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Sample records for monolayer collapse pressure

  1. Collapse of Langmuir monolayer at lower surface pressure: Effect of hydrophobic chain length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikdas2089@gmail.com; Kundu, Sarathi [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati, Assam 781035 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Long chain fatty acid molecules (e.g., stearic and behenic acids) form a monolayer on water surface in the presence of Ba{sup 2+} ions at low subphase pH (≈ 5.5) and remain as a monolayer before collapse generally occurs at higher surface pressure (π{sub c} > 50 mN/m). Monolayer formation is verified from the surface pressure vs. area per molecule (π-A) isotherms and also from the atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the films deposited by single upstroke of hydrophilic Si (001) substrate through the monolayer covered water surface. At high subphase pH (≈ 9.5), barium stearate molecules form multilayer structure at lower surface pressure which is verified from the π-A isotherms and AFM analysis of the film deposited at 25 mN/m. Such monolayer to multilayer structure formation or monolayer collapse at lower surface pressure is unusual as at this surface pressure generally fatty acid salt molecules form a monolayer on the water surface. Formation of bidentate chelate coordination in the metal containing headgroups is the reason for such monolayer to multilayer transition. However, for longer chain barium behenate molecules only monolayer structure is maintained at that high subphase pH (≈ 9.5) due to the presence of relatively more tail-tail hydrophobic interaction.

  2. Cation-induced monolayer collapse at lower surface pressure follows specific headgroup percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kaushik; Sah, Bijay Kumar; Kundu, Sarathi

    2017-02-01

    A Langmuir monolayer can be considered as a two-dimensional (2D) sheet at higher surface pressure which structurally deform with mechanical compression depending upon the elastic nature of the monolayer. The deformed structures formed after a certain elastic limit are called collapsed structures. To explore monolayer collapses at lower surface pressure and to see the effect of ions on such monolayer collapses, out-of-plane structures and in-plane morphologies of stearic acid Langmuir monolayers have been studied both at lower (≈6.8) and higher (≈9.5) subphase p H in the presence of M g2 +,C a2 +,Z n2 +,C d2 + , and B a2 + ions. At lower subphase p H and in the presence of all cations, the stearic acid monolayer remains as a monolayer before collapse, which generally takes place at higher surface pressure (πc>50 mN /m ). However, at higher subphase p H , structural changes of stearic acid monolayers occur at relatively lower surface pressure depending upon the specific dissolved ions. Among the same group elements of M g2 +,C a2 + , and B a2 + , only for B a2 + ions does monolayer to multilayer transition take place from a much lower surface pressure of the monolayer, remaining, however, as a monolayer for M g2 + and C a2 + ions. For another same group elements of Z n2 + and C d2 + ions, a less covered bilayer structure forms on top of the monolayer structure at lower surface pressure, which is evidenced from both x-ray reflectometry and atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the presence of two coexisting conformations formed by the two different metal-headgroup coordinations and the monolayer to trilayer or multilayer transformation takes place when the coverage ratio of the two molecular conformations changes from the critical value (pc) of ≈0.66 . Such ion-specific monolayer collapses are correlated with the 2D lattice percolation model.

  3. Understanding the collapse mechanism in Langmuir monolayers through polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Thiago Eichi; Caseli, Luciano

    2013-07-23

    The collapse of films at the air-water interface is related to a type of 2D-to-3D transition that occurs when a Langmuir monolayer is compressed beyond its stability limit. Studies on this issue are extremely important because defects in ultrathin solid films can be better understood if the molecular mechanisms related to collapse processes are elucidated. This paper explores how the changes of vibration of specific groups of lipid molecules, as revealed by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), are affected by the monolayer collapse. Different mechanisms of collapse were studied, for those lipids that undergo constant-area collapse (such as stearic acid) and for those that undergo constant-pressure collapse (such as DPPC, DPPG, and DODAB). Lipid charges also affect the mechanism of collapse, as demonstrated for two oppositely charged lipids.

  4. Lateral pressure profiles in lipid monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2010-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained and atomistic models to study the lateral pressure profiles in lipid monolayers. We first consider simple oil/air and oil/water interfaces, and then proceed to lipid monolayers at air/water and oil/water interfaces. The results are qual

  5. Physiological hydrostatic pressure protects endothelial monolayer integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Marschhausen, K; Waschke, J; Drenckhahn, D

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial monolayer integrity is required to maintain endothelial barrier functions and has found to be impaired in several disorders like inflammatory edema, allergic shock, or artherosclerosis. Under physiologic conditions in vivo, endothelial cells are exposed to mechanical forces such as hydrostatic pressure, shear stress, and cyclic stretch. However, insight into the effects of hydrostatic pressure on endothelial cell biology is very limited at present. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that physiological hydrostatic pressure protects endothelial monolayer integrity in vitro. We investigated the protective efficacy of hydrostatic pressure in microvascular myocardial endothelial (MyEnd) cells and macrovascular pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) by the application of selected pharmacological agents known to alter monolayer integrity in the absence or presence of hydrostatic pressure. In both endothelial cell lines, extracellular Ca(2+) depletion by EGTA was followed by a loss of vascular-endothelial cadherin (VE-caherin) immunostaining at cell junctions. However, hydrostatic pressure (15 cmH(2)O) blocked this effect of EGTA. Similarly, cytochalasin D-induced actin depolymerization and intercellular gap formation and cell detachment in response to the Ca(2+)/calmodulin antagonist trifluperazine (TFP) as well as thrombin-induced cell dissociation were also reduced by hydrostatic pressure. Moreover, hydrostatic pressure significantly reduced the loss of VE-cadherin-mediated adhesion in response to EGTA, cytochalasin D, and TFP in MyEnd cells as determined by laser tweezer trapping using VE-cadherin-coated microbeads. In caveolin-1-deficient MyEnd cells, which lack caveolae, hydrostatic pressure did not protect monolayer integrity compromised by EGTA, indicating that caveolae-dependent mechanisms are involved in hydrostatic pressure sensing and signaling.

  6. Singularities in gravitational collapse with radial pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, S M C V; Goncalves, Sergio M. C. V.; Jhingan, Sanjay

    2001-01-01

    We analyze spherical dust collapse with non-vanishing radial pressure, $\\Pi$, and vanishing tangential stresses. Considering a barotropic equation of state, $\\Pi=\\gamma\\rho$, we obtain an analytical solution in closed form---which is exact for $\\gamma=-1,0$, and approximate otherwise---near the center of symmetry (where the curvature singularity forms). We study the formation, visibility, and curvature strength of singularities in the resulting spacetime. We find that visible, Tipler strong singularities can develop from generic initial data. Radial pressure alters the spectrum of possible endstates for collapse, increasing the parameter space region that contains no visible singularities, but cannot by itself prevent the formation of visible singularities for sufficiently low values of the energy density. Known results from pressureless dust are recovered in the $\\gamma=0$ limit.

  7. Axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD): a film balance technique for high collapse pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Acosta, Edgar J; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2008-10-07

    Collapse pressure of insoluble monolayers is a property determined from surface pressure/area isotherms. Such isotherms are commonly measured by a Langmuir film balance or a drop shape technique using a pendant drop constellation (ADSA-PD). Here, a different embodiment of a drop shape analysis, called axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD) is used as a film balance. It is shown that ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The ability to measure very low surface tension values (e.g., drop setup, and leak-proof design make the constrained sessile drop constellation a better choice than the pendant drop constellation in many situations. Results of compression isotherms are obtained on three different monolayers: octadecanol, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC), and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol (DPPG). The collapse pressures are found to be reproducible and in agreement with previous methods. For example, the collapse pressure of DPPC is found to be 70.2 mJ/m2. Such values are not achievable with a pendant drop. The collapse pressure of octadecanol is found to be 61.3 mJ/m2, while that of DPPG is 59.0 mJ/m2. The physical reasons for these differences are discussed. The results also show a distinctive difference between the onset of collapse and the ultimate collapse pressure (ultimate strength) of these films. ADSA-CSD allows detailed study of this collapse region.

  8. Collapse of Corroded Pipelines under Combined Tension and External Pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ye

    Full Text Available In this work, collapse of corroded pipeline under combined external pressure and tension is investigated through numerical method. Axially uniform corrosion with symmetric imperfections is firstly considered. After verifying with existing experimental results, the finite element model is used to study the effect of tension on collapse pressure. An extensive parametric study is carried out using Python script and FORTRAN subroutine to investigate the influence of geometric parameters on the collapse behavior under combined loads. The results are used to develop an empirical equation for estimating the collapse pressure under tension. In addition, the effects of loading path, initial imperfection length, yielding anisotropy and corrosion defect length on the collapse behavior are also investigated. It is found that tension has a significant influence on collapse pressure of corroded pipelines. Loading path and anisotropic yielding are also important factors affecting the collapse behavior. For pipelines with relatively long corrosion defect, axially uniform corrosion models could be used to estimate the collapse pressure.

  9. The structure and dynamics of Nano Particles encapsulated by the SDS monolayer collapse at the water/TCE interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenxiong

    2016-11-01

    The super-saturated surfactant monolayer collapses with the nanoparticles (NPs) at the water/trichloroethylene (TCE) interface are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that sodium alkyl sulfate (SDS) monolayer collapse is initiated by buckling and followed primarily by budding and the bud encapsulating the NPs and oil molecules. The developed bud detaches from the monolayer into a water phase and forms the swollen micelle emulsion with NPs and oil molecules. We investigate the wavelength of the initial budding and the theoretical description of the budding process. The wavelength of the monolayer increases with bending modulus. The energy barrier of the budding can be easily overcome by thermal fluctuation energy, which indicates that budding process proceeds rapidly.

  10. Recoverable and Programmable Collapse from Folding Pressurized Origami Cellular Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Fang, H.; Wang, K. W.

    2016-09-01

    We report a unique collapse mechanism by exploiting the negative stiffness observed in the folding of an origami solid, which consists of pressurized cells made by stacking origami sheets. Such a collapse mechanism is recoverable, since it only involves rigid folding of the origami sheets and it is programmable by pressure control and the custom design of the crease pattern. The collapse mechanism features many attractive characteristics for applications such as energy absorption. The reported results also suggest a new branch of origami study focused on its nonlinear mechanics associated with folding.

  11. The additional phase transition of DPPC monolayers at high surface pressure confirmed by GIXD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Serna, Jorge B. de la; Struth, Bernd

    Pulmonary surfactant forms the alveolar monolayer at the air/aqueous interface within the lung. During the breathing process, the surface pressure periodically varies from ~40mN/m up to ~70mN/m. The film is mechanically stable during this rapid and reversible expansion. The monolayer consists...... of ~90% of lipid with 10% integrated proteins. Among its lipid compounds, di- palmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) dominates (~45wt%). No other lipid but DPPC was so far reported to be compressible to very high surface pressure (~70mN/m) before its monolayer collapsed. Its liquid......-expanded/liquid-condensed (LE/LC) phase transition at ~10mN/m is well known. Here we present results from Langmuir isotherm measurements that evidence a so far not documented second phase transition at elevated surface pressure Π (~50mN/m). The varying lateral structures of the monolayer at 8mN/m, 20mN/m, 30mN/m, 40mN/m, 50m...

  12. Paths to collapse for isolated skyrmions in few-monolayer ferromagnetic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosic, Dusan; Mulkers, Jeroen; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Ludermir, Teresa B.; Milošević, Milorad V.

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topological spin configurations in materials with chiral Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), that are potentially useful for storing or processing information. To date, DMI has been found in few bulk materials, but can also be induced in atomically thin magnetic films in contact with surfaces with large spin-orbit interactions. Recent experiments have reported that isolated magnetic skyrmions can be stabilized even near room temperature in few-atom-thick magnetic layers sandwiched between materials that provide asymmetric spin-orbit coupling. Here we present the minimum-energy path analysis of three distinct mechanisms for the skyrmion collapse, based on ab initio input and the performed atomic-spin simulations. We focus on the stability of a skyrmion in three atomic layers of Co, either epitaxial on the Pt(111) surface or within a hybrid multilayer where DMI nontrivially varies per monolayer due to competition between different symmetry breaking from two sides of the Co film. In laterally finite systems, their constrained geometry causes poor thermal stability of the skyrmion toward collapse at the boundary, which we show to be resolved by designing the high-DMI structure within an extended film with lower or no DMI.

  13. The Collapse of Monolayers Containing Pulmonary Surfactant Phospholipids Is Kinetically Determined

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wenfei; Piknova, Barbora; Hall, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that during and after slow compressions of monomolecular films containing the complete set of purified phospholipids (PPL) from calf surfactant at an air/water interface, surface pressures (π) reach and sustain values that are remarkably high relative to expectations from simple systems with model lipids. Microscopy shows that the liquid-expanded, tilted-condensed, and collapsed phases are present together in the PPL films between 45 and 65 mN/m. The Gibbs phase rule ...

  14. Calculations of plastic collapse load of pressure vessel using FEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-fei LIU; Jin-yang ZHENG; Li MA; Cun-jian MIAO; Lin-lin WU

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical method using finite element analysis (FEA) to calculate the plastic collapse loads of pressure vessels under internal pressure, and compares the analytical methods according to three criteria stated in the ASME Boiler Pressure Vessel Code. First, a finite element technique using the arc-length algorithm and the restart analysis is developed to conduct the plastic collapse analysis of vessels, which includes the material and geometry non-linear properties of vessels. Second,as the mechanical properties of vessels are assumed to be elastic-perfectly plastic, the limit load analysis is performed by employing the Newton-Raphson algorithm, while the limit pressure of vessels is obtained by the twice-elastic-slope method and the tangent intersection method respectively to avoid excessive deformation. Finally, the elastic stress analysis under working pressure is conducted and the stress strength of vessels is checked by sorting the stress results. The results are compared with those obtained by experiments and other existing models. This work provides a reference for the selection of the failure criteria and the calculation of the plastic collapse load.

  15. Collapse of composite tubes under uniform external hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. T.; Ross, C. T. F.; Little, A. P. F.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes an experimental and a theoretical investigation into the collapse of 22 circular cylindrical composite tubes under external hydrostatic pressure. The investigations were on the collapse of fibre reinforced plastic tube specimens made from a mixture of three carbon and two E-glass fibre layers. The theoretical investigations were carried out using an in-house finite element computer program called BCLAM, together with the commercial computer package, namely ANSYS. It must be emphasised here that BS 5500 does not appear to exclusively cater for the buckling of composite shells under external hydrostatic pressure, so the work presented here is novel and should be useful to industry. The experimental investigations showed that the composite specimens behaved similarly to isotropic materials previously tested, in that the short vessels collapsed through axisymmetric deformation while the longer tubes collapsed through non-symmetric bifurcation buckling. Furthermore it was discovered that the models failed at changes of the composite lay-up due to the manufacturing process of these models. These changes seemed to be the weak points of the specimens.

  16. Collapse of composite tubes under uniform external hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P T; Ross, C T F; Little, A P F, E-mail: Carl.ross@ntlworld.co [University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3DJ (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes an experimental and a theoretical investigation into the collapse of 22 circular cylindrical composite tubes under external hydrostatic pressure. The investigations were on the collapse of fibre reinforced plastic tube specimens made from a mixture of three carbon and two E-glass fibre layers. The theoretical investigations were carried out using an in-house finite element computer program called BCLAM, together with the commercial computer package, namely ANSYS. It must be emphasised here that BS 5500 does not appear to exclusively cater for the buckling of composite shells under external hydrostatic pressure, so the work presented here is novel and should be useful to industry. The experimental investigations showed that the composite specimens behaved similarly to isotropic materials previously tested, in that the short vessels collapsed through axisymmetric deformation while the longer tubes collapsed through non-symmetric bifurcation buckling. Furthermore it was discovered that the models failed at changes of the composite lay-up due to the manufacturing process of these models. These changes seemed to be the weak points of the specimens.

  17. Experimental Verification of Steel Pipe Collapse under Vacuum Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrique, R.; Rodal, E.

    2016-11-01

    Steel pipes are used widely in hydroelectric systems and in pumping systems. Both systems are subject to hydraulic transient effects caused by changes in boundary conditions, such as sudden valve closures, pump failures, or accidents. Water column separation, and its associated vaporization pressure inside the pipe, can cause the collapse of thin walled steel pipes subject to atmospheric pressure, as happened during the well known Oigawa Power Plant accident in Japan, in 1950. The conditions under which thin walled pipes subject to external pressure can collapse have been studied mathematically since the second half of the XIX century, with classical authors Southwell and Von Mises obtaining definitive equations for long and short pipes in the second decade of the XX century, in which the fundamental variables are the diameter to thickness ratio D/t and the length to diameter ratio L/D. In this paper, the predicted critical D/t ratio for steel pipe collapse is verified experimentally, in a physical model able to reproduce hydraulic transients, generating vacuum pressures through rapid upstream valve closures.

  18. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  19. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  20. Pressure-area isotherm of a lipid monolayer from molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2007-01-01

    We calculated the pressure-area isotherm of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid monolayer from molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained molecular model. We characterized the monolayer structure, geometry, and phases directly from the simulations and compared the calculated

  1. Prediction of Collapse Scope of Deep-Buried Tunnels Using Pressure Arch Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel collapse remains a serious problem in practice. Effective prediction methods on tunnel collapse are necessary for tunnel engineering. In this study, systematic study on the pressure arch was presented to predict tunnel collapse. Multiple factors under different conditions were considered. First, the pressure arch was described as a certain scope in comparison with the lowest pressure arch line. Then, a deep-buried circular tunnel was selected as the investigated object. Its collapse scope was analyzed using the lowest pressure arch line. Meanwhile, the main influence from the ground stress field was considered. Different modes of ground stress fields were investigated in detail. The results indicate that the collapse scope varies with different ground stress fields. Determination on the collapse scope is strongly affected by the judgment standard of the pressure arch. Furthermore, a selected case was analyzed with the pressure arch. The area and the height of tunnel collapse were calculated with multiple factors, including ground stress field, judgment standard, and lateral pressure coefficient. Finally, selected results were compared with relevant previous researches, and reasonable results were obtained. The present results are helpful for further understanding of the tunnel collapse and could provide suitable guidance for tunnel projects.

  2. Pressure-induced K-Λ crossing in monolayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanxia; Dou, Xiuming; Ding, Kun; Jiang, Desheng; Yang, Fuhua; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-05-01

    The energy band structures and related room temperature exciton transitions of monolayer and bilayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) are investigated using photoluminescence (PL) spectra under hydrostatic pressure up to 5.42 GPa. For monolayer WSe2, it is found that the conduction band Λ valley is 70 +/- 30 meV higher than the K valley at zero pressure, and the K-Λ valley crossover happens at a pressure of approximately 2.25 GPa. The PL peak of exciton related to the direct K-K interband transition in monolayer and bilayer WSe2 shows a pressure-induced blue-shift at the rates of 31.5 +/- 0.6 and 27 +/- 1 meV GPa-1, respectively. The indirect Λ-K interband transition for monolayer and bilayer WSe2 exhibits a distinctly different pressure response. The pressure coefficient is as small as -3 +/- 6 meV GPa-1 for monolayer, but a much larger value of -22 +/- 1 meV GPa-1 for bilayer WSe2, indicating that the interlayer coupling has a strong effect on the electronic states at the Λ valley.The energy band structures and related room temperature exciton transitions of monolayer and bilayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) are investigated using photoluminescence (PL) spectra under hydrostatic pressure up to 5.42 GPa. For monolayer WSe2, it is found that the conduction band Λ valley is 70 +/- 30 meV higher than the K valley at zero pressure, and the K-Λ valley crossover happens at a pressure of approximately 2.25 GPa. The PL peak of exciton related to the direct K-K interband transition in monolayer and bilayer WSe2 shows a pressure-induced blue-shift at the rates of 31.5 +/- 0.6 and 27 +/- 1 meV GPa-1, respectively. The indirect Λ-K interband transition for monolayer and bilayer WSe2 exhibits a distinctly different pressure response. The pressure coefficient is as small as -3 +/- 6 meV GPa-1 for monolayer, but a much larger value of -22 +/- 1 meV GPa-1 for bilayer WSe2, indicating that the interlayer coupling has a strong effect on the electronic states at the Λ valley

  3. A closed solution for the collapse load of pressurized pipelines in free spans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Luciano M. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Murray, David W.; Xuejun Song [University of Alberta (Canada). Civil Engineering Dept.

    2005-07-01

    Submarine pipelines for oil exploitation, generally, are under internal pressure and compressive thermal loading. Due to rough see-bottom terrains, these pipelines may be supported only intermittently and span freely. The collapse of such pipelines may produce oil leakage to the environment. A common engineering practice for the determination of the collapse load of such pipelines is the use of finite element modeling. This paper presents an analytical method for the determination of the collapse load of pressurized pipelines extended over free spans. The formulation also takes into account the internal pressure and initial imperfection, generally present in these pipelines. Collapse load is determined from a deduced transcendental equation. Results of the presented formulation are compared with sophisticated finite element analyses. While sophisticated finite element analysis requires hours of computer processing, the present formulation takes practically no time to assess a good approximation for the collapse load of pressurized free span pipelines under compression. The present paper is not intended to substitute the more precise finite element analyses but to provide an easier, faster, and practical way to determine a first approximation of the collapse load of pressurized free span pipelines. (author)

  4. Pressure-dependent optical and vibrational properties of monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Avinash P.

    2015-01-14

    Controlling the band gap by tuning the lattice structure through pressure engineering is a relatively new route for tailoring the optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials. Here, we investigate the electronic structure and lattice vibrational dynamics of the distorted monolayer 1T-MoS2 (1T′) and the monolayer 2H-MoS2 via a diamond anvil cell (DAC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The direct optical band gap of the monolayer 2H-MoS2 increases by 11.7% from 1.85 to 2.08 eV, which is the highest reported for a 2D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) material. DFT calculations reveal a subsequent decrease in the band gap with eventual metallization of the monolayer 2H-MoS2, an overall complex structure-property relation due to the rich band structure of MoS2. Remarkably, the metastable 1T′-MoS2 metallic state remains invariant with pressure, with the J2, A1g, and E2g modes becoming dominant at high pressures. This substantial reversible tunability of the electronic and vibrational properties of the MoS2 family can be extended to other 2D TMDs. These results present an important advance toward controlling the band structure and optoelectronic properties of monolayer MoS2 via pressure, which has vital implications for enhanced device applications.

  5. Pressure-induced lattice collapse in the tetragonal phase of single-crystalline Fe(1.05)Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Yi, Wei [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Sun, Liling [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Chen, Xiao-Jia [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Hemley, Russell [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Lu, Wei [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Dong, Xiaoli [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Ligang, Bai [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; Jing, Liu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL; Molaison, Jamie J [ORNL; Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Chen, Genfu [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Wang, Nanlin [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Zhao, Zhongxian [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-induced lattice collapse was discovered in tetragonal T phase of single crystal Fe{sub 1.05}Te at room temperature through x-ray and neutron-diffraction measurements. A remarkable compression along the c axis {approx}5% was observed upon increasing pressure from the ambient condition to 4 GPa. Indexed results demonstrate that the crystallographic structure remains unchanged after the collapse, revealing that the collapse does not break symmetry of crystal structure. The Fe-spin state change was proposed to account for the lattice collapse. The equations of state for the T phase and pressure-induced collapsed T phase were determined from the diffraction measurements.

  6. Evidence for the propagation of 2D pressure pulses in lipid monolayers near the phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Griesbauer, J; Wixforth, A; Schneider, M F

    2012-01-01

    The existence and propagation of acoustic pressure pulses on lipid monolayers at the air/water-interfaces are directly observed by simple mechanical detection. The pulses are excited by small amounts of solvents added to the monolayer from the air phase. Employing a deliberate control of the lipid interface compressibility k, we can show that the pulses propagate at velocities, which are precisely reflecting the nonlinear behavior of the interface. This is manifested by a pronounced minimum of the sound velocity in the monolayer phase transition regime, while ranging up to 1.5 m/s at high lateral pressures. Motivated by the ubiquitous presence of lipid interfaces in biology, we propose the demonstrated sound propagation as an efficient and fast way of communication and protein modulation along nerves, between cells and biological units being controlled by the physical state of the interfaces.

  7. Skewed norms under peer pressure: Formation and collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Michaeli, Moti; Spiro, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows that peer pressure may lead to dynamic convergence to a norm that is skewed with respect to preferences in society, yet is endogenously upheld by the population. Moreover, a skewed norm will often be more sustainable than a representative norm. This may explain the skewness of various social and religious norms. By furthermore interpreting a norm as a political regime, we show that biased regimes can be sustained even without the existence of a powerful group with coherent in...

  8. A novel numerical model for estimating the collapse pressure of flexible pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Victor P.P.; Antoun Netto, Theodoro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia], e-mail: victor@lts.coppe.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    As the worldwide oil and gas industry operational environments move to ultra-deep waters, failure mechanisms in flexible pipes such as instability of the armor layers under compression and hydrostatic collapse are more likely to occur. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable numerical tools to reproduce the failure mechanisms that may occur in flexible pipes. This work presents a representative finite element model of flexible pipe capable to reproduce its pre and post-collapse behavior under hydrostatic pressure. The model, developed in the scope of this work, uses beam elements and includes nonlinear kinematics and material behavior influences. The dependability of the numerical results is assessed in light of experimental tests on flexible pipes with 4 inches and 8 inches nominal diameter available in the literature (Souza, 2002). The applied methodology provided coherent values regarding the estimation of the collapse pressures and results have shown that the proposed model is capable to reproduce experimental results. (author)

  9. Large-area, high-quality monolayer graphene from polystyrene at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Fu, Can; Sun, Haibin; Meng, Lanxiang; Xia, Yanjie; Zhang, Chongwu; Yi, Xiaolei; Yang, Wenchao; Guo, Pengfei; Wang, Chunlei; Liu, Jiangfeng

    2017-04-01

    Graphene films have been attracting great interest owing to their unique physical properties. In this paper, we develop an efficient method to prepare large-area monolayer graphene (97.5% coverage) by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu foils using polystyrene in a short time (3 min). Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are employed to confirm the thickness and uniformity of the graphene films. Graphene films on glass substrates show high optical transmittance and electrical conductivity. Magnetic transport studies demonstrate that the as-grown monolayer graphene exhibits a high carrier mobility of 3395 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at 25 K. On the basis of the analysis, it is concluded that our method is a simple, safe and versatile approach for the synthesis of monolayer graphene.

  10. Negative Expiratory Pressure Technique: An Awake Test to Measure Upper Airway Collapsibility in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Helena Larramona; Marcus, Carole L.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Morera, Joan C. Oliva; Huang, Jingtao; Farre, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Upper airway (UA) collapsibility is a major pathophysiologic feature of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In adolescents, it is measured by obtaining the slope of pressure-flow relationship (SPF) while applying negative nasal pressure during sleep. An easier technique to assess UA collapsibility, consisting of application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP) during wakefulness, has demonstrated differences between control and OSAS subjects. We hypothesized that the NEP technique would correlate with SPF as a measurement of UA collapsibility in adolescents. Design: During wakefulness, NEP of −5 cm H2O in the seated and supine position was applied during the first second of expiration. The area under the expiratory flow-volume curve during NEP was compared to tidal breathing (RatioNEP). In addition, adolescents underwent SPF measurements during sleep. Two SPF techniques were performed to measure the activated and relatively hypotonic UA. Setting: Pediatric sleep laboratory. Participants: Seven adolescents with OSAS and 20 controls. Results: In the seated position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and both hypotonic SPF (r = −0.39, P = 0.04) and activated SPF (r = −0.62, P = 0.001). In the supine position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and activated SPF (r = −0.43, P = 0.03) and a trend for hypotonic SPF (r = −0.38, P = 0.06). Conclusions: The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique correlates with the hypotonic and activated slope of pressure-flow relationship measurements. The seated position showed the strongest correlation. The NEP technique can be used as an alternative method to evaluate upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. Citation: Carrera HL, Marcus CL, McDonough JM, Morera JC, Huang J, Farre R, Montserrat JM. Negative expiratory pressure technique: an awake test to measure upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1783–1791. PMID:26158888

  11. Effects of surface pressure on the properties of Langmuir monolayers and interfacial water at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Clark, Anthony J; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-02-24

    The effects of surface pressure on the physical properties of Langmuir monolayers of palmitic acid (PA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA) at the air/water interface are investigated through molecular dynamics simulations with atomistic force fields. The structure and dynamics of both monolayers and interfacial water are compared across the range of surface pressures at which stable monolayers can form. For PA monolayers at T = 300 K, the untilted condensed phase with a hexagonal lattice structure is found at high surface pressure, while the uniformly tilted condensed phase with a centered rectangular lattice structure is observed at low surface pressure, in agreement with the available experimental data. A state with uniform chain tilt but no periodic spatial ordering is observed for DPPA monolayers on a Na(+)/water subphase at both high and low surface pressures. The hydrophobic acyl chains of both monolayers pack efficiently at all surface pressures, resulting in a very small number of gauche defects. The analysis of the hydrogen-bonding structure/dynamics at the monolayer/water interface indicates that water molecules hydrogen-bonded to the DPPA head groups reorient more slowly than those hydrogen-bonded to the PA head groups, with the orientational dynamics becoming significantly slower at high surface pressure. Possible implications for physicochemical processes taking place on marine aerosols in the atmosphere are discussed.

  12. Nanostructured water and carbon dioxide inside collapsing carbon nanotubes at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wenwen; Cerqueira, Tiago F T; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A L; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2016-07-20

    We present simulations of the collapse under hydrostatic pressure of carbon nanotubes containing either water or carbon dioxide. We show that the molecules inside the tube alter the dynamics of the collapse process, providing either mechanical support and increasing the collapse pressure, or reducing mechanical stability. At the same time the nanotube acts as a nanoanvil, and the confinement leads to the nanostructuring of the molecules inside the collapsed tube. In this way, depending on the pressure and on the concentration of water or carbon dioxide inside the nanotube, we observe the formation of 1D molecular chains, 2D nanoribbons, and even molecular single and multi-walled nanotubes. The structure of the encapsulated molecules correlates with the mechanical response of the nanotube, opening up opportunities for the development of new devices or composite materials. Our analysis is quite general and it can be extended to other molecules in carbon nanotube nanoanvils, providing a strategy to obtain a variety of nano-objects with controlled features.

  13. Simultaneously Propagating Voltage and Pressure Pulses in Lipid Monolayers of pork brain and synthetic lipids

    CERN Document Server

    Griesbauer, J; Wixforth, A; Schneider, M F

    2012-01-01

    Hydrated interfaces are ubiquitous in biology and appear on all length scales from ions, individual molecules to membranes and cellular networks. In vivo, they comprise a high degree of self-organization and complex entanglement, which limits their experimental accessibility by smearing out the individual phenomenology. The Langmuir technique, however, allows the examination of defined interfaces, whose controllable thermodynamic state enables one to explore the proper state diagrams. Here we demonstrate that voltage and pressure pulses simultaneously propagate along monolayers comprised of either native pork brain or synthetic lipids. The excitation of pulses is conducted by the application of small droplets of acetic acid and monitored subsequently employing timeresolved Wilhelmy plate and Kelvin probe measurements. The isothermal state diagrams of the monolayers for both lateral pressure and surface potential are experimentally recorded, enabling us to predict dynamic voltage pulse amplitudes of 0,1 to 3mV...

  14. Upper airway collapsibility evaluated by a negative expiratory pressure test in severe obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Romano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the usefulness of measuring upper airway collapsibility with a negative expiratory pressure application as a screening test for severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. INTRODUCTION: OSA is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and it may have serious consequences. Its recognition may have important implications during the perioperative period. Increased upper airway collapsibility is one of the main determinants of OSA, and its evaluation could be useful for identifying this condition. METHODS: Severe OSA and normal subjects (24 in each group were matched by body mass index and referred to our sleep laboratory. The subjects were enrolled in an overnight sleep study, and a diurnal negative expiratory pressure test was performed. Flow drop (DV and expiratory volume were measured in the first 0.2 s (V02 of the negative expiratory pressure test. RESULTS: DV (% and V02 (% values were statistically different between normal and OSA subjects. OSA patients showed a greater decrease in flow than normal subjects. In addition, severely OSA patients exhaled during the first 0.2 s of the negative expiratory pressure application was an average of only 11.2% of the inspired volume compared to 34.2% for the normal subjects. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristics showed that V02 (% and DV (% could accurately identify severe OSA in subjects with sensitivities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively, and specificities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: V02 (% and DV (% are highly accurate parameters for detecting severe OSA. The pharyngeal collapsibility measurement, which uses negative expiratory pressure during wakefulness, is predictive of collapsibility during sleep.

  15. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Meyer, Jakob Abild Stengaard; Petersen, Søren Vermehren

    2014-01-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially...... increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp3carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets prepared in a closed container under moderate pressure showed linear I-V characteristics...... with a conductivity of 267.2-537.5S/m. It was found that the chemical reduction under pressure results in larger graphene domains (sp2networks) in the RGO sheets when compared to that prepared under atmospheric pressure, indicating that the present reduction of GO sheets under the pressure is one of the effective...

  16. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopic Study on Reaction between Self-Assembled Monolayers and Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Shinohara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma is becoming increasingly adopted in bioapplications such as plasma medicine and agriculture. This study investigates the interaction between plasma and molecules in living tissues, focusing on plasma-protein interactions. To this end, the reaction of air-pressure air plasma with NH2-terminated self-assembled monolayer is investigated by infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry. The atmospheric-pressure plasma decomposed the NH2 components, the characteristic units of proteins. The decomposition is attributed to water clusters generated in the plasma, indicating that protein decomposition by plasma requires humid air.

  17. Vapor film collapse triggered by external pressure pulse and the fragmentation of melt droplet in FCIs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qian; TONG Lili; CAO Xuewu; KRIVENTSEV Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation process of high-temperature molten drop is a key factor to determine the ratio heat transferred to power in FCIs,which estimates the possible damage degree during the hypothetical severe accident in the nuclear reactors.In this paper,the fragmentation process of melt droplet in FCIs is investigated by theoretic analysis.The fragmentation mechanism is studied when an external pressure pulse applied to a melt droplet,which is surrounded by vapor film.The vapor film collapse which induces fragmentation of melt droplet is analyzed and modeled.And then the generated pressure is calculated.The vapor film collapse model is introduced to fragmentation correlation,and the predicted fragment size is calculated and compared with experimental data.The result shows that the developed model can predict the diameter of fragments and can be used to calculate the fragmentation process appreciatively.

  18. The effects of bubble-bubble interactions on pressures and temperatures produced by bubbles collapsing near a rigid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation occurs in a wide range of hydraulic applications, and one of its most important consequences is structural damage to neighboring surfaces following repeated bubble collapse. A number of studies have been conducted to predict the pressures produced by the collapse of a single bubble. However, the collapse of multiple bubbles is known to lead to enhanced collapse pressures. In this study, we quantify the effects of bubble-bubble interactions on the bubble dynamics and pressures/temperatures produced by the collapse of a pair of bubbles near a rigid surface. For this purpose, we use an in-house, high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing method to solve the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows. The non-spherical bubble dynamics are investigated and the subsequent pressure and temperature fields are characterized based on the relevant parameters entering the problem: stand-off distance, geometrical configuation, collapse strength. We demonstrate that bubble-bubble interactions amplify/reduce pressures and temperatures produced at the collapse, and increase the non-sphericity of the bubbles and the collapse time, depending on the flow parameters.

  19. Effects of Altered Intra-abdominal Pressure on the Upper Airway Collapsibility in a Porcine Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Lin Ren; Yan-Ru Li; Ji-Xiang Wu; Jing-Ying Ye; Rachel Jen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea is strongly associated with obesity, particularly abdominal obesity common in centrally obese males.Previous studies have demonstrated that intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is increased in morbid obesity, and tracheal traction forces may influence pharyngeal airway collapsibility.This study aimed to investigate that whether IAP plays a role in the mechanism of upper airway (UA) collapsibility via IAP-related caudal tracheal traction.Methods: An abdominal wall lifting (AWL) system and graded CO2 pneumoperitoneum pressure was applied to four supine, anesthetized Guizhou miniature pigs and its effects on tracheal displacement (TD) and airflow dynamics of UA were studied.Individual run data in 3 min obtained before and after AWL and obtained before and after graded pneumoperitoneum pressure were analyzed.Differences between baseline and AWL/graded pneumoperitoneum pressure data of each pig were examined using a Student's t-test or analysis of variance.Results: Application of AWL resulted in decreased IAP and significant caudal TD.The average displacement amplitude was 0.44 mm (P < 0.001).There were three subjects showed increased tidal volume (TV) (P < 0.0l) and peak inspiratory airflow (P < 0.01);however, the change of flow limitation inspiratory UA resistance (Rua) was not significant.Experimental increased IAP by pneumoperitoneum resulted in significant cranial TD.The average displacement amplitude was 1.07 mm (P < 0.001) when IAP was 25 cmH20 compared to baseline.There were three subjects showed reduced Rua while the TV increased (P < 0.01).There was one subject had decreased TV and elevated Rua (P < 0.001).Conclusions: Decreased IAP significantly increased caudal TD, and elevated IAP significantly increased cranial TD.However, the mechanism of UA collapsibility appears primarily mediated by changes in lung volume rather than tracheal traction effect.TV plays an independent role in the mechanism of UA collapsibility.

  20. Heart period and blood pressure characteristics in splanchnic arterial occlusion shock-induced collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletti, Federico; Gambarotta, Nicolò; Penn, Alexander H; Ferrario, Manuela; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2017-02-01

    The nature of hemodynamic instability typical of circulatory shock is not well understood, but an improved interpretation of its dynamic features could help in the management of critically ill patients. The objective of this work was to introduce new metrics for the analysis of arterial blood pressure (ABP) in order to characterize the risk of catastrophic outcome in splanchnic arterial occlusion (SAO) shock. Continuous ABP (fs = 1 kHz) was measured in rats during experimental SAO shock, which induced a fatal pressure drop (FPD) in ABP. The FPD could either be slow (SFPD) or fast (FFPD), with the latter causing cardiovascular collapse. Time series of mean arterial pressure, systolic blood pressure and heart period were derived from ABP. The sample asymmetry-based algorithm Heart Rate Characteristics was adapted to compute the Heart Period Characteristics (HPC) and the Blood Pressure Characteristics (BPC). Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was assessed by means of a bivariate model. The approach to FPD of the animals who collapsed (FFPD) was characterized by higher BRS in the low frequency band versus SFPD animals (0.36 ± 0.15 vs. 0.19 ± 0.12 ms/mmHg, p value = 0.0196), bradycardia as indicated by the HPC (0.76 ± 0.57 vs. 1.94 ± 1.27, p value = 0.0179) and higher but unstable blood pressure as indicated by BPC (3.02 ± 2.87 vs. 1.47 ± 1.29, p value = 0.0773). The HPC and BPC indices demonstrated promise as potential clinical markers of hemodynamic instability and impending cardiovascular collapse, and this animal study suggests their test in data from intensive care patients.

  1. Transcutaneous pressure at which the internal jugular vein is collapsed on ultrasonic imaging predicts easiness of the venous puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Woo Jin; Fukui, Michihiko; Kooguchi, Kunihiko; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Shinzato, Taiichi

    2011-04-01

    Even though we use ultrasound guidance for central venous puncture, we sometimes experience difficulties. We infer that in such cases the vein is collapsed and that the transcutaneous ultrasound probe pressure at which the vein is collapsed (P (tc)) may predict the easiness of the venous puncture. We measured P (tc) and the diameter of the internal jugular vein in 47 adult patients in our ICU. After successful puncture, we also measured venous pressure (P (v)). The patients were divided into two groups based on the number of puncture attempts: ≥3 attempts constituted the "difficult group" and venous collapsibility and vertical diameter determine difficulty in performing venous puncture.

  2. Simultaneously propagating voltage and pressure pulses in lipid monolayers of pork brain and synthetic lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbauer, J.; Bössinger, S.; Wixforth, A.; Schneider, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrated interfaces are ubiquitous in biology and appear on all length scales from ions and individual molecules to membranes and cellular networks. In vivo, they comprise a high degree of self-organization and complex entanglement, which limits their experimental accessibility by smearing out the individual phenomenology. The Langmuir technique, however, allows the examination of defined interfaces, the controllable thermodynamic state of which enables one to explore the proper state diagrams. Here we demonstrate that voltage and pressure pulses simultaneously propagate along monolayers comprised of either native pork brain or synthetic lipids. The excitation of pulses is conducted by the application of small droplets of acetic acid and monitored subsequently employing time-resolved Wilhelmy plate and Kelvin probe measurements. The isothermal state diagrams of the monolayers for both lateral pressure and surface potential are experimentally recorded, enabling us to predict dynamic voltage pulse amplitudes of 0.1-3 mV based on the assumption of static mechanoelectrical coupling. We show that the underlying physics for such propagating pulses is the same for synthetic and natural extracted (pork brain) lipids and that the measured propagation velocities and pulse amplitudes depend on the compressibility of the interface. Given the ubiquitous presence of hydrated interfaces in biology, our experimental findings seem to support a fundamentally new mechanism for the propagation of signals and communication pathways in biology (signaling), which is based neither on protein-protein or receptor-ligand interaction nor diffusion.

  3. Hydration in Lipid Monolayers: Correlation of Water Activity and Surface Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disalvo, E Anibal; Hollmann, Axel; Martini, M Florencia

    2015-01-01

    In order to give a physical meaning to each region of the membrane we define the interphase as the region in a lipid membrane corresponding to the polar head groups imbibed in water with net different properties than the hydrocarbon region and the water phase. The interphase region is analyzed under the scope of thermodynamics of surface and solutions based on the definition of Defay-Prigogine of an interphase and the derivation that it has in the understanding of membrane processeses in the context of biological response. In the view of this approach, the complete monolayer is considered as the lipid layer one molecule thick plus the bidimensional solution of the polar head groups inherent to it (the interphase region). Surface water activity appears as a common factor for the interaction of several aqueous soluble and surface active proteins with lipid membranes of different composition. Protein perturbation can be measured by changes in the surface pressure of lipid monolayers at different initial water surface activities. As predicted by solution chemistry, the increase of surface pressure is independent of the particle nature that dissolves. Therefore, membranes give a similar response in terms of the determined surface states given by water activity independent of the protein or peptide.

  4. The Usability of a Pressure-Indicating Film to Measure the Teat Load Caused by a Collapsing Liner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Demba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of damage to the teat and mastitis requires determination of the teat load caused by a collapsing liner. The aim of this study was to test a pressure-indicating film designed to measure the pressure between a collapsing liner and artificial teats. The Ultra Super Low and the Extreme Low pressure-indicating films were tested on two types of artificial teat. The experiments were performed with a conventional milking cluster equipped with round silicone liners. For each teat and film type, 30 repetitions were performed. Each repetition was performed with a new piece of film. Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to detect differences between the pressure values for the different teats. The area of regions where pressure-indication color developed was calculated to determine the most suitable film type. Both film types measured the pressure applied to both artificial teats by the teat cup liner. Thus, the pressure-indicating films can be used to measure the pressure between a collapsing liner and an artificial teat. Based on the results of the present investigation, a pressure-indicating film with the measurement ranges of both film types combined would be an optimal tool to measure the overall pressure between an artificial teat and a collapsing liner.

  5. On the stability of (M theory) stars against collapse: Role of anisotropic pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyana Rama, S.

    2015-09-01

    Unitarity of evolution in gravitational collapses implies existence of macroscopic stable horizonless objects. With such objects in mind, we study the effects of anisotropy of pressures on the stability of stars. We consider stars in four or higher dimensions and also stars in M theory made up of (intersecting) branes. Taking the stars to be static, spherically symmetric and the equations of state to be linear, we study “singular solutions” and the asymptotic perturbations around them. Oscillatory perturbations are likely to imply instability. We find that nonoscillatory perturbations, which may imply stability, are possible if an appropriate amount of anisotropy is present. This result suggests that it may be possible to have stable horizonless objects in four or any higher dimensions, and that anisotropic pressures may play a crucial role in ensuring their stability.

  6. On the Stability of (M theory) Stars against Collapse : Role of Anisotropic Pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Rama, S Kalyana

    2015-01-01

    Unitarity of evolution in gravitational collapses implies existence of macroscopic stable horizonless objects. With such objects in mind, we study the effects of anisotropy of pressures on the stability of stars. We consider stars in four or higher dimensions and also stars in M theory made up of (intersecting) branes. Taking the stars to be static, spherically symmetric and the equations of state to be linear, we study the asymptotic solutions and perturbations around them. Oscillatory perturbations are known to imply instability. We find that non oscillatory perturbations, which may imply stability, are possible if an appropriate amount of anisotropy is present. This result suggests that it may be possible to have stable horizonless objects in four or any higher dimensions, and that anisotropic pressures may play a crucial role in ensuring their stability.

  7. Fast low-temperature plasma reduction of monolayer graphene oxide at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodik, Michal; Zahoranova, Anna; Micusik, Matej; Bugarova, Nikola; Spitalsky, Zdenko; Omastova, Maria; Majkova, Eva; Jergel, Matej; Siffalovic, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We report on an ultrafast plasma-based graphene oxide reduction method superior to conventional vacuum thermal annealing and/or chemical reduction. The method is based on the effect of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma generated by the diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in proximity of the graphene oxide layer. As the reduction time is in the order of seconds, the presented method is applicable to the large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide layers. The short reduction times are achieved by the high-volume power density of plasma, which is of the order of 100 W cm‑3. Monolayers of graphene oxide on silicon substrate were prepared by a modified Langmuir–Schaefer method and the efficient and rapid reduction by methane and/or hydrogen plasma was demonstrated. The best results were obtained for the graphene oxide reduction in hydrogen plasma, as verified by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Stress focusing and collapse of a thin film under constant pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Eugenio; Cabezas, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Thin elastic sheets and shells are prone to focus stress when forced, due to their near inextensibility. Singular structures such as ridges, vertices, and folds arising from wrinkles, are characteristic of the deformation of such systems. Usually the forcing is exerted at the boundaries or at specific points of the surface, in displacement controlled experiments. On the other hand, much of the phenomenology of stress focusing can be found at micro and nanoscales, in physics and biology, making it universal. We will consider the post-buckling regime of a thin elastic sheet that is subjected to a constant normal distributed force. Specifically, we will present experiments made on thin elastoplastic sheets that collapse under atmospheric pressure. For instance, in vacuum-sealing technology, when a flat plastic bag is forced to wrap a solid volume, a series of self-contacts and folds develop. The unfolded bag shows a pattern of scars whose structure is determined by the geometry of the volume and by the exact way it stuck to its surface, by friction. Inspired by this everyday example we study the geometry of folds that result from collapsing a hermetic bag on regular rigid bodies.

  9. Phase transitions in diglyceride monolayers studied by computer simulations, pressure-area isotherms and x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Toxværd, S.; Larsen, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    1,2-sn-diglyceride monolayers exhibit unique and complex phase transitions as a function of surface pressure. The dynamical response of the layer on expanding the film has been investigated by computer simulations, (π-A) isotherms and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. Good agreement is found b...

  10. Ramifications of structural deformations on collapse loads of critically cracked pipe bends under in-plane bending and internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasidharan, Sumesh; Arunachalam, Veerappan; Subramaniam, Shanmugam [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli (India)

    2017-02-15

    Finite-element analysis based on elastic-perfectly plastic material was conducted to examine the influence of structural deformations on collapse loads of circumferential through-wall critically cracked 90 .deg. pipe bends undergoing in-plane closing bending and internal pressure. The critical crack is defined for a through-wall circumferential crack at the extrados with a subtended angle below which there is no weakening effect on collapse moment of elbows subjected to in-plane closing bending. Elliptical and semioval cross sections were postulated at the bend regions and compared. Twice-elastic-slope method was utilized to obtain the collapse loads. Structural deformations, namely, ovality and thinning, were each varied from 0% to 20% in steps of 5% and the normalized internal pressure was varied from 0.2 to 0.6. Results indicate that elliptic cross sections were suitable for pipe ratios 5 and 10, whereas for pipe ratio 20, semioval cross sections gave satisfactory solutions. The effect of ovality on collapse loads is significant, although it cancelled out at a certain value of applied internal pressure. Thinning had a negligible effect on collapse loads of bends with crack geometries considered.

  11. Pressure-induced collapsed-tetragonal phase in SrCo2As2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasekara, W. T.; Kaluarachchi, U. S.; Ueland, B.; Pandey, Abhishek; Lee, Y. B.; Taufour, V.; Sapkota, A.; Kothapalli, K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Feng, Yejun

    2015-12-08

    We present high-energy x-ray diffraction data under applied pressures up to p = 29 GPa, neutron diffraction measurements up to p = 1.1GPa, and electrical resistance measurements up to p = 5.9GPa, on SrCo2As2. Our x-ray diffraction data demonstrate that there is a first-order transition between the tetragonal (T) and collapsed-tetragonal (cT) phases, with an onset above approximately 6 GPa at T = 7K. The pressure for the onset of the cT phase and the range of coexistence between the T and cT phases appears to be nearly temperature independent. The compressibility along the a axis is the same for the T and cT phases, whereas, along the c axis, the cT phase is significantly stiffer, which may be due to the formation of an As-As bond in the cT phase. Our resistivity measurements found no evidence of superconductivity in SrCo2As2 for p 5.9 GPa and T 1.8 K. The resistivity data also show signatures consistent with a pressure-induced phase transition for p 5.5 GPa. Single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements performed up to 1.1 GPa in the T phase found no evidence of stripe-type or A-type antiferromagnetic ordering down to 10 K. Spin-polarized total-energy calculations demonstrate that the cT phase is the stable phase at high pressure with a c a ratio of 2.54. Furthermore, these calculations indicate that the cT phase of SrCo2As2 should manifest either A-type antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic order.

