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Sample records for monokine-based reporter assay

  1. A simple reporter assay for screening claudin-4 modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Akihiro; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2012-10-05

    Claudin-4, a member of a tetra-transmembrane protein family that comprises 27 members, is a key functional and structural component of the tight junction-seal in mucosal epithelium. Modulation of the claudin-4-barrier for drug absorption is now of research interest. Disruption of the claudin-4-seal occurs during inflammation. Therefore, claudin-4 modulators (repressors and inducers) are promising candidates for drug development. However, claudin-4 modulators have never been fully developed. Here, we attempted to design a screening system for claudin-4 modulators by using a reporter assay. We prepared a plasmid vector coding a claudin-4 promoter-driven luciferase gene and established stable reporter gene-expressing cells. We identified thiabendazole, carotene and curcumin as claudin-4 inducers, and potassium carbonate as a claudin-4 repressor by using the reporter cells. They also increased or decreased, respectively, the integrity of the tight junction-seal in Caco-2 cells. This simple reporter system will be a powerful tool for the development of claudin-4 modulators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Considerations for the design and reporting of enzyme assays in high-throughput screening applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Acker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the key steps and methods which are used to develop enzyme assays suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS applications. The goals of HTS enzyme assays are defined relative to lower-throughput bench top assays and important aspects which go into constructing robust and sensitive enzyme assays are described. Methods that have been applied to common enzyme classes are reviewed and pitfalls related to assay artifacts are discussed. We also suggest a reporting format to describe the steps in HTS enzyme assays.

  3. Confinement Vessel Assay System: Design and Implementation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano D. [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-18

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1- to 2-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. We have developed a neutron assay system for the purposes of Materials Control and Accountability (MC&A) measurements of the vessel prior to and after cleanout. We present our approach to confronting the challenges in designing, building, and testing such a system. The system was designed to meet a set of functional and operational requirements. A Monte Carlo model was developed to aid in optimizing the detector design as well as to predict the systematic uncertainty associated with confinement vessel measurements. Initial testing was performed to optimize and determine various measurement parameters, and then the system was characterized using {sup 252}Cf placed a various locations throughout the measurement system. Measurements were also performed with a {sup 252}Cf source placed inside of small steel and HDPE shells to study the effect of moderation. These measurements compare favorably with their MCNPX model equivalent, making us confident that we can rely on the Monte Carlo simulation to predict the systematic uncertainty due to variations in response to material that may be localized at different points within a vessel.

  4. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Fenyö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibody assessments play a central role in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 vaccine development but it is unclear which assay, or combination of assays, will provide reliable measures of correlates of protection. To address this, an international collaboration (NeutNet involving 18 independent participants was organized to compare different assays. METHODS: Each laboratory evaluated four neutralizing reagents (TriMab, 447-52D, 4E10, sCD4 at a given range of concentrations against a panel of 11 viruses representing a wide range of genetic subtypes and phenotypes. A total of 16 different assays were compared. The assays utilized either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (virus infectivity assays, VI assays, or their Env-pseudotyped (gp160 derivatives produced in 293T cells (PSV assays from molecular clones or uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically-engineered cell lines in either a single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs that included extracellular or intracellular p24 antigen detection, RNA quantification and luciferase and beta-galactosidase reporter gene expression. FINDINGS: PSV assays were generally more sensitive than VI assays, but there were important differences according to the virus and inhibitor used. For example, for TriMab, the mean IC50 was always lower in PSV than in VI assays. However, with 4E10 or sCD4 some viruses were neutralized with a lower IC50 in VI assays than in the PSV assays. Inter-laboratory concordance was slightly better for PSV than for VI assays with some viruses, but for other viruses agreement between laboratories was limited and depended on both the virus and the neutralizing reagent. CONCLUSIONS: The NeutNet project demonstrated clear differences in assay sensitivity that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus. No single assay was

  5. Mutagenicity test system based on a reporter gene assay for short-term detection of mutagens (MutaGen assay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Claudia; Arndt, Christian; Reifferscheid, Georg

    2003-02-05

    The construction of a bacterial mutation assay system detecting reversions of base substitutions and frameshifts in tetracycline (tet) and ampicillin resistance genes located on low copy plasmids is described. Frameshift mutations were introduced into repetitive GC-sequences and G-repeats known to be mutagenic hot-spots. Base pair substitutions were inserted in or around the active site of the ampicillinase gene thus generating reversibility of the ampicilline sensitivity. The plasmids carry genes to enable sensitive, fast and specific detection of mutagens in bacteria. MucAB was cloned into the test plasmid to enhance error-prone DNA-repair. The conventional reversion principle has been combined with the luminometric measurement of an inducible reporter gene. The revertants are detected after induction of the beta-galactosidase-producing lacZ-gene either controlled by its natural lac-promotor or by the more stringently repressed (anhydrotetracyclin inducible) tetA promotor. The tester strains containing the tetA/lacZ reporter gene construct can grow in full medium over the complete assay. This test procedure enables screening for mutations within one working day. Incubation for 16 h reveals high sensitivity.

  6. Quantification of Atlantic salmon type-I interferon using an Mx1 promoter reporter gene assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Audny; Collet, Bertrand; Sandaker, Elin; Secombes, Christopher J; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2004-02-01

    We here describe an assay for the detection of interferon-like activity in Atlantic salmon based on the transient transfection of chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 cells) with a rainbow trout Mx1 promoter linked to a luciferase reporter. A beta-galactosidase gene under the control of a constitutively expressed beta-actin promoter was used as a transfection standard, and luciferase and beta gal expression were measured by a commercially available kit. Interferon containing supernatants from poly I:C- or CpG-stimulated leucocytes added to transfected CHSE-cells induced high luciferase expression (>60-fold induction compared to supernatants from non-stimulated cells). There was no response to supernatants from LPS- and ConA/PMA-stimulated leucocytes, demonstrating the specificity for type I interferon-like activity. Duplicate samples analysed using a cell protection assay for detection of antiviral activity correlated well with levels obtained by the Mx1 promoter reporter gene assay (R2=0.97), confirming the reporter assay as a reliable substitute for the standard antiviral assay. The Mx reporter gene assay also has advantages in terms of sensitivity, high dynamic range and reliability over the conventional cell protection assay.

  7. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  8. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Heyndrickx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibodies provide markers for vaccine-induced protective immunity in many viral infections. By analogy, HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by immunization may well predict vaccine effectiveness. Assessment of neutralizing antibodies is therefore of primary importance, but is hampered by the fact that we do not know which assay(s can provide measures of protective immunity. An international collaboration (NeutNet involving 18 different laboratories previously compared different assays using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and soluble CD4 (Phase I study. METHODS: In the present study (Phase II, polyclonal reagents were evaluated by 13 laboratories. Each laboratory evaluated nine plasmas against an 8 virus panel representing different genetic subtypes and phenotypes. TriMab, a mixture of three mAbs, was used as a positive control allowing comparison of the results with Phase I in a total of nine different assays. The assays used either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (Virus Infectivity Assays, VIA, or Env (gp160-pseudotyped viruses (pseudoviruses, PSV produced in HEK293T cells from molecular clones or from uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically engineered cell lines in either single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs including extra- or intra-cellular p24 antigen detection, luciferase, beta-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene expression. FINDINGS: Using TriMab, results of Phase I and Phase II were generally in agreement for six of the eight viruses tested and confirmed that the PSV assay is more sensitive than PBMC (p = 0.014. Comparisons with the polyclonal reagents showed that sensitivities were dependent on both virus and plasma. CONCLUSIONS: Here we further demonstrate clear differences in assay sensitivities that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus

  9. International Network for Comparison of HIV Neutralization Assays: The NeutNet Report II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyndrickx, Leo; Heath, Alan; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Alcami, Jose; Bongertz, Vera; Jansson, Marianne; Malnati, Mauro; Montefiori, David; Moog, Christiane; Morris, Lynn; Osmanov, Saladin; Polonis, Victoria; Ramaswamy, Meghna; Sattentau, Quentin; Tolazzi, Monica; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Willems, Betty; Wrin, Terri; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Background Neutralizing antibodies provide markers for vaccine-induced protective immunity in many viral infections. By analogy, HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by immunization may well predict vaccine effectiveness. Assessment of neutralizing antibodies is therefore of primary importance, but is hampered by the fact that we do not know which assay(s) can provide measures of protective immunity. An international collaboration (NeutNet) involving 18 different laboratories previously compared different assays using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and soluble CD4 (Phase I study). Methods In the present study (Phase II), polyclonal reagents were evaluated by 13 laboratories. Each laboratory evaluated nine plasmas against an 8 virus panel representing different genetic subtypes and phenotypes. TriMab, a mixture of three mAbs, was used as a positive control allowing comparison of the results with Phase I in a total of nine different assays. The assays used either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (Virus Infectivity Assays, VIA), or Env (gp160)-pseudotyped viruses (pseudoviruses, PSV) produced in HEK293T cells from molecular clones or from uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically engineered cell lines in either single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs including extra- or intra-cellular p24 antigen detection, luciferase, beta-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene expression. Findings Using TriMab, results of Phase I and Phase II were generally in agreement for six of the eight viruses tested and confirmed that the PSV assay is more sensitive than PBMC (p = 0.014). Comparisons with the polyclonal reagents showed that sensitivities were dependent on both virus and plasma. Conclusions Here we further demonstrate clear differences in assay sensitivities that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus

  10. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper;

    2011-01-01

    relative to Renilla luciferase expression. Thus, results are independent of cell number or differences in cell viability, resulting in intra and inter assay coefficients of variation of 10% or less. Normalization of results relative to the expression of an internal standard also provides a means......A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFa antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NF¿B regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NF¿B. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFa-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...

  11. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper;

    2011-01-01

    relative to Renilla luciferase expression. Thus, results are independent of cell number or differences in cell viability, resulting in intra and inter assay coefficients of variation of 10% or less. Normalization of results relative to the expression of an internal standard also provides a means......A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFα antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NFκB regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NFκB. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFα-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...

  12. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-

  13. Conference report: the 5th cell-based assay and bioanalytical method development conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 80 participants met at the Marriot Hotel, San Francisco, CA, USA, between the 4th and 6th October 2010 to share novel techniques and discuss the emerging approaches in the evolving field of cell-based assay and bioanalytical method development. This report highlights the discussion and summary of the meeting.

  14. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-

  15. A rapid and quantitative coat protein complex II vesicle formation assay using luciferase reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, J Chris; Kim, Jinoh

    2012-02-15

    The majority of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is facilitated by coat protein complex II (COPII). The COPII proteins deform the ER membrane into vesicles at the ER exit sites. During the vesicle formation step, the COPII proteins load cargo molecules into the vesicles. Formation of COPII vesicles has been reconstituted in vitro in yeast and in mammalian systems. These in vitro COPII vesicle formation assays involve incubation of microsomal membranes and purified COPII proteins with nucleotides. COPII vesicles are separated from the microsomes by differential centrifugation. Interestingly, the efficiency of the COPII vesicle formation with purified recombinant mammalian COPII proteins is lower than that with cytosol, suggesting that an additional cytosolic factor(s) is involved in this process. Indeed, other studies have also implicated additional factors. To facilitate biochemical identification of such regulators, a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay is necessary because the current assay is lengthy. To expedite this assay, we generated luciferase reporter constructs. The reporter proteins were packaged into COPII vesicles and yielded quantifiable luminescent signals, resulting in a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay.

  16. Automated reporter quantification in vivo: high-throughput screening method for reporter-based assays in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Walker

    Full Text Available Reporter-based assays underlie many high-throughput screening (HTS platforms, but most are limited to in vitro applications. Here, we report a simple whole-organism HTS method for quantifying changes in reporter intensity in individual zebrafish over time termed, Automated Reporter Quantification in vivo (ARQiv. ARQiv differs from current "high-content" (e.g., confocal imaging-based whole-organism screening technologies by providing a purely quantitative data acquisition approach that affords marked improvements in throughput. ARQiv uses a fluorescence microplate reader with specific detection functionalities necessary for robust quantification of reporter signals in vivo. This approach is: 1 Rapid; achieving true HTS capacities (i.e., >50,000 units per day, 2 Reproducible; attaining HTS-compatible assay quality (i.e., Z'-factors of ≥0.5, and 3 Flexible; amenable to nearly any reporter-based assay in zebrafish embryos, larvae, or juveniles. ARQiv is used here to quantify changes in: 1 Cell number; loss and regeneration of two different fluorescently tagged cell types (pancreatic beta cells and rod photoreceptors, 2 Cell signaling; relative activity of a transgenic Notch-signaling reporter, and 3 Cell metabolism; accumulation of reactive oxygen species. In summary, ARQiv is a versatile and readily accessible approach facilitating evaluation of genetic and/or chemical manipulations in living zebrafish that complements current "high-content" whole-organism screening methods by providing a first-tier in vivo HTS drug discovery platform.

  17. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Scippo, Marie Louise [Department of Food Sciences, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Muller, Marc [Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering GIGA-R, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Antignac, Jean-Philippe [LABERCA, ENVN, USC INRA 2013, BP 50707, 44 307, Nantes (France); Malone, Edward [The State Laboratory, Young' s Cross, Celbridge, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Bovee, Toine F.H. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, AE Wageningen 6700 (Netherlands); Mitchell, Samuel [Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC{sub 50} of 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} and 0.16 ng mL{sup -1} respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally

  18. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function.

  19. The use of nanocrystal quantum dot as fluorophore reporters in molecular beacon-based assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-12-01

    The utilization of molecular beacon (MB) biosensor probes to detect nucleic acid targets has received enormous interest within the scientific community. This interest has been stimulated by the operational qualities of MB-based probes with respect to their unique sensitivity and specificity. The design of MB biosensors entails not only optimizing the sequence of the loop to hybridize with the nucleic acid target or optimization of the length of the stem to tune the sensitivity but also the selection of the appropriate fluorophore reporter to generate the signal transduction read-out upon hybridization of the probe with the target sequence. Traditional organic fluorescent dyes are mostly used for signal reporting in MB assays but their optical properties in comparison to semiconductor fluorescent quantum dot (Qdot) nanocrystals are at a disadvantage. This review highlights the progress made in exploiting Qdot as fluorophore reporters in MB-based assays with the aim of instigating further development in the field of Qdot-MB technology. The development reported to date indicates that unparalleled fluorescence signal reporting in MB-based assays can be achieved using well-constructed Qdot fluorophores.

  20. Validation of an interferon stimulatory response element reporter gene assay for quantifying type I interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoski, S R; Xie, M; Hall, E B; Mercadante, P M; Spencer, T E; Lonergan, P; Ealy, A D

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a virus-free, cell-based interferon (IFN) bioassay and determine the utility of this assay on biological samples that contained IFN-τ, the trophoblast-secreted maternal recognition of pregnancy factor in ruminants. Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells were transduced with lentiviral particles that contained a firefly luciferase reporter construct driven by an IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE). Stably transduced cells were selected with the use of puromycin resistance. A linear, dose-responsive response was detected with human IFN-α and ovine IFN-τ. Interferon activity was detected in conditioned media from bovine trophoblast cells and uterine flushes collected from sheep and cattle. Activity also was detected in media collected after individual or small group culture of in vitro-produced bovine blastocysts at day 8 to 10 after fertilization. In summary, this IFN stimulatory response element-reporter assay may be used as an alternative to virus-dependent, cytopathic assays. It contains a similar sensitivity to IFNs and can be completed in a shorter time than cytopathic assays and does not require heightened biosafety conditions after cell transduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a facile method for high throughput screening with reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, A S; Andrews, J L; Littleton, T R; Ignar, D M

    2000-10-01

    This report describes a facile methodology for high throughput screening with stable mammalian cell reporter gene assays. We have adapted a 96-well adherent cell method to an assay in which cells propagated in suspension are dispensed into 96- or 384-well plates containing test compounds in 100% DMSO. The validation of a stable CHO cell line that expresses 6xCRE-luciferase for use as a reporter gene host cell line is described. The reporter gene, when expressed in this particular CHO cell line, appears to respond specifically to modulation of cAMP levels, thus the cell line is appropriate for screening and pharmacological analysis of Galpha(s)- and Galpha(i)-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors. The development of the new suspension cell assay in both 96- and 384-well formats was performed using a derivative of the CHO host reporter cell line that was stably transfected with human melanocortin-1 receptor. The response of this cell line to NDP-alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and forskolin was nearly identical between the adherent and suspension methods. The new method offers improvements in cost, throughput, cell culture effort, compound stability, accuracy of compound delivery, and hands-on time. The 384-well assay can be performed at high capacity in any laboratory without the use of expensive automation systems such that a single person can screen 100 plates per day with 3.5-4 h hands-on time. Although the system has been validated using Galpha(s)-coupled receptor-mediated activation of a cAMP response element, the method can be applied to other types of targets and/or transcriptional response elements.

  2. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    cotransfected with the human androgen receptor expression vector and the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV)(2)-luciferase vector using the new nonliposomal transfection reagent FuGene, Stimulation of the cells for 24 h with the synthetic androgen receptor agonist, R1881 (10 nM), resulted in a 30- to 60-fold...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were......-on laboratory time. This assay is a powerful tool for the efficient and accurate determination and quantification of the effects of antiandrogens on reporter gene transcription, To extend the application of FuGene, the reagent was shown to be superior compared to Lipofectin for transfecting MCF7 human breast...

  3. Optimization of reporter gene assay: several factors influencing detection of promoter activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Li-xiang; WENG Mo; ZHANG Zong-yu; TONG Tan-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Promoter analysis is currently applied to detect the expression of the targeted gene in studies of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. As a reporter gene, luciferase plays an important role and has been used widely in the promoter assay.Methods Human embryonic lung fibroblast cells (2BS), HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells were transfected with various genes embedded by lipofectamine. This study determined various factors that affect promoter activity determination,such as the selection of the reporter genes and internal references, the dose and the type of the vectors carrying the transcription factors, the host cells and the instruments.Results The sensitivity of the luciferase assay was much higher than that of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Moreover, promoter activity is increased in a dose-related manner only in certain ranges outside of which the results may be reversed and the promoter activity is related to the expression vector which is carrying the cDNA.Otherwise, the length of the promoter, internal references and the host cell can also influence the promoter activity.Conclusions To detect the promoter activity accurately, a few factors including dose, vector, length and host cell which influence reporter gene assay aforementioned should be considered.

  4. Zebrafish-based reporter gene assays reveal different estrogenic activities in river waters compared to a conventional human-derived assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonavane, Manoj; Creusot, Nicolas; Maillot-Maréchal, Emmanuelle; Péry, Alexandre; Brion, François; Aїt-Aïssa, Selim

    2016-04-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) act on the endocrine system through multiple mechanisms of action, among them interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) is a well-identified key event in the initiation of adverse outcomes. As the most commonly used estrogen screening assays are either yeast- or human-cell based systems, the question of their (eco)toxicological relevance when assessing risks for aquatic species can be raised. The present study addresses the use of zebrafish (zf) derived reporter gene assays, both in vitro (i.e. zf liver cell lines stably expressing zfERα, zfERβ1 and zfERβ2 subtypes) and in vivo (i.e. transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zf embryos), to assess estrogenic contaminants in river waters. By investigating 20 French river sites using passive sampling, high frequencies of in vitro zfER-mediated activities in water extracts were measured. Among the different in vitro assays, zfERβ2 assay was the most sensitive and responsive one, enabling the detection of active compounds at all investigated sites. In addition, comparison with a conventional human-based in vitro assay highlighted sites that were able to active zfERs but not human ER, suggesting the occurrence of zf-specific ER ligands. Furthermore, a significant in vivo estrogenic activity was detected at the most active sites in vitro, with a good accordance between estradiol equivalent (E2-EQ) concentrations derived from both in vitro and in vivo assays. Overall, this study shows the relevance and usefulness of such novel zebrafish-based assays as screening tools to monitor estrogenic activities in complex mixtures such as water extracts. It also supports their preferred use compared to human-based assays to assess the potential risks caused by endocrine disruptive chemicals for aquatic species such as fish.

  5. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay Project Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, R P; Langlois, R G; Nasarabadi, S; Benett, W J; Colston, B W; Johnson, D C; Brown, S B; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-04-17

    This report covers phase 2 (year 2) of the Nucleic Acid System--Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay project. The objective of the project is to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in a multiplex mode using flow cytometry. The Hybrid instrument consists of a flow-through PCR module capable of handling a multiplexed PCR assay, a hybridizing module capable of hybridizing multiplexed PCR amplicons and beads, and a flow cytometer module for bead-based identification, all controlled by a single computer. Multiplex immunoassay using bead-based Luminex flow cytometry is available, allowing rapid screening for many agents. PCR is highly specific and complements and verifies immunoassay. It can also be multiplexed and detection provided using the bead-based Luminex flow cytometer. This approach allows full access to the speed and 100-fold multiplex capability of flow cytometry for rapid screening as well as the accuracy and specificity of PCR. This project has two principal activities: (1) Design, build and test a prototype hybrid PCR/flow cytometer with the basic capabilities for rapid, broad spectrum detection and identification, and (2) Develop and evaluate multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products. This project requires not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This involves development and evaluation of multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products.

  6. Inter-laboratory assessment of a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay - progress report on phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, A-L; Stedman, D B; Ball, J; Hillegass, J M; Flood, A; Zhang, C X; Panzica-Kelly, J; Cao, J; Coburn, A; Enright, B P; Tornesi, M B; Hetheridge, M; Augustine-Rauch, K A

    2012-04-01

    This report provides a progress update of a consortium effort to develop a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicity assay. Twenty non-proprietary compounds (10 animal teratogens and 10 animal non-teratogens) were evaluated blinded in 4 laboratories. Zebrafish embryos from pond-derived and cultivated strain wild types were exposed to the test compounds for 5 days and subsequently evaluated for lethality and morphological changes. Each of the testing laboratories achieved similar overall concordance to the animal data (60-70%). Subsequent optimization procedures to improve the overall concordance focused on compound formulation and test concentration adjustments, chorion permeation and number of replicates. These optimized procedures were integrated into a revised protocol and all compounds were retested in one lab using embryos from pond-derived zebrafish and achieved 85% total concordance. To further assess assay performance, a study of additional compounds is currently in progress at two laboratories using embryos from pond-derived and cultivated-strain wild type zebrafish.

  7. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-03

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations.

  8. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro reporter gene assays for short-term screening of estrogenic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Zeinstra, L.M.; Schuitemaker, F.; Lanser, P.H.; Bogerd, J.; Brouwer, A.; Vethaak, A.D.; Voogt, de P.; Murk, A.J.; Burg, van der B.

    2002-01-01

    Functional in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays have recently been developed for the rapid determination of exposure to (xeno)estrogens. The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated chemically activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay uses T47D human breast cancer cells stably trans

  9. MPRAnator: a web-based tool for the design of massively parallel reporter assay experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos-Soares, Ilias; Jain, Naman; Gray, Jesse M; Hemberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid advances in DNA synthesis and sequencing technologies and the continuing decline in the associated costs, high-throughput experiments can be performed to investigate the regulatory role of thousands of oligonucleotide sequences simultaneously. Nevertheless, designing high-throughput reporter assay experiments such as massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) and similar methods remains challenging. We introduce MPRAnator, a set of tools that facilitate rapid design of MPRA experiments. With MPRA Motif design, a set of variables provides fine control of how motifs are placed into sequences, thereby allowing the investigation of the rules that govern transcription factor (TF) occupancy. MPRA single-nucleotide polymorphism design can be used to systematically examine the functional effects of single or combinations of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at regulatory sequences. Finally, the Transmutation tool allows for the design of negative controls by permitting scrambling, reversing, complementing or introducing multiple random mutations in the input sequences or motifs. MPRAnator tool set is implemented in Python, Perl and Javascript and is freely available at www.genomegeek.com and www.sanger.ac.uk/science/tools/mpranator The source code is available on www.github.com/hemberg-lab/MPRAnator/ under the MIT license. The REST API allows programmatic access to MPRAnator using simple URLs. igs@sanger.ac.uk or mh26@sanger.ac.ukSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Yeast Reporter Assay to Identify Cellular Components of Ricin Toxin A Chain Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Björn; Schnöder, Tina; Schmitt, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    RTA, the catalytic A-subunit of the ribosome inactivating A/B toxin ricin, inhibits eukaryotic protein biosynthesis by depurination of 28S rRNA. Although cell surface binding of ricin holotoxin is mainly mediated through its B-subunit (RTB), sole application of RTA is also toxic, albeit to a significantly lower extent, suggesting alternative pathways for toxin uptake and transport. Since ricin toxin trafficking in mammalian cells is still not fully understood, we developed a GFP-based reporter assay in yeast that allows rapid identification of cellular components required for RTA uptake and subsequent transport through a target cell. We hereby show that Ypt6p, Sft2p and GARP-complex components play an important role in RTA transport, while neither the retromer complex nor COPIB vesicles are part of the transport machinery. Analyses of yeast knock-out mutants with chromosomal deletion in genes whose products regulate ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases (Arf-GTPases) and/or retrograde Golgi-to-ER (endoplasmic reticulum) transport identified Sso1p, Snc1p, Rer1p, Sec22p, Erv46p, Gea1p and Glo3p as novel components in RTA transport, suggesting the developed reporter assay as a powerful tool to dissect the multistep processes of host cell intoxication in yeast. PMID:27929418

  11. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Casella, Andrew M.; Haight, R. C.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Danon, Yaron; Hatchett, D.; Becker, Bjorn; Devlin, M.; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.; Gavron, A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; O' Donnell, J. M.

    2011-08-01

    Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 collaboration activities. Progress made by the collaboration in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS techniques applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model demonstrated the potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space. Similar results were obtained using a perturbation approach developed by LANL. Benchmark measurements have been successfully conducted at LANL and at RPI using their respective LSDS instruments. The ISU and UNLV collaborative effort is focused on the fabrication and testing of prototype fission chambers lined with ultra-depleted 238U and 232Th, and uranium deposition on a stainless steel disc using spiked U3O8 from room temperature ionic liquid was successful, with improving thickness obtained. In FY2012, the collaboration plans a broad array of activities. PNNL will focus on optimizing its empirical model and minimizing its reliance on calibration data, as well continuing efforts on developing an analytical model. Additional measurements are

  12. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.

