17. Effect of ion irradiation on the structure and the surface topography of carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligacheva, E.A.; Galyaeva, L.V.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Belykh, T.A.; Ligachev, A.E.; Sokhoreva, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of C + ion irradiation (40 keV, 10 15 - 10 19 cm -2 ) on the structure and surface topography of high-module carbon fibers is investigated. Interplanar distance and internal stress values are found to be minimal at a radiation dose of 10 17 cm -2 , the height of a layer pack being practically unchanged. The relief of ion irradiated carbon fiber surface constitutes regularly repetitive valleys and ridges spaced parallel with the fiber axis [ru

  18. Gap state related blue light emitting boron-carbon core shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Thakur, Anup

    2016-01-01

    Boron-carbon core shell structures have been synthesized by solvo-thermal synthesis route. The synthesized material is highly pure. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the reduction of reactants in to boron and carbon. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the shell is uniform with average thickness of 340 nm. Photo luminescence studies showed that the material is blue light emitting with CIE color coordinates: x=0.16085, y=0.07554.

  19. Spinning, structure and properties of PP/CNTs and PP/carbon black composite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcincin, A.; Hricova, M.; Ujhelyiova, A.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of the compatibilisers-dispersants and other nanofillers on melt spinning of the polypropylene (PP) composites, containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and carbon black pigment (CBP) has been investigated. Further, the structure and selected properties of composite fibers, such as mechanical and electrical have been studied. The results revealed, that percolation threshold for PP/CBP composite fibres was situated within the concentration of 15 - 20 wt%, what is several times higher than for PP/CNTs fibers.

  20. Properties and Structure of In Situ Transformed PAN-Based Carbon Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Cao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers in situ prepared during the hot-pressed sintering in a vacuum is termed in situ transformed polyacrylonitrile-based (PAN-based carbon fibers, and the fibrous precursors are the pre-oxidized PAN fibers. The properties and structure of in situ transformed PAN-based carbon fibers are investigated by Nano indenter, SEM, TEM, XRD, and Raman. The results showed that the microstructure of the fiber surface layer was compact, while the core was loose, with evenly-appearing microvoids. The elastic modulus and nanohardness of the fiber surface layer (303.87 GPa and 14.82 GPa were much higher than that of the core (16.57 GPa and 1.54 GPa, and its interlayer spacing d002 and crystallinity were about 0.347 nm and 0.97 respectively. It was found that the preferred orientation of the surface carbon layers with ordered carbon atomic arrangement tended to be parallel to the fiber axis, whereas the fiber core in the amorphous region exhibited a random texture and the carbon atomic arrangement was in a disordered state. It indicates that the in situ transformed PAN-based carbon fibers possess significantly turbostratic structure and anisotropy.

  1. Experimental investigation and numerical modeling of carbonation process in reinforced concrete structures Part II. Practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saetta, Anna V.; Vitaliani, Renato V.

    2005-01-01

    The mathematical-numerical method developed by the authors to predict the corrosion initiation time of reinforced concrete structures due to carbonation process, recalled in Part I of this work, is here applied to some real cases. The final aim is to develop and test a practical method for determining the durability characteristics of existing buildings liable to carbonation, as well as estimating the corrosion initiation time of a building at the design stage. Two industrial sheds with different ages and located in different areas have been analyzed performing both experimental tests and numerical analyses. Finally, a case of carbonation-induced failure in a prestressed r.c. beam is presented

  2. Carbon Nanotubes Advanced Topics in the Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jorio, Ado; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes field has evolved substantially since the publication of the bestseller "Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications". The present volume builds on the generic aspects of the aforementioned book, which emphasizes the fundamentals, with the new volume emphasizing areas that have grown rapidly since the first volume, guiding future directions where research is needed and highlighting applications. The volume also includes an emphasis on areas like graphene, other carbon-like and other tube-like materials because these fields are likely to affect and influence developments in nanotubes in the next 5 years.

  3. Smart Manufacturing Methods for Carbon/Vinyl Ester Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erickson, Curtis G

    2008-01-01

    .... Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) a common composite fabrication methodology for composite structures is extremely sensitive to the material systems used and the production set-up or design...

  4. Evaluation of forest structure, biomass and carbon sequestration in subtropical pristine forests of SW China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizami, Syed Moazzam; Yiping, Zhang; Zheng, Zheng; Zhiyun, Lu; Guoping, Yang; Liqing, Sha

    2017-03-01

    Very old natural forests comprising the species of Fagaceae (Lithocarpus xylocarpus, Castanopsis wattii, Lithocarpus hancei) have been prevailing since years in the Ailaoshan Mountain Nature Reserve (AMNR) SW China. Within these forest trees, density is quite variable. We studied the forest structure, stand dynamics and carbon density at two different sites to know the main factors which drives carbon sequestration process in old forests by considering the following questions: How much is the carbon density in these forest trees of different DBH (diameter at breast height)? How much carbon potential possessed by dominant species of these forests? How vegetation carbon is distributed in these forests? Which species shows high carbon sequestration? What are the physiochemical properties of soil in these forests? Five-year (2005-2010) tree growth data from permanently established plots in the AMNR was analysed for species composition, density, stem diameter (DBH), height and carbon (C) density both in aboveground and belowground vegetation biomass. Our study indicated that among two comparative sites, overall 54 species of 16 different families were present. The stem density, height, C density and soil properties varied significantly with time among the sites showing uneven distribution across the forests. Among the dominant species, L. xylocarpus represents 30% of the total carbon on site 1 while C. wattii represents 50% of the total carbon on site 2. The average C density ranged from 176.35 to 243.97 t C ha -1 . The study emphasized that there is generous degree to expand the carbon stocking in this AMNR through scientific management gearing towards conservation of old trees and planting of potentially high carbon sequestering species on good site quality areas.

  5. Electronic structure of single- and multiple-shell carbon fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Nori, F.

    1994-01-01

    We study the electronic states of giant single-shell and the recently discovered nested multiple-shell carbon fullerenes within the tight-binding approximation. We use two different approaches, one based on iterations and the other on symmetry, to obtain the π-state energy spectra of large fullerene cages: C 240 , C 540 , C 960 , C 1500 , C 2160 , and C 2940 . Our iteration technique reduces the size of the problem by more than one order of magnitude (factors of ∼12 and 20), while the symmetry-based approach reduces it by a factor of 10. We also find formulas for the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energies of C 60n 2 fullerenes as a function of n, demonstrating a tendency towards a metallic regime for increasing n. For multiple-shell fullerenes, we analytically obtain the eigenvalues of the intershell interaction

  6. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an ∼1 μm film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film (∼7 μm) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35±3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  7. The Health Risk Assessment of Pb and Cr leachated from fly ash monolith landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Ming-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Yao; Chen, Yen-Chuan; Shih, Hsiu-Ching; Yu, Yue-Hwa; Ma, Hwong-wen

    2009-01-01

    As of 2004, nearly two hundred thousand tons of fly ash monoliths are created each year in Taiwan to confine heavy metals for reducing the leaching quantity by precipitation. However, due to abnormal monolith fracture, poorly liner quality or exceeding usage over designed landfill capacity, serious groundwater pollution of the landfills has been reported. This research focuses on Pb and Cr leaching from monolithic landfill to assess the risk of groundwater pollution in the vicinity. The methodology combines water budget simulations using HELP model with fate and risk simulations using MMSOILS model for 5 kinds of landfill structures and 2 types of leaching models, and calculates the risk distribution over 400 grids in the down gradient direction of groundwater. The results demonstrated that the worst liner quality will cause the largest risk and the most significant exposure pathway is groundwater intake, which accounted for 98% of the total risk. Comparing Pb and Cr concentrations in the groundwater with the drinking water standards, only 14.25% of the total grids are found to be under 0.05 mg/L of Pb, and over 96.5% of the total grids are in the safety range of Cr. It indicates that Pb leaching from fly ash monolithic landfills may cause serious health risks. Without consideration of the parameters uncertainty, the cancer and noncancer risk of Pb with the sanitary landfill method was 4.23E-07 and 0.63, respectively, both under acceptable levels. However, by considering the parameters uncertainty, the non-carcinogenic risk of Pb became 1.43, exceeding the acceptable level. Only under the sealed landfill method was the hazard quotient below 1. It is important to use at least the sealed landfill for fly ash monoliths containing lead to effectively reduce health risks.

  8. Equilibrium structures and flows of polar and nonpolar liquids in different carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramyan, Andrey K.; Bessonov, Nick M.; Mirantsev, Leonid V.; Chevrychkina, Anastasiia A.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of equilibrium structures and flows of polar water and nonpolar methane confined by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with circular and square cross sections and bounding walls with regular graphene structure and random (amorphous) distribution of carbon atoms have been performed. The results of these simulations show that equilibrium structures of both confined liquids depend strongly on the shape of the cross section of SWCNTs, whereas the structure of their bounding walls has a minor influence on these structures. On contrary, the external pressure driven water and methane flows through above mentioned SWCNTs depend significantly on both the shape of their cross sections and the structure of their bounding walls.

  9. Identification of fullerenes in iron-carbon alloys structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUZEEV Iskander Rustemovich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Steels of various purposes are used in the construction industry, for example, as the reinforcement material in reinforced concrete structures. In the oil and gas industry, steel structures are used for storage and transportation of explosive toxic media. In this case the catastrophic damages might take place, that points at insufficiently deep knowledge about the processes running in structural materials when load is applied. Recent studies show that many properties of steel are set at the nanoscale level during crystallization from the molten metal and thermal treatment. To detect and identify fullerenes С60 and С70, which are independent nanoscale objects in steel structure, by various methods requires studying of how these objects influence on formation of steel properties. Iron atoms can serve as a catalyst and, interacting with large aromatic structures or fragments of the graphite planes, they form voluminous fullerene-type structures. The inverse phenomenon, i.e. influence of the formed nanoscale objects on structuring of the iron atoms, is also possible, as fullerene size is comparable with the size of the stable nucleus of the iron crystalline phase. The article discusses the issue of mechanisms of fullerenes formation in steels and cast irons. The most complicated issue in the study is the fullerenes identification by spectral methods as the quantity of released molecules is small. In order to increase the sensitivity of the fullerenes IR-spectrometry method, potassium bromide has been proposed to use. Dried and reduced sediment obtained as a result of dissolving iron matrix in steels is mixed with potassium bromide, the mixture becomes bright-orange. This fact points to presence of bromic fullerenes and to presence of fullerenes in the studied specimens. It is shown that the offered specimen preparation algorithm significantly increases sensitivity of the method.

  10. A novel photocatalytic monolith reactor for multiphase heterogeneous photocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, P.; Carneiro, J.T.; Moulijn, J.A.; Mul, Guido

    2008-01-01

    A novel reactor for multi-phase photocatalysis is presented, the so-called internally illuminated monolith reactor (IIMR). In the concept of the IIMR, side light emitting fibers are placed inside the channels of a ceramic monolith, equipped with a TiO2 photocatalyst coated on the wall of each

  11. Immobilisation of shredded soft waste in cement monolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.J.; Dalton, M.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-04-01

    A grouting process for the immobilisation of shredded contaminated laboratory waste in a cement monolith is being developed at the Atomic Energy Establishment Winfrith. The objective is to produce a 'monolithic' type package which is acceptable both for sea and land disposal. The work carried out on this project in the period April 1982 - March 1983 is summarised in this report. (author)

  12. Fabrication of mesoporous polymer monolith: a template-free approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Keisuke; Nandi, Mahasweta; Maruyama, Jun; Oka, Tatsuya; Tsujimoto, Takashi; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2011-07-14

    Mesoporous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) monolith has been fabricated by a template-free approach using the unique affinity of PAN towards a water/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) mixture. A newly developed Thermally Induced Phase Separation Technique (TIPS) has been used to obtain the polymer monoliths and their microstructures have been controlled by optimizing the concentration and cooling temperature.

  13. Creating deep soil core monoliths: Beyond the solum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil monoliths serve as useful teaching aids in the study of the Earth’s critical zone where rock, soil, water, air, and organisms interact. Typical monolith preparation has so far been confined to the 1 to 2-m depth of the solum. Critical ecosystem services provided by soils include materials from ...

  14. Fine-grain concrete from mining waste for monolithic construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesovik, R. V.; Ageeva, M. S.; Lesovik, G. A.; Sopin, D. M.; Kazlitina, O. V.; Mitrokhin, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    The technology of a monolithic construction is a well-established practice among most Russian real estate developers. The strong points of the technology are low cost of materials and lower demand for qualified workers. The monolithic construction uses various types of reinforced slabs and foamed concrete, since they are easy to use and highly durable; they also need practically no additional treatment.