  12. Prediction of magnetic moment collapse in ZrFe{sub 2} under hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenxu; Zhang, Wanli [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties of ZrFe{sub 2} in the cubic Laves phase are investigated by calculations based on density functional theory. The magnetic moment decreases with the increase of the hydrostatic pressure in an unusual way: Two-step magnetic collapse is predicted. The first one is a continuous change from 1.53 μ{sub B}/Fe to 0.63 μ{sub B}/Fe at about 3.6 GPa, and the other is from 0.25 μ{sub B}/Fe to the nonmagnetic state at about 15 GPa in a first order manner under the local spin density approximation of the exchange correlation potential. A metastable state with intermediate spin moment about 0.15 μ{sub B}/Fe may exist before that. We understand this process by the changes of density of states during it. The magnetic moment decreases under the pressure in the vicinity of the experimental lattice constant with dlnm/dp=−0.038 GPa{sup −1}. The spontaneous volume magnetostriction is 3.6%, which is huge enough to find potential applications in magnetostriction actuators and sensors. We suggest that the Invar effect of this compound may be understood when considering the magnetic moment variation according to the magnetostrictive model of Invar.

  13. Experiments of draining and filling processes in a collapsible tube at high external pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaud, P.; Guesdon, P.; Fullana, J.-M.

    2012-02-01

    The venous circulation in the lower limb is mainly controlled by the muscular action of the calf. To study the mechanisms governing the venous draining and filling process in such a situation, an experimental setup, composed by a collapsible tube under external pressure, has been built. A valve preventing back flows is inserted at the bottom of the tube and allows to model two different configurations: physiological when the fluid flow is uni-directional and pathological when the fluid flows in both directions. Pressure and flow rate measurements are carried out at the inlet and outlet of the tube and an original optical device with three cameras is proposed to measure the instantaneous cross-sectional area. The experimental results (draining and filling with physiological or pathological valves) are confronted to a simple one-dimensional numerical model which completes the physical interpretation. One major observation is that the muscular contraction induces a fast emptying phase followed by a slow one controlled by viscous effects, and that a defect of the valve decreases, as expected, the ejected volume.

  14. Pressure-Dependent Light Emission of Charged and Neutral Excitons in Monolayer MoSe 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Xinpeng [State; Li, Fangfei [State; Lin, Jung-Fu [Department; Gong, Yuanbo [State; Huang, Xiaoli [State; Huang, Yanping [State; Han, Bo [State; Zhou, Qiang [State; Cui, Tian [State

    2017-07-19

    Tailoring the excitonic properties in two-dimensional monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) through strain engineering is an effective means to explore their potential applications in optoelectronics and nanoelectronics. Here we report pressure-tuned photon emission of trions and excitons in monolayer MoSe2 via a diamond anvil cell (DAC) through photoluminescence measurements and theoretical calculations. Under quasi-hydrostatic compressive strain, our results show neutral (X0) and charged (X–) exciton emission of monolayer MoSe2 can be effectively tuned by alcohol mixture vs inert argon pressure transmitting media (PTM). During this process, X– emission undergoes a continuous blue shift until reaching saturation, while X0 emission turns up splitting. The pressure-dependent charging effect observed in alcohol mixture PTM results in the increase of the X– exciton component and facilitates the pressure-tuned emission of X– excitons. This substantial tunability of X– and X0 excitons in MoSe2 can be extended to other 2D TMDs, which holds potential for developing strained and optical sensing devices.

  15. Effect of pressure on the anomalous response functions of a confined water monolayer at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Marco G.; Stokely, Kevin; Stanley, H. Eugene; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2012-11-01

    We study a coarse-grained model for a water monolayer that cannot crystallize due to the presence of confining interfaces, such as protein powders or inorganic surfaces. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and mean field calculations, we calculate three response functions: the isobaric specific heat CP, the isothermal compressibility KT, and the isobaric thermal expansivity αP. At low temperature T, we find two distinct maxima in CP, KT, and |αP|, all converging toward a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) with increasing pressure P. We show that the maximum in CP at higher T is due to the fluctuations of hydrogen (H) bond formation and that the second maximum at lower T is due to the cooperativity among the H bonds. We discuss a similar effect in KT and |αP|. If this cooperativity were not taken into account, both the lower-T maximum and the LLCP would disappear. However, comparison with recent experiments on water hydrating protein powders provides evidence for the existence of the lower-T maximum, supporting the hypothesized LLCP at positive P and finite T. The model also predicts that when P moves closer to the critical P the CP maxima move closer in T until they merge at the LLCP. Considering that other scenarios for water are thermodynamically possible, we discuss how an experimental measurement of the changing separation in T between the two maxima of CP as P increases could determine the best scenario for describing water.

  16. Effect of Gradual Onset +G(sub z) Acceleration on Rate of Visual Field Collapse and Intraocular Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Richard F.; Rositano, Salvador A.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the size of the visual field during positive acceleration are poorly understood, but involve mainly the arterial blood pressure at the eye level and intraocular pressure (IOP) (3). Fluid and electrolyte shifts that occur in the general circulation during acceleration may well influence the rate at which the visual field collapses. This could, in turn, suggest the relative influences that arterial blood pressure, IOP, and various compensatory mechanisms have upon acceleration tolerance. Such knowledge could also be of use in the design and development of protective techniques for use in the acceleration environment. The present investigation was performed to study blood withdrawal (hypovolemia) and subsequent reinfusion, oral fluid replacement upon IOP, and the rate at which the visual field collapses during gradual onset +G(sub z) acceleration (0.5 G/min).

  17. Pressure-induced phase transition and bandgap collapse in the wide-bandgap semiconductor InTaO4

    CERN Document Server

    Errandonea, D; Garg, A B; Botella, P; Martinez-Garcia, D; Pellicer-Porres, J; Rodriguez-Hernandez, P; Munoz, A; Cuenca-Gotor, V; Sans, J A

    2016-01-01

    A pressure-induced phase transition, associated with an increase of the coordination number of In and Ta, is detected beyond 13 GPa in InTaO4 by combining synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman measurements in a diamond anvil cell with ab-initio calculations. High-pressure optical-absorption measurements were also carried out. The high-pressure phase has a monoclinic structure which shares the same space group with the low-pressure phase (P2/c). The structure of the high-pressure phase can be considered as a slight distortion of an orthorhombic structure described by space group Pcna. The phase transition occurs together with a unit-cell volume collapse and an electronic bandgap collapse observed by experiments and calculations. Additionally, a band crossing is found to occur in the low-pressure phase near 7 GPa. The pressure dependence of all the Raman-active modes is reported for both phases as well as the pressure dependence of unit-cell parameters and the equations of state. Calculations also provide inf...

  18. Collapsed tetragonal phase and superconductivity of BaFe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhoya, Walter; Stemshorn, Andrew; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sefat, Athena S.; Sales, Brian C.; Hope, Kevin M.; Weir, Samuel T. (UAB); (ORNL); (LLNL); (Montevallo)

    2010-11-12

    High pressure x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements have been carried out on BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} to a pressure of 35 GPa and temperature of 10 K using a synchrotron source and designer diamond anvils. At ambient temperature, a phase transition from the tetragonal phase to a collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase is observed at 17 GPa under nonhydrostatic conditions as compared to 22 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The superconducting transition temperature increases rapidly with pressure up to 34 K at 1 GPa and decreases gradually with a further increase in pressure. Our results suggest that T{sub C} falls below 10 K in the pressure range of 16-30 GPa, where CT phase is expected to be stable under high-pressure and low-temperature conditions.

  19. Collapsing Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  20. On the influence of the UOE forming process on material properties and collapse pressure of deep water pipelines: experimental work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timms, Chris; Swanek, Doug; DeGeer, Duane [C-FER Technologies, Alberta (Canada); Mantovano, Luciano O. [Tenaris Siderca, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ernst, Hugo A. [Tenaris Siderca, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Structural Integrity Dept.; Toscano, Rita G. [SIM y TEC, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Souza, Marcos P.; Chad, Luis C. [Tenaris Confab, Pindamonhangaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Large diameter pipes for onshore and offshore applications are manufactured using the UOE process. The manufacturing process consists in the cold forming of heavy plates followed by welding and then by an expansion. It has been demonstrated in previous work that, for deep water applications, the cold forming process involved in UOE pipe manufacturing significantly reduces pipe collapse strength. To improve the understanding of these effects, Tenaris has embarked on a program to model the phases of the UOE manufacturing process using finite element methods. Previous phases of this work formulated the basis for the model development and described the 2D approach taken to model the various steps of manufacture. More recent developments included modeling enhancements, some sensitivity analyses, and comparison of predictions to the results of full-scale collapse testing performed at C FER. This work has shown correlations between manufacturing parameters and collapse pressure predictions. The results of the latest phase of the research program are presented in this paper. This work consists of full scale collapse testing and extensive coupon testing on samples collected from various stages of the UOE pipe manufacturing process including plate, UO, UOE, and thermally aged UOE. Four UOE pipe samples manufactured with varying forming parameters were provided by Tenaris for this test program along with associated plate and UO samples. Full-scale collapse and buckle propagation tests were conducted on a sample from each of the four UOE pipes including one that was thermally aged. Additional coupon-scale work included measurement of the through thickness variation of material properties and a thermal ageing study aimed at better understanding UOE pipe strength recovery. The results of these tests will provide the basis for further refinement of the finite element model as the program proceeds into the next phase. (author)

  1. Effect of pressure on thermal conductivity and pressure collapse of ice in a polymer-hydrogel and kinetic unfreezing at 1 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G P

    2011-03-28

    We report a study of aqueous solutions of poly(vinylalcohol) and its hydrogel by thermal conductivity, κ, and specific heat measurements. In particular, we investigate (i) the changes in the solution and the hydrogel at 0.1 MPa observed in the 350-90 K range and of the frozen hydrogel at 130 K observed in the range from 0.1 MPa to 1.3 GPa, and (ii) the nature of the pressure collapse of ice in the frozen hydrogel and kinetic unfreezing on heating of its high density water at 1 GPa. The water component of the polymer solution on cooling either first phase separates and then freezes to hexagonal ice or freezes without phase separation and the dispersed polymer chains freeze-concentrate in nanoscopic and microscopic regions of the grain boundaries and grain junctions of the ice crystals in the frozen state of water in the hydrogel. The change in κ with temperature at 1 bar is reversible with some hysteresis, but not reversible with pressure after compression to 0.8 GPa at 130 K. At high pressures the crystallized state collapses showing features of κ and specific heat characteristic of formation of high density amorphous solid water. The pressure of structural collapse is 0.08 GPa higher than that of ice at 130 K. The slowly formed collapsed state shows kinetic unfreezing or glass-liquid transition temperature at 140 K for a time scale of 1 s. Comparison with the change in the properties observed for ice shows that κ decreases when the polymer is added.

  2. Collapse Pressure Analysis of Transversely Isotropic Thick-Walled Cylinder Using Lebesgue Strain Measure and Transition Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to provide guidance for the design of the thick-walled cylinder made up of transversely isotropic material so that collapse of cylinder due to influence of internal and external pressure can be avoided. The concept of transition theory based on Lebesgue strain measure has been used to simplify the constitutive equations. Results have been analyzed theoretically and discussed numerically. From this analysis, it has been concluded that, under the influence of internal and external pressure, circular cylinder made up of transversely isotropic material (beryl is on the safer side of the design as compared to the cylinders made up of isotropic material (steel. This is because of the reason that percentage increase in effective pressure required for initial yielding to become fully plastic is high for beryl as compared to steel which leads to the idea of “stress saving” that reduces the possibility of collapse of thick-walled cylinder due to internal and external pressure.

  3. Low temperature carrier transport study of monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors prepared by chemical vapor deposition under an atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinke, E-mail: xkliu@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: wujing026@gmail.com; He, Jiazhu; Tang, Dan; Lu, Youming; Zhu, Deliang; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Sun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Technology of Ceramics, Nanshan District Key Lab for Biopolymer and Safety Evaluation, Shenzhen University, 3688 Nanhai Ave, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Qiang; Wen, Jiao; Yu, Wenjie [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, CAS, 865 Chang Ning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu, Wenjun [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Department of Microelectronics, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Jing, E-mail: xkliu@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: wujing026@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Road, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); He, Zhubing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, 1088 Xueyuan Road, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Ang, Kah-Wee [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117583 Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-09-28

    Large size monolayer Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) was successfully grown by chemical vapor deposition method under an atmospheric pressure. The electrical transport properties of the fabricated back-gate monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors (FETs) were investigated under low temperatures; a peak field effect mobility of 59 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} was achieved. With the assist of Raman measurement under low temperature, this work identified the mobility limiting factor for the monolayer MoS{sub 2} FETs: homopolar phonon scattering under low temperature and electron-polar optical phonon scattering at room temperature.

  4. Buoyancy Limitation of Filamentous Cyanobacteria under Prolonged Pressure due to the Gas Vesicles Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeynayaka, Helayaye Damitha Lakmali; Asaeda, Takashi; Kaneko, Yasuko

    2017-08-01

    Freshwater cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena galeata were cultured in chambers under artificially generated pressures, which correspond to the hydrostatic pressures at deep water. Variations occurred in gas vesicles volume, and buoyancy state of cells under those conditions were analyzed at different time intervals (5 min, 1 day, and 5 days). Variations in gas vesicles morphology of cells were observed by transmission electron microscopy images. Settling velocity ( Vs) of cells which governs the buoyancy was observed with the aid of a modified optical microscope. Moreover, effects of the prolonged pressure on cell ballast composition (protein and polysaccharides) were examined. Elevated pressure conditions reduced the cell ballast and caused a complete disappearance of gas vesicles in Pseudanabaena galeata cells. Hence cyanobacteria cells were not able to float within the study period. Observations and findings of the study indicate the potential application of hydrostatic pressure, which naturally occurred in hypolimnion of lakes, to inhibit the re-suspension of cyanobacteria cells.

  5. A collapse of ferromagnetism in an organic based magnet under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlie, Adam; Terry, Ian; Szablewski, Marek; Xiao, Fan; Williams, Robert C.

    2017-02-01

    The metal-organic charge transfer compound NiTCNQ2 has been subjected to pressure where both magnetisation and muon experiments show a suppression of T C with an applied pressure. At 12 kbar, it appears that the sample is paramagnetic and this gives an estimate of the pressure required for switching the transition on/off. The present work also provides some insight into the molecular structure since this behaviour can be explained if the structure is 3D. It is proposed that the TCNQ interactions increase along a stack with increasing pressure which causes spins on the TCNQ to couple into a singlet state with just isolated Ni ions left, which behave paramagnetically.

  6. Cosmological black holes: the spherical perfect fluid collapse with pressure in a FRW background

    CERN Document Server

    Moradi, Rahim; Mansouri, Reza

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a spherically symmetric structure model in a cosmological background filled with perfect fluid with non-vanishing pressure as an exact solution of Einstein equations using the Lema\\^{i}tre solution. To study its local and quasi-local characteristics including the novel features of its central black hole, we have suggested an algorithm to integrate the equations numerically. The result shows intriguing effects of the pressure inside the structure. The evolution of the central black hole within the FRW universe, its decoupling from the expanding parts of the model, the structure of its space-like apparent horizon, the limiting case of the dynamical horizon tending to a slowly evolving horizon, and the decreasing mass in-fall to the black hole is also studied. We have also calculated the redshift of a light emitted from nearby the cosmological structure to an observer in the FRW background and have shown that it contains both the local gravitational and the cosmological redshift with some obs...

  7. Study on collapse behavior of a square plate subjected to water pressure; Suiatsu wo ukeru kukeiban no atsukai kyodo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, T.; Fujikubo, M.; Mizutani, K. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-04-10

    Bottom plates of a hull are subjected to laterally distributing force due to in-plane compression force and water pressure in the ship`s length direction as a result of longitudinal bending in a hogging condition. Because buckling collapse of the hull bottom plates leads directly to longitudinal bending collapse of the hull bottom cross section, the hull bottom plates must have sufficient strength. The present study performs a static elastic large deflection analysis and an elasto-plastic large deflection analysis. It elucidates buckling collapse behavior of a square plate subjected to water pressure and in-plane compression load, and considers limits in application of conventional approximation analysis methods. In the case of a water pressure action, deflection components growing in excess of the buckling load do not necessarily correspond to buckling modes of the case where no water pressure is acting upon. Conventional approximation analysis methods may not be able often to pursue actual buckling phenomena. According the result of an analysis on hull bottom panels of an actual ship, the ultimate strength decreases when the water pressure is large. Compression force in the lateral direction as a result of water pressure acting on ship`s sides affected very little the ultimate strength. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  8. An Erosion Aggressiveness Index (EAI) Based on Pressure Load Estimation Due to Bubble Collapse in Cavitating Flows Within the RANS Solvers

    OpenAIRE

    Bergeles, G.; Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.; Li, J; Wang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous research efforts, there is no reliable and widely accepted tool for the prediction of erosion prone material surfaces due to collapse of cavitation bubbles. In the present paper an Erosion Aggressiveness Index (EAI) is proposed, based on the pressure loads which develop on the material surface and the material yield stress. EAI depends on parameters of the liquid quality and includes the fourth power of the maximum bubble radius and the bubble size number density distribution...

  9. Distribution of Coexisting Solid and Fluid Phases Alters the Kinetics of Collapse from Phospholipid Monolayers†

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wenfei; Hall, Stephen B.

    2006-01-01

    To determine how coexistence of liquid-expanded (LE) and tilted-condensed (TC) phases in phospholipid monolayers affects collapse from the air/water interface, we studied binary films containing dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine–dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) mixtures between 10 and 100% DPPC. Previously published results established that this range of compositions represents the LE–TC coexistence region at the equilibrium spreading pressure of 47 mN/m. When held at 49.5 mN/m on a captive ...

  10. Collapse calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Marti, J.

    2007-05-01

    A collapse caldera is a volcanic explosive structure that forms during the collapse of crustal blocks on top of a shallow magma chamber. During this collapse, a large volume of magma is evacuated, first explosively, in the form of pyroclastic fallouts and pyroclastic flows, and then effusively, as lava domes or flows after collapse. The result is a catastrophic explosive volcanic collapse that forms a depression that could end with different shapes, circular, oval, rectangular, or irregular. Three main types of collapse calderas can be defined, 1) summit caldera, 2) classic caldera, and 3) graben caldera. Summit calderas are those formed at the top of large volcanoes and are related to relatively small-volume pyroclastic products that include plinian fallouts and ignimbrites, such as Crater Lake, Las Cañadas, and Somma-Vesuvio. Classic calderas are semi-circular to irregular-shaped large structures, several km in diameter that are related to relatively large-volume pyroclastic products including pumice fallouts and widespread ignimbrites, such as Long-Valley, Campi Flegrei, and Los Humeros. Graben calderas are explosive volcano-tectonic collapse structures from which large-volume, ignimbrite-forming eruptions occurred through several vents along the graben walls and the intra-graben block faults causing the collapse of the graben or of a sector of the graben. The main products of graben calderas are surge-deposits and large-volume widespread ignimbrite sheets. Pumice fallouts are practically absent. Examples include the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, La Pacana (Andes), Catalan Pyrenees, and perhaps Scafell (United Kingdom). Any of the three caldera types mentioned above could have collapsed in three different ways, 1) piston, when the collapse occurs as a single crustal block; 2) trap-door, when collapse occurs unevenly along one side while the opposite side remains with no collapse; 3) piece-meal, when collapse occurs as broken pieces of the crust on top of

  11. Palmitic Acid on Salt Subphases and in Mixed Monolayers of Cerebrosides: Application to Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Adams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Palmitic acid (PA has been found to be a major constituent in marine aerosols, and is commonly used to investigate organic containing atmospheric aerosols, and is therefore used here as a proxy system. Surface pressure-area isotherms (π-A, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM, and vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG were used to observe a PA monolayer during film compression on subphases of ultrapure water, CaCl2 and MgCl2 aqueous solutions, and artificial seawater (ASW. π-A isotherms indicate that salt subphases alter the phase behavior of PA, and BAM further reveals that a condensation of the monolayer occurs when compared to pure water. VSFG spectra and BAM images show that Mg2+ and Ca2+ induce ordering of the PA acyl chains, and it was determined that the interaction of Mg2+ with the monolayer is weaker than Ca2+. π-A isotherms and BAM were also used to monitor mixed monolayers of PA and cerebroside, a simple glycolipid. Results reveal that PA also has a condensing effect on the cerebroside monolayer. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that attractive interactions between the two components exist; this may be due to hydrogen bonding of the galactose and carbonyl headgroups. BAM images of the collapse structures show that mixed monolayers of PA and cerebroside are miscible at all surface pressures. These results suggest that the surface morphology of organic-coated aerosols is influenced by the chemical composition of the aqueous core and the organic film itself.

  12. Buckling and unstable collapse of seamless pipes and tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakani, S.; Van den Abeele, F. [ArcelorMittal Global RnD Ghent, Zelzate, (Belgium); Bar, J. [ArcelorMittal Tubular Products Ostrava, Ostrava, (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-01

    Off-shore pipelines and high pressure casings are subject to buckling and unstable collapse. This paper investigated the unstable collapse of seamless pipes under compressive loading. Collapse pressure tests for high collapse casing grades L80HC and P110HC were carried out by enclosing end-capped specimens in a pressure vessel, and applying hydrostatic pressure. Analytical calculations were performed to predict the critical collapse pressure for pipes with different values of diameter to wall thickness. Four regimes were identified and studied: yielding collapse, plastic collapse, transition range and elastic collapse. Simplified design equations were produced for each regime to estimate the collapse pressure more efficiently. The influence of initial geometric imperfections and material properties was studied with the aim of developing a modified design equation for collapse able to predict the critical collapse pressure of dented seamless pipes. Experimental tests showed that the pipes complied with API standards and the modified equation was validated.

  13. Effects of Calcium Ions on Thermodynamic Properties of Mixed Bilirubin/Cholesterol Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Tang, Yu-feng; Li, Ye-min; Xie, An-jian; Shen, Yu-hua; Zhu, Jin-miao; Li, Chuan-hao

    2008-04-01

    The mixed monolayer behavior of bilirubin/cholesterol was studied through surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms on aqueous solutions containing various concentrations of calcium ions. Based on the data of π-A isotherms, the mean area per molecule, collapse pressure, surface compressibility modulus, excess molecular areas, free energy of mixing, and excess free energy of mixing of the monolayers on different subphases were calculated. The results show an expansion in the structure of the mixed monolayer with Ca2+ in subphase, and non-ideal mixing of the components at the air/water interface is observed with positive deviation from the additivity rule in the excess molecular areas. The miscibility between the components is weakened with the increase of concentration of Ca2+ in subphase. The facts indicate the presence of coordination between Ca2+ and the two components. The mixed monolayer, in which the molar ratio of bilirubin to cholesterol is 3:2, is more stable from a thermodynamic point of view on pure water. But the stable 3:2 stoichiometry complex is destroyed with the increase of the concentration of Ca2+ in subphase. Otherwise, the mixed monolayers have more thermodynamic stability at lower surface pressure on Ca2+ subphase.

  14. Effects of Calcium Ions on Thermodynamic Properties of Mixed Bilirubin/Cholesterol Monolayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong Wu; Yu-feng Tang; Ye-min Li; An-jian Xie; Yu-hua Shen; Jin-miao Zhu; Chuan-hao Li

    2008-01-01

    The mixed monolayer behavior of bilirubin/cholesterol was studied through surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms on aqueous solutions containing various concentrations of calcium ions.Based on the data of π-A isotherms,the mean area per molecule,collapse pressure,surface compressibility modulus,excess molecular areas,free energy of mixing,and excess free energy of mixing of the monolayers on different subphases were calculated.The results show an expansion in the structure of the mixed monolayer with Ca2+ in subphase, and non-ideal mixing of the components at the air/water interface is observed with positive deviation from the additivity rule in the excess molecular areas.The miscibility between the components is weakened with the increase of concentration of Ca2+ in subphase.The facts indicate the presence of coordination between Ca2+ and the two components.The mixed monolayer,in which the molar ratio of bilirubin to cholesterol is 3:2,is more stable from a thermodynamic point of view on pure water.But the stable 3:2 stoichiometry complex is destroyed with the increase of the concentration of Ca2+ in subphase.Otherwise,the mixed monolayers have more thermodynamic stability at lower surface pressure on Ca2+ subphase.

  15. Collapse of the magnetic moment under pressure of AFe{sub 2} (A=Y, Zr, Lu and Hf) in the cubic Laves phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenxu, E-mail: xwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-04-15

    The electronic structures of four Laves phase iron compounds (e.g. YFe{sub 2}, ZrFe{sub 2}, LuFe{sub 2} and HfFe{sub 2}) have been calculated with a state-of-the-art full potential electronic structure code. Our theoretical work predicted that the magnetic moments collapse under hydrostatic pressure. This feature is found to be universal in these materials. Its electronic origin is provided by the sharp peaks in the density of states near the Fermi level. It is shown that a first order quantum phase transition can be expected under pressure in Y(Zr, or Lu)Fe{sub 2}, while a second order one in HfFe{sub 2}. The bonding characteristics are discussed to elucidate the equilibrium lattice constant variation. The large spontaneous volume magnetostriction gives one of the most important characteristics of these compounds. Invar anomalies in these compounds can be partly explained by the current work when the fast continuous magnetic moment decrease with the decrease of the lattice constant was properly considered. This work may be as a first insight into the rich world of quantum phase transition and Invar mechanism in these Laves phase compounds. - Highlights: • Magnetic moment of YFe{sub 2}, ZrFe{sub 2}, LuFe{sub 2} and HfFe{sub 2} collapses under pressure. • The transition in Y(Zr or Lu) Fe{sub 2} under pressure is first order. • The transition in HfFe{sub 2} under pressure is second order. • The Invar effects in the compounds can be put into the magnetostriction model.

  16. Collapsed Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  17. Cylindrical Collapse and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, L

    2005-01-01

    We study the matching conditions for a collapsing anisotropic cylindrical perfect fluid, and we show that its radial pressure is non zero on the surface of the cylinder and proportional to the time dependent part of the field produced by the collapsing fluid. This result resembles the one that arises for the radiation - though non-gravitational - in the spherically symmetric collapsing dissipative fluid, in the diffusion approximation.

  18. Interfacial properties in Langmuir monolayers and LB films of DPPC with partially fluorinated alcohol (F8H7OH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Hirano, Chikayo; Fujita, Ichiro; Shibata, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Two-component interactions between (perfluorooctyl) heptanol (F8H7OH) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which is a major component of pulmonary surfactants in mammals, were systematically elucidated using Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of the compounds. The interactions such as the miscibility of the compounds and their phase behavior were examined from thermodynamic and morphological perspectives. The surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms of the binary monolayers containing F8H7OH in different mole fractions (XF8H7OH) were measured simultaneously. The excess Gibbs free energy of mixing of the two components was calculated from the π-A isotherms. The resulting isotherm data were employed to construct a two-dimensional (2D) phase diagram of the system. The phase diagram revealed that the transition pressure as well as the monolayer collapse pressure change with changes in XF8H7OH. These thermodynamic analyses suggested that the miscibility of the two components and the solidification of DPPC monolayers can be induced by the addition of F8H7OH. The phase behavior upon monolayer compression was observed morphologically in situ using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and fluorescence microscopy (FM), as well as ex situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Interestingly, the AFM-based analysis revealed the formation of monodispersed 2D micelles consisting of F8H7OH at low surface pressures.

  19. Self-Collapse Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuanzhen; Xu, Xiaobin; Yang, Qing; Man, Tianxing; Jonas, Steven J; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Andrews, Anne M; Weiss, Paul S

    2017-08-09

    We report a facile, high-throughput soft lithography process that utilizes nanoscale channels formed naturally at the edges of microscale relief features on soft, elastomeric stamps. Upon contact with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) functionalized substrates, the roof of the stamp collapses, resulting in the selective removal of SAM molecules via a chemical lift-off process. With this technique, which we call self-collapse lithography (SCL), sub-30 nm patterns were achieved readily using masters with microscale features prepared by conventional photolithography. The feature sizes of the chemical patterns can be varied continuously from ∼2 μm to below 30 nm by decreasing stamp relief heights from 1 μm to 50 nm. Likewise, for fixed relief heights, reducing the stamp Young's modulus from ∼2.0 to ∼0.8 MPa resulted in shrinking the features of resulting patterns from ∼400 to ∼100 nm. The self-collapse mechanism was studied using finite element simulation methods to model the competition between adhesion and restoring stresses during patterning. These results correlate well with the experimental data and reveal the relationship between the line widths, channel heights, and Young's moduli of the stamps. In addition, SCL was applied to pattern two-dimensional arrays of circles and squares. These chemical patterns served as resists during etching processes to transfer patterns to the underlying materials (e.g., gold nanostructures). This work provides new insights into the natural propensity of elastomeric stamps to self-collapse and demonstrates a means of exploiting this behavior to achieve patterning via nanoscale chemical lift-off lithography.

  20. Mixed DPPC/DPPG monolayers at very high film compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Acosta, Edgar J; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2009-09-15

    A drop shape technique using a constrained sessile drop constellation (ADSA-CSD) has been introduced as a superior technique for studying spread films specially at high collapse pressures [Saad et al. Langmuir 2008, 24, 10843-10850]. It has been shown that ADSA-CSD has certain advantages including the need only for small quantities of liquid and insoluble surfactants, the ability to measure very low surface tension values, easier deposition procedure, and leak-proof design. Here, this technique was applied to investigate mixed DPPC/DPPG monolayers to characterize the role of such molecules in maintaining stable film properties and surface activity of lung surfactant preparations. Results of compression isotherms were obtained for different DPPC/DPPG mixture ratios: 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, 60/40, and 50/50 in addition to pure DPPC and pure DPPG at room temperature of 24 degrees C. The ultimate collapse pressure of DPPC/DPPG mixtures was found to be 70.5 mJ/m2 (similar to pure DPPC) for the cases of low DPPG content (up to 20%). Increasing the DPPG content in the mixture (up to 40%) caused a slight decrease in the ultimate collapse pressure. However, further increase of DPPG in the mixture (50% or more) caused a sharp decrease in the ultimate collapse pressure to a value of 59.9 mJ/m2 (similar to pure DPPG). The change in film elasticity was also tracked for the range of mixture ratios studied. The physical reasons for such changes and the interaction between DPPC and DPPG molecules are discussed. The results also show a change in the film hysteresis upon successive compression and expansion cycles for different mixture ratios.

  1. Hydrostatic pressure dependence on the collapsing of heptamer clusters in the charge ordered spinel AlV2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavathi, S.; Vennila Raju, Selva; Chandra, Sharat; Williams, Quentin; Sahu, P. Ch.

    2017-01-01

    Charge frustrated spinels have engaged the interest of condensed matter studies due to the novel formation of multimer molecular sub units that lifts the degeneracy in the ground state. An exhaustive study on the stability of these molecular sub units is not available in the literature. In the present study, evidence has been obtained for the first time that hydrostatic pressure beyond 21 GPa, destabilizes the vanadium heptamer molecular sub units reversibly in the unique ambient temperature charge ordered spinel AlV2O4. The bulk modulus and its pressure derivative of the charge ordered phase are constrained. In addition a systematic structural analysis as a function of temperature shows destabilization of vanadium trimers those stack up to make the heptamer units. The crystal structure and total energy have been calculated using first principles density functional formalism (GGA approximation) as a function of pressure. The results obtained corroborate the stability of the frustrated phase beyond 20 GPa.

  2. Collapsed City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Nacho Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Currently, when the socio-economic circumstances seem to announce another change of cultural paradigm for the 21st century, the interest in the urban fact seems to have been renewed in architecture. However, this is no longer focused on models of growth and efficiency, as happened in the 70s....... Nowadays the situation is quite different. The enthusiasm for the economic growth which had characterized late capitalism and much of the postmodern cultural production has disappeared, and has given place to some global unease on a possible system collapse. Once the economy does not grow, but threatens...... with its imminent breakdown, the architectural interests have shifted to urban environments like Tokyo, Detroit, Lagos or Rio de Janeiro; places that demonstrate, somehow, an urban culture of collapse....

  3. The miscibility of milk sphingomyelin and cholesterol is affected by temperature and surface pressure in mixed Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ken; Ropers, Marie-Hélène; Lopez, Christelle

    2017-06-01

    The miscibility of milk sphingomyelin (milk-SM) and cholesterol was investigated in this study. The effect of different physical states of milk-SM on its interactions with cholesterol was determined by the recording of isotherms of compression of Langmuir films for temperatures above and below the gel to Lα phase transition of milk-SM (Tm∼34°C). For T=15°CTm, the milk-SM molecules were in a LE phase regardless of the surface pressure applied. A phase diagram pressure - milk-SM/cholesterol composition was established. This study demonstrated that both temperature and surface pressure affected the miscibility between the milk-SM and cholesterol. The strongest attractive forces (i.e. condensing effect) were identified for 30mol% cholesterol when the milk-SM was in the LE phase state.

  4. Collapse of the magnetic moment under pressure of AFe2 (A=Y, Zr, Lu and Hf) in the cubic Laves phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxu; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-04-01

    The electronic structures of four Laves phase iron compounds (e.g. YFe2, ZrFe2, LuFe2 and HfFe2) have been calculated with a state-of-the-art full potential electronic structure code. Our theoretical work predicted that the magnetic moments collapse under hydrostatic pressure. This feature is found to be universal in these materials. Its electronic origin is provided by the sharp peaks in the density of states near the Fermi level. It is shown that a first order quantum phase transition can be expected under pressure in Y(Zr, or Lu)Fe2, while a second order one in HfFe2. The bonding characteristics are discussed to elucidate the equilibrium lattice constant variation. The large spontaneous volume magnetostriction gives one of the most important characteristics of these compounds. Invar anomalies in these compounds can be partly explained by the current work when the fast continuous magnetic moment decrease with the decrease of the lattice constant was properly considered. This work may be as a first insight into the rich world of quantum phase transition and Invar mechanism in these Laves phase compounds.

  5. Mechanisms of network collapse in GeO2 glass: high-pressure neutron diffraction with isotope substitution as arbitrator of competing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezka, Kamil; Salmon, Philip S.; Zeidler, Anita; Whittaker, Dean A. J.; Drewitt, James W. E.; Klotz, Stefan; Fischer, Henry E.; Marrocchelli, Dario

    2012-12-01

    The structure of the network forming glass GeO2 is investigated by making the first application of the method of in situ neutron diffraction with isotope substitution at pressures increasing from ambient to 8 GPa. Of the various models, the experimental results are in quantitative agreement only with molecular dynamics simulations made using interaction potentials that include dipole-polarization effects. When the reduced density ρ/ρ0 ≳ 1.16, where ρ0 is the value at ambient pressure, network collapse proceeds via an interplay between the predominance of distorted square pyramidal GeO5 units versus octahedral GeO6 units as they replace tetrahedral GeO4 units. This replacement necessitates the formation of threefold coordinated oxygen atoms and leads to an increase with density in the number of small rings, where a preference is shown for sixfold rings when ρ/ρ0 = 1 and fourfold rings when ρ/ρ0 = 1.64.

  6. Inhomogeneous electromagnetic gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein-Schabes, J.A.

    1985-04-15

    The collapse of an inhomogeneous dust cloud in the presence of an electromagnetic field is investigated in detail. The possibility of a naked singularity arising is studied using some known solutions for a spherical charged inhomogeneous dust cloud. It is found that locally naked singularities may develop when the arbitrary functions in the solution are chosen in a special way, but that a global naked singularity will not form. Also the role of the electromagnetic pressure is discussed.

  7. Two-component Langmuir monolayers and LB films of DPPC with partially fluorinated alcohol (F8H9OH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Hirano, Chikayo; Shibata, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of (perfluorooctyl)nonanol (F8H9OH) with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was systematically studied in two-component monolayers at air-water interface. The thermodynamic property and phase morphology of the monolayers were investigated by isotherm measurements and several microscopic methods such as Brewster angle microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM topographies for Langmuir-Blodgett films of F8H9OH exhibit the formation of monodispersed surface micelles. In the two-component system, the incorporation of F8H9OH induces condensation (or solidification) of DPPC monolayers. The excess Gibbs free energy and interaction parameter (or energy) of the two components were calculated from the isotherm data. Both the phase transition pressure for the coexistence of ordered and disordered phases and collapse pressure of monolayers vary with the mole fraction of F8H9OH, indicating binary miscibility between F8H9OH and DPPC within a monolayer state. The miscibility is also confirmed visually by in situ and ex situ microscopy at micro- and nanometer scales.

  8. Reversible tuning of the collapsed tetragonal phase transition in CaF e2A s2 by separate control of chemical pressure and electron doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, K.; Stingl, C.; Manna, R. S.; Jin, C. Q.; Gegenwart, P.

    2015-12-01

    Single crystals of Ca (Fe1-xR ux ) 2A s2(0 ≤x ≤0.065 ) and C a1 -yL ay(Fe0.973Ru0.027 ) 2A s2(0 ≤y ≤0.2 ) have been synthesized and studied with respect to their structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. The partial substitution of Fe by Ru induces a decrease of the c -axis constant leading for x ≤0.023 to a suppression of the coupled magnetic and structural (tetragonal to orthorhombic) transitions. At xcr=0.023 a first-order transition to a collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase is found, which behaves like a Fermi liquid and which is stabilized by further increase of x . The absence of superconductivity near xcr is consistent with truly hydrostatic pressure experiments on undoped CaF e2A s2 . Starting in the CT regime at x =0.027 , we investigate the additional effect of electron doping by partial replacement of Ca by La. Most remarkably, with increasing y the CT phase transition is destabilized and the system is tuned back into a tetragonal ground state at y ≥ 0.08. This effect is ascribed to a weakening of interlayer As-As bonds by electron doping. Upon further electron doping filamentary superconductivity with Tc of 41 K at y =0.2 is observed.

  9. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  10. Quantum dust collapse in 2 +1 dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Souvik; Vaz, Cenalo; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we will examine the consequence of a canonical theory of quantum dust collapse in 2 +1 dimensions. The solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation describing the collapse indicates that collapsing shells outside the apparent horizon are accompanied by outgoing shells within the apparent horizon during their collapse phase and stop collapsing once they reach the apparent horizon. Taking this picture of quantum collapse seriously, we determine a static solution with energy density corresponding to a dust ball whose collapse has terminated at the apparent horizon. We show that the boundary radius of the ball is larger than the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli radius confirming that no event horizon is formed. The ball is sustained by radial pressure which we determine and which we attribute to the Unruh radiation within it.

  11. Speed of collapse of the non-ventilated lung during single-lung ventilation for thoracoscopic surgery: the effect of transient increases in pleural pressure on the venting of gas from the non-ventilated lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzner, J; Peacock, M J; Harris, R J

    2001-10-01

    A study of 10 anaesthetised patients placed in the lateral position for thoracoscopic surgery assessed whether transient increases in pleural pressure on the side of the non-ventilated lung might increase the speed at which gas vents from that lung. The transient increases in pleural pressure were generated by the mediastinal displacement that occurs with each inspiratory phase of positive pressure ventilation of the dependent lung. When combined with a unidirectional valve allowing gas to flow out of the non-ventilated lung, and a second valve allowing ambient airflow into, but not out of, the thoracic cavity via an initial thoracoscopy access site, this mediastinal displacement could conceivably serve to 'pump' gas out of the non-ventilated lung. Using the four different combinations of valve inclusion or omission, the volume of gas that vented from the non-ventilated lung into a measuring spirometer was recorded during a 120-s measurement sequence. It was found that the speed of venting was not increased by the transient increases in pleural pressure, and that in all but one of a total of 34 measurement sequences, venting had ceased by the end of the sequence. Gas venting was a mean (SD) of 85.5 (11.9)% complete in 25 s (five breaths), and 96.6 (6.1)% complete in 60 s. This prompt partial lung collapse very likely reflected the passive elastic recoil of the lung, while the failure of transient increases in pleural pressure to result in ongoing venting of gas was probably a consequence of airways closure as the lung collapsed. It is concluded that techniques that aim to speed lung collapse by increasing pleural pressure are unlikely to be effective.

  12. ELASTICITY OF MONOLAYER OF LINOLEIC ACID AND ITS POLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic elasticity of linoleic acid monolayer on a subphase of 10-4mol/L TbCla at various surface pressure has been measured by means of dynamic oscillation method in measuring the change of surface pressure caused by periodic compressionexpansion cycles of the barrier. The elasticity of monolayer increases with increasing of surface pressure linegrly. The linoleic acid polymer monolayer has been obtained under UV-irradiation in situ when keeping a constant surface pressure. But the elasticity of the resulting polymerized monolayer is even smaller than that of its corresponding monomer monolayer. The elasticity of the polymerized linoleic acid monolayer decreases with increasing polymerization time. The explanation based on entropy has been presented.

  13. Suppression of magnetism and development of superconductivity within the collapsed tetragonal phase of Ca[subscript 0.67]Sr[subscript 0.33]Fe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffries, J.R.; Butch, N.P.; Kirshenbaum, K.; Saha, S.R.; Samudrala, G.; Weir, S.T.; Vohra, Y.K.; Paglione, J. (LLNL); (UAB); (Maryland)

    2012-10-24

    Structural and electronic characterizations of (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} have been performed as a function of pressure up to 12 GPa using conventional and designer diamond anvil cells. The compound (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} behaves intermediately between its end members, displaying a suppression of magnetism and the onset of superconductivity. Like other members of the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family, (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} undergoes a pressure-induced isostructural volume collapse, which we associate with the development of As-As bonding across the mirror plane of the structure. This collapsed tetragonal phase abruptly cuts off the magnetic state and supports superconductivity with a maximum T{sub c} = 22.2 K. The maximum T{sub c} of the superconducting phase is not strongly correlated with any structural parameter, but its proximity to the abrupt suppression of magnetism as well as the volume-collapse transition suggests that magnetic interactions and structural inhomogeneity may play a role in its development.

  14. Collapsing granular suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kadau, D.; Andrade Jr, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    A 2D contact dynamics model is proposed as a microscopic description of a collapsing suspension/soil to capture the essential physical processes underlying the dynamics of generation and collapse of the system. Our physical model is compared with real data obtained from in situ measurements performed with a natural collapsing/suspension soil. We show that the shear strength behavior of our collapsing suspension/soil model is very similar to the behavior of this collapsing suspension soil, for...

  15. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  16. Geotechnical properties of Egyptian collapsible soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled E. Gaaver

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of constructing structures on collapsible soils presents significant challenges to geotechnical engineers due to sudden reduction in volume upon wetting. Identifying collapsible soils when encountered in the field and taking the needed precautions should substantially reduce the risk of such problems usually reported in buildings and highways. Collapsible soils are those unsaturated soils that can withstand relatively high pressure without showing significant change in volume, however upon wetting; they are susceptible to a large and sudden reduction in volume. Collapsible soils cover significant areas around the world. In Egypt, collapsible soils were observed within the northern portion of the western desert including Borg El-Arab region, and around the city of Cairo in Six-of-October plateau, and Tenth-of-Ramadan city. Settlements associated with development on untreated collapsible soils usually lead to expensive repairs. One method for treating collapsible soils is to densify their structure by compaction. The ongoing study presents the effect of compaction on the geotechnical properties of the collapsible soils. Undisturbed block samples were recovered from test pits at four sites in Borg El-Arab district, located at about 20 km west of the city of Alexandria, Egypt. The samples were tested in both unsoaked and soaked conditions. Influence of water inundation on the geotechnical properties of collapsible soils was demonstrated. A comparative study between natural undisturbed and compacted samples of collapsible soils was performed. An attempt was made to relate the collapse potential to the initial moisture content. An empirical correlation between California Bearing Ratio of the compacted collapsible soils and liquid limit was adopted. The presented simple relationships should enable the geotechnical engineers to estimate the complex parameters of collapsible soils using simple laboratory tests with a reasonable accuracy.

  17. Fracture Characteristics of Monolayer CVD-Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Hwangbo, Yun; Lee, Choong-Kwang; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Su; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    We have observed and analyzed the fracture characteristics of the monolayer CVD-graphene using pressure bulge testing setup. The monolayer CVD-graphene has appeared to undergo environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in room condition, i.e. stress corrosion cracking arising from the adsorption of water vapor on the graphene and the subsequent chemical reactions. The crack propagation in graphene has appeared to be able to be reasonably tamed by adjusting applied humidity and stress. ...

  18. Langmuir monolayer and Langmuir-Blodgett films formed by a melamine-headed azobenzene-derived amphiphile: interfacial assembly affected by host-guest interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Wang, Yanhua; Xiao, Yunxia; Liu, Fang; Lu, Guo-Yuan

    2009-04-09

    A novel azobenzene-derived amphiphile with a melamine head, 2Azo-2C12H2-melamine, has been synthesized. pi-A isotherm measurements displayed that this amphiphile is able to form a stable Langmuir monolayer on both pure water and barbituric acid (BA)- or thymine (T)-containing subphases. The collapse surface pressure and limiting molecular area of its Langmuir monolayer on pure water are 40 mN/m and 0.56 nm2, respectively. However, when barbituric acid or thymine was introduced into the subphase, the corresponding pi-A isotherms of the monolayers exhibited a lower collapse surface pressure (22 mN/m for BA, 21 mN/m for T) and smaller limiting molecular area (0.54 nm2 for BA and 0.52 nm2 for T). UV-vis and FT-IR studies of the LB films formed by 2Azo-2C12H25-melamine have also been carried out. The results indicated that the LB films of 2Azo-2C12H25-melamine deposited from pure water undergo distinct collapse of the H-aggregate upon UV irradiation, while the LB films deposited from a BA- or T-containing subphase retain the H-aggregate. The host-guest-interaction-induced blockage of azobenzene photoisomerization should be responsible for the stabilized H-aggregate. A 1:1 host/guest binding mode to form a linear supramolecular polymeric chain has been proposed in the Langmuir monolayers formed on a BA- or T-containing subphase. The current results suggest that the host-guest interaction should be an effective means to manipulate the interfacial assembly of azobenzene-derived amphiphiles.

  19. Monolayer film behavior of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Thomas; Schooling, Sarah R; Beveridge, Terry J; Katsaras, John

    2008-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential biomacromolecule making up approximately 50% of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. LPS chemistry facilitates cellular barrier and permeability functions and mediates interactions between the cell and its environment. To better understand the local interactions within LPS membranes, the monolayer film behavior of LPS extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen of medical importance, was investigated by Langmuir film balance. LPS formed stable monolayers at the air-water interface and the measured lateral stresses and modulus (rigidity) of the LPS film in the compressed monolayer region were found to be appreciable. Scaling theories for two-dimensional (2D) polymer chain conformations were used to describe the pi-A profile, in particular, the high lateral stress region suggested that the polysaccharide segments reside at the 2D air-water interface. Although the addition of monovalent and divalent salts caused LPS molecules to adopt a compact conformation at the air-water interface, they did not appear to have any influence on the modulus (rigidity) of the LPS monolayer film under biologically relevant stressed conditions. With increasing divalent salt (CaCl2) content in the subphase, however, there is a progressive reduction of the LPS monolayer's collapse pressure, signifying that, at high concentrations, divalent salts weaken the ability of the membrane to withstand elevated stress. Finally, based on the measured viscoelastic response of the LPS films, we hypothesize that this property of LPS-rich outer membranes of bacteria permits the deformation of the membrane and may consequently protect bacteria from catastrophic structural failure when under mechanical-stress.

  20. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Yuji [Ames Laboratory; Roy, Beas [Ames Laboratory; Ran, Sheng [Ames Laboratory; Budko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul C. [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  1. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  2. Collapsing cavities in reactive and nonreactive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Neil K.; Field, John E.

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents results of a high-speed photographic study of cavities collapsed asymmetrically by shocks of strengths in the range 0.26 GPa to 3.5 GPa. Two-dimensional collapses of cavity configurations punched into a 12% by weight gelatine in water sheet, and an ammonium nitrate/sodium nitrate (AN/SN) emulsion explosive were photographed using schlieren optics. The single cavity collapses were characterized by the velocity of the liquid jet formed by the upstream wall as it was accelerated by the shock and by the time taken for the cavity to collapse. The shock pressure did not qualitatively affect the collapse behaviour but jet velocities were found to exceed incident shock velocities at higher pressures. The more violent collapses induced light emission from the compressed gas in the cavity. When an array of cavities collapsed, a wave, characterized by the particle velocity in the medium, the cavity diameter and the inter-cavity spacing, was found to run through the array. When such an array was created within an emulsion explosive, ignition of the reactive matrix occurred ahead of the collapse wave when the incident shock was strong.