    2011-09-30

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today's confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model, which accounts for self-shielding effects using empirical basis vectors calculated from the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a matrix containing the true self-shielding functions of the used fuel assembly models. The potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space was demonstrated. Also, in FY2011, PNNL continued to develop an analytical model. Such efforts included the addition of six more non-fissile absorbers in the analytical shielding function and the non-uniformity of the neutron flux across the LSDS assay chamber. A hybrid analytical-empirical approach was developed to determine the mass of total Pu (sum of the masses of 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu), which is an important quantity in safeguards. Results using this hybrid method were of approximately the same accuracy as the

  13. Development of a robust reporter-based assay for the bioactivity determination of anti-VEGF therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Xu, Gang-Ling; Gao, Kai; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Lei; Liu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chuan-Fei; Wang, Wen-Bo; Li, Meng; Chen, Wei; Fan, Frank; Cong, Mei; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2016-06-05

    Development of anti-VEGF based biologic agents has been a focus in cancer treatment for the past decades, and several anti-VEGF pharmaceuticals have been already approved for treatment of various medical indications especially in cancer. The first anti-angiogenic agent approved by FDA was bevacizumab (BVZ, trade name Avastin, Genentech/Roche), a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody. Accurate determination of bioactivity is crucial for the safety and efficacy of therapeutic antibodies. The current method widely used in the lot release and stability test for clinical trial batches of BVZ is anti-proliferation assay using primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which is tedious with high assay variations. We describe here the development and preliminary validation of a reporter gene assay (RGA) that is based on an HEK293 cell line stably expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), and a luciferase reporter under the control of nuclear factor activated T cell (NFAT) response elements. Our study shows this assay not only to be superior on precision, sensitivity and assay simplicity compared with HUVEC assay, but also applicable to other VEGF-targeted biotherapeutics. These results show for the first time that this new reporter assay, based on the VEGF-VEGFR-NFAT pathway, can be a viable supplement to the HUVEC assay and employed in potency determination of BVZ and other kinds of anti-VEGF antibody-based biotherapeutics. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. An improved thyroid hormone reporter assay to determine the thyroid hormone-like activity of amiodarone, bithionol, closantel and rafoxanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kana; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Sugihara, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Nariaki

    2012-01-05

    A number of environmental chemicals have been reported to exhibit thyroid hormone-like activity. Since thyroid hormones play a crucial role in development, it is important to identify chemicals in the environment that are capable of endocrine disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis. In order to detect thyroid hormone-like activity, the growth of pituitary cell lines has been commonly used as a sensitive marker, albeit with limited specificity to thyroid hormones. Reporter gene assays using the thyroid hormone responsive element (TRE) connected to the luciferase reporter gene have also been developed. Thus far however, this type of assay appears to have limited sensitivity compared to cell growth assays. In the present study, we developed a highly sensitive TRE reporter gene assay by using a pituitary cell line, MtT/E-2, and by culturing cells in a serum-free medium. Our assay was developed in order to detect T3 activity at a concentration of 10(-11)M. This assay identified thyroid hormone-like activity from the antiarrhythmic drug, amiodarone, and from three anti-parasitic drugs, bithionol, closantel and rafoxanide, all commonly used in veterinary medicine. Thyroid hormone-like activity of these compounds was further confirmed by the induction of BCL3 gene expression in MtT/E-2, which is known to be regulated by thyroid hormones. Our improved assay was proved to be a sensitive tool for assessing thyroid hormone-like activity of environmental chemicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel quantitative fluorescent reporter assay for RAG targets and RAG activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines eTrancoso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recombination-Activating Genes (RAG 1 and 2 form the site specific recombinase that mediates V(DJ recombination, a process of DNA editing required for lymphocyte development and responsible for their diverse repertoire of antigen receptors. Mistargeted RAG activity associates with genome alteration and is responsible for various lymphoid tumors. Moreover several non-lymphoid tumors express RAG ectopically. A practical and powerful tool to perform quantitative assessment of RAG activity and to score putative RAG-Recognition signal sequences (RSS is required in the fields of immunology, oncology, gene therapy and development.Here we report the detailed characterization of a novel fluorescence-based reporter of RAG activity, named GFPi, a tool that allows measuring recombination efficiency by simple FACS analysis. GFPi can be produced both as a plasmid for transient transfection experiments in cell lines or as a retrovirus for stable integration in the genome, thus supporting ex vivo and in vivo studies. The GFPi assay faithfully quantified endogenous and ectopic RAG activity as tested in genetically modified fibroblasts, tumor derived cell lines, developing pre B cells and hematopoietic cells. The GFPi assay also successfully ranked the recombination efficiency of various RSS pairs, including bona fide RSS associated with V(DJ segments, artificial consensus sequences modified or not at specific nucleotides known to affect their efficiencies, or cryptic RSS involved in RAG-dependent activation of oncogenes.Our work validates the GFPi reporter as a practical quantitative tool for the study of RAG activity and RSS efficiencies. It should turn useful for the study of RAG mediated V(DJ and aberrant rearrangements, lineage commitment and vertebrate evolution.

  16. Light and heavy dansyl reporter groups in food chemistry: amino acid assay in beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Fabio; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Di Donna, Leonardo; Athanassopoulos, Constantinos M; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    5-Dimethylamino-1-sulfonyl naphthalene (DNS, commonly referred as dansyl) is a functionality, bearing well-established properties in directing the fragmentation, by mass spectrometry (MS), of the corresponding ionized sulfonylated derivatives. This property is shared also by its labeled analogs. The use of d(0)/d(6) DNS derivatives is now exploited in the application of the well-established isotope dilution mass spectrometric approach in the assay of complex mixtures. A new method for the quantitation of amino acids (AAs) in beverages is therefore presented, which relies on liquid chromatographic separation of their N-dansylated derivatives followed by comparative electrospray tandem MS/MS of the d(0)/d(6) isobaric mixtures. Labeled and unlabeled DNS derivatives of the selected AAs are readily available by microwave-assisted synthetic protocols. The novelty of the method is represented by the use of heavy and light DNS-isotopologue providing suitable reporter groups. Multiple-reaction monitoring has been applied in the assay of AAs in wine, pineapple juice and bergamot juice with good-to-excellent results as proved by both relative standard deviation, lower than 15%, and by the accuracy values in the range 90-110%.

  17. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-09-28

    Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e

  18. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of selected phthalates using reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ouxi; Du, Guizhen; Sun, Hong; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Song, Ling; Wang, Xinru

    2009-12-01

    Phthalates are widely used in the plastic industry and food packaging, imparting softness and flexibility to normally rigid plastic medical devices and children's toys. Even though phthalates display low general toxicity, there is increasing concern on the effects of endocrine system induced by some of phthalate compounds. The hormone activity of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were assessed using the luciferase reporter gene assays. The results showed that DBP, MBP and DEHP, not only exhibited potent antiandrogenic activity, with IC(50) value of 1.05x10(-6), 1.22x10(-7)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, but also showed the androgenic activity with EC(50) value of 6.17x10(-6), 1.13x10(-5)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M. We also found that all the three related chemicals possessed thyroid receptor (TR) antagonist activity with IC(50) of 1.31x10(-5), 2.77x10(-6)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, and none showed TR agonist activity. These results indicate that TR might be the targets of industrial chemicals. In the ER mediate reporter gene assay, three chemicals showed no agonistic activity except for DBP, which appeared weakly estrogenic at the concentration of 1.0x10(-4)M. Together, the findings demonstrate that the three phthalates could simultaneously disrupt the function of two or more hormonal receptors. Therefore, these phthalates should be considered in risk assessments for human health.

  19. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro reporter gene assays for short-term screening of estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Zeinstra, Laura M; Schuitemaker, Femke; Lanser, Peter H; Bogerd, Jan; Brouwer, Abraham; Vethaak, A Dick; De Voogt, Pim; Murk, Albertinka J; Van der Burg, Bart

    2002-10-15

    Functional in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays have recently been developed for the rapid determination of exposure to (xeno)estrogens. The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated chemically activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay uses T47D human breast cancer cells stably transfected with an ER-mediated luciferase gene construct. In the in vivo assay, transgenic zebrafish are used in which the same luciferase construct has been stably introduced. In both assays, luciferase reporter gene activity can be easily quantified following short-term exposure to chemicals activating endogenous estrogen receptors. The objective of this study was to compare responses by known (xeno)estrogenic compounds in both assays. Exposure to the (xeno)estrogens estradiol (E2), estrone, ethynylestradiol (EE2), o,p'-DDT, nonylphenol (NP), and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) revealed that EE2 was the most potent (xeno)estrogen tested and was 100 times more potent than E2 in the transgenic zebrafish assay, whereas in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, EE2 and E2 were equipotent Although the xenoestrogens o,p'-DDT and NP were full estrogen agonists in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, only o,p'-DDT demonstrated weak dose-related estrogenic activity in vivo. To determine if differences in reporter gene activity may be explained by differential affinity of (xeno)estrogens to human and zebrafish ERs, full-length sequences of the zebrafish ER subtypes alpha, beta, and gamma were cloned, and transactivation by (xeno)estrogens was compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Using transiently transfected recombinant ER and reporter gene constructs, EE2 also showed relatively potent activation of zebrafish ERalpha and ERbeta compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Zebrafish ERbeta and ERgamma showed higher transactivation by (xeno)estrogens relative to E2 than human ERbeta.

  20. A Robotic BG1Luc Reporter Assay to Detect Estrogen Receptor Agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Stoner, Matthew A.; Yang, Chun Z.; Bittner, George D.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity (EA) have been associated with various adverse health effects. US agencies (ICCVAM/NICEATM) tasked to assess in vitro transcription activation assays to detect estrogenic receptor (ER) agonists for EA have recently validated a BG1Luc assay in manual format, but prefer robotic formats. We have developed a robotic BG1Luc EA assay to detect EA that demonstrated 100% concordance with ICCVAM meta-analyses and ICCVAM BG1Luc results in manual f...

  1. High-throughput viability assay using an autonomously bioluminescent cell line with a bacterial Lux reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Bradley; Thorne, Natasha; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity.

  2. Development of Techniques for Spent Fuel Assay – Differential Dieaway Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goodsell, Alison [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Iliev, Metodi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Desimone, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rael, Carlos D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Polk, Paul John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-28

    This report summarizes the work done under a DNDO R&D funded project on the development of the differential dieaway method to measure plutonium in spent fuel. There are large amounts of plutonium that are contained in spent fuel assemblies, and currently there is no way to make quantitative non-destructive assay. This has led NA24 under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to establish a multi-year program to investigate, develop and implement measurement techniques for spent fuel. The techniques which are being experimentally tested by the existing NGSI project do not include any pulsed neutron active techniques. The present work covers the active neutron differential dieaway technique and has advanced the state of knowledge of this technique as well as produced a design for a practical active neutron interrogation instrument for spent fuel. Monte Carlo results from the NGSI effort show that much higher accuracy (1-2%) for the Pu content in spent fuel assemblies can be obtained with active neutron interrogation techniques than passive techniques, and this would allow their use for nuclear material accountancy independently of any information from the operator. The main purpose of this work was to develop an active neutron interrogation technique for spent nuclear fuel.

  3. A robotic BG1Luc reporter assay to detect estrogen receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Matthew A; Yang, Chun Z; Bittner, George D

    2014-08-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity (EA) have been associated with various adverse health effects. US agencies (ICCVAM/NICEATM) tasked to assess in vitro transcription activation assays to detect estrogenic receptor (ER) agonists for EA have recently validated a BG1Luc assay in manual format, but prefer robotic formats. We have developed a robotic BG1Luc EA assay to detect EA that demonstrated 100% concordance with ICCVAM meta-analyses and ICCVAM BG1Luc results in manual format for 27 ICCVAM test substances, i.e. no false negatives or false positives. This robotic assay also consistently assessed other, more problematic ICCVAM test substances such as clomiphene citrate, L-thyroxin, and tamoxifen. Agonist responses using this robotic BG1Luc assay were consistently inhibited by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780, confirming that agonist responses were due to binding to ERs rather than to a non-specific agonist response. This robotic assay also detected EA in complex mixtures of substances such as extracts of personal care products, plastic resins or plastic consumer products. This robotic BG1Luc assay had at least as high accuracy and greater sensitivity and repeatability when compared to its manual version or to the other ICCVAM/OECD validated assays for EA (manual BG1Luc and CERI).

  4. A Mutagenesis Assay for Reporter Gene Screening Using Partially Degenerate Oligonucleotides of the Tandems NNT and NNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huifen Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all proteins are tolerable to mutations. Whether a specific protein can be a mutable target is of importance in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. This study reported a novel mutagenesis assay using tandem NNT and NNC oligonucleotides to test the mutability of a candidate gene. These two tandem oligonucleotides avoid the risk of forming nonsense mutations and render flexibility of truncating or expanding the insertion size. As a reporter gene, ZeoR (zeocin resistance gene was confirmed to have a high tolerance for mutagenesis by this new assay.

  5. Relative quantification of protein-protein interactions using a dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaizheng Jia

    Full Text Available The identification and quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions are essential to the functional characterization of proteins in the post-proteomics era. The methods currently available are generally time-consuming, technically complicated, insensitive and/or semi-quantitative. The lack of simple, sensitive approaches to precisely quantify protein-protein interactions still prevents our understanding of the functions of many proteins. Here, we develop a novel dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay by combining a biotinylated Firefly luciferase pull-down assay with a dual luciferase reporter assay. The biotinylated Firefly luciferase-tagged protein enables rapid and efficient isolation of a putative Renilla luciferase-tagged binding protein from a relatively small amount of sample. Both of these proteins can be quantitatively detected using the dual luciferase reporter assay system. Protein-protein interactions, including Fos-Jun located in the nucleus; MAVS-TRAF3 in cytoplasm; inducible IRF3 dimerization; viral protein-regulated interactions, such as MAVS-MAVS and MAVS-TRAF3; IRF3 dimerization; and protein interaction domain mapping, are studied using this novel assay system. Herein, we demonstrate that this dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay enables the quantification of the relative amounts of interacting proteins that bind to streptavidin-coupled beads for protein purification. This study provides a simple, rapid, sensitive, and efficient approach to identify and quantify relative protein-protein interactions. Importantly, the dual luciferase reporter pull-down method will facilitate the functional determination of proteins.

  6. Comprehensive Luciferase-Based Reporter Gene Assay Reveals Previously Masked Up-Regulatory Effects of miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danae Campos-Melo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the majority of the transcriptome at a post-transcriptional level. Because of this critical role, it is important to ensure that the assays used to determine their functionality are robust and reproducible. Typically, the reporter gene assay in cell-based systems has been the first-line method to study miRNA functionality. In order to overcome some of the potential errors in interpretation that can be associated with this assay, we have developed a detailed protocol for the luciferase reporter gene assay that has been modified for miRNAs. We demonstrate that normalization against the effect of the miRNA and cellular factors on the luciferase coding sequence is essential to obtain the specific impact of the miRNA on the 3'UTR (untranslated region target. Our findings suggest that there is a real possibility that the roles for miRNA in transcriptome regulation may be misreported due to inaccurate normalization of experimental data and also that up-regulatory effects of miRNAs are not uncommon in cells. We propose to establish this comprehensive method as standard for miRNA luciferase reporter assays to avoid errors and misinterpretations in the functionality of miRNAs.

  7. Performance validation of commercially available mobile waste-assay systems: Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanfein, M.; Bonner, C.; Maez, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-11-01

    Prior to disposal, nuclear waste must be accurately characterized to identify and quantify the radioactive content to reduce the radioactive hazard to the public. Validation of the waste-assay systems` performance is critical for establishing the credibility of the assay results for storage and disposal purposes. Canberra Nuclear has evaluated regulations worldwide and identified standard, modular, neutron- and gamma-waste-assay systems that can be used to characterize a large portion of existing and newly generated transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste. Before making claims of guaranteeing any system`s performance for specific waste types, the standardized systems` performance be evaluated. 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. p53 Promoter-based Reporter Gene in vitro Assays for Quick Assessment of Agents with Genotoxic Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaixing LI; Ke SHI; Ruiwen CHEN; Yan HE; Dan WU; Shuhan SUN

    2007-01-01

    The p53 promoter-based green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase reporter gene assays have been established for detecting DNA damage induced by genotoxic agents.To evaluate the system,NIH3T3 cells transfected with either pHP53-GFP or pMP53-GFP construct were treated with mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Expression of the GFP reporter gene was significantly and specifically induced in the cells exposed to mitomycin or 5-fluorouracil.Then we treated NIH3T3 cells harboring pHP53-Luc or pMP53-Luc vector with mitomycin,5-fluorouracil or cisplatin at various concentrations.Similarly,exposure of the cells to these agents with genotoxic potentials resulted in a dose-dependent induction in luciferase reporter gene expression.Thus,these in vitro reporter gene assays could provide an ideal system for quick assessment or screening of agents with genotoxic potential.

  9. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, A.; Haight, R. C.; Harris, Jason; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O' Donnell, J. M.; Stewart, T.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Executive Summary The Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign is supporting a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of using Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) to conduct direct, independent and accurate assay of fissile isotopes in used fuel assemblies. The collaboration consists of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Idaho State University (ISU). There are three main challenges to implementing LSDS to assay used fuel assemblies. These challenges are the development of an algorithm for interpreting the data with an acceptable accuracy for the fissile masses, the development of suitable detectors for the technique, and the experimental benchmarking of the approach. This report is a summary of the progress in these areas made by the collaboration during FY2012. Significant progress was made on the project in FY2012. Extensive characterization of a “semi-empirical” algorithm was conducted. For example, we studied the impact on the accuracy of this algorithm by the minimization of the calibration set, uncertainties in the calibration masses, and by the choice of time window. Issues such a lead size, number of required neutrons, placement of the neutron source and the impact of cadmium around the detectors were also studied. In addition, new algorithms were developed that do not require the use of plutonium fission chambers. These algorithms were applied to measurement data taken by RPI and shown to determine the 235U mass within 4%. For detectors, a new concept for a fast neutron detector involving 4He recoil from neutron scattering was investigated. The detector has the potential to provide a couple of orders of magnitude more sensitivity than 238U fission chambers. Progress was also made on the more conventional approach of using 232Th fission chambers as fast neutron detectors. For

  10. Application of the dual-luciferase reporter assay to the analysis of promoter activity in Zebrafish embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulero Victoriano

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dual-luciferase assay has been widely used in cell lines to determine rapidly but accurately the activity of a given promoter. Although this strategy has proved very useful, it does not allow the promoter and gene function to be analyzed in the context of the whole organism. Results Here, we present a rapid and sensitive assay based on the classical dual-luciferase reporter technique which can be used as a new tool to characterize the minimum promoter region of a gene as well as the in vivo response of inducible promoters to different stimuli. We illustrate the usefulness of this system for studying both constitutive (telomerase and inducible (NF-κB-dependent promoters. The flexibility of this assay is demonstrated by induction of the NF-κB-dependent promoters using simultaneous microinjection of different pathogen-associated molecular patterns as well as with the use of morpholino-gene mediated knockdown. Conclusion This assay has several advantages compared with the classical in vitro (cell lines and in vivo (transgenic mice approaches. Among others, the assay allows a rapid and quantitative measurement of the effects of particular genes or drugs in a given promoter in the context of a whole organism and it can also be used in high throughput screening experiments.

  11. Assays for Qualification and Quality Stratification of Clinical Biospecimens Used in Research: A Technical Report from the ISBER Biospecimen Science Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsou, Fay; Bulla, Alexandre; Cho, Sang Yun; Clements, Judith; Chuaqui, Rodrigo; Coppola, Domenico; De Souza, Yvonne; De Wilde, Annemieke; Grizzle, William; Guadagni, Fiorella; Gunter, Elaine; Heil, Stacey; Hodgkinson, Verity; Kessler, Joseph; Kiehntopf, Michael; Kim, Hee Sung; Koppandi, Iren; Shea, Katheryn; Singh, Rajeev; Sobel, Marc; Somiari, Stella; Spyropoulos, Demetri; Stone, Mars; Tybring, Gunnel; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Van den Eynden, Gert; Wadhwa, Lalita

    2016-10-01

    This technical report presents quality control (QC) assays that can be performed in order to qualify clinical biospecimens that have been biobanked for use in research. Some QC assays are specific to a disease area. Some QC assays are specific to a particular downstream analytical platform. When such a qualification is not possible, QC assays are presented that can be performed to stratify clinical biospecimens according to their biomolecular quality.

  12. Hybrid Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station: FY10 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing the concept of an automated UF6 cylinder verification station that would be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until the arrival of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. At the center of this unattended system is a hybrid enrichment assay technique that combines the traditional enrichment-meter method (based on the 186 keV peak from 235U) with non-traditional neutron-induced high-energy gamma-ray signatures (spawned primarily by 234U alpha emissions and 19F(alpha, neutron) reactions). Previous work by PNNL provided proof-of-principle for the non-traditional signatures to support accurate, full-volume interrogation of the cylinder enrichment, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties in enrichment assay due to UF6 heterogeneity and providing greater sensitivity to material substitution scenarios. The work described here builds on that preliminary evaluation of the non-traditional signatures, but focuses on a prototype field system utilizing NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers, and enrichment analysis algorithms that integrate the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Results for the assay of Type-30B cylinders ranging from 0.2 to 4.95 wt% 235U, at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant in Richland, WA, are described for the following enrichment analysis methods: 1) traditional enrichment meter signature (186 keV peak) as calculated using a square-wave convolute (SWC) algorithm; 2) non-traditional high-energy gamma-ray signature that provides neutron detection without neutron detectors and 3) hybrid algorithm that merges the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Uncertainties for each method, relative to the declared enrichment for each cylinder, are calculated and compared to the uncertainties from an attended

  13. The promoter competition assay (PCA): a new approach to identify motifs involved in the transcriptional activity of reporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hube, Florent; Myal, Yvonne; Leygue, Etienne

    2006-05-01

    Identifying particular motifs responsible for promoter activity is a crucial step toward the development of new gene-based preventive and therapeutic strategies. However, to date, experimental methods to study promoter activity remain limited. We present in this report a promoter competition assay designed to identify, within a given promoter region, motifs critical for its activity. This assay consists in co-transfecting the promoter to be analyzed and double-stranded oligonucleotides which will compete for the binding of transcription factors. Using the recently characterized SBEM promoter as model, we first delineated the feasibility of the method and optimized the experimental conditions. We then identified, within an 87-bp region responsible for a strong expression of the reporter gene, an octamer-binding site essential for its transcriptional regulation. The importance of this motif has been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. The promoter competition assay appears to be a fast and efficient approach to identify, within a given promoter sequence, sites critical for its activity.

  14. Evaluation of Estrogenic Activity of Wastewater: Comparison Among In Vitro ERα Reporter Gene Assay, In Vivo Vitellogenin Induction, and Chemical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masaru; Kitamura, Tomokazu; Kumar, Vimal; Park, Chang-Beom; Ihara, Mariko O; Lee, Sang-Jung; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen; Okamoto, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2015-05-19

    The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) reporter gene assay has long been used to measure estrogenic activity in wastewater. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the assay represents net estrogenic activity in the balance between estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in wastewater. However, it remained unclear whether the net estrogenic activity measured by the in vitro ERα reporter gene assay can predict the in vivo estrogenic effect of wastewater. To determine this, we measured the following: estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of wastewater and reclaimed water by the in vitro ERα reporter gene assay, expression of vitellogenin-1 (vtg1) and choriogenin-H (chgH) in male medaka (Oryzias latipes) by quantitative real-time PCR, and estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol, and 17α-ethynylestradiol concentrations chemically to predict estrogenic activity. The net estrogenic activity measured by the in vitro medaka ERα reporter gene assay predicted the in vivo vtg1/chgH expression in male medaka more accurately than the concentrations of estrogens. These results also mean that in vivo vtg1/chgH expression in male medaka is determined by the balance between estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities. The in vitro medaka ERα reporter gene assay also predicted in vivo vtg1/chgH expression on male medaka better than the human ERα reporter gene assay.

  15. Reporter assay for endo/lysosomal escape of toxin-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Thakur, Mayank; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Bhargava, Cheenu; Wiesner, Burkhard; Eichhorst, Jenny; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander

    2014-05-22

    Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa) and ricin A-chain (RTA)-were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates-saporin-HRP, (Alexa)saporin and saporin-KQ-RTA-were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release) or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape) was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of (Alexa)saporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10-1000 nM.

  16. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use.

  17. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Gilabert-Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa and ricin A-chain (RTA—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM.

  18. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog...

  19. Rapid and Sensitive Reporter Gene Assays for Detection of Antiandrogenic and Estrogenic Effects of Environmental Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog...

  20. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotan, M.; Elliot, C.T.; Scippo, M.L.; Müller, M.; Antignac, J.P.; Malone, E.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Mitchell, S.; Connolly, L.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to en

  1. Plasmid transfection in bovine cells: Optimization using a realtime monitoring of green fluorescent protein and effect on gene reporter assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Johan S; Bionaz, Massimo

    2017-08-30

    Gene reporter technology (GRT) has opened several new avenues for monitoring biological events including the activation of transcription factors, which are central to the study of nutrigenomics. However, this technology relies heavily on the insertion of foreign plasmid DNA into the nuclei of cells (i.e., transfection), which can be very challenging and highly variable among cell types. The objective of this study was to investigate the optimal conditions to generate reliable GRT assay data on bovine immortalized cell lines, Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) and bovine mammary epithelial alveolar (MACT) cells. Results are reported for two experiments. In Experiment 1, using 96 well-plate and a robotic inverted fluorescent microscope, we compared transfection efficiency among commercially available transfection reagents (TR) Lipofectamine® 3000 (Lipo3), Lipofectamine® LTX (LipoLTX), and TransIT-X2® (TransX2), three doses of TR (i.e., 0.15, 0.3, and 0.4μL/well), and three doses of Green Fluorescent Protein plasmid DNA (i.e., 10, 25, and 50ng/well). Transfection efficiency and mortality rate were analyzed using CellProfiler software. Transfection efficiency increased until the end of the experiment (20h post-transfection) at which point MACT had greater transfection than MDBK cells (16.3% vs. 2.2%). It is unclear the reason for the low transfection in MDBK cells. Maximal transfection efficiency was obtained with 0.3μL/well of LipoLTX plus 25ng/well of plasmid DNA (ca. 29.5±1.9%) and 0.15μL/well of LipoLTX plus 25ng/well of plasmid DNA (ca. 4.0±0.4%) for MACT and MDBK cells, respectively. The higher amount of TR and DNA was generally associated with higher cell mortality. Using high, medium, and low transfection efficiency conditions determined in Experiment 1, we performed a GRT assay for peroxisome proliferator-activated response element (PPRE) luciferase in MACT and MDBK cells treated with 10nM or 100nM of synthetic Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor

  2. Electrochemical Measurement of the β-Galactosidase Reporter from Live Cells: A Comparison to the Miller Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Zhou, Xinyi Y; Ueda, Hana; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Kim, Eunkyoung; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-15

    In order to match our ability to conceive of and construct cells with enhanced function, we must concomitantly develop facile, real-time methods for elucidating performance. With these, new designs can be tested in silico and steps in construction incrementally validated. Electrochemical monitoring offers the above advantages largely because signal transduction stems from direct electron transfer, allowing for potentially quicker and more integrated measurements. One of the most common genetic reporters, β-galactosidase, can be measured both spectrophotometrically (Miller assay) and electrochemically. However, since the relationship between the two is not well understood, the electrochemical methods have not yet garnered the attention of biologists. With the aim of demonstrating the utility of an electrochemical measurement to the synthetic biology community, we created a genetic construct that interprets and reports (with β-galactosidase) on the concentration of the bacterial quorum sensing molecule autoinducer-2. In this work, we provide a correlation between electrochemical measurements and Miller Units. We show that the electrochemical assay works with both lysed and whole cells, allowing for the prediction of one from the other, and for continuous monitoring of cell response. We further present a conceptually simple and generalized mathematical model for cell-based β-galactosidase reporter systems that could aid in building and predicting a variety of synthetic biology constructs. This first-ever in-depth comparison and analysis aims to facilitate the use of electrochemical real-time monitoring in the field of synthetic biology as well as to facilitate the creation of constructs that can more easily communicate information to electronic systems.

  3. Assessment of combined antiandrogenic effects of binary parabens mixtures in a yeast-based reporter assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dehua; Chen, Lujun; Zhu, Xiaobiao; Li, Feifei; Liu, Cong; Liu, Rui

    2014-05-01

    To date, toxicological studies of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have typically focused on single chemical exposures and associated effects. However, exposure to EDCs mixtures in the environment is common. Antiandrogens represent a group of EDCs, which draw increasing attention due to their resultant demasculinization and sexual disruption of aquatic organisms. Although there are a number of in vivo and in vitro studies investigating the combined effects of antiandrogen mixtures, these studies are mainly on selected model compounds such as flutamide, procymidone, and vinclozolin. The aim of the present study is to investigate the combined antiandrogenic effects of parabens, which are widely used antiandrogens in industrial and domestic commodities. A yeast-based human androgen receptor (hAR) assay (YAS) was applied to assess the antiandrogenic activities of n-propylparaben (nPrP), iso-propylparaben (iPrP), methylparaben (MeP), and 4-n-pentylphenol (PeP), as well as the binary mixtures of nPrP with each of the other three antiandrogens. All of the four compounds could exhibit antiandrogenic activity via the hAR. A linear interaction model was applied to quantitatively analyze the interaction between nPrP and each of the other three antiandrogens. The isoboles method was modified to show the variation of combined effects as the concentrations of mixed antiandrogens were changed. Graphs were constructed to show isoeffective curves of three binary mixtures based on the fitted linear interaction model and to evaluate the interaction of the mixed antiandrogens (synergism or antagonism). The combined effect of equimolar combinations of the three mixtures was also considered with the nonlinear isoboles method. The main effect parameters and interaction effect parameters in the linear interaction models of the three mixtures were different from zero. The results showed that any two antiandrogens in their binary mixtures tended to exert equal antiandrogenic activity

  4. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, September 1, 1992--August 24, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1993-08-20

    The overall goal of this project is to improve the effectiveness of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to image and quantify radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. During the past year, we have made significant progress toward this goal, and this report summarizes that work. Our efforts have been mainly directed along three fronts. First, we have developed and tested new reconstruction methods including three-dimensional iterative algorithms that model non-uniform attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Both fan beam and parallel beam collimator geometries have been modeled and novel ways of improving the efficiency of the computationally intensive methods have been introduced. Second, an ultra-high resolution, small field-of-view pinhole collimator has been constructed and evaluated. Reconstructed spatial resolution of 1 to 3 mm (FWHM) has been achieved in phantom scans with a useful field-of-view of 9 to 10 cm. Finally, we have investigated the ability of SPECT to image and quantify astatine-211 distributions. Reconstructed images of phantom data demonstrated quantitative accuracy to within 10% with proper attenuation and scatter compensation.