  15. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  16. Media Presentation Synchronisation for Non-monolithic Rendering Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Vaishnavi (Ishan); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); B. Gao (Bo)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractNon-monolithic renderers are physically distributed media playback engines. Non-monolithic renderers may use a number of different underlying network connection types to transmit media items belonging to a presentation. There is therefore a need for a media based and inter-network- type

  17. Experimental study on influence of carbon dioxide on porous structure and mechanical properties of shale rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Miedzińska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shale rocks are geological formations which can be unconventional gas reservoirs. During their interaction with carbon dioxide, which can be used as a fracturing fluid in shale gas recovery process, many phenomena take place that can influence rock structure and mechanical properties. The research on changes in rock structure under super critical carbon dioxide interaction and their influence of shale properties were presented in the paper. The structural tests were carried out with the use of microscopic techniques with different resolutions of visualization. The uniaxial compression test was applied as a mechanical properties’ assessment experiment. As a result of research, some dependence was observed. The bigger decrease was in porosity after infiltration in lower zooms, the bigger increase in porosity in high zooms and mechanical properties was noticed. Keywords: geomechanics, shale rock, carbon dioxide

  18. Stability and electronic structure of carbon capsules with superior gas storage properties: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, Arun K.; Pati, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Stability and electronic structure of various carbon capsules are studied. • Effects of capsule’s sizes on electronic and optical properties are explored. • Changes in cohesive and formation energy and electronic gap are discussed. • Capsule’s gas storage propensity is addressed using DFT and ab initio MD. • Capsule’s optical absorptions are discussed with and without stored gas molecules. - Abstract: Structures, electronic and optical properties of carbon nanocapsules of varying sizes (length and diameter) are studied using first-principles density functional theory. Based on calculated cohesive energy, formation energy, electronic gap and extent of orbital delocalization, we examine structural stability and changes in low-energy physics of these carbon capsules. We find that both cohesive and formation energy decrease with increase in capsule’s sizes, indicating their greater structural rigidity and favorable formation feasibility. The electronic gap also decreases with increase in capsule’s sizes due to the larger electronic delocalization. The simulated optical absorption spectra show lowering of low-energy peak positions with increase in the capsule’s dimensions, consistent with the reduction in electronic gap. Additionally, we also provide an estimate of gas storage capacity for the larger carbon capsule (C 460 ) considered. We find 7.69 wt.% and 28.08 wt.% storage propensity for hydrogen and carbon dioxide gases, respectively, which clearly suggests their potential use as light storage materials

  19. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  20. Microscopic and Macroscopic Structures of Carbon Nanotubes Produced by Pyrolysis of Iron Phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaoming; Dai Liming

    2002-01-01

    By pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine (FePc), either in a patterned or non-patterned fashion, under an Ar/H 2 atmosphere, we have demonstrated the large-scale production of aligned carbon nanotubes perpendicular to the substrate surface useful for building devices with three-dimensional structures. Depending on the particular pyrolytic conditions used, carbon nanotubes with a wide range of microscopic structures having curved, helical, coiled, branched, and tube-within-tube shapes have also been prepared by the pyrolysis of FePc. This, coupled with several microfabrication methods (photolithography, soft-lithography, self-assembling, micro-contact transfer, etc.), has enabled us to produce carbon nanotube arrays of various macroscopic architectures including polyhedral, flower-like, dendritic, circular, multilayered, and micropatterned geometries. In this article, we summarize our work on the preparation of FePc-generated carbon nanotubes with the large variety of microscopic and macroscopic structures and give a brief overview on the perspectives of making carbon nanotubes with tailor-made microscopic/macroscopic structures, and hence well-defined physicochemical properties, for specific applications

  1. Structure and properties of carbon nanotubes/sol-gel nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrass, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising filler materials owing to their exceptional mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. Since their discovery in 1991, a major effort has been made in developing CNT-polymer nanocomposites, whereas CNT/ceramic based nanocomposites, in particularly, CNT/silica nanocomposites, have been very little studied. This thesis focuses on preparation and characterization of novel CNT/silica nanocomposite glasses synthesized by the Sol-Gel technology. A comprehensive analysis of their morphological, optical, and electrical properties was conducted, and analyzed according to existing theoretical models. The nanocomposites hosting matrix is a hybrid organic/inorganic glass prepared by the Fast-Sol-Gel (FSG) route. Using specific conditions in the FSG procedure, the resultant glasses are nonporous, exhibiting no contraction upon drying. Their analogous Classical-Sol-Gel (CSG) glasses, however, are porous, and do exhibit contraction upon drying. The FSG glasses are relatively new materials, and their physical and optical properties were only meagerly studied. In our present work we have conducted a comprehensive experimental research on some previously ignored characteristics such as: UV-vis-IR optical absorption and transmission, and the organic content effect on the refraction index n, density ρ, thermal expansion coefficient β, and thermo-optic coefficient dn/dT. We found that organic residues within the glass decrease the refractive index, density, and thermo-optic coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, however, increases with the organic content. A negative linear dependence of the thermo-optic coefficient on the thermal expansion coefficient was obtained. CNT/FSG nanocomposites were prepared by using a solution mixing method, while CNT/CSG nanocomposites were prepared by means of an in situ polymerization technique. Nanocomposites based on FSG hybrid glasses were characterized for their nonlinear optical and

  2. Dislocation structure and cold resistance of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul', Yu.P.; Karnaukh, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    In the formation of the dislocation structure of a small (10%) deformation, the determining effect on the cold brittleness temperature is exerted by the degree of uniformity in the distribution of dislocations and microvolumes. The overall density of the dislocations is of secondary importance here. By pretreatment to achieve more uniform distribution and dispersion of particles of the excess phase, the degree of uniformity of dislocation distribution in microvolumes can be increased, the cold brittleness temperature lowered and the effect of various deformation patterns on resistance to cold counterbalanced. The formation of a cell-type dislocation structure in the case of a nonuniform distribution of relatively large particles of the excess phase and in that of a large overall density of dislocations does not result in low brittleness temperatures. The formation of a cell-type dislocation structure in the case of uniform distribution of particles of the excess phase and of a comparatively small overall density of dislocations is accompanied by a very pronounced decrease in cold brittleness temperature not only by comparison with other types of dislocation structure but also with the normalized state. At the same time the formation of this kind of a cell structure leads to a substantial (factor of 2-5) increase in resistance to plastic deformation. The prerequisites for obtaining an optimum dislocation are fulfilled either by a combination of hardening from the austenitic region and prompt, small-scale (5%) deformation, or by a combination of accelerated cooling from the austenitic region, 30-40% deformation and high yield. The size of the dislocation cells observed under the electron microscope does not exhibit - within the limits investigated - any direct effect on the cold brittleness temperature. (author)

  3. Chromate removal as influenced by the structural changes of soil components upon carbonization at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.Y.; Liu, J.C.; Chiang, P.N.; Wang, S.L.; Kuan, W.H.; Tzou, Y.M.; Deng, Y.; Tseng, K.J.; Chen, C.C.; Wang, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Surface fire could induce heat transferring into the soil, creating a carbonized environment, which may alter the chemical compositions of soil organic matters (SOM). In the study, a surface soil was carbonized at up to 600 °C with limited air to simulate soils experiencing a surface fire, and Cr(VI) removal on the carbonized soils was investigated. NMR and FTIR analyses demonstrated a remarkable change of SOM structures at 300–400 °C. TGA-MS spectra indicated that (e.g. C 2 H 4 , CH 3 OH and C 3 H 8 ) were the major components in the evolved gases from the pyrolyzed soil. A maximum amount of Cr(VI) removal (ca. 4 mg g −1 soil) occurred for the 200 °C-carbonized soils, attributed mainly to a significant increase of Cr(VI) reduction by 0.1 M KCl extractable organic carbon (EOC) with abundant carboxylic groups. Nonetheless, the formation of aromatic C upon carbonization of the soil at >400 °C may be responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. - Highlights: ► A maximum amount of Cr(VI) removal occurred for the 200 °C-carbonized soil. ► Extractable organic carbon (EOC) was increased upon carbonization of soil. ► EOC, enriched with carboxylic groups, enhances Cr(VI) reduction by the soil. ► The formation of aromatic C on a carbonized soil may be responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. ► Reductive product of Cr(III) tends to bond on high-temperature-modified soil. - This study first addresses the importance of surface fire-induced heat transferring into the soil to the transformations of environmental pollutants, i.e. chromium.

  4. Determination of dynamic characteristics of multi-layer carbon plastic structures of high-resolution scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Н. Маслей

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The comparative analysis results for the numerical determination of the dynamic characteristics of multi-layer carbon-fiber plates of the space vehicle scanner design by various types of finite element approximation of the physico-mechanical properties of the composite material are presented. Using the topological structure of the construction of reinforcing layers material in the plate package plane, experimental data for the elastic and mass characteristics of homogeneous carbon-fiber fibers, equivalent structural and orthotropic stiffness and elastic characteristics of the material of composite plates are determined.

  5. PAN-based carbon fiber negative electrodes for structural lithium-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Hellqvist Kjell, Maria; Jacques, Eric; Zenkert, Dan; Behm, Mårten; Lindbergh, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Several grades of commercially-available polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers have been studied for structural lithium-ion batteries to understand how the sizing, different lithiation rates and number of fibers per tow affect the available reversible capacity, when used as both current collector and electrode, for use in structural batteries. The study shows that at moderate lithiation rates, 100 mA g-1, most of the carbon fibers display a reversible capacity close to or above 100 mAh ...

  6. Structural and electrical properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, S.; Rout, D.; Swain, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotube on the structure and electrical properties of composites was investigated. Samples based on epoxy resin with different weight percentage of MWCNTs were prepared and characterized. The interaction between MWCNT & epoxy resin was noticed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (f-MWCNT) reinforced epoxy composite was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The dispersion of f-MWCNT in epoxy resin was evidenced by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Electrical properties of epoxy/f-MWCNT nanocomposites were measured & the result indicated that the conductivity increased with increasing concentration of f-MWCNTs.

  7. Highly improved operation of monolithic BGO-PET blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Montoro, A.; Sanchez, F.; Majewski, S.; Zanettini, S.; Benlloch, J. M.; Gonzalez, A. J.

    2017-11-01

    In PET scanners both scintillation crystals and photosensors are key components defining the system's performance and cost. Original PET systems used BGO or NaI(Tl) scintillators but achieved limited performance due to its slow decay and relatively low light output. Moreover, NaI(Tl) has low stopping power for 511 keV annihilation photons. In this study we report the possibility to reintroduce BGO crystals, and in particular in the form of monolithic blocks, especially suitable for low-dose large-size PET scanners, offering significantly improved sensitivity at a highly reduced cost compared to LYSO type fast scintillators. We have studied the performance of a monolithic BGO block as large as 50 × 50 × 15 mm3 with black-painted lateral walls to reduce lights spread, enabling accurate photon depth of interaction (DOI) measurements. A directional optical layer, called retro-reflector, was coupled to the entrance face bouncing back the scintillation light in the direction of the emission source and, therefore, adding to the light signal while preserving the narrow light cone distribution. Four configurations namely 12 × 12 and 16 × 16 SiPM arrays (3 mm × 3 mm each) as photosensors, with or without a nanopattern treatment at the crystal exit face, have been studied. This structure consisted of a thin layer of a specific high refractive index material shaped with a periodic nanopattern, increasing the scintillation light extraction. The readout returned information for each SiPM row and column, characterizing the X-Y light distribution projections. We have studied the detector spatial resolution using collimated 22Na sources at normal incidence. The DOI resolution was evaluated using collimated gamma beams with lateral incidence. The overall best detector performance was obtained for the 16× 16 SiPM array offering higher readout granularity. We have determined the spatial resolution for 3 separated DOI layers, obtaining the best results for the DOI region near to

  8. Analysis of Practicality and Performance Evaluation for Monolithic Kernel and Micro-Kernel Operating Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Miao

    2011-01-01

    The microkernel system (as opposite to monolithic systems) has been developed for severalyears, with the hope that microkernels could solve the problems of other operating systems.However, the evolution of the microkernel systems did not go as many people expected. Becauseof faultinesses of the design in system structure, the performance of the first generation ofmicrokernel operating systems was disappointing. The overhead of the system was too high tobear for users. However, the second-gene...

  9. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruggs, S.J.; Putman, P.T.; Fang, H.; Alessandrini, M.; Salama, K.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample

  10. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scruggs, S.J. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: Sscruggs2@uh.edu; Putman, P.T. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Fang, H. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Alessandrini, M. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Salama, K. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample.

  11. Characterizing the structural degradation in a PEMFC cathode catalyst layer : carbon corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, A.; Stumper, J. [Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Gyenge, E. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The structural degradation resulting from carbon corrosion of a cathode catalyst layer in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated in this study. In order to oxidize the catalyst carbon support, the PEMFC catalyst layer was subjected to a 30 hour accelerated stress test that cycled the cathode potential from 0.1 to 1.5 VRHE at 30 and 150 second intervals. The rate and amount of carbon loss was determined by measuring the carbon dioxide in the exhaust gas. The structural degradation of the catalyst layer was characterized and correlated to the PEMFC performance using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and polarization analyses. This analysis revealed a clear thinning of the cathode catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer carbon sub-layer, and a reduction in the effective platinum surface area due to the carbon support oxidation. The thinned cathode catalyst layer changed the water management, and increased the voltage loss associated with the oxygen mass transport and catalyst layer ohmic resistance. In order to further develop and verify this methodology for other degradation mechanisms, emphasis was placed on EIS measurements.