  3. Mode of interaction of ganglioside Langmuir monolayer originated from echinoderms: three binary systems of ganglioside/DPPC, ganglioside/DMPE, and ganglioside/cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Kazuki; Ikeda, Yuriko; Kawasaki, Hideya; Yamada, Koji; Higuchi, Ryuichi; Shibata, Osamu

    2006-09-01

    The surface pressure (pi)-area (A), the surface potential (DeltaV)-A, and the dipole moment (mu( perpendicular))-A isotherms were obtained for monolayers made from a ganglioside originated from echinoderms [Diadema setosum ganglioside (DSG-1)], dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), cholesterol (Ch), and their combinations. Monolayers spread on several different substrates were investigated at the air/water interface by the Wilhelmy method, ionizing electrode method, fluorescence microscopy (FM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface potentials (DeltaV) of pure components were analyzed using the three-layer model proposed by Demchak and Fort [R.J. Demchak, T. Fort, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 46 (1974) 191-202]. The new finding was that DSG-1 was stable and showed a liquid-expanded film and that its monolayer behavior of DeltaV was sensitive for the change of the NaCl concentration in the subphase. Moreover, the miscibility of DSG-1 and three major lipids in the two-component monolayers was examined by plotting the variation of the molecular area and the surface potential as a function of the DSG-1 molar fraction (X(DSG-1)), using the additivity rule. From the A-X(DSG-1) and DeltaV(m)-X(DSG-1) plots, partial molecular surface area (PMA) and apparent partial molecular surface potential (APSP) were determined at the discrete surface pressure. The PMA and APSP with the mole fraction were extensively discussed for the miscible system. The miscibility was also investigated from the two-dimensional phase diagrams. Furthermore, a regular surface mixture, for which the Joos equation was used for the analysis of the collapse pressure of two-component monolayers, allowed calculation of the interaction parameter (xi) and the interaction energy (-Deltavarepsilon) between them. The observations using fluorescence microscopy and AFM image also provide us the miscibility in the monolayer state.

  4. Collapsing granular suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadau, D; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2009-11-01

    A 2D contact dynamics model is proposed as a microscopic description of a collapsing suspension/soil to capture the essential physical processes underlying the dynamics of generation and collapse of the system. Our physical model is compared with real data obtained from in situ measurements performed with a natural collapsing/suspension soil. We show that the shear strength behavior of our collapsing suspension/soil model is very similar to the behavior of this collapsing suspension soil, for both the unperturbed and the perturbed phases of the material.

  5. Hexagonal Nanoarchitecture of Composite Monolayer of Magnetite Nanoparticles and Geminus Surfactant 1,3-Propylenebis (dodecyldimethylammonium) Dibromide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Ming-Xian; GAN,Li-Hua; HAO,Zhi-Xian; XU,Zi-Jie; ZHU,Da-Zhang; CHEN,Long-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Negatively charged magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of about 10 nm have been synthesized by a chemical coprecipitation method using sodium dodecyl benzene sulphonate as a surface modifying reagent. Composite Langmuir monolayer of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and geminus surfactant 1,3-propylenebis(dodecyldimethylammonium) dibromide (C12-C3-C12) was prepared on the subphase of Fe3O4 nanoparticle hydrosols. In the presence of the magnetite nanoparticles, the collapse pressure of the composite monolayer and the limited mean molecular area of C12-C3-C12 are higher than those on pure water subphase. Transmission electron microscopy observation of a C12-C3-C12/Fe3O4 nanoparticle complex shows that Fe3O4 nanoparticles and geminus surfactant had an unexpected hexagonal nanoarchitecture at the air-liquid interface when the surface pressure of the composite monolayer increased to about 12 mN·m-1. A mechanism for constructing the particular nanopatterned configuration of the C12-C3-C12/Fe3O4 nanoparticle complex in the Langmuir layer directly from the unique molecular structure of the geminus surfactant and the interfacial interactions between C12-C3-C12 and the components in the subphase was proposed.

  6. Membrane Insertion by Trichosanthin Using the Monolayer Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛毅; 夏晓峰; 隋森芳

    2003-01-01

    A monolayer technique was used to investigate the interaction between the ribosome inactivating protein trichosanthin (TCS) and phospholipid membrane.The adsorption experiments show that the negatively charged 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) causes obvious enrichment of TCS beneath the monolayer, indicating electrostatic attraction between TCS and the negatively charged phospholipid.When TCS was incorporated into the DPPG monolayer at low pH, it could not be completely squeezed out until the monolayer collapsed.The results suggest that the electrostatic attraction and the hydrophobic force are involved in the interaction between TCS and phospholipids at different stages.These findings may be correlated with the membrane translocation mechanism of TCS.

  7. Gravitational Collapse End States

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments on the final state of a gravitationally collapsing massive matter cloud are summarized and reviewed here. After a brief background on the problem, we point out how the black hole and naked singularity end states arise naturally in spherical collapse. We see that it is the geometry of trapped surfaces that governs this phenomena.

  8. Penetration of lipid monolayers by psychoactive drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demel, R.A.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1966-01-01

    The ability of a number of psychoactive drugs to penetrate lipid monolayers of varying composition was examined, and the following observation were made: (1) The increase in surface pressure of a monomolecular film appeared to depend on the chemical nature of the lipid as well as on the initial film

  9. Pressure-volume curves: revisiting the impact of negative turgor during cell collapse by literature review and simulations of cell micromechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yiting; Zhang, Yanxiang; Zheng, Quan-Shui; Tyree, Melvin T

    2014-07-01

    The Scholander-Hammel pressure chamber has been used in thousands of papers to measure osmotic pressure, πc , turgor pressure, Pt , and bulk modulus of elasticity, ε, of leaf cells by pressure-volume (PV) curve analysis. PV analysis has been questioned in the past. In this paper we use micromechanical analysis of leaf cells to examine the impact on PV curve analysis of negative turgor in living cells (Pt ). Models predict negative Pt (-0.1 to -1.8 MPa) depending on leaf cell size and shape in agreement with experimental values reported by J. J. Oertli. Modeled PV curves have linear regions even when Pt is quite negative, contrary to the arguments of M.T. Tyree. Negative Pt is totally missed by PV curve analysis and results in large errors in derived πc and Pt but smaller errors in ε. A survey of leaf cell sizes vs habitat (arid, temperate, and rainforest), suggests that the majority of published PV curves result in errors of 0.1-1.8 MPa in derived πc and Pt , whereby the error increases with decreasing cell size. We propose that small cell size in leaves is an ecological adaptation that permits plants to endure negative values of water potential with relatively little water loss. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Quantum dust collapse in 2+1 dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Souvik; Wijewardhana, L C R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will examine the consequence of a canonical theory of quantum dust collapse in 2+1 dimensions. The solution of the WDW equation describing the collapse indicates that collapsing shells outside the apparent horizon are accompanied by outgoing shells within the apparent horizon during their collapse phase and stop collapsing once they reach the apparent horizon. Taking this picture of quantum collapse seriously, we determine a static solution with energy density corresponding to a dust ball whose collapse has terminated at the apparent horizon. We show that the boundary radius of the ball is larger than the BTZ radius confirming that no event horizon is formed. The ball is sustained by radial pressure which we determine and which we attribute to the Unruh radiation within it.

  11. Collapse of axion stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  12. Collapse of Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L C R

    2016-01-01

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. These dense configurations, which are the endpoints of collapse, have extremely high binding energy, and as a result, decay through number changing $3\\,a\\rightarrow a$ interactions with an extremely short lifetime.

  13. Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Pearle, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Some possible benefits of dynamical collapse for a quantum theory of cosmogenesis are discussed. These are a possible long wait before creation begins, creation of energy and space, and choice of a particular universe out of a superposition.

  14. Collapse of axion stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory,P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States); Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L.C.R. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  15. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form. This image of the Alba Patera region has both lava tube collapse pits (running generally east/west) and subsidence related collapse within structural grabens. Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 26.9, Longitude 256.5 East (103.5 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  16. Lava Tube Collapse Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form. These collapse pits are found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. They are likely lava tube collapse pits related to flows from Hadriaca Patera. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -36.8, Longitude 89.6 East (270.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D

  17. 采动剧烈垮冒煤巷的支承压力分布规律研究%Study on Abutment Pressure Distribution Law in Collapse Coal Roadway with Mining-induced Violently

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李开晴; 何富连; 严红; 韩红强

    2011-01-01

    针对阳煤集团新元公司采动剧烈的垮冒煤巷普遍存在顶板严重下沉、巷帮严重臌帮和巷道底鼓等问题,对煤柱支承压力进行了现场实测和计算机三维数值模拟,分析研究采动剧烈影响下的煤巷支承压力分布规律,得出应力集中系数平均值达3.2及煤巷支承压力的分布范围,从而为采动剧烈垮冒煤巷的支护方案设计提供科学依据。%Aiming at the problems such as roof severe subsidence,the ribs of roadway ingression and floor heave in roadway of Yangguan coal industry Co.Ltd Xinyuan corporation,abutment pressure of coal pillars are analyzed by field measurements and 3D numerical simulation to research on the distribution law of abutment pressure in the mining-induced violently collapse coal roadway.The average value of stress concentration factor is 3.2,and the abutment distribution scale is obtained.These results can supply the scientific basis for the supporting scheme design.

  18. Ascraeus Mons Collapse Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form. These collapse pits are found on the flank of Ascraeus Mons. The pits and channels are all related to lava tube formation and emptying. Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 8, Longitude 253.9 East (106.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal

  19. Sulci Collapse Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form. This is the Noctis Labyrinthus region of Mars. These collapse pits are forming along structural fractures that are allowing the release of volatiles from the subsurface. This is believed to be the way that chaos terrain forms on Mars. This area represents the early stage of chaos formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -12.6, Longitude 264 East (96 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project

  20. Tharsis Collapse Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form. These collapse pits are found within the extensive lava flows of the Tharsis region. They are related to lava tubes, likely coming from Ascraeus Mons. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 22.8, Longitude 266.8 East (93.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington

  1. Tractus Catena Collapse Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form. These collapse pits are found in graben located in Tractus Catena. These features are related to subsidence after magma chamber evacuation of Alba Patera. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 35.8, Longitude 241.7 East (118.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  2. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essington, Timothy E; Moriarty, Pamela E; Froehlich, Halley E; Hodgson, Emma E; Koehn, Laura E; Oken, Kiva L; Siple, Margaret C; Stawitz, Christine C

    2015-05-26

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches.

  3. Polymerization of a diacetylenic phospholipid monolayer at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Daillant, J.; Luzet, D.

    1994-01-01

    Monolayers of a polymerizable phospholipid on water have been studied both before and after polymerization. Before polymerization, the phase diagram is established by isotherm measurements and optical microscopy (epifluorescence and direct observation between crossed polarizer and analyzer). This allows us to bring into evidence a coexistence region between a condensed and an expanded phase, above a triple point temperature T_t = 20 ^{circ}C. The dramatic influence of impurities on the size of coexistence domains between the condensed phase and the expanded one is clearly demonstrated, even at a very low concentration of impurities. Structural and morphological modifications during the polymerization where investigated using X-ray surface scattering together with atomic force microscopy. Whatever the polymerization conditions (constant area or constant pressure), X-ray reflectivity clearly shows the reorientation of the diacetylenic links. Only constant area polymerization leads to a viscoelastic behavior of the film, as shown by talcum decoration. The topochemical nature of the polymerization of diacetylenic groups induces strong constraints on the monolayers and, when the polymerization is achieved at constant area, leads to the collapse of the films evidenced by both techniques.

  4. Adsorption of Ions at Uncharged Insoluble Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshkova, T. V.; Minkov, I. L.; Tsekov, R.; Slavchov, R. I.

    2016-08-01

    A method is proposed for the experimental determination of the adsorption of inorganic electrolytes at a surface covered with insoluble surfactant monolayer. This task is complicated by the fact that the change of the salt concentration alters both chemical potentials of the electrolyte and the surfactant. Our method resolves the question by combining data for the surface pressure versus area of the monolayer at several salt concentrations with data for the equilibrium spreading pressure of crystals of the surfactant (used to fix a standard state). We applied the method to alcohols spread at the surface of concentrated halide solutions. The measured salt adsorption is positive and has nonmonotonic dependence on the area per surfactant molecule. For the liquid expanded film, depending on the concentration, there is one couple of ions adsorbed per each 3–30 surfactant molecules. We analyzed which ion, the positive or the negative, stands closer to the surface, by measuring the effect of NaCl on the Volta potential of the monolayer. The potentiometric data suggest that Na+ is specifically adsorbed, while Cl– remains in the diffuse layer, i.e., the surface is positively charged. The observed reverse Hofmeister series of the adsorptions of NaF, NaCl, and NaBr suggests the same conclusion holds for all these salts. The force that causes the adsorption of Na+ seems to be the interaction of the ion with the dipole moment of the monolayer.

  5. Langmuir monolayers of cerebroside originated from Linckia laevigata: binary systems of cerebrosides and phospholipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruta, Tomoki; Hoda, Kazuki; Inagaki, Masanori; Higuchi, Ryuichi; Shibata, Osamu

    2005-08-01

    The surface pressure (pi)-area (A), the surface potential (DeltaV)-A and the dipole moment (mu( perpendicular))-A isotherms were obtained for six cerebrosides of LLC-2, LLC-2-1, LLC-2-8, LLC-2-10, LLC-2-12, and LLC-2-15, which were isolated from Linckia laevigata, and two-component monolayers of two different cerebrosides (LLC-2 and LLC-2-8) with phospholipid of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on a subphase of 0.15 M sodium chloride solution as a function of cerebroside compositions in the two-component systems by employing the Wilhelmy method, the ionizing electrode method, and the fluorescence microscopy. The new finding was that LLC-2 showed a stable and liquid expanded type film. Four of them (LLC-2-8, -10, -12, and -15) had the phase transition from the liquid-expanded (LE) to the liquid-condensed (LC) states at 298.2 K. The apparent molar quantity changes (Deltas(gamma), Deltah(gamma), and Deltau(gamma)) on their phase transition on 0.15M at 298.2 K were calculated. The miscibility of cerebroside and phospholipid in the two-component monolayers was examined by plotting the variation of the molecular area and the surface potential as a function of the cerebroside molar fraction (X(cerebroside)), using the additivity rule. From the A-X(cerebroside) and DeltaV(m)-X(phospholipid) plots, a partial molecular surface area (PMA) and an apparent partial molecular surface potential (APSP) were determined at the discrete surface pressure. The PMA and APSP with the mole fraction were extensively discussed for the miscible systems. Judging from the two-dimensional phase diagrams, these were found to be one type, a positive azeotropic type; all the cerebrosides were miscible with DPPC. Furthermore, assuming a regular surface mixture, the Joos equation for the analysis of the collapse pressure of two-component monolayers allowed calculation of the interaction parameter (xi) and the interaction energy (-Deltavarepsilon) between the cerebrosides and DPPC. The

  6. Seepage characteristics of collapse column fillings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Boyang; Bai Haibo; Zhang Kai

    2016-01-01

    With concealment and hysteresis, water-inrush from Karst collapse column has become an important security hazard of lower group coal mining in North China. Based on the MTS815.02 seepage test system, we analyzed the impact of consolidation pressure, initial moisture content and confining pressure on the permeability of fillings in order to study the seepage characteristics of collapse column fillings. The results show that:(1) The permeability of collapse column fillings is of the order of 10?16–10?15 magni-tude and decreases with an increase in consolidation pressure and decrease in initial moisture content. (2) The essence of filling seepage law change is the change in porosity, and a power function relationship exists between the permeability ratio and porosity ratio. (3) With increasing confining pressure, the per-meability of fillings decreases. However, under low confining pressure (1.2–4 MPa), the change of confin-ing pressure has no obvious influence on the permeability.

  7. Study of film boiling collapse behavior during vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Masahiro; Yamano, Norihiro; Sugimoto, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi

    1996-06-01

    Possible large scale vapor explosions are safety concern in nuclear power plants during severe accident. In order to identify the occurrence of the vapor explosion and to estimate the magnitude of the induced pressure pulse, it is necessary to investigate the triggering condition for the vapor explosion. As a first step of this study, scooping analysis was conducted with a simulation code based on thermal detonation model. It was found that the pressure at the collapse of film boiling much affects the trigger condition of vapor explosion. Based on this analytical results, basic experiments were conducted to clarify the collapse conditions of film boiling on a high temperature solid ball surface. Film boiling condition was established by flooding water onto a high temperature stainless steel ball heated by a high frequency induction heater. After the film boiling was established, the pressure pulse generated by a shock tube was applied to collapse the steam film on the ball surface. As the experimental boundary conditions, materials and size of the balls, magnitude of pressure pulse and initial temperature of the carbon and stainless steel balls were varied. The transients of pressure and surface temperature were measured. It was found that the surface temperature on the balls sharply decreased when the pressure wave passed through the film on balls. Based on the surface temperature behavior, the film boiling collapse pattern was found to be categorized into several types. Especially, the pattern for stainless steel ball was categorized into three types; no collapse, collapse and reestablishment after collapse. It was thus clarified that the film boiling collapse behavior was identified by initial conditions and that the pressure required to collapse film boiling strongly depended on the initial surface temperature. The present results will provide a useful information for the analysis of vapor explosions based on the thermal detonation model. (J.P.N.)

  8. Stiffness of lipid monolayers with phase coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Benjamín; Mangiarotti, Agustín; Wilke, Natalia

    2013-08-27

    The surface dilational modulus--or compressibility modulus--has been previously studied for monolayers composed of pure materials, where a jump in this modulus was related with the onset of percolation as a result of the establishment of a connected structure at the molecular level. In this work, we focused on monolayers composed of two components of low lateral miscibility. Our aim was to investigate the compressibility of mixed monolayers at pressures and compositions in the two-phase region of the phase diagram, in order to analyze the effect of the mechanical properties of each phase on the stiffness of the composite. In nine different systems with distinct molecular dipoles and charges, the stiffness of each phase and the texture at the plane of the monolayer were studied. In this way, we were able to analyze the general compressibility of two-phase lipid monolayers, regardless of the properties of their constituent parts. The results are discussed in the light of the following two hypotheses: first, the stiffness of the composite could be dominated by the stiffness of each phase as a weighted sum according to the percentage of each phase area, regardless of the distribution of the phases in the plane of the monolayer. Alternatively, the stiffness of the composite could be dominated by the mechanical properties of the continuous phase. Our results were better explained by this latter proposal, as in all the analyzed mixtures it was found that the mechanical properties of the percolating phase were the determining factors. The value of the compression modulus was closer to the value of the connected phase than to that of the dispersed phase, indicating that the bidimensional composites displayed mechanical properties that were related to the properties of each phases in a rather complex manner.

  9. Growth cone collapse assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  10. On bore collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Harry H.; Ghazali, A.

    1988-06-01

    Using the laser-induced fluorescent method, the transition process from bore to runup mode, i.e., "bore collapse," is investigated experimentally. The observed process appears to be different from both previous analytical and numerical predictions. The results indicate that momentum exchange takes place between the incident bore and the quiescent water body along the shoreline. Turbulence generated in a bore nearshore is highly three-dimensional and sporadic. Very close to the shore, turbulence is advected with the bore front, and consequently, the bore collapse process involves strong turbulent action onto the dry beach bed.

  11. Monolayer compression induces fluidization in binary system of partially fluorinated alcohol (F4H11OH) with DPPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Ohmine, Aya; Kai, Shoko; Shibata, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A two-component Langmuir monolayer consisting of (perfluorobutyl)undecanol (F4H11OH) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a major component of pulmonary surfactants in mammals, has been investigated at the air-water interface. The binary monolayer has been systematically examined from both thermodynamic and morphological perspectives. The excess Gibbs free energy of mixing has been calculated from surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) isotherms, and the results indicate that the miscibility of the two-component system shows a maximum in thermodynamical stability when the mole fraction (X(F4H11OH)) is 0.3. Results from a two-dimensional phase diagram (π vs. X(F4H11OH)) are consistent with these findings and depict the degree of miscibility resulting from the variation in the transition and collapse pressures relative to the concentration of X(F4H11OH). The miscibility is also supported by in situ Brewster angle microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy for the system after transfer onto a mica substrate. Aside from temperature, a known driving force for the fluidization of DPPC monolayers is a change in surface composition caused by the addition of additive molecules. In the present study, however, the fluidization is driven by increasing surface pressures even at constant X(F4H11OH). Such a fluidization is a fascinating property when looked at in context of its potential implications for pulmonary replacement therapy, and hence, this study provides a fundamental insight into designing fluorinated materials for biomedical use.

  12. Studies on the interactions between parabens and lipid membrane components in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Gawryś, Maciej; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between parabens (PBs) and lipid components of mammalian and bacterial cell membranes were investigated in model systems of Langmuir monolayers. Me-, Et-, Pr- and Bu-paraben studied in this paper are frequently applied as cosmetics and food preservatives, since they possess broad antimicrobial activity. The mode of PB action is connected with their incorporation into the membrane of bacterial organisms, however; it is not known what is the role of the respective lipid species in this mechanism. This problem is crucial to understand the differences in paraben activity toward individual microorganisms and to shed the light onto the problem of PB cytotoxicity reported in studies on mammalian cells. In this paper, the mentioned aspects were investigated with application of the Langmuir monolayer technique complemented with BAM and GIXD. Our experiments revealed that the influence of PBs depends on their chemical structure, solution concentration and on the class of lipid. The strongest modification of the monolayer characteristics, leading to its collapse at low surface pressure, occurred in the presence of BuPB, having the largest chain. PBs interact preferentially with the monolayers possessing low degree of condensation, whereas for LC state, the effect was weaker and observed only as modification of the 2D unit cells. In the model systems, PBs interact with phospholipids characteristic for mammalian membranes (phosphatidylcholine) stronger than with bacterial (phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin). This strong influence of parabens on the model systems composed of animal lipids may explain cytotoxic activity of these preservatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  13. Úlceras por presión: un problema potencial en los servicios de urgencias colapsados Pressure ulcers: A potencial problem in collapsed emergency services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Guerrero Miralles

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Las úlceras por presión (UPP en el medio hospitalario son un grave problema sanitario donde la enfermera tiene una gran responsabilidad, dentro de su rol autónomo, ya que se estima que un 51,6% se producen dentro del propio hospital y que un 95% son evitables. Los servicios de urgencias (SU podrían ser el origen silente de un alto porcentaje de UPP durante los primeros días de ingreso, pues el perfil del paciente atendido es cada vez más anciano y pluripatológico, a lo que se le suma el riesgo añadido de la patología aguda y las escasas medidas de prevención pospuestas como resultado de focalizar la atención en el compromiso vital. El objetivo de este estudio es determinar la necesidad de instaurar medidas de prevención de UPP en los pacientes de riesgo desde la llegada al Servicio de Urgencias. Para ello, se recogió información de 74 de los 102 pacientes adultos atendidos en el Área de Medicina y Críticos del Hospital San Jaume de Calella, entre los días 26 de febrero y 2 de marzo de 2007. Se realizó un estudio observacional longitudinal analítico prospectivo con un muestreo probabilístico accidental que consistía en valorar la integridad de la piel del paciente a la llegada al servicio, junto con la valoración de los factores de riesgo intrínsecos y extrínsecos, y realizar dos revaloraciones dentro de las primeras 24 y 48 horas a los pacientes que continuaban en el hospital. Se observó 1 UPP grado III, 2 grado II, 8 grado I y 7 signos de alarma de nueva aparición en menos de 48 horas desde el ingreso en el servicio. Los resultados demuestran que: - Las horas en urgencias son suficientes y determinantes para iniciar el proceso de UPP en pacientes de riesgo que se encuentran en situación aguda. - La identificación del colectivo de riesgo a través de la escala de Braden y la instauración precoz de medidas de prevención disminuiría la incidencia de UPP durante los dos primeros días de ingreso.Pressure ulcers (PU in

  14. Partially saturated granular column collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Barbara; Johnson, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Debris flows are gravity-driven sub-aerial mass movements containing water, sediments, soil and rocks. These elements lead to characteristics common to dry granular media (e.g. levee formation) and viscous gravity currents (viscous fingering and surge instabilities). The importance of pore fluid in these flows is widely recognised, but there is significant debate over the mechanisms of build up and dissipation of pore fluid pressure within debris flows, and the resultant effect this has on dilation and mobility of the grains. Here we specifically consider the effects of the liquid surface in the flow. We start with a simple experiment constituting a classical axisymmetric granular column collapse, but with fluid filling the column up to a depth comparable to the depth of grains. Thus, as the column collapses, capillary forces may be generated between the grains that prevent dilation. We explore a parameter space to uncover the effects of fluid viscosity, particle size, column size, aspect ratio, grain shape, saturation level, initial packing fraction and significantly, the effects of fine sediments in suspension which can alter the capillary interaction between wetted macroscopic grains. This work presents an initial scaling analysis and attempts to relate the findings to current debris flow modelling approaches.

  15. Monolayer solid of N-2/Ag(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruch, L.W.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1998-01-01

    An incommensurate monolayer solid of N-2/Ag(111) is modeled using extensive molecular-dynamics simulations. The conditions treated range from the low-temperature orientationally ordered solid to the melting of the solid. The properties are evaluated as a function of spreading pressure. Comparison...... is made to recent experimental data for N-2/Ag(111) and to results for N-2 adsorbed on graphite. Cu(110), and MgO(001). [S0163-1829(98)02715-5]....

  16. Collapsible Geostrut Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Portable truss structure collapsible into smaller volume for storage and transportation. At new site, reerected quickly, without need to reassemble parts. Structure could be tent, dome, tunnel, or platform. Key element in structure joint, called "geostrut joint," includes internal cable. Structure is network of struts attached to geostrut joints. Pulling cables taut in all joints makes structure rigid. Releasing cables relaxes structure.

  17. Scapholunate advanced collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeranz, Stephen J; Salazar, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This case study reviews the pathophysiology of scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC), which is the most common etiology of degenerative arthritis in the wrist. The scapholunate ligament serves a critical role in stability of the carpus. Disruption of the scapholunate ligament, its sequela, and the magnetic resonance imaging evaluation are discussed, with review of the defining features of this disease and its progression.

  18. Dancing building prevents collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, R.

    2007-01-01

    In future, anybody caught inside a building during an earthquake need no longer fear the roof collapsing on them. Thanks to the use of composite materials, all the building will do is dance along, riding the waves of the earthquake. At least, according to Professor Ir. Adriaan Beukers of the

  19. Impact Crater Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. J.; Ivanov, B. A.

    The detailed morphology of impact craters is now believed to be mainly caused by the collapse of a geometrically simple, bowl-shaped "transient crater." The transient crater forms immediately after the impact. In small craters, those less than approximately 15 km diameter on the Moon, the steepest part of the rim collapses into the crater bowl to produce a lens of broken rock in an otherwise unmodified transient crater. Such craters are called "simple" and have a depth-to-diameter ratio near 1:5. Large craters collapse more spectacularly, giving rise to central peaks, wall terraces, and internal rings in still larger craters. These are called "complex" craters. The transition between simple and complex craters depends on 1/g, suggesting that the collapse occurs when a strength threshold is exceeded. The apparent strength, however, is very low: only a few bars, and with little or no internal friction. This behavior requires a mechanism for temporary strength degradation in the rocks surrounding the impact site. Several models for this process, including acoustic fluidization and shock weakening, have been considered by recent investigations. Acoustic fluidization, in particular, appears to produce results in good agreement with observations, although better understanding is still needed.

  20. Dancing building prevents collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, R.

    2007-01-01

    In future, anybody caught inside a building during an earthquake need no longer fear the roof collapsing on them. Thanks to the use of composite materials, all the building will do is dance along, riding the waves of the earthquake. At least, according to Professor Ir. Adriaan Beukers of the Aerospa

  1. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  2. Road Collapse in Magnum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, A.N.; van Zwol, Roelof; Flokstra, Jan; Brasa, Niek; Quak, Wilko

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a triangulation based collapse algorithm in the general-purpose object oriented DBMS Magnum. The contribution of the paper is twofold. First, we show that true integration of complex spatial functionality in a DBMS can be achieved. Second, we worked out a c

  3. Dancing building prevents collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, R.

    2007-01-01

    In future, anybody caught inside a building during an earthquake need no longer fear the roof collapsing on them. Thanks to the use of composite materials, all the building will do is dance along, riding the waves of the earthquake. At least, according to Professor Ir. Adriaan Beukers of the Aerospa

  4. Static stability of collapsible tube conveying non-Newtonian fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Yushutin, V S

    2014-01-01

    The global static stability of a Starling Resistor conveying non-Newtonian fluid is considered. The Starling Resistor consists of two rigid circular tubes and axisymmetric collapsible tube mounted between them. Upstream and downstream pressures are the boundary condition as well as external to the collapsible tube pressure. Quasi one-dimensional model has been proposed and a boundary value problem in terms of nondimensional parameters obtained. Nonuniqueness of the boundary value problem is regarded as static instability. The analytical condition of instability which defines a surface in parameter space has been studied numerically. The influence of fluid rheology on stability of collapsible tube is established.

  5. Stellar core collapse. I - Infall epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riper, K. A.; Lattimer, J. M.

    1981-10-01

    Simulations of the collapse of the central iron core of a 15-solar-mass spherically symmetric star are reported. In this paper the infall epoch, between the onset of collapse and core bounce, is considered. The models use the recent equation of state of Lamb, Lattimer, Pethick, and Ravenhall and general-relativistic hydrodynamics. The electron capture rates on nuclei proceed rapidly for densities less than 10 to the 11th g/cu cm, but are suppressed at higher densities where the neutron number of the nucleus, N, exceeds 40 (Fuller, Fowler, and Newman). Neutrino transport is treated by a leakage scheme. The effects of changes in the neutrino trapping density and of qualitative changes in the electron capture reactions on the evolution are explored. Greater lepton loss during collapse leads to larger pressure deficits, more rapid collapse, and smaller inner homologous cores. The entropy change during the infall is small, the absolute value of delta s being less than 0.8. The mass of inner core is given, to about 20%, by the formula of Goldreich and Weber. Because the collapsing core is far from equilibrium, the effects of general relativity are small.

  6. Vapour and air bubble collapse analysis in viscous compressible water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Bazanini

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of the collapse of bubbles (or cavities are shown, using the finite difference method, taking into account the compressibility of the liquid, expected to occur in the final stages of the collapse process. Results are compared with experimental and theoretical data for incompressible liquids, to see the influence of the compressibility of the water in the bubble collapse. Pressure fields values are calculated in an area of 800 x 800 mm, for the case of one bubble under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry. Results are shown as radius versus time curves for the collapse (to compare collapse times, and pressure curves in the plane, for pressure fields. Such calculations are new because of their general point of view, since the existing works do not take into account the existence of vapour in the bubble, neither show the pressure fields seen here. It is also expected to see the influence of the compressibility of the water in the collapse time, and in the pressure field, when comparing pressure values.

  7. Molecular Dynamic Studies on Langmuir Monolayers of Stearic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Chui-peng; ZHANG Hong-xing; ZHAO Zeng-xia; ZHENG Qing-chuan

    2013-01-01

    Compression isotherm for stearic acid was obtained by means of molecular dynamic simulation and compared to experimentally measured values for the Langmuir monolayers.Compared to the previous simulation,the present simulation has provided a method to reproduce the compression of the monolayer.The result is consistent with other experimental results.By analyzing the alkyl tails,the configuration of stearic acid molecules during the compression process was studied and a uniform monolayer was obtained after compression.Stearic acid molecules were observed to form fine organized monolayer from completely random structure.Hexatic order of the arrangement has been identified for the distribution of stearic acid molecules in the monolayer.At the end of the compression,the stearic acid molecules were tightly packed in the gap of two other molecules.At last,the hydrogen bonds in the system were analyzed.The main hydrogen bonds were from stearic acid-water interaction and their intensities constantly decreased with the decreased of surface area per molecule.The weak hydrogen bond interaction between stearic acid molecules may be the reason of easy collapse.

  8. Collapse in the Endurance Athlete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Sallis

    2005-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Most cases of collapse are benign in nature and occur after an athlete crosses the finish line or stops exercising. Athletes who collapse before finishing are more likely to have a serious condition.

  9. Condensation-Induced Steam Bubble Collapse in a Pipeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Steam bubbles often occur in pipelines due to the pipeline structure or operational errors. The water hammer force induced by the steam bubble collapse is a hidden safety concern. This paper experimentally and numerically investigates the conditions for steam bubble formation and collapse. A series of video pictures taken in the laboratory show that steam bubbles form and collapse over several cycles. The pressure history of the steam bubbles is measured in conjunction with the pictures. In the experiment, the liquid column cavitated at the low pressures and then the cavities collapsed due to condensation causing high pressure pulses. The process was also simulated numerically. The results suggest that coolant pipeline design and operation must include procedures to avoid steam bubble formation.

  10. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  11. On the Wavefunction Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Cristinel Stoica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wavefunction collapse is usually seen as a discontinuous violation of the unitary evolution of a quantum system, caused by the observation. Moreover, the collapse appears to be nonlocal in a sense which seems at odds with general relativity. In this article the possibility that the wavefunction evolves continuously and hopefully unitarily during the measurement process is analyzed. It is argued that such a solution has to be formulated using a time symmetric replacement of the initial value problem in quantum mechanics. Major difficulties in apparent conflict with unitary evolution are identified, but eventually its possibility is not completely ruled out. This interpretation is in a weakened sense both local and realistic, without contradicting Bell's theorem. Moreover, if it is true, it makes general relativity consistent with quantum mechanics in the semiclassical framework.Quanta 2016; 5: 19–33.

  12. Collapse, environment, and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Karl W

    2012-03-06

    Historical collapse of ancient states poses intriguing social-ecological questions, as well as potential applications to global change and contemporary strategies for sustainability. Five Old World case studies are developed to identify interactive inputs, triggers, and feedbacks in devolution. Collapse is multicausal and rarely abrupt. Political simplification undermines traditional structures of authority to favor militarization, whereas disintegration is preconditioned or triggered by acute stress (insecurity, environmental or economic crises, famine), with breakdown accompanied or followed by demographic decline. Undue attention to stressors risks underestimating the intricate interplay of environmental, political, and sociocultural resilience in limiting the damages of collapse or in facilitating reconstruction. The conceptual model emphasizes resilience, as well as the historical roles of leaders, elites, and ideology. However, a historical model cannot simply be applied to contemporary problems of sustainability without adjustment for cumulative information and increasing possibilities for popular participation. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Western Europe responded to environmental crises by innovation and intensification; such modernization was decentralized, protracted, flexible, and broadly based. Much of the current alarmist literature that claims to draw from historical experience is poorly focused, simplistic, and unhelpful. It fails to appreciate that resilience and readaptation depend on identified options, improved understanding, cultural solidarity, enlightened leadership, and opportunities for participation and fresh ideas.

  13. The Modeling of Pulmonary Particulate Matter Transport Using Langmuir Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jeremy M.

    The effects of a barrier in proximity to the air-water interface on the dynamics of a Langmuir monolayer system are observed. A monolayer of Survanta, bovine lung surfactant, is deposited onto the interface of an aqueous buffer solution. Polystyrene particles one micron in diameter and tagged with fluorescent carboxylate groups are distributed evenly throughout the monolayer surface. The bead-monolayer system is compressed and expanded to induce folding. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate is placed below the monolayer in the buffer solution to study interactions between the folding monolayer and a barrier. The presence of the substrate is shown to shift surface pressure-area isotherms toward regions of lower area by an average of 8.9 mN/m. The surface of the PDMS substrate can be imaged using fluorescence microscopy to detect the presence of particles or surfactant that may have been transported there from the air-water interface during folding. Images show the transferral of particles and monolayer together suggesting the pinch-off of a fold or the direct interaction of a fold with the barrier.

  14. Synthesis of Novel Amphiphilic Azobenzenes and X-ray Scattering Studies of Their Langmuir Monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Kjær, Kristian; Breiby, Dag Werner;

    2008-01-01

    . At the air-water interface, the amphiphilic azobenzenes form noncrystalline but stable Langmuir films that display an unusual reversible monolayer collapse close to 35 mN/m. The structures and phase transitions were studied by X-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, both utilizing...

  15. Friction of mixed and single-component aromatic monolayers in contacts of different adhesive strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruths, M

    2006-02-09

    Friction force microscopy has been used to study single-component and mixed self-assembled monolayers of aminothiophenol and thiophenol on gold. The friction forces and transition pressures of mixed monolayers were intermediate to the ones of single-component monolayers, and varied systematically with composition. The strength of the adhesion was altered by working in dry N2 gas or in ethanol. In all systems studied, low adhesion (in ethanol) resulted in a linear dependence of the friction on load already at low loads, whereas high adhesion (in dry N2) gave an apparent area-dependence. However, for a given monolayer composition, similar transition pressures were observed in dry N2 and in ethanol, suggesting that the overall monolayer structure was not strongly altered by the presence of ethanol. Similar observations were made for very close-packed monolayers of octadecanethiol.

  16. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  17. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  18. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  19. Fracture Characteristics of Monolayer CVD-Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwangbo, Yun; Lee, Choong-Kwang; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Su; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-03-01

    We have observed and analyzed the fracture characteristics of the monolayer CVD-graphene using pressure bulge testing setup. The monolayer CVD-graphene has appeared to undergo environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in room condition, i.e. stress corrosion cracking arising from the adsorption of water vapor on the graphene and the subsequent chemical reactions. The crack propagation in graphene has appeared to be able to be reasonably tamed by adjusting applied humidity and stress. The fracture toughness, describing the ability of a material containing inherent flaws to resist catastrophic failure, of the CVD-graphene has turned out to be exceptionally high, as compared to other carbon based 3D materials. These results imply that the CVD-graphene could be an ideal candidate as a structural material notwithstanding environmental susceptibility. In addition, the measurements reported here suggest that specific non-continuum fracture behaviors occurring in 2D monoatomic structures can be macroscopically well visualized and characterized.

  20. Effect of Rotation in Cloud Core Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuribe, T.

    The collapse of rotating clouds is investigated.At first, isothermal collapse of an initially uniform-density, uniform-rotating, molecular cloud core with pressure and self-gravity is investigated to determine the conditions under which a cloud is unstable to fragmentation. A semianalytic model for the collapse of rotating spheroids is developed with the method of characteristics for inwardly propagating rarefaction waves. Three-dimensional self-gravitating hydrodynamical calculations are performed for the initially uniform-density rigid-rotating sphere. Both investigations show that the criterion for fragmentation is modified from the one in the literature if the property of the non-homologous collapse is taken into account. It is shown that the central flatness, that is, the axial ratio of the isodensity contour in the central region, is a good indicator for the fate of the cloud. We derive the criterion for the fragmentation considering the evolution of the flatness of the central core. If the central flatness becomes greater than the critical value ˜ 4π, a collapsing cloud with moderate perturbations is unstable for fragmentation, while if the central flatness stays smaller than the critical value, it does not fragment at least before adiabatic core formation. Warm clouds (α0 ≳ 0.5) are not expected to fragment before adiabatic core formation almost independent of the initial rotation (β0) and the properties of the initial perturbation. The effect of the initial density central concentration is also investigated. If it exists, distortion or flattening of a cloud core is suppressed even if α0 ≲ 0.5 in small rotation cases due to stronger nonhomologous property of the collapse. We conclude that the binary fragmentation is difficult during isothermal stage if a core collapse had started from near spherical configurations with moderate thermal energy or small rotation. We suggest that the close binary fragmentation may be possible in the nonisothermal

  1. Langmuir monolayers and Differential Scanning Calorimetry for the study of the interactions between camptothecin drugs and biomembrane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadó, Ana; Giuffrida, M Chiara; Sagristá, M Lluïsa; Castelli, Francesco; Pujol, Montserrat; Alsina, M Asunción; Mora, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    CPT-11 and SN-38 are camptothecins with strong antitumor activity. Nevertheless, their severe side effects and the chemical instability of their lactone ring have questioned the usual forms for its administration and have focused the current research on the development of new suitable pharmaceutical formulations. This work presents a biophysical study of the interfacial interactions of CPT-11 and SN-38 with membrane mimetic models by using monolayer techniques and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The aim is to get new insights for the understanding of the bilayer mechanics after drug incorporation and to optimize the design of drug delivery systems based on the formation of stable bilayer structures. Moreover, from our knowledge, the molecular interactions between camptothecins and phospholipids have not been investigated in detail, despite their importance in the context of drug action. The results show that neither CPT-11 nor SN-38 disturbs the structure of the complex liposome bilayers, despite their different solubility, that CPT-11, positively charged in its piperidine group, interacts electrostatically with DOPS, making stable the incorporation of a high percentage of CPT-11 into liposomes and that SN-38 establishes weak repulsive interactions with lipid molecules that modify the compressibility of the bilayer without affecting significantly neither the lipid collapse pressure nor the miscibility pattern of drug-lipid mixed monolayers. The suitability of a binary and a ternary lipid mixture for encapsulating SN-38 and CPT-11, respectively, has been demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  3. Relative microvascular pressure sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min; Zemp, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Microcirculation may be characterized by the vascular pressure as it is influenced by pressure-driven perfusion. Crosssections of blood vessels can be visualized by photoacoustic imaging and compressing on vessels causes deformation. The photoacoustic signals of blood, when compressed to the point of vessel collapse, may or may not vanish depending on the buckling process it undergoes. We form relative pressure images of microvessels by tracking vessel collapse as a function of externally applied pressure using photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Disproportionate Collapse in Building Structures.

    OpenAIRE

    JANSSENS, VICTORIA MARIA; O'DWYER, DERMOT WILLIAM

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Cork, Ireland The failure of the Ronan Point apartment tower focused interest in disproportionate collapse, and prompted the ?Fifth Amendment? to the UK Building Regulations which was introduced in 1970. From this point on structures were required to exhibit a minimum level of robustness to resist progressive collapse. These rules have remained relatively unchanged for over 40 years. This paper presents a review of the concepts relating to structural collapse, and the robustne...

  5. On collapsibilities of Yule's measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    impson's paradox reminds people that the statistical inference in a low-dimensional space probably distorts the reality in a high one seriously.To study the paradox with respect to Yule's measure,this paper discusses simple collapsibility,strong collapsibility and consecutive collapsibility,and presents necessary and sufficient conditions of them.In fact,these conditions are of great importance for observational and experimental designs,eliminating confounding bias,categorizing discrete variables and so on.

  6. What prevents gravitational collapse in string theory?

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Samir D

    2016-01-01

    It is conventionally believed that if a ball of matter of mass $M$ has a radius close to $2GM$ then it must collapse to a black hole. But string theory microstates (fuzzballs) have no horizon or singularity, and they do {\\it not} collapse. We consider two simple examples from classical gravity to illustrate how this violation of our intuition happens. In each case the `matter' arises from an extra compact dimension, but the topology of this extra dimension is not trivial. The pressure and density of this matter diverge at various points, but this is only an artifact of dimensional reduction; thus we bypass results like Buchadahl's theorem. Such microstates give the entropy of black holes, so these topologically nontrivial constructions dominate the state space of quantum gravity.

  7. Transport processes in anisotropic gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, J

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method to study the influence of thermal conduction and viscous processes in anisotropic gravitational collapse. To this end we employ the HJR method to solve the Einstein equations. The Maxwell-Cattaneo type transport equations are used to find the temperature and bulk and shear viscous pressures. Under some conditions Maxwell-Cattaneo transport equations comply with relativistic causality. Thus, it is advisable to use them instead of Eckart transport equations. In the inner layers of the star the temperature ceases to be sensitive to the boundary condition. This behavior, which can be explained in terms of the Eddington approximation, allows us to find the thickness of the neutrinosphere. The dynamics of collapsing dense stars is deeply influenced by the neutrino emission/absorption processes. These cool the star and drive it to a new equilibrium state. Therefore, the calculation of transport coefficients is based on these processes.

  8. Gold nanoparticle self-assembly in two-component lipid Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilevsky, Alina; Jelinek, Raz

    2011-02-15

    Self-assembly processes are considered to be fundamental factors in supramolecular chemistry. Langmuir monolayers of surfactants or lipids have been shown to constitute effective 2D "templates" for self-assembled nanoparticles and colloids. Here we show that alkyl-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) adopt distinct configurations when incorporated within Langmuir monolayers comprising two lipid components at different mole ratios. Thermodynamic and microscopy analyses reveal that the organization of the Au NP aggregates is governed by both lipid components. In particular, we show that the configurations of the NP assemblies were significantly affected by the extent of molecular interactions between the two lipid components within the monolayer and the monolayer phases formed by each individual lipid. This study demonstrates that multicomponent Langmuir monolayers significantly modulate the self-assembly properties of embedded Au NPs and that parameters such as the monolayer composition, surface pressure, and temperature significantly affect the 2D nanoparticle organization.

  9. Monolayer patterning using ketone dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Xue, Yi; Pašková, Tereza; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2013-08-14

    The self-assembly of multi-component monolayers with designed patterns requires molecular recognition among components. Dipolar interactions have been found to influence morphologies of self-assembled monolayers and can affect molecular recognition functions. Ketone groups have large dipole moments (2.6 D) and are easily incorporated into molecules. The potential of ketone groups for dipolar patterning has been evaluated through synthesis of two 1,5-disubstituted anthracenes bearing mono-ketone side chains, STM characterization of monolayers self-assembled from their single and two component solutions and molecular mechanics simulations to determine their self-assembly energetics. The results reveal that (i) anthracenes bearing self-repulsive mono-ketone side chains assemble in an atypical monolayer morphology that establishes dipolar attraction, instead of repulsion, between ketones in adjacent side chains; (ii) pairs of anthracene molecules whose self-repulsive ketone side chains are dipolar complementary spontaneously assemble compositionally patterned monolayers, in which the two components segregate into neighboring, single component columns, driven by side chain dipolar interactions; (iii) compositionally patterned monolayers also assemble from dipolar complementary anthracene pairs that employ different dipolar groups (ketones or CF2 groups) in their side chains; (iv) the ketone group, with its larger dipole moment and size, provides comparable driving force for patterned monolayer formation to that of the smaller dipole, and smaller size, CF2 group.

  10. Caldera types and collapse styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Three main types of collapse calderas can be defined, 1) summit caldera, 2) classic caldera, and 3) graben caldera. Summit calderas are those formed at the top of large volcanoes and are related to relatively small- volume pyroclastic products that include plinian fallouts and ignimbrites, such as Crater Lake, Las Cañadas, and Somma-Vesuvio. Classic calderas are semi-circular to irregular-shaped large structures, several km in diameter that are related to relatively large-volume pyroclastic products including pumice fallouts and widespread ignimbrites, such as Long-Valley, Campi Flegrei, and Los Humeros. Graben calderas are explosive volcano-tectonic collapse structures from which large-volume, ignimbrite-forming eruptions occurred through several vents along the graben walls and the intra-graben block faults causing the collapse of the graben or of a sector of the graben. The main products of graben calderas are surge-deposits and large-volume widespread ignimbrite sheets. Pumice fallouts are practically absent. Examples include the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, La Pacana (Andes), Catalan Pyrenees, and perhaps Scafell (United Kingdom). Any of the three caldera types mentioned above could have collapsed at least in three different ways, 1) piston, when the collapse occurs as a single crustal block; 2) trap-door, when collapse occurs unevenly along one side while the opposite side remains with no collapse; 3) piece-meal, when collapse occurs as broken pieces of the crust on top of the magma chamber.

  11. The collapsed football pla yer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are several reasons why football players collapse or appear to have collapsed on ... minor, resulting in mild concussion (brain injury), but ... after being struck by lightning. The match ... does occur, it attracts a great deal of media attention ...

  12. Surface viscoelastic properties of spread ferroelectric liquid crystal monolayer on air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramneek; Bhullar, Gurpreet Kaur; Raina, K. K.

    2013-06-01

    Ferroelectric Liquid crystal having Smectic C* phase at room temperature was capable of forming Langmuir monolayer due to presence of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups in it. Surface viscoelasticity properties of FLC monolayer spread on water surface had been determined by dynamic oscillation method and discussed as a function of surface pressure. Dynamic viscoelastic properties such as G (Elastic modulus), G' (storage (elastic) modulus), G' (Loss (viscous) modulus) and phase change with sinusoidal oscillation had been measured at phase changing surface pressure values. As monolayer was becoming condensed, increasing trend was observed in G' values while G' was decreasing. At higher frequencies, viscous modulus G' had negative values. This relaxation phenomenon was probably caused by conformational rearrangements that acted to fluidize monolayer. Phase change tan θ was positive, response in surface pressure was ahead of the de-formation in area and the monolayer had positive dilatational viscosity. Phase change tan θ was negative, response in surface pressure was hysteretic to the deformation in area, and negative dilatational viscosity had been observed. Studies of monolayer in barrier oscillating mode provided us the surface pressure which was most suitable for Langmuir Blodgett monolayer deposition.

  13. Chiral and herringbone symmetry breaking in water-surface monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, I.R.; Kenn, R.M.; Goudot, A.

    1996-01-01

    We report the observation from monolayers of eicosanoic acid in the L(2)' phase of three distinct out-of-plane first-order diffraction peaks, indicating molecular tilt in a nonsymmetry direction and hence the absence of mirror symmetry. At lower pressures the molecules tilt in the direction of th...