  5. Pim-1 kinase inhibits the activation of reporter gene expression in Elk-1 and c-Fos reporting systems but not the endogenous gene expression: an artifact of the reporter gene assay by transient co-transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the molecular mechanism and signal transduction of pim-1, an oncogene encoding a serine-threonine kinase. This is a true oncogene which prolongs survival and inhibits apoptosis of hematopoietic cells. In order to determine whether the effects of Pim-1 occur by regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, we used a transcriptional reporter assay by transient co-transfection as a screening method. In this study, we found that Pim-1 inhibited the Elk-1 and NFkappaB transcriptional activities induced by activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in reporter gene assays. However, Western blots showed that the induction of Elk-1-regulated expression of endogenous c-Fos was not affected by Pim-1. The phosphorylation and activation of neither Erk1/2 nor Elk-1 was influenced by Pim-1. Also, in the gel shift assay, the pattern of endogenous NFkappaB binding to its probe was not changed in any manner by Pim-1. These data indicate that Pim-1 does not regulate the activation of Erk1/2, Elk-1 or NFkappaB. These contrasting results suggest a pitfall of the transient co-transfection reporter assay in analyzing the regulation of transcription factors outside of the chromosome context. It ensures that results from reporter gene expression assay should be verified by study of endogenous gene expression.

  6. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Forbes

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb.

  7. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.; Groene, E.M. de; Meeteren-Kreikamp, A.P. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2 and

  8. Water quality assessment using the AREc32 reporter gene assay indicative of the oxidative stress response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; Dutt, Mriga; Maylin, Erin; Tang, Janet Y M; Toze, Simon; Wolf, C Roland; Lang, Matti

    2012-11-01

    The reporter gene assay AREc32 is based on the induction of the Nrf2 mediated oxidative stress response pathway in the human breast cancer cell line MCF7, where eight copies of the antioxidant response element (ARE) are linked to a reporter gene encoding for luciferase. The Nrf2-ARE pathway is responsive to many chemicals that cause oxidative stress, among them a large number of pesticides and skin irritants. We adopted and validated the AREc32 bioassay for water quality testing. tert-Butylhydroquinone served as the positive control, phenol as the negative control and other reactive chemicals were assessed for their specificity. An environmentally relevant reference chemical, benzo(a)pyrene was the most potent inducer of all tested chemicals. The concentration causing an induction ratio (IR) of 1.5 (EC(IR1.5)) was chosen as the effect benchmark value. The assay was applied to 21 water samples ranging from sewage to drinking water, including secondary treatment and various tertiary treatment options (ozonation, biologically activated carbon filtration, membrane filtration, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation, chlorination, chloramination). The samples were enriched by solid phase extraction. In most samples the oxidative stress response was far more sensitive than cytotoxicity. The primary and secondary treated effluent exceeded the effect threshold IR 1.5 at a relative enrichment factor (REF) of 1, i.e., the native samples were active. All tertiary treated samples were less potent and their EC(IR1.5) lay between REF 1 and 10. The Nrf2 pathway was induced at a REF of approximately 10 for surface waters and drinking water, and above this enrichment cytotoxicity took over in most samples and quenched the induction. The blank (ultrapure water run through the sample enrichment process) was cytotoxic at an REF of 100, which is the limit of concentrations range that can be evaluated. Treatment typically decreased both the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress response apart

  9. Solid-phase contact assay that uses a lux-marked Nitrosomonas europaea reporter strain to estimate toxicity of bioavailable linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Kristian K; Pedersen, Anders; Sørensen, Jan

    2002-07-01

    Information about in situ toxicity of the bioavailable pools of adsorptive soil pollutants is a prerequisite for proper ecological risk assessment in contaminated soils. Such toxicity data may be obtained by assays allowing for direct exposure of introduced test microorganisms to the toxicants, as they appear in solid solution equilibria in the natural soil. We describe a novel sensitive solid-phase contact assay for in situ toxicity testing of soil pollutants based on a recombinant bioluminescent reporter strain of Nitrosomonas europaea. A slurry of the reporter strain and soil sample was shaken for 1 h, after which bioluminescence was measured either directly (soil slurry protocol) or in the supernatant obtained after centrifugation (soil extract protocol). The assay was validated for both protocols by using linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) as a toxic and adsorptive model compound in the soil samples. Interestingly, LAS showed the same toxicity to the reporter strain with either soil incubation (both protocols) or pure culture, suggesting that adsorbed LAS pools contributed to the observed toxicity. The solid-phase contact assay that used the reporter strain of lux-marked N. europaea was slightly more sensitive for the detection of LAS toxicity in soil than activity-based assays targeting indigenous nitrifiers and much more sensitive than assays targeting indigenous heterotrophic microbes. We conclude that the new solid-phase contact assay, which is based on direct interaction of the test microorganisms with bioavailable pools of the toxicants in soil, provides a most sensitive and relevant method for evaluating the in situ toxicity and assessing the risks of soil contaminants.

  10. Chemical analysis and mutational assay of distilled oils from the H-coal direct liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Samples from the H-Coal process, a catalytic, single-stage, coal liquefaction technology, were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. For these investigations, a blend of light and heavy H-Coal process oils was fractionally distilled into 50/sup 0/F boiling point cuts. The chemical analyses and biological testing results presented in this status report deal primarily with the blended material and the distillate fractions boiling above 650/sup 0/F. Results from the microbial mutagenicity assays indicated that onset of biological activity in the crude materials occurred above 700/sup 0/F. Similar trends have been observed for Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) I, SRC II, Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) and Exxon EDS process materials. After chemical class fractionation, the primary source of microbial mutagenicity of the crude boiling point cuts was the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) fractions. Amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino-PAH) were present at sufficient concentration levels in the N-PAC fractions to account for the observed mutagenic responses. In general, the chemical composition of the H-Coal materials studied was similar to that of other single-stage liquefaction materials. The degree of alkylation in these materials was determined to be greater than in the SRC and less than in the EDS process distillate cuts. 13 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  11. Developing in vitro reporter gene assays to assess the hormone receptor activities of chemicals frequently detected in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Si, Chaozong; Bian, Qian; Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Liansheng; Wang, Xinru

    2012-08-01

    The present study intended to develop receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene assays to evaluate and compare the estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR) and thyroid hormone receptor (TR) activities of target chemicals. Di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP), chlorpyrifos (CPF), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and bisphenol A (BPA) are some of the most common contaminants in drinking water and are frequently detected in China and worldwide. The chemicals were tested at concentrations of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 times their maximum contaminant level in drinking water. The results showed that BPA possessed various activities on ER, AR and TR. DEHP and CPF could suppress 17β-estradiol or testosterone activity with different potencies, and DEHP possessed weaker anti-thyroid hormone activity. 2,4-D showed no agonist or antagonist activity against these hormone receptors, but it significantly enhanced the activity of testosterone through AR. Furthermore, the mixture of DEHP and CPF exhibited stronger ER and AR antagonist activities than each single component alone, but their combined effects were less than the expected effects based on the additive model. These results implied that the transcription activation mediated by hormone receptors was the potential endocrine-disrupting mechanism of the test chemicals. Our study also provided useful tools for evaluation of their endocrine disrupting activity.

  12. Chemical analysis and mutational assay of distilled oils from the H-coal direct liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Samples from the H-Coal process, a catalytic, single-stage, coal liquefaction technology, were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. For these investigations, a blend of light and heavy H-Coal process oils was fractionally distilled into 50/sup 0/F boiling point cuts. The chemical analyses and biological testing results presented in this status report deal primarily with the blended material and the distillate fractions boiling above 650/sup 0/F. Results from the microbial mutagenicity assays indicated that onset of biological activity in the crude materials occurred above 700/sup 0/F. Similar trends have been observed for Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) I, SRC II, Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) and Exxon EDS process materials. After chemical class fractionation, the primary source of microbial mutagenicity of the crude boiling point cuts was the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) fractions. Amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino-PAH) were present at sufficient concentration levels in the N-PAC fractions to account for the observed mutagenic responses. In general, the chemical composition of the H-Coal materials studied was similar to that of other single-stage liquefaction materials. The degree of alkylation in these materials was determined to be greater than in the SRC and less than in the EDS process distillate cuts. 13 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  13. Coupling ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas and luciferase reporter assays to assess rod-specific promoter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulling, Arnaud; Escher, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas is an established tool to modulate gene expression and to study cell type-specific gene expression. Here we coupled ex vivo electroporation to luciferase reporter assays to facilitate the study of rod-photoreceptor-specific gene promoters. The activity of the rod-specific proximal bovine rhodopsin promoter was significantly increased in C57BL/6J wild-type retinas at postnatal days 1 and 7 by 3.4-fold and 8.7-fold respectively. In C57BL/6J Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas, where the rod photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor Nr2e3 is not expressed, a significant increase by 2.5-fold was only observed at postnatal day 7. Cone-specific S-opsin promoter activity was not modulated in C57BL/6J wild-type and Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas. Taken together, we describe an easily implementable protocol to assess rod-specific promoter activity in a physiological context resembling that of the developing postnatal mouse retina.

  14. Validation and application of reporter gene assays for the determination of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disruptor activity in sport supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T; Oplatowska, Michalina; Connolly, Lisa

    2012-07-01

    Previously developed estrogen and androgen mammalian reporter gene assays (RGAs) were assessed for their potential use as a quantitative screening method in the detection of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disruptors (EDs) in sport supplements. The validation of both RGAs coupled with dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) was performed in accordance with European Commission Decision EC/2002/6579 for biological screening methods. Decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) were established for both the estrogen and androgen RGAs. All samples were compliant with CCα and CCβ in both bioassays. Recovery rates were 96 % for 17β-estradiol and 115 % for dihydrotestosterone as obtained in their corresponding RGA. Both estrogens and androgens were stable in samples for more than 3 weeks, when stored at -20 °C. Specificity, good repeatability (coefficients of variation (CV), 12-25 %), reproducibility and robustness of both bioassays were also observed. Four different ED modes of action were determined for estrogens and androgens in 53 sport supplements, using the validated RGAs. This study revealed that 89 % of the investigated sport supplements contained estrogenic EDs and 51 % contained androgenic compounds. In conclusion, both bioassays are suitable for sport supplement screening of estrogenic and androgenic EDs.

  15. Development of an in vitro assay for teratogens: Final report, 1 July 1983 to 31 August 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the work were to apply an in vitro teratogen assay system to samples of fossil fuel combustion products and to extend the assay system by incorporating metabolic activation. Potential teratogenicity was measured by the ability of a test compound to inhibit the attachment of tumor cells to lectin coated plastic surfaces.

  16. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiku, Hitoshi, E-mail: shiku@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takeda, Michiaki; Murata, Tatsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Akiba, Uichi; Hamada, Fumio [Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata gakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Matsue, Tomokazu, E-mail: matsue@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2009-04-27

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or {kappa}B (binding site for NF{kappa}B (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4 x 4 array of circles of diameter 300 {mu}m by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL{sup -1} dexamethasone, 10 ng mL{sup -1} forskolin, or 100 ng mL{sup -1} TNF-{alpha} (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNF{kappa}B-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5 x 10{sup 4} cells per well.

  17. Comparative study of human and mouse pregnane X receptor agonistic activity in 200 pesticides using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sata, Fumihiro; Takeuchi, Shinji; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Nagai, Tadanori

    2011-02-27

    The nuclear receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PXR activation may affect energy metabolism as well as the endocrine and immune systems. In this study, we characterized and compared the agonistic activities of a variety of pesticides against human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR). We tested the hPXR and mPXR agonistic activity of 200 pesticides (29 organochlorines, 11 diphenyl ethers, 56 organophosphorus pesticides, 12 pyrethroids, 22 carbamates, 12 acid amides, 7 triazines, 7 ureas, and 44 others) by reporter gene assays using COS-7 simian kidney cells. Of the 200 pesticides tested, 106 and 93 activated hPXR and mPXR, respectively, and a total of 111 had hPXR and/or mPXR agonistic activity with greater or lesser inter-species differences. Although all of the pyrethroids and most of the organochlorines and acid amides acted as PXR agonists, a wide range of pesticides with diverse structures also showed hPXR and/or mPXR agonistic activity. Among the 200 pesticides, pyributicarb, pretilachlor, piperophos and butamifos for hPXR, and phosalone, prochloraz, pendimethalin, and butamifos for mPXR, acted as particularly potent activators at low concentrations in the order of 10⁻⁸-10⁻⁷ M. In addition, we found that several organophosphorus oxon- and pyributicarb oxon-metabolites decreased PXR activation potency compared to their parent compounds. These results suggest that a large number of structurally diverse pesticides and their metabolites possess PXR-mediated transcriptional activity, and their ability to do so varies in a species-dependent manner in humans and mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro reporter gene assays for assessment of PPAR- and Nrf2-mediated health effects of tomato and its bioactive constituents

    OpenAIRE

    Gijsbers, L.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of food products with health-promoting properties, such as for example margarines with plant sterols, fruit juice enriched with calcium and cereals with (soluble) fibre, has increased rapidly during the last years. The present thesis provides proof-of-principle that reporter gene assays are effective tools to investigate the effects of functional foods and food compounds on gene expression pathways. In order to test fruits and vegetables for selected functions in reporter gene...

  19. Preliminary report of the comparison of multiple non-destructive assay techniques on LANL Plutonium Facility waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, C.; Schanfein, M.; Estep, R. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Prior to disposal, nuclear waste must be accurately characterized to identify and quantify the radioactive content. The DOE Complex faces the daunting task of measuring nuclear material with both a wide range of masses and matrices. Similarly daunting can be the selection of a non-destructive assay (NDA) technique(s) to efficiently perform the quantitative assay over the entire waste population. In fulfilling its role of a DOE Defense Programs nuclear User Facility/Technology Development Center, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility recently tested three commercially built and owned, mobile nondestructive assay (NDA) systems with special nuclear materials (SNM). Two independent commercial companies financed the testing of their three mobile NDA systems at the site. Contained within a single trailer is Canberra Industries segmented gamma scanner/waste assay system (SGS/WAS) and neutron waste drum assay system (WDAS). The third system is a BNFL Instruments Inc. (formerly known as Pajarito Scientific Corporation) differential die-away imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) counter. In an effort to increase the value of this comparison, additional NDA techniques at LANL were also used to measure these same drums. These are comprised of three tomographic gamma scanners (one mobile unit and two stationary) and one developmental differential die-away system. Although not certified standards, the authors hope that such a comparison will provide valuable data for those considering these different NDA techniques to measure their waste as well as the developers of the techniques.

  20. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  1. Development of an in vitro assay for teratogens. Progress report, 1 July 1983-31 August 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro teratogen assay system was applied to samples of fossil fuel combustion products. Potential teratogenicity was measured by the ability of a test compound to inhibit the attachment of tumor cells to lectin coated plastic surfaces. 13 refs., 3 tabs. (DT)

  2. A real time Metridia luciferase based non-invasive reporter assay of mammalian cell viability and cytotoxicity via the β-actin promoter and enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupold, Shawn E; Johnson, Tamara; Chowdhury, Wasim H; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Secreted reporter molecules offer a means to evaluate biological processes in real time without the need to sacrifice samples at pre-determined endpoints. Here we have adapted the secreted bioluminescent reporter gene, Metridia luciferase, for use in a real-time viability assay for mammalian cells. The coding region of the marine copepod gene has been codon optimized for expression in human cells (hMLuc) and placed under the control of the human β-actin promoter and enhancer. Metridia luciferase activity of stably transfected cell models corresponded linearly with cell number over a 4-log dynamic range, detecting as few as 40 cells. When compared to standard endpoint viability assays, which measure the mitochondrial dehydrogenase reduction of tetrazolium salts, the hMLuc viability assay had a broader linear range of detection, was applicable to large tissue culture vessels, and allowed the same sample to be repeatedly measured over several days. Additional studies confirmed that MLuc activity was inhibited by serum, but demonstrated that assay activity remained linear and was measurable in the serum of mice bearing subcutaneous hMLuc-expressing tumors. In summary, these comparative studies demonstrate the value of humanized Metridia luciferase as an inexpensive and non-invasive method for analyzing viable cell number, growth, tumor volume, and therapeutic response in real time.

  3. A real time Metridia luciferase based non-invasive reporter assay of mammalian cell viability and cytotoxicity via the β-actin promoter and enhancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn E Lupold

    Full Text Available Secreted reporter molecules offer a means to evaluate biological processes in real time without the need to sacrifice samples at pre-determined endpoints. Here we have adapted the secreted bioluminescent reporter gene, Metridia luciferase, for use in a real-time viability assay for mammalian cells. The coding region of the marine copepod gene has been codon optimized for expression in human cells (hMLuc and placed under the control of the human β-actin promoter and enhancer. Metridia luciferase activity of stably transfected cell models corresponded linearly with cell number over a 4-log dynamic range, detecting as few as 40 cells. When compared to standard endpoint viability assays, which measure the mitochondrial dehydrogenase reduction of tetrazolium salts, the hMLuc viability assay had a broader linear range of detection, was applicable to large tissue culture vessels, and allowed the same sample to be repeatedly measured over several days. Additional studies confirmed that MLuc activity was inhibited by serum, but demonstrated that assay activity remained linear and was measurable in the serum of mice bearing subcutaneous hMLuc-expressing tumors. In summary, these comparative studies demonstrate the value of humanized Metridia luciferase as an inexpensive and non-invasive method for analyzing viable cell number, growth, tumor volume, and therapeutic response in real time.

  4. Production, purification and assay of thrombopoietin. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976. [X radiation, /sup 35/S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, T.P.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted which indicate that thrombopoietin can be detected by both a bioassay and an immunoassay in sera of patients with various platelet production disorders. Other studies have shown that the kidney appears to have a vital role in thrombopoietin production; the mechanism of how platelet-specific antisera causes thrombocytopenia has been investigated. Also, an investigation has been made into the preparation of assay mice and the different methods for the measurement of thrombopoietin. These studies indicate that mice in rebound-thrombocytosis are more sensitive to exogenous TSF than normal or platelet transfused mice. Also, % /sup 35/S incorporation into platelets of assay mice is the most sensitive measurement of thrombopoiesis. The effects of hypoxia on platelet production was also investigated along with the release of thrombopoietin in animals exposed to RAMPS and whole-body x-irradiation.

  5. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankvoort, B M; de Groene, E M; van Meeteren-Kreikamp, A P; Witkamp, R F; Rodenburg, R J; Aarts, J M

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2 androgen response element. The application of this cell line in an endogenous Androgen Receptor-mediated LUciferase eXpression assay (AR-LUX) was validated. An EC50 value of 86 pM was determined for the standard androgen R1881 with a detection limit of 46 pM. Other androgens like dihydrotestosterone, 17beta-trenbolone, and bolasterone also induced luciferase expression, while anti-androgens suppressed these responses. As expected, AR-mediated responses were also elicited by high concentrations of the steroids progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, d-aldosterone, and dexamethasone, with observed EC50 values 10 to 350,000 times higher than that for R1881. A unique feature of the AR-LUX assay is that effects on modulation of active endogenous AR-levels are reliably reflected in the luciferase induction response, as exemplified by vitamin D, all-trans-retinoic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, and forskolin. This feature is especially useful when assessing complex mixtures, e.g., environmental samples or natural compound libraries. From these data it is concluded that the AR-LUX assay is a reliable in vitro test system for the detection and quantification of AR-mediated biological effects. The 96-well plate format makes the assay particularly suitable for high-throughput screening.

  6. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  7. Dioxin-like activity of brominated dioxins as individual compounds or mixtures in in vitro reporter gene assays with rat and mouse hepatoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, G; Nakamura, M; Michinaka, C; Tue, N M; Handa, H; Takigami, H

    2017-10-01

    In vitro reporter gene assays detecting dioxin-like compounds have been developed and validated since the middle 1990's, and applied to the determination of dioxin-like activities in various samples for their risk management. Data on characterizing the potency of individual brominated dioxins and their activity in mixture with chlorinated dioxins are still limited on the cell-based assay. This study characterized the dioxin-like activities of the 32 brominated dioxins, such as polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polybrominated dibenzofurans (PBDFs), coplanar polybrominated biphenyls, mixed halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PXDFs), as a sole component or in a mixture by DR-CALUX (dioxin-responsive chemically activated luciferase expression) using the rat hepatoma H4IIE cell line and XDS-CALUX (xenobiotic detection systems-chemically activated luciferase expression) assays using the mouse hepatoma H1L6.1 cell line. The 2,3,7,8-TCDD-relative potencies (REPs) of most of the brominated dioxins were within a factor of 10 of the WHO toxicity equivalency factor (WHO-TEF) for the chlorinated analogues. The REPs of a few PXDFs were an order of magnitude higher than the corresponding WHO-TEFs, indicating their toxicological importance. Results with reconstituted mixtures suggest that the activity of brominated and chlorinated dioxins in both CALUX assays was dose-additive. Thus, obtained results indicated the applicability of the CALUX assays as screening tools of brominated dioxins together with their chlorinated analogues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Mutagenicity of Sulfur Mustard in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D. L.; Sass, E. J.; Fritz, L. K.; Sasser, L. B.

    1989-07-31

    The mutagenic potential of bis 2-chloroethyl sulfide (HD} a bifunctional sulfur mustard was evaluated in the standard plate incorporation version and the preincubation modification of the Salmonella/microsomal assay with tester strains TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102, with and without 59 activation. HD-induced point mutations in strain TA102 and frameshift mutations in TA97 but showed little or no mutagenicity against strains TA98 and TA100. Extensive HD-induced cell killing was observed with the excision repair deficient strains (TA100, TA98 and TA97) but not with strain TA102, which is wild-activation by Aroc1or induced rat liver microsomes (S9).

  9. (Short-term assays for detecting environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and teratogens): Foreign trip report, February 4--28, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1989-03-08

    The traveler participated in the Second Southeast Asian Workshop on Short-term Assays for Detecting Environmental Mutagens, Carcinogens, and Teratogens, held in Bangkok and Chiang Mai, Thailand. He was a member of the International Advisory Committee of this Workshop, was a coordinator of the US delegation, and delivered two lectures. While in Bangkok, he participated in two round-table discussions on subjects of immediate significance to Thailand. He also traveled to The Philippines where he gave a lecture at the University of the Philippines in Quezon City. The contacts made by the traveler resulted in a US Environmental Protection Agency-initiated discussion of future funding for in vivo aneuploidy research at ORNL.

  10. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Mutagenicity of Lewisite in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D. L.; Sass, E. J.; Fritz, L. K.; Sasser, L. B.

    1989-07-31

    The mutagenic potential of lewisite was evaluated in the standard plate incorporation method and by the preincubation modification of the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay with tester strains TA97, TA98, TAlOO and TA102. All strains were tested with activation (20 and 50 {micro}l/ plate) and without activation. The lewisite was screened initially for toxicity with TA98 over a range of concentrations from 0.01 to 250 {micro}g of material per plate. However, concentrations selected for mutagenicity testing were adjusted to a range of 0.001 to 5 {micro}g/plate because of the sensitivity of tester strain TA102, which exhibited cytotoxicity at 0.01 ug/plate. No mutagenic response was exhibited by any of the strains in either method used. All other tester strains showed evidence of cytoxicity (reduction in mutagen response or sparse background lawn) at 5.0 {micro}g/plate or lower.

  11. A lack of premature termination codon read-through efficacy of PTC124 (Ataluren in a diverse array of reporter assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P McElroy

    Full Text Available The drug molecule PTC124 (Ataluren has been described as a read-through agent, capable of suppressing premature termination codons (PTCs and restoring functional protein production from genes disrupted by nonsense mutations. Following the discovery of PTC124 there was some controversy regarding its mechanism of action with two reports attributing its activity to an off-target effect on the Firefly luciferase (FLuc reporter used in the development of the molecule. Despite questions remaining as to its mechanism of action, development of PTC124 continued into the clinic and it is being actively pursued as a potential nonsense mutation therapy. To thoroughly test the ability of PTC124 to read through nonsense mutations, we conducted a detailed assessment comparing the efficacy of PTC124 with the classical aminoglycoside antibiotic read-through agent geneticin (G418 across a diverse range of in vitro reporter assays. We can confirm the off-target FLuc activity of PTC124 but found that, while G418 exhibits varying activity in every read-through assay, there is no evidence of activity for PTC124.

  12. A lack of premature termination codon read-through efficacy of PTC124 (Ataluren) in a diverse array of reporter assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Stuart P; Nomura, Toshifumi; Torrie, Leah S; Warbrick, Emma; Gartner, Ulrike; Wood, Gavin; McLean, W H Irwin

    2013-01-01

    The drug molecule PTC124 (Ataluren) has been described as a read-through agent, capable of suppressing premature termination codons (PTCs) and restoring functional protein production from genes disrupted by nonsense mutations. Following the discovery of PTC124 there was some controversy regarding its mechanism of action with two reports attributing its activity to an off-target effect on the Firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter used in the development of the molecule. Despite questions remaining as to its mechanism of action, development of PTC124 continued into the clinic and it is being actively pursued as a potential nonsense mutation therapy. To thoroughly test the ability of PTC124 to read through nonsense mutations, we conducted a detailed assessment comparing the efficacy of PTC124 with the classical aminoglycoside antibiotic read-through agent geneticin (G418) across a diverse range of in vitro reporter assays. We can confirm the off-target FLuc activity of PTC124 but found that, while G418 exhibits varying activity in every read-through assay, there is no evidence of activity for PTC124.

  13. Oestrogenic activity of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant effluent evaluated by the E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiliro, Tiziana, E-mail: tiziana.schiliro@unito.it [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, University of Torino, Via Santena 5bis, 10126 Torino (Italy); Porfido, Arianna [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, University of Torino, Via Santena 5bis, 10126 Torino (Italy); Spina, Federica; Varese, Giovanna Cristina [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Viale Mattioli 25, 10125 Torino (Italy); Gilli, Giorgio [Department of Public Health and Microbiology, University of Torino, Via Santena 5bis, 10126 Torino (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    This study quantified the biological oestrogenic activity in the effluent of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWWTP) in northwestern Italy. Samples of the IWWTP effluent were collected monthly, both before and after tertiary treatment (ozonation). After solid phase extraction, all samples were subjected to two in vitro tests of total estrogenic activity, the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay, or E-screen test, and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay, to measure the 17{beta}-oestradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ). In the E-screen test, the mean EEQ values were 2.35 {+-} 1.68 ng/L pre-ozonation and 0.72 {+-} 0.58 ng/L post-ozonation; in the MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, the mean EEQ values were 4.18 {+-} 3.54 ng/L pre-ozonation and 2.53 {+-} 2.48 ng/L post-ozonation. These results suggest that the post-ozonation IWWTP effluent had a lower oestrogenic activity (simple paired t-tests, p < 0.05). The average reduction of estrogenic activity of IWWTP effluent after ozonation was 67 {+-} 26% and 52 {+-} 27% as measured by E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, respectively. There was a positive and significant correlation between the two tests (Rho S = 0.650, p = 0.022). This study indicates that the environmental risk is low because oestrogenic substances are deposited into the river via IWWTP at concentrations lower than those at which chronic exposure has been reported to affect the endocrine system of living organisms. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two in vitro tests are suited for oestrogenic activity assessment in textile WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a significant correlation between the results of the two in vitro tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oestrogenic activity of the effluent is reduced by ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The input of estrogenic substances into the river via textile WWTP is low.

  14. Novel whole-cell Reporter Assay for Stress-Based Classification of Antibacterial Compounds Produced by Locally Isolated Bacillus spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Nithya, Vadakedath; Halami, Prakash M.

    2012-01-01

    Reporter bacteria are beneficial for the rapid and sensitive screening of cultures producing peptide antibiotics, which can be an addition or alternative to the established antibiotics. This study was carried out to validate the usability of specific reporter strains for the target mediated identification of antibiotics produced by native Bacillus spp. isolated from different food sources. During preliminary classification, cell wall stress causing Bacillus isolates were screened by using rep...

  15. Biological measurement of estrogenic activity in urine and bile conjugates with the in vitro ER-CALUX reporter gene assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Jonas, Arjen; Lahr, Joost; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-03-01

    Although estrogens are excreted as biologically inactive conjugates, they can be reconverted to an active form, possibly by bacteria. A simple method was developed to deconjugate estrogen metabolites present in human urine and fish bile back to active estrogens by enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase or live Escherichia coli cells. Deconjugated extracts were tested for estrogenic activity in the in vitro stable estrogen receptor-mediated chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay. Estrogen glucuronides in urine obtained from human males and females were effectively converted to active forms after incubation with beta-glucuronidase or E. coli. The highest estrogenic activity was found in deconjugated metabolites from urine of a pregnant woman, in which levels up to 3,000 nmol estradiol equivalents per liter of urine were found after overnight incubation of urine with E. coli. Bile sampled from male bream and flounder from various freshwater and marine locations was also deconjugated and a good correlation was found between high biliary estrogenic activity and elevated levels of xenoestrogenic activity in surface water as well as in plasma vitellogenin. Therefore, the measurement of deconjugated bile could form a useful (indirect) biomarker for internal dose of xenoestrogens in male fish.