  12. Characterization of coal structure by CP/MAS carbon-13 NMR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Maekawa, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Cross-polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (n.m.r.) spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of the whole structures of different ranks of coal. Three basic structural parameters, namely carbon aromaticity fa, new carbon aromaticity fa', and atomic H/C ratio for the hypothetical unsubstituted aromatic nuclei Haru/Car, were derived from the combined data of ultimate analysis, the distributions of carbon and oxygen functional groups obtained from the spectrum and the distribution of four types of methylene carbon groups in coal. Both fa and fa' values generally increased with coal rank and ranged from 0.51 to 0.71 and from 0.62 to 0.76, respectively. Haru/Car value tended to decrease with coal rank although the value was greatly affected by the types of hydroaromatic methylene carbons to aromatic rings. The values indicated that lower-rank coals consisted mainly of 1-3 aromatic rings, and higher-rank coals, 3-5 aromatic rings. 24 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  13. Hybrid integration of carbon nanotubes in silicon photonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Valdeiglesias, E.; Zhang, W.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Le Roux, X.; Serna, S.; Hoang, H. C.; Marris-Morini, D.; Cassan, E.; Intonti, F.; Sarti, F.; Caselli, N.; La China, F.; Gurioli, M.; Balestrieri, M.; Vivien, L.; Filoramo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Silicon photonics, due to its compatibility with the CMOS platform and unprecedented integration capability, has become the preferred solution for the implementation of next generation optical interconnects to accomplish high efficiency, low energy consumption, low cost and device miniaturization in one single chip. However, it is restricted by silicon itself. Silicon does not have efficient light emission or detection in the telecommunication wavelength range (1.3 μm-1.5 μm) or any electro-optic effect (i.e. Pockels effect). Hence, silicon photonic needs to be complemented with other materials for the realization of optically-active devices, including III-V for lasing and Ge for detection. The very different requirement of these materials results in complex fabrication processes that offset the cost-effectiveness of the Si photonics approach. For this purpose, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed as an attractive one-dimensional light emitting material. Interestingly, semiconducting single walled CNTs (SWNTs) exhibit room-temperature photo- and electro-luminescence in the near-IR that could be exploited for the implementation of integrated nano-sources. They can also be considered for the realization of photo-detectors and optical modulators, since they rely on intrinsically fast non-linear effects, such as Stark and Kerr effect. All these properties make SWNTs ideal candidates in order to fabricate a large variety of optoelectronic devices, including near-IR sources, modulators and photodetectors on Si photonic platforms. In addition, solution processed SWNTs can be integrated on Si using spin-coating or drop-casting techniques, obviating the need of complex epitaxial growth or chip bonding approaches. Here, we report on our recent progress in the coupling of SWNTs light emission into optical resonators implemented on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. .

  14. 6. international conference on Nano-technology in Carbon: from synthesis to applications of nano-structured carbon and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the sixth international conference sponsored this year by the French Carbon Group (GFEC), the European Research Group on Nano-tubes GDRE 'Nano-E', in collaboration with the British Carbon Group and the 'Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel' (local organizer). The aim of this conference is to promote carbon science in the nano-scale as, for example, nano-structured carbons, nano-tubes, nano-wires, fullerenes, etc. This conference is designed to introduce those with an interest in materials to current research in nano-technology and to bring together research scientists working in various disciplines in the broad area of nano-structured carbons, nano-tubes and fullerene-related nano-structures. Elemental carbon is the simplest exemplar of this nano-technology based on covalent bonding, however other systems (for example containing hetero-atoms) are becoming important from a research point of view, and provide alternative nano-materials with unique properties opening a broad field of applications. Nano-technology requires an understanding of these materials on a structural and textural point of view and this will be the central theme. This year the conference will feature sessions on: S1. Control and synthesis of nano-materials 1.1 Nano-structured carbons: pyrolysis of polymers, activation, templates,... 1.2 Nano-tubes: Catalytic method, HiPCO, graphite vaporization, electrolysis,... 1.3 Fullerenes S2. Chemistry of carbon nano-materials 2.1 Purification of carbon nano-tubes 2.2 Functionalization - Self-assembling S3. Structural characterization S4. Theory and modelling S5. Relationship between structure and properties S6. Applications Water and air purification, Gas and energy storage, Composite materials, Field emission, Nano-electronics, Biotechnology,... S7. Environmental impact. Only one paper concerning carbon under irradiation has been added to the INIS database. (authors)

  15. Synthesis of a specific monolithic column with artificial recognition sites for L-glutamic acid via cryo-crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktürk, Ilgım; Üzek, Recep; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new molecular imprinting (MIP)-based monolithic cryogel column was prepared using chemically crosslinked molecularly imprinted nanoparticles, to achieve a simplified chromatographic separation (SPE) for a model compound, L-glutamic acid (L-Glu). Cryogelation through crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles forms stable monolithic cryogel columns. This technique reduces the leakage of nanoparticles and increases the surface area, while protecting the structural features of the cryogel for stable and efficient recognition of the template molecule. A non-imprinted monolithic cryogel column (NIP) was also prepared, using non-imprinted nanoparticles produced without the addition of L-Glu during polymerization. The molecularly imprinted monolithic cryogel column (MIP) indicates apparent recognition selectivity and a good adsorption capacity compared to the NIP. Also, we have achieved a significant increase in the adsorption capacity, using the advantage of high surface area of the nanoparticles.

  16. Effect of forest structural change on carbon storage in a coastal Metasequoia glyptostroboides stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiangrong; Yu, Mukui; Wu, Tonggui

    2013-01-01

    Forest structural change affects the forest's growth and the carbon storage. Two treatments, thinning (30% thinning intensity) and underplanting plus thinning, are being implemented in a coastal Metasequoia glyptostroboides forest shelterbelt in Eastern China. The vegetation carbon storage significantly increased in the underplanted and thinned treatments compared with that in the unthinned treatment (P 0.05). The soil light fraction organic carbon (LFOC) was significantly higher at the 0-15 cm soil layer in the thinned and underplanted stands compared with that in the unthinned stand (P < 0.05). The soil respiration of the underplanted treatment was significantly higher than that of the unthinned treatment only in July (P < 0.05). This study concludes that 30% thinning and underplanting after thinning could be more favorable to carbon sequestration for M. glyptostroboides plantations in the coastal areas of Eastern China.

  17. Effect of Forest Structural Change on Carbon Storage in a Coastal Metasequoia glyptostroboides Stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrong Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest structural change affects the forest’s growth and the carbon storage. Two treatments, thinning (30% thinning intensity and underplanting plus thinning, are being implemented in a coastal Metasequoia glyptostroboides forest shelterbelt in Eastern China. The vegetation carbon storage significantly increased in the underplanted and thinned treatments compared with that in the unthinned treatment (P0.05. The soil light fraction organic carbon (LFOC was significantly higher at the 0–15 cm soil layer in the thinned and underplanted stands compared with that in the unthinned stand (P<0.05. The soil respiration of the underplanted treatment was significantly higher than that of the unthinned treatment only in July (P<0.05. This study concludes that 30% thinning and underplanting after thinning could be more favorable to carbon sequestration for M. glyptostroboides plantations in the coastal areas of Eastern China.

  18. Structural Break, Stock Prices of Clean Energy Firms and Carbon Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubao; Cai, Junyu

    2018-03-01

    This paper uses EU ETS carbon future price and Germany/UK clean energy firms stock indices to study the relationship between carbon market and clean energy market. By structural break test, it is found that the ‘non-stationary’ variables judged by classical unit root test do own unit roots and need taking first difference. After analysis of VAR and Granger causality test, no causal relationships are found between the two markets. However, when Hsiao’s version of causality test is employed, carbon market is found to have power in explaining the movement of stock prices of clean energy firms, and stock prices of clean energy firms also affect the carbon market.

  19. CAISSON TYPE HOLLOW FLOOR SLABS OF MONOLITHIC MULTI-STOREYED BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malakhova Anna Nikolaevna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the disadvantages of building structures made of reinforced concrete is their considerable weight. One of the trends to decrease the weight of concrete structures, including floor slabs, is the arrangement of voids in the cross-sectional building structures. In Russian and foreign practice paper, cardboard and plastic tubes has been used for creation of voids in the construction of monolithic floor slabs. Lightweight concretes were also used for production of precast hollow core floor slabs. The article provides constructive solutions of precast hollow core floor slabs and solid monolithic slabs that were used in the construction of buildings before wide use of large precast hollow core floor slabs. The article considers the application of caisson hollow core floor slabs for modern monolithic multi-storeyed buildings. The design solutions of such floor slabs, experimental investigations and computer modeling of their operation under load were described in this article. The comparative analysis of the calculation results of computer models of a hollow slabs formed of rod or plastic elements showed the similarity of calculation results.

  20. Effect of pore structure on the activated carbon's capability to sorb airborne methylradioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhola, A.J.; Friel, J.V.

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect pore structure of activated carbons has on their capabiity to sorp airborne methylradioiodine. Six de-ashed carbons of very diverse pore structure were selected for study. Batches of each were impregnated with (1) 4.3% I 2 , (2) 5.6% KI, (3) 2% KI, (4) 3% KI to 2% I 2 , (5) 2% I 2 , and (6) 3.4% KIO 3 . Some carbon was reserved for testing without impregnant. Standard procedures at ambient temperature and pressure were followed in the methyliodide testing, with some changes only made to meet the requirements of the specialized study. The surface area of the open-pore volume, for KI impregnated carbons, determined the sorptive efficiency. This relationship is expressed by the equation ln p = ln a - ks, where p is the fraction of methyliodide penetrating the bed and s the surface area. The quantity (a) is associated with the macropore properties, and deterines the capability of the carbon to sorb at very high humidites (> 95% RH). Constant k is to a large degree dependent on the mean diameter of the micropores. Elemental iodine impregnated carbons were considerably less effective than those impregnated with KI, and their sorptive of methyliodide did not follow the above equation. Their activity could be increased by a second impregnation with KOH. KI impregnated carbons lost their activity when treated with HCl on converting the Ki to I 2 . The conversion of KI to I 2 by acid gases in nuclear power plants offers an explanation for the cause of carbon aging

  1. Testing the performance of a Dynamic Global Ecosystem Model: Water balance, carbon balance, and vegetation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, Christopher J.; Foley, Jonathan A.; Delire, Christine; Fisher, Veronica A.; Coe, Michael T.; Lenters, John D.; Young-Molling, Christine; Ramankutty, Navin; Norman, John M.; Gower, Stith T.

    2000-09-01

    While a new class of Dynamic Global Ecosystem Models (DGEMs) has emerged in the past few years as an important tool for describing global biogeochemical cycles and atmosphere-biosphere interactions, these models are still largely untested. Here we analyze the behavior of a new DGEM and compare the results to global-scale observations of water balance, carbon balance, and vegetation structure. In this study, we use version 2 of the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS), which includes several major improvements and additions to the prototype model developed by Foley et al. [1996]. IBIS is designed to be a comprehensive model of the terrestrial biosphere; the model represents a wide range of processes, including land surface physics, canopy physiology, plant phenology, vegetation dynamics and competition, and carbon and nutrient cycling. The model generates global simulations of the surface water balance (e.g., runoff), the terrestrial carbon balance (e.g., net primary production, net ecosystem exchange, soil carbon, aboveground and belowground litter, and soil CO2 fluxes), and vegetation structure (e.g., biomass, leaf area index, and vegetation composition). In order to test the performance of the model, we have assembled a wide range of continental and global-scale data, including measurements of river discharge, net primary production, vegetation structure, root biomass, soil carbon, litter carbon, and soil CO2 flux. Using these field data and model results for the contemporary biosphere (1965-1994), our evaluation shows that simulated patterns of runoff, NPP, biomass, leaf area index, soil carbon, and total soil CO2 flux agree reasonably well with measurements that have been compiled from numerous ecosystems. These results also compare favorably to other global model results.

  2. Ultrafast preparation of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-based ionic liquid hybrid monolith via photoinitiated polymerization, and its application to capillary electrochromatography of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingyu; Lei, Xiaoyun; Deng, Lijun; Li, Minsheng; Yao, Sicong; Wu, Xiaoping

    2018-06-06

    An ionic liquid hybrid monolithic capillary column was prepared within 7 min via photoinitiated free-radical polymerization of an ionic liquid monomer (1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide); VBIMNTF 2 ) and a methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) acting as a cross-linker. The effects of composition of prepolymerization solution and initiation time on the porous structure and electroosmotic flow (EOF) of monolithic column were investigated. The hybrid monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FTIR. Owing to the introduction of a rigid nanosized POSS silica core and ionic liquids with multiple interaction sites, the monolithic column has a well-defined 3D skeleton morphology, good mechanical stability, and a stable anodic electroosmotic flow. The hybrid monolithic stationary phase was applied to the capillary electrochromatographic separation of various alkylbenzenes, phenols, anilines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The column efficiency is highest (98,000 plates/m) in case of alkylbenzenes. Mixed-mode retention mechanisms including hydrophobic interactions, π-π stacking, electrostatic interaction and electrophoretic mobility can be observed. This indicates the potential of this material in terms of efficient separation of analytes of different structural type. Graphical Abstract Preparation of a mixed-mode ionic liquid hybrid monolithic column via photoinitiated polymerization of methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) and 1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (VBIMNTF 2 ) ionic liquid for use in capillary electrochromatography.