  14. Karst Collapse Mechanism and Criterion for Its Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺可强; 刘长礼; 王思敬

    2001-01-01

    Karst collapse, caused by natural or artificial abstraction of groundwater, has been a focus of environmental geological problems for its ever-increasing hazardousness. The potential erosion theory and vacuum suction erosion theory,which reveal the origin of karst collapse macroscopically, are popularly accepted. However, a mathematic prediction criterion for karst collapse cannot be established only by these two theories. From a new perspective, this paper attempts to explain the microcosmic mechanism of karst collapse on the basis of these two theories. When the shear stress surpasses the shear strength of soil, a certain point or a certain plane in the unconsolidated soil covering karst caves will fail under the mechanical effects of water and air as well as its load-pressure, and with the increase of damaged points, a breaking plane appears and the soil on karst caves is completely damaged; as a result, the karst ground collapses. On the basis of the MohrCoulomb failure theory and previous studies, the paper presents a prediction criterion of karst collapse. Finally, by taking,for example, nine typical cases of collapse caused by pumping tests in Guizhou, the paper gives the calculation process of the model and proves its reliability.``

  15. Effect of cavitation bubble collapse on hydraulic oil temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈伟; 张健; 孙毅; 张迪嘉; 姜继海

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation bubble collapse has a great influence on the temperature of hydraulic oil. Herein, cone-type throttle valve experiments are carried out to study the thermodynamic processes of cavitation. First, the processes of growth and collapse are analysed, and the relationships between the hydraulic oil temperature and bubble growth and collapse are deduced. The effect of temperature is then considered on the hydraulic oil viscosity and saturated vapour pressure. Additionally, an improved form of the Rayleigh–Plesset equation is developed. The effect of cavitation on the hydraulic oil temperature is experimentally studied and the effects of cavitation bubble collapse in the hydraulic system are summarised. Using the cone-type throttle valve as an example, a method to suppress cavitation is proposed.

  16. Phenomenological Modeling for Langmuir Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Dimitri; Kelly, David; Safford, Twymun; Prayaga, Chandra; Varney, Christopher N.; Wade, Aaron

    Experimentally, Langmuir monolayers have applications in molecular optical, electronic, and sensor devices. Traditionally, Langmuir monolayers are described by a rigid rod model where the rods interact via a Leonard-Jones potential. Here, we propose effective phenomenological models and utilize Monte Carlo simulations to analyze the phase behavior and compare with experimental isotherms. Research reported in this abstract was supported by UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01.

  17. Electromagnetic wave collapse in a radiation background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Mattias; Brodin, Gert; Stenflo, Lennart

    2003-10-17

    The nonlinear interaction, due to quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects between an electromagnetic pulse and a radiation background, is investigated by combining the methods of radiation hydrodynamics with the QED theory for photon-photon scattering. For the case of a single coherent electromagnetic pulse, we obtain a Zakharov-like system, where the radiation pressure of the pulse acts as a driver of acoustic waves in the photon gas. For a sufficiently intense pulse and/or background energy density, there is focusing and the subsequent collapse of the pulse. The relevance of our results for various astrophysical applications are discussed.

  18. Drying Induced Hydrophobic Polymer Collapse

    OpenAIRE

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Chandler, David

    2002-01-01

    We have used computer simulation to study the collapse of a hydrophobic chain in water. We find that the mechanism of collapse is much like that of a first-order phase transition. The evaporation of water in the vicinity of the polymer provides the driving force for collapse, and the rate limiting step is the nucleation of a sufficiently large vapor bubble. The study is made possible through the application of transition path sampling and a coarse-grained treatment of liquid water. Relevance ...

  19. Protostellar collapse of magneto-turbulent cloud cores: shape during collapse and outflow formation

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    We investigate protostellar collapse of molecular cloud cores by numerical simulations, taking into account turbulence and magnetic fields. By using the adaptive mesh refinement technique, the collapse is followed over a wide dynamic range from the scale of a turbulent cloud core to that of the first core. The cloud core is lumpy in the low density region owing to the turbulence, while it has a smooth density distribution in the dense region produced by the collapse. The shape of the dense region depends mainly on the mass of the cloud core; a massive cloud core tends to be prolate while a less massive cloud core tends to be oblate. In both cases, anisotropy of the dense region increases during the isothermal collapse. The minor axis of the dense region is always oriented parallel to the local magnetic field. All the models eventually yield spherical first cores supported mainly by the thermal pressure. Most of turbulent cloud cores exhibit protostellar outflows around the first cores. These outflows are clas...

  20. Interaction of Egg-Sphingomyelin with DOPC in Langmuir Monolayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-chun Hao; Run-guang Sun; Jing Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are a dynamic microdomain structure found in recent years,enriched in sphingolipids,cholesterol and particular proteins.The change of structure and function of lipid rafts could result in many diseases.In this work,the monolayer miscibility behavior of mixed systems of Egg-Sphingomyelin (ESM) with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was investigated in terms of mean surface area per molecule and excess molecular area △Aex at certain surface pressure,surface pressure and excess surface pressure △πex at certain mean molecular area.The stability and compressibility of the mixed monolayers was assessed by the parameters of surface excess Gibbs free energy △Gex,excess Helmholtz energy △Hex and elasticity.Thermodynamic analysis indicates △Aex and △πex in the binary systems with positive deviations from the ideal behavior,suggesting repulsive interaction.The maximum of △Gex and △Hex was at the molar fraction of ESM of 0.6,demonstrating the mixed monolayer was more unstable.The repulsive interaction induced phase separation in the monolayer.

  1. Interaction of Egg-Sphingomyelin with DOPC in Langmuir Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chang-chun; Sun, Run-guang; Zhang, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Lipid rafts are a dynamic microdomain structure found in recent years, enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and particular proteins. The change of structure and function of lipid rafts could result in many diseases. In this work, the monolayer miscibility behavior of mixed systems of Egg-Sphingomyelin (ESM) 1 with 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was investigated in terms of mean surface area per molecule and excess molecular area ΔAex at certain surface pressure, surface pressure and excess surface pressure Δπex at certain mean molecular area. The stability and compressibility of the mixed monolayers was assessed by the parameters of surface excess Gibbs free energy ΔGex, excess Helmholtz energy ΔHex and elasticity. Thermodynamic analysis indicates ΔAex and Δπex in the binary systems with positive deviations from the ideal behavior, suggesting repulsive interaction. The maximum of ΔGex and ΔHex was at the molar fraction of ESM of 0.6, demonstrating the mixed monolayer was more unstable. The repulsive interaction induced phase separation in the monolayer.

  2. Ionic channels and nerve membrane constituents. Tetrodotoxin-like interaction of saxitoxin with cholesterol monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V

    1972-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) have the same striking property of blocking the Na(+) channels in the axolemma. Experiments with nerve plasma membrane components of the squid Dosidicus gigas have shown that TTX interacts with cholesterol monolayers. Similar experiments were carried out with STX. The effect of STX on the surface pressure-area diagrams of lipid monolayers and on the fluorescence emission spectra of sonicated nerve membranes was studied. The results indicate a TTX-like interaction of STX with cholesterol monolayers. The expansion of the monolayers caused by 10(-6)M STX was 2.2 A(2)/cholesterol molecule at 25 degrees C. From surface pressure measurements at constant cholesterol area (39 A(2)/molecule) in media with various STX concentrations, it was calculated that the STX/cholesterol surface concentration ratio is 0.54. The apparent dissociation constant of the STX-cholesterol monolayer complex is 4.0 x 10(-7)M. The STX/cholesterol ratio and the apparent dissociation constant are similar to those determined for TTX. The presence of other lipids in the monolayers affects the STX-cholesterol association. The interactions of STX and TTX with cholesterol monolayers suggest (a) that cholesterol molecules may be part of the nerve membrane Na(+) channels, or (b) that the toxin receptor at the nerve membrane shares similar chemical features with the cholesterol monolayers.

  3. 高压高产气井试气求产过程中油管挤毁失效分析%Failure Analysis on the Collapsed Tubing of the High Pressure and High Production Gas Well in the Process of Testing and Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛继军; 赵滨; 赵赫

    2014-01-01

    One of the tubing used in the gas well under the high pressure and high production has occurred in the split,fall,collapse and severe diapirism of tube body in the trial extraction process.This paper have a test of tube so that certain the reason that split,fall,collapsed and se-vere diapirism of tube body by the analysis of the macroscopic,physical and chemical properties, microscopic metallographic.The result shows that gas,liquid pipe ram and solid multiphase flow in tube may be formatted the instantaneous negative pressure and increase the likelihood of the tubing were collapsed in the process of the gas testing and production.Then it has resulted in clogging,severe erosion,thinning wall and piercing in tube.Finally the tube has occurred in frac-ture because of the tensile strength.%某高压高产气井试气用油管在试提中发生管体断裂掉落,并有管体挤毁和严重刺穿现象。通过对油管进行宏观分析、理化性能分析、微观金相分析试验,以确定油管发生断裂掉落以及挤毁和刺穿的原因。结果表明:在放喷求产过程中油管内存在气、液、固等多相流,可能会形成瞬时负压,增加了油管被挤毁变形的可能性;随后造成流道堵塞,油管内冲蚀严重,壁厚变薄发生刺穿,最后因拉伸强度不足而发生断裂。

  4. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to ...

  5. A History of Collapse Factor Modeling and Empirical Data for Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    deQuay, Laurence; Hodge, B. Keith

    2010-01-01

    One of the major technical problems associated with cryogenic liquid propellant systems used to supply rocket engines and their subassemblies and components is the phenomenon of propellant tank pressurant and ullage gas collapse. This collapse is mainly caused by heat transfer from ullage gas to tank walls and interfacing propellant, which are both at temperatures well below those of this gas. Mass transfer between ullage gas and cryogenic propellant can also occur and have minor to significant secondary effects that can increase or decrease ullage gas collapse. Pressurant gas is supplied into cryogenic propellant tanks in order to initially pressurize these tanks and then maintain required pressures as propellant is expelled from these tanks. The net effect of pressurant and ullage gas collapse is increased total mass and mass flow rate requirements of pressurant gases. For flight vehicles this leads to significant and undesirable weight penalties. For rocket engine component and subassembly ground test facilities this results in significantly increased facility hardware, construction, and operational costs. "Collapse Factor" is a parameter used to quantify the pressurant and ullage gas collapse. Accurate prediction of collapse factors, through analytical methods and modeling tools, and collection and evaluation of collapse factor data has evolved over the years since the start of space exploration programs in the 1950 s. Through the years, numerous documents have been published to preserve results of studies associated with the collapse factor phenomenon. This paper presents a summary and selected details of prior literature that document the aforementioned studies. Additionally other literature that present studies and results of heat and mass transfer processes, related to or providing important insights or analytical methods for the studies of collapse factor, are presented.

  6. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Dierichs, Karola; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from concave grains can be stable without external support. Previous research show that the stability of the columns depends on column diameter and height, by observing column stability after carefully lifting their confinement tubes. Thinner and taller columns collapse with higher probability. While the column stability weakly depends on packing density, it strongly depends on inter-particle friction. Experiments that cause the column to collapse also reveal similar trends, as more effort (such as heavier loading or shearing) is required to destabilize columns that are intrinsically more stable. In the current experiments, we invesitage the effect of vibration on destructing a column. Short columns collapse following the relaxation dynamics of disorder systems, which coincides with similar experiments on staple packings. However, tall columns collapse faster at the beginning, in addition to the relaxation process coming after. Using high-speed imaging, we analyze column collapse data from different column geometries. Ongoing work is focusing on characterizing the stability of hexapod packings to vibration. We thanks NSF-DMR-1206351 and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Diacetylene mixed Langmuir monolayers for interfacial polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Carmona, Luisa; Rubia-Payá, Carlos; García-Espejo, G; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-05-19

    Polydiacetylene (PDA) and its derivatives are promising materials for applications in a vast number of fields, from organic electronics to biosensing. PDA is obtained through polymerization of diacetylene (DA) monomers, typically using UV irradiation. DA polymerization is a 1-4 addition reaction with both initiation and growth steps with topochemical control, leading to the "blue" polymer form as primary reaction product in bulk and at interfaces. Herein, the diacetylene monomer 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (DA) and the amphiphilic cationic N,N'-dioctadecylthiapentacarbocyanine (OTCC) have been used to build a mixed Langmuir monolayer. The presence of OTCC imposes a monolayer supramolecular structure instead of the typical trilayer of pure DA. Surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy, and UV-vis reflection spectroscopy measurements, as well as computer simulations, have been used to assess in detail the supramolecular structure of the DA:OTCC Langmuir monolayer. Our experimental results indicate that the DA and OTCC molecules are sequentially arranged, with the two OTCC alkyl chains acting as spacing diacetylene units. Despite this configuration is expected to prevent photopolymerization of DA, the polymerization takes place without phase segregation, thus exclusively leading to the red polydiacetylene form. We propose a simple model for the initial formation of the "blue" or "red" PDA forms as a function of the relative orientation of the DA units. The structural insights and the proposed model concerning the supramolecular structure of the "blue" and "red" forms of the PDA are aimed at the understanding of the relation between the molecular and macroscopical features of PDAs.

  8. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single

  9. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single p

  10. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single p

  11. Collapse of Non-Rectangular Channels in a Soft Elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepayotl-Ramirez, Daniel; Park, Yong-Lae; Lu, Tong; Majidi, Carmel

    2013-03-01

    We examine the collapse of microchannels in a soft elastomer by treating the sidewalls as in- denters that penetrate the channel base. This approach leads to a closed-form algebraic mapping between applied pressure and cross-sectional deformation that are in strong agreement with ex- perimental measurements and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) simulation. Applications of this new approach to modeling soft microchannel collapse range from lab-on-a-chip microfluidics for pressure-controlled protein filtration to soft-matter pressures sensing. We demonstrate the latter by comparing theoretical predictions with experimental measurements of the pressure-controlled electrical resistance of liquid-phase Gallium alloy microchannels embedded in a soft silicone elas- tomer.

  12. Considering thermal-viscous collapse of the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, William; Sommers, Aleah; Rajaram, Harihar; Abdalati, Waleed; Frahm, Joel

    2015-07-01

    We explore potential changes in Greenland ice sheet form and flow associated with increasing ice temperatures and relaxing effective ice viscosities. We define "thermal-viscous collapse" as a transition from the polythermal ice sheet temperature distribution characteristic of the Holocene to temperate ice at the pressure melting point and associated lower viscosities. The conceptual model of thermal-viscous collapse we present is dependent on: (1) sufficient energy available in future meltwater runoff, (2) routing of meltwater to the bed of the ice sheet interior, and (3) efficient energy transfer from meltwater to the ice. Although we do not attempt to constrain the probability of thermal-viscous collapse, it appears thermodynamically plausible to warm the deepest 15% of the ice sheet, where the majority of deformational shear occurs, to the pressure melting point within four centuries. First-order numerical modeling of an end-member scenario, in which prescribed ice temperatures are warmed at an imposed rate of 0.05 K/a, infers a decrease in ice sheet volume of 5 ± 2% within five centuries of initiating collapse. This is equivalent to a cumulative sea-level rise contribution of 33 ± 18 cm. The vast majority of the sea-level rise contribution associated with thermal-viscous collapse, however, would likely be realized over subsequent millennia.

  13. Considering thermal-viscous collapse of the Greenland ice sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, William; Sommers, Aleah; Rajaram, Harihar; Abdalati, Waleed; Frahm, Joel

    2015-07-01

    We explore potential changes in Greenland ice sheet form and flow associated with increasing ice temperatures and relaxing effective ice viscosities. We define "thermal-viscous collapse" as a transition from the polythermal ice sheet temperature distribution characteristic of the Holocene to temperate ice at the pressure melting point and associated lower viscosities. The conceptual model of thermal-viscous collapse we present is dependent on: (1) sufficient energy available in future meltwater runoff, (2) routing of meltwater to the bed of the ice sheet interior, and (3) efficient energy transfer from meltwater to the ice. Although we do not attempt to constrain the probability of thermal-viscous collapse, it appears thermodynamically plausible to warm the deepest 15% of the ice sheet, where the majority of deformational shear occurs, to the pressure melting point within four centuries. First-order numerical modeling of an end-member scenario, in which prescribed ice temperatures are warmed at an imposed rate of 0.05 K/a, infers a decrease in ice sheet volume of 5 ± 2% within five centuries of initiating collapse. This is equivalent to a cumulative sea-level rise contribution of 33 ± 18 cm. The vast majority of the sea-level rise contribution associated with thermal-viscous collapse, however, would likely be realized over subsequent millennia.

  14. Decoupling of crystalline and conformational degrees of freedom in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, John Hjorth; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.

    1989-01-01

    by a liquid-conformationally ordered phase. This prediction is consistent with synchrotron x-ray experiments which show that the chain-ordering transition and the crystallization process need not take place at the same lateral pressure. A characterization is provided of the nonequilibrium effects and pattern-formation...... of the experimentally observed isotherms of lipid monolayer phase behavior. It is pointed out that cholesterol, which promotes lipid-chain conformational order, has a unique capacity of acting as a `crystal breaker' in the solid monolayer phases and therefore provides a molecular mechanism for decoupling crystalline...... and conformational order in lipid monolayers containing cholesterol. The phase diagram of mixed cholesterol–lipid monolayers is derived and discussed in relation to monolayer experiments. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  15. Seismic Progressive Collapse: Qualitative Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wibowo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive collapse is a catastrophic structural phenomenon that can occur because of human-made and natural hazards. In progressive collapse mechanism, a single local failure may cause a significant deformation which then may lead to collapse of a structure. The current practices in progressive collapse analysis and design method generally focus on preventing progressive collapse due to abnormal gravity and blast loads. Progressive collapse behaviour of structures due to earthquake loads has not received as much attention. This paper presents a brief overview of the current state-of-knowledge, insights, and issues related to progressive collapse behaviour of structures caused by earthquake loading.

  16. Positional order in Langmuir monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaganer, V.M.; Brezesinski, G.; Möhwald, H.;

    1998-01-01

    We find that a structural solid-solid phase transition in a two-dimensional Langmuir film is accompanied by strong positional disorder. Specifically, we find by a grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction experiment that in monolayers of octadecanol both the hexagonal phase LS and the centered rectangu......We find that a structural solid-solid phase transition in a two-dimensional Langmuir film is accompanied by strong positional disorder. Specifically, we find by a grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction experiment that in monolayers of octadecanol both the hexagonal phase LS and the centered...

  17. Electromelting of Confined Monolayer Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Hu

    2013-01-01

    In sharp contrast to the prevailing view that electric fields promote water freezing, here we show by molecular dynamics simulations that monolayer ice confined between two parallel plates can melt into liquid water under perpendicularly applied electric field. The melting temperature of the monolayer ice decreases with the increasing strength of the external field due to field-induced disruption of the water-wall interaction induced well-ordered network of hydrogen bond. This electromelting process should add an important new ingredient to the physics of water.

  18. Sequence-specific DNA interactions with calixarene-based langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullaud, Vanessa; Moridi, Negar; Shahgaldian, Patrick

    2014-07-29

    The interactions of an amphiphilic calixarene, namely p-guanidino-dodecyloxy-calix[4]arene, 1, self-assembled as Langmuir monolayers, with short double stranded DNA, were investigated by surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, surface ellipsometry and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). Three DNA 30mers were used as models, poly(AT), poly(GC) and a random DNA sequence with 50% of G:C base pairs. The interactions of these model DNA duplexes with 1-based Langmuir monolayers were studied by measuring compression isotherms using increasing DNA concentrations (10(-6), 10(-5), 10(-4), and 5 × 10(-4) g L(-1)) in the aqueous subphase. The isotherms of 1 showed an expansion of the monolayer with, interestingly, significant differences depending on the duplex DNA sequence studied. Indeed, the interactions of 1-based monolayers with poly(AT) led to an expansion of the monolayer that was significantly more pronounced that for monolayers on subphases of poly(GC) and the random DNA sequence. The structure and thickness of 1-based Langmuir monolayers were investigated by BAM and surface ellipsometry that showed differences in thickness and structure between a monolayer formed on pure water or on a DNA subphase, with here again relevant dissimilarities depending on the DNA composition.

  19. Gravitational collapse and naked singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tomohiro Harada

    2004-10-01

    Gravitational collapse is one of the most striking phenomena in gravitational physics. The cosmic censorship conjecture has provided strong motivation for research in this field. In the absence of a general proof for censorship, many examples have been proposed, in which naked singularity is the outcome of gravitational collapse. Recent developments have revealed that there are examples of naked singularity formation in the collapse of physically reasonable matter fields, although the stability of these examples is still uncertain. We propose the concept of `effective naked singularities', which will be quite helpful because general relativity has limitation in its application at the high-energy end. The appearance of naked singularities is not detestable but can open a window for the new physics of strongly curved space-times.

  20. Langmuir monolayers composed of single and double tail sulfobetaine lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Gavin; Gee, Anthony P; Arnold, Thomas; Edler, Karen J; Lewis, Simon E

    2016-07-15

    Owing to structural similarities between sulfobetaine lipids and phospholipids it should be possible to form stable Langmuir monolayers from long tail sulfobetaines. By modification of the density of lipid tail group (number of carbon chains) it should also be possible to modulate the two-dimensional phase behaviour of these lipids and thereby compare with that of equivalent phospholipids. Potentially this could enable the use of such lipids for the wide array of applications that currently use phospholipids. The benefit of using sulfobetaine lipids is that they can be synthesised by a one-step reaction from cheap and readily available starting materials and will degrade via different pathways than natural lipids. The molecular architecture of the lipid can be easily modified allowing the design of lipids for specific purposes. In addition the reversal of the charge within the sulfobetaine head group relative to the charge orientation in phospholipids may modify behaviour and thereby allow for novel uses of these surfactants. Stable Langmuir monolayers were formed composed of single and double tailed sulfobetaine lipids. Surface pressure-area isotherm, Brewster Angle Microscopy and X-ray and neutron reflectometry measurements were conducted to measure the two-dimensional phase behaviour and out-of-plane structure of the monolayers as a function of molecular area. Sulfobetaine lipids are able to form stable Langmuir monolayers with two dimensional phase behaviour analogous to that seen for the well-studied phospholipids. Changing the number of carbon tail groups on the lipid from one to two promotes the existence of a liquid condensed phase due to increased Van der Waals interactions between the tail groups. Thus the structure of the monolayers appears to be defined by the relative sizes of the head and tail groups in a predictable way. However, the presence of sub-phase ions has little effect on the monolayer structure, behaviour that is surprisingly different to

  1. Spread mixed monolayers of deoxycholic and dehydrocholic acids at the air-water interface, effect of subphase pH. Characterization by axisymmetric drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Paula V; Fernández-Leyes, Marcos D; Prieto, Gerardo; Ruso, Juan M; Sarmiento, Félix; Schulz, Pablo C

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (deoxycholic and dehydrocholic acids) spread mixed monolayers behavior at the air/water interface were studied as a function of subphase pH using a constant surface pressure penetration Langmuir balance based on the Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA). We examined the influence of electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydration forces on the interaction between amphiphilic molecules at the interface by the collapse area values, the thermodynamic parameters and equation of state virial coefficients analysis. The obtained results showed that at neutral (pH=6.7) or basic (pH=10) subphase conditions the collapse areas values are similar to that of cholanoic acid and consistent with the cross-sectional area of the steroid nucleus (approximately 40 A(2)). The Gibbs energy of mixing values (DeltaG(mix) or =1). Such behavior indicates that the polar groups of the molecules interacts each other more strongly by repulsive electrostatic forces than with the more hydrophobic part of the molecule.

  2. Black holes and dark energy from gravitational collapse on the brane

    CERN Document Server

    Gergely, L A

    2006-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of a pressureless fluid in general relativity (Oppenheimer-Snyder collapse) results in a black hole. The study of the same phenomenon in the brane-world scenario has shown that the exterior of the collapsing dust sphere cannot be static. By allowing for pressure, we show that the exterior of a fluid sphere can be static. The gravitational collapse on the brane proceeds according to the modified gravitational dynamics, turning the initial nearly dust-like configuration into a fluid with tensions. These tensions represent the response of the brane to the streching effect of the collapse and they behave like dark energy. This behaviour is proper to brane-worlds, the tensions vanish in the general relativistic limit. In the gravitational collapse on the brane both the energy density and the tension increase towards infinite values. The infinite tensions however could not stop the formation of the brane black hole.

  3. Moduli destabilization via gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dong-il [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Pedro, Francisco G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Yeom, Dong-han [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-06-15

    We examine the interplay between gravitational collapse and moduli stability in the context of black hole formation. We perform numerical simulations of the collapse using the double null formalism and show that the very dense regions one expects to find in the process of black hole formation are able to destabilize the volume modulus. We establish that the effects of the destabilization will be visible to an observer at infinity, opening up a window to a region in spacetime where standard model's couplings and masses can differ significantly from their background values.

  4. Ekpyrotic collapse with multiple fields

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David

    2007-01-01

    A scale invariant spectrum of isocurvature perturbations is generated during collapse in the scaling solution in models where two or more fields have steep negative exponential potentials. The scale invariance of the spectrum is realised by a tachyonic instability in the isocurvature field. We show that this instability is due to the fact that the scaling solution is a saddle point in the phase space. The late time attractor is identified with a single field dominated ekpyrotic collapse in which a steep blue spectrum for isocurvature perturbations is found. Although quantum fluctuations do not necessarily to disrupt the classical solution, an additional preceding stage is required to establish classical homogeneity.

  5. Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of InP quantum dots with short chain ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, K; Wittebrood, L; Moreels, I; Deresmes, D; Grandidier, B; Hens, Z

    2006-08-15

    We demonstrate the organization of nearly monodisperse colloidal InP quantum dots at the air/water interface in Langmuir monolayers. The organization of the particles is monitored in situ by surface pressure-surface area measurements and ex situ by AFM measurements on films transferred to mica by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The influence of different ligands on the quality of the monolayer formed has been studied. We show that densely packed monolayers with little holes can be formed using short chain ligands like pyridine and pentamethylene sulfide. The advantage of using short chain ligands for electron tunneling to or from the quantum dots is demonstrated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  6. Critical behavior of collapsing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper; Sourdis, C.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the mean curvature evolution of rotationally symmetric surfaces. Using numerical methods, we detect critical behavior at the threshold of singularity formation resembling that of gravitational collapse. In particular, the mean curvature simulation of a one-parameter family of initial...

  7. Mechanical properties and stabilities of α-boron monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing; Han, Liang; Wen, Xiaodong; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Zhongfang; Lian, Jie; De, Suvranu

    2015-01-21

    We investigate the mechanical properties and stabilities of planar α-boron monolayers under various large strains using density functional theory (DFT). α-Boron has a high in-plane stiffness, about 2/3 of that of graphene, which suggests that α-boron is four times as strong as iron. Potential profiles and stress-strain curves indicate that a free standing α-boron monolayer can sustain large tensile strains, up to 0.12, 0.16, and 0.18 for armchair, zigzag, and biaxial deformations, respectively. Third, fourth, and fifth order elastic constants are indispensable for accurate modeling of the mechanical properties under strains larger than 0.02, 0.06, and 0.08 respectively. Second order elastic constants, including in-plane stiffness, are predicted to monotonically increase with pressure, while the trend of Poisson's ratio is reversed. The surface sound speeds of both the compressional and shear waves increase with pressure. The ratio of these two sound speeds increases with the increase of pressure and converges to a value of 2.5. Our results imply that α-boron monolayers are mechanically stable under various large strains and have advanced mechanical properties - high strength and high flexibility.

  8. Penetration of surfactin into phospholipid monolayers: nanoscale interfacial organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeman, M; Berquand, A; Dufrêne, Y F; Paquot, M; Dufour, S; Deleu, M

    2006-12-19

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with surface pressure-area isotherms were used to probe the interfacial behavior of phospholipid monolayers following penetration of surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis strains. Prior to penetration experiments, interfacial behavior of different surfactin molecules (cyclic surfactins with three different aliphatic chain lengths--S13, S14, and S15--and a linear surfactin obtained by chemical cleavage of the cycle of the surfactin S15) has been investigated. A more hydrophobic aliphatic chain induces greater surface-active properties of the lipopeptide. The opening of the peptide ring reduces the surface activity. The effect of phospholipid acyl chain length (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine- (DPPC), and distearoylphosphatidylcholine) and phospholipid polar head (DPPC, dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine) on monolayer penetration properties of the surfactin S15 has been explored. Results showed that while the lipid monolayer thickness and the presence of electrostatic repulsions from the interfacial film do not significantly influence surfactin insertion, these parameters strongly modulate the ability of the surfactin to alter the nanoscale organization of the lipid films. We also probed the effect of surfactin structure (influence of the aliphatic chain length and of the cyclic structure of the peptide ring) on the behavior of DPPC monolayers. AFM images and isotherms showed that surfactin penetration is promoted by longer lipopeptide chain length and a cyclic polar head. This indicates that hydrophobic interactions are of main importance for the penetration power of surfactin molecules.

  9. Upper airway collapsibility in anesthetized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litman, Ronald S; McDonough, Joseph M; Marcus, Carole L; Schwartz, Alan R; Ward, Denham S

    2006-03-01

    We sought to establish the feasibility of measuring upper airway narrowing in spontaneously breathing, anesthetized children using dynamic application of negative airway pressure. A secondary aim was to compare differences in upper airway collapsibility after the administration of sevoflurane or halothane. Subjects were randomized to either drug for inhaled anesthetic induction. Each was adjusted to their 1 MAC value (0.9% for halothane and 2.5% for sevoflurane) and a blinded anesthesia provider held the facemask without performing manual airway opening maneuvers but with inclusion of an oral airway device. Inspiratory flows were measured during partial upper airway obstruction created by an adjustable negative pressure-generating vacuum motor inserted into the anesthesia circuit. Critical closing pressure of the pharynx (Pcrit) was obtained by plotting the peak inspiratory flow of the obstructed breaths against the corresponding negative pressure in the facemask and extrapolating to zero airflow using linear correlation. Fourteen children were enrolled, seven in each anesthetic group. Two children in the halothane group did not develop flow-limited airway obstruction despite negative pressures as low as -9 cm H2O. Pcrit for sevoflurane ranged from -6.7 to -11.6 (mean +/- sd, -9.8 +/- 1.9) cm H2O. Pcrit for halothane ranged from -8.1 to -33 (mean +/- sd, -19.4 +/- 9.3) cm H2O (sevoflurane versus halothane, P = 0.048). We conclude that when using dynamic application of negative airway pressure, halothane appears to cause less upper airway obstruction than sevoflurane at equipotent concentrations.

  10. Hierarchical gravitational fragmentation. I. Collapsing cores within collapsing clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Raúl Naranjo; Loughnane, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor-Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like $r^-2$ density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with t...

  11. Computational Models of Stellar Collapse and Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D; Burrows, A; Livne, E; O'Connor, E; Löffler, F

    2009-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among Nature's most energetic events. They mark the end of massive star evolution and pollute the interstellar medium with the life-enabling ashes of thermonuclear burning. Despite their importance for the evolution of galaxies and life in the universe, the details of the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism remain in the dark and pose a daunting computational challenge. We outline the multi-dimensional, multi-scale, and multi-physics nature of the core-collapse supernova problem and discuss computational strategies and requirements for its solution. Specifically, we highlight the axisymmetric (2D) radiation-MHD code VULCAN/2D and present results obtained from the first full-2D angle-dependent neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the post-core-bounce supernova evolution. We then go on to discuss the new code Zelmani which is based on the open-source HPC Cactus framework and provides a scalable AMR approach for 3D fully general-relativistic modeling of stellar col...

  12. How fast is protein hydrophobic collapse?

    OpenAIRE

    Sadqi, Mourad; Lapidus, Lisa J.; Muñoz, Victor

    2003-01-01

    One of the most recurring questions in protein folding refers to the interplay between formation of secondary structure and hydrophobic collapse. In contrast with secondary structure, it is hard to isolate hydrophobic collapse from other folding events. We have directly measured the dynamics of protein hydrophobic collapse in the absence of competing processes. Collapse was triggered with laser-induced temperature jumps in the acid-denatured form of a simple protein and monitored by fluoresce...

  13. Theoretical analysis on water-inrush mechanism of concealed collapse pillars in floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Junhua; Bai Haibo; Yao Banghua; Wu Yu

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the water-inrush mechanism of concealed collapse pillars from the mechanical view,a mechanical model for water-inrush of collapse pillars has been established based on thick plate theory of elastic mechanics in this paper. By solving this model the deformation of water-resistant rock strata under the action of water pressure and the expression of critical water pressure for collapse pillar waterinrush have been obtained The research results indicate that: the boundary conditions and strength of water-resistant strata play important roles in influencing water-inrush of collapse pillars. The critical water-inrush pressure is determined by both relative thickness and absolute thickness of water-resistant strata.

  14. On collapsibilities of Yule's measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Jianhua

    2001-01-01

    [1]Simpson,E.H.,The interpretation of interaction in contingency tables,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1951,13:238-241.[2]Bishop,Y.M.M.,Effects of collapsing multidimensional contingency tables,Biometrics,1971,27:545-562.[3]Whittemore,A.S.,Collapsibility of multidimensional contingency tables,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1978,40:328-340.[4]Good,I.J.,Mittal,Y.,The amalgamation and geometry of two-by-two contingency tables,Ann.Statist.,1987,15:694-711.[5]Gail,M.H.,Adjusting for covariates that have the same distribution in exposed and unexposed cohorts,Modern Statistical Methods in Chronic Disease Epidemiology (eds.Moolgavkar,S.H.,Prentice,R.L.),New York:Wiley,1986,3-18.[6]Wermuth,N.,Parametric collapsibility and the lack of moderating effects in contingency tables with a dichotomous response variable,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1987,49:353-364.[7]Wermuth,N.,Moderating effects of subgroups in linear models,Biometrika,1989,76:81-92.[8]Ducharme,G.R.,Lepage,Y.,Testing collapsibility in contingency tables,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1986,48:197-205.[9]Geng Zhi,Collapsibility of relative risk in contingency tables with a response variable,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1992,54:585-593.[10]Guo Jianhua,Geng Zhi,Collapsibility of logistic regression coefficients,J.R.Statist.Soc.B,1995,57:263-267.[11]Rosenbaum,P.,Rubin,D.B.,The central role of the propensity score in observational studies for causal effects,Biometrika,1983,70:41-55.[12]Greenland,S.,Robins,J.M.,Pearl,J.,Confounding and collapsibility in causal inference,Statist.Sci.,1999,14:29-46.[13]Freedman,D.,From association to causation:some remarks on the history of statistics,Statist.Sci.,1999,14:243-258.[14]Geng,Z.,Guo,J.H.,Lau,T.S.et al.,Confounding,consistency and collapsibility for causal effects in epidemiologic studies,To appear in Statist.Sinica,2001.[15]Yule,G.U.,Notes on the theory of association of attributes in statistics,Biometrika,1903,2:121-134.[16]Lancaster,H.O.,The Chi-squared Distribution

  15. Spreadsheets and the Financial Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Croll, Grenville J

    2009-01-01

    We briefly review the well-known risks, weaknesses and limitations of spreadsheets and then introduce some more. We review and slightly extend our previous work on the importance and criticality of spreadsheets in the City of London, introducing the notions of ubiquity, centrality, legality and contagion. We identify the sector of the financial market that we believed in 2005 to be highly dependant on the use of spreadsheets and relate this to its recent catastrophic financial performance. We outline the role of spreadsheets in the collapse of the Jamaican banking system in the late 1990's and then review the UK financial regulator's knowledge of the risks of spreadsheets in the contemporary financial system. We summarise the available evidence and suggest that there is a link between the use of spreadsheets and the recent collapse of the global financial system. We provide governments and regulating authorities with some simple recommendations to reduce the risks of continued overdependence on unreliable spr...

  16. Surface chemistry of lipid raft and amyloid Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Garima; Pao, Christine; Micic, Miodrag; Johnson, Sheba; Leblanc, Roger M

    2011-10-15

    Lipid rafts being rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids are considered to provide ordered lipid environment in the neuronal membranes, where it is hypothesized that the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) to Aβ (1-40) and Aβ (1-42) takes place. It is highly likely that the interaction of lipid raft components like cholesterol, sphingomylein or GM1 leads to nucleation of Aβ and results in aggregation or accumulation of amyloid plaques. One has investigated surface pressure-area isotherms of the lipid raft and Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer. The compression-decompression cycles and the stability of the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer are crucial parameters for the investigation of interaction of Aβ (1-40) with the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. It was revealed that GM1 provides instability to the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. Adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing neutral (POPC) or negatively charged phospholipid (DPPG) was examined. The adsorption isotherms revealed that the concentration of cholesterol was important for adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing POPC whereas for the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing DPPG:cholesterol or GM1 did not play any role. In situ UV-vis absorption spectroscopy supported the interpretation of results for the adsorption isotherms.

  17. Collapsing floating-point operations

    OpenAIRE

    Defour, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of collapsing dependent floating-point operations. The presentation focuses on studying the dataflow graph of benchmark involving a large number of floating-point instructions. In particular, it focuses on the relevance of new floating-point operators performing two dependent operations which are similar to "fused multiply and add". Finally, this paper examines the implementation cost and critical path reduction from this strategy.

  18. Preventing State Collapse in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    region.4 The longer the war goes on, the higher the probability of state collapse, fragmentation, endemic terrorism, and continued refugee flows. The...fighting extremism, sectarianism, and non-interference in the internal affairs of Syria, a political solution, respect for minority rights , human rights ...Even the Muslim Brotherhood had de-emphasized sectarian loyalties in favor of human rights and rule of law.56 A tradition of centralized governance

  19. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Maharaj; G Govender; M Govender

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere evolving into a final static configuration described by the interior Schwarzschild solution. The temperature profiles of this particular model are obtained within the framework of causal thermodynamics. The overall temperature evolution is enhanced by contributions from the temperature gradient induced by perturbations as well as relaxational effects within the stellar core.

  20. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshika Girihagama

    Full Text Available Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m. Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section, with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet, and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  1. Understanding Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A

    2004-01-01

    I summarize, in the form of an extended abstract, the ongoing efforts at the University of Arizona (and in collaboration) to understand core-collapse supernovae theoretically. Included are short discussions of 1D (SESAME) and 2D (VULCAN/2D) codes and results, as well as discussions of the possible role of rotation. Highlighted are recent developments in multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics and the essential physics of the neutrino-driven mechanism.

  2. Colony collapse disorder in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainat, Benjamin; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Neumann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a condition of honey bees, which has contributed in part to the recent major losses of honey bee colonies in the USA. Here we report the first CCD case from outside of the USA. We suggest that more standardization is needed for the case definition to diagnose CCD and to compare data on a global scale. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A study on cavity collapse for utilizing green implosion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunhee; Gojani, Ardian; Han, Tae-Hee; Yoh, Jack

    2009-06-01

    The mechanical energy generated by laser-induced implosion and the dynamics between non-condensable gas and liquid are studied experimentally and numerically. We have designed a micro implosion piston (MIP) to utilize the energy of implosion for inducing a piston motion. The MIP has the shape of a cone and is filled with liquid at room temperature and a high pressure (˜ 6 bars). Focusing of a high power laser pulse inside the MIP leads to creation of several bubbles that expand and collapse with successive rebounds. The bubble-liquid interaction develops a micro- jet that destroys the symmetry of the bubble. This bubble implosion motion, induced by the pressure gradient across the cavity wall produces high pressures wave within a few nanoseconds. These pressure waves are affected by different conditions such as the distance between the bubble and piston head, the dimension of the MIP, and the pressure at which the MIP is driven. The radius of the bubble is measured by double exposure photography, while pressure histories are measured by hydrophones. We investigate the relationship between the radius of the bubble, the overpressure of the secondary shock wave and the motion of the micro piston, and compare it to numerical simulations. The aim is to reach a state inside the MIP that would cause a sustainable and efficient motion of piston through cavity collapse induced high pressure pulses.

  4. New Features on the Phase Transitions of Behenic Acid Monolayers as Unveiled by 2D-Compressibility Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Wen-Ying; YU Zhi-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Phase behavior of Langmuir monolayers of behenic acid (BeA) has been examined by two-dimensional compressibility.It was found that phase transitions of BeA could be classified into two distinct categories,named Type-I and Type-II in this work.The former is typified by a positive peak on the compressibility-pressure (β-π)curve,indicating the transition can occur itself in a way of collapse from the initial structure.The latter is characterized by a dropping step on the β-π curve,implying that it cannot happen itself and the driven force is continuous compression.For BeA molecules,compressibility coefficients at the initial and final state are the same,βi=βf,for Type-I phase transition from L2 to L2' state,whilst βi>βf for Type-II phase transition from L.2' state to S state.

  5. Lipid monolayers and adsorbed polyelectrolytes with different degrees of polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Thomas; Ahrens, Heiko; Lawrenz, Frank; Gröning, Andreas; Nestler, Peter; Günther, Jens-Uwe; Helm, Christiane A

    2014-06-17

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) of different molecular weight M(w) is adsorbed to oppositely charged DODAB monolayers from dilute solutions (0.01 mmol/L). PSS adsorbs flatly in a lamellar manner, as is shown by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction (exception: PSS with M(w) below 7 kDa adsorbs flatly disordered to the liquid expanded phase). The surface coverage and the separation of the PSS chains are independent of PSS M(w). On monolayer compression, the surface charge density increases by a factor of 2, and the separation of the PSS chains decreases by the same factor. Isotherms show that on increase of PSS M(w) the transition pressure of the LE/LC (liquid expanded/liquid condensed) phase transition decreases. When the contour length exceeds the persistence length (21 nm), the transition pressure is low and constant. For low-M(w) PSS (<7 kDa) the LE/LC transition of the lipids and the disordered/ordered transition of adsorbed PSS occur simultaneously, leading to a maximum in the contour length dependence of the transition enthalpy. These findings show that lipid monolayers at the air/water interface are a suitable model substrate with adjustable surface charge density to study the equilibrium conformation of adsorbed polyelectrolytes as well as their interactions with a model membrane.

  6. A trough for improved SFG spectroscopy of lipid monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Johannes; van Zadel, Marc-Jan; Weidner, Tobias

    2017-05-01

    Lipid monolayers are indispensable model systems for biological membranes. The main advantage over bilayer model systems is that the surface pressure within the layer can be directly and reliably controlled. The sensitive interplay between surface pressure and temperature determines the molecular order within a model membrane and consequently determines the membrane phase behavior. The lipid phase is of crucial importance for a range of membrane functions such as protein interactions and membrane permeability. A very reliable method to probe the structure of lipid monolayers is sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Not only is SFG extremely surface sensitive but it can also directly access critical parameters such as lipid order and orientation, and it can provide valuable information about protein interactions along with interfacial hydration. However, recent studies have shown that temperature gradients caused by high power laser beams perturb the lipid layers and potentially obscure the spectroscopic results. Here we demonstrate how the local heating problem can be effectively reduced by spatially distributing the laser pulses on the sample surface using a translating Langmuir trough for SFG experiments at lipid monolayers. The efficiency of the trough is illustrated by the detection of enhanced molecular order due to reduced heat load.

  7. Study on the effect of subcooling on vapor film collapse on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yutaka; Tochio, Daisuke; Yanagida, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface is needed to be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcooling condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcooling condition. In case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse, homogeneous vapor generation occurred all over the surface of steel particle in low subcooling condition. On the other hand, heterogeneous vapor generation was observed for higher subcooling condition. In case of vapor film collapse spontaneously, fluctuation of the gas-liquid interface after quenching propagated from bottom to top of the steel particle heterogeneously in low subcooling condition. On the other hand, simultaneous vapor generation occurred for higher subcooling condition. And the time transient of pressure, particle surface temperature, water temperature and visual information were simultaneously measured in the vapor film collapse experiment by external pressure pulse. Film thickness was estimated by visual data processing technique with the pictures taken by the high-speed video camera. Temperature and heat flux at the vapor-liquid interface were estimated by solving the heat condition equation with the measured pressure, liquid temperature and vapor film thickness as boundary conditions. Movement of the vapor-liquid interface were estimated with the PIV technique with the visual observation

  8. Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

  9. Adsorption of anionic polyelectrolytes to dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelking, J.; Menzel, H.

    Monolayers of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODA) at the air/water interface were used as model for charged surfaces to study the adsorption of anionic polyelectrolytes. After spreading on a pure water surface the monolayers were compressed and subsequently transferred onto a polyelectrolyte solution employing the Fromherz technique. The polyelectrolyte adsorption was monitored by recording the changes in surface pressure at constant area. For poly(styrene sulfonate) and carboxymethylcellulose the plot of the surface pressure as function of time gave curves which indicate a direct correlation between the adsorbed amount and surface pressure as well as a solely diffusion controlled process. In the case of rigid rod-like poly(p-phenylene sulfonate)s the situation is more complicated. Plotting the surface pressure as function of time results in a curve with sigmoidal shape, characterized by an induction period. The induction period can be explained by a domain formation, which can be treated like a crystallization process. Employing the Avrami expression developed for polymer crystallization, the change in the surface pressure upon adsorption of rigid rod-like poly(p-phenylene sulfonate)s can be described.

  10. Protein-induced surface structuring in myelin membrane monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Carla M; Maggio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    Monolayers prepared from myelin conserve all the compositional complexity of the natural membrane when spread at the air-water interface. They show a complex pressure-dependent surface pattern that, on compression, changes from the coexistence of two liquid phases to a viscous fractal phase embedded in a liquid phase. We dissected the role of major myelin protein components, myelin basic protein (MBP), and Folch-Lees proteolipid protein (PLP) as crucial factors determining the structural dynamics of the interface. By analyzing mixtures of a single protein with the myelin lipids we found that MBP and PLP have different surface pressure-dependent behaviors. MBP stabilizes the segregation of two liquid phases at low pressures and becomes excluded from the film under compression, remaining adjacent to the interface. PLP, on the contrary, organizes a fractal-like pattern at all surface pressures when included in a monolayer of the protein-free myelin lipids but it remains mixed in the MBP-induced liquid phase. The resultant surface topography and dynamics is regulated by combined near to equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium effects. PLP appears to act as a surface skeleton for the whole components whereas MBP couples the structuring to surface pressure-dependent extrusion and adsorption processes.

  11. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-01

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  12. Packing of ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, J.; Kuhl, T.L.; Kjær, K.

    2001-01-01

    DPPE monolayer and does not distort the hexagonal in-plane unit cell or out-of-plane two-dimensional (2-D) packing compared with a pure DPPE monolayer. The oligosaccharide headgroups were found to extend normally from the monolayer surface, and the incorporation of these glycolipids into DPPE...... monolayers did not affect hydrocarbon tail packing (fluidization or condensation of the hydrocarbon region). This is in contrast to previous investigations of lipopolymer-lipid mixtures, where the packing structure of phospholipid monolayers was greatly altered by the inclusion of lipids bearing hydrophilic...... polymer groups. Indeed, the lack of packing disruptions by the oligosaccharide groups indicates that protein-GM, interactions, including binding, insertion, chain fluidization, and domain formation (lipid rafts), can be studied in 2-D monolayers using scattering techniques....

  13. Modeling Stimuli-Responsive Nanoparticle Monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we model a monolayer formed at the water-oil interface, which comprises stimuli-responsive nanoparticles. The solid core of the nanoparticle encompasses beads arranged in an fcc lattice structure and its surface is uniformly grafted with stimuli-responsive polymer chains. The surface-active nanoparticles adsorb to the interface from the suspension to minimize total energy of the system and create a monolayer covering the interface. We investigate the monolayer formation by characterizing the detailed adsorption kinetics. We explore the microstructure of the monolayer at different surface coverage, including the particle crowding and ordering, and elucidate the response of monolayer to external stimuli. The collective behavior of the particles within the monolayer is demonstrated quantitatively by vector-vector autocorrelation functions. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the interfacial behavior of stimuli-responsive nanoparticles.

  14. Origin of the Instability of Octadecylamine Langmuir Monolayer at Low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avazbaeva, Zaure; Sung, Woongmo; Lee, Jonggwan; Phan, Minh Dinh; Shin, Kwanwoo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-12-29

    It has been reported that an octadecylamine (ODA) Langmuir monolayer becomes unstable at low pH values with no measurable surface pressure at around pH 3.5, suggesting significant dissolution of the ODA molecule into the subphase solution (Albrecht, Colloids Surf. A 2006, 284-285, 166-174). However, by lowering the pH further, ODA molecules reoccupy the surface, and a full monolayer is recovered at pH 2.5. Using surface sum-frequency spectroscopy and pressure-area isotherms, it is found that the recovered monolayer at very low pH has a larger area per molecule with many gauche defects in the ODA molecules as compared to that at high pH values. This structural change suggests that the reappearance of the monolayer is due to the adsorbed Cl(-) counterions to the protonated amine groups, leading to partial charge neutralization. This proposition is confirmed by intentionally adding monovalent salts (i.e., NaCl, NaBr, or NaI) to the subphase to recover the monolayer at pH 3.5, in which the detailed structure of the monolayer is confirmed by sum frequency spectra and the adsorbed anions by X-ray reflectivity.

  15. Aging increases upper airway collapsibility in Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Andrew D; Ogasa, Toshiyuki; Magalang, Ulysses J; Krasney, John A; Farkas, Gaspar A

    2008-11-01

    The upper airway muscles play an important role in maintaining upper airway collapsibility, and the incidence of sleep-disordered breathing increases with age. We hypothesize that the increase in airway collapsibility with increasing age can be linked to changes in upper airway muscle mechanics and structure. Eight young (Y: 6 mo) and eight old (O: 30 mo) Fischer 344 rats were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated, and the pharyngeal pressure associated with flow limitation (Pcrit) was measured 1) with the hypoglossal (cnXII) nerve intact, 2) following bilateral cnXII denervation, and 3) during cnXII stimulation. With the cnXII intact, the upper airways of older rats were more collapsible compared with their younger counterparts [Pcrit = -7.1 +/- 0.6 (SE) vs. -9.5 +/- 0.7 cmH2O, respectively; P = 0.033]. CnXII denervation resulted in an increase in Pcrit such that Pcrit became similar in both groups (O: -4.2 +/- 0.5 cmH2O; Y: -5.4 +/- 0.5 cmH2O). In all rats, cnXII stimulation decreased Pcrit (less collapsible) in both groups (O: -11.3 +/- 1.0 cmH2O; Y: -10.2 +/- 1.0 cmH2O). The myosin heavy chain composition of the genioglossus muscle demonstrated a decrease in the percentage of the IIb isoform (38.3 +/- 2.5 vs. 21.7 +/- 1.7%; P collapsible with age and that the increase in upper airway collapsibility with age is likely related to altered neural control rather than to primary alterations in upper airway muscle structure and function.