  16. Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis.

  17. Development of a stably transfected estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene assay in the human T47D breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, J; van den Brink, C E; Brouwer, A; Murk, A J; van der Saag, P T; Vethaak, A D; van der Burg, B

    1999-03-01

    Development of an estrogen receptor-mediated, chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene-expression (ER-CALUX) assay was attempted by stable transfection of luciferase reporter genes in a number of cell lines. Stable transfection of the chimeric Gal4 estrogen receptor and luciferase gene constructs in MCF-7 breast cancer and Hepa.1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cell lines, as well as transfection of a newly constructed luciferase reporter gene pEREtata-Luc in the ECC-1 human endometrial cell line, resulted in constitutive, non-estradiol-inducible clones. Stable transfection of pEREtata-Luc in the T47D breast cancer cell line, however, resulted in an extremely sensitive, highly responsive cell line. Following a 24-h exposure to estradiol (E2), stably transfected T47D.Luc cells demonstrated a detection limit of 0.5 pM, an EC50 of 6 pM, and a maximum induction of 100-fold relative to solvent controls. No clear reduction in responsiveness has been found over extended culture periods (50 passages). Anti-estrogens ICI 182,780, TCDD, and tamoxifen inhibited the estradiol-mediated luciferase induction. Genistein, nonylphenol, and o,p'DDT were the most potent (pseudo-)estrogens tested in this system (EC50 100, 260, and 660 nM, respectively). Determination of interactive effects of the (pseudo-)estrogens nonylphenol, o,p'DDT, chlordane, endosulfan, dieldrin, and methoxychlor revealed that, in combination with 3 pM E2, (pseudo-)estrogens were additive. Slightly more than additive effects (less than 2-fold) were found for combinations of dieldrin and endosulfan tested in the range of 3 to 6 microM. At these concentrations, the combination of endosulfan and chlordane demonstrated additive interaction. The ER-CALUX assay with T47D cells can provide a sensitive, responsive, and rapid in vitro system to detect and measure substances with potential (anti-)estrogenic activity.

  18. The E-screen test and the MELN gene-reporter assay used for determination of estrogenic activity in fruits and vegetables in relation to pesticide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilirò, Tiziana; Porfido, Arianna; Longo, Annalisa; Coluccia, Sara; Gilli, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may lead to adverse systemic effects by interfering with normal hormone homeostasis, and diet is considered to be among the main routes of EDC exposure. The present study investigated the total estrogenic activity of fruits and vegetables by calculating the 17-β-estradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ) using two in vitro tests: the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay (E-screen test) and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay. Of the 24 analyzed fruits and vegetables, 14 contained from 1 to 4 pesticide residues in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 1.19 ppm, whereas the other 10 did not contain any pesticide residues. The EEQ values for all positive samples ranged from 0.010 to 0.616 μg/100g for the above in vitro tests. Our study demonstrates that estrogenic activity was present in fruits and vegetables and that the concentration of allowable pesticide residues and EEQ values were positively correlated; however, no correlation was found by comparing the estrogenic activity and the intrinsic content of phytoestrogens obtained from the available literature. A theoretical adult dietary intake of 0.7-0.9 ng EEQ/L/day from fruits and vegetables was calculated.

  19. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  20. Improvement of heavy metal stress and toxicity assays by coupling a transgenic reporter in a mutant nematode strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, K.-W. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Shirley K.W. [Atmospheric, Marine and Coastal Environment Program, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chow, King L. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China) and Atmospheric, Marine and Coastal Environment Program, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: bokchow@ust.hk

    2005-09-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated that wild type Caenorhabditis elegans displays high sensitivity to heavy metals in a lethality test at a level comparable to that of other bioindicator organisms. Taking advantage of the genetics of this model organism, we have tested a number of mutant strains for enhanced sensitivity in heavy metal induced lethality and stress response. These mutants are defective in genes controlling dauer formation, longevity or response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Among the tested mutants, a double mutant daf-16 unc-75 strain was identified to have superior sensitivity. It has a 6-, 3- and 2-fold increase in sensitivity to cadmium, copper and zinc, respectively, as compared with that of wild type animals. When a fluorescent reporter transgene was coupled with this double mutant for stress detection, a 10-fold enhancement of sensitivity to cadmium over the wild type strain was observed. These transgenic animals, superior to most of the model organisms currently used in bioassays for environmental pollutants, offer a fast and economic approach to reveal the bioavailability of toxic substance in field samples. This study also demonstrates that combination of genetic mutations and transgenesis is a viable approach to identify sensitive indicator animals for environmental monitoring.

  1. Similarities in the endocrine-disrupting potencies of indoor dust and flame retardants by using human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cell-based reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Go; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Malarvannan, Govindan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Sakai, Shin-ichi; Brouwer, Abraham; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2013-03-19

    Indoor dust is a sink for many kinds of pollutants, including flame retardants (FRs), plasticizers, and their contaminants and degradation products. These pollutants can be migrated to indoor dust from household items such as televisions and computers. To reveal high-priority end points of and contaminant candidates in indoor dust, using CALUX reporter gene assays based on human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cell lines, we evaluated and characterized the endocrine-disrupting potencies of crude extracts of indoor dust collected from Japan (n = 8), the United States (n = 21), Vietnam (n = 10), the Philippines (n = 17), and Indonesia (n = 10) and for 23 selected FRs. The CALUX reporter gene assays used were specific for compounds interacting with the human androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2). Indoor dust extracts were agonistic to ERα, GR, and PPARγ2 and antagonistic against AR, PR, GR, and PPARγ2. In comparison, a majority of FRs was agonistic to ERα and PPARγ2 only, and some FRs demonstrated receptor-specific antagonism against all tested nuclear receptors. Hierarchical clustering clearly indicated that agonism of ERα and antagonism of AR and PR were common, frequently detected end points for indoor dust and tested FRs. Given our previous results regarding the concentrations of FRs in indoor dust and in light of our current results, candidate contributors to these effects include not only internationally controlled brominated FRs but also alternatives such as some phosphorus-containing FRs. In the context of indoor pollution, high-frequency effects of FRs such as agonism of ERα and antagonism of AR and PR are candidate high-priority end points for further investigation.

  2. Against vaccine assay secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors.

  3. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  4. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Toward a rationale for the PTC124 (Ataluren) promoted readthrough of premature stop codons: a computational approach and GFP-reporter cell-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentini, Laura; Melfi, Raffaella; Di Leonardo, Aldo; Spinello, Angelo; Barone, Giampaolo; Pace, Andrea; Palumbo Piccionello, Antonio; Pibiri, Ivana

    2014-03-03

    The presence in the mRNA of premature stop codons (PTCs) results in protein truncation responsible for several inherited (genetic) diseases. A well-known example of these diseases is cystic fibrosis (CF), where approximately 10% (worldwide) of patients have nonsense mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. PTC124 (3-(5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-benzoic acid), also known as Ataluren, is a small molecule that has been suggested to allow PTC readthrough even though its target has yet to be identified. In the lack of a general consensus about its mechanism of action, we experimentally tested the ability of PTC124 to promote the readthrough of premature termination codons by using a new reporter. The reporter vector was based on a plasmid harboring the H2B histone coding sequence fused in frame with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNA, and a TGA stop codon was introduced in the H2B-GFP gene by site-directed mutagenesis. Additionally, an unprecedented computational study on the putative supramolecular interaction between PTC124 and an 11-codon (33-nucleotides) sequence corresponding to a CFTR mRNA fragment containing a central UGA nonsense mutation showed a specific interaction between PTC124 and the UGA codon. Altogether, the H2B-GFP-opal based assay and the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation support the hypothesis that PTC124 is able to promote the specific readthrough of internal TGA premature stop codons.

  6. Data on regulation of the gene for the adipocyte-enriched micropeptide Adig/Smaf1 by qPCR analysis and luciferase reporter assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Ren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes qPCR analysis for the Adig/Smaf1 gene in multiple in vitro adipocyte differentiation models including white and brown adipogenesis, cell lines and primary cultures. The article also contains qPCR data for transcript levels of Adig/Smaf1 in a wide panel of murine tissues. Expression of Adig/Smaf1 transcript in white and brown adipose tissue in fasted and refed mice is reported and also data for Adig/Smaf1 transcript expression in genetically obese ob/ob mice. Data on the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Srebp1c on Adig/Smaf1 transcript levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes are shown. Luciferase reporter assays provide data for regulation of an ~ 2 kb fragment of the 5′ flanking region of Adig/Smaf1 gene by PPARγ/RXRα. This data is related to a research article describing Adig/Smaf1 protein expression, “Expression, regulation and functional assessment of the 80 amino acid Small Adipocyte Factor 1 (Smaf1 protein in adipocytes” (G. Ren, P. Eskandari, S. Wang, C.M. Smas, 2016 [1].

  7. Prostate-specific antigen as a biomarker of condom failure: comparison of three laboratory assays and self-reported condom use problems in a randomized trial of female condom performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Terri; Warner, Lee; Macaluso, Maurizio; Frezieres, Ron; Snead, Margaret; Wraxall, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for semen exposure, may provide a more objective measure of condom failure than subject self-reports. Methods for measuring PSA vary and their comparability with respect to assessing condom performance has not been adequately evaluated. This study compared results from three different PSA assays of vaginal samples collected by subjects in a randomized clinical trial which compared the performance of female condoms. We selected 30 pairs of pre- and post-coital vaginal samples from subjects who reported condom functionality problems or whose original PSA assay was positive. Samples were retested using three different PSA assays [quantitative enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA), rocket immune-electrophoresis (RIE) and chromatographic immunoassay (CIA)]. We compared the proportion of condom uses where the post-coital PSA result indicated semen exposure for each of the three assays. Despite varying levels of sensitivity, the results from all three assays were remarkably consistent. Self-reported condom failures did not correlate well with positive PSA results, suggesting that exclusive reliance on either PSA or user self-report may be inadequate for assessing condom functionality. In combination with user self-report of condom failure, PSA testing provides a reliable, objective marker of condom functionality. Studies based on PSA testing may improve on conventional contraceptive clinical trials by offering a more direct assessment of a condom product's ability to prevent semen exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prostate-specific antigen as a biomarker of condom failure: comparison of three laboratory assays and self-reported condom use problems in a randomized trial of female condom performance☆, ☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Terri; Warner, Lee; Macaluso, Maurizio; Frezieres, Ron; Snead, Margaret; Wraxall, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for semen exposure, may provide a more objective measure of condom failure than subject self-reports. Methods for measuring PSA vary and their comparability with respect to assessing condom performance has not been adequately evaluated. This study compared results from three different PSA assays of vaginal samples collected by subjects in a randomized clinical trial which compared the performance of female condoms. Study Design We selected 30 pairs of pre- and post-coital vaginal samples from subjects who reported condom functionality problems or whose original PSA assay was positive. Samples were retested using three different PSA assays [quantitative enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA), rocket immune-electrophoresis (RIE) and chromatographic immunoassay (CIA)]. We compared the proportion of condom uses where the post-coital PSA result indicated semen exposure for each of the three assays. Results Despite varying levels of sensitivity, the results from all three assays were remarkably consistent. Self-reported condom failures did not correlate well with positive PSA results, suggesting that exclusive reliance on either PSA or user self-report may be inadequate for assessing condom functionality. Conclusion In combination with user self-report of condom failure, PSA testing provides a reliable, objective marker of condom functionality. Studies based on PSA testing may improve on conventional contraceptive clinical trials by offering a more direct assessment of a condom product's ability to prevent semen exposure. PMID:22386229

  9. Tandem reporter assay for myristoylated proteins post-translationally (TRAMPP) identifies novel substrates for post-translational myristoylation: PKCε, a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dale D O; Ahpin, Chrisselle Y; Heit, Ryan J; Perinpanayagam, Maneka A; Yap, Megan C; Veldhoen, Richard A; Goping, Ing Swie; Berthiaume, Luc G

    2012-01-01

    Myristoylation, the addition of a 14-carbon fatty acid to the N-terminal glycine of a protein, is key to protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions. Typically, myristoylation occurs cotranslationally; however, post-translational myristoylation of caspase-cleaved proteins is now emerging as a well-established protein modification and as a novel regulator of apoptosis. To identify additional post-translationally myristoylated proteins, we engineered a plasmid vector encoding for a caspase-cleavable reporter protein named tandem reporter assay for myristoylation of proteins post-translationally (TRAMPP). pTRAMPP consists of tdTomato-DEVD-"test myristoylation sequence"-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After induction of apoptosis, the reporter protein is cleaved by caspases, which frees a new N-terminal glycine residue attached to EGFP that can be myristoylated. We used pTRAMPP in appropriately transfected cells to identify 7 post-translationally myristoylated proteins. First, we confirmed the post-translational myristoylation of two previously identified putative substrates, cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain 2A and PKCε (ctPKCε), and identified 5 more caspase-cleaved potential substrates for myristoylation that include the antiapoptotic regulator of apoptosis, Mcl-1, and the causative agent of Huntington's disease, huntingtin protein. Further investigation revealed that post-translationally myristoylated ctPKCε localized to membranes and increased Erk signaling and degradation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, which prevented a significant loss of mitochondrial potential of 17% over nonmyristoylated ctPKCε in HeLa cells in the presence of apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, these findings suggest a possible antiapoptotic role for post-translationally myristoylated caspase-cleaved ctPKCε.

  10. Product-induced gene expression, a product-responsive reporter assay used to screen metagenomic libraries for enzyme-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2010-11-01

    A reporter assay-based screening method for enzymes, which we named product-induced gene expression (PIGEX), was developed and used to screen a metagenomic library for amidases. A benzoate-responsive transcriptional activator, BenR, was placed upstream of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein and used as a sensor. Escherichia coli sensor cells carrying the benR-gfp gene cassette fluoresced in response to benzoate concentrations as low as 10 μM but were completely unresponsive to the substrate benzamide. An E. coli metagenomic library consisting of 96,000 clones was grown in 96-well format in LB medium containing benzamide. The library cells were then cocultivated with sensor cells. Eleven amidase genes were recovered from 143 fluorescent wells; eight of these genes were homologous to known bacterial amidase genes while three were novel genes. In addition to their activity toward benzamide, the enzymes were active toward various substrates, including d- and l-amino acid amides, and displayed enantioselectivity. Thus, we demonstrated that PIGEX is an effective approach for screening novel enzymes based on product detection.

  11. Development and validation of cell-based luciferase reporter gene assays for measuring neutralizing anti-drug antibodies against interferon beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanrud, Christina; Ryner, Malin; Luft, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    . The assays were re-developed and validated as part of the "Anti-Biopharmaceutical Immunization: Prediction and analysis of clinical relevance to minimize the risk" (ABIRISK) consortium and involved a joint collaboration between four academic laboratories and two pharmaceutical companies. The LUC assay...

  12. An in vivo reporter assay for sRNA-directed gene control in Gram-positive bacteria: identifying a novel sRNA target in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivain, Lorraine; Bordeau, Valérie; Eyraud, Alex; Hallier, Marc; Dreano, Stéphane; Tattevin, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) play a major role in the regulation of various cellular functions. Most sRNAs interact with mRNA targets via an antisense mechanism, modifying their translation and/or degradation. Despite considerable progresses in discovering sRNAs in Gram-positive bacteria, their functions, for the most part, are unknown. This is mainly due to difficulties in identifying their targets. To aid in the identification of sRNA targets in Gram-positive bacteria, we set up an in vivo method for fast analysis of sRNA-mediated post-transcriptional control at the 5΄ regions of target mRNAs. The technology is based on the co-expression of an sRNA and a 5΄ sequence of an mRNA target fused to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The system was challenged on Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic Gram-positive pathogen. We analyzed several established sRNA–mRNA interactions, and in addition, we identified the ecb mRNA as a novel target for SprX2 sRNA. Using our in vivo system in combination with in vitro experiments, we demonstrated that SprX2 uses an antisense mechanism to prevent ecb mRNA translation initiation. Furthermore, we used our reporter assay to validate sRNA regulations in other Gram-positive organisms, Bacillus subtilis and Listeria monocytogenes. Overall, our method is broadly applicable to challenge the predicted sRNA–mRNA interactions in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:28369640

  13. Assessment of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a human cell-based reporter gene assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondráček, Jan; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Neča, Jiří; Ciganek, Miroslav; Grycová, Aneta; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Machala, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity is one of key events in toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although various classes of AhR ligands may differentially activate human and rodent AhR, there is presently a lack of data on the human AhR-inducing relative potencies (REPs) of PAHs. Here, we focused on estimation of the AhR-mediated activities of a large set of environmental PAHs in human gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, with an aim to develop the human AhR-based REP values with potential implications for risk assessment of PAHs. The previously identified weakly active PAHs mostly failed to activate the AhR in human cells. The order for REPs of individual PAHs in human cells largely corresponded with the available data from rodent-based experimental systems; nevertheless, we identified differences up to one order of magnitude in REP values of PAHs between human and rodent cells. Higher REP values were found in human cells for some important environmental contaminants or suspected carcinogens, such as indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, benz[a]anthracene or benzo[b]fluoranthene, while lower REP values were determined for methyl-substituted PAHs. Our results also indicate that a different rate of metabolism for individual PAHs in human vs. rodent cells may affect estimation of REP values in human cell-based assay, and potentially alter toxicity of some compounds, such as benzofluoranthenes, in humans. We applied the AZ-AhR assay to evaluation of the AhR-mediated activity of complex mixtures of organic compounds associated with diesel exhaust particles, and we identified the polar compounds present in these mixtures as being particularly highly active in human cells, as compared with rodent cells. The present data suggest that differences may exist between the AhR-mediated potencies of PAHs in human and rodent cells, and that the AhR-mediated effects of polar PAH derivatives and metabolites in human cell models deserve further

  14. The corneal pocket assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cornea in most species is physiologically avascular, and thus this assay allows the measurement of newly formed vessels. The continuous monitoring of neovascular growth in the same animal allows the evaluation of drugs acting as suppressors or stimulators of angiogenesis. Under anesthesia a micropocket is produced in the cornea thickness and the angiogenesis stimulus (tumor tissue, cell suspension, growth factor) is placed into the pocket in order to induce vascular outgrowth from the limbal capillaries. Neovascular development and progression can be modified by the presence of locally released or applied inhibitory factors or by systemic treatments. In this chapter the experimental details of the avascular cornea assay, the technical challenges, and advantages and disadvantages in different species are discussed. Protocols for local drug treatment and tissue sampling for histology and pharmacokinetic profile are reported.

  15. Standardization of Assay Procedures for Analysis of the CSF Biomarkers Amyloid β(1-42, Tau, and Phosphorylated Tau in Alzheimer's Disease: Report of an International Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Large variation in assay performance and outcomes of CSF Aβ1-42, total Tau (Tau, and phosphorylated Tau (pTau (at amino acid 181 levels is observed between laboratories. The aim of this study was to assess the differences in assay procedures between several experienced international laboratories, as potential sources of error. 14 groups performed the Aβ42, Tau, and pTau assays according to the guidelines of the manufacturer. Differences in analytical procedures between the laboratories were monitored. At least 23 items in assay procedures were identified that varied between the laboratories, including procedures for washing, pipetting, incubation, finishing, and sample handing. In general, the inter- and intra-assay variation between the groups was generally below 10% for all three assays. We concluded that 17 international centers that use the same assays for Aβ42, Tau and pTau on a regular basis do not uniformly adhere to the procedures recommended by the manufacturer. For harmonization of intercenter results of these biomarkers standardization of protocols is highly needed.

  16. Environmental Technology Verification Report for Abraxis Ecologenia® 17β-Estradiol (E2) Microplate Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Test Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    This verification test was conducted according to procedures specifiedin the Test/QA Planfor Verification of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Test Kis for the Quantitative Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) in Aqueous Phase Samples. Deviations to the...

  17. Evaluation of an hPXR reporter gene assay for the detection of aquatic emerging pollutants: screening of chemicals and application to water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creusot, Nicolas; Kinani, Said; Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Ait-Aissa, Selim [Unite Ecotoxicologie, INERIS, Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Balaguer, Patrick [IRCM-UM1-CRLC Val d' Aurelle, INSERM U896, Montpellier (France); Tapie, Nathalie; LeMenach, Karyn; Budzinski, Helene [ISM/LPTC-UMR 5255 CNRS Universite Bordeaux 1, Talence (France)

    2010-01-15

    Many environmental endocrine-disrupting compounds act as ligands for nuclear receptors. Among these receptors, the human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) is well described as a xenobiotic sensor to various classes of chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and steroids. To assess the potential use of PXR as a sensor for aquatic emerging pollutants, we employed an in vitro reporter gene assay (HG5LN-hPXR cells) to screen a panel of environmental chemicals and to assess PXR-active chemicals in (waste) water samples. Of the 57 compounds tested, 37 were active in the bioassay and 10 were identified as new PXR agonists: triazin pesticides (promethryn, terbuthryn, terbutylazine), pharmaceuticals (fenofibrate, bezafibrate, clonazepam, medazepam) and non co-planar polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs; PCB101, 138, 180). Furthermore, we detected potent PXR activity in two types of water samples: passive polar organic compounds integrative sampler (POCIS) extracts from a river moderately impacted by agricultural and urban inputs and three effluents from sewage treatment works (STW). Fractionation of POCIS samples showed the highest PXR activity in the less polar fraction, while in the effluents, PXR activity was mainly associated with the dissolved water phase. Chemical analyses quantified several PXR-active substances (i.e., alkylphenols, hormones, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, PCBs, bisphenol A) in POCIS fractions and effluent extracts. However, mass-balance calculations showed that the analyzed compounds explained only 0.03% and 1.4% of biological activity measured in POCIS and STW samples, respectively. In effluents, bisphenol A and 4-tert-octylphenol were identified as main contributors of instrumentally derived PXR activities. Finally, the PXR bioassay provided complementary information as compared to estrogenic, androgenic, and dioxin-like activity measured in these samples. This study shows the usefulness of HG5LN-hPXR cells to detect PXR-active compounds in water samples

  18. A functional whole blood assay to measure viability of mycobacteria, using reporter-gene tagged BCG or M.Tb (BCGlux/M.Tb lux).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sandra; Martineau, Adrian; Kampmann, Beate

    2011-09-14

    Functional assays have long played a key role in measuring of immunogenicity of a given vaccine. This is conventionally expressed as serum bactericidal titers. Studies of serum bactericidal titers in response to childhood vaccines have enabled us to develop and validate cut-off levels for protective immune responses and such cut-offs are in routine use. No such assays have been taken forward into the routine assessment of vaccines that induce primarily cell-mediated immunity in the form of effector T cell responses, such as TB vaccines. In the animal model, the performance of a given vaccine candidate is routinely evaluated in standardized bactericidal assays, and all current novel TB-vaccine candidates have been subjected to this step in their evaluation prior to phase 1 human trials. The assessment of immunogenicity and therefore likelihood of protective efficacy of novel anti-TB vaccines should ideally undergo a similar step-wise evaluation in the human models now, including measurements in bactericidal assays. Bactericidal assays in the context of tuberculosis vaccine research are already well established in the animal models, where they are applied to screen potentially promising vaccine candidates. Reduction of bacterial load in various organs functions as the main read-out of immunogenicity. However, no such assays have been incorporated into clinical trials for novel anti-TB vaccines to date. Although there is still uncertainty about the exact mechanisms that lead to killing of mycobacteria inside human macrophages, the interaction of macrophages and T cells with mycobacteria is clearly required. The assay described in this paper represents a novel generation of bactericidal assays that enables studies of such key cellular components with all other cellular and humoral factors present in whole blood without making assumptions about their relative individual contribution. The assay described by our group uses small volumes of whole blood and has already been

  19. Impact of ubiquitous inhibitors on the GUS gene reporter system: evidence from the model plants Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice and correction methods for quantitative assays of transgenic and endogenous GUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerola Paolo D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-glucuronidase (GUS gene reporter system is one of the most effective and employed techniques in the study of gene regulation in plant molecular biology. Improving protocols for GUS assays have rendered the original method described by Jefferson amenable to various requirements and conditions, but the serious limitation caused by inhibitors of the enzyme activity in plant tissues has thus far been underestimated. Results We report that inhibitors of GUS activity are ubiquitous in organ tissues of Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice, and significantly bias quantitative assessment of GUS activity in plant transformation experiments. Combined with previous literature reports on non-model species, our findings suggest that inhibitors may be common components of plant cells, with variable affinity towards the E. coli enzyme. The reduced inhibitory capacity towards the plant endogenous GUS discredits the hypothesis of a regulatory role of these compounds in plant cells, and their effect on the bacterial enzyme is better interpreted as a side effect due to their interaction with GUS during the assay. This is likely to have a bearing also on histochemical analyses, leading to inaccurate evaluations of GUS expression. Conclusions In order to achieve reliable results, inhibitor activity should be routinely tested during quantitative GUS assays. Two separate methods to correct the measured activity of the transgenic and endogenous GUS are presented.

  20. Progress and goals for INMM ASC N15 consensus standard ""Administrative practices for the determination and reporting of results of non-destructive assay measurements of nuclear material in situ for safeguards nuclear criticality safety and other purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamb, Frank W [UNWIN CORPORATION

    2009-01-01

    This paper will discuss the goals and progress to date on the development of INMM Accredited Standard Committee (ASC) N15 consensus standard Administrative Practices for the Determination and Reporting of Results of Non-Destructive Assay Measurements of Nuclear Material in situ for Safeguards, Nuclear Criticality Safety, and Other Purposes. This standard will define administrative practices in the areas of data generation and reporting of NDA assay of holdup deposits with consideration of the stakeholders of the reported results. These stakeholders may include nuclear material accounting and safeguards, nuclear criticality safety, waste management, health physics, facility characterization, authorization basis, radiation safety, and site licensing authorities. Stakeholder input will be solicited from interested parties and incorporated during the development of the document. Currently only one consensus standard exists that explicitly deals with NDA holdup measurements: ASTM C1455 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Assay of Special Nuclear Material Holdup Using Gamma-Ray Spectroscopic Methods. The ASTM International standard emphasizes the activities involved in actually making measurements, and was developed by safeguards and NDA experts. This new INMM ASC N15 standard will complement the existing ASTM international standard. One of the largest driving factors for writing this new standard was the recent emphasis on in situ NDA measurements by the safeguards community due to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) recommendation 2007-1 on in situ NDA measurements. Specifically, DNFSB recommendation 2007-1 referenced the lack of programmatic requirements for accurate in situ measurements and the use of measurement results for compliance with safety based requirements. That being the case, this paper will also discuss the progress made on the Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2007-1 Safety-Related In Situ

  1. Colorimetric protein assay techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapan, C V; Lundblad, R L; Price, N C

    1999-04-01

    There has been an increase in the number of colorimetric assay techniques for the determination of protein concentration over the past 20 years. This has resulted in a perceived increase in sensitivity and accuracy with the advent of new techniques. The present review considers these advances with emphasis on the potential use of such technologies in the assay of biopharmaceuticals. The techniques reviewed include Coomassie Blue G-250 dye binding (the Bradford assay), the Lowry assay, the bicinchoninic acid assay and the biuret assay. It is shown that each assay has advantages and disadvantages relative to sensitivity, ease of performance, acceptance in the literature, accuracy and reproducibility/coefficient of variation/laboratory-to-laboratory variation. A comparison of the use of several assays with the same sample population is presented. It is suggested that the most critical issue in the use of a chromogenic protein assay for the characterization of a biopharmaceutical is the selection of a standard for the calibration of the assay; it is crucial that the standard be representative of the sample. If it is not possible to match the standard with the sample from the perspective of protein composition, then it is preferable to use an assay that is not sensitive to the composition of the protein such as a micro-Kjeldahl technique, quantitative amino acid analysis or the biuret assay. In a complex mixture it might be inappropriate to focus on a general method of protein determination and much more informative to use specific methods relating to the protein(s) of particular interest, using either specific assays or antibody-based methods. The key point is that whatever method is adopted as the 'gold standard' for a given protein, this method needs to be used routinely for calibration.