  3. Nano-structured carbon materials for improved biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razumiene, J., E-mail: julija.razumiene@bchi.vu.lt [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Sakinyte, I. [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Barkauskas, J. [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania); Baronas, R. [Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel protocols of graphite oxidation were used for successful synthesis of GOPs. • Newly synthesized GOPs were applicable for electrode design in reagentless bioelectrocatalytic systems operating on direct electron transfer. • We show that bioelectrocatalytic processes strongly depend on functionalities, morphology and structural features of GOPs. - Abstract: A set of oxidized graphite samples have been newly synthesized using different protocols. Atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis revealed the changes in structure and functionalities of obtained graphite oxidation products (GOPs) compared to pristine graphite. The substances have been tested as electrode materials applicable for bioelectrocatalytic systems using pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH). The application of GOPs allowed achieving the direct electron transfer (DET) from active site of PQQ-GDH to the electrode surface. Needless of additional electron transfer (ET) mediating compounds highly improved features of the biosensors. The efficiency of the biosensors has been evaluated for all types of biosensors varied from 32 μA/cm{sup 2} to 64 μA/cm{sup 2} using as electrode materials GOP1 and thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO), respectively. TRGO containing function groups (according TGA, ∼6% of the weight loss) and smallest particles (average diameter was ∼11 nm and the average height was ∼0.5 nm) exhibited the higher efficiency for ET acceleration in the biosensor acting on principle of DET.

  4. Restoring forest structure and process stabilizes forest carbon in wildfire-prone southwestern ponderosa pine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurteau, Matthew D; Liang, Shuang; Martin, Katherine L; North, Malcolm P; Koch, George W; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-03-01

    Changing climate and a legacy of fire-exclusion have increased the probability of high-severity wildfire, leading to an increased risk of forest carbon loss in ponderosa pine forests in the southwestern USA. Efforts to reduce high-severity fire risk through forest thinning and prescribed burning require both the removal and emission of carbon from these forests, and any potential carbon benefits from treatment may depend on the occurrence of wildfire. We sought to determine how forest treatments alter the effects of stochastic wildfire events on the forest carbon balance. We modeled three treatments (control, thin-only, and thin and burn) with and without the occurrence of wildfire. We evaluated how two different probabilities of wildfire occurrence, 1% and 2% per year, might alter the carbon balance of treatments. In the absence of wildfire, we found that thinning and burning treatments initially reduced total ecosystem carbon (TEC) and increased net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB). In the presence of wildfire, the thin and burn treatment TEC surpassed that of the control in year 40 at 2%/yr wildfire probability, and in year 51 at 1%/yr wildfire probability. NECB in the presence of wildfire showed a similar response to the no-wildfire scenarios: both thin-only and thin and burn treatments increased the C sink. Treatments increased TEC by reducing both mean wildfire severity and its variability. While the carbon balance of treatments may differ in more productive forest types, the carbon balance benefits from restoring forest structure and fire in southwestern ponderosa pine forests are clear.

  5. Surface structural evolvement in the conversion of polyacrylonitrile precursors to carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xin; Zou, Ruifen; OuYang, Qin; Wang, Xuefei; Zhang, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The characteristic striated topography of PAN precursors resulted from the wet spinning process could pass down to carbon fibers. • The ridges and grooves monitored became much more well-defined after the thermo-oxidation. • Both the depth and the width of longitudinal grooves decreased after the carbonization. • Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and silicon were the governing elements on the fiber surface. - Abstract: Surface structural evolvement in the conversion of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursors to carbon fibers was investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM results showed that the characteristic striated topography of PAN precursors resulted from the wet spinning process could pass down to carbon fibers. The fiber diameter gradually decreased from 11.3 μm to 5.5 μm and the corresponding density increased from 1.18 g/cm 3 to 1.80 g/cm 3 in the conversion of PAN precursors to carbon fibers. The ridges and grooves monitored by AFM became much more well-defined after the thermo-oxidation. However, the original longitudinal grooves were destroyed and both the depth and the width of longitudinal grooves decreased after the carbonization. XPS results revealed that carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and silicon were the governing elements on the fiber surface. The −C−C functional groups was the dominant groups and the relative contents of −C=O and −COO groups gradually increased in the process of thermo-oxidation and carbonization

  6. The Synthesis of Peculiar Structure of Springlike Multiwall Carbon Nanofibers/Nanotubes via Mechanothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahebali Manafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanothermal (MT method is one of the methods used for large-scale production of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers. The different peculiar morphologies of carbon allotropes are introduced with an extraordinary structure for the first time by MT method. In this paper, the influence of milling time and annealing temperature on the crystallinity and morphology of the synthesized nanopowders was investigated. Surprisingly, in this investigation, we report the synthesis of springlike multiwalled carbon nanofibers (S-MWCNFs by a two-step annealing of milled graphite in an Ar atmosphere. On the other hand, the MT method could be used for the preparation of suitable structures with applications in nanocomposite materials, which is an important task in the era of nanotechnology.

  7. Mechanical behavior of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic restorations: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Silvestri, T.; Camargo, R.; Rippe, M.P.; Amaral, M.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of grinding with diamond burs and low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior (biaxial flexural strength and structural reliability), surface topography, and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic dental restorations. Disc-shaped

  8. Graphene-based carbons as supercapacitor electrodes with bicontinuous, porous polyacrylonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bit-Na; Yang, Young Suk; You, In-Kyu

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we fabricated a bicontinuous carbon structure (BCS) with high porosity and a loosely connected framework structure. The role of the BCS is to support a concrete supercapacitor active electrode structure. Poly(acrylonitrile) was used as a precursor for the BCS material, which was a porous polymer monolith carbonized by heat treatment (at 1100 °C). The BCS was prepared by mixing with an active material, graphene or an activated carbon. The mixed materials were used as an electrode material in a supercapacitor. The BCS13 + AC sample (∼107.5 F/g) showed a higher specific capacitance than the commercial activated carbon cell (∼76 F/g). The BCS13 + graphene sample (∼75 F/g) also exhibited a higher specific capacitance than the graphene cell (∼49 F/g). This BCS monolith had many macro- and micropores in its structure, enabling fast electrolyte ion movement and excellent electrochemical performance with a low equivalent series resistance (ESR).

  9. Feasibility demonstration of consolidating porous beryllium/carbon structures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, M.J.; Hoover, G.E.; Mueller, J.J.; Hanes, H.D.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study was initiated to determine if porous beryllium structures could be fabricated by consolidating beryllium-coated microballoons into a rigid structure. The target specifications were to coat nominally 1-mm diameter microspheres with 0.5-mil beryllium coatings and then bond into a structure. Because of the very short time period, it was agreeable to use existing or quickly-available materials. The general approach was to apply coatings to carbon or quartz microspheres. Physical vapor deposition and ''snow-balling'' of fine beryllium powder were the two methods investigated. Once the particles were coated, HIP (pressure bonding) and pressureless sintering were to be investigated as methods for consolidating the microballoons. A low level of effort was to be spent to look at means of fabricating an all-carbon structure

  10. Optimization and application of octadecyl-modified monolithic silica for solid-phase extraction of drugs in whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namera, Akira; Saito, Takeshi; Ota, Shigenori; Miyazaki, Shota; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Masataka

    2017-09-29

    Monolithic silica in MonoSpin for solid-phase extraction of drugs from whole blood samples was developed to facilitate high-throughput analysis. Monolithic silica of various pore sizes and octadecyl contents were synthesized, and their effects on recovery rates were evaluated. The silica monolith M18-200 (20μm through-pore size, 10.4nm mesopore size, and 17.3% carbon content) achieved the best recovery of the target analytes in whole blood samples. The extraction proceeded with centrifugal force at 1000rpm for 2min, and the eluate was directly injected into the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system without any tedious steps such as evaporation of extraction solvents. Under the optimized condition, low detection limits of 0.5-2.0ngmL -1 and calibration ranges up to 1000ngmL -1 were obtained. The recoveries of the target drugs in the whole blood were 76-108% with relative standard deviation of less than 14.3%. These results indicate that the developed method based on monolithic silica is convenient, highly efficient, and applicable for detecting drugs in whole blood samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium-Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    Capt Todd D. Church APPROVED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials C~t) Kraig/[ Vandewalle Date...copyrighted material in the thesis/dissertation manuscript entitled: "Translucency arid Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials manufacturers have developed more translucent monolithic zirconium oxide

  12. Flexible and elastic porous poly(trimethylene carbonate) structures for use in vascular tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Y.; Kamphuis, Marloes; Zhang Zheng, Z.Z.; Zhang, Z.; Sterk, L.M.Th.; Vermes, I.; Poot, Andreas A.; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    Biocompatible and elastic porous tubular structures based on poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate), PTMC, were developed as scaffolds for tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels. High-molecular-weight PTMC (Mn = 4.37 × 105) was cross-linked by gamma-irradiation in an inert nitrogen atmosphere.

  13. Stratigraphy and Structure of the Subsurface Cambrian and Ordovician Carbonates of New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Lawrence V.

    This publication presents a description of 137 wells in New York State and adjacent parts of Pennsylvania. Correlations with surface exposures are established. Maps and cross sections display the thickness, structure, and stratigraphic relationships of the carbonates described. A paleogeologic map of New York State at the end of the Early…

  14. Carbonate Melt Rocks from the Haughton Impact Structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, G. R.; Spray, J. G.; Lee, P.

    2002-01-01

    The target rocks at the Haughton impact structure, Canada, are predominantly carbonates. The well preserved allochthonous crater-fill deposits are reinterpreted here as being carbonatitic impact melt rocks. The implications of our findings will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Study of the adsorption characteristics and pore structure of activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutics, K; Kotsis, L; Argyelan, J; Szolcsanyi, P

    1985-05-01

    Charcoal prepared by heating walnut shells at 500/sup 0/C in a nitrogen atmosphere was activated by CO/sub 2/ at various temperatures. The adsorption equilibrium and mass transfer characteristics of the activated carbon were studied. The structural properties were determined by means of additional measurements. A pore model is proposed to explain the variation of the pore structure with the activation process. The micropore sizes predicted by the model agree with the adsorption data.

  16. The research of structural features of astralens - nanodimensional carbon particles of fulleroid type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, A.N.; Nikitin, V.A.; Rybalko, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The article is focused on the research of structural features of astralens - nanodimensional carbonic particles of fulleroid type. Astralens are perspective nanomodificators of properties of materials of different types. The potentials os astralens as modificators depend on their characteristic structural features, and in the first place, on the distribution of nanoparticles by sizes. The typical dimensions of astralens are determined to be within the range of 15-75 nm [ru

  17. Biomimetic small peptide functionalized affinity monoliths for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Xia, Donghai; Han, Hai; Peng, Kun; Zhu, Peijie; Crommen, Jacques; Wang, Qiqin; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2018-08-09

    The rapid development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has necessitated the advancement of mAbs purification technologies. In this study, a biomimetic small peptide ligand 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzoic acid-Arg-Arg-Gly (DAAG) functionalized monolith was fabricated through a metal ion chelation-based multi-step approach. The resulting monolith showed good chromatographic performance. Compared with the Ni 2+ based IMAC monolith, the DAAG functionalized monolith exhibited not only excellent specificity but also higher dynamic binding capacity (DBC). The 10% DBC and 50% DBC for hIgG reached as high values as 26.0 and 34.6 mg/mL, respectively, at a ligand density of 8.8 μmol/mL, due to the high porosity and accessibility of the monolithic matrix. Moreover, the stability of the DAAG functionalized monolith in successive breakthrough experiments indicates that it has a promising potential for long-term use in mAbs purification. Finally, the DAAG functionalized monolith was successfully applied to the purification of trastuzumab or human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from biological samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation of a poly(3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-co-propargyl methacrylate-co-pentaerythritol triacrylate) monolithic column by in situ polymerization and a click reaction for capillary liquid chromatography of small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zian; Yu, Ruifang; Hu, Wenli; Zheng, Jiangnan; Tong, Ping; Zhao, Hongzhi; Cai, Zongwei

    2015-07-07

    Combining free radical polymerization with click chemistry via a copper-mediated azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction in a "one-pot" process, a facile approach was developed for the preparation of a poly(3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-co-propargyl methacrylate-co-pentaerythritol triacrylate) (AZT-co-PMA-co-PETA) monolithic column. The resulting poly(AZT-co-PMA-co-PETA) monolith showed a relatively homogeneous monolithic structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. Different ratios of monomers and porogens were used for optimizing the properties of a monolithic column. A series of alkylbenzenes, amides, anilines, and benzoic acids were used to evaluate the chromatographic properties of the polymer monolith in terms of hydrophobic, hydrophilic and cation-exchange interactions, and the results showed that the poly(AZT-co-PMA-co-PETA) monolith exhibited more flexible adjustment in chromatographic selectivity than that of the parent poly(PMA-co-PETA) and AZT-modified poly(PMA-co-PETA) monoliths. Column efficiencies for toluene, DMF, and formamide with 35,000-48,000 theoretical plates per m could be obtained at a linear velocity of 0.17 mm s(-1). The run-to-run, column-to-column, and batch-to-batch repeatabilities of the retention factors were less than 4.2%. In addition, the proposed monolith was also applied to efficient separation of sulfonamides, nucleobases and nucleosides, anesthetics and proteins for demonstrating its potential.