  16. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    KAUST Repository

    Mandal, Pritam

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low.

  17. A simple method to tune graphene growth between monolayer and bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhi Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selective growth of either monolayer or bilayer graphene is of great importance. We developed a method to readily tune large area graphene growth from complete monolayer to complete bilayer. In an ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition process, we used the sample temperature at which to start the H2 flow as the control parameter and realized the change from monolayer to bilayer growth of graphene on Cu foil. When the H2 starting temperature was above 700°C, continuous monolayer graphene films were obtained. When the H2 starting temperature was below 350°C, continuous bilayer films were obtained. Detailed characterization of the samples treated under various conditions revealed that heating without the H2 flow caused Cu oxidation. The more the Cu substrate oxidized, the less graphene bilayer could form.

  18. On the Interaction between Digitonin and Cholesterol in Langmuir Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Kamil; Orczyk, Marta; Gutberlet, Thomas; Brezesinski, Gerald; Geue, Thomas; Fontaine, Philippe

    2016-09-06

    In this article, we describe the effect of a highly hemolytic saponin, digitonin, on model lipids cholesterol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) using a combination of tensiometric (surface pressure and dilatational surface elasticity), spectroscopic (infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, IRRAS), microscopic (fluorescence microscopy), and scattering techniques (neutron reflectivity, NR, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, GIXD). The monolayers of individual lipids and their 10:9 (mol/mol) mixture were exposed to an aqueous solution of digitonin (10(-4) M) by subphase exchange using a setup developed recently in our laboratory. The results confirm that digitonin can adsorb onto both bare and lipid-covered water-air interfaces. In the case of DPPC, a relatively weak interaction can be observed, but the presence of cholesterol drastically enhances the effect of digitonin. The latter is shown to dissociate the weak cholesterol-DPPC complexes and to bind cholesterol in an additional layer attached to the original lipid monolayer.

  19. Mixed Langmuir monolayers of gramicidin A and fluorinated alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Obidowicz, Katarzyna; Vila Romeu, Nuria; Broniatowska, Elzbieta; Dynarowicz-Łatka, Patrycja

    2007-09-15

    Mixed monolayers of gramicidin A (GA) and three alcohols, differing in the degree of fluorination, namely C18OH, F18OH, and F8H10OH have been investigated by means of: surface manometry (pi-A isotherms) and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) aiming at finding appropriate molecules for incorporating gramicidin A for a biosensor design. Our results proved that only the semifluorinated alcohol is appropriate material for this purpose since it forms miscible and homogeneous monolayers with GA within the whole concentration range. The experimental results have been supported by the calculations of van der Waals energy profiles using the Insight II program. Both the hydrogenated and perfluorinated alcohols were found to aggregate at higher surface pressures, which exclude their application for gramicidin-based biosensor construction.

  20. Langmuir monolayers of a hydrogenated/fluorinated catanionic surfactant: from the macroscopic to the nanoscopic size scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Elena; Piñeiro, Angel; Miller, Reinhard; Ruso, Juan M; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2009-07-21

    Langmuir monolayers of the hydrogenated/fluorinated catanionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium perfluorooctanoate at the air/water interface are studied at room temperature. Excess Gibbs energies of mixing, DeltaG(E), as well as transition areas and pressures, were obtained from the surface pressure-area isotherm. The DeltaG(E) curve indicates that tail-tail interactions are more important than head-head interactions at low pressures and vice versa. Atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations allowed a fine characterization of the monolayer structure as a function of the area per molecule at mesoscopic and nanoscopic size scales, respectively. A combined analysis of the techniques allow us to conclude that electrostatic interactions between the ionic head groups are dominant in the monolayer while hydrophobic parts are of secondary importance. Overall, results obtained from the different techniques complement to each other, giving a comprehensive characterization of the monolayer.

  1. Phase separated anionic domains in ternary mixed lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, K M; Grainger, D W

    1993-04-01

    A series of ternary mixed monolayers containing varying amounts of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and equimolar additions of 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LYSO-PC) and palmitic acid (PA) were studied at the air-water interface. These mixed monolayers were used to model phospholipid biomembrane interfaces resulting from phospholipase A2 (PLA2) hydrolysis. Recent work [D.W. Grainger A. Reichert, H. Ringsdorf and C. Salesse (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1023, 365-379] has shown that PLA2 hydrolysis of pure phospholipid monolayers results in formation of large PLA2 domains at the air-water interface. These domains are proposed to result from PLA2 adsorption to phase separated regions in the hydrolyzed monolayer. To elucidate the phase behaviour in these monolayer systems, surface pressure-area isotherms were measured for the ternary mixtures on pure water and buffered subphases. Fluorescence microscopy at the air-water interface was used to image fluorescent probe-doped monolayer mixtures during isothermal compressions. A water-soluble cationic carbocyanine dye was used to probe the interfacial properties of the mixed monolayers. Isotherm data do not provide unambiguous evidence for either phase separation or ideal mixing of monolayer components. Fluorescence microscopy is more revealing, showing that lateral phase separation of microstructures containing palmitic acid occurred only when monolayer subphases contained Ca2+ ions at alkaline pH. At either low pH or on Ca(2+)-free subphases, phase separation was not observed.

  2. Collapse Modeling of a Masonry Arch Dam Using the Cohesive Interface Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element (FE approach with zero-thickness cohesive interface elements is presented to simulate collapse of continuum structures. The element removal technique merged with the general contact algorithm is adapted in the FE approach to achieve modeling for a transition from continua to discontinua, that is, fracture, fragmentation, and collapse. Collapse process of Meihua masonry arch dam, which is a famous disaster in dam engineering in China, is simulated and the failure mechanism is studied. The collapse process obtained from the presented procedure coincides with the field observation after the dam failure. The failure of Meihua arch dam can be attributed to reducing shear strength of the peripheral joint between the dam body and the concrete pedestal by daubing a layer of asphalt there. With low sliding resistance strength, the masonry dam body may slide upwards along the peripheral joint under hydrostatic pressure, leading to weakening of the arch action, fracturing, and final collapse of the dam.

  3. Gradual caldera collapse at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, regulated by lateral magma outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hooper, Andrew; Holohan, Eoghan P; Halldórsson, Sæmundur A; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G; Cesca, Simone; Vogfjörd, Kristín S; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Jarosch, Alexander H; Jónasson, Kristján; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Bagnardi, Marco; Parks, Michelle M; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Pálsson, Finnur; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Heimann, Sebastian; Reynolds, Hannah I; Dumont, Stéphanie; Bali, Eniko; Gudfinnsson, Gudmundur H; Dahm, Torsten; Roberts, Matthew J; Hensch, Martin; Belart, Joaquín M C; Spaans, Karsten; Jakobsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B; Fridriksdóttir, Hildur M; Drouin, Vincent; Dürig, Tobias; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Riishuus, Morten S; Pedersen, Gro B M; van Boeckel, Tayo; Oddsson, Björn; Pfeffer, Melissa A; Barsotti, Sara; Bergsson, Baldur; Donovan, Amy; Burton, Mike R; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2016-07-15

    Large volcanic eruptions on Earth commonly occur with a collapse of the roof of a crustal magma reservoir, forming a caldera. Only a few such collapses occur per century, and the lack of detailed observations has obscured insight into the mechanical interplay between collapse and eruption. We use multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data to show that the 110-square-kilometer and 65-meter-deep collapse of Bárdarbunga caldera in 2014-2015 was initiated through withdrawal of magma, and lateral migration through a 48-kilometers-long dike, from a 12-kilometers deep reservoir. Interaction between the pressure exerted by the subsiding reservoir roof and the physical properties of the subsurface flow path explain the gradual, near-exponential decline of both collapse rate and the intensity of the 180-day-long eruption.

  4. Advanced numerical simulation of collapsible earth dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Farias, M.M.; Cordao Neto, M.P. [Brasilia Univ., Federal District (Brazil). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-12-15

    This paper discussed a systematic methodology for the hydromechanical coupled numerical analysis of earth dams constructed with unsaturated collapsible soil. Every design stage was considered, including construction, reservoir filling, and advance of saturation front until the steady-state flow condition is attained. A transient analysis of safety factors applicable to 3-dimensional conditions was presented, giving consideration to unsaturated materials and the interrelation between hydraulic and mechanical phenomena by solving equilibrium and continuity conditions at the same time. The finite element method was used to formulate equilibrium and continuity conditions for both soil skeleton and pore water, which necessitated a realistic mechanical model for the stress-strain-suction relation in unsaturated porous material and adequate constitutive models related to water flow and storage, giving special consideration to imposing appropriate boundary conditions for each simulation stage. The methodology was applied to the analysis of earth dams composed of soils at optimum, dry of optimum, and mixed compaction conditions. The dry section simulated dams constructed using poorly compacted, dry material, which are prone to collapse. By strategically placing the optimum materials in the areas of the earth fill that are most stressed, the mixed section could be designed less expensively with the same or better performance as the homogenous section at optimum conditions. The coupled analysis provides a higher safety factor than uncoupled analysis and a realistic picture of end-of-construction pore pressure distribution. The simulation of reservoir filling and saturation front advance permitted clear identification of the initialization, development, and evolution of internal failure mechanisms. 21 refs., 6 tabs., 19 figs.

  5. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Eben; Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H.; Leonard, David L.; VanderWerf, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua‘i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species’ ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua‘i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai‘i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing.

  6. Design of Pneumatic Collapsible Steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Nair

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The steering wheel is the important cause of fatal injury for drivers in frontal collision. When frontal collision occurs, due to the kinetic energy of driver or occupant body, it moves forward against steering wheel and wind shield. Actually in a frontal collision forces will be first transmitted through driver’s feet which act as fulcrum so the body will rotate about it. For the taller driver steering works as fulcrum. Driver head & chest hit the steering or windshield which may cause severe injury or death. Considering the injury potential of steering wheel we are presenting a new idea Pneumatic Collapsible Steering Column (PCS.

  7. Spherically symmetric scalar field collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koyel Ganguly; Narayan Banerjee

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that a scalar field, minimally coupled to gravity, may have collapsing modes even when the energy condition is violated, that is, for ( + 3) < 0. This result may be useful in the investigation of the possible clustering of dark energy. All the examples dealt with have apparent horizons formed before the formation of singularity. The singularities formed are shell focussing in nature. The density of the scalar field distribution is seen to diverge at singularity. The Ricci scalar also diverges at the singularity. The interior spherically symmetric metric is matched with exterior Vaidya metric at the hypersurface and the appropriate junction conditions are obtained.

  8. Thermodynamics of a collapsed object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaubey, N. (Inst. of Science and Techn., Sultanpur (India). Technological Faculty); De Sabbata, V. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1981-06-20

    Here is presented a thermodynamic study in the Reissner-Nordstroem blackhole which leads to a beautiful conclusion that the product of surface gravities of the outer horizon and the inner horizon of the blackhole is equal to the inverse square of charge distribution over it. If one considers a more general collapsed object wherein rotation is also considered, a similar inference is that the product of surface gravities of the inner and the outer horizon is equal to the inverse of the sum of squares of the charge distribution and angular momentum per unit mass of the rotation.

  9. Reopening modes of a collapsed elasto-rigid channel

    CERN Document Server

    Ducloué, Lucie; Thompson, Alice B; Juel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the reopening mechanics of strongly collapsed airways, we study the steady propagation of an air finger through a collapsed oil-filled channel with a single compliant wall. In a previous study using fully-compliant elastic tubes, a `pointed' air finger was found to propagate at high speed and low pressure, which may enable rapid reopening of highly collapsed airways with minimal tissue damage (Heap & Juel 2008). In this paper, we identify the selection mechanism of that pointed finger, which remained unexplained, by conducting an experimental study in a rigid rectangular Hele-Shaw channel with an elastic top boundary. The constitutive behaviour of this elasto-rigid channel is broadly similar to that of an elastic tube, but unlike the tube the channel's cross-section adopts self-similar shapes from the undeformed state to the point of first near wall contact. The simplification of the vessel geometry enables the systematic investigation of the reopening dynamics in terms of initial collapse. W...

  10. Collapsibility and Volume Change Behavior of Unsaturated Residual Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azalan A. Aziz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual soils occur in most countries of the world but the greater areas and depths are normally found in tropical humid areas. In these places, the soil forming processes are still very active and the weathering development is much faster than the erosive factor. Most residual soil exhibit high suctions for most of the year. The absence of positive pore water pressure except immediately after rain, makes conventional soil mechanics for saturated soil not so relevant. Ignorance or lack of understanding of the geotechnical behavior of soil in the partially or unsaturated state has caused a lot of damages to infrastructures, buildings and other structures. For instance, the collapsibility and volume change of partially saturated soils in connection with the drying or wetting causes a lot of damage in foundation, roads and other structures. It is also observed that many shallow slope failures involve a slumping (collapse type of failure. As such, the development of extended soil mechanics, which embraces the soil in the unsaturated state or subjected to soil suction, is essential. This study examines the collapsibility and volume change behavior specifically of an unsaturated residual soil under various levels of applied matric suction (ua-uw and net mean stress (σ-ua in a predetermined stress path. The volume change of the soil is found to be sensitive to both the applied matric suction and net mean stress. The soil is found to exhibit a collapsibility behavior upon a reduction in applied matric suction at constant net mean stress.

  11. Minisuperspace Stellar Collapse in Semi-Classical Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishna, Jayashree; Moran, Christine Corbett

    2015-01-01

    We compute the Schr\\"odinger and WKB propagators for the semi-classical collapse of a sphere of dust. This extends the work by Redmount and Suen (1993) from the free particle case to nontrivial gravity. In the Oppenheimer-Snyder model, a star can be idealised as a collapsing dust sphere of uniform density and zero pressure. The particles that make up the star have the attributes of classical dust where each particle is assumed to be infinitesimal in size and to interact only gravitationally with other matter. We include quantum mechanical effects, which lift some of these assumptions. This allows for the possibility that some configurations will not collapse to black holes. We find analytic, closed-form solutions for classical paths of a particle on the surface of a collapsing star in Schwarzschild and Kruskal geometries. Kruskal coordinates can be used to study the wavefunction inside the apparent horizon. The propagator is written in closed form in Schwarzschild coordinates in both the WKB and in the Schr\\"...

  12. Transport dynamics of collapse in a giant ELM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Tetsuyuki [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Kimitaka

    1998-09-01

    Dynamics of collapse in a giant ELM (Edge Localized Mode) is presented. A model of transport bifurcation between the H-mode and the magnetic braiding mode (M-mode) is applied to the simulational study of edge plasma dynamics. The bifurcation contains the hysteresis characteristics. The pressure profile development, the propagation of the bifurcation (transition) fronts and the resultant bursting fluxes are obtained. The appearance of a pivot point in the pressure profile, an avalanche followed to the transition front propagation, and the structure of the burst are shown. (author)

  13. Structure, interfacial properties, and dynamics of the sodium alkyl sulfate type surfactant monolayer at the water/trichloroethylene interface: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen-Xiong; Guo, Hong-Xia

    2010-05-20

    In this work, we perform a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the category of sodium alkyl sulfate (SDS-type) surfactant monolayers at the water/trichloroethylene (TCE) interface. Three separate tail-length SDS-type molecules are used. We investigate the conformation of surfactant chain (i.e., packing, orientation, and order), interfacial properties (i.e., interfacial thickness, interfacial tension, area compressibility, and bending modulus), their dependence on the chain length, and the average area per surfactant chain. We also examine the behavior of the surfactant monolayer in the metastable regime of negative surface tension with reference to collapse. The simulation has clearly shown that the very dilute monolayer is well described as a two-dimensional gas. With the increase of interfacial surfactant coverage, the monolayer is in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase. The surfactant tails at the interface become straighter, more ordered, and thicker at higher surfactant coverage. At the same time, interfacial tension of long-tail systems is always lower than that of short-tail systems. In the LE phase, the area compressibility modulus and the bending modulus increase with an increase in tail length. With a further decrease in molecular areas, the monolayer with large negative surface tension becomes unstable. Our simulations show that buckling of the monolayers is of dynamic nature as a response to mechanical instability. The further transformation pathway from buckling to bud can be controlled by the bending modulus, which depends crucially on the tail length and interfacial surfactant coverage. At a given area per molecule, the short tail chain makes the monolayer softer, and the budding process becomes more probable. For the supersaturated softer SDS monolayer, the collapse transition is initiated by the buckling of monolayers, followed primarily by budding and detachment of the nanoscale swollen micelle from the monolayer. Despite a number of

  14. Silo Collapse under Granular Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, G.; Colonnello, C.; Boltenhagen, P.; Darias, J. R.; Peralta-Fabi, R.; Brau, F.; Clément, E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, at a laboratory scale, the collapse of cylindrical shells of radius R and thickness t induced by a granular discharge. We measure the critical filling height for which the structure fails upon discharge. We observe that the silos sustain filling heights significantly above an estimation obtained by coupling standard shell-buckling and granular stress distribution theories. Two effects contribute to stabilize the structure: (i) below the critical filling height, a dynamical stabilization due to granular wall friction prevents the localized shell-buckling modes to grow irreversibly; (ii) above the critical filling height, collapse occurs before the downward sliding motion of the whole granular column sets in, such that only a partial friction mobilization is at play. However, we notice also that the critical filling height is reduced as the grain size d increases. The importance of grain size contribution is controlled by the ratio d /√{R t }. We rationalize these antagonist effects with a novel fluid-structure theory both accounting for the actual status of granular friction at the wall and the inherent shell imperfections mediated by the grains. This theory yields new scaling predictions which are compared with the experimental results.

  15. Identification of collapse patterns of cavitation bubbles close to a solid wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes different patterns of bubble deformation during the cavitation bubble collapse close to a solid wall for different bubble-wall distances. The bubble is generated by energy discharge in water. The collapse patterns are investigated using high-speed photography. The magnitude of the bubble-wall interaction is measured using the PVDF film. The shock wave pressure in the far field is measured using the PVDF hydrophone.

  16. Time symmetry in wave-function collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedingham, D. J.; Maroney, O. J. E.

    2017-04-01

    The notion of a physical collapse of the wave function is embodied in dynamical collapse models. These involve a modification of the unitary evolution of the wave function so as to give a dynamical account of collapse. The resulting dynamics is at first sight time asymmetric for the simple reason that the wave function depends on those collapse events in the past but not those in the future. Here we show that dynamical wave-function collapse models admit a general description that has no built-in direction of time. Given some simple constraints, we show that there exist empirically equivalent pictures of collapsing wave functions in both time directions, each satisfying the same dynamical rules. A preferred direction is singled out only by the asymmetric initial and final time constraints on the state of the universe.

  17. Radiation driven collapse of protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Sébastien; Robinson, Ian K

    2006-01-01

    During coherent X-ray diffraction measurements on crystals of ferritin at room temperature using monochromatic undulator radiation from the Advanced Photon Source, a sudden lattice contraction was observed following a characteristic latent period and ultimately leading to the collapse of the crystal. The progression of this collapse is analysed using a two-state Hendricks-Teller model. It reveals that 55% of the layers collapse by 1.6% before the crystal completely stops diffracting.

  18. Collapse of three on a sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidambi, R.; Newton, P.K. [Southern California Univ., Los Angeles (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Center for Applied Mathematical Sciences

    1999-12-01

    The self-similar collapse of three vortices moving on the surface of a sphere of radius R is analysed and compared with known results of critical literature. Formulas for the collapsing trajectories are derived and compared with the planar formulas. The Hamiltonian system is derived governing the vortex motion. In this projected plane, the solutions are not self-similar. In the last section, the collapse process is studied using tri-linear coordinates, which reduces the system to a planar one.

  19. Self-similar scalar field collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Narayan; Chakrabarti, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    A spherically symmetric collapsing scalar field model is discussed with a dissipative fluid which includes a heat flux. This vastly general matter distribution is analyzed at the expense of a high degree of symmetry in the space-time, that of conformal flatness and self-similarity. Indeed collapsing models terminating into a curvature singularity can be obtained. The formation of black holes or the occurrence of naked singularities depends on the initial collapsing profiles.

  20. Ion Induced Changes in Phosphoinositide Monolayers at Phisiological Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe; Forstner, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play a crucial role in many cellular process that occur at the plasma membrane such as calcium release, exocytosis or endocytosis. In order to specifically regulate these functions PIPs must segregate in pools at the plasma membrane. A possible mechanism that could induce and regulate such organization of phosphoinositides is their interaction with bivalent cations. Understanding the physicochemical mechanism that can regulate membrane structure is a crucial step in the development of adaptive biomimetic membrane systems. Using Langmuir monolayers, we investigated the effect of calcium and magnesium on the surface pressure-area/lipid isotherm of monolayer of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2), dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). It is found that the decrease of area per lipid, i.e. the increase in aggregation, is mostly dependent on the lipid's head group charge but ion specific. In addition, we discuss changes in free energy and compressibility of these monolayer-ion systems. NSF

  1. Fluorescence detection and imaging of amino-functionalized organic monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirahata, Naoto [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: SHIRAHATA.naoto@nims.go.jp; Furumi, Seiichi [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Masuda, Yoshitake; Hozumi, Atsushi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimo-shidami, Moriyama, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Sakka, Yoshio [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-03

    Amino-terminated organic monolayer formed on silicon covered with native oxide (SiO{sub 2}/Si) was directly visualized under observation with fluorescent microscopy. This successful fluorescence visualization was achieved by a combination of fluorescamine method and photopatterning of the amino-terminated surface. As a typical example, an amino-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was formed on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate in a vapor of 12.5 vol.% solution of N-(6-aminohexyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane [H{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}NH(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Si(OCH{sub 3}){sub 3}, AHAPS] diluted with absolute toluene. A micropattern of AHAPS-SAM was photolithographycally prepared using 172 nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light under a reduced pressure of 10 Pa for 30 min through a photomask. The resultant micropattern composed of AHAPS- and SiOH-covered regions was provided to fluorescamine method. Due to a nonluminescence of fluorescamine itself under UV/visible irradiation, a fluorescent emission could not be observed on SiOH regions of the micropattern. In contrast, fluorescamine reacted with the outermost amino group of the AHAPS-SAM to give a fluorescent emission. A comprehensible fluorescence method for verifying formation of an amino-terminated organic monolayer has been developed.

  2. Oleic acid disorders stratum corneum lipids in Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guangru; VanWyck, Dina; Xiao, Xin; Mack Correa, M Catherine; Gunn, Euen; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2013-04-16

    Oleic acid (OA) is well-known to affect the function of the skin barrier. In this study, the molecular interactions between OA and model stratum corneum (SC) lipids consisting of ceramide, cholesterol, and palmitic acid (PA) were investigated with Langmuir monolayer and associated techniques. Mixtures with different OA/SC lipid compositions were spread at the air/water interface, and the phase behavior was tracked with surface pressure-molecular area (π-A) isotherms. With increasing OA levels in the monolayer, the films became more fluid and more compressible. The thermodynamic parameters derived from π-A isotherms indicated that there are preferential interactions between OA and SC lipids and that films of their mixtures were thermodynamically stable. The domain structure and lipid conformational order of the monolayers were studied through Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), respectively. Results indicate that lower concentrations of OA preferentially mix with and disorder the ceramide-enriched domains, followed by perturbation of the PA-enriched domains and disruption of SC lipid domain separation at higher OA levels.

  3. Specific Ion Effects in Cholesterol Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Del Castillo-Santaella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of ions with interfaces and, in particular, the high specificity of these interactions to the particular ions considered, are central questions in the field of surface forces. Here we study the effect of different salts (NaI, NaCl, CaCl2 and MgCl2 on monolayers made of cholesterol molecules, both experimentally (surface area vs. lateral pressure isotherms measured by a Langmuir Film Balance and theoretically (molecular dynamics (MD all-atomic simulations. We found that surface isotherms depend, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on the nature of the ions by altering the shape and features of the isotherm. In line with the experiments, MD simulations show clear evidences of specific ionic effects and also provide molecular level details on ion specific interactions with cholesterol. More importantly, MD simulations show that the interaction of a particular ion with the surface depends strongly on its counterion, a feature ignored so far in most theories of specific ionic effects in surface forces.

  4. In situ Observation of the Photochromism in the Langmuir Monolayer of a Non—typical Amphiphilic Spiropyran Derivative at the Air/Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贡浩飞; 唐季安; 王聪敏; 樊美公; 刘鸣华

    2003-01-01

    In situ photochromic process in the monolayer of aphotochromic spiropyran derivative without long alkyl chain,was investigated.The photochromism at the air/water interface under differnet surface pressures was studied by surface pressure-area isotherms,surface pressure-time curves,area-time curves and Brewster angle microscopy.Both forms of the compound were found to form monolayers at the air/water interface althouhg it does not have long alkyl chain.A large area expansion in the monolayer corresponding to a zreoth order reaction was found at the initial stage of the UV light irradiation.A series of dynamic investigations revealed that at high pressure after phase transition in the monolayer,the surface pressure changes greatly umder alternative irradiation of UV and visible light.An obvious morphological change accompanying with the photochromism was observed in situ.

  5. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  6. Collapse of granular media subjected to wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Korchi Fatima Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the collapse of granular materials subjected to wetting action. For soils, the collapse potential depends on several parameters such as liquid limit, matric suction, compactness, initial water content and the amount of fine particles. The effect of grain size, which plays a key role in the rearrangement of grains, remains little studied and poorly understood. To investigate the capillary origin of the collapse phenomenon, we present an experimental study on macroscopic and local scales. Our results show the effect of grain size and water content on collapse.

  7. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  8. Coulomb excitations of monolayer germanene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-01-01

    The feature-rich electronic excitations of monolayer germanene lie in the significant spin-orbit coupling and the buckled structure. The collective and single-particle excitations are diversified by the magnitude and direction of transferred momentum, the Fermi energy and the gate voltage. There are four kinds of plasmon modes, according to the unique frequency- and momentum-dependent phase diagrams. They behave as two-dimensional acoustic modes at long wavelength. However, for the larger momenta, they might change into another kind of undamped plasmons, become the seriously suppressed modes in the heavy intraband e–h excitations, keep the same undamped plasmons, or decline and then vanish in the strong interband e–h excitations. Germanene, silicene and graphene are quite different from one another in the main features of the diverse plasmon modes. PMID:28091555

  9. Influence of calcium on ceramide-1-phosphate monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana S. L. Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P plays an important role in several biological processes, being identified as a key regulator of many protein functions. For instance, it acts as a mediator of inflammatory responses. The mediation of the inflammation process happens due to the interaction of C1P with the C2 domain of cPLA2α, an effector protein that needs the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium ions. The aim of this study was to determine the phase behaviour and structural properties of C1P in the presence and absence of millimolar quantities of calcium in a well-defined pH environment. For that purpose, we used monomolecular films of C1P at the soft air/liquid interface with calcium ions in the subphase. The pH was varied to change the protonation degree of the C1P head group. We used surface pressure versus molecular area isotherms coupled with other monolayer techniques as Brewster angle microscopy (BAM, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD. The isotherms indicate that C1P monolayers are in a condensed state in the presence of calcium ions, regardless of the pH. At higher pH without calcium ions, the monolayer is in a liquid-expanded state due to repulsion between the negatively charged phosphate groups of the C1P molecules. When divalent calcium ions are added, they are able to bridge the highly charged phosphate groups, enhancing the regular arrangement of the head groups. Similar solidification of the monolayer structure can be seen in the presence of a 150 times larger concentration of monovalent sodium ions. Therefore, calcium ions have clearly a strong affinity for the phosphomonoester of C1P.

  10. Collapse Analysis of Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2008-01-01

    A probabilistic based collapse analysis has been performed for a glulam frame structure supporting the roof over the main court in a Norwegian sports centre. The robustness analysis is based on the framework for robustness analysis introduced in the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety...... of Structures and a probabilistic modelling of the timber material proposed in the Probabilistic Model Code (PMC) of the Joint Committee on Structural Safety (JCSS). Due to the framework in the Danish Code the timber structure has to be evaluated with respect to the following criteria where at least one shall...... be fulfilled: a) demonstrating that those parts of the structure essential for the safety only have little sensitivity with respect to unintentional loads and defects, or b) demonstrating a load case with „removal of a limited part of the structure‟ in order to document that an extensive failure...

  11. Gravitational Collapse in Gravity's Rainbow

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed Farag; Majumder, Barun; Mistry, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we will analyze the gravitational collapse in the framework of gravity's rainbow. We will demonstrate that the position of the horizon for a particle inside the black hole depends on the energy of that particle. It will also be observe that the position of the horizon for a particle falling radially into the black hole also depends on its energy. Thus, it is possible for a particle coming from outside to interact with a particle inside the black, and take some information outside the black hole. This is because for both these particles the position of horizon is different. So, even though the particle from inside the black hole is in its own horizon, it is not in the horizon of the particle coming from outside. Thus, we will demonstrate that in gravity's rainbow information can get out of a black hole.

  12. Critical perspectives on historical collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Karl W; Endfield, Georgina H

    2012-03-06

    Historical collapse of ancient states or civilizations has raised new awareness about its possible relevance to current issues of sustainability, in the context of global change. This Special Feature examines 12 case studies of societies under stress, of which seven suffered severe transformation. Outcomes were complex and unpredictable. Five others overcame breakdown through environmental, political, or socio-cultural resilience, which deserves as much attention as the identification of stressors. Response to environmental crises of the last millennium varied greatly according to place and time but drew from traditional knowledge to evaluate new information or experiment with increasing flexibility, even if modernization or intensification were decentralized and protracted. Longer-term diachronic experience offers insight into how societies have dealt with acute stress, a more instructive perspective for the future than is offered by apocalyptic scenarios.

  13. Higgs portals to pulsar collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars apparently missing from the galactic center could have been destroyed by asymmetric fermionic dark matter ($m_X = 1-100$ GeV) coupled to a light scalar ($m_{\\phi}= 5-20$ MeV), which mixes with the Higgs boson. We point out that this pulsar-collapsing dark sector can resolve the core-cusp problem and will either be excluded or discovered by upcoming direct detection experiments. Another implication is a maximum pulsar age curve that increases with distance from the galactic center, with a normalization that depends on the couplings and masses of dark sector particles. In addition, we use old pulsars outside the galactic center to place bounds on asymmetric Higgs portal models.

  14. Gravitational perfect fluid collapse in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, G.; Tahir, M.

    2017-08-01

    The Einstein Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravity is the low-energy limit of heterotic super-symmetric string theory. This paper deals with gravitational collapse of a perfect fluid in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity by considering the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. For this purpose, the closed form of the exact solution of the equations of motion has been determined by using the conservation of the stress-energy tensor and the condition of marginally bound shells. It has been investigated that the presence of a Gauss-Bonnet coupling term α >0 and the pressure of the fluid modifies the structure and time formation of singularity. In this analysis a singularity forms earlier than a horizon, so the end state of the collapse is a naked singularity depending on the initial data. But this singularity is weak and timelike, which goes against the investigation of general relativity.

  15. Collapse and rebound of a gas-filled spherical bubble immersed in a diagnostic ultrasonic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymé-Bellegarda, E J

    1990-08-01

    This work is concerned with the influence of the finite-amplitude distortion of a driving diagnostic ultrasonic field on the collapse and rebound of a gas-filled spherical microbubble, present in the exposed compressible liquid. Such an analysis is especially important since one of the mechanisms for cavitation damage comes from the very large gas pressures generated at bubble collapse and in the subsequent pressure wave formed by bubble rebound. Gilmore's model [F.R. Gilmore, "The growth or collapse of a spherical bubble in a viscous compressible liquid," Hydrodynamics Lab. Rep. No. 26-4, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (1952)] for bubble dynamics is used to obtain the motion of the bubble interface when subjected to a pulsed diagnostic ultrasonic field of large amplitude. Knowledge of the bubble motion allows one to derive the pressure distribution around the bubble. Numerical results over a range of initial bubble sizes, acoustic pressures, and frequencies relevant to medical use show that the strength of the pressure spikes radiated by the rebounding bubble depends upon (i) the acoustic frequency (f), (ii) the initial bubble size (R0), and (iii) the magnitude of the pressure amplitude of the fundamental (PF) in a Fourier series description of the distorted pulse. As the pressure spikes propagate outward from the bubble wall, their strength is attenuated as the reciprocal of the distance from the center of collapse.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Water-Assembled Graphene Oxide Langmuir Monolayers: Guiding Controlled Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Katharine L; Biedermann, Laura B; Zavadil, Kevin R

    2015-09-15

    Liquid-phase transfer of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers is investigated from the perspective of the mechanical properties of these films. Monolayers are assembled in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough, and oscillatory barrier measurements are used to characterize the resulting compressive and shear moduli as a function of surface pressure. GO monolayers are shown to develop a significant shear modulus (10-25 mN/m) at relevant surface pressures while RGO monolayers do not. The existence of a shear modulus indicates that GO is acting as a two-dimensional solid driven by strong interaction between the individual GO sheets. The absence of such behavior in RGO is attributed to the decrease in oxygen moieties on the sheet basal plane, permitting RGO sheets to slide across one another with minimum energy dissipation. Knowledge of this two-dimensional solid behavior is exploited to successfully transfer large-area, continuous GO films to hydrophobic Au substrates. The key to successful transfer is the use of shallow-angle dipping designed to minimize tensile stress present during the insertion or extraction of the substrate. A shallow dip angle on hydrophobic Au does not impart a beneficial effect for RGO monolayers, as these monolayers do not behave as two-dimensional solids and do not remain coherent during the transfer process. We hypothesize that this observed correlation between monolayer mechanical properties and continuous film transfer success is more universally applicable across substrate hydrophobicities and could be exploited to control the transfer of films composed of two-dimensional materials.

  17. 关于黄土湿陷性评价和剩余湿陷量的新认识%New recognition of collapsibility evaluation and remnant collapse of loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚志华; 黄雪峰; 陈正汉; 方祥位; 苗强强; 张江水

    2014-01-01

    Based on summarized results of several large-scale soaking tests, some new recognition about methodology of collapsibility evaluation and reasonable limit of remnant collapse are proposed to modify difference between computed collapse under overburden pressure and measured value, and to decrease the collapsible loess treatment depth. When acquiring the computed collapse under overburden pressure, a depth correction factoris suggested to make computed collapse under overburden pressure and the computed collapse of laboratory tests approximate measured collapse of in-situ tests;and it will decrease remnant collapse of collapsible loess in deeper position in some degree. When obtaining computed collapse, a scheme amplifying coefficient threshold of collapsibility (0.015) is presented, the method combined with depth correction factorcan reach the expected goal to enlarge the computed collapse and decrease remnant collapse of deeper collapsible loess. The conception“critical collapsibility depth”of dead weight collapse loess with heavy section is proposed;the critical collapsibility depth is set as 20-25 m temporarily according to some test data. In combination with the method of depth correction factor and amplifying coefficient threshold of collapsibility, the conception of critical collapsibility depth can decrease effectively remnant collapse of collapsible loess. The research results will be of interest for similar projects in the area of dead weight collapse loess and be useful to revise“standard for building construction in collapsible loess regions”.%在总结诸多大型浸水现场试验成果的基础上,提出了一些关于湿陷性评价方法和剩余湿陷量合理控制等问题的新认识,目的是为了修正自重湿陷性黄土场地的自重湿陷量计算值与其实测值之间的差异,并减小地基处理深度。在获取自重湿陷量的计算值时,引进了一个深度修正系数,使自重湿陷量和湿陷

  18. Gravitational waves from dark matter collapse in a star

    CERN Document Server

    Kurita, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the collapse of clusters of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the core of a Sun-like star and the possible formation of mini-black holes and the emission of gravity waves. When the number of WIMPs is small, thermal pressure balances the WIMP cluster's self gravity. If the number of WIMPs is larger than a critical number, thermal pressure cannot balance gravity and the cluster contracts. If WIMPs are collisionless and bosonic, the cluster collapses directly to form a mini-black hole. For fermionic WIMPs, the cluster contracts until it is sustained by Fermi pressure, forming a small compact object. If the fermionic WIMP mass is smaller than $4\\times 10^2$ GeV, the radius of the compact object is larger than its Schwarzschild radius and Fermi pressure temporally sustains its self gravity, halting the formation of a black hole. If the fermionic WIMP mass is larger than $4\\times 10^2$ GeV, the radius is smaller than its Schwarzschild radius and the compact object becomes a mini-black h...

  19. Modeling of surface cleaning by cavitation bubble dynamics and collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Georges L; Kapahi, Anil; Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2016-03-01

    Surface cleaning using cavitation bubble dynamics is investigated numerically through modeling of bubble dynamics, dirt particle motion, and fluid material interaction. Three fluid dynamics models; a potential flow model, a viscous model, and a compressible model, are used to describe the flow field generated by the bubble all showing the strong effects bubble explosive growth and collapse have on a dirt particle and on a layer of material to remove. Bubble deformation and reentrant jet formation are seen to be responsible for generating concentrated pressures, shear, and lift forces on the dirt particle and high impulsive loads on a layer of material to remove. Bubble explosive growth is also an important mechanism for removal of dirt particles, since strong suction forces in addition to shear are generated around the explosively growing bubble and can exert strong forces lifting the particles from the surface to clean and sucking them toward the bubble. To model material failure and removal, a finite element structure code is used and enables simulation of full fluid-structure interaction and investigation of the effects of various parameters. High impulsive pressures are generated during bubble collapse due to the impact of the bubble reentrant jet on the material surface and the subsequent collapse of the resulting toroidal bubble. Pits and material removal develop on the material surface when the impulsive pressure is large enough to result in high equivalent stresses exceeding the material yield stress or its ultimate strain. Cleaning depends on parameters such as the relative size between the bubble at its maximum volume and the particle size, the bubble standoff distance from the particle and from the material wall, and the excitation pressure field driving the bubble dynamics. These effects are discussed in this contribution.

  20. Structure and dynamics of lipid monolayers: Implications for enzyme catalysed lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Toxværd, S.; Larsen, N.B.;

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the substrate on the interfacial activation of Upases by an interdisciplinary study of the structure and dynamics of 1,2-sn dipalmitoylglycerol monolayers at distinct surface pressures. The diglyceride Langmuir film undergoes two phase transitions occurring at 38....

  1. Interactions of hemin, antimalarial drugs and hemin-antimalarial complexes with phospholipid monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginsburg, H.; Demel, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Hemin, antimalarial drugs and complexes formed between them, have demonstrable effects on biological membranes. Using the phospholipid monolayer model, we show that hemin intercalates into the membrane and increases its surface pressure, depending on the lipid composition and the initial surface pre

  2. Binary phase diagram of monolayers of simple 1,2-diol derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, C. De; Bringezu, F.; Brezesinski, G.;

    1998-01-01

    The miscibility properties of monolayers of two 1,2-diol derivatives, 1-palmitoylglycerol (1) and 1-hexadecylglycerol (2), have been studied at the air-water interface using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). While, at all pressures investigated, compound (I) exhibits only a NN...

  3. Microcomputer interface for computer-controlled enzyme kinetic studies with the monolayer technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, G. de; Donné-Op den Kelder, G.M.; Wildt, H. van der

    1984-01-01

    Abstract A microcomputer interface for computer-assisted monolayer experiments was developed, tested, and used for analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis by pancreatic phospholipases A2 (EC 3.1.1.4) of 1,2-didodecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-sulfate monitored under constant surface pressure. The interface descr

  4. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Changchun; Feng, Ying; Gao, Feng; Lu, Xiaolong; Li, Junhua; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure-area (π-A) and pressure-time (π-T) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central

  5. Drug induced `softening' in phospholipid monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay; Bhattacharya, Dhananjay

    2015-06-01

    Compressibility measurements on Langmuir monolayers of the phospholipid Dimystoryl Phospatidylcholine (DMPC) in pristine form and in the presence of the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Piroxicam at 0.025 drug/lipid (D/L) molecular ratio at different temperatures, show that the monolayer exhibits large increase (and subsequent decrease) in compressibility due to the drug in the vicinity of the Liquid Expanded - Liquid Condensed (LE-LC) phase transition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lipid monolayer in presence of drug molecules show a disordering of the tail tilt, which is consistent with the above result.

  6. Electrochemical Deposition Of Thiolate Monolayers On Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Marc D.; Weissharr, Duane E.

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical method devised for coating metal (usually, gold) surfaces with adherent thiolate monolayers. Affords greater control over location and amount of material deposited and makes it easier to control chemical composition of deposits. One important potential use for this method lies in fabrication of chemically selective thin-film resonators for microwave oscillators used to detect pollutants: monolayer formulated to bind selectively pollutant chemical species of interest, causing increase in mass of monolayer and corresponding decrease in frequency of resonance. Another important potential use lies in selective chemical derivatization for purposes of improving adhesion, lubrication, protection against corrosion, electrocatalysis, and electroanalysis.

  7. The Collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' Narrative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böss, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An account of the factors that led to the collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' economy in 2008 and an explanation of the political effects and implications for Irish identity.......An account of the factors that led to the collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' economy in 2008 and an explanation of the political effects and implications for Irish identity....

  8. Critical gravitational collapse with angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We derive a theoretical model of mass and angular momentum scaling in type-II critical collapse with rotation. We focus on the case where the critical solution has precisely one, spherically symmetric, unstable mode. We demonstrate excellent agreement with numerical results for critical collapse of a rotating radiation fluid, which falls into this case.

  9. Sharper criteria for the wave collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Rypdal, K.

    1995-01-01

    Sharper criteria for three-dimensional wave collapse described by the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation (NLSE) are derived. The collapse threshold corresponds to the ground state soliton which is known to be unstable. Thus, for nonprefocusing distributions this represents the separatrix between...

  10. Contagious cooperation, temptation and ecosystem collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, A.P.; Soest, van D.; Grasman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Real world observations suggest that social norms of cooperation can be effective in overcoming social dilemmas such as the joint management of a common pool resource—but also that they can be subject to slow erosion and sudden collapse. We show that these patterns of erosion and collapse emerge end

  11. Collapse dynamics of bubble raft under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alexander; Dennin, Michael; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Irvine Collaboration; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We report on the collapse of bubble rafts under compression in a closed rectangular geometry. A bubble raft is a single layer of bubbles at the air-water interface. A collapse event occurs when bubbles submerge beneath the neighboring bubbles under applied compression causing the structure of the bubble raft to go from single-layer to multi-layer. We studied the collapse dynamics as a function of compression velocity. At higher compression velocity we observe a more uniform distribution of collapse events, whereas at lower compression velocities, the collapse events accumulate at the system boundaries. We will present results that compare the distribution of collapse probability in the experiments to simulations based on a one-dimensional Ising model with elastic coupling between spin elements. Both the experimental system and simulations are excellent models for collapse in a number of complex systems. By comparing the two systems, we can tune the simulation to better understand the role of the Ising and elastic couplings in determining the collapse dynamics. We acknowledge DMR-1309402.

  12. Collapse of Electrostatic Waves in Magnetoplasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Yu, M. Y.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1984-01-01

    The two-fluid model is employed to investigate the collapse of electrostatic waves in magnetized plasmas. It is found that nonlinear interaction of ion cyclotron, upper-, and lower-hybrid waves with adiabatic particle motion along the external magnetic field can cause wave-field collapse....

  13. Hierarchical Cluster Assembly in Globally Collapsing Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Colin, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in a numerical simulation of a molecular cloud (MC) undergoing global hierarchical collapse (GHC). The global nature of the collapse implies that the SFR increases over time. The hierarchical nature of the collapse consists of small-scale collapses within larger-scale ones. The large-scale collapses culminate a few Myr later than the small-scale ones and consist of filamentary flows that accrete onto massive central clumps. The small-scale collapses form clumps that are embedded in the filaments and falling onto the large-scale collapse centers. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall motion of their parent clumps. Thus, the filaments feed both gaseous and stellar material to the massive central clump. This leads to the presence of a few older stars in a region where new protostars are forming, and also to a self-similar structure, in which each unit is composed of smaller-scale sub-units that approach each other and may merge. Becaus...

  14. Fire-induced collapses of steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondera, Alexandru; Giuliani, Luisa

    Single-story steel buildings such as car parks and industrial halls are often characterised by stiff beams and flexible columns and may experience an outward (sway) collapse during a fire, endangering people and properties outside the building. It is therefore a current interest of the research...... on the beam. By means of those tables, a simple method for the assessment and the countermeasure of unsafe collapse mode of single-story steel buildings can be derived....... to investigate the collapse behaviour of single-story steel frames and identify relevant structural characteristics that influence the collapse mode. In this paper, a parametric study on the collapse a steel beam-column assembly with beam hinged connection and fixed column support is carried out under...

  15. Four Tails Problems for Dynamical Collapse Theories

    CERN Document Server

    McQueen, Kelvin J

    2015-01-01

    The primary quantum mechanical equation of motion entails that measurements typically do not have determinate outcomes, but result in superpositions of all possible outcomes. Dynamical collapse theories (e.g. GRW) supplement this equation with a stochastic Gaussian collapse function, intended to collapse the superposition of outcomes into one outcome. But the Gaussian collapses are imperfect in a way that leaves the superpositions intact. This is the tails problem. There are several ways of making this problem more precise. But many authors dismiss the problem without considering the more severe formulations. Here I distinguish four distinct tails problems. The first (bare tails problem) and second (structured tails problem) exist in the literature. I argue that while the first is a pseudo-problem, the second has not been adequately addressed. The third (multiverse tails problem) reformulates the second to account for recently discovered dynamical consequences of collapse. Finally the fourth (tails problem di...

  16. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Dijksman, J. A.; Shearer, M.

    2017-01-01

    The collapse dynamics of an axisymmetric fluid cavity that wets the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls are studied. Lubrication theory is applied to the governing field equations for the thin film to yield an evolution equation that captures the effect of capillary, gravitational, and centrifugal forces on this converging flow. The focus is on the quasistatic spreading regime, whereby contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the contact-angle to the contact-line speed. Surface tension forces dominate the collapse dynamics for small holes with the collapse time appearing as a power law whose exponent compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Gravity accelerates the collapse process. Volume dependence is predicted and compared with experiment. Centrifugal forces slow the collapse process and lead to complex dynamics characterized by stalled spreading behavior that separates the large and small hole asymptotic regimes.

  17. Continuous Observations and the Wave Function Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Marchewka, A

    2011-01-01

    We propose to modify the collapse axiom of quantum measurement theory by replacing the instantaneous with a continuous collapse of the wave function in finite time $\\tau$. We apply it to coordinate measurement of a free quantum particle that is initially confined to a domain $D\\subset\\rR^d$ and is observed continuously by illuminating $\\rR^d-D$. The continuous collapse axiom (CCA) defines the post-measurement wave function (PMWF)in $D$ after a negative measurement as the solution of Schr\\"odinger's equation at time $\\tau$ with instantaneously collapsed initial condition and homogeneous Dirichlet condition on the boundary of $D$. The CCA applies to all cases that exhibit the Zeno effect. It rids quantum mechanics of the unphysical artifacts caused by instantaneous collapse and introduces no new artifacts.

  18. Collapse and dispersal of a homogeneous spin fluid in Einstein-Cartan theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, M.; Jalalzadeh, S.; Ziaie, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, we revisit the process of gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric homogeneous dust fluid which is described by the Oppenheimer-Snyder (OS) model (Oppenheimer and Snyder in Phys Rev D 56:455, 1939). We show that such a scenario would not end in a spacetime singularity when the spin degrees of freedom of fermionic particles within the collapsing cloud are taken into account. To this purpose, we take the matter content of the stellar object as a homogeneous Weyssenhoff fluid. Employing the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW metric for the interior spacetime setup, it is shown that the spin of matter, in the context of a negative pressure, acts against the pull of gravity and decelerates the dynamical evolution of the collapse in its later stages. Our results show a picture of gravitational collapse in which the collapse process halts at a finite radius, whose value depends on the initial configuration. We thus show that the spacetime singularity that occurs in the OS model is replaced by a non-singular bounce beyond which the collapsing cloud re-expands to infinity. Depending on the model parameters, one can find a minimum value for the boundary of the collapsing cloud or correspondingly a threshold value for the mass content below which the horizon formation can be avoided. Our results are supported by a thorough numerical analysis.

  19. Influence of head group methylation on the phase behavior of lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brezesinski, G.; Bringezu, F.; Weidemann, G.

    1998-01-01

    per three tails exceeds that per head, an influence of the head group methylation on the monolayer structure is observed. The tilt angles at lower lateral pressures and the transition pressure to a hexagonal packing of upright oriented chains increase with increasing methylation degree. The transition...... from the NN tilted rectangular to this hexagonal phase is connected with a pressure region where the in-plane components Q(xy) of the two peaks coincide while the out-of-plane components Q(z) differ. This indicates an undistorted hexagonal in-plane lattice even for tilted chains. The area-pressure...... and X-ray measurements below 10 mN/m, can be explained by the formation of holes in the monolayer. Possibly the tilting of the triple-chain molecules leads to an orientational ordering of the head group dipoles and therefore to an electrostatic repulsion between condensed phase domains. (C) 1998...