  2. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  3. A Continuous, Fluorogenic Sirtuin 2 Deacylase Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galleano, Iacopo; Schiedel, Matthias; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    and kinetic insight regarding sirtuin inhibitors, it is important to have access to efficient assays. In this work, we report readily synthesized fluorogenic substrates enabling enzyme-economical evaluation of SIRT2 inhibitors in a continuous assay format as well as evaluation of the properties of SIRT2...

  4. Assays of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in actually contaminated soils using transgenic tobacco plants carrying a recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated β-glucuronidase reporter gene expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Hideyuki; Gion, Keiko; Utani, Yasushi; Wakai, Taketo; Kodama, Susumu; Eun, Heesoo; Kim, Yun-Seok; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 carrying the recombinant mouse aryl hydrocarbon receptor XD4V-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system was used for assay of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds consisting of polychlorinated dibenzeno-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs) in actually contaminated soils. The transgenic tobacco plant XD4V-26 showed a significant dose-dependent induced GUS activity when cultured on MS medium containing PCB126 [toxic equivalency factor (TEF) = 0.1]. In contrast, PCB169 and PCB180, which have 0.03 of TEF and unassigned TEF values, respectively, did not significantly induce GUS activity under the same conditions as with PCB126. When the tobacco plants were cultivated for up to 5 weeks on actually contaminated soils with dioxins and dioxin-like compounds collected from the periphery of an incinerator used for disposal of residential and industrial wastes, GUS activity in the leaves was dose-dependently increased. The plants clearly detected 360 pg-TEQ g(-1) of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in this assay. There was a positive correlation between GUS activity and TEQ value of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in the plants. This assay does not require any extraction and purification processes for the actually contaminated soil samples.

  5. A reporter gene assay to assess the molecular mechanisms of xenobiotic-dependent induction of the human CYP3A4 gene in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, M S; Williams, J M; Tarbit, M; Goldfarb, P S; Gray, T J; Gibson, G G

    1999-03-01

    1. A plasmid containing 1 kb of the CYP3A4 regulatory (promoter) region coupled to a reporter gene for secretary placental alkaline phosphatase (SPAP) was transfected into HepG2 cells. Transfected cells were dosed with several known inducers of CYP3A4 and the levels of SPAP were measured. The effect of co-transfecting a plasmid encoding the human glucocorticoid receptor on reporter gene activity was also examined. 2. Dexamethasone induced CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner and induction was approximately doubled in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor. Dexamethasone-dependent induction was blocked by RU-486 (a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist), in the presence of the co-transfected glucocorticoid receptor. 3. Induction of CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression and enhancement of the induction by the glucocorticoid receptor was also observed with pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), rifampicin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenylbutazone and phenobarbitone, all known in vivo inducers of CYP3A4 in man. 4. Metyrapone and sulfinpyrazone induced CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression, but induction was not enhanced by the glucocorticoid receptor. 5. Clotrimazole, erythromycin and triacetyloleandomycin (TAO) did not induce CYP3A4-dependent reporter gene expression, consistent with the observation that these inducers act through post-transcriptional mechanisms. 6. These results highlight differences in the molecular mechanisms of induction of CYP3A4 by the xenobiotics studied and indicate that the glucocorticoid receptor is involved in the induction of the CYP3A4 gene by some, but not all, CYP3A4 inducers. 7. We propose that the approach described here provides a useful in vitro approach for the identification of transcriptional regulators of the CYP3A4 gene.

  6. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  7. In vitro reporter gene assays for assessment of PPAR- and Nrf2-mediated health effects of tomato and its bioactive constituents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of food products with health-promoting properties, such as for example margarines with plant sterols, fruit juice enriched with calcium and cereals with (soluble) fibre, has increased rapidly during the last years. The present thesis provides proof-of-principle that reporter gene ass

  8. In vitro reporter gene assays for assessment of PPAR- and Nrf2-mediated health effects of tomato and its bioactive constituents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of food products with health-promoting properties, such as for example margarines with plant sterols, fruit juice enriched with calcium and cereals with (soluble) fibre, has increased rapidly during the last years. The present thesis provides proof-of-principle that reporter gene ass

  9. In vitro reporter gene assays for assessment of PPAR- and Nrf2-mediated health effects of tomato and its bioactive constituents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of food products with health-promoting properties, such as for example margarines with plant sterols, fruit juice enriched with calcium and cereals with (soluble) fibre, has increased rapidly during the last years. The present thesis provides proof-of-principle that reporter gene

  10. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  11. Development of HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene assays in human cells for assessing the oxidative damage induced by silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lili; Wang, Jianshu; Zhang, Leshuai W; Che, Bizhong; Dong, Guangzhu; Fan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Kaiming

    2016-08-01

    The exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products requires novel tools for rapid and cost-effective toxicology screening. In order to assess the oxidative damage induced by nanoparticles, toxicity test systems based on a human HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter in HepG2, LO2, A549, and HBE cells were established. After treated with heat shock and a group of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different primary particle sizes, the cell viability, oxidative damage, and luciferase activity were determined. The time-dependent Ag(+) ions release from AgNPs in cell medium was also evaluated. Our results showed that heat shock produced a strong time-dependent induction of relative luciferase activity in the four luciferase reporter cells. Surprisingly, at 4h of recovery, the relative luciferase activity was >98× the control level in HepG2-luciferase cells. Exposure to different sizes of AgNPs resulted in activation of the HSPA1A promoter in a dose-dependent manner, even at low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic doses. The smaller (5nm) AgNPs were more potent in luciferase induction than the larger (50 and 75nm) AgNPs. These results were generally in accordance with the oxidative damage indicated by malondialdehyde concentration, reactive oxygen species induction and glutathione depletion, and Ag(+) ions release in cell medium. Compared with the other three luciferase reporter cells, the luciferase signal in HepG2-luciferase cells is obviously more sensitive and stable. We conclude that the luciferase reporter cells, especially the HepG2-luciferase cells, could provide a valuable tool for rapid screening of the oxidative damage induced by AgNPs.

  12. High-level expression of wild-type p53 in melanoma cells is frequently associated with inactivity in p53 reporter gene assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Houben

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inactivation of the p53 pathway that controls cell cycle progression, apoptosis and senescence, has been proposed to occur in virtually all human tumors and p53 is the protein most frequently mutated in human cancer. However, the mutational status of p53 in melanoma is still controversial; to clarify this notion we analysed the largest series of melanoma samples reported to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical analysis of more than 180 melanoma specimens demonstrated that high levels of p53 are expressed in the vast majority of cases. Subsequent sequencing of the p53 exons 5-8, however, revealed only in one case the presence of a mutation. Nevertheless, by means of two different p53 reporter constructs we demonstrate transcriptional inactivity of wild type p53 in 6 out of 10 melanoma cell lines; the 4 other p53 wild type melanoma cell lines exhibit p53 reporter gene activity, which can be blocked by shRNA knock down of p53. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In melanomas expressing high levels of wild type p53 this tumor suppressor is frequently inactivated at transcriptional level.

  13. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  14. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  15. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  16. Assays for thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, T.P.

    1977-01-01

    In summary, thrombopoietin levels have been determined indirectly by measuring thrombocytopoiesis in assay animals (platelet counting, measurement of isotope incorporation into newly formed platelets, changes in platelet sizes, or alterations in number and size of megakaryocytes) and by use of an immunoassay. Although much work remains, it seems clear at the present time that isotopic uptake into platelets of specially prepared assay mice (rebound-thrombocytosis) is superior to the other techniques now available for the measurement of thrombopoietin. However, the ideal assay for TSF which is specific, rapid, and inexpensive is yet to be developed. An immunoassay is in the development stage, but will require additional work before it can be utilized for the routine assay of TSF.

  17. New Rapid Spore Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kminek, Gerhard; Conley, Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The presentation will detail approved Planetary Protection specifications for the Rapid Spore Assay for spacecraft components and subsystems. Outlined will be the research and studies on which the specifications were based. The research, funded by ESA and NASA/JPL, was conducted over a period of two years and was followed by limited cleanroom studies to assess the feasibility of this assay during spacecraft assembly.

  18. The skin-blanching assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, P; Neumann, H A M; Thio, H B

    2012-10-01

    The skin-blanching assay is used for the determination and bioequivalence of dermatologic glucocorticoids (GCs). The exact mechanism of the production of blanching is not fully understood, but it is considered that local vasoconstriction of the skin microvasculature and the consequent blood-flow reduction cause this phenomenon. Several factors influence skin blanching, including drug concentration, duration of application, nature of vehicle, occlusion, posture and location. The intensity of vasoconstriction can be measured in several ways: visual or quantitative methods, such as reflectance spectroscopy, thermography, laser Doppler velocimetry and chromametry. In literature, contradicting results in the correlation of the skin-blanching assay with different tests to determine GC sensitivity have been reported, limiting its clinical usefulness.

  19. A Novel Oral Fluid Assay (LC-QTOF-MS) for the Detection of Fentanyl and Clandestine Opioids in Oral Fluid After Reported Heroin Overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Matthew K; Chai, Peter R; Krotulski, Alex J; Friscia, Melissa; Chapman, Brittany P; Varma, Neha; Boyer, Edward W; Logan, Barry K; Babu, Kavita M

    2017-10-02

    The adulteration of heroin with non-pharmaceutical fentanyl and other high-potency opioids is one of the factors contributing to striking increases in overdose deaths. To fully understand the magnitude of this problem, accurate detection methods for fentanyl and other novel opioid adulterant exposures are urgently required. The objective of this work was to compare the detection of fentanyl in oral fluid and urine specimens using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) in a population of heroin users presenting to the Emergency Department after overdose. This was a prospective observational study of adult Emergency Department patients who presented after a reported heroin overdose requiring naloxone administration. Participants provided paired oral fluid and urine specimens, which were prepared, extracted, and analyzed using a dual LC-QTOF-MS workflow for the identification of traditional and emerging drugs of abuse. Analytical instrumentation included SCIEX TripleTOF® 5600+ and Waters Xevo® G2-S QTOF systems. Thirty participants (N = 30) were enrolled during the study period. Twenty-nine participants had fentanyl detected in their urine, while 27 had fentanyl identified in their oral fluid (overall agreement 93.3%, positive percent agreement 93.1%). Cohen's Kappa (k) was calculated and demonstrated moderately, significant agreement (k = 0.47; p value 0.002) in fentanyl detection between oral fluid and urine using this LC-QTOF-MS methodology. Additional novel opioids and metabolites, including norfentanyl, acetylfentanyl, and U-47700, were detected during this study. In this study of individuals presenting to the ED after reported heroin overdose, a strikingly high proportion had a detectable fentanyl exposure. Using LC-QTOF-MS, the agreement between paired oral fluid and urine testing for fentanyl detection indicates a role for oral fluid testing in surveillance for nonpharmaceutical fentanyl. Additionally, the use of

  20. Assays for Determination of Protein Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical analysis of proteins relies on accurate quantification of protein concentration. Detailed in this appendix are some commonly used methods for protein analysis, e.g., Lowry, Bradford, bicinchoninic acid (BCA), UV spectroscopic, and 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (CBQCA) assays. The primary focus of this report is assay selection, emphasizing sample and buffer compatibility. The fundamentals of generating protein assay standard curves and of data processing are considered, as are high-throughput adaptations of the more commonly used protein assays. Also included is a rapid, inexpensive, and reliable BCA assay of total protein in SDS-PAGE sample buffer that is used for equal loading of SDS-PAGE gels. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Development of a new PCR-based assay to detect Anaplasmataceae and the first report of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma platys in cattle from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Mustapha; Davoust, Bernard; Benterki, Mohamed Seghir; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is a hemoparasitic disease considered as a major constraint to cattle production in many countries. This pathology is at least partially caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma centrale, and Anaplasma bovis. The global threat and emergence of these species in animals require the reliable identification of these bacteria in animal samples. In this study, we developed a new qPCR tool targeting the 23S rRNA gene for the detection of Anaplasmataceae bacteria. The primers and probe for the qPCR reaction had 100% specificity and could identify at least A. phagocytophilum, A. marginale, A. centrale, Anaplasma ovis, Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia ruminantium, Neorickettisa sennetsu, and Neorickettsia risticii. We used this tool to test samples of bovines from Batna (Algeria), an area from which bovine anaplasmosis have never been reported. We identified three genetic variants of A. phagocytophilum, A. platys and Anaplasma sp. "variant 4". This finding should attract the attention of public authorities to assess the involvement of these pathogens in human and animal health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In Vivo Imaging of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Regulation in a Subcutaneous and Orthotopic GL261 Glioma Tumor Model Using a Reporter Gene Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bürgi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intratumoral hypoxia changes the metabolism of gliomas, leading to a more aggressive phenotype with increased resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. Hypoxia triggers a signaling cascade with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF as a key regulator. We monitored activation of the HIF pathway longitudinally in murine glioma tumors. GL261 cells, stably transfected with a luciferase reporter driven under the control of a promoter comprising the HIF target gene motive hypoxia response element, were implanted either subcutaneously or orthotopically. In vivo experiments were carried out using bioluminescence imaging. Tumors were subsequently analyzed using immunofluorescence staining for hypoxia, endothelial cells, tumor perfusion, and glucose transporter expression. Transient upregulation of the HIF signaling was observed in both subcutaneous and orthotopic gliomas. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed hypoxic regions in subcutaneous and, to a lesser extent, intracranial tumors. Subcutaneous tumors showed substantial necrosis, which might contribute to the decreased bioluminescence output observed toward the end of the experiment. Orthotopic tumors were less hypoxic than subcutaneous ones and did not develop extensive necrotic areas. Although this may be the result of the overall smaller size of orthotopic tumors, it might also reflect differences in the local environment, such as the better intrinsic vascularization of brain tissue compared to the subcutaneous tissue compartment.

  3. A secondary dengue 4 infection in a traveler returning from Haiti confirmed by virus isolation, complete genome sequencing and neutralisation assay: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Amelie; Ninove, Laetitia; Zandotti, Christine; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Klitting, Raphaelle; Baronti, Cecile; Stein, Andreas; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Rémi N

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the clinical and laboratory findings of a dengue 4 virus (DENV) secondary infection in a patient returning from Haiti to France. The diagnostic of acute DEN-4 virus infection was demonstrated by (i) the presence of DEN-4 RNA in two successive serum samples, (ii) the isolation of a DEN-4 virus in Vero cells and subsequent identification of subtype IIb through complete genome sequencing, (iii) the presence of dengue NS1 antigen, (iv) the seroconversion with detection of dengue IgM in the second serum while negative in the first serum. The diagnosis of secondary dengue episode was demonstrated by (i) the presence of dengue IgG in the early serum, and (ii) the demonstration that neutralising antibodies against DEN-3 were present at the acute stage of the disease. Next-generation sequencing has a primary role to play in phylogeographic studies including database sequences, sequences from imported cases, and sequences from autochthonous cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of LINE-1 mobility in neuroblastoma cells by in vitro retrotransposition reporter assay: FACS analysis can detect only the tip of the iceberg of the inserted L1 elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Re, Brunella, E-mail: brunella.delre@unibo.it [Department of Evolutionary Experimental Biology, University of Bologna, via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Inter-departmental Center ' L. Galvani' , via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Marcantonio, Pamela [Department of Evolutionary Experimental Biology, University of Bologna, via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Capri, Miriam [Department of Experimental Pathology, University of Bologna, via S. Giacomo 8, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Inter-departmental Center ' L. Galvani' , via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Giorgi, Gianfranco [Department of Evolutionary Experimental Biology, University of Bologna, via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Inter-departmental Center ' L. Galvani' , via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-12-10

    Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (L1) are retroelements generally repressed in most differentiated somatic cells. Their activity has been observed in some undifferentiated and tumour cells and could be involved in tumour onset and progression. Growing evidences show that the L1 activation can occur in neuronal precursor cells during differentiation process. Neuroblastoma is a tumour originating from neuronal precursor cells, and, although the molecular basis of its progression is still poorly understood, the implication of L1 activation has not yet been investigated. In this study L1 mobility in neuroblastoma BE(2)C cells was assessed using the in vitro retrotransposition assay consisting in an episomal EGFP-tagged L1{sub RP} element, whose mobility can be evaluated by cytofluorimetric analysis (FACS) of EGFP expression. FACS results have shown a low retrotransposition activity. To detect L1{sub RP} integrated in transcriptionally repressed genomic sites, both a cell treatment with a stimulator of reporter gene promoter, and a quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis were performed. A retrotransposition activity ten and one thousand times that of FACS was found, respectively. These results point out that the real rate of L1 retrotransposition events in tumour cells might be considerably higher than that reported so far by evaluating only the reporter gene expression.

  5. Validation of a new yeast-based reporter assay consisting of human estrogen receptors alpha/beta and coactivator SRC-1: application for detection of estrogenic activity in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wai-Ling; Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Kondo, Mami; Yagi, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous substances that act like hormones in the endocrine system and disrupt the physiologic function of endogenous hormones. In the present study, we established reporter yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing human estrogen receptors, ERalpha or ERbeta. These strains contain a reporter plasmid carrying an estrogen responsive element (ERE) upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene, and a plasmid expressing a steroid receptor coactivator, SRC-1e. Using these reporter strains, we demonstrated dose-dependent estrogenic activities of different categories of ligands, a natural hormone, 17beta-estradiol (E2); a synthetic drug, diethylstilbestrol (DES); phytoestrogens, genistein, daizein and emodin; and an environmental endocrine disrupter, bisphenol A. EC(50) values of E2 for ERalpha and ERbeta are 5.31 x 10(-10) and 5.85 x 10(-10) M, respectively. We also demonstrated that these yeasts were applicable for measuring estrogenic activities of environmental water samples. Most downstream sites of a river showed similar activity in both ERalpha and ERbeta assays. These yeast strains are useful and convenient for detecting and comparing the estrogenic ligand activities of environmental samples in response to ERalpha and ERbeta.

  6. Evaluation of LINE-1 mobility in neuroblastoma cells by in vitro retrotransposition reporter assay: FACS analysis can detect only the tip of the iceberg of the inserted L1 elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Re, Brunella; Marcantonio, Pamela; Capri, Miriam; Giorgi, Gianfranco

    2010-12-10

    Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (L1) are retroelements generally repressed in most differentiated somatic cells. Their activity has been observed in some undifferentiated and tumour cells and could be involved in tumour onset and progression. Growing evidences show that the L1 activation can occur in neuronal precursor cells during differentiation process. Neuroblastoma is a tumour originating from neuronal precursor cells, and, although the molecular basis of its progression is still poorly understood, the implication of L1 activation has not yet been investigated. In this study L1 mobility in neuroblastoma BE(2)C cells was assessed using the in vitro retrotransposition assay consisting in an episomal EGFP-tagged L1(RP) element, whose mobility can be evaluated by cytofluorimetric analysis (FACS) of EGFP expression. FACS results have shown a low retrotransposition activity. To detect L1(RP) integrated in transcriptionally repressed genomic sites, both a cell treatment with a stimulator of reporter gene promoter, and a quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis were performed. A retrotransposition activity ten and one thousand times that of FACS was found, respectively. These results point out that the real rate of L1 retrotransposition events in tumour cells might be considerably higher than that reported so far by evaluating only the reporter gene expression.

  7. CTL ELISPOT assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Elena; Popescu, Iulia; Gigante, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot (Elispot) is a quantitative method for measuring relevant parameters of T cell activation. The sensitivity of Elispot allows the detection of low-frequency antigen-specific T cells that secrete cytokines and effector molecules, such as granzyme B and perforin. Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) studies have taken advantage with this high-throughput technology by providing insights into quantity and immune kinetics. Accuracy, sensitivity, reproducibility, and robustness of Elispot resulted in a wide range of applications in research as well as in diagnostic field. Actually, CTL monitoring by Elispot is a gold standard for the evaluation of antigen-specific T cell immunity in clinical trials and vaccine candidates where the ability to detect rare antigen-specific T cells is of relevance for immune diagnostic. The most utilized Elispot assay is the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) test, a marker for CD8(+) CTL activation, but Elispot can also be used to distinguish different subsets of activated T cells by using other cytokines such as T-helper (Th) 1-type cells (characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-21, and TNF-α), Th2 (producing cytokines like IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13), and Th17 (IL-17) cells. The reliability of Elispot-generated data, by the evaluation of T cell frequency recognizing individual antigen/peptide, is the core of this method currently applied widely to investigate specific immune responses in cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. The Elispot assay is competing with other methods measuring single-cell cytokine production, e.g., intracellular cytokine by FACS or Miltenyi cytokine secretion assay. Other types of lymphocyte frequency and function assays include limiting dilution assay (LDA), cytotoxic T cell assay (CTL), and tetramer staining. Compared with respect to sensitivity the Elispot assay is outranking other methods to define frequency of antigen-specific lymphocytes. The method

  8. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is /sup 125/I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed.

  9. New oligosaccharyltransferase assay method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2007-11-01

    We developed a new in vitro assay for oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), which catalyzes the transfer of preassembled oligosaccharides on lipid carriers onto asparagine residues in polypeptide chains. The asparagine residues reside in the sequon, Asn-X-Thr/Ser, where X can be any amino acid residue except Pro. We demonstrate the potency of our assay using the OST from yeast. In our method, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to separate the glycopeptide products from the peptide substrates. The substrate peptide is fluorescently labeled and the formation of glycopeptides is analyzed by fluorescence gel imaging. Two in vitro OST assay methods are now widely used, but both the methods depend on previous knowledge of the oligosaccharide moiety: One method uses lectin binding as the separation mechanism and the other method uses biosynthetically or chemoenzymatically synthesized lipid-linked oligosaccharides as donors. N-linked protein glycosylation is found in all three domains of life, but little is known about the N-glycosylation in Archaea. Thus, our new assay, which does not require a priori knowledge of the oligosaccharides, will be useful in such cases. Indeed, we have detected the OST activity in the membrane fraction from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus.

  10. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  11. Instrument for assaying radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  12. Nano-immunosafety: issues in assay validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, Diana; Italiani, Paola [Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Oostingh, Gertie J; Duschl, Albert [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor F [Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Campus de la UAB - Facultat de Ciencies, Edifici CM7, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Nelissen, Inge, E-mail: diana.boraschi@itb.cnr.it [VITO NV, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-07-06

    Assessing the safety of engineered nanomaterials for human health must include a thorough evaluation of their effects on the immune system, which is responsible for defending the integrity of our body from damage and disease. An array of robust and representative assays should be set up and validated, which could be predictive of the effects of nanomaterials on immune responses. In a trans-European collaborative work, in vitro assays have been developed to this end. In vitro tests have been preferred for their suitability to standardisation and easier applicability. Adapting classical assays to testing the immunotoxicological effects of nanoparticulate materials has raised a series of issues that needed to be appropriately addressed in order to ensure reliability of results. Besides the exquisitely immunological problem of selecting representative endpoints predictive of the risk of developing disease, assay results turned out to be significantly biased by artefactual interference of the nanomaterials or contaminating agents with the assay protocol. Having addressed such problems, a series of robust and representative assays have been developed that describe the effects of engineered nanoparticles on professional and non-professional human defence cells. Two of such assays are described here, one based on primary human monocytes and the other employing human lung epithelial cells transfected with a reporter gene.

  13. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  14. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  15. Random assay in radioimmunoassay: Feasibility and application compared with batch assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Hwan Hee; Park, Sohyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineNational Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The batch assay has been conventionally used for radioimmunoassay (RIA) because of its technical robustness and practical convenience. However, it has limitations in terms of the relative lag of report time due to the necessity of multiple assays in a small number of samples compared with the random assay technique. In this study, we aimed to verify whether the random assay technique can be applied in RIA and is feasible in daily practice. The coefficients of variation (CVs) of eight standard curves within a single kit were calculated in a CA-125 immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the reference of the practically ideal CV of the CA-125 kit. Ten standard curves of 10 kits from 2 prospectively collected lots (pLot) and 85 standard curves of 85 kits from 3 retrospectively collected lots (Lot) were obtained. Additionally, the raw measurement data of both 170 control references and 1123 patients' sera were collected retrospectively between December 2015 and January 2016. A standard curve of the first kit of each lot was used as a master standard curve for a random assay. The CVs of inter-kits were analyzed in each lot, respectively. All raw measurements were normalized by decay and radioactivity. The CA-125 values from control samples and patients' sera were compared using the original batch assay and random assay. In standard curve analysis, the CVs of inter-kits in pLots and Lots were comparable to those within a single kit. The CVs from the random assay with normalization were similar to those from the batch assay in the control samples (CVs % of low/high concentration; Lot1 2.71/1.91, Lot2 2.35/1.83, Lot3 2.83/2.08 vs. Lot1 2.05/1.21, Lot2 1.66/1.48, Lot3 2.41/2.14). The ICCs between the batch assay and random assay using patients' sera were satisfactory (Lot1 1.00, Lot2 0.999, Lot3 1.00). The random assay technique could be successfully applied to the conventional CA-125 IRMA kits. The random assay showed strong agreement with the batch assay. The

  16. Identification and comparison of anti-inflammatory ingredients from different organs of Lotus nelumbo by UPLC/Q-TOF and PCA coupled with a NF-κB reporter gene assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengge Zhou

    Full Text Available Lotus nelumbo (LN (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. is an aquatic crop that is widely distributed throughout Asia and India, and various parts of this plant are edible and medicinal. It is noteworthy that different organs of this plant are used in traditional herbal medicine or folk recipes to cure different diseases and to relieve their corresponding symptoms. The compounds that are contained in each organ, which are named based on their chemical compositions, have led to their respective usages. In this work, a strategy was used to identify the difference ingredients and screen for Nuclear-factor-kappaB (NF-κB inhibitors with anti-inflammatory ability in LN. Seventeen main difference ingredients were compared and identified from 64 samples of 4 different organs by ultra-performance liquid chromatography that was coupled with quadrupole/time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS with principal component analysis (PCA. A luciferase reporter assay system combined with the UPLC/Q-TOF-MS information was applied to screen biologically active substances. Ten NF-κB inhibitors from Lotus plumule (LP extracts, most of which were isoquinoline alkaloids or flavone C-glycosides, were screened. Heat map results showed that eight of these compounds were abundant in the LP. In conclusion, the LP extracts were considered to have the best anti-inflammatory ability of the four LN organs, and the chemical material basis (CMB of this biological activity was successfully validated by multivariate statistical analysis and biological research methods.

  17. Growth cone collapse assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  18. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  19. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  20. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  1. Bacterial assays for recombinagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G R

    1992-12-01

    Two principal strategies have been used for studying recombinagenic effects of chemicals and radiation in bacteria: (1) measurement of homologous recombination involving defined alleles in a partially diploid strain, and (2) measurement of the formation and loss of genetic duplications in the bacterial chromosome. In the former category, most methods involve one allele in the bacterial chromosome and another in a plasmid, but it is also possible to detect recombination between two chromosomal alleles or between two extrachromosomal alleles. This review summarizes methods that use each of these approaches for detecting recombination and tabulates data on agents that have been found to be recombinagenic in bacteria. The assays are discussed with respect to their effectiveness in testing for recombinagens and their potential for elucidating mechanisms underlying recombinagenic effects.

  2. Assays of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and co-contaminated heavy metals in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying the recombinant guinea pig aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated β-glucuronidase reporter gene expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Sayuri; Ohta, Masaya; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic Arabidopsis plant XgD2V11-6 carrying the recombinant guinea pig (g) aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system was examined for assay of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and co-contaminated heavy metals. When the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were treated with PCB126 (toxic equivalency factor; TEF: 0.1) and PCB169 (TEF: 0.03), the GUS activity of the whole plants was increased significantly. After treatment with PCB80 (TEF: 0), the GUS activity was nearly the same level as that treated with 0.1% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as a vehicle control. After exposure to a 1:1 mixture of PCB126 and PCB169, the GUS activity was increased additively. However, after exposure to a mixture of PCB126 and PCB80, the GUS activity was lower than that of the treatment with PCB126 alone. Thus, PCB80 seemed to be an antagonist towards AhR. When the transgenic plants were treated with each of the heavy metals Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb together with PCB126, Cd and Pb increased the PCB126-induced GUS activity. On the other hand, Fe, Cu and Zn did not affect the PCB126-induced GUS activity. In the presence of the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-B (MEL-B) and the carrier protein bovine serum albumin (BSA), the PCB126-induced GUS activity was increased, but the Cd-assisted PCB126-induced GUS activity was not affected. Thus, MEL-B and BSA seemed to increase uptake and transport of PCB126, respectively.