  19. Asymmetric hydration structure around calcium ion restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Kusudo, Tomoko; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-01-01

    The adsorbed phase and hydration structure of an aqueous solution of Ca(NO 3 ) 2 restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons (ACs) having different average pore widths (0.63 and 1.1 nm) were investigated with the analysis of adsorption isotherms and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra on Ca K -edge. The adsorbed density of Ca 2+ per unit micropore volume in the narrower pore was higher than in the wider pore, while the adsorbed amount per unit mass of carbon with the narrower pore was half of the amount of ACs with the larger pore. On the other hand, variations in the bands assigned to double-electron ( KM I ) and 1s  →  3d excitations in XAFS spectra demonstrate the formation of a distorted hydration cluster around Ca 2+ in the micropore, although the structural parameters of hydrated Ca 2+ in the micropores were almost consistent with the bulk aqueous solution, as revealed by the analysis of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra. In contrast to the hydration structure of monovalent ions such as Rb + , which generally presents a dehydrated structure in smaller than 1 nm micropores in ACs, the present study clearly explains that the non-spherically-symmetric structure of hydrated Ca 2+ restricted in carbon micropores whose sizes are around 1 nm is experimentally revealed where any dehydration phenomena from the first hydration shell around Ca 2+ could not be observed. (paper)

  20. Comparison of polystyrene scintillator fiber array and monolithic polystyrene for neutron imaging and radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R., E-mail: raspberry@lanl.gov; Cutler, T. E.; Danly, C. R.; Espy, M. A.; Goglio, J. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Madden, A. C.; Mayo, D. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nelson, R. O.; Swift, A. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Zocco, T. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The neutron imaging diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility has been operating since 2011 generating neutron images of deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at peak compression. The current design features a scintillating fiber array, which allows for high imaging resolution to discern small-scale structure within the implosion. In recent years, it has become clear that additional neutron imaging systems need to be constructed in order to provide 3D reconstructions of the DT source and these additional views need to be on a shorter line of sight. As a result, there has been increased effort to identify new image collection techniques that improve upon imaging resolution for these next generation neutron imaging systems, such as monolithic deuterated scintillators. This work details measurements performed at the Weapons Neutron Research Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory that compares the radiographic abilities of the fiber scintillator with a monolithic scintillator, which may be featured in a future short line of sight neutron imaging systems.

  1. Controlled crosslinking of trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate for preparation of organic monolithic columns for capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Mariana R; Aggarwal, Pankaj; Lee, Milton L; Bottoli, Carla B G

    2017-11-01

    Organic monolithic columns based on single crosslinking of trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) monomer were prepared in a single step by living/controlled free-radical polymerization. Full optimization of the preparation, such as using different percentages of TRIM and different amounts of radical promoter as well as various porogen solvents were explored. The resulting monolithic columns were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy and nitrogen sorption for structure morphology studies and surface area measurements, respectively. Using capillary liquid chromatography, 150 μm i.d. columns were applied to separate a mixture of small hydrophobic molecules. The results indicated that column performance is highly sensitive to the type and the amount of porogen solvents used in the polymerization mixture composition. Good resolution factors and methylene selectivity were obtained, indicating the promising potential of this material for capillary liquid chromatography separations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A Reliable Method for the Preparation of Multiporous Alumina Monoliths by Ice-Templating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Dhainaut

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alumina supports presenting a bimodal porosity are generally advantageous for the conversion of bulky molecules such as found in biomass, refining, and petrochemistry. However, shaping of such materials, while controlling pores size and orientation, proves to be hard. This problem can be tackled by using a simple method involving sol-gel chemistry, surfactant self-assembly, and ice-templating. Herein, a systematic study of the formulation and process parameters’ influence on the final material properties is presented. This protocol results in the repeatable preparation of centimeter-sized alumina monoliths presenting a uni-directional macroporosity and structured mesopores. These monoliths should be of particular interest in high flow rate catalytic applications.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Luminescent Downshifting in Top Cell of Monolithic Tandem Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfoud Abderrezek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the conversion efficiency of monolithic tandem solar cells is limited by the short-circuit current density matching between the top and the bottom cells. Generally, the top cell presents the lowest current in the two subcells. In this paper, in order to increase the short-circuit current density in the top cell, we present a theoretical survey of the luminescence downshifting (LDS approach for the design of monolithic tandem solar cells. The photovoltaic (PV glass encapsulation material is replaced with a polymer material of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA type which is doped with diverse kinds of organic dyes. The performance of the n-p-p+ GaInP structure has been simulated as a function of the organic dyes. Gains achieved for the short-circuit current density and conversion efficiency are, respectively, 13.13% and 13.38%, under AM1.5G illumination spectra.

  4. Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical performance used as anodes of structural lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Mengjie; Wang, Shubin; Yu, Yalin; Feng, Qihang; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Boming

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Carboxyl functionalized CF is acquired by simple chemical oxidation method. • These CF have preserved the tensile strength, better electrochemical properties. • The presence of H_3PO_4 prevented the turbostratic carbon from over-oxidization. • There CF can be used as anodes of multifunctional structural battery. • The preservation and improvement is result from the hindered over-oxidization. - Abstract: Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical properties were acquired through a simple chemical oxidation method, and the proposed underlying mechanism was verified. The surface of carboxyl functionalizing carbon fibers is necessary in acquiring functional groups on the surface of carbon fibers to further improve the thermal, electrical or mechanical properties of the fibers. Functionalization should preserve the tensile strength and electrochemical properties of carbon fibers, because the anodes of structural batteries need to have high strength and electrochemical properties. Functionalized with mixed H_2SO_4/HNO_3 considerably reduced the tensile strength of carbon fibers. By contrast, the appearance of H_3PO_4 preserved the tensile strength of functionalized carbon fibers, reduced the dispersion level of tensile strength values, and effectively increased the concentration of functional acid groups on the surface of carbon fibers. The presence of phosphoric acid hindered the over-oxidation of turbostratic carbon, and consequently preserved the tensile strength of carbon fibers. The increased proportion of turbostratic carbon on the surface of carbon fibers concurrently enhanced the electrochemical properties of carbon fibers.

  5. Monolithic Carbide-Derived Carbon Films for Micro-Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Chmiola, John; Largeot, Céline; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Microbatteries with dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers that are produced by common microfabrication techniques are poised to provide integration of power sources onto electronic devices, but they still suffer from poor cycle lifetime, as well as power and temperature range of operation issues that are alleviated with the use of supercapacitors. There have been a few reports on thin-film and other micro-supercapacitors, but they are either too thin to provide sufficie...

  6. Temperature Dependence on Structural, Tribological, and Electrical Properties of Sputtered Conductive Carbon Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Seob; Hong, Byung You; Cho, Sang Jin; Boo, Jin Hyo

    2011-01-01

    Conductive carbon films were prepared at room temperature by unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) on silicon substrates using argon (Ar) gas, and the effects of post-annealing temperature on the structural, tribological, and electrical properties of carbon films were investigated. Films were annealed at temperatures ranging from 400 .deg. C to 700 .deg. C in increments of 100 .deg. C using a rapid thermal annealing method by vacuum furnace in vacuum ambient. The increase of annealing temperature contributed to the increase of the ordering and formation of aromatic rings in the carbon film. Consequently, with increasing annealing temperature the tribological properties of sputtered carbon films are deteriorated while the resistivity of carbon films significantly decreased from 4.5 x 10 -3 to 1.0 x 10 -6 Ω-cm and carrier concentration as well as mobility increased, respectively. This behavior can be explained by the increase of sp 2 bonding fraction and ordering sp 2 clusters in the carbon networks caused by increasing annealing temperature

  7. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Briceñ o, Kelly; Montané , Daniel; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Iulianelli, Adolfo; Basile, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Briceño, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  9. An investigation of fractal characteristics of mesoporous carbon electrodes with various pore structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyun, Su-Il; Rhee, Chang-Kyu

    2004-01-01

    Fractal characteristics of mesoporous carbon electrodes were investigated with various pore structures using the N 2 gas adsorption method and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image analysis method. The mesoporous carbons with various pore structures were prepared by imprinting mesophase pitch used as a carbonaceous precursor with different colloidal silica particles. All imprinted mesoporous carbons were composed of two groups of pores produced from the carbonisation of mesophase pitch and from the silica imprinting. The overall surface fractal dimensions of the carbon specimens were determined from the analyses of the N 2 gas adsorption isotherms. In order to distinguish the surface fractal dimension of the carbonisation-induced pore surface from that fractal dimension of the silica-imprinted pore surface, the individual surface fractal dimensions were determined from the image analyses of the TEM images. From the comparison of the overall surface fractal dimension with the individual surface fractal dimensions, it was recognised that the overall surface fractal dimension is crucially influenced by the individual surface fractal dimension of the silica-imprinted pore surface. Moreover, from the fact that the silica-imprinted pore surface with broad relative pore size distribution (PSD) gave lower value of the individual surface fractal dimension than that pore surface with narrow relative PSD, it is concluded that as the silica-imprinted pores comprising the carbon specimen agglomerate, the individual surface fractal dimension of that pore surface decreases

  10. Relating microbial community structure to functioning in forest soil organic carbon transformation and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yeming; Wang, Juan; Huang, Xueman; Tang, Zuoxin; Liu, Shirong; Sun, Osbert J

    2014-03-01

    Forest soils store vast amounts of terrestrial carbon, but we are still limited in mechanistic understanding on how soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization or turnover is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors in forest ecosystems. We used phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarker to study soil microbial community structure and measured activities of five extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose (i.e., β-1,4-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase), chitin (i.e., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase), and lignin (i.e., phenol oxidase and peroxidase) as indicators of soil microbial functioning in carbon transformation or turnover across varying biotic and abiotic conditions in a typical temperate forest ecosystem in central China. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was performed to determine the interrelationship between individual PFLAs and biotic and abiotic site factors as well as the linkage between soil microbial structure and function. Path analysis was further conducted to examine the controls of site factors on soil microbial community structure and the regulatory pathway of changes in SOC relating to microbial community structure and function. We found that soil microbial community structure is strongly influenced by water, temperature, SOC, fine root mass, clay content, and C/N ratio in soils and that the relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, saprophytic fungi, and actinomycetes explained most of the variations in the specific activities of soil enzymes involved in SOC transformation or turnover. The abundance of soil bacterial communities is strongly linked with the extracellular enzymes involved in carbon transformation, whereas the abundance of saprophytic fungi is associated with activities of extracellular enzymes driving carbon oxidation. Findings in this study demonstrate the complex interactions and linkage among plant traits, microenvironment, and soil physiochemical properties in affecting SOC via microbial regulations.

  11. Monolithic and Flexible ZnS/SnO2 Ultraviolet Photodetectors with Lateral Graphene Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Xie, Yunchao; Deng, Heng; Tumlin, Travis; Zhang, Chi; Su, Jheng-Wun; Yu, Ping; Lin, Jian

    2017-05-01

    A continuing trend of miniaturized and flexible electronics/optoelectronic calls for novel device architectures made by compatible fabrication techniques. However, traditional layer-to-layer structures cannot satisfy such a need. Herein, a novel monolithic optoelectronic device fabricated by a mask-free laser direct writing method is demonstrated in which in situ laser induced graphene-like materials are employed as lateral electrodes for flexible ZnS/SnO 2 ultraviolet photodetectors. Specifically, a ZnS/SnO 2 thin film comprised of heterogeneous ZnS/SnO 2 nanoparticles is first coated on polyimide (PI) sheets by a solution process. Then, CO 2 laser irradiation ablates designed areas of the ZnS/SnO 2 thin film and converts the underneath PI into highly conductive graphene as the lateral electrodes for the monolithic photodetectors. This in situ growth method provides good interfaces between the graphene electrodes and the semiconducting ZnS/SnO 2 resulting in high optoelectronic performance. The lateral electrode structure reduces total thickness of the devices, thus minimizing the strain and improving flexibility of the photodetectors. The demonstrated lithography-free monolithic fabrication is a simple and cost-effective method, showing a great potential for developement into roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A top-down approach for fabricating free-standing bio-carbon supercapacitor electrodes with a hierarchical structure

    OpenAIRE

    Yingzhi Li; Qinghua Zhang; Junxian Zhang; Lei Jin; Xin Zhao; Ting Xu

    2015-01-01

    Biomass has delicate hierarchical structures, which inspired us to develop a cost-effective route to prepare electrode materials with rational nanostructures for use in high-performance storage devices. Here, we demonstrate a novel top-down approach for fabricating bio-carbon materials with stable structures and excellent diffusion pathways; this approach is based on carbonization with controlled chemical activation. The developed free-standing bio-carbon electrode exhibits a high specific ca...