  20. Noble metal nanoparticles deposited on self-assembled monolayers using Pulsed Laser Deposition show coulomb blockade at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speets, Emiel A.; Dordi, Barbara; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Oncel, Nuri; Hallbäck, Ann-Sofie; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.; Poelsema, Bene; Rijnders, Guus; Blank, Dave H.A.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2005-01-01

    Nanometer-sized noble-metal clusters are fabricated on top of alkylthiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on annealed gold by pulsed laser deposition at elevated pressures. The size distribution of the clusters depends on the metal and on the pressure during the deposition. Scanning tunneling mic

  1. Method to synthesize metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    Metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials can be synthesized from metal alkoxide precursors by solution precipitation or solvothermal processing. The synthesis routes are more scalable, less complex and easier to implement than other synthesis routes.

  2. The Pore Collapse “Hot-Spots” Model Coupled with Brittle Damage for Solid Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the building of a numerical pore collapse model with “hot-spots” formation for the impacted damage explosives. According to damage mechanical evolution of brittle material, the one-dimensional elastic-viscoplastic collapse model was improved to incorporate the impact damage during the dynamic collapse of pores. The damage of explosives was studied using the statistical crack mechanics (SCRAM. The effects of the heat conduction and the chemical reaction were taken into account in the formation of “hot-spots.” To verify the improved model, numerical simulations were carried out for different pressure states and used to model a multiple-impact experiment. The results show that repeated weak impacts can lead to the collapse of pores and the “hot-spots” may occur due to the accumulation of internal defects accompanied by the softening of explosives.

  3. Ambipolar diffusion regulated collapse of filaments threaded by perpendicular magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Burge, C A; Falle, S A E G; Hartquist, T W

    2016-01-01

    We numerically reproduce the density profiles for filaments that are in magnetohydrostatic and pressure equilibrium with their surroundings obtained in Tomisaka (2014) and show that these equilibria are dynamically stable. If the effect of ambipolar diffusion is considered, these filaments lose magnetic support initiating cloud collapse. The filaments do not lose magnetic flux. Rather the magnetic flux is redistributed within the filament from the centre towards the envelope. The rate of the collapse is inversely proportional to the fractional ionisation and two gravitationally-driven ambipolar diffusion regimes for the collapse are observed as predicted in Mouschovias & Morton (1991). For high values of the ionisation coefficient, that is $X \\geq 10^{-7}$, the gas is strongly coupled to the magnetic field and the Jeans length is larger than the ambipolar diffusion length scale. Then the collapse is governed by magnetically-regulated ambipolar diffusion. For $X \\lesssim 10^{-8}$, the gas is weakly coupled...

  4. Spherically-symmetric, cold collapse: the exact solutions and a comparison with self-similar solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    We present the exact solutions for the collapse of a spherically-symmetric, cold (i.e., pressureless) cloud under its own self-gravity, valid for arbitrary initial density profiles and not restricted to the realm of self-similarity. These solutions exhibit a number of remarkable features, including the self-consistent formation of and subsequent accretion onto a central point mass. A number of specific examples are provided, and we show that Penston's solution of pressureless, self-similar collapse is recovered for polytropic density profiles; importantly, however, we demonstrate that the time over which this solution holds is fleetingly narrow, implying that much of the collapse proceeds non-self-similarly. We show that our solutions can naturally incorporate turbulent pressure support, and we investigate the evolution of overdensities -- potentially generated by such turbulence -- as the collapse proceeds. Finally, we analyze the evolution of the angular velocity and magnetic fields in the limit that their ...

  5. An equivalent circuit model for transmitting capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers in collapse mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcum, Selim; Yamaner, F Yalcin; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Köymen, Hayrettin; Atalar, Abdullah

    2011-07-01

    The collapse mode of operation of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) was shown to be a very effective way to achieve high output pressures. However, no accurate analytical or equivalent circuit model exists for understanding the mechanics and limits of the collapse mode. In this work, we develop an equivalent nonlinear electrical circuit that can accurately simulate the mechanical behavior of a CMUT with given dimensions and mechanical parameters under any large or small signal electrical excitation, including the collapse mode. The static and dynamic deflections of a plate predicted from the model are compared with finite element simulations. The equivalent circuit model can estimate the static deflection and transient behavior of a CMUT plate to within 5% accuracy. The circuit model is in good agreement with experimental results of pulse excitation applied to fabricated CMUTs. The model is suitable as a powerful design and optimization tool for collapsed and uncollapsed CMUTs.

  6. Non-adiabatic radiative collapse of a relativistic star under different initial conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Sharma; Ramesh Tikekar

    2012-09-01

    We examine the role of space-time geometry in the non-adiabatic collapse of a star dissipating energy in the form of radial heat flow, studying its evolution under different initial conditions. The collapse of a star filled with a homogeneous perfect fluid is compared with that of a star filled with inhomogeneous imperfect fluid under anisotropic pressure. Both the configurations are spherically symmetric. However, in the latter case, the physical space = constant of the configurations endowed with spheroidal or pseudospheroidal geometry is assumed to be inhomogeneous. It is observed that as long as the collapse is shear-free, its evolution depends only on the mass and size of the star at the onset of collapse.

  7. Scapholunate advanced collapse wrist salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmead, D; Watson, H K; Damon, C; Herber, S; Paly, W

    1994-09-01

    Patients with scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrist do not have to undergo total wrist arthrodesis; the SLAC pattern spares the radiolunate articulation, providing a basis for salvage. We report the results of 100 cases in which a technique comprised of scaphoid excision and limited wrist arthrodesis was used. The average followup period of 44 months revealed excellent functional status and a high rate of patient satisfaction. The majority of employed patients were able to return to their original jobs, and many chose to resume wrist-related recreational activities. Pain relief was good to excellent in most cases. Extension/flexion averaged 72 degrees (53% of a normal opposite wrist), radioulnar deviation 37 degrees (59%), and grip strength 80% of the opposite side. X-ray films revealed only two instances of radiolunate destruction, both in conjunction with ulnar translation of the carpus. The other 98 patients demonstrated a well-preserved radiolunate joint regardless of followup interval. Complications were few. Nonunion occurred in three cases. A dorsal impingement of the capitate and radius (12%) was felt to be technique-related and avoidable by careful capitolunate alignment.

  8. Magnetic Collapse of a Neutron Gas No Magnetar Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Martínez, A; Cuesta, H J M; Martinez, Aurora Perez; Rojas, Hugo Perez; Mosquera-Cuesta, Herman J.

    2000-01-01

    A degenerate neutron gas in equilibrium with a background of electrons and protons in a magnetic field exerts its pressure anisotropically, having a smaller value perpendicular than along the magnetic field. For critical fields the magnetic pressure may produce the vanishing of the equatorial pressure of the neutron gas, and the outcome could be a transverse collapse of the star. This fixes a limit to the fields to be observable in stable pulsars as a function of their density. The final structure left over after the implosion might be a mixed phase of nucleons and meson ($\\pi^{\\pm,0},\\kappa^{\\pm,0}$) condensate (a strange star also likely) or a black string, but no magnetar at all.

  9. Mass spectrometric analysis of monolayer protected nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengjiang

    Monolayer protected nanoparticles (NPs) include an inorganic core and a monolayer of organic ligands. The wide variety of core materials and the tunable surface monolayers make NPs promising materials for numerous applications. Concerns related to unforeseen human health and environmental impacts of NPs have also been raised. In this thesis, new analytical methods based on mass spectrometry are developed to understand the fate, transport, and biodistributions of NPs in the complex biological systems. A laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) method has been developed to characterize the monolayers on NP surface. LDI-MS allows multiple NPs taken up by cells to be measured and quantified in a multiplexed fashion. The correlations between surface properties of NPs and cellular uptake have also been explored. LDI-MS is further coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantitatively measure monolayer stability of gold NPs (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs), respectively, in live cells. This label-free approach allows correlating monolayer structure and particle size with NP stability in various cellular environments. Finally, uptake, distribution, accumulation, and excretion of NPs in higher order organisms, such as fish and plants, have been investigated to understand the environmental impact of nanomaterials. The results indicate that surface chemistry is a primary determinant. NPs with hydrophilic surfaces are substantially less toxic and present a lower degree of bioaccumulation, making these nanomaterials attractive for sustainable nanotechnology.

  10. Motion of three vortices near collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoncini, X.; Kuznetsov, L.; Zaslavsky, G. M.

    2000-08-01

    A system of three point vortices in an unbounded plane has a special family of self-similarly contracting or expanding solutions: during the motion, the vortex triangle remains similar to the original one, while its area decreases (grows) at a constant rate. A contracting configuration brings three vortices to a single point in a finite time; this phenomenon known as vortex collapse is of principal importance for many-vortex systems. Dynamics of close-to-collapse vortex configurations depends on the way the collapse conditions are violated. Using an effective potential representation, a detailed quantitative analysis of all the different types of near-collapse dynamics is performed when two of the vortices are identical. We discuss time and length scales, emerging in the problem, and their behavior as the initial vortex triangle is approaching an exact collapse configuration. Different types of critical behaviors, such as logarithmic or power-law divergences are exhibited, which emphasize the importance of the way the collapse is approached. Period asymptotics for all singular cases are presented as functions of the initial vortice's configurations. Special features of passive particle mixing by near-collapse flows are illustrated numerically.

  11. Compressible air flow through a collapsing liquid cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Gordillo, Stephan Gekle \\and José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiscale approach to simulate the impact of a solid object on a liquid surface: upon impact a thin liquid sheet is thrown upwards all around the rim of the impactor while in its wake a large surface cavity forms. Under the influence of hydrostatic pressure the cavity immediately starts to collapse and eventually closes in a single point from which a thin, needle-like jet is ejected. Existing numerical treatments of liquid impact either consider the surrounding air as an incompressible fluid or neglect air effects altogether. In contrast, our approach couples a boundary-integral method for the liquid with a Roe scheme for the gas domain and is thus able to handle the fully \\emph{compressible} gas stream that is pushed out of the collapsing impact cavity. Taking into account air compressibility is crucial, since, as we show in this work, the impact crater collapses so violently that the air flow through the cavity neck attains supersonic velocities already at cavity diameters larger than 1 mm. Ou...

  12. The collapse of the Sella Zerbino gravity dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petaccia, G; Lai, C G; Milazzo, C; Natale, L

    2016-08-23

    When a severe flood wave completely filled the Ortiglieto reservoir on August 13, 1935, the 14 m high "Sella Zerbino" secondary dam failed catastrophically causing > 100 casualties. Both of the dams, Sella Zerbino-Zerbino Saddle and Bric Zerbino-Zerbino Peak (Fig. 1) were overtopped but only the Sella Zerbino failed whereas the main barrage did not suffer any damage. The lawsuit that followed this tragic event ended with a full acquittal of the dam's designers since the plaintiff experts succeeded in demonstrating that the collapse was due to an extreme rainfall storm of unpredictable intensity. The case was then officially closed and still today the failure of the Sella Zerbino dam is attributed to the unpredictable hydrological event. Recently, Natale and Petaccia (2013) re-examined the case assessing the capacity of the flood spillways which equipped the Bric Zerbino dam. This paper thoroughly reviews the mechanics of the collapse of the Sella Zerbino dam focusing on the stability of the structure. The water pressure underneath the dam and the poor quality of the foundation rock is believed to have played a major role in the sequence of events that ended in the collapse of the barrage.

  13. Redefining the Septal L-Strut to Prevent Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dong-Heon; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    During septorhinoplasty, septal cartilage is frequently resected for various purposes but the L-strut is preserved. Numerous materials are inserted into the nasal dorsum during dorsal augmenation rhinoplasty without considering nasal structural safety. This study used a finite element method (FEM) to redefine the septal L-strut, to prevent collapse as pressure moved from the rhinion to the supratip breakpoint on the nasal dorsum and as the contact percentage between the caudal L-strut and the maxillary crest changed. We designed a 1-cm-wide L-strut model based on computed tomography data. At least 45% of the width of the L-strut in the inferior portion of the caudal strut must be preserved during septoplasty to stabilize the septum. In augmentation rhinoplasty, the caudal L-strut must either be preserved perfectly or reinforced to prevent collapse or distortion of the L-strut. The dorsal augmentation material must be fixed in an augmentation pocket to prevent movement of graft material toward the supratip breakpoint, which can disrupt the L-strut. We conducted a numerical analysis using a FEM to predict tissue/organ behavior and to help clinicians understand the reasons for target tissue/organ collapse and deformation. PMID:27073993

  14. Modeling asymmetric cavity collapse with plasma equations of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Brett; Hawker, Nicholas; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-05-01

    We explore the effect that equation of state (EOS) thermodynamics has on shock-driven cavity-collapse processes. We account for full, multidimensional, unsteady hydrodynamics and incorporate a range of relevant EOSs (polytropic, QEOS-type, and SESAME). In doing so, we show that simplified analytic EOSs, like ideal gas, capture certain critical parameters of the collapse such as velocity of the main transverse jet and pressure at jet strike, while also providing a good representation of overall trends. However, more sophisticated EOSs yield different and more relevant estimates of temperature and density, especially for higher incident shock strengths. We model incident shocks ranging from 0.1 to 1000 GPa, the latter being of interest in investigating the warm dense matter regime for which experimental and theoretical EOS data are difficult to obtain. At certain shock strengths, there is a factor of two difference in predicted density between QEOS-type and SESAME EOS, indicating cavity collapse as an experimental method for exploring EOS in this range.

  15. Specificity of the initial collapse in the folding of the cold shock protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magg, Christine; Kubelka, Jan; Holtermann, Georg; Haas, Elisha; Schmid, Franz X

    2006-07-28

    The two-state folding reaction of the cold shock protein from Bacillus caldolyticus (Bc-Csp) is preceded by a rapid chain collapse. A fast shortening of intra-protein distances was revealed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements with protein variants that carried individual pairs of donor and acceptor chromophores at various positions along the polypeptide chain. Here we investigated the specificity of this rapid compaction. Energy transfer experiments that probed the stretching of strand beta2 and the close approach between the strands beta1 and beta2 revealed that the beta1-beta2 hairpin is barely formed in the collapsed form, although it is native-like in the folding transition state of Bc-Csp. The time course of the collapse could not be resolved by pressure or temperature jump experiments, indicating that the collapsed and extended forms are not separated by an energy barrier. The co-solute (NH4)2SO4 stabilizes both native Bc-Csp and the collapsed form, which suggests that the large hydrated SO4(2-) ions are excluded from the surface of the collapsed form in a similar fashion as they are excluded from folded Bc-Csp. Ethylene glycol increases the stability of proteins because it is excluded preferentially from the backbone, which is accessible in the unfolded state. The collapsed form of Bc-Csp resembles the unfolded form in its interaction with ethylene glycol, suggesting that in the collapsed form the backbone is still accessible to water and small molecules. Our results thus rule out that the collapsed form is a folding intermediate with native-like chain topology. It is better described as a mixture of compact conformations that belong to the unfolded state ensemble. However, some of its structural elements are reminiscent of the native protein.

  16. Large-Scale Synthesis and Systematic Photoluminescence Properties of Monolayer MoS2 on Fused Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yi; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Yilun; Sheng, Bowen; Wang, Xinqiang; Dai, Lun

    2016-07-20

    Monolayer MoS2, with fascinating mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, has generated enormous scientific curiosity and industrial interest. Controllable and scalable synthesis of monolayer MoS2 on various desired substrates has significant meaning in both basic scientific research and device application. Recent years have witnessed many advances in the direct synthesis of single-crystalline MoS2 flakes or their polycrystalline aggregates on numerous diverse substrates, such as SiO2-Si, mica, sapphire, h-BN, and SrTiO3, etc. In this work, we used the dual-temperature-zone atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition method to directly synthesize large-scale monolayer MoS2 on fused silica, the most ordinary transparent insulating material in daily life. We systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) properties of monolayer MoS2 on fused silica and SiO2-Si substrates, which have different thermal conductivity coefficients and thermal expansion coefficients. We found that there exists a stronger strain on monolayer MoS2 grown on fused silica, and the strain becomes more obvious as temperature decreases. Moreover, the monolayer MoS2 grown on fused silica exhibits the unique trait of a fractal shape with tortuous edges and has stronger adsorbability. The monolayer MoS2 grown on fused silica may find application in sensing, energy storage, and transparent optoelectronics, etc.

  17. Collapse of a charged radiating star with shear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Maharaj; M Govender

    2000-05-01

    The junction conditions for a magnetohydrodynamic fluid sphere undergoing dissipative gravitational collapse in the form of a radial heat flux with shear are obtained. These conditions extend particular results of earlier treatments. We demonstrate that the pressure is proportional to the magnitude of the heat flux as is the case in shear-free models. However in our case the gravitational potentials must be solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell system of equations. The mass function () is increased by a factor related to the charge of the radiating star. Physical quantities relating to the local conservation of momentum and surface redshift are obtained.

  18. Pasta phases in core-collapse supernova matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Helena; Chiacchiera, Silvia; Providência, Constança

    2016-04-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean field models. Three different calculations are used for comparison, the Thomas-Fermi (TF), the Coexisting Phases (CP) and the Compressible Liquid Drop (CLD) approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. The free energy and pressure, in the space of particle number densities and temperatures expected to cover the pasta region, are calculated. Finally, a comparison with a finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  19. Gravitational collapse with rotating thin shells and cosmic censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, Jorge V

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational collapse of matter in the presence of rotation is a mostly unexplored topic but it might have important implications for cosmic censorship. Recently a convenient setup was identified to address this problem, by considering thin matter shells at the interface between two equal angular momenta Myers-Perry spacetimes in five dimensions. This note provides more details about the matching of such cohomogeneity-1 spacetimes and extends the results obtained therein to arbitrary higher odd dimensions. It is also pointed out that oscillatory orbits for shells in asymptotically flat spacetimes can be naturally obtained if the matter has a negative pressure component.

  20. Energy partition at the collapse of spherical cavitation bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, M; Obreschkow, D; Kobel, P; Dorsaz, N; de Bosset, A; Farhat, M

    2012-10-01

    Spherically collapsing cavitation bubbles produce a shock wave followed by a rebound bubble. Here we present a systematic investigation of the energy partition between the rebound and the shock. Highly spherical cavitation bubbles are produced in microgravity, which suppresses the buoyant pressure gradient that otherwise deteriorates the sphericity of the bubbles. We measure the radius of the rebound bubble and estimate the shock energy as a function of the initial bubble radius (2-5.6mm) and the liquid pressure (10-80kPa). Those measurements uncover a systematic pressure dependence of the energy partition between rebound and shock. We demonstrate that these observations agree with a physical model relying on a first-order approximation of the liquid compressibility and an adiabatic treatment of the noncondensable gas inside the bubble. Using this model we find that the energy partition between rebound and shock is dictated by a single nondimensional parameter ξ=Δpγ6/[p(g0)1/γ(ρc2)1-1/γ], where Δp=p∞ - pv is the driving pressure, p∞ is the static pressure in the liquid, pv is the vapor pressure, pg0 is the pressure of the noncondensable gas at the maximal bubble radius, γ is the adiabatic index of the noncondensable gas, ρ is the liquid density, and c is the speed of sound in the liquid.

  1. Energy partition at the collapse of spherical cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, M.; Obreschkow, D.; Kobel, P.; Dorsaz, N.; de Bosset, A.; Farhat, M.

    2012-10-01

    Spherically collapsing cavitation bubbles produce a shock wave followed by a rebound bubble. Here we present a systematic investigation of the energy partition between the rebound and the shock. Highly spherical cavitation bubbles are produced in microgravity, which suppresses the buoyant pressure gradient that otherwise deteriorates the sphericity of the bubbles. We measure the radius of the rebound bubble and estimate the shock energy as a function of the initial bubble radius (2-5.6mm) and the liquid pressure (10-80kPa). Those measurements uncover a systematic pressure dependence of the energy partition between rebound and shock. We demonstrate that these observations agree with a physical model relying on a first-order approximation of the liquid compressibility and an adiabatic treatment of the noncondensable gas inside the bubble. Using this model we find that the energy partition between rebound and shock is dictated by a single nondimensional parameter ξ=Δpγ6/[pg01/γ(ρc2)1-1/γ], where Δp=p∞-pv is the driving pressure, p∞ is the static pressure in the liquid, pv is the vapor pressure, pg0 is the pressure of the noncondensable gas at the maximal bubble radius, γ is the adiabatic index of the noncondensable gas, ρ is the liquid density, and c is the speed of sound in the liquid.

  2. Biological effects of stellar collapse neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I

    1996-01-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create a radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  3. Core-Collapse supernovae and its progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars unable to sustain gravitational collapse, at the end of nuclear burning stage, turns out into core-collapse supernovae, leaving behind compact objects like neutron stars or black holes. The progenitor properties like mass and metallicity primarily governs the explosion parameters and type of compact remnant. In this contribution we summarize observational study of three Core Collapse type IIP SNe 2012aw, 2013ab and 2013ej, which are rigorously observed from ARIES and other Indian observatories and discuss their progenitor and explosion properties.

  4. How fast is the wave function collapse?

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatiev, A Yu

    2012-01-01

    Using complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formulation, a new kind of non-linear equations is proposed that have almost classical structure and extend the Schroedinger equation to describe the collapse of the wave function as a finite-time process. Experimental bounds on the collapse time are reported (of order 0.1 ms to 0.1 ps) and its convenient dimensionless measure is introduced. This parameter helps to identify the areas where sensitive probes of the possible collapse dynamics can be done. Examples are experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates, ultracold neutrons or ultrafast optics.

  5. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Casadio, Roberto; Giusti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell) gravitons that account for the (negative) Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with the area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive) interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without singularity.

  6. On the quantum corrected gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Ramón, E-mail: ramon.torres-herrera@upc.edu; Fayos, Francesc, E-mail: f.fayos@upc.edu

    2015-07-30

    Based on a previously found general class of quantum improved exact solutions composed of non-interacting (dust) particles, we model the gravitational collapse of stars. As the modeled star collapses a closed apparent 3-horizon is generated due to the consideration of quantum effects. The effect of the subsequent emission of Hawking radiation related to this horizon is taken into consideration. Our computations lead us to argue that a total evaporation could be reached. The inferred global picture of the spacetime corresponding to gravitational collapse is devoid of both event horizons and shell-focusing singularities. As a consequence, there is no information paradox and no need of firewalls.

  7. On the quantum corrected gravitational collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Torres

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a previously found general class of quantum improved exact solutions composed of non-interacting (dust particles, we model the gravitational collapse of stars. As the modeled star collapses a closed apparent 3-horizon is generated due to the consideration of quantum effects. The effect of the subsequent emission of Hawking radiation related to this horizon is taken into consideration. Our computations lead us to argue that a total evaporation could be reached. The inferred global picture of the spacetime corresponding to gravitational collapse is devoid of both event horizons and shell-focusing singularities. As a consequence, there is no information paradox and no need of firewalls.

  8. Chiral hierarchical self-assembly in Langmuir monolayers of diacetylenic lipids

    KAUST Repository

    Basnet, Prem B.

    2013-01-01

    When compressed in the intermediate temperature range below the chain-melting transition yet in the low-pressure liquid phase, Langmuir monolayers made of chiral lipid molecules form hierarchical structures. Using Brewster angle microscopy to reveal this structure, we found that as the liquid monolayer is compressed, an optically anisotropic condensed phase nucleates in the form of long, thin claws. These claws pack closely to form stripes. This appears to be a new mechanism for forming stripes in Langmuir monolayers. In the lower temperature range, these stripes arrange into spirals within overall circular domains, while near the chain-melting transition, the stripes arrange into target patterns. We attributed this transition to a change in boundary conditions at the core of the largest-scale circular domains. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Large-Size Monolayer MoSe2 Crystals on Molten Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianyi; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Tan, Sherman J R; Xu, Hai; Wu, Bo; Liu, Bo; Fu, Deyi; Fu, Wei; Geng, Dechao; Liu, Yanpeng; Liu, Wei; Tang, Wei; Li, Linjun; Zhou, Wu; Sum, Tze Chien; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-25

    We report the fast growth of high-quality millimeter-size monolayer MoSe2 crystals on molten glass using an ambient pressure CVD system. We found that the isotropic surface of molten glass suppresses nucleation events and greatly improves the growth of large crystalline domains. Triangular monolayer MoSe2 crystals with sizes reaching ∼2.5 mm, and with a room-temperature carrier mobility up to ∼95 cm(2)/(V·s), can be synthesized in 5 min. The method can also be used to synthesize millimeter-size monolayer MoS2 crystals. Our results demonstrate that "liquid-state" glass is a highly promising substrate for the low-cost growth of high-quality large-size 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs).

  10. Assembly of organic monolayers on polydicyclopentadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perring, Mathew; Bowden, Ned B

    2008-09-16

    The first well-defined organic monolayers assembled on polydicyclopentadiene is reported. Commercial grade dicyclopentadiene was polymerized with the Grubbs' second-generation catalyst in a fume hood under ambient conditions at very low monomer to catalyst loadings of 20 000 to 1. This simple method resulted in a polymer that was a hard solid and appeared slightly yellow. Brief exposures of a few seconds of this polymer to Br 2 lead to a surface with approximately half of the olefins brominated as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The ATR-IR spectroscopy was carried out with the polymer in contact with a Ge hemisphere housed in a GATR accessory from Harrick. This brominated polydicyclopentadiene was immersed in DMF with 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzylamine to assemble a monolayer. The amines displaced Br on the surface to form a monolayer that exposed a CF 3 group on the surface. The surface was extensively studied by XPS using the method described by Tougaard to find the distribution of F within the surface layer. The ratio for the peak area, Ap, to the background height, B, measured 30 eV below the peak maximum was 109.8 eV. This value clearly indicated that F was found only at the surface and was not found within the polymer. A surface coverage of 1.37 amines per nm (2) was estimated and indicated that the monolayer was 28% as dense as a similar monolayer assembled from thiols on gold. Finally, a simple method to pattern these monolayers using soft lithography is described. This work is critically important because it reports the first monolayers on a relatively new and emerging polymer that has many desirable physical characteristics such as high hardness, chemical stability, and ease of forming different shapes.

  11. Interaction of methionine-enkephalins with raft-forming lipids: monolayers and BAM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanova, A; Jordanova, A; Dzimbova, T; Pajpanova, T; Golovinsky, E; Lalchev, Z

    2014-05-01

    Enkephalins (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met/Leu) are opioid peptides with proven antinociceptive action in organism. They interact with opioid receptors belonging to G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. It is known that these receptors are located preferably in membrane rafts composed mainly of sphingomyelin (Sm), cholesterol (Cho), and phosphatidylcholine. In the present work, using Langmuir's monolayer technique in combination with Wilhelmy's method for measuring the surface pressure, the interaction of synthetic methionine-enkephalin and its amidated derivative with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), Sm, and Cho, as well as with their double and triple mixtures, was studied. From the pressure/area isotherms measured, the compressional moduli of the lipids and lipid-peptide monolayers were determined. Our results showed that the addition of the synthetic enkephalins to the monolayers studied led to change in the lipid monolayers characteristics, which was more evident in enkephalinamide case. In addition, using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), the surface morphology of the lipid monolayers, before and after the injection of both enkephalins, was determined. The BAM images showed an increase in surface density of the mixed surface lipids/enkephalins films, especially with double and triple component lipid mixtures. This effect was more pronounced for the enkephalinamide as well. These observations showed that there was an interaction between the peptides and the raft-forming lipids, which was stronger for the amidated peptide, suggesting a difference in folding of both enkephalins. Our research demonstrates the potential of lipid monolayers for elegant and simple membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions at the plane of biomembranes.

  12. Gravitational collapse with decaying vacuum energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Beesham

    2011-09-01

    The effect of dark energy on the end state of spherical radiation collapse is considered within the context of the cosmic censorship hypothesis. It is found that it is possible to have both black holes as well as naked singularities.

  13. Collapsible truss structure is automatically expandable

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Coil springs wound with maximum initial tension in a three-truss, closed loop structure form a collapsible truss structure. The truss automatically expands and provides excellent rigidity and close dimensional tolerance when expanded.

  14. Climate and the Collapse of Maya Civilization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerald H. Haug; Detlef Günther; Larry C. Peterson; Daniel M. Sigman; Konrad A. Hughen; Beat Aeschlimann

    2003-01-01

    .... A seasonally resolved record of titanium shows that the collapse of Maya civilization in the Terminal Classic Period occurred during an extended regional dry period, punctuated by more intense...

  15. Hawking radiation from a collapsing quantum shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, Jorge; Eyheralde, Rodrigo; Gambini, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    We study Hawking radiation from a collapsing shell with uncertainty in its position and momentum. We see there are deviations from the usual spectrum early on in the evolution, tending asymptotically to the usual spectrum plus small corrections.

  16. Signatures of star formation by cold collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sub-virial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed SPH simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (sub-virial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of sub-virial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made either early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the grow...

  17. Loop quantum dynamics of the gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Yaser; Dapor, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We consider a quantum description for a spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a massless scalar field. The effective scenario from loop quantum gravity is applied to a homogeneous interior spacetime. Classical singularity that arises at the final stage of our collapsing system, is resolved and replaced by a quantum bounce. Our main purpose is to investigate the evolution of trapped surfaces during the collapse in semiclassical regime. We show that, in this regime, there exists a threshold scale bellow which no horizon can form as collapse evolves towards the bounce. By employing the matching conditions at the boundary shell, quantum effects are carried out to the exterior region, leading to an improved Vaidya geometry. In addition, the effective mass loss emerging in this model predicts an outward energy flux from the interior quantum geometry regime.

  18. Simple Analytic Models of Gravitational Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, R.

    2005-02-09

    Most general relativity textbooks devote considerable space to the simplest example of a black hole containing a singularity, the Schwarzschild geometry. However only a few discuss the dynamical process of gravitational collapse, by which black holes and singularities form. We present here two types of analytic models for this process, which we believe are the simplest available; the first involves collapsing spherical shells of light, analyzed mainly in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates; the second involves collapsing spheres filled with a perfect fluid, analyzed mainly in Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates. Our main goal is pedagogical simplicity and algebraic completeness, but we also present some results that we believe are new, such as the collapse of a light shell in Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  19. Controlled synthesis of high-quality crystals of monolayer MoS2 for nanoelectronic device application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaonian; Li, Qiang; Hu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional layered materials have attracted significant interest for their potential applications in electronic and optoelectronics devices. Among them, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), especially molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), is extensively studied because of its unique properties....... Monolayer MoS2 so far can be obtained by mechanical exfoliation or chemical vapor deposition (CVD). However, controllable synthesis of large area monolayer MoS2 with high quality needs to be improved and their growth mechanism requires more studies. Here we report a systematical study on controlled...... synthesis of high-quality monolayer MoS2 single crystals using low pressure CVD. Large-size monolayer MoS2 triangles with an edge length up to 405 mu m were successfully synthesized. The Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy studies indicate high homogenous optical characteristic of the synthesized...

  20. Arsia Mons Collapse Pits in IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form. These collapse pits are found on the flank of Arsia Mons and are related to lava tube collapse. Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.8, Longitude 240.4 East (119.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was

  1. Precursory singularities in spherical gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Kayll

    1992-05-01

    General conditions are developed for the formation of naked precursory ('shell-focusing') singularities in spherical gravitational collapse. These singularities owe their nakedness to the fact that the gravitational potential fails to be single valued prior to the onset of a true gravitational singularity. It is argued that they do not violate the spirit of cosmic censorship. Rather, they may well be an essentially generic feature of relativistic gravitational collapse.

  2. DR21 Main: A Collapsing Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Larry

    2008-01-01

    The molecular cloud, DR21 Main, is an example of a large-scale gravitational collapse about an axis near the plane of the sky where the collapse is free of major disturbances due to rotation or other effects. Using flux maps, polarimetric maps, and measurements of the field inclination by comparing the line widths of ion and neutral species, we estimate the temperature, mass, magnetic field, and the turbulent kinetic, mean magnetic, and gravitational potential energies, and present a 3D model...

  3. Nonlinear Progressive Collapse Analysis Including Distributed Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Osama Ahmed; Imam Zubair Syed; Khattab Rania

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the effect of incorporating distributed plasticity in nonlinear analytical models used to assess the potential for progressive collapse of steel framed regular building structures. Emphasis on this paper is on the deformation response under the notionally removed column, in a typical Alternate Path (AP) method. The AP method employed in this paper is based on the provisions of the Unified Facilities Criteria – Design of Buildings to Resist Progressive Collapse, develop...

  4. Progressive collapse and methods of prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilieva, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the process of progressive collapse and to find more methods and approaches to design the structure for preventing from this kind of failure. And the last aim was to find Russian norms and standards and make calculations on progressive collapse of the trade center, according to them. In this way the work was commissioned by Finnmap Consulting Oy. The thesis should be interesting to design engineers working with designing the large-span structures o...

  5. Cardiovascular collapse with attempted pericardial drain withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly B Kraus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tamponade is a rare but serious emergency condition in the pediatric population. As treatment, a pericardial drain is often placed to evacuate the fluid. We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with cardiac tamponade secondary to renal failure. After the tamponade resolved, she suffered cardiovascular collapse upon attempted drain withdrawal. This case highlights an unusual cause for cardiovascular collapse, which occurred on blind removal of a pericardial drain.

  6. Cardiovascular collapse with attempted pericardial drain withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Molly B Kraus; Spitznagel, Rachel A; Kugler, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a rare but serious emergency condition in the pediatric population. As treatment, a pericardial drain is often placed to evacuate the fluid. We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with cardiac tamponade secondary to renal failure. After the tamponade resolved, she suffered cardiovascular collapse upon attempted drain withdrawal. This case highlights an unusual cause for cardiovascular collapse, which occurred on blind removal of a pericardial drain.

  7. Scalar field collapse with an exponential potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Soumya

    2017-02-01

    An analogue of the Oppenheimer-Synder collapsing model is treated analytically, where the matter source is a scalar field with an exponential potential. An exact solution is derived followed by matching to a suitable exterior geometry, and an analysis of the visibility of the singularity. In some situations, the collapse indeed leads to a finite time curvature singularity, which is always hidden from the exterior by an apparent horizon.

  8. The universe remembers no wavefunction collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2016-01-01

    Two thought experiments are analyzed, revealing that the quantum state of the universe does not contain definitive evidence of the wavefunction collapse. The first thought experiment shows that unitary quantum evolution alone can account for the outcomes of any combination of quantum experiments. This is in contradiction with the standard view on quantum measurement, which appeals to the wavefunction collapse, but it is in full agreement with the special state proposal (L.S. Schulman in Phys ...

  9. Four tails problems for dynamical collapse theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Kelvin J.

    2015-02-01

    The primary quantum mechanical equation of motion entails that measurements typically do not have determinate outcomes, but result in superpositions of all possible outcomes. Dynamical collapse theories (e.g. GRW) supplement this equation with a stochastic Gaussian collapse function, intended to collapse the superposition of outcomes into one outcome. But the Gaussian collapses are imperfect in a way that leaves the superpositions intact. This is the tails problem. There are several ways of making this problem more precise. But many authors dismiss the problem without considering the more severe formulations. Here I distinguish four distinct tails problems. The first (bare tails problem) and second (structured tails problem) exist in the literature. I argue that while the first is a pseudo-problem, the second has not been adequately addressed. The third (multiverse tails problem) reformulates the second to account for recently discovered dynamical consequences of collapse. Finally the fourth (tails problem dilemma) shows that solving the third by replacing the Gaussian with a non-Gaussian collapse function introduces new conflict with relativity theory.

  10. Behavior of lysozyme adsorbed onto biological liquid crystal lipid monolayer at the air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Shi, Ruixin; Hao, Changchun; Chen, Huan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Junhua; Xu, Guoqing; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between proteins and lipids is one of the basic problems of modern biochemistry and biophysics. The purpose of this study is to compare the penetration degree of lysozyme into 1,2-diapalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethano-lamine (DPPE) by analyzing the data of surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms and surface pressure-time (π-T) curves. Lysozyme can penetrate into both DPPC and DPPE monolayers because of the increase of surface pressure at an initial pressure of 15 mN/m. However, the changes of DPPE are larger than DPPC, indicating stronger interaction of lysozyme with DPPE than DPPC. The reason may be due to the different head groups and phase state of DPPC and DPPE monolayers at the surface pressure of 15 mN/m. Atomic force microscopy reveals that lysozyme was absorbed by DPPC and DPPE monolayers, which leads to self-aggregation and self-assembly, forming irregular multimers and conical multimeric. Through analysis, we think that the process of polymer formation is similar to the aggregation mechanism of amyloid fibers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. GK201603026), and the National University Science and Technology Innovation Project of China (Grant No. 201610718013).

  11. Scapholunate advanced collapse and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse arthritis--update on evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Robert J

    2011-04-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse are common patterns of wrist arthritis. Scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse is caused by trauma, whereas SLAC wrist may also result from chronic pseudogout and can appear bilaterally without a clear history of injury. Surgical treatment for SLAC wrist includes 4-corner arthrodesis, capitolunate arthrodesis, complete wrist arthrodesis, proximal row carpectomy (PRC), denervation, and radial styloidectomy. Scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse wrist has the additional surgical option of excision of the distal ununited scaphoid fragment. Controversy persists over the relative merits of PRC versus 4-corner arthrodesis and whether PRC may be performed in the setting of capitate arthritis.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Response and Collapse for Steel Frame Structures Subjected to Blast Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiuhua; DUAN Zhongdong; ZHANG Chunwei

    2008-01-01

    The progressive collapse of steel frame structures under the blast load was investigated using LS-DYNA.The multi-material Eulerian and Lagrangian coupling algorithm was adopted.A fluid-structure coupling finite element model was established which consists of Lagrange element for simulating steel frame structures and concrete ground,multiple ALE element for simulating air and TNT explosive material.Numerical simulations of the blast pressure wave propagation,structural dynamic responses and deformation,and progressive collapse of a five-story steel frame structure in the event of an explosion near above ground were performed.The numerical analysis showed that the Lagrangian and Eulerian coupling algorithm gave good simulations of the shock wave propagation in the mediums and blast load effects on the structure.The columns subjected to blast load may collapse by shear yielding rather than by flexural deformation.The columns and joints of steel beam to column in the front steel frame structure generated enormous plastic deformation subjected to intensive blast waves,and columns lost carrying capacity,subsequently leading to the collapse of the whole structure.The approach coupling influence between structural deformation and fluid load well simulated the progressive collapse process of structures,and provided an effective tool for analyzing the collapse mechanism of the steel frame structure under blast load.

  13. Intermolecular forces in lipid monolayers. Two-dimensional virial coefficients for pentadecanoic acid from micromanometry on spread monolayers at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Norman R; Pethica, Brian A

    2009-07-07

    The lateral intermolecular forces between surfactant or lipid molecules in monolayers at interfaces are fundamental to understanding the phenomena of surface activity and the interactions of lipids in two-dimensional structures such as smectic phases and biomembranes. The classical approach to these forces is via the two-dimensional virial coefficients, which requires precise micromanometry on monolayer isotherms in the dilute gaseous region. Low pressure isotherms out to high surface areas in the two-dimensional gas range have been measured at 15, 25 and 30 degrees C for insoluble monolayers of n-pentadecanoic acid spread at the interface between water-vapour saturated air and a dilute aqueous solution of HCl. The data allow estimates of virial coefficients up to the third term. The second virial coefficients are compared with those predicted from a statistical mechanical model for monolayers of n-alkylcarboxylic acids treated as side-by-side parallel chains extended at the surface with the carboxyl head groups shielded in the water phase. The two sets coincide at approximately 26 degrees C, but the experimental estimates show a much larger dependence on temperature than the model predicts. Chain conformation effects, head group interactions and surface field polarization are discussed as possible temperature-dependent contributions to the lateral potentials of mean force.

  14. The effect of diaphragm contraction on upper airway collapsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, David R; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Platt, Peter R; Schwartz, Alan R; Eastwood, Peter R

    2013-08-01

    Increasing lung volume increases upper airway patency and decreases airway resistance and collapsibility. The role of diaphragm contraction in producing these changes remains unclear. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of selective diaphragm contraction, induced by phrenic nerve stimulation, on upper airway collapsibility and the extent to which any observed change was attributable to lung volume-related changes in pressure gradients or to diaphragm descent-related mediastinal traction. Continuous bilateral transcutaneous cervical phrenic nerve stimulation (30 Hz) was applied to nine supine, anesthetized human subjects during transient decreases in airway pressure to levels sufficient to produce flow limitation when unstimulated. Stimulation was applied at two intensities (low and high) and its effects on lung volume and airflow quantified relative to unstimulated conditions. Lung volume increased by 386 ± 269 ml (means ± SD) and 761 ± 556 ml during low and high stimulation, respectively (P traction from diaphragm descent. The study provides a rationale for use of continuous phrenic stimulation to treat obstructive sleep apnea.

  15. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnoea: mechanisms for increased collapsibility of the passive pharyngeal airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Shiroh

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests there are significant links between obesity and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), with a particular emphasis on the importance of fat distribution in the development of OSA. In patients with OSA, the structure of the pharyngeal airway collapses. A collapsible tube within a rigid box collapses either due to decreased intraluminal pressure or increased external tissue pressure (i.e. reduction in transmural pressure), or due to reduction in the longitudinal tension of the tube. Accordingly, obesity should structurally increase the collapsibility of the pharyngeal airway due to excessive fat deposition at two distinct locations. In the pharyngeal airway region, excessive soft tissue for a given maxillomandibular enclosure size (upper airway anatomical imbalance) can increase tissue pressure surrounding the pharyngeal airway, thereby narrowing the airway. Even mild obesity may cause anatomical imbalance in individuals with a small maxilla and mandible. Lung volume reduction due to excessive central fat deposition may decrease longitudinal tracheal traction forces and pharyngeal wall tension, changing the 'tube law' in the pharyngeal airway (lung volume dependence of the upper airway). The lung volume dependence of pharyngeal airway patency appears to contribute more significantly to the development of OSA in morbidly obese, apnoeic patients. Neurostructural interactions required for stable breathing may be influenced by obesity-related hormones and cytokines. Accumulating evidence strongly supports these speculations, but further intensive research is needed.

  16. Growth and collapse of a vapor bubble in a narrow tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ory, E.; Yuan, H.; Prosperetti, A.; Popinet, S.; Zaleski, S.

    2000-01-01

    The fluid mechanical aspects of the axisymmetric growth and collapse of a bubble in a narrow tube filled with a viscous liquid are studied numerically. The tube is open at both ends and connects two liquid reservoirs at constant pressure. The bubble is initially a small sphere and growth is triggere

  17. Collapsing Bubble in Metal for High Energy Density Physics Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, S F; Barnard, J J; Leung, P T; Yu, S S

    2011-04-13

    This paper presents a new idea to produce matter in the high energy density physics (HEDP) regime in the laboratory using an intense ion beam. A gas bubble created inside a solid metal may collapse by driving it with an intense ion beam. The melted metal will compress the gas bubble and supply extra energy to it. Simulations show that the spherical implosion ratio can be about 5 and at the stagnation point, the maximum density, temperature and pressure inside the gas bubble can go up to nearly 2 times solid density, 10 eV and a few megabar (Mbar) respectively. The proposed experiment is the first to permit access into the Mbar regime with existing or near-term ion facilities, and opens up possibilities for new physics gained through careful comparisons of simulations with measurements of quantities like stagnation radius, peak temperature and peak pressure at the metal wall.

  18. Thermal ripples in model molybdenum disulfide monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remsing, Richard C.; Klein, Michael L. [Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Center for the Computational, Design of Functional Layered Materials, and Department of Chemistry, Temple University, 1925 N. 12th St., 19122, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Waghmare, Umesh V. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, 560 064, Jakkur, Bangalore (India)

    2017-01-15

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) monolayers have the potential to revolutionize nanotechnology. To reach this potential, it will be necessary to understand the behavior of this two-dimensional (2D) material on large length scales and under thermal conditions. Herein, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nature of the rippling induced by thermal fluctuations in monolayers of the 2H and 1T phases of MoS{sub 2}. The 1T phase is found to be more rigid than the 2H phase. Both monolayer phases are predicted to follow long wavelength scaling behavior typical of systems with anharmonic coupling between vibrational modes as predicted by classic theories of membrane-like systems. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Thermal transport in monolayer InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimagoudar, Arun S.; Ma, Jinlong; Chen, Yani; Li, Wu

    2017-08-01

    Two-dimensional InSe, a recently synthesized semiconductor having a moderate band gap, has gained attention due to its ultra high mobility and high photo-responsivity. In this work, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of monolayer InSe by solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) with first-principles calculated inter atomic force constants. κ of monolayer InSe is isotropic and found to be around 27.6 W m K-1 at room temperature along the in-plane direction. The size dependence of κ shows the size effect can persist up to 20 μm. Further, κ can be reduced to half by tuning the sample size to 300 nm. This low value suggests that κ might be a limiting factor for emerging nanoelectronic applications of monolayer InSe.

  20. Elastic bending modulus of monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Qiang; Huang Rui [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Arroyo, Marino [Department of Applied Mathematics 3, LaCaN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2009-05-21

    An analytic formula is derived for the elastic bending modulus of monolayer graphene based on an empirical potential for solid-state carbon atoms. Two physical origins are identified for the non-vanishing bending stiffness of the atomically thin graphene sheet, one due to the bond-angle effect and the other resulting from the bond-order term associated with the dihedral angles. The analytical prediction compares closely with ab initio energy calculations. Pure bending of graphene monolayers into cylindrical tubes is simulated by a molecular mechanics approach, showing slight nonlinearity and anisotropy in the tangent bending modulus as the bending curvature increases. An intrinsic coupling between bending and in-plane strain is noted for graphene monolayers rolled into carbon nanotubes. (fast track communication)

  1. Fullerene monolayer formation by spray coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenka, J; Flipse, C F J

    2010-02-10

    Many large molecular complexes are limited in thin film applications by their insufficient thermal stability, which excludes deposition via commonly used vapour phase deposition methods. Here we demonstrate an alternative way of monolayer formation of large molecules by a simple spray coating method under ambient conditions. This technique has been successfully applied on C(60) dissolved in toluene and carbon disulfide. Monolayer thick C(60) films have been formed on graphite and gold surfaces at particular deposition parameters, as confirmed by atomic force and scanning tunnelling microscopies. Structural and electronic properties of spray coated C(60) films on Au(111) have been found comparable to thermally evaporated C(60). We attribute the monolayer formation in spray coating to a crystallization process mediated by an ultrathin solution film on a sample surface.

  2. Magneto photoluminescence measurements of tungsten disulphide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Jan; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Heimbrodt, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides have attracted great interest in the last few years. Thinned down to the monolayer limit they change from an indirect band structure to a direct band gap in the visible region. Due to the monolayer thickness the inversion symmetry of the crystal is broken and spin and valley are coupled to each other. The degeneracy between the two equivalent valleys, K and K‧, respectively, can be lifted by applying an external magnetic field. Here, we present photoluminescence measurements of CVD-grown tungsten disulphide (WS2) monolayers at temperatures of 2 K. By applying magnetic fields up to 7 T in Faraday geometry, a splitting of the photoluminescence peaks can be observed. The magnetic field dependence of the A-exciton, the trion and three bound exciton states is discussed and the corresponding g-factors are determined.

  3. The influence of an antitumor lipid - erucylphosphocholine - on artificial lipid raft system modeled as Langmuir monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnętrzak, Anita; Łątka, Kazimierz; Makyła-Juzak, Katarzyna; Zemla, Joanna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    Outer layer of cellular membrane contains ordered domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, called 'lipid rafts', which play various biological roles, i.e., are involved in the induction of cell death by apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that these domains may constitute binding sites for selected drugs. For example alkylphosphocholines (APCs), which are new-generation antitumor agents characterized by high selectivity and broad spectrum of activity, are known to have their molecular targets located at cellular membrane and their selective accumulation in tumor cells has been hypothesized to be linked with the alternation of biophysical properties of lipid rafts. To get a deeper insight into this issue, interactions between representative APC: erucylphosphocholine, and artificial lipid raft system, modeled as Langmuir monolayer (composed of cholesterol and sphingomyelin mixed in 1:2 proportion) were investigated. The Langmuir monolayer experiments, based on recording surface pressure-area isotherms, were complemented with Brewster angle microscopy results, which enabled direct visualization of the monolayers structure. In addition, the investigated monolayers were transferred onto solid supports and studied with AFM. The interactions between model raft system and erucylphosphocholine were analyzed qualitatively (with mean molecular area values) as well as quantitatively (with ΔG(exc) function). The obtained results indicate that erucylphosphocholine introduced to raft-mimicking model membrane causes fluidizing effect and weakens the interactions between cholesterol and sphingomyelin, which results in phase separation at high surface pressures. This leads to the redistribution of cholesterol molecules in model raft, which confirms the results observed in biological studies.

  4. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-07-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a (10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy.

  5. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  6. Surgical repair of traumatically induced collapsing trachea in an ostrich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, S R; Taylor, T S; Johnson, J H; Heisterkamp, K B; Sanders, E A

    1995-08-15

    A region of tracheal collapse was identified by endoscopy after surgical repair of a traumatic injury to the neck in an ostrich. During periods of excitation, the ostrich would become dyspneic and collapse. A tracheal split-ring prosthesis was placed surgically to support the collapsing trachea. This technique, which is frequently used in dogs, is applicable for use in birds with collapsing trachea.