  3. Sperm DNA assays and their relationship to sperm motility and morphology in bulls (Bos Taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Rosanna; Romano, Juan E; Varner, Dickson D; Di Palo, Rossella; Love, Charles C

    2015-08-01

    The relationship among sperm DNA assays in bulls with different sperm motility and morphology measures has not been reported. The objectives of the present study were to (1) describe Comet assay measures and examine their repeatability (inter- and intra-assay); (2) compare sperm DNA quality assays (i.e., Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay-SCSA; alkaline and neutral Comet assays and Sperm Bos Halomax assay-SBH) in two groups of bulls selected on either greater and lesser sperm motility and morphology (greater compared with lesser); (3) determine the relationship among DNA assays and sperm motility and morphology values. Inter-assay repeatability was greater for the neutral Comet assay as compared to the alkaline Comet assay. Intra-assay repeatability was greater than inter-assay repeatability for both Comet assays. Comet assay dimension measures and percentage tail DNA were the most repeatable for both Comet assays. Among sperm DNA quality assays, only SCSA measures and neutral Comet assay Ghosts (% Ghosts), head diameter and area, and comet area were different between greater and lesser sperm quality groups (P<0.05). The SCSA measures were inversely correlated with neutral Comet head measures (diameter, area, and intensity) and positively with percentage Ghosts (P<0.05). The % Ghosts and COMP-αt were correlated with some measures of sperm morphology and sperm motility. The neutral Comet assay was more appropriate for sperm evaluation than the alkaline Comet assay for distinguishing among groups with different sperm quality.

  4. Herbicide resistance screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Herbicide resistance screening is a method that can be used not only to determine presence of the enzyme, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase, encoded by either the Bar or the Pat gene in transgenic maize, but also to assess the inheritance ratio of those genes in a segregating population. Herbicide screening can also be used to study linkage of a transgene of interest that was cotransformed with the herbicide resistance marker gene. By combining the herbicide screen assay with a PCR-based screen of leaf tissue DNA for the presence of both the Bar or the Pat gene marker and a cotransformed transgene of interest from the same seedling tissue and maintaining that seedling identity, the researcher can identify linkage or the possible breakdown in linkage of the marker gene and the transgene of interest. Further, the occurrence of "DNA silencing" can be evaluated if an individual seedling that was susceptible to the applied herbicide nonetheless gave PCR data that indicated presence of the gene responsible for herbicide resistance. Similarly, "DNA silencing" of the gene of interest may be investigated if the seeds can be screened and scored for that phenotypic trait in a nondestructive manner prior to planting.

  5. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2014-01-01

    assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41......We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four......% tested positive on all four. Agreement was lower in women aged ≥ 30 years (30%, vs. 49% at samples (29%, vs. 38% in follow-up samples), and in women with concurrent normal cytology (22%, vs. 68% with abnormal cytology). Among primary screening samples from women aged 30...

  6. Engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates for novel assay capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Keith V.

    2004-06-01

    In the development of HTS as a central paradigm of drug discovery, fluorescent reporter molecules have generally been adopted as the favored signal transducer. Nevertheless, luminescence has maintained a prominent position among certain methodologies, most notably genetic reporters. Recently, there has been growing partiality for luminescent assays across a broader range of applications due to their sensitivity, extensive linearity, and robustness to library compounds and complex biological samples. This trend has been fostered by development several new assay designs for diverse targets such as kinases, cytochrome p450's, proteases, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. This review addresses recent progress made in the use of bioluminescent assays for drug discovery, highlighting new detection capabilities brought about by engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates. In reporter gene applications, modified luciferases have provided greatly improved expression efficiency in mammalian cells, improved responsiveness to changes of transcriptional rate, and increased the magnitude of the reporter response. Highly stabilized luciferase mutants have enabled new assays strategies for high-throughput screening based on detection of ATP and luciferin. Assays based on ATP support rapid analysis of cell metabolism and enzymatic processes coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Although luciferin is found natively only in luminous beetles, coupled assays have been designed using modified forms of luciferin requiring the action of second enzyme to yield luminescence. Due to the very low inherent background and protection of the photon-emitter afforded by the enzyme, bioluminescent assays often outperform the analogous fluorescent assays for analyses performed in multiwell plates.

  7. Practical assay issues with the PERT/PBRT assay: a highly sensitive reverse transcriptase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A; Dusing, S

    2006-01-01

    Product safety testing for retroviruses can be achieved by a panel of screening assays, including electron microscopy, viral gene specific PCRs, virus propagation, and detection of reverse transciptase activity. The application of PCR-based reverse transcriptase assays (PERT) that are approximately a million-fold more sensitive than conventional nucleotide incorporation assays in the testing of biologicals is described. Use of PERT assays can be applied to three areas: (i) screening for adventitious retrovirus contamination; (ii) detecting and quantifying endogenous viral particle load and (iii) monitoring levels of infectious retrovirus generation in cell lines that contain endogenous retroviruses.

  8. Effects of methylation status of CpG islands on results of luciferase reporter assay%细胞荧光素酶报告基因试验受CpG岛甲基化状态影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宝珍; 邓大君

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of methylation status of CpG islands of endogenous E-cadherin (CDH1) gene on the promoter activity of corresponding genes in reporter assays. Methods The methylation statuses of CpG island of CDHI in 8 different cell lines were detected by methylation-specific PCR. CDH1 protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Two sets of pGL3 reporter vectors with different genotypes/haplotypes of the CDH1 promoter were constructed [pGI3-A(-73)/-C(-73)pGL3-H1/-H4]and used to transfect these cell lines. The differences between these promoter reporter vectors were analyzed by t-test. Results (1) CDH1 CpG island was unmethylated in AGS, MCF7, MKN74, and PC-3 cell lines,expressed in MCF7, MKN74, and PC-3 ,but not in AGS. Expression of CDH1 was silenced by methylation in HeLa, BGC823, A549, and RKO cell lines. (2) In the four CDH1 -unmethylated MCFT, M KN74, PC-3, and AGS cell lines ,the promoter activities of pGI3-C(-73)(as 0. 78±0. 10,0. 17±0.01,0. 11±0. 01,1.19±0. 18)were significantly higher than those of pGL3-A(-73)(as 0. 30±0. 08,0. 07±0. 01,0. 07±0. 01,0. 39±0. 04) (t values are -6. 298, -12. 349, -8. 128, -7.388, and P<0. 01). However, in the four C DH1 -methylated HeLa, BGC823, A549, and RKO cell lines, the promoter activity of pGL3-C(-73)(as 0. 09±0. 02,0. 13±0. 02,0. 05±0. 01,0. 01±0. 00) was significantly lower than that of pGL3-A(-73)(as 0. 16±0. 01,0.25±0.01,0. 11±0.03,0.03±0.00) (t valued at 5.958,11. 189,3. 661,13. 866,and P<0.05). (3) In the unmethylated MKN74 and methylated RKO cell lines, the promoter activities of pGI3-H1/-H4 were obviously and contrarily different(as 1.57±0. 23/0. 94±0. 06 and 0. 38±0. 02/0. 50±0. 04 ,t values were 4. 577 and -4. 915 ,P values were 0. 010 and 0. 003). Conclusion The methylation status of CpG island of the target gene in the tested cell lines affects the promoter activity in Reporter Assay significantly. The most active one may be the most suppressive one.%目的 研究细

  9. From Antenna to Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Evan G.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Ligand-sensitized, luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable importance because their unique photophysical properties (microsecond to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts) make them well suited as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived emission of lanthanide(III) cations can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence to vastly enhance measurement sensitivity. One challenge in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive complexes with sufficient stability and aqueous solubility for practical applications. In this Account, we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technology. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms and using multi-chromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity; earlier examples utilized a single pendant chromophore (that is, a single “antenna”). Ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to ∼60% that are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM chromophore and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally, we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong

  10. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays.

  11. Production and assay of forskolin antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, L.T.; Ho, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Forskolin (Fo), a cardiovascular active diterpene of plant origin, has been widely used as a research tool in regulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase (AC). A linear relationship of Fo binding to plasma membrane with activation of AC has been reported. The present abstract describes the production and assay of Fo antibodies (AB). 7-0-Hemisuccinyl-7-deacetyl Fo, coupled to either human serum albumin or goat IgG, was injected into goats to elicit AB to Fo haptan. AB to Fo in antiserum or an isolated IgG fraction was tested by two assay methods, a radioimmunoassay using /sup 3/H-Fo as a tracer and a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using horse radish peroxidase-rabbit anti goat IgG as indicator. The titers for Fo antiserum were 4000-10,000. In the defined assay condition, approximately 20-25% of the added /sup 3/H-Fo was found to bind to AB. The bound radioactivity was displaced by Fo-HSA or Fo-goat IgG or free unlabelled Fo ranging from 0.5-50 pmol/tube, or 5-500 nM. The IC/sub 50/ was approximately 8-10 pmol/tube or 80-100 nM. The binding of HRP-rabbit anti goat IgG in the ELISA was inhibited by proper Fo conjugate. The development of methods for production and assay for Fo AB may be useful in the study of mechanism of activation of AC by Fo and Fo-like compound.

  12. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSAY FOR VITAMIN B

    OpenAIRE

    Bishnoi Kapil*, , ,; Kataria Mahesh; Singhal Vipin; Gupta Deepika

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrients added to foods are analyzed using various procedures depending on their nature and properties. The microbiological assays are better than chemical method because any suitable change in vitamin molecule which may not be detected by chemical method will be revealed by change in microbial activity. The microbiological assay of vitamins is based upon the comparison of the stimulation of growth of bacteria by measured concentration of vitamin with that produced by known concentratio...

  13. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  14. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein-particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  15. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei, E-mail: kwng@ntu.edu.sg; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein–particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  16. Barcoded microchips for biomolecular assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Jiashu; Zou, Yu; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-20

    Multiplexed assay of analytes is of great importance for clinical diagnostics and other analytical applications. Barcode-based bioassays with the ability to encode and decode may realize this goal in a straightforward and consistent manner. We present here a microfluidic barcoded chip containing several sets of microchannels with different widths, imitating the commonly used barcode. A single barcoded microchip can carry out tens of individual protein/nucleic acid assays (encode) and immediately yield all assay results by a portable barcode reader or a smartphone (decode). The applicability of a barcoded microchip is demonstrated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoassays for simultaneous detection of three targets (anti-gp41 antibody, anti-gp120 antibody, and anti-gp36 antibody) from six human serum samples. We can also determine seven pathogen-specific oligonucleotides by a single chip containing both positive and negative controls.

  17. Radioreceptor assay method for insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, K.F.; Wood, R.J. (Bureau of Drug Research, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Health Protection Branch)

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive practical radioreceptor assay method for pharmaceutical insulin products has been developed with partially purified rat liver plasma membranes and the optimal conditions under which the best overall assay performance is obtainable have been defined. Intra- and inter-assay variations of the method averaged 7.3 and 12.2% of the man, respectively, when expressed as the coefficient of variation. Potency estimates of an insulin product obtained with the proposed method correlated well with those determined by the mouse convulsion bioassay method. Liver membranes prepared according to the method could be stored for up to ten weeks at 4/sup 0/C and for 6 months or more at -18/sup 0/C without losing insulin-binding ability.

  18. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jansson, Peter [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  19. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): A Nondestructive Assay Technique for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Plutonium Assay Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2010-12-01

    This is an end-of-year report for a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The first-year goals for this project were modest and included: 1) developing a zero-order MCNP model for the NRTA technique, simulating data results presented in the literature, 2) completing a preliminary set of studies investigating important design and performance characteristics for the NRTA measurement technique, and 3) documentation of this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes a nine month period of work.

  20. Assays for laboratory confirmation of novel human coronavirus (hCoV-EMC) infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, V M; Müller, M A; Costabel, U; Timm, J; Binger, T; Meyer, B; Kreher, P; Lattwein, E; Eschbach-Bludau, M; Nitsche, A; Bleicker, T; Landt, O; Schweiger, B; Drexler, J F; Osterhaus, A D; Haagmans, B L; Dittmer, U; Bonin, F; Wolff, T; Drosten, C

    2012-12-06

    We present a rigorously validated and highly sensitive confirmatory real-time RT-PCR assay (1A assay) that can be used in combination with the previously reported upE assay. Two additional RT-PCR assays for sequencing are described, targeting the RdRp gene (RdRpSeq assay) and N gene (NSeq assay), where an insertion/deletion polymorphism might exist among different hCoV-EMC strains. Finally, a simplified and biologically safe protocol for detection of antibody response by immunofluorescence microscopy was developed using convalescent patient serum.

  1. Development of a five-hour radiometric serum antibacterial assay for gram-positive cocci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckwith, D.G.; Guidon, P.T. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    A preliminary report on a 5-hr radiometric serum antibacterial assay (ABA) for Gram-positive cocci is presented. The method agreed within +- one twofold dilution with static ABA endpoints in 24/26 (92%) of the assays and with cidal ABA end-points in 23/26 (88%) of the assays performed.

  2. The ECVAM international validation study on in vitro tests for acute skin irritation: report on the validity of the EPISKIN and EpiDerm assays and on the Skin Integrity Function Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Horst; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Liebsch, Manfred; Botham, Phil; Fentem, Julia H; Eskes, Chantra; Roguet, Roland; Cotovio, José; Cole, Thomas; Worth, Andrew; Heylings, Jon; Jones, Penny; Robles, Catherine; Kandárová, Helena; Gamer, Armin; Remmele, Marina; Curren, Rodger; Raabe, Hans; Cockshott, Amanda; Gerner, Ingrid; Zuang, Valérie

    2007-12-01

    ECVAM sponsored a formal validation study on three in vitro tests for skin irritation, of which two employ reconstituted human epidermis models (EPISKIN, EpiDerm), and one, the skin integrity function test (SIFT), employs ex vivo mouse skin. The goal of the study was to assess whether the in vitro tests would correctly predict in vivo classifications according to the EU classification scheme, "R38" and "no label" (i.e. non-irritant). 58 chemicals (25 irritants and 33 non-irritants) were tested, having been selected to give broad coverage of physico-chemical properties, and an adequate distribution of irritancy scores derived from in vivo rabbit skin irritation tests. In Phase 1, 20 of these chemicals (9 irritants and 11 non-irritants) were tested with coded identities by a single lead laboratory for each of the methods, to confirm the suitability of the protocol improvements introduced after a prevalidation phase. When cell viability (evaluated by the MTT reduction test) was used as the endpoint, the predictive ability of both EpiDerm and EPISKIN was considered sufficient to justify their progression to Phase 2, while the predictive ability of the SIFT was judged to be inadequate. Since both the reconstituted skin models provided false predictions around the in vivo classification border (a rabbit Draize test score of 2), the release of a cytokine, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), was also determined. In Phase 2, each human skin model was tested in three laboratories, with 58 chemicals. The main endpoint measured for both EpiDerm and EPISKIN was cell viability. In samples from chemicals which gave MTT assay results above the threshold of 50% viability, IL-1alpha release was also measured, to determine whether the additional endpoint would improve the predictive ability of the tests. For EPISKIN, the sensitivity was 75% and the specificity was 81% (MTT assay only); with the combination of the MTT and IL-1alpha assays, the sensitivity increased to 91%, with a

  3. Kinetic viability assays using DRAQ7 probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Akagi, Jin; Dobrucki, Jurek; Errington, Rachel; Smith, Paul J; Takeda, Kazuo; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-07-01

    Cell death within cell populations is a stochastic process where cell-to-cell variation in temporal progression through the various stages of cell death arises from asynchrony of subtle fluctuations in the signaling pathways. Most cell death assays rely on detection of the specific marker of cell demise at the end-point of cell culturing. Such an approach cannot account for the asynchrony and the stochastic nature of cell response to the death-inducing signal. There is a need therefore for rapid and high-throughput bioassays capable of continuously tracking viability of individual cells from the time of encountering a stress signal up to final stages of their demise. In this context, a new anthracycline derivative, DRAQ7, is gaining increasing interest as an easy-to-use marker capable of long-term monitoring of cell death in real-time. This novel probe neither penetrates the plasma membrane of living cells nor does it affect the cells' susceptibility to the death-inducing agents. However, when the membrane integrity is compromised, DRAQ7 enters cells undergoing demise and binds readily to nuclear DNA to report cell death. Here, we provide three sets of protocols for viability assays using DRAQ7 probe. The first protocol describes the innovative use of single-color DRAQ7 real-time assay to dynamically track cell viability. The second protocol outlines a simplified end-point DRAQ7 staining approach. The final protocol highlights the real-time and multiparametric apoptosis assay utilizing DRAQ7 dye concurrently with tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), the mitochondrial trans-membrane electrochemical potential (ΔΨm) sensing probe.

  4. The Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: The Stethoscope of Genetic Toxicology for the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: According to the 2007 National Research Council report Toxicology for the Twenty-First Century, modern methods (e.g., "omics," in vitro assays, high-throughput testing, computational methods) will lead to the emergence of a new approach to toxicology. The Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay has been central to the field of genetic toxicology since the 1970s. Here we document the paradigm shifts engendered by the assay, the validation and applications of the assay, an...

  5. Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gossypiboma (GP is a term used to express the mass resulting from forgotten cotton sponge in operations. Rarely, a transmural migration may occur into the gastrointestinal lumen without creating any defect by GP. Laparotomy or endoscopic removal may be required, by the way it can be taken out of the body itself by intestinal ways. In this study, we reported a case of mechanical intestinal obstruction causing GP. Case. The fifty-one-year-old female patient admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of mechanical intestinal obstruction and had a history of open cholecystectomy 20 years ago. There were the findings of intestinal obstruction in abdominal plain radiography and computerized tomography. The sponge that obstructed the lumen completely 40 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve was identified in the laparotomy with the diagnosis of brid ileus. The small intestine was closed over double-fold after removal of sponge. Transmural migration of abdominal-remained sponge was thought to be occurred without creating a defect after cholecystectomy. Postoperatively, the patient was discharged without having any problems at 4th day of hospitalization. Conclusion. Although it is a rare situation in routine clinical practice, GP should be considered as a differential diagnosis in the patients who had a diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction, and laparotomy was applied before. As GP may lead to situations which cause mortality, all precautions should be taken to prevent it.

  6. Heritability of nociception IV: neuropathic pain assays are genetically distinct across methods of peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erin E; Costigan, Michael; Herbert, Teri A; Lariviere, William R

    2014-05-01

    Prior genetic correlation analysis of 22 heritable behavioral measures of nociception and hypersensitivity in the mouse identified 5 genetically distinct pain types. In the present study, we reanalyzed that dataset and included the results of an additional 9 assays of nociception and hypersensitivity, with the following goals: to replicate the previously identified 5 pain types; to test whether any of the newly added pain assays represent novel genetically distinct pain types; and to test the level of genetic relatedness among 9 commonly used neuropathic pain assays. Multivariate analysis of pairwise correlations between assays shows that the newly added zymosan-induced heat hypersensitivity assay does not conform to the 2 previously identified groups of heat hypersensitivity assays and cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, the first organ-specific visceral pain model examined, is genetically distinct from other inflammatory assays. The 4 included mechanical hypersensitivity assays are genetically distinct and do not comprise a single pain type as previously reported. Among the 9 neuropathic pain assays including autotomy, chemotherapy, nerve ligation and spared nerve injury assays, at least 4 genetically distinct types of neuropathic sensory abnormalities were identified, corresponding to differences in nerve injury method. In addition, 2 itch assays and Comt genotype were compared to the expanded set of nociception and hypersensitivity assays. Comt genotype was strongly related only to spontaneous inflammatory nociception assays. These results indicate the priority for continued investigation of genetic mechanisms in several assays newly identified to represent genetically distinct pain types.

  7. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  8. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  9. Bioluminescence assay for cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described.

  10. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  11. Usefulness of human coagulation and fibrinolysis assays in domestic pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Anna-Marie Bloch; Olsen, Aage Kristian; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Pigs are often used as animal models in research on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. The usefulness of the assays applied within this field, and the knowledge of reference intervals are therefore essential and of utmost importance. In the study reported here, we investigated the applicability...... time, tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, factor VII, protein C, protein S, prothrombin fragment 1+2, antithrombin, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, fibrinogen, soluble fibrin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, plasmin inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and D-dimer. We found...... that 11 of 12 functional assays, but only 3 of 10 immunoassays, were applicable to porcine plasma, and we determined the normal range of these variables. We conclude that human functional assays are useful in porcine plasma, whereas only a few immunologic assays can be used. However, precautions must...

  12. Heated oligonucleotide ligation assay (HOLA): an affordable single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W C; Gorrochotegui-Escalante, N; Duteau, N M

    2006-03-01

    Most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection requires expensive equipment and reagents. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is an inexpensive SNP assay that detects ligation between a biotinylated "allele-specific detector" and a 3' fluorescein-labeled "reporter" oligonucleotide. No ligation occurs unless the 3' detector nucleotide is complementary to the SNP nucleotide. The original OLA used chemical denaturation and neutralization. Heated OLA (HOLA) instead uses a thermal stable ligase and cycles of denaturing and hybridization for ligation and SNP detection. The cost per genotype is approximately US$1.25 with two-allele SNPs or approximately US$1.75 with three-allele SNPs. We illustrate the development of HOLA for SNP detection in the Early Trypsin and Abundant Trypsin loci in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and at the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s.

  13. Comparative endpoint sensitivity of in vitro estrogen agonist assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, David A; Connors, Kristin A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Environmental and human health implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), particularly xenoestrogens, have received extensive study. In vitro assays are increasingly employed as diagnostic tools to comparatively evaluate chemicals, whole effluent toxicity and surface water quality, and to identify causative EDCs during toxicity identification evaluations. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated ToxCast under the Tox21 program to generate novel bioactivity data through high throughput screening. This information is useful for prioritizing chemicals requiring additional hazard information, including endocrine active chemicals. Though multiple in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess estrogen agonist activity, the relative endpoint sensitivity of these approaches and agreement of their conclusions remain unclear during environmental diagnostic applications. Probabilistic hazard assessment (PHA) approaches, including chemical toxicity distributions (CTD), are useful for understanding the relative sensitivity of endpoints associated with in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays by predicting the likelihood of chemicals eliciting undesirable outcomes at or above environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, PHAs were employed to examine the comparative endpoint sensitivity of 16 in vitro assays for estrogen agonist activity using a diverse group of compounds from the USEPA ToxCast dataset. Reporter gene assays were generally observed to possess greater endpoint sensitivity than other assay types, and the Tox21 ERa LUC BG1 Agonist assay was identified as the most sensitive in vitro endpoint for detecting an estrogenic response. When the sensitivity of this most sensitive ToxCast in vitro endpoint was compared to the human MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, a common in vitro model for biomedical and environmental monitoring applications, the ERa LUC BG1 assay was several orders of magnitude less

  14. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Ladeira; Susana Viegas; Manuel C. Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN) assay is a comprehensive system for measuring DNA damage; cytostasis and cytotoxicity-DNA damage events are scored specifically in once-divided binucleated cells. The endpoints possible to be measured are micronuclei (MN), a biomarker of chromosome breakage and/or whole chromosome loss, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB), a biomarker of DNA misrepair and/or telomere end-fusions, and nuclear buds (NBUD), a biomarker of elimination of amplified DNA and/...

  15. Comparison of the Freelite serum free light chain (SFLC) assay with serum and urine electrophoresis/immunofixation and the N Latex FLC assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, S C; McGill, K; Wienholt, L; Carr, A; Brown, D A; Kelleher, A D; Breit, S N; Sewell, W A

    2015-10-01

    Few reports have compared available serum free light chain (SFLC) assays. Here, a retrospective audit of the Freelite SFLC assay compared results to electrophoresis (EP)/immunofixation (IFX) and the N Latex FLC assay.A total of 244 samples collected over 3.5 months were studied using the Freelite and N Latex FLC nephelometry assays. Results were compared with serum and/or urine EP/IFX. The precision and linearity of the N Latex FLC assay was examined.Detectable paraprotein by serum or urine EP/IFX was present in 94% of samples with kappa and 100% with lambda FLC restriction. The correlation between the assays was higher for kappa (rho = 0.97) than lambda (rho = 0.89) especially when lambda results were above the upper limit of normal (rho = 0.62). Agreement in the categorical diagnosis as measured by the Cohen's kappa statistic was good (0.70). The N Latex FLC assay displayed good precision and linearity. In discordant samples the Freelite and N Latex FLC assays had equivalent agreement with IFX.Traditional methods of EP/IFX detected paraproteins in the majority of cases. Correlation between the Freelite and N Latex FLC assay is better for kappa than lambda FLC. The two assays are not entirely equivalent. Care should be taken by interpreting physicians and laboratories considering switching assays.

  16. Formalization, annotation and analysis of diverse drug and probe screening assay datasets using the BioAssay Ontology (BAO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma D Vempati

    Full Text Available Huge amounts of high-throughput screening (HTS data for probe and drug development projects are being generated in the pharmaceutical industry and more recently in the public sector. The resulting experimental datasets are increasingly being disseminated via publically accessible repositories. However, existing repositories lack sufficient metadata to describe the experiments and are often difficult to navigate by non-experts. The lack of standardized descriptions and semantics of biological assays and screening results hinder targeted data retrieval, integration, aggregation, and analyses across different HTS datasets, for example to infer mechanisms of action of small molecule perturbagens. To address these limitations, we created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO. BAO has been developed with a focus on data integration and analysis enabling the classification of assays and screening results by concepts that relate to format, assay design, technology, target, and endpoint. Previously, we reported on the higher-level design of BAO and on the semantic querying capabilities offered by the ontology-indexed triple store of HTS data. Here, we report on our detailed design, annotation pipeline, substantially enlarged annotation knowledgebase, and analysis results. We used BAO to annotate assays from the largest public HTS data repository, PubChem, and demonstrate its utility to categorize and analyze diverse HTS results from numerous experiments. BAO is publically available from the NCBO BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/1533. BAO provides controlled terminology and uniform scope to report probe and drug discovery screening assays and results. BAO leverages description logic to formalize the domain knowledge and facilitate the semantic integration with diverse other resources. As a consequence, BAO offers the potential to infer new knowledge from a corpus of assay results, for example molecular mechanisms of action of perturbagens.

  17. Formalization, annotation and analysis of diverse drug and probe screening assay datasets using the BioAssay Ontology (BAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vempati, Uma D; Przydzial, Magdalena J; Chung, Caty; Abeyruwan, Saminda; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Visser, Ubbo; Lemmon, Vance P; Schürer, Stephan C

    2012-01-01

    Huge amounts of high-throughput screening (HTS) data for probe and drug development projects are being generated in the pharmaceutical industry and more recently in the public sector. The resulting experimental datasets are increasingly being disseminated via publically accessible repositories. However, existing repositories lack sufficient metadata to describe the experiments and are often difficult to navigate by non-experts. The lack of standardized descriptions and semantics of biological assays and screening results hinder targeted data retrieval, integration, aggregation, and analyses across different HTS datasets, for example to infer mechanisms of action of small molecule perturbagens. To address these limitations, we created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO). BAO has been developed with a focus on data integration and analysis enabling the classification of assays and screening results by concepts that relate to format, assay design, technology, target, and endpoint. Previously, we reported on the higher-level design of BAO and on the semantic querying capabilities offered by the ontology-indexed triple store of HTS data. Here, we report on our detailed design, annotation pipeline, substantially enlarged annotation knowledgebase, and analysis results. We used BAO to annotate assays from the largest public HTS data repository, PubChem, and demonstrate its utility to categorize and analyze diverse HTS results from numerous experiments. BAO is publically available from the NCBO BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/1533. BAO provides controlled terminology and uniform scope to report probe and drug discovery screening assays and results. BAO leverages description logic to formalize the domain knowledge and facilitate the semantic integration with diverse other resources. As a consequence, BAO offers the potential to infer new knowledge from a corpus of assay results, for example molecular mechanisms of action of perturbagens.

  18. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification. A heparin assay is a device used to determine the level of the anticoagulant heparin in the...

  19. A colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libreros-Minotta, C A; Tipton, P A

    1995-11-01

    A simple and rapid colorimetric assay for cytokinin oxidase is described. The assay is based on the formation of a Schiff base between the enzymatic reaction product 3-methyl-2-butenal and p-aminophenol. The assay is effective in the submicromolar concentration range and can be used in crude plant extracts as well as in more highly purified preparations.

  20. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Saiz, Albert;

    2016-01-01

    ) assays in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). METHODS: Coded samples from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMOSD (101) and controls (92) were tested at 15 European diagnostic centres using 21 assays including live (n=3) or fixed cell-based assays (n=10), flow cytometry (n=4...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay. (a) Identification. An endotoxin assay is a device that uses serological techniques in whole blood. The device...