  13. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  14. Present status of the MONOLITH project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    MONOLITH is a proposed massive (34 kt) magnetized tracking calorimeter at the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, optimized for the detection of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The main goal is to establish (or reject) the neutrino oscillation hypothesis through an explicit observation of the full first oscillation swing. The Δm 2 sensitivity range for this measurement comfortably covers the complete Super-Kamiokande allowed region. Other measurements include studies of matter effects, the NC up/down ratio, ν bar / ν ratio, the study of cosmic ray muons in the multi-TeV range, and auxiliary measurements from the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam. Depending on approval, data taking with the part of the detector could start towards the end of 2004

  15. Monolithic fuel injector and related manufacturing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve [Greenville, SC; Johnson, Thomas Edward [Greenville, SC; Lacy, Benjamin [Greenville, SC; York, William David [Greenville, SC; Stevenson, Christian Xavier [Greenville, SC

    2012-05-22

    A monolithic fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle includes a substantially hollow vesicle body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween, an internal baffle plate extending radially outwardly from a downstream end of the bore, terminating short of the peripheral wall, thereby defining upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body, in fluid communication by way of a radial gap between the baffle plate and the peripheral wall. A plurality of integral pre-mix tubes extend axially through the upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body and through the baffle plate, with at least one fuel injection hole extending between each of the pre-mix tubes and the upstream fuel plenum, thereby enabling fuel in the upstream plenum to be injected into the plurality of pre-mix tubes. The fuel injection head is formed by direct metal laser sintering.

  16. Structure and Stability of High-Pressure Dolomite with Implications for the Earth's Deep Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is subducted into the mantle primarily in the form of metasomatically calcium-enriched basaltic rock, calcified serpentinites and carbonaceous ooze. The fate of these carbonates in subduction zones is not well understood. End-member CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite typically breaks down into two carbonates at 2-7 GPa, which may further decompose to oxides and CO2-bearing fluid. However, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have recently shown that the presence of iron may be sufficient to stabilize dolomite I to high pressures, allowing the transformation to dolomite II at 17 GPa and subsequently to dolomite III at 35 GPa [1][2]. Such phases may be a principal host for deeply subducted carbon. The structure and equation of state of these high-pressure phases is debated and the effect of varying concentrations of iron is unknown, creating a need for theoretical calculations. Here we compare calculated dolomite structures to experimentally observed phases. Using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) interfaced with a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures (USPEX), a monoclinic phase with space group 5 ("dolomite sg5") was found for pure end-member dolomite. Dolomite sg5 has a lower energy than reported dolomite structures and an equation of state that resembles that of dolomite III. It is possible that dolomite sg5 is not achieved experimentally due to a large energy barrier and a correspondingly large required volume drop, resulting in the transformation to metastable dolomite II. Due to the complex energy landscape for candidate high-pressure dolomite structures, it is likely that several competing polymorphs exist. Determining the behavior of high-pressure Ca-Mg-Fe(-Mn) dolomite phases in subduction environments is critical for our understanding of the Earth's deep carbon cycle and supercell calculations with Fe substitution are in progress. [1] Mao, Z., Armentrout, M., Rainey, E., Manning, C. E., Dera, P., Prakapenka, V. B., and Kavner, A

  17. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M.; Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O.; Puziy, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. ► Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. ► Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. ► Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. ► Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S BET = 2081 m 2 /g, V tot = 1.1 cm 3 /g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0–2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7–5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7–7.4; 8.8–9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1–10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  18. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M. [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O. [M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 2 Tereshchenkivska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Puziy, A.M., E-mail: alexander.puziy@ispe.kiev.ua [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 Degree-Sign C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S{sub BET} = 2081 m{sup 2}/g, V{sub tot} = 1.1 cm{sup 3}/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  19. A functional-structural kiwifruit vine model integrating architecture, carbon dynamics and effects of the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Mikolaj; Seleznyova, Alla N; Hanan, Jim

    2011-04-01

    Functional-structural modelling can be used to increase our understanding of how different aspects of plant structure and function interact, identify knowledge gaps and guide priorities for future experimentation. By integrating existing knowledge of the different aspects of the kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) vine's architecture and physiology, our aim is to develop conceptual and mathematical hypotheses on several of the vine's features: (a) plasticity of the vine's architecture; (b) effects of organ position within the canopy on its size; (c) effects of environment and horticultural management on shoot growth, light distribution and organ size; and (d) role of carbon reserves in early shoot growth. Using the L-system modelling platform, a functional-structural plant model of a kiwifruit vine was created that integrates architectural development, mechanistic modelling of carbon transport and allocation, and environmental and management effects on vine and fruit growth. The branching pattern was captured at the individual shoot level by modelling axillary shoot development using a discrete-time Markov chain. An existing carbon transport resistance model was extended to account for several source/sink components of individual plant elements. A quasi-Monte Carlo path-tracing algorithm was used to estimate the absorbed irradiance of each leaf. Several simulations were performed to illustrate the model's potential to reproduce the major features of the vine's behaviour. The model simulated vine growth responses that were qualitatively similar to those observed in experiments, including the plastic response of shoot growth to local carbon supply, the branching patterns of two Actinidia species, the effect of carbon limitation and topological distance on fruit size and the complex behaviour of sink competition for carbon. The model is able to reproduce differences in vine and fruit growth arising from various experimental treatments. This implies it will be a valuable

  20. The importance of forest structure for carbon fluxes of the Amazon rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödig, Edna; Cuntz, Matthias; Rammig, Anja; Fischer, Rico; Taubert, Franziska; Huth, Andreas

    2018-05-01

    Precise descriptions of forest productivity, biomass, and structure are essential for understanding ecosystem responses to climatic and anthropogenic changes. However, relations between these components are complex, in particular for tropical forests. We developed an approach to simulate carbon dynamics in the Amazon rainforest including around 410 billion individual trees within 7.8 million km2. We integrated canopy height observations from space-borne LIDAR in order to quantify spatial variations in forest state and structure reflecting small-scale to large-scale natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Under current conditions, we identified the Amazon rainforest as a carbon sink, gaining 0.56 GtC per year. This carbon sink is driven by an estimated mean gross primary productivity (GPP) of 25.1 tC ha‑1 a‑1, and a mean woody aboveground net primary productivity (wANPP) of 4.2 tC ha‑1 a‑1. We found that successional states play an important role for the relations between productivity and biomass. Forests in early to intermediate successional states are the most productive, and woody above-ground carbon use efficiencies are non-linear. Simulated values can be compared to observed carbon fluxes at various spatial resolutions (>40 m). Notably, we found that our GPP corresponds to the values derived from MODIS. For NPP, spatial differences can be observed due to the consideration of forest successional states in our approach. We conclude that forest structure has a substantial impact on productivity and biomass. It is an essential factor that should be taken into account when estimating current carbon budgets or analyzing climate change scenarios for the Amazon rainforest.

  1. Carbon redistribution and precipitation in high temperature ion-implanted strained Si/SiGe/Si multi-layered structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaiduk, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract Carbon depth profiles after high temperature implantation in strained Si/SiGe/Si multilayered system and induced structural defects.......Graphical abstract Carbon depth profiles after high temperature implantation in strained Si/SiGe/Si multilayered system and induced structural defects....

  2. Preparation of methacrylate-based anion-exchange monolithic microbore column for chromatographic separation of DNA fragments and oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabarudin, Akhmad, E-mail: sabarjpn@ub.ac.id [Division of Nano-materials Science, EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furu-Cho, Chikusa-Ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Brawijaya University, Jl Veteran Malang 65145 (Indonesia); Huang, Junchao; Shu, Shin; Sakagawa, Shinnosuke [Division of Nano-materials Science, EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furu-Cho, Chikusa-Ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Umemura, Tomonari, E-mail: umemura@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Nano-materials Science, EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furu-Cho, Chikusa-Ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2012-07-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbore-scale (1 mm i.d.) anion-exchange monolithic column. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potentially preparative applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Separation of oligodeoxythymidylic acids and DNA fragments. - Abstract: In this paper, we report on the preparation of a microbore-scale (1 mm i.d.) anion-exchange monolithic column suitable not only for analytical purposes but also for potentially preparative applications. In order to meet the conflicting requirements of high permeability and good mechanical strength, the following two-step procedure was applied. First, an epoxy-containing monolith was synthesized by in situ copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) within the confines of a silicosteel tubing of 1.02 mm i.d. and 1/16 Double-Prime o.d. in the presence of a ternary porogenic mixture of 1-propanol, 1,4-butanediol, and water. The monolithic matrix was subsequently converted into weak anion-exchanger via the ring-opening reaction of epoxy group with diethyl amine. The dynamic binding capacity was 21.4 mg mL{sup -1} for bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 10% breakthrough. The morphology and porous structure of this monolith were assessed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC). To optimize the separation efficiency, the effects of various chromatographic parameters upon the separation of DNA fragments were investigated. The resulting monolithic anion exchanger demonstrated good potential for the separation of both single- and double-stranded DNA molecules using a gradient elution with NaCl in Tris-HCl buffer (20 mM). Oligodeoxythymidylic acids (dT{sub 12}-dT{sub 18}) were successfully resolved at pH 8, while the fragments of 20 bp DNA ladder, 100 bp DNA ladder, and pBR322-HaeIII digest were efficiently separated at pH 9.

  3. The system of quantum structures coated with the diamond-like carbon for silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, V.P.; Abyzov, A.S.; Luchaninov, A.A.; Omarov, A.O.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2010-01-01

    The peculiarity of the process of amorphous diamond-like carbon coating deposition on the surface of Si photoelectric cell with quantum filaments, which was irradiated by the electrons and heavy multi-charge ions, have been investigated. The experimental results on the investigations of the optical characteristics of the nitrogen doped hydrogenated diamond-like carbon a-C:(H,N) coatings were presented. The parameters of the process of a-C:(H,N) coating deposition on the surfaces of disordered Si semiconductors structures were optimized for the purpose of minimizing optical reflection coefficient from the front surface of the crystal and supplying its mechanical durability.

  4. Flexible solid-state supercapacitors based on carbon nanoparticles/MnO2 nanorods hybrid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Longyan; Lu, Xi-Hong; Xiao, Xu; Zhai, Teng; Dai, Junjie; Zhang, Fengchao; Hu, Bin; Wang, Xue; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Hu, Chenguo; Tong, Yexiang; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-01-24

    A highly flexible solid-state supercapacitor was fabricated through a simple flame synthesis method and electrochemical deposition process based on a carbon nanoparticles/MnO(2) nanorods hybrid structure using polyvinyl alcohol/H(3)PO(4) electrolyte. Carbon fabric is used as a current collector and electrode (mechanical support), leading to a simplified, highly flexible, and lightweight architecture. The device exhibited good electrochemical performance with an energy density of 4.8 Wh/kg at a power density of 14 kW/kg, and a demonstration of a practical device is also presented, highlighting the path for its enormous potential in energy management. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Wireless and embedded carbon nanotube networks for damage detection in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saafi, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Concrete structures undergo an uncontrollable damage process manifesting in the form of cracks due to the coupling of fatigue loading and environmental effects. In order to achieve long-term durability and performance, continuous health monitoring systems are needed to make critical decisions regarding operation, maintenance and repairs. Recent advances in nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes have opened the door for new smart and advanced sensing materials that could effectively be used in health monitoring of structures where wireless and real time sensing could provide information on damage development. In this paper, carbon nanotube networks were embedded into a cement matrix to develop an in situ wireless and embedded sensor for damage detection in concrete structures. By wirelessly measuring the change in the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube networks, the progress of damage can be detected and monitored. As a proof of concept, wireless cement-carbon nanotube sensors were embedded into concrete beams and subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of damage on their response. Experimental results showed that the wireless response of the embedded nanotube sensors changes due to the formation of cracks during loading. In addition, the nanotube sensors were able to detect the initiation of damage at an early stage of loading.

  6. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori α-Carbonic Anhydrase by Sulfonamides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyanta K Modak

    Full Text Available Periplasmic α-carbonic anhydrase of Helicobacter pylori (HpαCA, an oncogenic bacterium in the human stomach, is essential for its acclimation to low pH. It catalyses the conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate using Zn(II as the cofactor. In H. pylori, Neisseria spp., Brucella suis and Streptococcus pneumoniae this enzyme is the target for sulfonamide antibacterial agents. We present structural analysis correlated with inhibition data, on the complexes of HpαCA with two pharmacological inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrases, acetazolamide and methazolamide. This analysis reveals that two sulfonamide oxygen atoms of the inhibitors are positioned proximal to the putative location of the oxygens of the CO2 substrate in the Michaelis complex, whilst the zinc-coordinating sulfonamide nitrogen occupies the position of the catalytic water molecule. The structures are consistent with acetazolamide acting as site-directed, nanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme by mimicking its reaction transition state. Additionally, inhibitor binding provides insights into the channel for substrate entry and product exit. This analysis has implications for the structure-based design of inhibitors of bacterial carbonic anhydrases.