  7. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingchen Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup, while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  8. Sub-THz Characterisation of Monolayer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Dadrasnia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the optical and electrical characteristics of monolayer graphene by using pulsed optoelectronic terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the frequency range of 325–500 GHz based on fast direct measurements of phase and amplitude. We also show that these parameters can, however, be measured with higher resolution using a free space continuous wave measurement technique associated with a vector network analyzer that offers a good dynamic range. All the scattering parameters (both magnitude and phase are measured simultaneously. The Nicholson-Ross-Weir method is implemented to extract the monolayer graphene parameters at the aforementioned frequency range.

  9. Nonlinear optical studies of organic monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Y.R.

    1988-02-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical effects are forbidden in a medium with inversion symmetry, but are necessarily allowed at a surface where the inversion summary is broken. They are often sufficiently strong so that a submonolayer perturbation of the surface can be readily detected. They can therefore be used as effective tools to study monolayers adsorbed at various interfaces. We discuss here a number of recent experiments in which optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) are employed to probe and characterize organic monolayers. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Review of collapse triggering mechanism of collapsible soils due to wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Loess soil deposits are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions and constitute about 10% of land area of the world. These soils typically have a loose honeycomb-type meta-stable structure that is susceptible to a large reduction in total volume or collapse upon wetting. Collapse characteristics contribute to various problems to infrastructures that are constructed on loess soils. For this reason, collapse triggering mechanism for loess soils has been of significant interest for researchers and practitioners all over the world. This paper aims at providing a state-of-the-art review on collapse mechanism with special reference to loess soil deposits. The collapse mechanism studies are summarized under three different categories, i.e. traditional approaches, microstructure approach, and soil mechanics-based approaches. The traditional and microstructure approaches for interpreting the collapse behavior are comprehensively summarized and critically reviewed based on the experimental results from the literature. The soil mechanics-based approaches proposed based on the experimental results of both compacted soils and natural loess soils are reviewed highlighting their strengths and limitations for estimating the collapse behavior. Simpler soil mechanics-based approaches with less parameters or parameters that are easy-to-determine from conventional tests are suggested for future research to better understand the collapse behavior of natural loess soils. Such studies would be more valuable for use in conventional geotechnical engineering practice applications.

  11. High-Quality Alkyl Monolayers on Silicon Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieval, A.B.; Linke, R.; Zuilhof, H.; Sudh"lter, E.J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Covalent attachment of functionalized monolayers onto silicon surfaces (see Figure for examples) is presented here as a strategy for surface modification. The preparation and structure of both unfunctionalized and functionalized alkyl-based monolayers are described, as are potential applications,

  12. Blue straggler formation at core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2016-01-01

    Among the most striking feature of blue straggler stars (BSS) is the presence of multiple sequences of BSSs in the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of several globular clusters. It is often envisaged that such a multiple BSS sequence would arise due a recent core collapse of the host cluster, triggering a number of stellar collisions and binary mass transfers simultaneously over a brief episode of time. Here we examine this scenario using direct N-body computations of moderately massive star clusters (of order 10^4 Msun ). As a preliminary attempt, these models are initiated with approx. 8-10 Gyr old stellar population and King profiles of high concentrations, being "tuned" to undergo core collapse quickly. BSSs are indeed found to form in a "burst" at the onset of the core collapse and several of such BS-bursts occur during the post-core-collapse phase. In those models that include a few percent primordial binaries, both collisional and binary BSSs form after the onset of the (near) core-collapse. However, t...

  13. Collapsibility and Wettability of Hydrothermally Treated Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghane Mirzaee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Study on collapsibility of oriental beech (Fagus orientalis and paulownia (Paulownia fortune woods due to their hydrothermal modification as well as the wettability and the water absorption were the main concerns of this research work. Out of these species, blocks of sizes 50×6×6cm were prepared and treated at temperatures of 130 and 150°C with a holding time of 30min in a stainless steel reactor containing the water. Oven dried weights and dimensions of the blocks were measured before and after the hydrothermal treatment to determine the density, collapsibility and mass loss due to applied treatment. Furthermore, small blocks of the treated wood were prepared and soaked in water for 1000-hr to determine their water absorption. The wettability of the woods were also measured to determine the water repellency. Results revealed that any raise of treatment temperature up to 150°C increases the density and the collapsibility. Treated wood collapsed in all directions; however, tangential collapse was much worse than the other directions. The contact angle was increased by rise of the treatment temperature. Hydrothermal treatment has reduced water absorption and increased the hydrophobicity of the woods.

  14. Anterior septal deviation and contralateral alar collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalek, P; Hahn, A

    2011-01-01

    Septal deviation is often found in conjunction with other pathological conditions that adversely affect nasal patency. Anterior septal deviation, together with contralateral alar collapse, is a relatively rare type of anatomical and functional incompetence. In our experience, it can often be resolved with septoplasty, without the necessity of surgery involving the external valve. The aim of this paper was to verify this hypothesis prospectively. Twelve patients with anterior septal deviation and simultaneous alar collapse on the opposite side were prospectively enrolled in the study. Subjective assessment of nasal patency was made on post-operative day 1, and again 6 months after surgery, using a subjective evaluation of nasal breathing. The width of the nostril (alar-columellar distance) on the side with the alar collapse was measured during inspiration pre-operatively, 1 day after surgery and again 6 months after surgery. Immediately after surgery, all patients reported improved or excellent nasal breathing on the side of the original septal deviation. On the collapsed side, one patient reported no change in condition. With the exception of one patient, all measurements showed some degree of improvement in the extension of the alar-columellar distance. The average benefit 6 months after surgery was an improvement of 4.54 mm. In our group of patients (anterior septal deviation and simultaneous contralateral alar collapse and no obvious structural changes of the alar cartilage) we found septoplasty to be entirely suitable and we recommend it as the treatment of choice in such cases.

  15. Motion of Three Vortices near Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Leoncini, X; Zaslavsky, G M

    2000-01-01

    A system of three point vortices in an unbounded plane has a special family of self-similarly contracting or expanding solutions: during the motion, vortex triangle remains similar to the original one, while its area decreases (grows) at a constant rate. A contracting configuration brings three vortices to a single point in a finite time; this phenomenon is known as vortex collapse and is of principal importance for many-vortex systems. The self-similar motion (contracting or expanding) is not generic, it arises when vortex strengths and initial positions satisfy two special collapse conditions. Dynamics of close-to-collapse vortex configurations depends on the way the collapse conditions are violated. We show, that when two of the vortices are identical, it is possible to reduce a three-vortex system to a problem of motion of a particle in an effective potential, defined by initial conditions. Using the effective potential representation, a detailed quantitative analysis of different types of near-collapse d...

  16. Photoluminescence and pressure effects in short period InN/nGaN superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staszczak, G.; Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of photoluminescence and its dependence on hydrostatic pressure are performed on a set of InN/nGaN superlattices with one InN monolayer and with different numbers of GaN monolayers. The emission energies, EPL, measured at ambient pressure, are close to the value of the band gap, Eg...

  17. Photoluminescence and pressure effects in short period InN/nGaN superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staszczak, G.; Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.;

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of photoluminescence and its dependence on hydrostatic pressure are performed on a set of InN/nGaN superlattices with one InN monolayer and with different numbers of GaN monolayers. The emission energies, EPL, measured at ambient pressure, are close to the value of the band gap, Eg, ...

  18. Lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenes in Langmuir monolayers: a synchrotron radiation scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2012-03-20

    Lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenes (lupeol, betulin, and betulinic acid) are natural products isolated from various plant sources. The terpenes exhibit a vast spectrum of biological activity and are applied in therapies for different diseases, among which the anticancer, anti-HIV, antihypercholesteremic, and antiinflammatory are the most promising. These chemicals possess amphiphilic structure and were proved to interact strongly with biomembranes, which can be the key stage in their mechanism of action. In our studies, we applied Langmuir monolayers as versatile models of biomembranes. It turned out that the three investigated terpenes are capable of stable monolayer formation; however, these monolayers differ profoundly regarding their physicochemical characteristics. In our research, we applied the Langmuir technique (surface pressure-mean molecular area (π-A) isotherm registration) coupled with Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), but the main focus was on the synchrotron radiation scattering method, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), which provides information on the amphiphilic molecule ordering in the angström scale. It was proved that all the investigated terpenes form crystalline phases in their monolayers. In the case of lupeol, only the closely packed upright phase was observed, whereas for betulin and betulinic acid, the phase situation was more complex. Betulinic acid molecules can be organized in an upright phase, which is crystalline, and in a tilted phase, which is amorphous. The betulin film is a conglomerate of an upright crystalline monolayer phase, tilted amorphous monolayer phase, and a crystalline tilted bilayer. In our paper, we discuss the factors leading to the formation of the observed phases and the implications of our results to the therapeutic applications of the native lupane-type triterpenes.

  19. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Mauro, E-mail: mariani@carina.fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); León, Gabriel, E-mail: gleon@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria – Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-01-10

    The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  20. Gravitational collapse of generalised Vaidya spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Mkenyeleye, Maombi D; Maharaj, Sunil D

    2014-01-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of a generalised Vaidya spacetime in the context of the Cosmic Censorship hypothesis. We develop a general mathematical framework to study the conditions on the mass function so that future directed non-spacelike geodesics can terminate at the singularity in the past. Thus our result generalises earlier works on gravitational collapse of the combinations of Type-I and Type-II matter fields. Our analysis shows transparently that there exist classes of generalised Vaidya mass functions for which the collapse terminates with a locally naked central singularity. We calculate the strength of the these singularities to show that they are strong curvature singularities and there can be no extension of spacetime through them.

  1. Relativistic Axions from Collapsing Bose Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkov, D. G.; Panin, A. G.; Tkachev, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    The substructures of light bosonic (axionlike) dark matter may condense into compact Bose stars. We study the collapse of critical-mass stars caused by attractive self-interaction of the axionlike particles and find that these processes proceed in an unexpected universal way. First, nonlinear self-similar evolution (called "wave collapse" in condensed matter physics) forces the particles to fall into the star center. Second, interactions in the dense center create an outgoing stream of mildly relativistic particles which carries away an essential part of the star mass. The collapse stops when the star remnant is no longer able to support the self-similar infall feeding the collisions. We shortly discuss possible astrophysical and cosmological implications of these phenomena.

  2. Plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahbar Ranji Ahmad

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion is one of the detrimental phenomena which reduces strength of structures. It is common practice to assume a uniform thickness reduction for general corrosion. Since the actual corroded plate has rough surfaces, to estimate the remaining strength of corroded structures, typically a much higher level of accuracy is required. The main aim of present work is to study plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates with irregular surfaces under tension. Non-linear finite element method by using computer code ANSYS was employed to determine plastic collapse load. By comparing the results with uniform thickness assumption, a reduction factor was proposed. It is found that by uniform thickness assumption, plastic collapse load of corroded plates are overestimated.

  3. Gravitational collapse: The story so far

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj S Joshi

    2000-10-01

    An outstanding problem in gravitation theory and relativistic astrophysics today is to understand the final outcome of an endless gravitational collapse. Such a continual collapse would take place when stars more massive than few times the mass of the sun collapse under their own gravity on exhausting their nuclear fuel. According to the general theory of relativity, this results either in a black hole, or a naked singularity – which can communicate with far away observers in the universe. While black holes are (almost) being detected and are increasingly used to model high energy astrophysical phenomena, naked singularities have turned into a topic of active discussion, aimed at understanding their structure and implications. Recent developments here are reviewed, indicating future directions.

  4. Relativistic axions from collapsing Bose stars

    CERN Document Server

    Levkov, D G; Tkachev, I I

    2016-01-01

    The substructures of light bosonic (axion-like) dark matter may condense into compact Bose stars. We study collapses of the critical-mass stars caused by attractive self-interaction of the axion-like particles and find that these processes proceed in an unexpected universal way. First, nonlinear self-similar evolution (similar to "wave collapse" in plasma physics) forces the particles to fall into the star center. Second, collisions in the dense center create an outgoing stream of mildly relativistic particles which carries away an essential part of the star mass. The collapse stops when the star remnant is no longer able to support the self-similar infall feeding the collisions. We shortly discuss possible astrophysical and cosmological implications of these phenomena.

  5. Core-Collapse Supernovae: Reflections and Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H -Thomas; Huedepohl, Lorenz; Marek, Andreas; Mueller, Bernhard; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most fascinating phenomena in astrophysics and provide a formidable challenge for theoretical investigation. They mark the spectacular end of the lives of massive stars and, in an explosive eruption, release as much energy as the sun produces during its whole life. A better understanding of the astrophysical role of supernovae as birth sites of neutron stars, black holes, and heavy chemical elements, and more reliable predictions of the observable signals from stellar death events are tightly linked to the solution of the long-standing puzzle how collapsing stars achieve to explode. In this article our current knowledge of the processes that contribute to the success of the explosion mechanism are concisely reviewed. After a short overview of the sequence of stages of stellar core-collapse events, the general properties of the progenitor-dependent neutrino emission will be briefly described. Applying sophisticated neutrino transport in axisymmetric (2D) simulations with ...

  6. Collapse of biodiversity in fractured metacommunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Charles; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    The increasing threat to global biodiversity from climate change, habitat destruction, and other anthropogenic factors motivates the search for features that increase the resistance of ecological communities to destructive disturbances. Recently, Gibson et al (Science 2013) observed that the damming of the Khlong Saeng river in Thailand caused a rapid collapse of biodiversity in the remaining tropical forests. Using a theoretical model that maps the distribution of coexisting species in an ecological community to a disordered system of Ising spins, we show that fracturing a metacommunity by inhibiting species dispersal leads to a collapse in biodiversity in the constituent local communities. The biodiversity collapse can be modeled as a diffusion on a rough energy landscape, and the resulting estimate for the rate of extinction highlights the role of species functional diversity in maintaining biodiversity following a disturbance.

  7. Shell instability of a collapsing dense core

    CERN Document Server

    Ntormousi, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the formation of binary and multiple stellar systems largely comes down to studying the circumstances for the fragmentation of a condensing core during the first stages of the collapse. However, the probability of fragmentation and the number of fragments seem to be determined to a large degree by the initial conditions. In this work we study the fate of the linear perturbations of a homogeneous gas sphere both analytically and numerically. In particular, we investigate the stability of the well-known homologous solution that describes the collapse of a uniform spherical cloud. The difficulty of the mathematical singularity in the perturbation equations is surpassed here by explicitly introducing a weak shock next to the sonic point. In parallel, we perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) numerical simulations of the linear stages of the collapse and compared the growth rates obtained by each method. With this combination of analytical and numerical tools, we explore the behavior of both spherica...

  8. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disk on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  9. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mariani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  10. Mixed monolayers and self-assembly vesicles ofO-sulfonated-N,N- dilauryl chitosan/O-quaternized-N,N-dilauryl chitosan%O-磺化/O-季铵化-N,N-双烷基壳聚糖混合单分子膜及自组装囊泡性质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛扬帆; 李明春; 辛梅华

    2015-01-01

    制备了具有良好油溶性的O-磺化-N,N-双十二烷基壳聚糖(HSDLCS)和O-季铵化-N,N-双十二烷基壳聚糖(QADLCS),研究了 HSDLCS/QADLCS 混合单分子膜和自组装囊泡性质的关系。结果表明,混合单分子膜的崩溃压(46.14mN/m)和最大压缩模量(Cs,max−1,98.85mN/m)较相应的单组分大;自组装形成球形囊泡的粒径在200~400nm;以维生素B12为模型药物制备 HSDLCS/QADLCS复合囊泡的载药量为0.1987mg/mg,包封率为38.25%,药物平衡释放率为23.68%。静电作用使得混合单分子膜的凝聚性和抗形变能力更强,复合囊泡药物通透性降低,结构更紧密。单分子膜的Cs,max−1与其相应载药囊泡药物平衡释放率呈一定的线性关系。%Oil-solubleO-sulfonated-N,N-dilauryl chitosan (HSDLCS) andO-quaternized-N,N- dilauryl chitosan (QADLCS) with similar substitution were synthesized. The properties of mixed monolayers and self-assembly vesicles of HSDLCS and QADLCS were studied. The mixed monolayers had larger collapse pressure (πc) larger maximum compression modulus (Cs,max−1) and limited molecular area (Aex) compared with HSDLCS and QADLCS monolayers. Spherical self-assembly vesicles were formed in diameter 200—400nm. Using Vitamin B12 as model drug,drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of complex vesicles were 0.1987 mg/mg and 38.25%,and equilibrium rates of Vitamin B12release was 23.68%. Electrostatic attraction existing between the hydrophilic groups of HSDLCS and QADLCS resulted in stronger anti-deformation ability and cohesion of the mixed monolayers,decreased drug permeability of complex vesicles,and more tight structure of vesicles.Therer was a linear relationship between theCs,max−1 of monolayers and equilibrium drug-release rate of the vesicles.

  11. Simulation of the Collapse of an Underwater Explosion Bubble under a Circular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kit-Keung Kan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-fluid, computational fluid dynamics study of the phenomena of bubble collapse under a submersed flat plate has been performed. In order to handle the rapidly changing bubble-water interface accurately, second order upwind differencing is used in calculating the advection term. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained for the pressure distribution on the plate. The computational results provide insight into the phenomenology of the jet impact, the formation of a radial hydraulic jump, and the complex interaction of that hydraulic jump with the collapsing toroidal bubble.

  12. How electron two-stream instability drives cyclic Langmuir collapse and continuous coherent emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Haihong; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Diamond, Patrick H.; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    2017-02-01

    Continuous plasma coherent emission is maintained by repetitive Langmuir collapse driven by the nonlinear evolution of a strong electron two-stream instability. The Langmuir waves are modulated by solitary waves in the linear stage and electrostatic whistler waves in the nonlinear stage. Modulational instability leads to Langmuir collapse and electron heating that fills in cavitons. The high pressure is released via excitation of a short-wavelength ion acoustic mode that is damped by electrons and reexcites small-scale Langmuir waves; this process closes a feedback loop that maintains the continuous coherent emission.

  13. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  14. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  15. Non-rotator phases in phospholipid monolayers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenn, R.M.; Kjær, K.; Möhwald, H.

    1996-01-01

    Monolayers of diacylphosphatidylethanolamines at the air/water interface are studied by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The results prove the existence of phases which show analogies with the rotator phases of single-chain surfactants: hexagonal tail lattice with no tilt; rectangular lattice...

  16. Statistical mechanics of a lipid monolayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, A.J.; Wiegel, F.W.

    1978-01-01

    We calculate from first principles the equation of state of a simple type of membrane: a monolayer consisting of lipid chain molecules with short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces. An approximate solution to the packing problem of the hydrocarbon chains is obtained by using a mathemat

  17. Semiconductor monolayer assemblies with oriented crystal faces

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Guijun

    2012-01-01

    Fabrication of two-dimensional monolayers of crystalline oxide and oxynitride particles was attempted on glass plate substrates. X-Ray diffraction patterns of the assemblies show only specific crystal facets, indicative of the uniform orientation of the particles on the substrate. The selectivity afforded by this immobilization technique enables the organization of randomly distributed polycrystalline powders in a controlled manner.

  18. Structure of cholesterol/ceramide monolayer mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffer, L.; Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of monolayers of cholesterol/ ceramide mixtures was investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, immunofluorescence, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements showed the existence of a crystalline mixed phase of the two...

  19. Edge conduction in monolayer WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Zaiyao; Palomaki, Tauno; Wu, Sanfeng; Zhao, Wenjin; Cai, Xinghan; Sun, Bosong; Nguyen, Paul; Finney, Joseph; Xu, Xiaodong; Cobden, David H.

    2017-07-01

    A two-dimensional topological insulator (2DTI) is guaranteed to have a helical one-dimensional edge mode in which spin is locked to momentum, producing the quantum spin Hall effect and prohibiting elastic backscattering at zero magnetic field. No monolayer material has yet been shown to be a 2DTI, but recently the Weyl semimetal WTe2 was predicted to become a 2DTI in monolayer form if a bulk gap opens. Here, we report that, at temperatures below about 100 K, monolayer WTe2 does become insulating in its interior, while the edges still conduct. The edge conduction is strongly suppressed by an in-plane magnetic field and is independent of gate voltage, save for mesoscopic fluctuations that grow on cooling due to a zero-bias anomaly, which reduces the linear-response conductance. Bilayer WTe2 also becomes insulating at low temperatures but does not show edge conduction. Many of these observations are consistent with monolayer WTe2 being a 2DTI. However, the low-temperature edge conductance, for contacts spacings down to 150 nm, never reaches values higher than ~20 μS, about half the predicted value of e2/h, suggesting significant elastic scattering in the edge.

  20. Molecular diffusion in monolayer and submonolayer nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    2001-01-01

    The orientational and translational motions in a monolayer fluid of physisorbed molecular nitrogen are treated using molecular dynamics simulations. Dynamical response functions and several approximations to the coefficient of translational diffusion are determined for adsorption on the basal pla...... where the ballistic approximation to the translational molecular self-correlation function is accurate....

  1. CAUSES AND COUNTERMEASURES FOR CHAOHU LAKESHORE COLLAPSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chao; WANG Xin-yuan; YANG Ze-dong; LU Ying-cheng; HE Hui

    2005-01-01

    By interpreting the remote sensing data of aerial photos and satellite images in different time, combining with field investigation, landform and water level observation, collecting data of weather, hydrology in Chaohu Lake, Anhui Province from 1957 to 2003, the reasons for collapse of Chaohu lakeshore were analyzed. The results are as follows: 1) The collapse of the Chaohu lakeshore is controlled macroscopically by two sets of north-east and the north-west faults, and the degree of collapse is determined microcosmically by lithology. 2) The constant change of water level, resulting from precipitation, wind speed and its direction, is one of the main reasons for intermittence collapse. 3) The soil and water loss or mud and sand filling up, resulting from artificial factors, such as inconsequence control of Chaohu sluice or irrational agricultural and industrial activities, etc., can uplift the lake's bed and drive water level up. The high water level also results in the collapse. Judging from the above mentioned reasons for the collapse, we have proposed some countermeasures: 1) Putting the lakeshore slope protection project such as stone and cement mortar into practice, and upstream slope should be 1:2.5 or 1:3, some parts of them should be 1:4, if they were not stable. The back slope, which is from Gui Mountain to Zhongmiao Temple, should be 1:1.5-1:3.2) Constructing a greenbelt for the lakeshore, planting some vegetation such as osier, bulrush and poplar, to resist waves between the high and the low water level. 3) Controlling Chaohu Lake water level scientifically. Corrosion of lakeshore that contains gravel clay and ferruginous-manganese concretionary structures, can decrease at low water level. 4) Renovating Chaohu Lake drainage area, strengthening the administration and supervision, breaking regionalism and establishing special administration organization.

  2. Strong anisotropic thermal conductivity of monolayer WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlong; Chen, Yani; Han, Zheng; Li, Wu

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) has attracted increasing attention due to its large magnetoresistance and pressure-induced superconductivity. In this work, we investigate the thermal conductivity (κ) of monolayer WTe2 by performing first-principles calculations, and find strong anisotropic κ with predicted room-temperature values of 9 and 20 W m-1 K-1 along two principal lattice directions, respectively. Such strong anisotropy suggests the importance of orientation when engineering thermal-related applications based on WTe2. The anisotropy of κ is attributed to the in-plane linear acoustic phonon branches, while the out-of-plane quadratic acoustic phonon branch is almost isotropic. The size dependence of κ shows that the size effect can persists up to 10 μm, and the anisotropy decreases with decreasing sample size due to the suppression of low-frequency anisotropic phonons by boundary scattering.

  3. Newtonian Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Guzman, F S

    2003-01-01

    In this letter, we develop a Newtonian approach to the collapse of galaxy fluctuations of scalar field dark matter under initial conditions inferred from simple assumptions. The full relativistic system, the so called Einstein-Klein-Gordon, is reduced to the Schr\\"odinger-Newton one in the weak field limit. The scaling symmetries of the SN equations are exploited to track the non-linear collapse of single scalar matter fluctuations. The results can be applied to both real and complex scalar fields.

  4. Black Hole Formation in Fuzzy Sphere Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Norihiro; Roy, Shubho; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2013-01-01

    We study the collapse of a fuzzy sphere, that is a spherical membrane built out of D0-branes, in the BFSS model. At weak coupling, as the sphere shrinks, open strings are produced. If the initial radius is large then open string production is not important and the sphere behaves classically. At intermediate initial radius the back-reaction from open string production is important but the fuzzy sphere retains its identity. At small initial radius the sphere collapses to form a black hole. The crossover between the later two regimes is smooth and occurs at the correspondence point of Horowitz and Polchinski.

  5. Gravitational blueshift from a collapsing object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyao Kong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a counterintuitive phenomenon of classical general relativity, in which a significant fraction of the radiation emitted by a collapsing object and detected by a distant observer may be blueshifted rather than redshifted. The key-point is that when the radiation propagates inside the collapsing body, it is blueshifted, and this time interval may be sufficiently long for the effect to be larger than the later redshift due to the propagation in the vacuum exterior, from the surface of the body to the distant observer. Unfortunately, the phenomenon can unlikely have direct observational implications, but it is interesting by itself as a pure relativistic effect.

  6. Gravitational blueshift from a collapsing object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingyao; Malafarina, Daniele; Bambi, Cosimo, E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn

    2015-02-04

    We discuss a counterintuitive phenomenon of classical general relativity, in which a significant fraction of the radiation emitted by a collapsing object and detected by a distant observer may be blueshifted rather than redshifted. The key-point is that when the radiation propagates inside the collapsing body, it is blueshifted, and this time interval may be sufficiently long for the effect to be larger than the later redshift due to the propagation in the vacuum exterior, from the surface of the body to the distant observer. Unfortunately, the phenomenon can unlikely have direct observational implications, but it is interesting by itself as a pure relativistic effect.

  7. Stability of Reflection Symmetric Collapsing Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore instability regions of non-static axial reflection symmetric spacetime with anisotropic source in the interior. We impose linear perturbation on the Einstein field equations and dynamical equations to establish the collapse equation. The effects of different physical factors like energy density and anisotropic stresses on the instability regions are studied under Newtonian and post-Newtonian limits. We conclude that stiffness parameter has a significant role in this analysis while the reflection terms increase instability ranges of non-static axial collapse.

  8. Sonographic Analysis of the Collapsed Gall Bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Suk; Choi, Jae Young; Choi, Seok Jin; Eun, Chung Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kyung Jin; Lee, Jeong Mi [Donga University Collge of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    This study was done to find answers for further following questions in cases of the collapsed gallbladder (GB) : What is the probability of the presence of stone when stony echo is visible in GB area? What is the probability of the presence of stone when only acoustic shadow is visible from GB area? What are the associated GB pathologies except stone or cholecystitis in previously mentioned situations and is it possible to differentiate them? What are the underlying pathologies of GB collapse without stony echo or acoustic shadow and is it possible to differentiate them sonographic ally? What are the rate and causes of re-expansion of the collapsed GB on follow-up study? Prospective study was done in 157 cases of collapsed GB with no visible or nearly no visible bile filled lumen in recent 3 years. Sonographic analysis for GB lesions was done in 61 confirmed cases. Changing pattern of GB lumen on follow-up study and their underlying pathologies were analyzed in 28 cases. Initial sonographic examination was done with 3 or 3.5 MHz transducer. No other transducer was used in cases showing stony echo or acoustic shadow in GB area, but additional examination was done with 5 or 7-4 MHz transducer in cases without stony echo or acoustic shadow. Among 31 cases, which showed stony echo, stone was found in 30 cases and milk of calcium bile in one case. Stone was present in all of the 11 cases which showed only acoustic shadow from the collapsed GB without stony echo. GB cancer was accompanied in 2 cases among upper 42 cases, and its possibility could be suspected sonographic ally. Underlying pathologies of the 19cases without stony echo or acoustic shadow were as follows : GB stone (3), cholecystitis (6), GB cancer (1), bile plug syndrome (1), hepatitis (5), and ascites (3). And sonographic differentiation of the underlying causes for the collapse was possible in only 1 case of GB cancer. Among 28 cases of the follow-up study, 20 cases showed re-expansion of the GB lumen and

  9. Role of evaporation in gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Baccetti, Valentina; Terno, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We study collapse of evaporating thin dust shells using two families of metrics to describe the {exterior geometry: the outgoing Vaidya metric and the retarded Schwarzschild metric. Both allow incorporation of Page's evaporation law (the latter in terms of the time at infinity), resulting in a modified equation} of motion for the shell. In these scenarios we find in each case that the collapse is accelerated due to evaporation, but the Schwarzschild radius is not crossed. Instead the shell is always at a certain sub-Planckian distance from this would-be horizon that depends only on the mass and evaporation rate.

  10. Glacier surge after ice shelf collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Hernán; Skvarca, Pedro

    2003-03-07

    The possibility that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet will collapse as a consequence of ice shelf disintegration has been debated for many years. This matter is of concern because such an event would imply a sudden increase in sea level. Evidence is presented here showing drastic dynamic perturbations on former tributary glaciers that fed sections of the Larsen Ice Shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula before its collapse in 1995. Satellite images and airborne surveys allowed unambiguous identification of active surging phases of Boydell, Sjögren, Edgeworth, Bombardier, and Drygalski glaciers. This discovery calls for a reconsideration of former hypotheses about the stabilizing role of ice shelves.

  11. Atomic Collapse in Graphene: Lost of Unitarity

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, David; Loewe, Marcelo; Raya, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the problem of atomic collapse in graphene by monopole impurities, both electric and magnetic, within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. For electric impurities, upon factorizing the radial Dirac Hamiltonian and identifying the supercharges, existence of a critical charge that makes the ground state {\\em fall-into-the-center} translates into lost of unitarity for the corresponding Hamiltonian. For the problem of magnetic monopole impurities, preservation of unitarity for all values of the parameters of the corresponding potential translates into the absence of atomic collapse in this case.

  12. X-ray diffraction studies of organic monolayers on the surface of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, P.; Peng, J.B.; Lin, B.; Ketterson, J.B.; Prakash, M.; Georgopoulos, P.; Ehrlich, S.

    1987-05-25

    We have used synchrotron radiation to study organic monolayers on water (''Langmuir films''). At high monolayer pressures, lead stearate (Pb(C/sub 17/H/sub 35/COO)/sub 2/) shows a powder peak at 1.60 A/sup -1/, implying an area per unit cell of 17.8 A/sup 2/ if the lattice is triangular. The correlation length is about 250 A. Lignoceric acid (C/sub 23/H/sub 47/COOH) shows a similar peak even though no heavy ions are attached. When the pressure is reduced, the peak in lead stearate does not observably move or broaden; below the ''knee'' in the isotherm, however, the peak height decreases slowly with increasing area, implying a first-order melting transition.

  13. Savinase action on bovine serum albumin (BSA) monolayers demonstrated with measurements at the air-water interface and liquid Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balashev, Konstantin; Callisen, Thomas H; Svendsen, Allan;

    2011-01-01

    We studied the enzymatic action of Savinase on bovine serum albumin (BSA) organized in a monolayer spread at the air/water interface or adsorbed at the mica surface. We carried out two types of experiments. In the first one we followed the degradation of the protein monolayer by measuring...... the surface pressure and surface area decrease versus time. In the second approach we applied AFM imaging of the supported BSA monolayers adsorbed on mica solid supports and extracted information for the enzyme action by analyzing the obtained images of the surface topography in the course of enzyme action...

  14. Plastic Collapse Localisation in Simple Shearing and Coaxial Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, B. E.; Ord, A.

    2011-12-01

    We explore, numerically, the evolution of localisation due to plastic collapse in both coaxial shortening and simple shearing deformations. These localisation features arise from plastic behaviour and hence differ from the formation of anticracks modelled by linear elastic behaviour (Fletcher and Pollard, 1990). The behaviour is close to that discussed by Rudnicki (2004) and Chemenda (2009) in that localisation consists of zones of plastic collapse separated by elastically unloaded regions. The constitutive behaviour assumed here comprises a Tresca yield with both strain-softening of the yield stress and of a cap that models plastic volumetric collapse during phase transformations, such as the olivine-spinel transition, with ΔVI., 2009. The formation of tabular compaction-band arrays: Theoretical and numerical analysis. J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 57, 851-868. Detournay, C., Cundall. P., & Parra. J. 2003. A study of compaction band formation with the double-yield model. FLAC and Numerical Modeling in Geomechanics-2003 Proceedings of the 3rd International FLAC Symposium, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, October 2003. R. Brummer (Ed), Balkema, 27-33. Fletcher, R.C., Pollard, D.D., 1990. Anticrack model for pressure solution surfaces. Geology 9, 419- 424. Green, H.W., Burnley, P.C., 1989. A new self-organizing mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes. Nature, 341, 733- 737. Issen, K.A., Rudnicki, J.W., 2000. Conditions for compaction bands in porous rocks. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 21,529-21,536. Rudnicki, J. W. 2004. Shear and compaction band formation on an elliptic yield cap. J. Geophys. Res., 109, B03402. Veveakis, E., Alevizos, S., & Vardoulakis, I. 2010. Chemical reaction capping of thermal instabilities during shear of frictional faults. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids. 58, 1175-1194.

  15. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M ˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  16. Study of the aggregation of human insulin Langmuir monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Johnson, Sheba; Micic, Miodrag; Orbulescu, Jhony; Whyte, Jeffrey; Garcia, Andrew R; Leblanc, Roger M

    2012-02-21

    The human insulin (HI) Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface was systematically investigated in the presence and absence of Zn(II) ions in the subphase. HI samples were dissolved in acidic (pH 2) and basic (pH 9) aqueous solutions and then spread at the air-water interface. Spectroscopic data of aqueous solutions of HI show a difference in HI conformation at different pH values. Moreover, the dynamics of the insulin protein showed a dependence on the concentration of Zn(II) ions. In the absence of Zn(II) ions in the subphase, the acidic and basic solutions showed similar behavior at the air-water interface. In the presence of Zn(II) ions in the subphase, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms suggest that HI may aggregate at the air-water interface. It was observed that increasing the concentration of Zn(II) ions in the acidic (pH 2) aqueous solution of HI led to an increase of the area at a specific surface pressure. It was also seen that the conformation of HI in the basic (pH 9) medium had a reverse effect (decrease in the surface area) with the increase of the concentration of Zn(II) ions in solution. From the compression-decompression cycles we can conclude that the aggregated HI film at air-water interface is not stable and tends to restore a monolayer of monomers. These results were confirmed from UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy analysis. Infrared reflection-absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the secondary structure and orientation changes of HI by zinc ions. Generally, the aggregation process leads to a conformation change from α-helix to β-strand and β-turn, and at the air-water interface, the aggregation process was likewise seen to induce specific orientations for HI in the acidic and basic media. A proposed surface orientation model is presented here as an explanation to the experimental data, shedding light for further research on the behavior of insulin as a Langmuir

  17. Transient 3D numerical simulations of column collapse and pyroclastic density current scenarios at Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposti Ongaro, T.; Neri, A.; Menconi, G.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Marianelli, P.; Cavazzoni, C.; Erbacci, G.; Baxter, P. J.

    2008-12-01

    Numerical simulations of column collapse and pyroclastic density current (PDC) scenarios at Vesuvius were carried out using a transient 3D flow model based on multiphase transport laws. The model describes the dynamics of the collapse as well as the effects of the 3D topography of the volcano on PDC propagation. Source conditions refer to a medium-scale sub-Plinian event and consider a pressure-balanced jet. Simulation results provide new insights into the complex dynamics of these phenomena. In particular: 1) column collapse can be characterized by different regimes, from incipient collapse to partial or nearly total collapse, thus confirming the possibility of a transitional field of behaviour of the column characterized by the contemporaneous and/or intermittent occurrence of ash fallout and PDCs; 2) the collapse regime can be characterized by its fraction of eruptive mass reaching the ground and generating PDCs; 3) within the range of the investigated source conditions, the propagation and hazard potential of PDCs appear to be directly correlated with the flow-rate of the mass collapsing to the ground, rather than to the collapse height of the column (this finding is in contrast with predictions based on the energy-line concept, which simply correlates the PDC runout and kinetic energy with the collapse height of the column); 4) first-order values of hazard variables associated with PDCs (i.e., dynamic pressure, temperature, airborne ash concentration) can be derived from simulation results, thereby providing initial estimates for the quantification of damage scenarios; 5) for scenarios assuming a location of the central vent coinciding with that of the present Gran Cono, Mount Somma significantly influences the propagation of PDCs, largely reducing their propagation in the northern sector, and diverting mass toward the west and southeast, accentuating runouts and hazard variables for these sectors; 6) the 2D modelling approximation can force an artificial

  18. Permeability of collapsed cakes formed by deposition of fractal aggregates upon membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Pyung-Kyu; Lee, Chung-Hak; Lee, Sangho

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated, theoretically, the physical properties of cake layers formed from aggregates to obtain a better understanding of membrane systems used in conjunction with coagulation/flocculation pretreatment. We developed a model based on fractal theory and incorporated a cake collapse effect to predict the porosity and permeability of the cake layers. The floc size, fractal dimension, and transmembrane pressure were main parameters that we used in these model calculations. We performed experiments using a batch cell device and a confocal laser-scanning microscope to verify the predicted specific cake resistances and porosities under various conditions. Based on the results of the model, the reduction in inter-aggregate porosity is more important than that in intra-aggregate porosity during the cake collapsing process. The specific cake resistance decreases upon increasing the aggregate size and decreasing the fractal dimensions. The modeled porosities and specific cake resistances of the collapsed cake layer agreed reasonably well with those obtained experimentally.

  19. Dynamical Instability of Shear-free Collapsing Star in Extended Teleparallel Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Jawad, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    We study the spherically symmetric collapsing star in terms of dynamical instability. We take the framework of extended teleparallel gravity with non-diagonal tetrad, power-law form of model presenting torsion and matter distribution as non-dissipative anisotropic fluid. The vanishing shear scalar condition is adopted to search the insights of collapsing star. We apply first order linear perturbation scheme to metric, matter and $f(T)$ functions. The dynamical equations are formulated under this perturbation scheme to develop collapsing equation for finding dynamical instability limits in two regimes such as Newtonian and post-Newtonian. We obtain constraint free solution of perturbed time dependent part with the help of vanishing shear scalar. The adiabatic index exhibits the instability ranges through second dynamical equation which depend on physical quantities such as density, pressure components, perturbed parts of symmetry of star, etc. We also develop some constraints on positivity of these quantities ...

  20. Tracheal compression delays alveolar collapse during deep diving in marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Brian L; Fahlman, Andreas; Jones, David R

    2008-05-31

    Marine mammals have very compliant alveoli and stiff upper airways; an adaptation that allows air to move from the alveoli into the upper airways, during breath-hold diving. Alveolar collapse is thought occur between 30 and 100 m and studies that have attempted to estimate gas exchange at depth have used the simplifying assumption that gas exchange ceases abruptly at the alveolar collapse depth. Here we develop a mathematical model that uses compliance values for the alveoli and upper airspaces, estimated from the literature, to predict volumes of the respiratory system at depth. Any compressibility of the upper airways decreases the volume to contain alveolar air yielding lung collapse pressures 2x that calculated assuming an incompressible upper airway. A simple relationship with alveolar volume was used to predict relative pulmonary shunt at depth. The results from our model agree with empirical data on gas absorption at depth as well as the degree of tracheal compression in forced and free diving mammals.

  1. The collapse of Io's primary atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Spencer, John R.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Richter, Matthew J.

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic outgassing due to tidal heating is the ultimate source of a tenuous SO2 atmosphere around Jupiter's moon Io. The question of whether SO2 frost on the surface plays a part, and to what degree, in maintaining Io's atmosphere with the constant volcanic outgassing is still debated. It is believed that for a sublimation-supported atmosphere, the primary atmosphere should collapse during eclipses by Jupiter, as the SO2 vapor pressure is strongly coupled to the temperature of the ice on the surface. No direct observations of Io's atmosphere in eclipse have previously been possible, due to the simultaneous need for high spectral and time sensitivity, as well as a high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we present the first ever high-resolution spectra at 19 µm of Io's SO2 atmosphere in Jupiter eclipse from the Gemini telescope. The strongest atmospheric band depth is seen to dramatically decay from 2.5 ± (0.08)% before the eclipse to 0.18 ± (0.16)% after 40 min in eclipse. Further modeling indicates that the atmosphere has collapsed shortly after eclipse ingress, implying that the atmosphere of Io has a strong sublimation-controlled component. The atmospheric column density—from pre-eclipse to in-eclipse—drops by a factor of 5 ± 2.

  2. Collapse and Fragmentation of Molecular Cloud Cores. IX. Magnetic Braking of Initially Filamentary Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2007-04-01

    The collapse and fragmentation of initially filamentary, magnetic molecular clouds are calculated in three dimensions with a gravitational, radiative hydrodynamics code. The code includes magnetic field effects in an approximate manner: magnetic pressure, tension, braking, and ambipolar diffusion are all modeled. The parameters varied are the ratio of the ambipolar diffusion time to the free-fall time at the center of the filamentary cloud (tad/tff=10, 20, or 106~∞), the cloud's reference magnetic field strength (Boi=0, 200, or 300 μG-the latter two values leading to magnetically subcritical clouds), the ratio of rotational to gravitational energy of the filament (10-4 or 10-2), and the efficiency of magnetic braking (represented by a factor fmb=0, 10-4, or 10-3). Three types of outcomes are observed: direct collapse and fragmentation into a multiple protostar system (models with Boi=0), periodic contraction and expansion without collapse (models with tad/tff=106), or periodic contraction and expansion leading eventually to collapse on a timescale of ~6tff-12tff (all other models). Because the computational grid is a finite-volume sphere, the expanding clouds bounce off the spherical boundary and recollapse toward the center of the spherical grid, leading to the periodic formation of shocked regions where the infalling gas collides with itself, forming dense layers susceptible to sustained collapse and eventual fragmentation. The models develop weakly supersonic velocity fields as a result of rebounding prior to collapse. The models show that magnetically supported clouds subject to magnetic braking can undergo dynamic collapse leading to protostellar fragmentation on scales of 10-100 AU, consistent with typical binary star separations.

  3. Galactic Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M; Matos, T; Núñez, D; Urena-Lopez, L A; Wiederhold, P; Alcubierre, Miguel; Matos, Tonatiuh; Nunez, Dario; Wiederhold, Petra

    2002-01-01

    We present a scenario for galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for galactic formation, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  4. Galactic Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    We present a scenario for galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for galactic formation, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  5. Collapsible structure for an antenna reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubert, M. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A collapsible support for an antenna reflector for use in supporting spacecraft antennas is described. The support has a regid base and a number of struts which are pivoted at the base. The deployment of the struts and their final configuration for supporting the antenna are illustrated.

  6. Higher Dimensional Radiation Collapse and Cosmic Censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, S G

    2000-01-01

    We study the occurrence of naked singularities in the spherically symmetric collapse of radiation shells in a higher dimensional spacetime. The necessary conditions for the formation of a naked singularity or a black hole are obtained. The naked singularities are found to be strong in the Tipler's sense and thus violating cosmic censorship conjecture.

  7. Tetanus with multiple wedge vertebral collapses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-07-06

    Jul 6, 2012 ... plication of paediatric tetanus and the associated ... of back pains-11 days, inability to open her mouth- 9 days, ... multiple vertebral collapses and the management chal- ... symptoms made the parents take her to a prayer house where the .... overlying the affected vertebrae, low-grade fever, chills,. Multiple.

  8. Collapse of a Bose gas: Kinetic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shyamal Biswas

    2012-08-01

    We have analytically explored the temperature dependence of critical number of particales for the collapse of a harmonically trapped attractively interacting Bose gas below the condensation point by introducing a kinetic approach within the Hartee-Fock approximation. The temperature dependence obtained by this easy approach is consistant with that obtained from the scaling theory.

  9. Nonlinear Progressive Collapse Analysis Including Distributed Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Osama Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the effect of incorporating distributed plasticity in nonlinear analytical models used to assess the potential for progressive collapse of steel framed regular building structures. Emphasis on this paper is on the deformation response under the notionally removed column, in a typical Alternate Path (AP method. The AP method employed in this paper is based on the provisions of the Unified Facilities Criteria – Design of Buildings to Resist Progressive Collapse, developed and updated by the U.S. Department of Defense [1]. The AP method is often used for to assess the potential for progressive collapse of building structures that fall under Occupancy Category III or IV. A case study steel building is used to examine the effect of incorporating distributed plasticity, where moment frames were used on perimeter as well as the interior of the three dimensional structural system. It is concluded that the use of moment resisting frames within the structural system will enhance resistance to progressive collapse through ductile deformation response and that it is conserative to ignore the effects of distributed plasticity in determining peak displacement response under the notionally removed column.

  10. Collapse of modern carbonate platform margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, H.T.; Hine, A.C.; Gardulski, A.

    1985-01-01

    Modern carbonate platform margins in the Florida-Bahama region have been viewed as depositional or constructional features. However, recent studies have shown that carbonate escarpments, such as the Blake-Bahama and West Florida Escarpments, are erosional in origin where the platform margins have a scalloped or horse-shoe shape. Seismic reflection data from one of these crescentic features along the west Florida platform margin indicate that it originated by large scale gravity collapse (slump). This collapse structure extends for at least 120 km along the margin and has removed about 350 m of strata as young as early Neogene. Although at least three generations of slope failure are recognized, catastrophic collapse appears to have occurred in the mid-Miocene. Gravitational instability due to high rates of sediment accumulation may have been the triggering mechanism. These data suggest that submarine slumping is an important process in the retreat of limestone escarpments and in the generation of carbonate megabreccia debris flows. Scalloped platform margins occur on satellite images of northern Exuma Sound and Columbus Basin in the Bahamas. The authors suggest that large-scale submarine slumping can cause elongation of structurally controlled intraplatform basins (Exuma South), and produce anomalous horse-shoe shaped basins (Columbus Basin) by mega-collapse processes.

  11. The heterogeneity of world trade collapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses drivers of imports during the major world trade collapses of the Great Depression (1930s; 34 countries) and the Great Recession (1930s; 173 countries). The analysis deals with the first year of these episodes and develops a small empirical model that shows a significa

  12. Colony Collapse Disorder: A descriptive studey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We ...

  13. Drops: The collapse of capillary jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba, Antonio; Cordoba, Diego; Fefferman, Charles; Fontelos, Marco A.

    2002-01-01

    The appearance of fluid filaments during the evolution of a viscous fluid jet is a commonly observed phenomenon. It is shown here that the break-up of such a jet subject to capillary forces is impossible through the collapse of a uniform filament. PMID:12172005

  14. Collapsing spherical null shells in general relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khakshournia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric null shell with the flat interior and a charged Vaidya exterior spacetimes is studied. There is no gravitational impulsive wave present on the null hypersurface which is shear-free and contracting. It follows that there is a critical radius at which the shell bounces and starts expanding.

  15. Study of polystyrene-poly(ethylene oxide) diblock copolymer monolayers as barriers to protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogikalmath, Gangadhar

    Protein adsorption resistant surfaces find use in many biomedical applications, such as catheters, dialysis devices and biosensors that involve blood contacting surfaces. To ensure long-term functioning of a device in an environment containing protein, there is a need to produce homogeneous surfaces that are resistant to protein adsorption. A polymer brush covered surface, produced by either physical adsorption or chemical grafting of hydrophilic polymers to surfaces, is one of the approaches used in creating such surfaces. High grafting densities needed to make an effective barrier are usually not realized in chemical grafting/adsorption from solution, due to self-exclusion of surface grafted molecules. In this dissertation polymer brush surfaces formed by chemically grafted PEO molecules and transferred monolayers of PS-b-PEO diblock copolymers are investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface pressure measurement techniques. An AFM adhesion mapping technique was used to evaluate the surface heterogeneity of chemically modified PEO and transferred diblock copolymer monolayer surfaces. The behavior of PS-b-PEO molecules at the air-water interface was studied using Langmuir trough. The stability of transferred diblock copolymer monolayers was investigated using AFM. Using SPR, protein adsorption to the diblock copolymer layers was investigated as a function of protein size (using HSA and ferritin) as a function of grafting density of PEO in the monolayer. It was seen that a lower density of the PS-b-PEO monolayer was sufficient to prevent ferritin adsorption (larger protein) while a higher density brush layer was required to achieve complete prevention of HSA adsorption to the surface. The effect of mobility of the polymer brush layer on protein adsorption prevention was analyzed using SPR and surface pressure measurements. It was seen that the copolymer monolayer (at the air-buffer interface) rearranged itself to

  16. Fluidization of a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine monolayer by fluorocarbon gases: potential use in lung surfactant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Vandamme, Thierry F; Goldmann, Michel; Fontaine, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Fluorocarbon gases (gFCs) were found to inhibit the liquid-expanded (LE)/liquid-condensed (LC) phase transition of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) Langmuir monolayers. The formation of domains of an LC phase, which typically occurs in the LE/LC coexistence region upon compression of DPPC, is prevented when the atmosphere above the DPPC monolayer is saturated with a gFC. When contacted with gFC, the DPPC monolayer remains in the LE phase for surface pressures lower than 38 mN m(-1), as assessed by compression isotherms and fluorescence microscopy (FM). Moreover, gFCs can induce the dissolution of preexisting LC phase domains and facilitate the respreading of the DPPC molecules on the water surface, as shown by FM and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. gFCs have thus a highly effective fluidizing effect on the DPPC monolayer. This gFC-induced fluidizing effect was compared with the fluidizing effect brought about by a mixture of unsaturated lipids and proteins, namely the two commercially available lung surfactant substitutes, Curosurf and Survanta, which are derived from porcine and bovine lung extracts, respectively. The candidate FCs were chosen among those already investigated for biomedical applications, and in particular for intravascular oxygen transport, i.e., perfluorooctyl bromide, perfluorooctylethane, bis(perfluorobutyl)ethene, perfluorodecalin, and perfluorooctane. The fluidizing effect is most effective with the linear FCs. This study suggests that FCs, whose biocompatibility is well documented, may be useful in lung surfactant substitute compositions.