  2. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida;

    2014-01-01

    of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical...

  3. Detection of Leishmania infantum in naturally infected Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) and Canis familiaris in Misiones, Argentina: the first report of a PCR-RFLP and sequencing-based confirmation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acardi, Soraya Alejandra; Liotta, Domingo Javier; Santini, María Soledad; Romagosa, Carlo Mariano; Salomón, Oscar Daniel

    2010-09-01

    In this study, a genotypification of Leishmania was performed using polimerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing techniques to identify species of Leishmania parasites in phlebotomine sand flies and dogs naturally infected. Between January-February of 2009, CDC light traps were used to collect insect samples from 13 capture sites in the municipality of Posadas, which is located in the province of Misiones of Argentina. Sand flies identified as Lutzomyia longipalpis were grouped into 28 separate pools for molecular biological analysis. Canine samples were taken from lymph node aspirates of two symptomatic stray animals that had been positively diagnosed with canine visceral leishmaniasis. One vector pool of 10 sand flies (1 out of the 28 pools tested) and both of the canine samples tested positively for Leishmania infantum by PCR and RFLP analysis. PCR products were confirmed by sequencing and showed a maximum identity with L. infantum. Given that infection was detected in one out of the 28 pools and that at least one infected insect was infected, it was possible to infer an infection rate at least of 0.47% for Lu. longipalpis among the analyzed samples. These results contribute to incriminate Lu. longipalpis as the vector of L. infantum in the municipality of Posadas, where cases of the disease in humans and dogs have been reported since 2005.

  4. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this...longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this assay may be used as a rapid...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour

  5. Steroid assays in paediatric endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honour, John W

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation.

  6. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  7. Validation of a Flow Cytometry Based Binding Assay for Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing EGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedeño-Arias, Mercedes; Sánchez-Ramírez, Javier; Blanco-Santana, Rancés; Rengifo-Calzado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    An ideal test used to characterize a product must be appropriate for the measurement of product quality, manufacturing consistency, product stability, and comparability studies. Flow cytometry has been successfully applied to the examination of antibodies and receptors on membrane surfaces; however, to date, the analytical validation of cytometry based assays is limited. Here we report on the validation of a flow cytometry-based assay used in the evaluation of nimotuzumab binding to cells over-expressing EGFR on cell surface. The assay was validated by examining, assay robustness, specificity, repeatability and intermediate precision. The assay was highly specific, robust for all studied factors except for cell fixation with 1% paraformaldehyde and met criteria for precision with RSD < 2%. In addition the assay has stability-indicating properties evidenced by the ability to detect changes in mAb degraded samples. Most importantly, the assay demonstrated to be useful for its intended use. PMID:21886904

  8. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  9. Kynetic resazurin assay (KRA) for bacterial quantification of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Yaxal; Mandel, Arkady; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Fast detection of bacterial concentrations is important for the food industry and for healthcare. Early detection of infections and appropriate treatment is essential since, the delay of treatments for bacterial infections tends to be associated with higher mortality rates. In the food industry and in healthcare, standard procedures require the count of colony-forming units in order to quantify bacterial concentrations, however, this method is time consuming and reports require three days to be completed. An alternative is metabolic-colorimetric assays which provide time efficient in vitro bacterial concentrations. A colorimetric assay based on Resazurin was developed as a time kinetic assay (KRA) suitable for bacterial concentration measurements. An optimization was performed by finding excitation and emission wavelengths for fluorescent acquisition. A comparison of two non-related bacteria, foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, was performed in 96 well plates. A metabolic and clonogenic dependence was established for fluorescent kinetic signals.

  10. Evaluation of a visualization assay for blood on forensic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Lepez, Trees; Van Hoofstat, David; Deforce, Dieter

    2015-05-01

    In forensics, bloodstains on dark fabrics might be invisible for the naked eye. Although several visualization, presumptive, and confirmatory blood tests have been developed, all have one or more disadvantages, especially on DNA analysis. We report here the use of a visualization assay that can visually detect blood drops up to 1/20 dilution. In this assay, the fabric is placed between two wet filter papers and covered by glass surfaces on both sides. Pressure is applied on the glass surfaces in which bloodstains transfer onto the filter papers through capillary forces. Detected stains can be tested with other more sensitive presumptive blood tests performed on the filter paper. Even more, DNA analysis can be performed on the transferred bloodstains. The presented visualization assay is easy to perform, extremely cheap, requires little hands on time, and does not affect bloodstain pattern analysis.

  11. Plasmodium Genus Assay Transition to the Joint Biological Agent Identification and Diagnostic System (JBAIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    AFRIMS), Bangkok, Thailand Final Report AFMSA O&M FY09 Project (FWH20090036H): Plasmodium Genus Assay Transition to the Joint Biological Agent...evaluation data to support AFPMB approval of the RAPID- based Plasmodium genus assay for use in vector/vector-borne disease surveillance on the RAPID...Objective 1 Results: Plasmodium genus RAPID/JBAIDS assay development activities conducted during the FY09 study did not resolve cross-reactivity

  12. Improved internal control for molecular diagnosis assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayagamoorthy, T; Maryanski, Danielle; Vinayagamoorthy, Dilanthi; Hay, Katie S L; Yo, Jacob; Carter, Mark; Wiegel, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The two principal determining steps in molecular diagnosis are the amplification and the identification steps. Accuracy of DNA amplification is primarily determined by the annealing sequence of the PCR primer to the analyte DNA. Accuracy for identification is determined either by the annealing region of a labelled probe for the real time PCR analysis, or the annealing of a sequencing primer for DNA sequencing analysis, that binds to the respective analyte (amplicon). Presently, housekeeping genes (Beta globin, GAPDH) are used in molecular diagnosis to verify that the PCR conditions are optimum, and are thus known as amplification controls [1-4]. Although these genes have been useful as amplification controls, they lack the true definition of an internal control because the primers and annealing conditions are not identical to the analyte being assayed. This may result in a false negative report [5]. The IC-Code platform technology described here provides a true internal control where the internal control and analyte share identical PCR primers annealing sequences for the amplification step and identical sequencing primer annealing sequence for the identification step. •The analyte and internal control have the same PCR and sequencing annealing sequences.•This method assures for little or no false negatives and false positives due to the method's design of using identical annealing conditions for the internal control and analyte, and by using DNA sequencing analysis for the identification step of the analyte, respectively.•This method also allows for a set lower limit of detection to be used by varying the amount of internal control used in the assay.

  13. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

  14. Development of a colorimetric assay for rapid quantitative measurement of clavulanic acid in microbial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xida; Xiang, Sihai; Li, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Yang, Keqian

    2012-02-01

    We developed a colorimetric assay to quantify clavulanic acid (CA) in culture broth of Streptomyces clavuligerus, to facilitate screening of a large number of S. clavuligerus mutants. The assay is based on a β-lactamase-catalyzed reaction, in which the yellow substrate nitrocefin (λ (max)=390 nm) is converted to a red product (λ (max)=486 nm). Since CA can irreversibly inhibit β-lactamase activity, the level of CA in a sample can be measured as a function of the A (390)/A (486) ratio in the assay mixture. The sensitivity and detection window of the assay were determined to be 50 μg L(-1) and 50 μg L(-1) to 10 mg L(-1), respectively. The reliability of the assay was confirmed by comparing assay results with those obtained by HPLC. The assay was used to screen a pool of 65 S. clavuligerus mutants and was reliable for identifying CA over-producing mutants. Therefore, the assay saves time and labor in large-scale mutant screening and evaluation tasks. The detection window and the reliability of this assay are markedly better than those of previously reported CA assays. This assay method is suitable for high throughput screening of microbial samples and allows direct visual observation of CA levels on agar plates.

  15. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Osnat; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2016-09-24

    Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval.

  16. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osnat Rosen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV < 13%. Most importantly, the antitoxin potency measured by the in vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p < 0.0001. Thus, this new in vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval.

  17. Quantitative CrAssphage PCR Assays for Human Fecal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental waters are monitored for fecal pollution to protect public health and water resources. Traditionally, general fecal indicator bacteria are used; however, they cannot distinguish human fecal waste from pollution from other animals. Recently, a novel bacteriophage, crAssphage, was discovered by metagenomic data mining and reported to be abundant in and closely associated with human fecal waste. To confirm bioinformatic predictions, 384 primer sets were designed along the length of the crAssphage genome. Based upon initial screening, two novel crAssphage qPCR assays (CPQ_056 and CPQ_064) were designed and evaluated in reference fecal samples and water matrices. The assays exhibited high specificities (98.6%) when tested against a large animal fecal reference library and were highly abundant in raw sewage and sewage impacted water samples. In addition, CPQ_056 and CPQ_064 assay performance was compared to HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 methods in paired experiments. Findings confirm viral crAssphage qPCR assays perform at a similar level to well established bacterial human-associated fecal source identification technologies. These new viral based assays could become important water quality management and research tools. To inform the public.

  18. Non-Destructive Assay of Curium Contaminated Transuranic Waste Drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, L.A.

    1998-11-01

    At the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a series of non-destructive assays were performed on five transuranic waste (TRU) drums containing non-plutonium scrap metal that was potentially contaminated with weapons grade plutonium and trace quantities of curium. Typically, waste drums containing metal matrices are assayed for plutonium content using passive neutron coincidence counting techniques. The presence of trace quantities of Cm-244 prevents this type of analysis because of the strong coincidence signal created by spontaneous fission of Cm-244. To discriminate between the plutonium and curium materials present, an active neutron measurement technique was used. A Cf shuffler designed for measurement of uranium bearing materials was calibrated for plutonium in the active mode. The waste drums were then assayed for plutonium content in the shuffler using the active-mode calibration. The curium contamination levels were estimated from the difference between the active-mode measurement in the shuffler and a passive assay in a neutron coincidence counter. Far field gamma-ray measurements were made to identify additional radioactive contaminants and to corroborate the plutonium measurement results obtained from the active-mode assay. This report describes in detail the measurement process used for characterization of these waste drums. The measurement results and the estimated uncertainty will be presented.

  19. A highly scalable peptide-based assay system for proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A Kozlov

    Full Text Available We report a scalable and cost-effective technology for generating and screening high-complexity customizable peptide sets. The peptides are made as peptide-cDNA fusions by in vitro transcription/translation from pools of DNA templates generated by microarray-based synthesis. This approach enables large custom sets of peptides to be designed in silico, manufactured cost-effectively in parallel, and assayed efficiently in a multiplexed fashion. The utility of our peptide-cDNA fusion pools was demonstrated in two activity-based assays designed to discover protease and kinase substrates. In the protease assay, cleaved peptide substrates were separated from uncleaved and identified by digital sequencing of their cognate cDNAs. We screened the 3,011 amino acid HCV proteome for susceptibility to cleavage by the HCV NS3/4A protease and identified all 3 known trans cleavage sites with high specificity. In the kinase assay, peptide substrates phosphorylated by tyrosine kinases were captured and identified by sequencing of their cDNAs. We screened a pool of 3,243 peptides against Abl kinase and showed that phosphorylation events detected were specific and consistent with the known substrate preferences of Abl kinase. Our approach is scalable and adaptable to other protein-based assays.

  20. Evaluation of a radioreceptor assay for TSH receptor autoantibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rootwelt, K.

    1988-02-01

    A commercial radioreceptor assay for TSH receptor autoantibodies (TRAb), based on solubilized porcine receptor and purified radio-iodinated bovine TSH, was tested in 264 subjects with a variety of thyroid disorders. The sensitivity of the assay for the detection of hyperthyroid Graves' disease was 91%. The assay specificity for Graves' disease was 95%. With the exception of one patient with Hashimoto's disease and one patient with de Quervain's subacute thyroiditis no subjects other than Graves' patients had detectable TRAb. Thus purely blocking TSII receptor autoantibodies were not detected with the assay. One female with thyroxine-treated idiopathic primary hypothyroidism who had given birth to two children with transiently elevated TSH, was found to have a circulating TSH-binding substance that resulted in an abnormally negative TRAb value, and highly discrepant results when TSH was measured with a double antibody TSH radioimmunoassay and an immunoradiometric assay. The TSH-binding substance was precipitated like a protein, but was not IgG. Similar findings have not previously been reported.

  1. A Rapid Zika Diagnostic Assay to Measure Neutralizing Antibodies in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential association of microcephaly and other congenital abnormalities with Zika virus (ZIKV infection during pregnancy underlines the critical need for a rapid and accurate diagnosis. Due to the short duration of ZIKV viremia in infected patients, a serologic assay that detects antibody responses to viral infection plays an essential role in diagnosing patient specimens. The current serologic diagnosis of ZIKV infection relies heavily on the labor-intensive Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT that requires more than one-week turnaround time and represents a major bottleneck for patient diagnosis. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a high-throughput assay for ZIKV and dengue virus (DENV diagnosis that can attain the “gold standard” of the current PRNT assay. The new assay is homogeneous and utilizes luciferase viruses to quantify the neutralizing antibody titers in a 96-well format. Using 91 human specimens, we showed that the reporter diagnostic assay has a higher dynamic range and maintains the relative specificity of the traditional PRNT assay. Besides the improvement of assay throughput, the reporter virus technology has also shortened the turnaround time to less than two days. Collectively, our results suggest that, along with the viral RT-PCR assay, the reporter virus-based serologic assay could be potentially used as the first-line test for clinical diagnosis of ZIKV infection as well as for vaccine clinical trials.

  2. Development and application of assays for serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gow, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis, two assays for serotonin were developed, validated, and used to investigate the relationship between platelet aggregation, serotonin levels and sodium status and serotonin levels and platelet function in patients with cardiovascular disease. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) using an (/sup 125/I)-labelled tracer was developed and validated for the measurement of serotonin in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and rat serum. Antisera were raised against N-succinamylserotonin conjugated to bovine albumin and, to improve assay sensitivity, the analyte was made chemically similar to the immunogen by conversion to N-acetylserotonin prior to assay, using the specific amino reagent N-acetoxysuccinimide. An assay for serotonin using high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) was developed, and used to validate the RIA. The RIA can be used to assay up to 100 samples/day compared with 10-20/day by the HPLC-ECD assay.

  3. Quantitative detection of RT activity by PERT assay: feasibility and limits to a standardized screening assay for human vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M; Morgeaux, S; Fuchs, F

    2000-06-01

    The detection of adventitious retroviruses has always been critical for assessing the safety concerns associated with viral vaccines. Assays for the enzymatic activity of reverse transcriptase (RT) are used as general methods for the detection of both known and unknown retroviruses. Several studies using newly-developed ultrasensitive PCR-based RT assays reported RT activity in viral vaccines grown in chicken cells. Here, we have assessed the performances of such a PCR-based RT assay--PERT assay--for the quantitative detection of RT activity in vaccines. Sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the method were studied on purified RT and viral vaccines treated to release RT from potentially contaminant retroviruses. The level of RT activity detected in chicken cell-derived vaccines was higher for live attenuated vaccines compared to inactivated ones. Contrary to other studies, RT activity was found in some mammalian cell-derived vaccines. AZT-TP sensitivity of RT activities detected in these vaccines and discrimination between retroviral and RT-like activities was further investigated. Feasibility and limits of PERT assay as a broad-spectrum retroviruses detection method in vaccines are discussed.

  4. Optical assay technology for safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelson, M.C.; Lipert, R.J.; Murray, G.M.; Schuler, R.A.; Vera, J.; Wang, Z.M.; Weeks, S.J.

    1990-10-01

    Research conducted in the Ames Laboratory Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program during the period July 1, 1990 to September 30, 1990 is reviewed; included are reprints and preprints of papers written during this quarter. The first demonstration of isotopic selectivity in Inductively Coupled Plasma -- Laser Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy (ICP-LEAFS) is reported and the application of ICP-LEAFS to U isotopic analysis is discussed. Current work in applying optical spectroscopy to the analytical determination of gas phase metal atoms is reviewed. Program administration topics are included in a separately bound Management Supplement to this report.

  5. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Improved microbial screning assay for the detection of quinolone residues in poultry and eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikkemaat, M.G.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Elferink, J.W.A.; Cocq, A.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Egmond, van H.J.

    2007-01-01

    An improved microbiological screening assay is reported for the detection of quinolone residues in poultry muscle and eggs. The method was validated using fortified tissue samples and is the first microbial assay to effectively detect enrofloxacin, difloxacin, danofloxacin, as well as flumequine and

  7. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  8. Inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage using a standard comet assay protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Ersson, Clara; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial inter-laboratory variations in the levels of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adherence to a standard comet assay protocol would reduce inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA damage. Fourteen laboratories ...

  9. a positive control plasmid for reporter gene assay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... complexity and diversity. The pGL3-Basic vector has been prevalently used as a tool for analyzing cis- ... influence our approach to pharmaceutical biotechnology. (Naylor, 1999). ... to function as a positive control. MATERIALS ...

  10. Using transgenic reporter assays to functionally characterize enhancers in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvon, Evgeny Z

    2015-09-01

    Enhancers or cis-regulatory modules play an instructive role in regulating gene expression during animal development and in response to the environment. Despite their importance, we only have an incomplete map of enhancers in the genome and our understanding of the mechanisms governing their function is still limited. Recent advances in genomics provided powerful tools to generate genome-wide maps of potential enhancers. However, most of these methods are based on indirect measures of enhancer activity and have to be followed by functional testing. Animal transgenesis has been a valuable method to functionally test and characterize enhancers in vivo. In this review I discuss how different transgenic strategies are utilized to characterize enhancers in model organisms focusing on studies in Drosophila and mouse. I will further discuss recent large-scale transgenic efforts to systematically identify and catalog enhancers as well as highlight the challenges and future directions in the field.

  11. Outliers affecting cardiac troponin I measurement: comparison of a new high sensitivity assay with a contemporary assay on the Abbott ARCHITECT analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Nicola; Blennerhassett, John; Lambert, Ramon; Sheehan, Paul; Vasikaran, Samuel D

    2014-07-01

    False-positive cardiac troponin (Tn) results caused by outliers have been reported on various analytical platforms. We have compared the precision profile and outlier rate of the Abbott Diagnostics contemporary troponin I (TnI) assay with their high sensitivity (hs) TnI assay. Three studies were conducted over a 10-month period using routine patients' samples. TnI was measured in duplicate using the contemporary TnI assay in Study 1 and Study 2 (n = 7011 and 7089) and the hs-TnI assay in Study 3 (n = 1522). Critical outliers were defined as duplicate results whose absolute difference exceeded a critical difference (CD = z x √2 x SDAnalytical) at a probability level of 0.0005, with one of the results on the opposite side of the decision limit to its partner. The TnI concentration at 10% imprecision (coefficient of variation) for the contemporary TnI assay was 0.034 µg/L (Study 1) and 0.042 µg/L (Study 2), and 0.006 µg/L (6 ng/L) for the hs-TnI assay. The critical outlier rates for the contemporary TnI assay were 0.51% (Study 1) and 0.37% (Study 2) using a cut-off of 0.04 µg/L, and 0% for the hs-TnI assay using gender-specific cut-offs. The significant number of critical outliers detected using the contemporary TnI assay may pose a risk for misclassification of patients. By contrast, no critical outliers were detected using the hs-TnI assay. However, the total outlier rates for both assays were significantly higher than the expected variability of either assay. The cause of these outliers remains unclear. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Direct Spectrophotometric Assay for Benzaldehyde Lyase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessy Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzaldehyde lyase from Pseudomonas fluorescens Biovar I. (BAL, EC 4.1.2.38 is a versatile catalyst for the organic synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy ketones. To allow fast assessment of enzyme activity, a direct spectrophotometric assay is desirable. Here, a new robust and easy-to-handle assay based on UV absorption is presented. The assay developed is based on the ligation of the α-hydroxy ketone (R-2,2′-furoin from 2-furaldehyde. A robust assay with direct monitoring of the product is facilitated with a convenient concentration working range minimising experimental associated with low concentrations.

  13. Non-isotopic dual parameter competition assay suitable for high-throughput screening of histone deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Daniel; Hildmann, Christian; Haus, Patricia; Galetovic, Antonia; Schober, Andreas; Schwienhorst, Andreas; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2009-07-01

    Histone deacetylases reside among the most important and novel target classes in oncology. Selective lead structures are intensively developed to improve efficacy and reduce adverse effects. The common assays used so far to identify new lead structures suffer from many false positive hits due to auto-fluorescence of compounds or triggering undesired signal transduction pathways. These drawbacks are eliminated by the dual parameter competition assay reported in this study. The assay involves a new fluorescent inhibitor probe that shows an increase in both, fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence lifetime upon binding to the enzyme. The assay is well suited for high-throughput screening.

  14. Assay-dependent variability of serum insulin concentrations: a comparison of eight assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Maryam; Arbab, Parvaneh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-04-01

    Although insulin measurement is essential for both clinical and research purposes, there is currently no reference method for insulin assays. The aim of this study was to compare results of serum insulin determined by a number of commercially available assays. We compared eight insulin assays by analyzing 165 serum samples. Assays included two chemiluminescence (Roche and DiaSorin), four ELISA (Tosoh, Mercodia, Monobind, and Diametra), and two IRMA (Izotop and BioSource) methods. Each assay was compared with the mean of all assay methods and Bland-Altman difference plots were used to measure agreement between each assay and overall mean. Least squared perpendicular distance regression analysis (Deming's method) was used to calculate slope and intercept for bias and also for each assay vs. mean of eight assays. Findings showed that the lowest and highest median insulin concentrations varied by a factor of 1.8. Maximum and minimum correlations with mean of assays were observed for Roche (0.992) and BioSource (0.844), respectively. Significant bias was observed in six assays. In pairwise comparisons of different assays, the highest and least mean differences were 7.78 μU/mL and -0.14 μU/mL, respectively. In conclusion, serum insulin measurement with different assays showed a maximum of 1.8-fold difference, a point that should be taken into consideration in the interpretation of circulating insulin levels in both clinical and research fields.

  15. Development of homogeneous luminescence assays for histone demethylase catalysis and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Akane; Tumber, Anthony; Rose, Nathan R; King, Oliver N F; Daniel, Michelle; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D; Schofield, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Covalent modifications to histones play important roles in chromatin dynamics and the regulation of gene expression. The JumonjiC (JmjC)-containing histone demethylases (HDMs) catalyze the demethylation of methylated lysine residues on histone tails. Here we report the development of homogeneous luminescence-based assay methods for measuring the catalytic activity and the binding affinities of peptides to HDMs. The assays use amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (ALPHA) technology, are sensitive and robust, and can be used for small molecule inhibitor screening of HDMs. We have profiled known inhibitors of JMJD2E and demonstrate a correlation between the inhibitor potencies determined by the ALPHA and other types of assays. Although this study focuses on the JMJD2E isoform, the catalytic turnover and binding assays described here can be used in studies on other HDMs. The assays should be useful for the development of small molecule inhibitors selective for HDM isoforms.

  16. Keratinocyte-based cell assays: their potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Tina; Ozir, Mateja; Törmä, Hans; Komel, Radovan; Liovic, Mirjana

    2012-11-01

    As an in vitro model system, patient-derived epidermolysis bullosa simplex keratinocytes have had an immense impact on what we know today about keratin filament function and their role in disease development. In the absence of gene therapy, screening compound libraries for new or better drugs is another approach to improve existing treatments for genodermatoses. However in this study, we report of the potential pitfalls when using this type of cell lines as a "reporter" system. When cell lines with different genetic backgrounds are being used in cell-based assays, the greatest obstacle is to determine the most appropriate culture conditions (i.e., the composition of medium, number of cells plated and number of days in culture). We demonstrate how culture conditions can greatly interfere with the cellular response in cell-based assays (cell proliferation, metabolic activity and migration), potentially also giving rise to misleading data.

  17. Mouse lung adhesion assay for Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.A.; Freer, J.H. (Department of Microbiology, Alexander Stone Building, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland)

    1982-03-01

    The ability of Bordetella pertussis to adhere to cell surfaces has been demonstrated by adhesion to tissue culture cells and adhesion to chicken, hamster or rabbit trachea in organ culture. In this report a mouse lung assay for adhesion is described and the results obtained using two virulent strains of B. pertussis and their avirulent counterparts. These were a C modulation of one of the original virulent strains and a phase IV variant of the other virulent strain. Organisms were radiolabelled by adding 1 ..mu..Ci (37 K Bq) of (/sup 14/C)glutamic acid per 10 ml of culture medium before inoculation and incubation for 5 days. The lungs were washed by perfusion in situ with at least two volumes (1 ml) of sterile 1% (w/v) casamino acids. The percentage of the inoculated organisms retained in the lungs was determined, after removal of the lungs, by one of the following two methods: viable count or radioactive count. Results for both methods were expressed as the percentage of the inoculum retained in the lungs plus or minus one standard deviation.

  18. METHODOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEZEEUW, RA

    1994-01-01

    Receptor assays occupy a particular position in the methods used in bioanalysis, as they do not exploit the physico-chemical properties of the analyte. These assays make use of the property of the analyte to bind to the specific binding site (receptor) and to competitively replace a labelled ligand

  19. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  20. Radioreceptor assay: theory and applications to pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G. (U.E.R. de Medecine, Sante et Biologie Humaine, 93 - Bobigny (France)); Simon, P. (Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France))

    The aim of the first part of this work is to present the theory of the radioreceptor assay and to compare it to the other techniques of radioanalysis (radioimmunoassay, competitive protein binding assays). The technology of the radioreceptor assay is then presented and its components (preparation of the receptors, radioligand, incubation medium) are described. The analytical characteristics of the radioreceptor assay (specificity, sensitivity, reproductibility, accuracy) and the pharmacological significance of the results are discussed. The second part is devoted to the description of the radioreceptor assays of some pharmacological classes (neuroleptics, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, ..beta..-blockers, anticholinergic drugs) and to their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. In conclusion, by their nature, radioreceptor assays are highly sensitive, reliable, precise, accurate and simple to perform. Their chief disadvantage relates to specificity, since any substance having an appreciable affinity to the receptor site will displace the specifically bound radioligand. Paradoxically in some cases, this lack of specificity may be advantageous in that it allows for the detection of not only the apparent compound but of active metabolites and endogenous receptor agonists as well and in that radioreceptors assays can be devised for a whole pharmacological class and not only for one drug as it is the case for classical physico-chemical techniques. For all these reasons future of radioreceptor assay in pharmacology appears promising.

  1. Acellular comet assay: a tool for assessing variables influencing the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Erin K; McNamee, James P; Prud'homme Lalonde, Louise; Jones, Trevor; Wilkinson, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an acellular modification to the alkaline comet assay to further evaluate key variables within the assay that may influence the outcome of genotoxicity studies is described. This acellular comet assay can detect differences of 0.2 Gy of (60)Co gamma-ray radiation between 0 and 1 Gy and differences of 1 Gy between 0 and 8 Gy; thus, this assay is applicable for a wide range of DNA damage levels. It is also shown that DNA damage from different radiation energies was not significantly different from (60)Co gamma-ray. This assay displayed a statistical increase in DNA damage due to uncontrolled exposure to natural light; however, the slope of the dose-response curve for light-exposed samples was similar to that for samples protected from light. A comparison of the alkaline comet assay with the acellular comet assay allowed for the intrinsic repair capacity of the alkaline comet assay to be quantified.