  7. Behaviors and kinetics of toluene adsorption-desorption on activated carbons with varying pore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Shunzheng; Yang, Zhongyu; Ma, Yueqiang; Feng, Tiecheng; Cui, Xiaoxu

    2018-05-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the behaviors and kinetics of toluene adsorption and desorption on activated carbons with varying pore structure. Five kinds of activated carbon from different raw materials were selected. Adsorption isotherms and breakthrough curves for toluene were measured. Langmuir and Freundlich equations were fitted to the equilibrium data, and the Freundlich equation was more suitable for simulating toluene adsorption. The process consisted of monolayer, multilayer and partial active site adsorption types. The effect of the pore structure of the activated carbons on toluene adsorption capacity was investigated. The quasi-first-order model was more suitable for describing the process than the quasi-second-order model. The adsorption data was also modeled by the internal particle diffusion model and it was found that the adsorption process could be divided into three stages. In the external surface adsorption process, the rate depended on the specific surface area. During the particle diffusion stage, pore structure and volume were the main factors affecting adsorption rate. In the final equilibrium stage, the rate was determined by the ratio of meso- and macro-pores to total pore volume. The rate over the whole adsorption process was dominated by the toluene concentration. The desorption behavior of toluene on activated carbons was investigated, and the process was divided into heat and mass transfer parts corresponding to emission and diffusion mechanisms, respectively. Physical adsorption played the main role during the adsorption process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Wireless and embedded carbon nanotube networks for damage detection in concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saafi, Mohamed

    2009-09-01

    Concrete structures undergo an uncontrollable damage process manifesting in the form of cracks due to the coupling of fatigue loading and environmental effects. In order to achieve long-term durability and performance, continuous health monitoring systems are needed to make critical decisions regarding operation, maintenance and repairs. Recent advances in nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes have opened the door for new smart and advanced sensing materials that could effectively be used in health monitoring of structures where wireless and real time sensing could provide information on damage development. In this paper, carbon nanotube networks were embedded into a cement matrix to develop an in situ wireless and embedded sensor for damage detection in concrete structures. By wirelessly measuring the change in the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube networks, the progress of damage can be detected and monitored. As a proof of concept, wireless cement-carbon nanotube sensors were embedded into concrete beams and subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of damage on their response. Experimental results showed that the wireless response of the embedded nanotube sensors changes due to the formation of cracks during loading. In addition, the nanotube sensors were able to detect the initiation of damage at an early stage of loading.

  9. The synthesis of weak acidic type hybrid monolith via thiol-ene click chemistry and its application in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiao; Liu, Shengquan; Wang, Menglin; Yao, Shouzhuo; Chen, Yingzhuang

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a porous structure and good permeability monolithic column was polymerized in UV transparent fused-silica capillaries via photo-initiated thiol-ene click polymerization of 2,4,6,8-tetravinyl-2,4,6,8-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMTVS), pentaerythritol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate)(PETMP), itaconic acid, respectively, in the presence of porogenic solvents (tetrahydrofuranand methanol) and an initiator (2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone) (DMPA) within 30 min. The physical properties of this monolith were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. For an overall evaluation of the monolith in chromatographic application, separations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, amides and bases were carried out. The column efficiency of this monolith could be as high as 112 560 N/m. It also possesses a potential application in fabrication of monoliths with high efficiency for c-LC. In addition, the resulting monolithic column demonstrated the potential use in analysis of environment waters. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Fabrication of an ionic-liquid-based polymer monolithic column and its application in the fractionation of proteins from complex biosamples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Doudou; Zhang, Qian; Bai, Ligai; Han, Dandan; Liu, Haiyan; Yan, Hongyuan

    2018-05-01

    An ionic-liquid-based polymer monolithic column was synthesized by free radical polymerization within the confines of a stainless-steel column (50 mm × 4.6 mm id). In the processes, ionic liquid and stearyl methacrylate were used as dual monomers, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linking agent, and polyethylene glycol 200 and isopropanol as co-porogens. Effects of the prepolymerization solution components on the properties of the resulting monoliths were studied in detail. Scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, and mercury intrusion porosimetry were used to investigate the morphology and pore size distribution of the prepared monoliths, which showed that the homemade ionic-liquid-based monolith column possessed a relatively uniform macropore structure with a total macropore specific surface area of 44.72 m 2 /g. Compared to a non-ionic-liquid-based monolith prepared under the same conditions, the ionic-liquid-based monolith exhibited excellent selectivity and high performance for separating proteins from complex biosamples, such as egg white, snailase, bovine serum albumin digest solution, human plasma, etc., indicating promising applications in the fractionation and analysis of proteins from the complex biosamples in proteomics research. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. In situ polymerization of monolith based on poly(Triallyl Isocyanurate-co-trimethylolpropane triacrylate) and its application in high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Bai, Ligai; Qin, Junxiao; Wang, Jiafei; Hao, Mengbei; Yang, Gengliang

    2015-04-01

    A novel organic monolithic stationary phase was prepared for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by in situ copolymerization. In which, triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) in a binary porogenic solvent consisting of polyethylene glycol 200 and 1, 2-propanediol were used. The resultant monoliths with different column properties (e.g., morphology and pressure) were optimized by adjusting the ratio of TMPTA/TAIC and the composition of porogenic solvent. The resulting poly(TAIC-co-TMPTA) monolith showed a relatively homogeneous structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. The chemical group of the monolith was assayed by the infrared spectra method, the morphology of monolithic material was studied by scanning electron microscopy and the pore size distribution was determined by a mercury porosimeter. A series of small molecules were used to evaluate the column performance in terms of hydrophobic mode. At an optimized flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1), the theoretical plate number of analyte was >15,000 plates m(-1). These applications demonstrated that the monoliths could be successfully used as the stationary phase in conjunction with HPLC to separate small molecules from the mixture. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Preparation of Silica Monoliths with Macropores and Mesopores and of High Specific Surface Area with Low Shrinkage using a Template Induced Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jianyu [Shanghai Normal Univ., Shanghai (China); Lu, Yan [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai (China); Whiting, Roger [AUT Univ., Auckland (New Zealand)

    2013-02-15

    In this study we report a new method for the synthesis of a silica monolithic column bed with bimodal pores (throughpores and mesopores). The template induced synthesis method was used to direct bimodal pores simultaneously instead of the usual post base-treating method. Block polymer Pluronic F127 was chosen as a dual-function template to form hierarchically porous silica monolith with both macropores and mesopores. This is a simplification of the method of monolithic column preparation. Poly(ethylene glycol) was used as a partial substitute for F127 can effectively prevent shrinkage during the monolith aging process without losing much surface area (944 m{sup 2}/g to 807 m{sup 2}/g). More importantly, the resultant material showed a much narrower mesopore size (centered at 6 nm) distribution than that made using only F127 as the template reagent, which helps the mass transfer process. The solvent washing method was used to remove the remaining organic template, and it was proved to be effective enough. The new synthesis method makes the fabrication of the silica monolithic column (especially capillary column) much easier. All the structure parameters indicate that monolith PFA05 prepared by the above method is a good material for separation, with the merits of much higher surface area than usual commercial HPLC silica particles, suitable mesopore volume, narrow mesopore size distribution, low shrinkage and it is easily prepared.

  13. Morphology and Structural Characterization of Carbon Nanowalls Grown via VHF-PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmal Hasanudin, M.; Wahab, Y.; Ismail, A. K.; Zahid Jamal, Z. A.

    2018-03-01

    A 150 MHz very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (150 MHz VHF-PECVD) system was utilized to fabricate two-dimensional carbon nanostructure from the mixture of methane and hydrogen. Morphology and structural properties of the grown nanostructure were investigated by FESEM imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Carbon nanowalls (CNW) with dense and wavy-like structure were successfully synthesized. The wavy-like morphology of CNW was found to be more distinct during growth at small electrode spacing and denser with increasing deposition time due to better flux of hydrocarbon radicals to the substrate and higher rate of reaction, respectively. Typical characteristics of CNW were observed from strong D band, narrow bandwidth of G band and single broad peak of 2D band of Raman spectra indicating the presence of disordered nanocrystalline graphite structure with high degree of graphitization.

  14. Formation of glassy carbon structure and its change under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurolenkin, E.I.; Lopato, Yu.S.; Virgil' ev, Yu.S.; Khakimova, D.K.; Aksenov, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    The changes of glassy carbon structure, which is prepared of phenol-formaldehyde and furfurol-phenol-formaldehyde resins in the process of irradiation with 5.3x10/sup 20/ cm/sup -2/ neutron fluence with the energy E>0.18 MeV in the temperature range of 90-540 deg C are studied. It is established the irradiation results in the shrinkage of the samples. The compression of the samples increases with the irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The thermal annealing does not result in the restoration of the volume of samples. The sample shrinkage, caused by more compact package of globular structures and the destruction of film structures, decrease gas permeability of glassy carbon.

  15. Model structures amplify uncertainty in predicted soil carbon responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zheng; Crowell, Sean; Luo, Yiqi; Moore, Berrien

    2018-06-04

    Large model uncertainty in projected future soil carbon (C) dynamics has been well documented. However, our understanding of the sources of this uncertainty is limited. Here we quantify the uncertainties arising from model parameters, structures and their interactions, and how those uncertainties propagate through different models to projections of future soil carbon stocks. Both the vertically resolved model and the microbial explicit model project much greater uncertainties to climate change than the conventional soil C model, with both positive and negative C-climate feedbacks, whereas the conventional model consistently predicts positive soil C-climate feedback. Our findings suggest that diverse model structures are necessary to increase confidence in soil C projection. However, the larger uncertainty in the complex models also suggests that we need to strike a balance between model complexity and the need to include diverse model structures in order to forecast soil C dynamics with high confidence and low uncertainty.

  16. Structure of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes produced by mechano-thermal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Conway, M.; FitzGerald, J.; Williams, J.S.; Chadderton, L.T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Structure of carbon and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes produced by mechano-thermal process has been investigated by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including high resolution TEM. FESEM and TEM reveal that nanotubes obtained have a diameter varying from several nm to 200 nm and a length of several micrometers. The size of the nanotubes appears to depend on both milling and heating conditions. Many nanotubes are extruded from particle clusters, implying a special growth mechanism. TEM reveals single- and multi- wall tubular structures and different caps. Bomboo-type nanotubes containing small metal particles inside are also observed in both carbon and BN tubes. This investigation shows that nanotubes with controlled size and structure could be produced by the mechano-thermal process

  17. Piezoresistive strain sensing of carbon nanotubes-based composite skin for aeronautical morphing structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardi, Massimo; Arena, Maurizio; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Ciminello, Monica; Guadagno, Liberata

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, smart composites based on different nano-scale carbon fillers, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are increasingly being thought of as a more possible alternative solution to conventional smart materials, mainly for their improved electrical properties. Great attention is being given by the research community in designing highly sensitive strain sensors for more and more ambitious challenges: in such context, interest fields related to carbon nanotubes have seen extraordinary development in recent years. The authors aim to provide the most contemporary overview possible of carbon nanotube-based strain sensors for aeronautical application. A smart structure as a morphing wing needs an embedded sensing system in order to measure the actual deformation state as well as to "monitor" the structural conditions. Looking at more innovative health monitoring tools for the next generation of composite structures, a resin strain sensor has been realized. The epoxy resin was first analysed by means of a micro-tension test, estimating the electrical resistance variations as function of the load, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the sensor. The epoxy dogbone specimen has been equipped with a standard strain gauge to quantify its strain sensitivity. The voltamperometric tests highlight a good linearity of the electrical resistance value as the load increases at least in the region of elastic deformation of the material. Such intrinsic piezoresistive performance is essentially attributable to the re-arrangement of conductive percolating network formed by MWCNT, induced by the deformation of the material due to the applied loads. The specimen has been prepared within this investigation, to demonstrate its performance for a future composite laminate typical of aerospace structures. The future carbon-fiber sensor can replace conventional metal foil strain gauges in aerospace applications. Furthermore, dynamic tests will be carried out to detect any non

  18. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  19. Location of geologic structures from interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery, Carbon County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, R. W.; Barton, R.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Possible geologic structures in the basin sediments of Carbon County and vicinity were located by interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery. These same structures are not evident on existing conventional geologic maps of the area. Subsequent field checks confirmed much of the geologic interpretation, but revealed that two apparent closed structures identified on the ERTS-1 imagery were actually topographic pseudostructures in flat or homoclinal sediments. Stereoscopic coverage (where available) allows the interpreter to avoid such misinterpretations.