  17. Interfacial Interactions and Nanostructure Changes in DPPG/HD Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaze Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant (LS plays a crucial role in regulating surface tension during normal respiration cycles by decreasing the work associated with lung expansion and therefore decreases the metabolic energy consumed. Monolayer surfactant films composed of a mixture of phospholipids and spreading additives are of optional utility for applications in lung surfactant-based therapies. A simple, minimal model of such a lung surfactant system, composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-(1-gylcerol] (DPPG and hexadecanol (HD, was prepared, and the surface pressure-area (π-A isotherms and nanostructure characteristics of the binary mixture were investigated at the air/water interface using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB and atomic force microscopy (AFM techniques. Based on the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analyzed in terms of compression modulus (Cs-1 , excess Gibbs free energy (ΔGexcπ , activity coefficients (γ, and interaction parameter (ξ. The results of this paper provide valuable insight into basic thermodynamics and nanostructure of mixed DPPG/HD monolayers; it is helpful to understand the thermodynamic behavior of HD as spreading additive in LS monolayer with a view toward characterizing potential improvements to LS performance brought about by addition of HD to lung phospholipids.

  18. Miscibility of dl-α-tocopherol β-glucoside in DPPC monolayer at air/water and air/solid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neunert, G. [Department of Physics and Biophysics, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-637 Poznan (Poland); Makowiecki, J.; Piosik, E.; Hertmanowski, R. [Faculty of Technical Physics, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Polewski, K. [Department of Physics and Biophysics, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-637 Poznan (Poland); Martynski, T., E-mail: tomasz.martynski@put.poznan.pl [Faculty of Technical Physics, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2016-10-01

    The role of newly synthesized tocopherol glycosidic derivative in modifying molecular organization and phase transitions of phospholipid monolayer at the air/water interface has been investigated. Two-component Langmuir films of dl-α-tocopheryl β-D-glucopyranoside (BG) mixed with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the whole range of mole fractions were formed at the water surface. An analysis of surface pressure versus mean molecular area (π-A) isotherms and Brewster angle microscope images showed that the presence of BG molecules changes the structure and packing of the DPPC monolayer in a BG concentration dependent manner. BG molecules incorporated into DPPC monolayer inhibit its liquid expanded to liquid condensed phase transition proportionally to the BG concentration. The monolayers were also transferred onto solid substrates and visualized using an atomic force microscope. The results obtained indicate almost complete miscibility of BG and DPPC in the monolayers at surface pressures present in the biological cell membrane (30-35·10{sup -3} N·m{sup -1}) for a BG mole fraction as high as 0.3. This makes the monolayer less packed and more disordered, leading to an increased permeability. The results support our previous molecular dynamics simulation data. - Highlights: • Langmuir films of α-tocopherol derivative with DPPC was studied thermodynamically. • Mixed DPPC/BG films were transferred onto mica substrates for topography imaging by using AFM. • Miscibility of BG/DPPC films at surface pressures present in membranes was observed up to MF = 0.3.

  19. Experiences Acquired by a Building Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Durusu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it has been purposed to share practice of event-scene administration, search and rescue and evacuation of injured and acquired experiences carried out throughout a building collapse. After an explosion at Diyarbakir Kurdoglu housings at 11 December 2006 about 08:20AM, five flats of an apartment that has five floors-ten flats were collapsed. Local military hospital ambulances, city ambulances, and fire-fighting vehicles arrived to event-place 10 minutes later. It has been found out that there were 13 people inside, 6 of which were children. Army rescue team arrived event-place about 01:30PM, then all non-professional persons has been sent away from region. Eight dead including five children, and five injured including one child have been taken out. Two people from close area have been also injured mildly due to the explosion. It has been found out that accident caused by boiler tank exploding. Sixth of total eight injured had only superficial wounds. Other two injured have been followed because of head trauma at first one and hepatic contusion and rib fracture at the other one. No complication observed after follow-up. Building collapses can create disaster potential according to the number of people inside and facilities of nearby region of the place accident taken place. The evaluation of the direction of building collapse during search and rescue operation would enhance possibility to reach more living in shorter time. Building collapses which can be considered as a miniature of big disaster potentials like earthquakes can be appraised as an important practical training and experience source on event-place administration, search and rescue operations and injured evacuation. We believe that share of the analysis and acquired experiences of this kind of studies would contribute interfering big disaster potentials. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 241-244

  20. Volcano electrical tomography unveils edifice collapse hazard linked to hydrothermal system structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Catastrophic collapses of the flanks of stratovolcanoes constitute a major hazard threatening numerous lives in many countries. Although many such collapses occurred following the ascent of magma to the surface, many are not associated with magmatic reawakening but are triggered by a combination of forcing agents such as pore-fluid pressurization and/or mechanical weakening of the volcanic edifice often located above a low-strength detachment plane. The volume of altered rock available for collapse, the dynamics of the hydrothermal fluid reservoir and the geometry of incipient collapse failure planes are key parameters for edifice stability analysis and modelling that remain essentially hidden to current volcano monitoring techniques. Here we derive a high-resolution, three-dimensional electrical conductivity model of the La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano from extensive electrical tomography data. We identify several highly conductive regions in the lava dome that are associated to fluid saturated host-rock and preferential flow of highly acid hot fluids within the dome. We interpret this model together with the existing wealth of geological and geochemical data on the volcano to demonstrate the influence of the hydrothermal system dynamics on the hazards associated to collapse-prone altered volcanic edifices. PMID:27457494

  1. Functional Catastrophe Analysis of Collapse Mechanism for Shallow Tunnels with Considering Settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Limit analysis is a practical and meaningful method to predict the stability of geomechanical properties. This work investigates the pore water effect on new collapse mechanisms and possible collapsing block shapes of shallow tunnels with considering the effects of surface settlement. The analysis is performed within the framework of upper bound theorem. Furthermore, the NL nonlinear failure criterion is used to examine the influence of different factors on the collapsing shape and the minimum supporting pressure in shallow tunnels. Analytical solutions derived by functional catastrophe theory for the two different shape curves which describe the distinct characteristics of falling blocks up and down the water level are obtained by virtual work equations under the variational principle. By considering that the mechanical properties of soil are not affected by the presence of underground water, the strength parameters in NL failure criterion can be taken to be the same under and above the water table. According to the numerical results in this work, the influences on the size of collapsing block different parameters have are presented in the tables and the upper bounds on the loads required to resist collapse are derived and illustrated in the form of supporting forces graphs that account for the variation of the embedded depth and other factors.

  2. Volcano electrical tomography unveils edifice collapse hazard linked to hydrothermal system structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique

    2016-07-26

    Catastrophic collapses of the flanks of stratovolcanoes constitute a major hazard threatening numerous lives in many countries. Although many such collapses occurred following the ascent of magma to the surface, many are not associated with magmatic reawakening but are triggered by a combination of forcing agents such as pore-fluid pressurization and/or mechanical weakening of the volcanic edifice often located above a low-strength detachment plane. The volume of altered rock available for collapse, the dynamics of the hydrothermal fluid reservoir and the geometry of incipient collapse failure planes are key parameters for edifice stability analysis and modelling that remain essentially hidden to current volcano monitoring techniques. Here we derive a high-resolution, three-dimensional electrical conductivity model of the La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano from extensive electrical tomography data. We identify several highly conductive regions in the lava dome that are associated to fluid saturated host-rock and preferential flow of highly acid hot fluids within the dome. We interpret this model together with the existing wealth of geological and geochemical data on the volcano to demonstrate the influence of the hydrothermal system dynamics on the hazards associated to collapse-prone altered volcanic edifices.

  3. Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chirag M; Stern, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) are the two most common patterns of posttraumatic wrist arthritis. This review discusses the etiology and clinical evaluation, as well as up-to-date treatment options, for both of these conditions. Classic as well as newer innovative techniques are discussed with clinical outcomes in order to provide an evidence-based review of the world's literature on SLAC/SNAC wrist.

  4. Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Chirag M.; Stern, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) are the two most common patterns of posttraumatic wrist arthritis. This review discusses the etiology and clinical evaluation, as well as up-to-date treatment options, for both of these conditions. Classic as well as newer innovative techniques are discussed with clinical outcomes in order to provide an evidence-based review of the world’s literature on SLAC/SNAC wrist.

  5. Epitaxial growth by monolayer restricted galvanic displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilić Rastko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a new method for epitaxial growth of metals in solution by galvanic displacement of layers pre-deposited by underpotential deposition (UPD was discussed and experimentally illustrated throughout the lecture. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM are employed to carry out and monitor a “quasi-perfect”, two-dimensional growth of Ag on Au(111, Cu on Ag(111, and Cu on Au(111 by repetitive galvanic displacement of underpotentially deposited monolayers. A comparative study emphasizes the displacement stoichiometry as an efficient tool for thickness control during the deposition process and as a key parameter that affects the deposit morphology. The excellent quality of layers deposited by monolayer-restricted galvanic displacement is manifested by a steady UPD voltammetry and ascertained by a flat and uniform surface morphology maintained during the entire growth process.

  6. Transport measurement of Li doped monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Ali; Sajadi, Ebrahim; Dosanjh, Pinder; Folk, Joshua; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich

    Lithium adatoms on monolayer graphene have been predicted to induce superconductivity with a critical temperature near 8 K, and recent experimental evidence by ARPES indicates a critical temperature nearly that high. Encouraged by these results, we investigated the effects of lithium deposited at cryogenic temperatures on the electronic transport properties of epitaxial and CVD monolayer graphene down to 3 K. The change of charge carrier density due to Li deposition was monitored both by the gate voltage shift of the Dirac point and by Hall measurements, in low and high doping regimes. In the high doping regime, a saturation density of 2×1013 cm-2 was observed independent of sample type, initial carrier density and deposition conditions. No signatures of superconductivity were observed down to 3 K.

  7. Molecular tilt on monolayer-protected nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giomi, L.

    2012-02-01

    The structure of the tilted phase of monolayer-protected nanoparticles is investigated by means of a simple Ginzburg-Landau model. The theory contains two dimensionless parameters representing the preferential tilt angle and the ratio ε between the energy cost due to spatial variations in the tilt of the coating molecules and that of the van der Waals interactions which favors the preferential tilt. We analyze the model for both spherical and octahedral particles. On spherical particles, we find a transition from a tilted phase, at small ε, to a phase where the molecules spontaneously align along the surface normal and tilt disappears. Octahedral particles have an additional phase at small ε characterized by the presence of six topological defects. These defective configurations provide preferred sites for the chemical functionalization of monolayer-protected nanoparticles via place-exchange reactions and their consequent linking to form molecules and bulk materials. Copyright © EPLA, 2012.

  8. Elasticity of a quantum monolayer solid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    1992-01-01

    A perturbation-theory formulation of the zero-temperature elastic constants is used to verify symmetry relations for a (monolayer) triangluar lattice. A generalization of the Cauchy relation between the two elastic constants of the triangular lattice with central-pair-potential interactions is gi...... is given for the quantum solid. The first-order quantum corrections are rederived in this formalism, and previous calculations are reanalyzed....

  9. Prevention of caval collapse during venous drainage for CPB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Sayed, Saad; Favre, Julien; Taub, Steven; von Segesser, Ludwig-Karl

    2013-01-01

    A new plastic self-expanding Smartcanula (Smartcanula LLC, Lausanne, Switzerland) is designed for central insertion and prevention of caval collapse. The objective of our work is to assess the influence of the new design on atrial chatter. Caval collapse over the entire caval axis, right atrial, hepatic, renal vein, and iliac vein is realized in drainage tubes with holes at 5 cm distance intervals. Smartcanulas with various lengths (26 cm [= right atrial], 34 cm [= hepatic], 43 cm [= renal], and 53 cm [= iliac]) versus two-stage cannulas are compared. Pressure drop (ΔP) is measured using Millar pressure-transducers. Flow rate (Q) is measured using an ultrasonic flow meter. Cannula resistance is defined as the ΔP/Q ratio. Data display and recording are controlled using LabView virtual instruments. At an 88 cm height differential, Q values are 8.69 and 6.8 l/min, and ΔP/Q ratios are 0.63 and 1.28 for the 26-cm Smartcanula and the reference cannula, respectively. The 34-cm Smartcanula showed 8.89 l/min and 0.6 ΔP/Q ratio vs. 7.59 l/min and 0.9 for the control cannula (P < 0.05). The 43-cm and 53-cm Smartcanulas showed Q values of 9.04 and 8.81 l/min, respectively, and ΔP/Q2 ratio of 0.6. The Smartcanula outperforms the two-stage cannula, and direct cannula insertion without guide wire is effective.

  10. Instability of a dissipative restricted non-static axial collapse with shear viscosity in f(R) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Yousaf, Z., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: zeeshan.math@pu.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590, Pakistan. (Pakistan)

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates stability regions for a non-static restricted class of axially symmetric geometry filled with anisotropic, heat radiating and shearing viscous fluid that collapses non-adiabatically. In this context, dynamical equations as well as collapse equation are constructed through perturbation scheme with f(R) = R+εR{sup 2} model. We then develop dynamical instability regions at Newtonian and post-Newtonian eras. It is concluded that pressure anisotropy and heat dissipation increases the instability regions of the collapsing system while shearing viscosity as well as f(R) dark sourced terms decrease them during collapse. Finally, we calculate our results under constant curvature condition and GR limit, i.e., f(R)→R.

  11. Properties of collapse dynamics in relativistic theory of gravitation in the case of smooth initial matter distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Antipin, K V; Silaev, P K

    2016-01-01

    We use both numerical and analytical approaches to study the dynamics of the gravitational collapse in the framework of the relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG). We use various equations of state for the collapsing matter and relatively realistic initial conditions with smooth matter distribution, which corresponds to static solution for the given equation of state. We also obtain results concerning the influence of the graviton mass on the properties of static solutions. We specify several characteristics of the process of the collapse, in particular, we determine the dependence of the turning point time (when contraction is replaced by inflation) on the graviton mass. We also study the influence of non-zero pressure on the dynamics of the collapse.

  12. Strain mapping in a graphene monolayer nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert J; Gong, Lei; Kinloch, Ian A; Riaz, Ibtsam; Jalil, Rashed; Novoselov, Kostya S

    2011-04-26

    Model composite specimens have been prepared consisting of a graphene monolayer sandwiched between two thin layers of polymer on the surface of a poly(methyl methacrylate) beam. It has been found that well-defined Raman spectra can be obtained from the single graphene atomic layer and that stress-induced Raman band shifts enable the strain distribution in the monolayer to be mapped with a high degree of precision. It has been demonstrated that the distribution of strain across the graphene monolayer is relatively uniform at levels of applied strain up to 0.6% but that it becomes highly nonuniform above this strain. The change in the strain distributions has been shown to be due to a fragmentation process due to the development of cracks, most likely in the polymer coating layers, with the graphene remaining intact. The strain distributions in the graphene between the cracks are approximately triangular in shape, and the interfacial shear stress in the fragments is only about 0.25 MPa, which is an order of magnitude lower than the interfacial shear stress before fragmentation. This relatively poor level of adhesion between the graphene and polymer layers has important implications for the use of graphene in nanocomposites, and methods of strengthening the graphene-polymer interface are discussed.

  13. Grafted silane monolayers: reconsideration of growth mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, D. A.; Nysten, B.; Jonas, A. M.; Legras, R.

    1998-03-01

    Chemical force microscopy is a new technique devised to image chemical heterogeneities on surfaces. It requires the chemical modification of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) tips in order to create chemical probes. In this respect, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of alkylchlorosilanes are particularly interesting as modifying agents for AFM tips. We report here our results on the kinetics of silanization and on the structure of such SAM's grafted on model surfaces (hydroxylated Si(100) wafers). AFM, contact angle measurements, X-ray reflectivity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize SAM's of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and octadecyldimethylchlorosilane (ODMS) grown from hexadecane and toluene solutions. The mechanism of grafting of OTS follows two stages. The first rapid stage corresponds to the nucleation and growth of island-like monolayer domains. The second slower stage is related to the densification of the monolayer. SAM's of ODMS were found to form thinner layers as compared to OTS, due to their lower grafting density probably resulting in a more disordered state of grafted alkyl chains. We also address the problems concerning the relationships between the quality of final SAM structures and the water content as well as the nature of the solvent used for silanization.

  14. Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Ang-Yu

    2017-05-15

    Structural symmetry-breaking plays a crucial role in determining the electronic band structures of two-dimensional materials. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to breaking the in-plane symmetry of graphene with electric fields on AB-stacked bilayers or stacked van der Waals heterostructures. In contrast, transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are semiconductors with intrinsic in-plane asymmetry, leading to direct electronic bandgaps, distinctive optical properties and great potential in optoelectronics. Apart from their in-plane inversion asymmetry, an additional degree of freedom allowing spin manipulation can be induced by breaking the out-of-plane mirror symmetry with external electric fields or, as theoretically proposed, with an asymmetric out-of-plane structural configuration. Here, we report a synthetic strategy to grow Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry. In particular, based on a MoS2 monolayer, we fully replace the top-layer S with Se atoms. We confirm the Janus structure of MoSSe directly by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and prove the existence of vertical dipoles by second harmonic generation and piezoresponse force microscopy measurements.

  15. Investigation on gallium ions impacting monolayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the physical phenomena of gallium (Ga+ ion impacting monolayer graphene in the nanosculpting process are investigated experimentally, and the mechanisms are explained by using Monte Carlo (MC and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Firstly, the MC method is employed to clarify the phenomena happened to the monolayer graphene target under Ga+ ion irradiation. It is found that substrate has strong influence on the damage mode of graphene. The mean sputtering yield of graphene under 30 keV Ga+ ion irradiation is 1.77 and the least ion dose to completely remove carbon atoms in graphene is 21.6 ion/nm2. Afterwards, the focused ion beam over 21.6 ion/nm2 is used for the irradiation on a monolayer graphene supported by SiO2 experimentally, resulting in the nanostructures, i.e., nanodot and nanowire array on the graphene. The performances of the nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy and Raman spectrum. A plasma plume shielding model is put forward to explain the nanosculpting results of graphene under different irradiation parameters. In addition, two damage mechanisms are found existing in the fabrication process of the nanostructures by using empirical MD simulations. The results can help us open the possibilities for better control of nanocarbon devices.

  16. Investigation on gallium ions impacting monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xin; Zhao, Haiyan, E-mail: hyzhao@tsinghua.edu.cn; Yan, Dong; Pei, Jiayun [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. Chinaand Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the physical phenomena of gallium (Ga{sup +}) ion impacting monolayer graphene in the nanosculpting process are investigated experimentally, and the mechanisms are explained by using Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, the MC method is employed to clarify the phenomena happened to the monolayer graphene target under Ga{sup +} ion irradiation. It is found that substrate has strong influence on the damage mode of graphene. The mean sputtering yield of graphene under 30 keV Ga{sup +} ion irradiation is 1.77 and the least ion dose to completely remove carbon atoms in graphene is 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2}. Afterwards, the focused ion beam over 21.6 ion/nm{sup 2} is used for the irradiation on a monolayer graphene supported by SiO2 experimentally, resulting in the nanostructures, i.e., nanodot and nanowire array on the graphene. The performances of the nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy and Raman spectrum. A plasma plume shielding model is put forward to explain the nanosculpting results of graphene under different irradiation parameters. In addition, two damage mechanisms are found existing in the fabrication process of the nanostructures by using empirical MD simulations. The results can help us open the possibilities for better control of nanocarbon devices.

  17. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua

    2015-02-19

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm \\'2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  18. Quantum gravitational dust collapse does not result in a black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Cenalo, E-mail: Cenalo.Vaz@uc.edu

    2015-02-15

    Quantum gravity suggests that the paradox recently put forward by Almheiri et al. (AMPS) can be resolved if matter does not undergo continuous collapse to a singularity but condenses on the apparent horizon. One can then expect a quasi-static object to form even after the gravitational field has overcome any degeneracy pressure of the matter fields. We consider dust collapse. If the collapse terminates on the apparent horizon, the Misner–Sharp mass function of the dust ball is predicted and we construct static solutions with no tangential pressure that would represent such a compact object. The collapse wave functions indicate that there will be processes by which energy extraction from the center occurs. These leave behind a negative point mass at the center which contributes to the total energy of the system but has no effect on the energy density of the dust ball. The solutions describe a compact object whose boundary lies outside its Schwarzschild radius and which is hardly distinguishable from a neutron star.

  19. Collapse of a nanoscopic void triggered by a spherically symmetric traveling sound wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyst, Robert; Litniewski, Marek; Garstecki, Piotr

    2012-05-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of the Lennard-Jones fluid (up to 10(7) atoms) are used to analyze the collapse of a nanoscopic bubble. The collapse is triggered by a traveling sound wave that forms a shock wave at the interface. The peak temperature T(max) in the focal point of the collapse is approximately ΣR(0)(a), where Σ is the surface density of energy injected at the boundary of the container of radius R(0) and α ≈ 0.4-0.45. For Σ = 1.6 J/m(2) and R(0) = 51 nm, the shock wave velocity, which is proportional to √Σ, reaches 3400 m/s (4 times the speed of sound in the liquid); the pressure at the interface, which is proportional to Σ, reaches 10 GPa; and T(max) reaches 40,000 K. The Rayleigh-Plesset equation together with the time of the collapse can be used to estimate the pressure at the front of the shock wave.

  20. Quantum gravitational dust collapse does not result in a black hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenalo Vaz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity suggests that the paradox recently put forward by Almheiri et al. (AMPS can be resolved if matter does not undergo continuous collapse to a singularity but condenses on the apparent horizon. One can then expect a quasi-static object to form even after the gravitational field has overcome any degeneracy pressure of the matter fields. We consider dust collapse. If the collapse terminates on the apparent horizon, the Misner–Sharp mass function of the dust ball is predicted and we construct static solutions with no tangential pressure that would represent such a compact object. The collapse wave functions indicate that there will be processes by which energy extraction from the center occurs. These leave behind a negative point mass at the center which contributes to the total energy of the system but has no effect on the energy density of the dust ball. The solutions describe a compact object whose boundary lies outside its Schwarzschild radius and which is hardly distinguishable from a neutron star.

  1. Gravitational and electric energies in collapse of spherically thin capacitor

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    In our previous article (PHYSICAL REVIEW D 86, 084004 (2012)), we present a study of strong oscillating electric fields and electron-positron pair-production in gravitational collapse of a neutral stellar core at or over nuclear densities. In order to understand the back-reaction of such electric energy building and radiating on collapse, we adopt a simplified model describing the collapse of a spherically thin capacitor to give an analytical description how gravitational energy is converted to both kinetic and electric energies in collapse. It is shown that (i) averaged kinetic and electric energies are the same order, about an half of gravitational energy of spherically thin capacitor in collapse; (ii) caused by radiating and rebuilding electric energy, gravitational collapse undergoes a sequence of "on and off" hopping steps in the microscopic Compton scale. Although such a collapse process is still continuous in terms of macroscopic scales, it is slowed down as kinetic energy is reduced and collapsing tim...

  2. A discrete model of energy-conserved wavefunction collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Energy nonconservation is a serious problem of dynamical collapse theories. In this paper, we propose a discrete model of energy-conserved wavefunction collapse. It is shown that the model is consistent with existing experiments and our macroscopic experience.

  3. Observations on cyanobacterial population collapse in eutrophic lake water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, H.J.; Ebert, J.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Van den Hove, L.; Pel, R.; Takkenberg, W.; Woldringh, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    In two laboratory-scale enclosures of water from the shallow, eutrophic Lake Loosdrecht (the Netherlands), the predominating filamentous cyanobacteria grew vigorously for 2 weeks, but then their populations simultaneously collapsed, whereas coccoid cyanobacteria and algae persisted . The collapse co

  4. Mucus Rupture in A Collapsed airway: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Mucus plugs can completely obstruct an airway. Difficulty in mucus clearance results in lost gas exchange and inflammation. Non-Newtonian properties of mucus, yielding stress and shear-thinning, play significant roles in mucus clearance. We use aqueous carbopol 940 as a mucus stimulant to study clearance of a mucus plug with properties of yielding stress and shear-thinning in a bench-top experiment. A collapsed airway of the 12th generation in a human lung is simulated in a two-dimensional PDMS channel. A stable pressure drop is set along the plug to drive rupture. A micro-PIV technique is used to acquire velocity fields during the rupture process. A yielding pressure drop (initiating plug yielding) is nearly independent of initial plug length. Plug rupture can occur by focused deformation along the centerline or by total plug propagation where the trailing film is thicker than the precursor film. Maximum velocity appears at the rupture moment, and increases at higher pressure drop or smaller plug length. The wall shear gradient can undergo a rapid reversal when rupture occurs, possibly an injurious event to underlying airway epithelial cells. This work is supported by NIH: HL84370 and HL85156.

  5. GIS-Based Evaluation of Danger in Karst Collapse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, feasibility and advantage of GIS technology are discussed to make a quantitative evaluation of karst collapses, a fast and precise evaluation method for developing interface between the karst collapse and GIS-based evaluation model is used to predict major natural geological disasters. A complete procedure of fuzzy-hierarchical GIS-based evaluation of karst collapses is illustrated with the karst collapses in western urban area of Guilin, China.

  6. Functional monolayers for direct electrical biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Tami Lasseter

    Frequency-dependent electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been used to characterize changes in electrical response that accompany specific binding of a protein to its substrate, using the biotin-avidin system as a model. This thesis work shows that avidin, at concentrations in the nanomolar range, can be detected electrically in a completely label-free manner under conditions of zero average current flow and without the use of any auxiliary redox agents. Electrical circuit modeling of the interface was used to relate the frequency-dependent electrical response to the physical picture of the interface before and after avidin binding. The interaction of proteins with semiconductors such as silicon and diamond is of great interest for applications such as electronic biosensing. Investigations into the use of covalently bound oligo(ethylene glycol), EG, monolayers on diamond and silicon to minimize nonspecific protein adsorption were conducted. Protein adsorption was monitored by fluorescence scanning as a function the length of the ethylene glycol chain (EG3 through EG6) and the terminal functional group (methyl- versus hydroxyl-terminated EG3 monolayer). More quantitative measurements were made by eluting adsorbed avidin from the surface and measuring the intensity of fluorescence in the solution. This thesis work shows that high quality EG monolayers are formed on silicon and diamond and that these EG3 monolayers are as effective as EG3 self-assembled monolayers on gold at resisting nonspecific avidin adsorption. These results show promise for use of silicon and diamond materials in many potential applications such as biosensing and medical implants. Substrate roughness is shown to play a role in nonspecific protein adsorption, where carbon-based surfaces having features less than approximately 5 nm, are highly resistant to protein adsorption. Functionalization of the surfaces with hexaethylene glycol confers additional resistance to protein adsorption. These

  7. Casimir light: field pressure.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The electromagnetic field is assigned a self-consistent role in which abrupt slowing of the collapse produces radiation and the pressure of the radiation produces abrupt slowing. A simple expression is introduced for the photon spectrum. Conditions for light emission are proposed that imply a high degree of spatial localization. Some numerical checks are satisfied. A study of the mechanical equations of motion suggests an explanation of the very short time scale in terms of oppositely directe...

  8. Collapsing dynamics of attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The self-similar collapse of 3D and quasi-2D atom condensates with negative scattering length is examined. 3D condensates are shown to blow up following the scenario of weak collapse, for which 3-body recombination weakly dissipates the atoms. In contrast, 2D condensates undergo a strong collapse...

  9. 26 CFR 1.341-1 - Collapsible corporations; in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collapsible corporations; in general. 1.341-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Collapsible Corporations; Foreign Personal Holding Companies § 1.341-1 Collapsible corporations; in general. Subject to the limitations contained in § 1.341-4 and the...

  10. Collapse and Revival in Holographic Quenches

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Emilia; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  11. Energy balance in the WTC collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kaiqi; Xu, Kang; Ansourian, Peter; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of this report is to provide an analysis of Twin Towers of the New York City's World Trade Centre collapsed after attacked by two jet aircrafts. The approach mainly focused on the effect of temperature on mechanical properties of the building, by modelling heat energy in the south tower. Energy balance during the collapse between the energy inputs by aircraft petrol and the transient heat to the towers was conducted. Both the overall structure between 80 to 83 stories and individual elements was modelled. The main elements contributed to the heat transition includes external and internal columns. Heat applied in 2D and 3D models for single elements was through convection and conduction. Analysis of transient heat was done using Strand7.

  12. Collapse and revival in holographic quenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  13. Critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarte, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space, and in supercritical evolutions that lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal; they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a non-spinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement ...

  14. Cosmic no hair for collapsing universes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidsey, James E [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-21

    It is shown that all contracting, spatially homogeneous, orthogonal Bianchi cosmologies that are sourced by an ultra-stiff fluid with an arbitrary and, in general, varying equation of state asymptote to the spatially flat and isotropic universe in the neighbourhood of the big crunch singularity. This result is employed to investigate the asymptotic dynamics of a collapsing Bianchi type IX universe sourced by a scalar field rolling down a steep, negative exponential potential. A toroidally compactified version of M*-theory that leads to such a potential is discussed and it is shown that the isotropic attractor solution for a collapsing Bianchi type IX universe is supersymmetric when interpreted in an 11-dimensional context.

  15. Spherical collapse for unified dark matter models

    CERN Document Server

    Caramês, Thiago R P; Velten, Hermano E S

    2014-01-01

    We study the non-linear spherical "top hat" collapse for Chaplygin and viscous unified cosmologies. The term unified refers to models where dark energy and dark matter are replaced by one single component. For the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) we extend previous results of [R. A. A. Fernandes {\\it et al}. Physical Review D 85, 083501 (2012)]. We discuss the differences at non-linear level between the GCG with $\\alpha=0$ and the $\\Lambda$CDM model. We show that both are indeed different. The bulk viscous model which differs from the GCG due to the existence of non-adiabatic perturbations is also studied. In this case, the clustering process is in general suppressed and the viable parameter space of the viscous model that accelerates the background expansion does not lead to collapsed structures. This result challenges the viability of unified viscous models.

  16. Environmental dependence in the ellipsoidal collapse model

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    N-body simulations have demonstrated a correlation between the properties of haloes and their environment. In this paper, we assess whether the ellipsoidal collapse model can produce a similar dependence. First, we explore the statistical correlation that originates from Gaussian initial conditions. We derive analytic expressions for a number of joint statistics of the shear tensor and estimate the sensitivity of the local characteristics of the shear to the global geometry of the large scale environment. Next, we concentrate on the dynamical aspect of the environmental dependence using a simplified model that takes into account the interaction between a collapsing halo and its environment. We find that the tidal force exerted by the surrounding mass distribution causes haloes embedded in overdense regions to virialize earlier. An effective density threshold whose shape depends on the large scale density provides a good description of this environmental effect. We show that, using this approach, a correlation...

  17. Fabrication of P3HT/gold nanoparticle LB films by P3HT templating Langmuir monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang-Huei [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Chia-Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wen-Ping, E-mail: mjkr.hsu@msa.hinet.net [Department of Chemical Engineering, National United University, Miao-Li, Taiwan 36063 (China); Chan, Han-Wen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 70101 (China); Lee, Yuh-Lang, E-mail: yllee@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 70101 (China)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Addition of ODA into the P3HT monolayer can significantly improve the dispersion ability of P3HT molecules. • The adsorption ability of the P3HT monolayer to the dispersed AuNPs can also be enhanced by the presence of ODA. - Abstract: Regioregular poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (rr-P3HT) and mixed P3HT/octadecyl amine (ODA) were used as template monolayers to adsorb the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dispersed in subphase. The behaviors of P3HT and P3HT/ODA monolayers were investigated by surface pressure area per molecule (π–A) isotherms, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental results show that P3HT does not form a homogeneous film and tends to aggregate at the air/water interface. Meanwhile, the amount of AuNPs adsorbed by the P3HT monolayers is low, attributable to the weak interaction between AuNPs and P3HT. By introduction of ODA molecules into the P3HT monolayer, the spreading of P3HT molecules at the air/water interface is improved and the aggregation of P3HT is significantly inhibited. A nearly uniform and homogeneously mixed P3HT/ODA monolayer can be obtained when 50% of ODA is introduced. It is also found that the introduction of ODA can significantly increase the adsorption of AuNPs. For the mixed monolayer with low ratio of ODA (P3HT/ODA = 1/0.2), a higher concentration of adsorbed AuNPs was observed on the corresponding monolayer. However, when the ODA/P3HT ratio increases to 1/1, the AuNPs tend to form three-dimensional (3D) aggregates and the AuNPs cannot distribute well as a homogeneous monolayer. This result is ascribed to the increasing hydrophobicity of the adsorbed AuNPs because of capping of more ODA molecules.

  18. Collapse of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive self-interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2016-10-01

    We study the collapse of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive self-interaction. Equilibrium states in which the gravitational attraction and the attraction due to the self-interaction are counterbalanced by the quantum pressure (Heisenberg's uncertainty principle) exist only below a maximum mass Mmax=1.012 ℏ/√{G m |as| } where asMmax the system is expected to collapse and form a black hole. We study the collapse dynamics by making a Gaussian ansatz for the wave function and reducing the problem to the study of the motion of a particle in an effective potential. We find that the collapse time scales as (M /Mmax-1 )-1 /4 for M →Mmax+ and as M-1 /2 for M ≫Mmax. Other analytical results are given above and below the critical point corresponding to a saddle-node bifurcation. We apply our results to QCD axions with mass m =10-4 eV /c2 and scattering length as=-5.8 ×10-53 m for which Mmax=6.5 ×10-14M⊙ and R =3.3 ×10-4R⊙. We confirm our previous claim that bosons with attractive self-interaction, such as QCD axions, may form low mass stars (axion stars or dark matter stars) but cannot form dark matter halos of relevant mass and size. These mini axion stars could be the constituents of dark matter. They can collapse into mini black holes of mass ˜10-14M⊙ in a few hours. In that case, dark matter halos would be made of mini black holes. We also apply our results to ultralight axions with mass m =1.93 ×10-20 eV /c2 and scattering length as=-8.29 ×10-60 fm for which Mmax=0.39 ×1 06M⊙ and R =33 pc . These ultralight axions could cluster into dark matter halos. Axionic dark matter halos with attractive self-interaction can collapse into supermassive black holes of mass ˜1 06M⊙ (similar to those reported at the center of galaxies) in about one million years. We point out the limitations of the Gaussian ansatz to describe the late stages of the collapse dynamics. We also mention the possibility that, instead of forming a black hole

  19. Interactions of a Tetrazine Derivative with Biomembrane Constituents: A Langmuir Monolayer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Hagimori, Masayori; Mukai, Takahiro; Shibata, Osamu

    2016-07-05

    Tetrazine (Tz) is expected to be used for bioimaging and as an analytical reagent. It is known to react very fast with trans-cyclooctene under water in organic chemistry. Here, to understand the interaction between Tz and biomembrane constituents, we first investigated the interfacial behavior of a newly synthesized Tz derivative comprising a C18-saturated hydrocarbon chain (rTz-C18) using a Langmuir monolayer spread at the air-water interface. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms were measured for monolayers of rTz-C18 and biomembrane constituents such as dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE), palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), and cholesterol (Ch). The lateral interaction between rTz-C18 and the lipids was thermodynamically elucidated from the excess Gibbs free energy of mixing and two-dimensional phase diagram. The binary monolayers except for the Ch system indicated high miscibility or affinity. In particular, rTz-C18 was found to interact more strongly with DPPE, which is a major constituent of the inner surface of cell membranes. The phase behavior and morphology upon monolayer compression were investigated by using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), fluorescence microscopy (FM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The BAM and FM images of the DPPC/rTz-C18, DPPG/rTz-C18, and PSM/rTz-C18 systems exhibited a coexistence state of two different liquid-condensed domains derived mainly from monolayers of phospholipids and phospholipids-rTz-C18. From these morphological observations, it is worthy to note that rTz-C18 is possible to interact with a limited amount of the lipids except for DPPE.

  20. Implications of lipid monolayer charge characteristics on their selective interactions with a short antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciumac, Daniela; Campbell, Richard A; Xu, Hai; Clifton, Luke A; Hughes, Arwel V; Webster, John R P; Lu, Jian R

    2017-02-01

    Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) target bacterial membranes and they kill bacteria by causing structural disruptions. One of the fundamental issues however lies in the selective responses of AMPs to different cell membranes as a lack of selectivity can elicit toxic side effects to mammalian host cells. A key difference between the outer surfaces of bacterial and mammalian cells is the charge characteristics. We report a careful study of the binding of one of the representative AMPs, with the general sequence G(IIKK)4I-NH2 (G4), to the spread lipid monolayers of DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (sodium salt)) mimicking the charge difference between them, using the combined measurements from Langmuir trough, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and neutron reflection (NR). The difference in pressure rise upon peptide addition into the subphase clearly demonstrated the different interactions arising from different lipid charge features. Morphological changes from the BAM imaging confirmed the association of the peptide into the lipid monolayers, but there was little difference between them. However, NR studies revealed that the peptide bound 4 times more onto the DPPG monolayer than onto the DPPC monolayer. Importantly, whilst the peptide could only be associated with the head groups of DPPC it was well penetrated into the entire DPPG monolayer, showing that the electrostatic interaction strengthened the hydrophobic interaction and that the combined molecular interactive processes increased the power of G4 in disrupting the charged membranes. The results are discussed in the context of general antibacterial actions as observed from other AMPs and membrane lytic actions.

  1. Scapholunate advanced collapse: a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Tischler, Brian T.; Diaz, Luis E.; Murakami, Akira M.; Roemer, Frank W.; Goud, Ajay R.; Arndt, William F.; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) is the most common cause of osteoarthritis involving the wrist. Along with clinical investigation, radiological studies play a vital role in the diagnosis of SLAC wrist. Given that the osteoarthritic changes that are seen with SLAC occur in a predictable progressive pattern, it is important to understand the pathological evolution of SLAC to be able to recognise the associated progressive imaging findings seen with this disease process. Focusing ...

  2. Caldera rim collapse: A hidden volcanic hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Merle, Olivier; Michon, Laurent; Bachèlery, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Following the emblematic flank collapse of Mount St Helens in 1981, numerous models of flank sliding have been proposed. These models have allowed to largely improve the understanding of mechanisms involved in such landslides, which represent a tremendous risk for populations living around volcanoes. In this article, a new mode of landslide formation, related to buried calderas, is described. The model emphasizes the paramount importance of the hidden ring fault that, ...

  3. Simulated cytoskeletal collapse via tau degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Sendek

    Full Text Available We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06-0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse.

  4. Collapse of Langmuir solitons in inhomogeneous plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y A; Nishida, Y; Cheng, C Z

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of Langmuir solitons in inhomogeneous plasmas is investigated numerically. Through numerical simulation solving Zakharov equations, the solitons are accelerated toward the low density side. As a consequence, isolated cavities moving at ion sound velocities are emitted. When the acceleration is further increased, solitons collapse and the cavities separate into two lumps released at ion sound velocities. The threshold is estimated by an analogy between the soliton and a particle overcoming the self-generated potential well.

  5. Gravitational collapse of barotropic spherical fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Giambo, R; Magli, G; Piccione, P; Giambo', Roberto; Giannoni, Fabio; Magli, Giulio; Piccione, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of spherical, barotropic perfect fluids is analyzed here. For the first time, the final state of these systems is characterized without resorting to simplifying assumptions - such as self-similarity - using a new approach based on non-linear o.d.e. techniques. Formation of naked singularities is shown to occur for solutions such that the mass function is sufficiently regular in a neighborhood of the spacetime singularity.

  6. Collapse and bounce of null fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Creelman, Bradley; Booth, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Exact solutions describing the spherical collapse of null fluids can contain regions which violate the energy conditions. Physically the violations occur when the infalling matter continues to move inwards even when non-gravitational repulsive forces become stronger than gravity. In 1991 Ori proposed a resolution for these violations: spacetime surgery should be used to replace the energy condition violating region with an outgoing solution. The matter bounces. We revisit and implement this p...

  7. Galactic collapse of scalar field dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcubierre, Miguel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Guzman, F Siddhartha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Nunez, Dario [Centre for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Urena-Lopez, L Arturo [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Wiederhold, Petra [Departamento de Control Automatico, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2002-10-07

    We present a scenario for core galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for the formation of a galactic core plus a remnant halo, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  8. Formation of satellites from cold collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaiem, David; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    We study the collapse of an isolated, initially cold, irregular (but almost spherical) and slightly inhomogeneous cloud of self-gravitating particles.The cloud is driven towards a virialized quasi-equilibrium state by a fast relaxation mechanism, occurring in a typical time τc, whose signature is a large change in the particle energy distribution. Post-collapse particles are divided into two main species: bound and free, the latter being ejected from the system. Because of the initial system's anisotropy, the time varying gravitational field breaks spherical symmetry so that the ejected mass can carry away angular momentum and the bound system can gain a non-zero angular momentum. In addition, while strongly bound particles form a compact core, weakly bound ones may form, in a time scale of the order of τc, several satellite sub-structures. These satellites have a finite lifetime that can be longer than τc and generally form a flattened distribution. Their origin and their abundance are related to the amplitude and nature ofinitial density fluctuations and to the initial cloud deviations from spherical symmetry, which are both amplified during the collapse phase. Satellites show a time dependent virial ratio that can be different from the equilibrium value b ≈ -1: although they are bound to the main virialized object, they are not necessarily virially relaxed.

  9. Closed String Tachyon: Inflation and Cosmological Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Escamilla-Rivera, Celia; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar; Obregon, Octavio

    2011-01-01

    By compactifying a critical bosonic string theory on an internal non-flat space with a constant volume, we study the role played by the closed string tachyon in the cosmology of the effective four-dimensional space-time. The effective tachyon potential consists on a negative constant related to the internal curvature space and a polynomial with only quadratic and quartic terms of the tachyon field. Based on it, we present a solution for the tachyon field and the scale factor, which describes an accelerated universe which expands to a maximum value before collapsing. At early times, the closed string tachyon potential behaves as a cosmological constant driving the Universe to an expansion. The value of the cosmological constant is determined by the curvature of the internal space which also fixes the value of the vacuum energy. As time evolves, inflation is present in our models, and it finishes long before the collapsing. At late times, we show that the collapse of the Universe starts as soon as the tachyon f...

  10. Chameleonic equivalence postulate and wave function collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Zanzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A chameleonic solution to the cosmological constant problem and the non-equivalence of different conformal frames at the quantum level have been recently suggested [Phys. Rev. D82 (2010) 044006]. In this article we further discuss the theoretical grounds of that model and we are led to a chameleonic equivalence postulate (CEP). Whenever a theory satisfies our CEP (and some other additional conditions), a density-dependence of the mass of matter fields is naturally present. Let us summarize the main results of this paper. 1) The CEP can be considered the microscopic counterpart of the Einstein's Equivalence Principle and, hence, a chameleonic description of quantum gravity is obtained: in our model, (quantum) gravitation is equivalent to a conformal anomaly. 2) To illustrate one of the possible applications of the CEP, we point out a connection between chameleon fields and quantum-mechanical wave function collapse. The collapse is induced by the chameleonic nature of the theory. We discuss the collapse for a S...

  11. Quantum Mechanical Effects in Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate quantum mechanical effects to various aspects of gravitational collapse. These quantum mechanical effects are implemented in the context of the Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism. The Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism allows us to investigate the time-dependent evolutions of the quantum mechanical effects, which is beyond the scope of the usual methods used to investigate the quantum mechanical corrections of gravitational collapse. Utilizing the time-dependent nature of the Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism, we study the quantization of a spherically symmetric domain wall from the view point of an asymptotic and infalling observer, in the absence of radiation. To build a more realistic picture, we then study the time-dependent nature of the induced radiation during the collapse using a semi-classical approach. Using the domain wall and the induced radiation, we then study the time-dependent evolution of the entropy of the domain wall. Finally we make some remarks about the pos...

  12. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  13. Properties of Neutron Star Critical Collapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mew-Bing

    2010-01-01

    Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in observations. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and neutron star phases, understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution and clarify the implication of these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the study of the phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

  14. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Raphael Hix

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  15. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Casadio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell gravitons that account for the (negative Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with Bekenstein's area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This result supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without central singularity, in which both gravitons and baryons are marginally bound and form a Bose–Einstein condensate at the critical point. The Hawking emission of baryons and gravitons is then described by the quantum depletion of the condensate and we show the two energy fluxes are comparable, albeit negligibly small on astrophysical scales.

  16. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Giusti, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell) gravitons that account for the (negative) Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with Bekenstein's area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive) interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This result supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without central singularity, in which both gravitons and baryons are marginally bound and form a Bose-Einstein condensate at the critical point. The Hawking emission of baryons and gravitons is then described by the quantum depletion of the condensate and we show the two energy fluxes are comparable, albeit negligibly small on astrophysical scales.

  17. Cosmic-ray ionisation in collapsing clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco; Galli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) play an important role in dense molecular cores, affecting their thermal and dynamical evolution and initiating the chemistry. Several studies have shown that the formation of protostellar discs in collapsing clouds is severely hampered by the braking torque exerted by the entrained magnetic field on the infalling gas, as long as the field remains frozen to the gas. We examine the possibility that the concentration and twisting of the field lines in the inner region of collapse can produce a significant reduction of the ionisation fraction. To check whether the CR ionisation rate (CRir) can fall below the critical value required to maintain good coupling, we first study the propagation of CRs in a model of a static magnetised cloud varying the relative strength of the toroidal/poloidal components and the mass-to-flux ratio. We then follow the path of CRs using realistic magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations of a rotating collapsing core. We find that an increment of...

  18. Nanostructure of polymer monolayer and polyelectrolyte brush at air/water interface by X-ray and neutron reflectometry

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, H; Matsumoto, K

    2003-01-01

    The nanostructure of amphiphilic diblock copolymer monolayer on water was directly investigated by in situ X-ray and neutron reflectivity techniques. The diblock copolymer consists of polysilacyclobutane, which is very flexible, as a hydrophobic block and polymethacrylic acid, an anionic polymer, as a hydrophilic block. The polymers with shorter hydrophilic segment formed a very smooth and uniform monolayer with hydrophobic layer on water and dense hydrophilic layer under the water. But the longer hydrophilic segment polymer formed three-layered monolayer with polyelectrolyte brush in addition to hydrophobic and dense hydrophilic layers. The dense hydrophilic layer is thought to be formed to avoid a contact between hydrophobic polymer layer and water. Its role is something like a 'carpet'. An additional interesting information is that the thickness of the 'carpet layer' is almost 15A, independent the surface pressure and hydrophilic polymer length. Highly quantitative information was obtained about the nanost...

  19. Synthesis and Monolayer Behaviors of Succinic Acid-Type Gemini Surfactants Containing Semifluoroalkyl Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Nagase, Youhei; Oida, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel succinic acid-type gemini surfactants containing semifluoroalkyl groups, dl- and meso-2,3-bis[Rf-(CH2)n]-succinic acids (Rf = C4F9, C6F13, C8F17; n = 2, 9), were successfully synthesized, and the effects of Rf, methylene chain length (n), and stereochemistry on their monolayer behaviors were studied. Critical micelle concentrations (CMC) of dl- and meso-2,3-bis[C4F9(CH2)9]-succinic acids were one order of magnitude smaller than that of the corresponding 1+1 type surfactant, C4F9(CH2)9COOH. From surface pressure-area (π-A) measurements, the lift-off areas of the geminis were found to decrease in the order C4F9 ≥ C6F13 > C8F17, regardless of methylene chain length and stereochemistry. The zero-pressure molecular areas of the geminis were twice those of the corresponding 1+1 type surfactants. Based on Gibbs compression modulus analysis, it was clarified that 2,3-bis[C8F17(CH2)n]-succinic gemini with short methylene chains (n = 2) would form more rigid monolayers than those having long methylene chains (n = 9). Unlike for 2,3-bis(alkyl)-succinic acids, the effects of stereochemistry on the monolayer behavior of semifluoroalkylated geminis were small.

  20. Electrochemical metallization of self-assembled porphyrin monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nann, Thomas; Kielmann, Udo; Dietrich, Christoph

    2002-04-01

    Multifunctional sensor systems are becoming increasingly important in electroanalytical chemistry. Together with ongoing miniaturization there is a need for micro- and nanopatterning tools for thin electroactive layers (e.g. self-assembling monolayers). This paper documents a method for production of a micro-array of different metal-porphyrin monolayers with different sensor properties. A new method has been developed for the selective and local metallization of bare porphyrin monolayers by cathodic pulsing and sweeping. The metal-porphyrin monolayers obtained were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. It was shown that porphyrin monolayers can be metallized with manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel by use of the new method. It is expected that all types of metal-porphyrin monolayers can be produced in the same manner.