  20. Field emission from a composite structure consisting of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C M; Chen, M Y; Hwang, J; Gan, J-Y; Kou, C S

    2006-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWCNTs) have been fabricated on carbon nanocones (CNCs) in a gravity-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. The CNCs with nanoscale Co particles at the top were first grown on the Co/Si(100) substrate biased at 350 V in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process. The CNCs typically are ∼200 nm in height, and their diameters are ∼100 nm near the bottom and ∼10 nm at the top. The nanoscale Co particles ∼10 nm in diameter act as catalysts which favour the growth of VA-SWCNTs out of CNCs at 850 0 C in the gravity-assisted CVD process. The average length and the growth time of VA-SWCNTs are ∼150 nm and 1.5 min, equivalent to a growth rate of ∼6 μm h -1 . The diameters of VA-SWCNTs are estimated to be 1.2-2.1 nm. When VA-SWCNTs are fabricated on CNCs, the turn-on voltage is reduced from 3.9 to 0.7 V μm -1 and the emission current density at the electric field of 5 V μm -1 is enhanced by a factor of more than 200. The composite VA-SWCNT/CNC structure is potentially an excellent field emitter. The emission stability of the VA-SWCNT/CNC field emitter is discussed

  1. Vibration technique for non-destructive testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    For nondestructive testing of structures of KFK (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) Adams and a group at the English University of Bristol, Department of Mechanical Engineering have developed a vibrational testing method. It is based on the fact that the decreasing self-oscillations of a structure can be measured in connection with a dynamical analysis at only one particular location of that structure. This way a damage can be localized and be quantized rawly. The mathematical model is simple and for every tested structure only one analysis is needed. Many kinds of damages in structures can be determined and reproduced especially in structures that represent typical cases of application of KFK in air and aerospace industry. (orig.) [de

  2. Hierarchically Porous Carbon Materials for CO 2 Capture: The Role of Pore Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez, Luis [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Barpaga, Dushyant [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Zheng, Jian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Sabale, Sandip [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Patel, Rajankumar L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Motkuri, Radha Kishan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2018-01-17

    With advances in porous carbon synthesis techniques, hierarchically porous carbon (HPC) materials are being utilized as relatively new porous carbon sorbents for CO2 capture applications. These HPC materials were used as a platform to prepare samples with differing textural properties and morphologies to elucidate structure-property relationships. It was found that high microporous content, rather than overall surface area was of primary importance for predicting good CO2 capture performance. Two HPC materials were analyzed, each with near identical high surface area (~2700 m2/g) and colossally high pore volume (~10 cm3/g), but with different microporous content and pore size distributions, which led to dramatically different CO2 capture performance. Overall, large pore volumes obtained from distinct mesopores were found to significantly impact adsorption performance. From these results, an optimized HPC material was synthesized that achieved a high CO2 capacity of ~3.7 mmol/g at 25°C and 1 bar.

  3. Chemical/structural characterization of carbon nanoparticles produced by laser pyrolysis and used for nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlanducci, S.; Valentini, F.; Piccirillo, S.; Terranova, M.L.; Botti, S.; Ciardi, R.; Rossi, M.; Palleschi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanoparticles produced by CO 2 laser pyrolysis have been investigated using morphological and structural probes such as high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron diffraction, as well as chemical probes, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. The produced particles resulted to have a spherical shape and a diameter of about 50 nm with graphitic domains of the order of 80 A. They contain appreciable fractions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which can be extracted with toluene, as well as fullerene units. The implications of these results for the use of carbon nanopowders in the carbon nanotube synthesis are also discussed

  4. Relationship between Structural Characteristics of Activated Carbons and Their Concentrating Efficiency with Respect to Nitroorganics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboda, R.; Gun'ko, V. M.; Tomaszewski, W.; Trznadel, B. J.

    2001-07-15

    The relationships between structural properties of activated microporous, micro-mesoporous, mesoporous, and graphitized carbons determined on the basis of nitrogen adsorption at 77.4 K and the efficiency of concentrating (solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique) several nitroorganic compounds from polar solvents were investigated. Microporosity, mesoporosity, fractality, and other characteristics of adsorbents were analyzed to evaluate the dependence of the effectiveness of the SPE technique with respect to nitrate esters, cyclic nitroamines, and nitroaromatics on the origin and texture of carbons. The values of the free energy of solvation and dipole moment of nitroorganic compounds in polar liquids computed with the SM5.42/PM3 method with consideration of geometry relaxation in solution were utilized to elucidate features of their concentration of carbon adsorbents. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Carbon dynamics, food web structure and reclamation strategies in Athabasca oil sands wetlands (CRFAW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciborowski, J.; Dixon, G.; Foote, L.; Liber, K.; Smits, J.

    2010-01-01

    This abstract provided details of the Carbon Dynamics, Food Web Structure and Reclamation Strategies in Athabasca Oil Sands Wetlands (CFRAW) program, a collaboration between oil sands industry partners and university laboratories. CFRAW researchers are investigating the effects of mine tailings and process waters on the development, health, and function of wetland communities in post-mining landscapes. The aim of the program is to accurately predict how quickly the reclaimed wetlands will approach conditions seen in reference wetland systems. The program is also examining the effects of hydrocarbons as a surrogate source of carbon after they are metabolized by bacteria. The biological uptake, pathways, and movement through the food web of materials used by the biota in constructed wetlands are also being studied. Flux estimates will be used to determine if wetlands amended with peat will maintain their productivity. A conceptual model of carbon pathways and budgets is also being developed.

  6. Investigation of metal/carbon-related materials for fuel cell applications by electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Ki-jeong [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: kong@krict.re.kr; Choi, Youngmin [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Beyong-Hwan [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-O [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyunju [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O.Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The potential of carbon-related materials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphite nanofibers (GNFs), supported metal catalysts as an electrode for fuel cell application was investigated using the first-principle electronic structure calculations. The stable binding geometries and energies of metal catalysts are determined on the CNT surface and the GNF edge. The catalyst metal is more tightly bound to the GNF edge than to the CNT surface because of the existence of active dangling bonds of edge carbon atoms. The diffusion barrier of metal atoms on the surface and edge is also obtained. From our calculation results, we have found that high dispersity is achievable for GNF due to high barrier against the diffusion of metal atoms, while CNT appears less suitable. The GNF with a large edge-to-wall ratio is more suitable for the high-performance electrode than perfect crystalline graphite or CNT.

  7. Investigation of metal/carbon-related materials for fuel cell applications by electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Ki-jeong; Choi, Youngmin; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-O; Chang, Hyunju

    2006-01-01

    The potential of carbon-related materials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphite nanofibers (GNFs), supported metal catalysts as an electrode for fuel cell application was investigated using the first-principle electronic structure calculations. The stable binding geometries and energies of metal catalysts are determined on the CNT surface and the GNF edge. The catalyst metal is more tightly bound to the GNF edge than to the CNT surface because of the existence of active dangling bonds of edge carbon atoms. The diffusion barrier of metal atoms on the surface and edge is also obtained. From our calculation results, we have found that high dispersity is achievable for GNF due to high barrier against the diffusion of metal atoms, while CNT appears less suitable. The GNF with a large edge-to-wall ratio is more suitable for the high-performance electrode than perfect crystalline graphite or CNT

  8. Catalytic Oxidation of Cyanogen Chloride over a Monolithic Oxidation Catalyst

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of cyanogen chloride was evaluated over a monolithic oxidation catalyst at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg C in air employing feed concentrations between 100 and 10,000 ppm...

  9. Effect of accelerated aging on translucency of monolithic zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Abdelbary

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Thickness of zirconia has significant effect on translucency. Aging has significant effect on thinner sections of zirconia. More research is required on zirconia towards making the material more translucent for its potential use as esthetic monolithic restoration.

  10. Microchip-based monolithic column for high performance liquid chromatography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed microchip based monolithic columns that can be used for liquid chromatography of small organic molecules, as well as, macromolecules such as...

  11. Monolithic Perovskite Silicon Tandem Solar Cells with Advanced Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Jan C.; Bett, Alexander J.; Bivour, Martin; Blasi, Benedikt; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Kohlstadt, Markus; Lee, Seunghun; Mastroianni, Simone; Mundt, Laura; Mundus, Markus; Ndione, Paul; Reichel, Christian; Schubert, Martin; Schulze, Patricia S.; Tucher, Nico; Veit, Clemens; Veurman, Welmoed; Wienands, Karl; Winkler, Kristina; Wurfel, Uli; Glunz, Stefan W.; Hermle, Martin

    2016-11-14

    For high efficiency monolithic perovskite silicon tandem solar cells, we develop low-temperature processes for the perovskite top cell, rear-side light trapping, optimized perovskite growth, transparent contacts and adapted characterization methods.

  12. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Fatih; Secilmis, Asli; Simsek, Irfan; Ozsevik, Semih

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (Pcomposite material and monolithic zirconia.

  13. Reliability Analysis and Optimal Design of Monolithic Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Burcharth, Hans F.; Christiani, E.

    1994-01-01

    Reliability analysis and reliability-based design of monolithic vertical wall breakwaters are considered. Probabilistic models of the most important failure modes, sliding failure, failure of the foundation and overturning failure are described . Relevant design variables are identified...

  14. Structure and giant magnetoresistance of carbon-based amorphous films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.; He, M.F.; Liu, Z.W.; Zeng, D.C.; Gu, Z.F.; Cheng, G.

    2014-01-01

    Pure amorphous carbon (a-C) and Co-doped Co x C 1−x films were prepared on n-Si(100) substrates by dc magnetron sputtering. In Co–C films, the nano-sized amorphous Co particles were homogeneously dispersed in the amorphous cross-linked carbon matrix. The structures of a-C and Co x C 1−x films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the a-C films were diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. After doping cobalt into DLC film, the sp 3 -hybridized carbon content in DLC composite films almost had no change. The as-deposited Co x C 1−x granular films had larger value of magnetoresistance (MR) than the amorphous carbon film. A very high positive MR, up to 15.5% at magnetic field B = 0.8 T and x = 2.5 at.% was observed in a Co x C 1−x granular film with thickness of 80 nm at room temperature when the external magnetic field was perpendicular to the electric current and the film surface. With increase of the film thickness and Co-doped content, the MR decreased gradually. It remains a challenge to well explain the observed MR effect in the Co x C 1−x granular films. - Highlights: • The amorphous carbon films were diamond-like carbon films. • No carbide appearing, the Co–C composite films form a good metal/insulator system. • A high positive magnetoresistance, up to 15.5% at B = 0.8 T was observed in Co–C films

  15. Effect of reaction temperature on structure and fluorescence properties of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lyuliang University, Lyuliang 033001 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Yaling [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Feng, Xiaoting [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang, E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) from ammonia solution and citric acid were synthesized at different temperatures. • Quantum yield (QY) of NCDs depends largely on the amount of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), more FPC gives higher QY. • The law of QY of NCDs first increase and then decrease with the reaction temperature increased is found and explained. • Nitrogen doping plays significant role in getting increased UV–vis absorption and QY. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of reaction temperature and nitrogen doping on the structure and fluorescence properties of carbon dots (CDs), six kinds of nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs) were synthesized at reaction temperatures of 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and 220 °C, separately, by using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source. Nitrogen-free CDs (N-free CDs-180) was also prepared at 180 °C by using citric acid as the only carbon source for comparison. Results show that reaction temperature has obvious effect on carbonization degree, quantum yield (QY), ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra but less effect on functional groups, nitrogen doping degree and fluorescence lifetime of NCDs. Compared with N-free CDs-180, NCDs-180 possesses enchanced QY and longer fluorescence lifetime. Doping nitrogen has obvious effect on UV–vis absorption and PL spectra but less effect on particles sizes and carbonization degree. The formation mechanism of NCDs is explored: QY of NCDs depends largely on the number of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), the competition between FPC formation on the surface of NCDs and carbon core growth leads to the change in number of FPC, and consequently to the NCDs with highest QY at appropriate hydrothermal temperature.

  16. On the structure of amorphous calcium carbonate--a detailed study by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Holger; Neumann, Markus; Mayer, Christian; Epple, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The calcium carbonate phases calcite, aragonite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite (calcium carbonate monohydrate), and ikaite (calcium carbonate hexahydrate) were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy ( (1)H and (13)C). Further model compounds were sodium hydrogencarbonate, potassium hydrogencarbonate, and calcium hydroxide. With the help of these data, the structure of synthetically prepared additive-free amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was analyzed. ACC contains molecular water (as H 2O), a small amount of mobile hydroxide, and no hydrogencarbonate. This supports the concept of ACC as a transient precursor in the formation of calcium carbonate biominerals.

  17. Towards a Technique for Extracting Microservices from Monolithic Enterprise Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Levcovitz, Alessandra; Terra, Ricardo; Valente, Marco Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The idea behind microservices architecture is to develop a single large, complex application as a suite of small, cohesive, independent services. On the other way, monolithic systems get larger over the time, deviating from the intended architecture, and becoming risky and expensive to evolve. This paper describes a technique to identify and define microservices on monolithic enterprise systems. As the major contribution, our evaluation shows that our approach was able to identify relevant ca...

  18. Translucency and Strength of High Translucency Monolithic Zirconium Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Zirconium -Oxide Materials presented at/published to the Journal of General Dentistry with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local file #16208. 2...Zirconia-Oxide Materials 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...OBSOLETE 48. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials

  19. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  20. Preparation of mesoporous carbon nitride structure by the dealloying of Ni/a-CN nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Shen, Yongqing; Huang, Jie; Liao, Bin; Wu, Xianying; Zhang, Xu

    2018-05-01

    The preparation of mesoporous carbon nitride (p-CN) structure by the selective dealloying process of Ni/a-CN nanocomposite films is investigated. The composition and structure of the Ni/a-CN nanocomposite films and porous carbon nitride (p-CN) films are determined by scan electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Phase separated structure including nickel carbide phase and the surrounding amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN) matrix are detected for the as-deposited films. Though the bulk diffusion is introduced in the film during the annealing process, the grain sizes for the post-annealed films are around 10 nm and change little comparing with the ones of the as-deposited films, which is associated with the thermostability of the CN surrounding in the film. The p-CN skeleton with its pore size around 12.5 nm is formed by etching the post-annealed films, indicative of the stability of the phase separated structure during the annealing process.