  2. A novel quantitative real-time PCR assay using self-reporting duplex mutation primers for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis%新型二聚体突变荧光引物定量检测沙眼衣原体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏乾峰; 覃西; 钱士匀; 涂植光

    2011-01-01

    目的 以二聚体突变荧光引物技术为基础建立对沙眼衣原体进行定量检测的新方法.方法 以沙眼衣原体主要外膜蛋白(MOMP)基因构建重组质粒作为DNA标准品,设计二聚体突变荧光引物,优化定量PCR体系并进行性能评价;同时对148例临床生殖道标本进行检测.结果 建立的二聚体突变荧光引物的定量PCR方法,其线性范围为101~109copies/μL,灵敏度为10 copies/μL;低浓度样品的批内变异系数(CV)为4.71%,批间CV为5.57%;高浓度样品的批内CV为3.20%,批间CV为3.66%;常见生殖道病原菌检测结果均为阴性;对确诊的148例患者标本检测准确率为90.32%.结论 建立的沙眼衣原体定量PCR检测方法具有快速、准确、结果可靠等特点,可为沙眼衣原体感染的诊断、治疗监测和流行病学调查提供较好的技术支持.%Objective To establish a novel real-time fluorescence PCR method to detect Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) using self-reporting duplex mutation primers. Methods The recombinant vector was constructed with major outer membrane protein ( MOMP) gene of CT and was used as the standard template. The self-reporting duplex mutation primers were designed according to the cloned gene sequence. The quantitative PCR reaction system was optimized and the experimental performance of real-time PCR was evaluated. A total of 148 clinical samples from tractus genitalis were detected. Results The developed method showed a wide range of linearity from 101 to 109 copies/μL and high sensitivity (10 copies/μL). The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficient of variation (CV) in the low concentration of samples were 4.71% and 5.57% respectively, while they were 3.20% and 3. 66% in the high concentration of samples. The results of common pathogenic bacteria in tractus genitalis detected by the established method were all negative, while 99.32% were positive in 148 clinical samples which were identified as Chlamydia trachomatis infection

  3. The Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: The Stethoscope of Genetic Toxicology for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Larry D.; de A. Umbuzeiro, Gisela; DeMarini, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives According to the 2007 National Research Council report Toxicology for the Twenty-First Century, modern methods (e.g., “omics,” in vitro assays, high-throughput testing, computational methods) will lead to the emergence of a new approach to toxicology. The Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay has been central to the field of genetic toxicology since the 1970s. Here we document the paradigm shifts engendered by the assay, the validation and applications of the assay, and how the assay is a model for future in vitro toxicology assays. Data sources We searched PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge using key words relevant to the Salmonella assay and additional genotoxicity assays. Data extraction We merged the citations, removing duplicates, and categorized the papers by year and topic. Data synthesis The Salmonella assay led to two paradigm shifts: that some carcinogens were mutagens and that some environmental samples (e.g., air, water, soil, food, combustion emissions) were mutagenic. Although there are > 10,000 publications on the Salmonella assay, covering tens of thousands of agents, data on even more agents probably exist in unpublished form, largely as proprietary studies by industry. The Salmonella assay is a model for the development of 21st century in vitro toxicology assays in terms of the establishment of standard procedures, ability to test various agents, transferability across laboratories, validation and testing, and structure–activity analysis. Conclusions Similar to a stethoscope as a first-line, inexpensive tool in medicine, the Salmonella assay can serve a similar, indispensable role in the foreseeable future of 21st century toxicology. PMID:20682480

  4. Improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay using the MultiScreen (R) Assay System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MJ; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, RA

    1999-01-01

    In this article, an improved benzodiazepine radioreceptor assay is described, which allows substantial reduction in assay time, The filtration in this method was performed by using the MultiScreen(R) Assay System. The latter consists of a 96-well plate with glass fibre filters sealed at the bottom,

  5. A fast Resazurin-based live viability assay is equivalent to the MTT-test in the KeratinoSens assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emter, Roger; Natsch, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The KeratinoSens™ assay was the first cell-based in vitro test in the skin sensitisation adverse outcome pathway to be endorsed by an ECVAM statement. It includes a cell viability assessment, which serves two purposes: It forms part of the prediction model to exclude false-positive irritants and cytotoxicity provides some information on sensitizer potency of chemicals, which can feed into a multivariate potency model. In the KeratinoSens™ protocol, Nrf2-dependent luciferase induction and the MTT-viability assay are performed in parallel plates. Resazurin-based viability assays do not require cell lysis and are compatible with luciferase measurements in the same cells. Here, we performed detailed comparison of the tetrazolium-based MTT assay and the PrestoBlue® assay on 35 reference chemicals tested in the full KeratinoSens™ protocol. Log-transformed IC50 and IC30 values measured with both methods correlate with an R(2) of 0.97 and 0.95. A single chemical showed divergent results and analysis by four different viability assays indicated the PrestoBlue® read-out to be correct. The new more rapid and resource efficient approach has clear advantages: Dose-response curves show lower variability and the two endpoints are measured on the same cells. This approach is a valid addition to or replacement of the MTT-readout in the KeratinoSens™ assay and it is recommended as a general tool for luciferase-based reporter assays.

  6. A Functional Henipavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Pseudotyped Lentivirus Assay System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broder Christopher C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hendra virus (HeV and Nipah virus (NiV are newly emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses discovered during outbreaks in Queensland, Australia in 1994 and peninsular Malaysia in 1998/9 respectively and classified within the new Henipavirus genus. Both viruses can infect a broad range of mammalian species causing severe and often-lethal disease in humans and animals, and repeated outbreaks continue to occur. Extensive laboratory studies on the host cell infection stage of HeV and NiV and the roles of their envelope glycoproteins have been hampered by their highly pathogenic nature and restriction to biosafety level-4 (BSL-4 containment. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a henipavirus envelope glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus assay system using either a luciferase gene or green fluorescent protein (GFP gene encoding human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 genome in conjunction with the HeV and NiV fusion (F and attachment (G glycoproteins. Results Functional retrovirus particles pseudotyped with henipavirus F and G glycoproteins displayed proper target cell tropism and entry and infection was dependent on the presence of the HeV and NiV receptors ephrinB2 or B3 on target cells. The functional specificity of the assay was confirmed by the lack of reporter-gene signals when particles bearing either only the F or only G glycoprotein were prepared and assayed. Virus entry could be specifically blocked when infection was carried out in the presence of a fusion inhibiting C-terminal heptad (HR-2 peptide, a well-characterized, cross-reactive, neutralizing human mAb specific for the henipavirus G glycoprotein, and soluble ephrinB2 and B3 receptors. In addition, the utility of the assay was also demonstrated by an examination of the influence of the cytoplasmic tail of F in its fusion activity and incorporation into pseudotyped virus particles by generating and testing a panel of truncation mutants of NiV and HeV F

  7. Fluorescence assay for evaluating microbicidal activity of hand antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gigosos, Rosa M; Mariscal, Alberto; Mariscal-Lopez, Eloisa; Gutierrez-Bedmar, Mario; Fernandez, Joaquin

    2015-11-01

    We developed a fluorescent β-d-glucuronidase activity (BGA)-based assay for detecting and quantifying Escherichia coli in samples to assess the biocide efficacy of hand antiseptics. The fluorescence level is proportional to the number of viable E. coli organisms present. We compared our assay results to those of the E. coli plate count method specified by the European standard for testing hygienic hand rub disinfectant products (EN1500). The plate count method requires excessive handling and materials and is not valid if the number of organisms per plate is too low or high for counting in many of the samples. We optimized the fluorescent assay based on the cleavage of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide by adding 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, a nonfluorogenic BGA substrate, to induce glucuronidase activity and reduce assay time. Furthermore, our method can be automated and eliminates the need for multiple dilutions. Fluorescence was temporally monitored, and the time required to reach a specific value of fluorescence was correlated with the initial number of viable E. coli organisms on the samples. There was a positive correlation (P counts by plate count and fluorescence methods. Reported effects in fluorescent BGA were compared to the EN1500 plate count method with five hand disinfectants. We found our method more advantageous, because it was as sensitive as the EN1500 method, requires less time to complete, and is less expensive and less laborious than conventional plating techniques.

  8. Cytokine release assays: current practices and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, D; Grimaldi, C; Fort, M; Walker, M; Kiessling, A; Wolf, B; Salcedo, T; Faggioni, R; Schneider, A; Ibraghimov, A; Scesney, S; Serna, D; Prell, R; Stebbings, R; Narayanan, P K

    2014-04-01

    As a result of the CD28 superagonist biotherapeutic monoclonal antibody (TGN 1412) "cytokine storm" incident, cytokine release assays (CRA) have become hazard identification and prospective risk assessment tools for screening novel biotherapeutics directed against targets having a potential risk for eliciting adverse pro-inflammatory clinical infusion reactions. Different laboratories may have different strategies, assay formats, and approaches to the reporting, interpretation, and use of data for either decision making or risk assessment. Additionally, many independent contract research organizations (CROs), academic and government laboratories are involved in some aspect of CRA work. As a result, while some pharmaceutical companies are providing CRA data as part of the regulatory submissions when necessary, technical and regulatory practices are still evolving to provide data predictive of cytokine release in humans and that are relevant to safety. This manuscript provides an overview of different approaches employed by the pharmaceutical industry and CROs, for the use and application of CRA based upon a survey and post survey follow up conducted by ILSI-Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Immunotoxicology Committee CRA Working Group. Also discussed is ongoing research in the academic sector, the regulatory environment, current limitations of the assays, and future directions and recommendations for cytokine release assays.

  9. Mobile non-destructive assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colarusso, A.P.; Audas, J.H.; Bieri, J.M.; Herrera, G.C.; Hastings, R.D.; Horton, W.S.; Kuckertz, T.H.; Kunz, W.E.; Medvick, P.A.; Vogel, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    A mobile system for non-destructive assay (NDA), developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides accurate and sensitive measurements for transuranic (TRU) isotopes contained in 208-iota drums of miscellaneous nuclear wastes. The NDA unit consists of four major subsystems: an assay chamber, counting and digital electronics, data acquisition, and a neutron generator. It performs both active and passive neutron waste measurements. The former determines the amount of fissile isotopes at a sensitivity level of 1 mg plutonium. The latter determines spontaneous fission and ..cap alpha..,n) isotopes at a comparable level. A complete assay consists of sequential active and passive measurements. The assay measurement and other supporting data are incorporated in a commercial spreadsheet program (Lotus 1,2,3) for further analysis, which includes various matrix corrections and a determination of whether or not the drum exceeds the 100-nCi/g threshold for TRU wastes. Field tests have been performed on three separate occasions, accomplishing more than 1800 waste drum assays. These waste drum assays are discussed, especially those comparing passive and active neutron measurements with independent segmented gamma scan assays. Results obtained with a set of 15 drums containing plutonium prepared from standards and actual hot waste matrices are also reviewed.

  10. Analytical characterization of the APTIMA HPV Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockter, Janel; Schroder, Astrid; Eaton, Barbara; Wang, Ann; Sikhamsay, Nathan; Morales, Liezel; Giachetti, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has improved the sensitivity for the detection of cervical pre-cancer and cancer as compared to Pap testing. Several HPV tests are commercially available and most target the DNA from 13 or 14 high-risk HPV types. The APTIMA HPV Assay however, detects HPV E6/E7 mRNA from 14 high-risk types of HPV: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68. To determine the analytical performance characteristics of the APTIMA HPV Assay. Analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, reproducibility, and the effect of potentially interfering substances was determined for the APTIMA HPV Assay on both the DTS (semi-automated) and TIGRIS DTS (fully automated) systems. The 95% detection limit for both systems was between 17 and 488 copies/reaction, depending on the HPV type. The assay did not cross-react with normal flora and opportunistic organisms that may be found in cervical samples, or low-risk HPV types. Spermicides, anti-fungal and anti-itch medications, whole blood, glacial acetic acid, and most lubricants did not interfere with assay performance. Those lubricants containing polyquaternium 15 did interfere with assay performance. Inter-instrument, inter-operator, inter-lot, and inter-run signal variability were 99% of the data. Intra-run variability was HPV Assay showed excellent performance and robustness.

  11. The importance of serological assays in diagnosing acute pulmonary histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RS Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by inhalation of Histoplasma capsulatum microconidia. The disease does not normally affect immunocompetent individuals after a single, transient inhalation exposure. However, longer exposure may cause chronic or disseminated acute pulmonary infection. Herein, we report the case of a 24-year-old immunocompetent patient, who presented fever, cough and dyspnea for one month. The chest radiography revealed interstitial infiltrate and diffuse micronodules. The patient reported having had close and prolonged contact with bats. Diagnosis was confirmed by positive double immunodifusion and immunoblotting assays. She was treated with ketoconazole (400 mg and there was complete resolution of the disease.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Phalen, D.N.; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By us...

  13. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buch Karl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calculated parameter in this assay, is determined mathematically. Exponential growth in both control and irradiated groups was proven as the underlying basis of the applicability of the multiple MTT assay. The equivalence to a clonogenic survival assay with its disadvantages such as time consumption was proven in two setups including plating of cells before and after irradiation. Three cell lines (A 549, LN 229 and F 98 were included in the experiment to study its principal and general applicability.

  14. Immunometric Double-Antibody Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Thomas O; Ascoli, Carl A

    2017-06-01

    The double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is preferentially used to determine the concentration of unknown antibody in a sample. Pure antigen is not required in this assay; however, the use of a reporter-labeled detection antibody is essential. The double-antibody sandwich ELISA is suitable for epitope mapping of different monoclonal antibodies that have been generated against a single antigen. First, plates are coated with a capture antibody specific for immunoglobulins generated by immunization of a host species. Next, the test antibody solution (e.g., serum) is incubated with the capture antibody to facilitate binding. The plates are washed to remove unbound antibody, and then antigen is added. The plates are washed again followed by the addition of an antigen-specific reporter-labeled antibody. Following incubation, unbound reporter antibody is washed off, and reporter-specific substrate is added. Reporter-mediated substrate hydrolysis is visualized and measured. The signal is proportional to the number of test antibodies present in the serum. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Performance and data interpretation of the in vivo comet assay in pharmaceutical industry: EFPIA survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Leede, Bas-Jan; Doherty, Ann; Guérard, Melanie; Howe, Jonathan; O'Donovan, Mike; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Thybaud, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by the ICH S2(R1) guideline. This paper summarizes a survey suggested by the Safety Working Party of European Medicines Agency (EMA), and conducted by the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) to investigate the experience among European pharmaceutical companies by conducting the in vivo comet assay for regulatory purpose. A special focus was given on the typology of the obtained results and to identify potential difficulties encountered with the interpretation of study data. The participating companies reported a total of 147 studies (conducted in-house or outsourced) and shared the conclusion on the comet assay response for 136 studies. Most of the studies were negative (118/136). Only about 10% (14/136 studies) of the comet assays showed a positive response. None of the positive comet assay results were clearly associated with organ toxicity indicating that the positive responses are not due to cytotoxic effects of the compound in the tissue examined. The number of comet assays with an equivocal or inconclusive response was rare, respectively comet assay and the regulatory acceptance of the current ICH S2 guidance.

  16. Isolation, production, purification, assay and characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation, production, purification, assay and characterization of fibrinolytic ... are isolated from Bacillus subtilis, β-haemolytic Streptococci and urine sample. ... recombinant E.coli containing short fragment genomic DNA of Pseudomonas sp.

  17. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... erythropoietin (an enzyme that regulates the production of red blood cells) in serum or urine. This assay provides diagnostic information for the evaluation of erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  18. Development of a multiplexed urine assay for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, Tatiana; Derecho, Carlo; Baden, Jonathan; Wang, Haiying; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Skelton, Joanne; Mehrotra, Jyoti; Varde, Shobha; Chowdary, Dondapati; Stallings, Walt; Leibovich, Bradley; Robin, Howard; Pelzer, Alexandre; Schäfer, Georg; Auprich, Marco; Mannweiler, Sebastian; Amersdorfer, Peter; Mazumder, Abhijit

    2008-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the value of DNA methylation in urine-based assays for prostate cancer diagnosis. However, a multicenter validation with a clinical prototype has not been published. We developed a multiplexed, quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) assay consisting of 3 methylation markers, GSTP1, RARB, and APC, and an endogenous control, ACTB, in a closed-tube, homogeneous assay format. We tested this format with urine samples collected after digital rectal examination from 234 patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations > or =2.5 microg/L in 2 independent patient cohorts from 9 clinical sites. In the first cohort of 121 patients, we demonstrated 55% sensitivity and 80% specificity, with area under the curve (AUC) 0.69. In the second independent cohort of 113 patients, we found a comparable sensitivity of 53% and specificity of 76% (AUC 0.65). In the first cohort, as well as in a combined cohort, the MSP assay in conjunction with total PSA, digital rectal examination status, and age improved the AUC without MSP, although the difference was not statistically significant. Importantly, the GSTP1 cycle threshold value demonstrated a good correlation (R = 0.84) with the number of cores found to contain prostate cancer or premalignant lesions on biopsy. Moreover, samples that exhibited methylation for either GSTP1 or RARB typically contained higher tumor volumes at prostatectomy than those samples that did not exhibit methylation. These data confirm and extend previously reported studies and demonstrate the performance of a clinical prototype assay that should aid urologists in identifying men who should undergo biopsy.

  19. Novel assay to quantify recombination in a calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Sally J; Job, Natalie; Ficorilli, Nino; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Gilkerson, James R

    2015-05-15

    Recombination is an important contributor to genomic evolution in many viral families, including the Caliciviridae. While it is known that genomic recombination in caliciviruses contributes to their rapid evolution, the precise molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The majority of reported recombination events in feline calicivirus (FCV) occur at a "hot spot" between the non-structural protein coding region (open reading frame 1) and structural protein coding region (open reading frame 2). To gain a better understanding of the rate of recombination at this point, we developed a quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay to quantify the rate of recombination between two divergent strains of FCV during co-infection in cell culture. The assay utilised virus-specific primers upstream and downstream of the recombinational "hot spot" that hybridise with only one of the strains in the co-infection. Recombinant progeny that shared ORF1 sequence identity with one parental virus and ORF2 sequence identity with the other parental virus, and the site of recombination, was confirmed by sequencing the amplicon generated by the assay. Recombinants were detected in co-infected cells using this assay, but not in cells infected with single strains that were mixed together following infection, thus confirming its specificity. Recombination between two FCVs in co-infected cell cultures was estimated to occur at a rate of at least 6.8×10(-6) single direction recombinant genomes per parental virus genome. Further application of this assay will enable factors influencing recombination in caliciviruses to be explored in greater detail, both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Multicenter performance evaluation of a second generation cortisol assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeser, Michael; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Ju Bae, Yoon; Bruegel, Mathias; Ceglarek, Uta; Fiers, Tom; Gaudl, Alexander; Kurka, Hedwig; Milczynski, Christoph; Prat Knoll, Cristina; Suhr, Anna C; Teupser, Daniel; Zahn, Ingrid; Ostlund, Richard E

    2017-05-01

    Untreated disorders of the adrenocortical system, such as Cushing's or Addison's disease, can be fatal, and accurate quantification of a patient's cortisol levels is vital for diagnosis. The objective of this study was to assess the analytical performance of a new fully-automated Elecsys® Cortisol II assay (second generation) to measure cortisol levels in serum and saliva. Four European investigational sites assessed the intermediate precision and reproducibility of the Cortisol II assay (Roche Diagnostics) under routine conditions. Method comparisons of the Cortisol II assay vs. liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), the gold standard for cortisol measurement, were performed. Cortisol reference ranges from three US sites were determined using samples from self-reported healthy individuals. The coefficients of variation (CVs) for repeatability, intermediate precision, and reproducibility for serum samples were ≤2.6%, ≤5.8%, and ≤9.5%, respectively, and for saliva were ≤4.4% and ≤10.9%, and ≤11.4%, respectively. Agreement between the Cortisol II assay and LC-MS/MS in serum samples was close, with a slope of 1.02 and an intercept of 4.473 nmol/L. Reference range samples were collected from healthy individuals (n=300) and serum morning cortisol concentrations (5-95th percentile) were 166.1-507 nmol/L and afternoon concentrations were 73.8-291 nmol/L. Morning, afternoon, and midnight saliva concentrations (95th percentile) were 20.3, 6.94, and 7.56 nmol/L, respectively. The Cortisol II assay had good precision over the entire measuring range and had excellent agreement with LC-MS/MS. This test was found suitable for routine diagnostic application and will be valuable for the diagnosis of adrenocortical diseases.

  1. The comet assay: a heavenly method!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    The contributions to this special issue of Mutagenesis have been selected to cover the main research areas served by the comet assay, namely genotoxicology, environmental toxicology, human biomonitoring and fundamental investigations into mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. Innovative methods are described, technical issues are explored, and guidelines are given for venturing into relatively new or unexploited areas of research. The popularity of the comet assay in a historical context is illustrated by a bibliometric survey.

  2. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  3. Variables Affecting Two Electron Transport System Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, G. Allen; Lanza, Guy R.

    1986-01-01

    Several methodological variables were critical in two commonly used electron transport activity assays. The dehydrogenase assay based on triphenyl formazan production exhibited a nonlinear relationship between formazan production (dehydrogenase activity) and sediment dilution, and linear formazan production occurred for 1 h in sediment slurries. Activity decreased with increased time of sediment storage at 4°C. Extraction efficiencies of formazan from sediment varied with alcohol type; methan...

  4. Screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals with MELN cells, an ER-transactivation assay combined with cytotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berckmans, P; Leppens, H; Vangenechten, C; Witters, H

    2007-10-01

    There is growing concern that some chemicals can cause endocrine disrupting effects to wild animals and humans. Therefore a rapid and reliable screening assay to assess the activity of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is required. These EDCs can act at multiple sites. Most studied mechanism is direct interaction with the hormone receptors, e.g. estrogen receptor. In this study the luciferase reporter gene assay using transgenic human MELN cells was used. Since cytotoxicity of the chemicals can decrease the luminescent signal in the transactivation assays, a cytotoxicity assay must be implemented. Mostly the neutral red (NR) assay is performed in parallel with the estrogenicity assay. To increase the reliability and cost-efficiency of the test, a method to measure estrogenicity and cytotoxicity in the same cell culture plate instead of in parallel plates was developed and evaluated. Therefore the NR-assay was compared with the CytoTox-ONE homogeneous membrane integrity assay. The latter measures LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) leakage based on a fluorometric method. For all compounds tested, the CytoTox-ONE test showed comparable curves and EC50-values to those obtained by the NR-assay. So the CytoTox-ONE kit, which seemed more sensitive than measurements of LDH-leakage based on a colorimetric method, is recommended to test cytotoxicity to MELN cells, with the advantage to use the same cells for ER-transactivation measurements. The chemicals tested in the optimised MELN assay showed estrogenic potencies comparable to those reported for several other transactivation assays.

  5. β-Glucuronidase-coupled assays of glucuronoyl esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraňová, Lucia; Puchart, Vladimír; Biely, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) are microbial enzymes with potential to cleave the ester bonds between lignin alcohols and xylan-bound 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid in plant cell walls. This activity renders GEs attractive research targets for biotechnological applications. One of the factors impeding the progress in GE research is the lack of suitable substrates. In this work, we report a facile preparation of methyl esters of chromogenic 4-nitrophenyl and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-glucuronides for qualitative and quantitative GE assay coupled with β-glucuronidase as the auxiliary enzyme. The indolyl derivative affording a blue indigo-type product is suitable for rapid and sensitive assay of GE in commercial preparations as well as for high throughput screening of microorganisms and genomic and metagenomic libraries.

  6. Immunometric Antibody Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Thomas O; Ascoli, Carl A

    2017-06-01

    The antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the most commonly used assay for rapid and accurate detection of antigens. It displays greater sensitivity compared with the indirect ELISA and can be used to determine absolute antigen concentrations in unknown samples provided purified antigen standards are available, although it requires the use of two different antibodies. Briefly, wells are coated with antigen-specific capture antibody then incubated with samples containing unknown antigen. Washing removes unbound antigen and exogenous sample protein before incubation with a second antigen-specific detection antibody, washing, and reincubation with a reporter-labeled tertiary antibody. After tertiary antibody is washed off, substrate is added and hydrolysis is measured spectrophotometrically. The signal intensity is directly proportional to the concentration of the antigen in the test sample. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. High frequency lateral flow affinity assay using superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago-Cachón, D.; Rivas, M.; Martínez-García, J. C.; Oliveira-Rodríguez, M.; Blanco-López, M. C.; García, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Lateral flow assay is one of the simplest and most extended techniques in medical diagnosis for point-of-care testing. Although it has been traditionally a positive/negative test, some work has been lately done to add quantitative abilities to lateral flow assay. One of the most successful strategies involves magnetic beads and magnetic sensors. Recently, a new technique of superparamagnetic nanoparticle detection has been reported, based on the increase of the impedance induced by the nanoparticles on a RF-current carrying copper conductor. This method requires no external magnetic field, which reduces the system complexity. In this work, nitrocellulose membranes have been installed on the sensor, and impedance measurements have been carried out during the sample diffusion by capillarity along the membrane. The impedance of the sensor changes because of the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. The results prove the potentiality of the method for point-of-care testing of biochemical substances and nanoparticle capillarity flow studies.

  8. Click-iT assay with improved DNA distribution histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelik, Ronald M; Krishan, Awtar

    2009-10-01

    The Click-iT Assay developed and commercialized by Invitrogen is based on incorporation of a new 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine analog, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into newly synthesized DNA and its recognition by azide dyes via a copper mediated "click" reaction. This relatively convenient and useful procedure depends on fixation of cells with paraformaldehyde and staining of the DNA with 7-aminoactinomycin-D (7-AAD). Both of these procedures result in DNA histograms with broad coefficients of variation (CV's). In this report, we have shown that after EdU incorporation, nuclei isolated by lysis can be incubated with the Click-iT Assay and stained with propidium iodide for generation of DNA histograms with low CV's. This modified procedure results in better DNA histograms by replacing 7-AAD with propidium iodide and also saves processing time by eliminating the fixation and permeabilization steps.

  9. Evaluation of red blood cell Pig-a assay and PIGRET assay in rats using chlorambucil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akihisa; Takahashi, Kei; Tsuchiyama, Hiromi; Oshida, Keiyu

    2016-11-15

    The Pig-a assay is a novel method to assess the in vivo mutagenicity of compounds, and it is expected to be useful for the detection of genotoxicity. In this study, to assess the performance of the Pig-a assay targeting red blood cells (RBCs; RBC Pig-a assay) and reticulocytes (RETs; PIGRET assay), chlorambucil, which is a genotoxicant, was orally administered to male rats once at 10, 20 and 40mg/kg on Day 1, and the mutant frequencies (MFs) of RBCs and RETs were examined periodically. In the RBC Pig-a assay, significant increases in MFs were observed at 40mg/kg on Day 15 and at 20mg/kg or higher on Day 29. In the PIGRET assay, MFs increased significantly at all dose levels on Day 8 and only at 20mg/kg on Day 15, but there was no increase in MFs in the treatment groups on Day 29. In conclusion, the RBC Pig-a assay and PIGRET assay in rats have sufficient sensitivity to detect the mutagenicity of chlorambucil, and the PIGRET assay could detect its mutagenicity earlier and at a lower dose than the RBC Pig-a assay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multicolor bioluminescence boosts malaria research: quantitative dual-color assay and single-cell imaging in Plasmodium falciparum parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevenini, Luca; Camarda, Grazia; Michelini, Elisa; Siciliano, Giulia; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Bona, Roberta; Kumar, T R Santha; Cara, Andrea; Branchini, Bruce R; Fidock, David A; Roda, Aldo; Alano, Pietro

    2014-09-02

    New reliable and cost-effective antimalarial drug screening assays are urgently needed to identify drugs acting on different stages of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, and particularly those responsible for human-to-mosquito transmission, that is, the P. falciparum gametocytes. Low Z' factors, narrow dynamic ranges, and/or extended assay times are commonly reported in current gametocyte assays measuring gametocyte-expressed fluorescent or luciferase reporters, endogenous ATP levels, activity of gametocyte enzymes, or redox-dependent dye fluorescence. We hereby report on a dual-luciferase gametocyte assay with immature and mature P. falciparum gametocyte stages expressing red and green-emitting luciferases from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus under the control of the parasite sexual stage-specific pfs16 gene promoter. The assay was validated with reference antimalarial drugs and allowed to quantitatively and simultaneously measure stage-specific drug effects on parasites at different developmental stages. The optimized assay, requiring only 48 h incubation with drugs and using a cost-effective luminogenic substrate, significantly reduces assay cost and time in comparison to state-of-the-art analogous assays. The assay had a Z' factor of 0.71 ± 0.03, and it is suitable for implementation in 96- and 384-well microplate formats. Moreover, the use of a nonlysing D-luciferin substrate significantly improved the reliability of the assay and allowed one to perform, for the first time, P. falciparum bioluminescence imaging at single-cell level.

  11. A combination assay for simultaneous assessment of multiple signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, A S; Liacos, J; Yingling, J; Ignar, D M

    1999-12-01

    We have developed an assay in which modulation of two or more signaling pathways can be assessed concurrently by combining reporter gene systems with fluorescent probe technology. The validation of this method was achieved by indirect analysis of adenylyl cyclase activation with the use of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-luciferase reporter system in combination with the measurement of calcium mobilization by Calcium Green-1 AM fluorescence on a fluorescent imaging plate reader. To demonstrate the utility of the method in studying the pharmacology of receptors that couple to more than one G protein, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, which stably expressed both the CRE-luciferase reporter gene and the human pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) receptor, were treated with PACAP 1-27 and 1-38. Calcium mobilization and the induction of adenylyl cyclase activity in response to each concentration of peptide were assessed in individuals wells. This assay may also be used to screen for ligands of two or more unrelated receptors simultaneously without compromising the assessment of either signaling pathway. To illustrate this point, Rat-1 fibroblasts, which expressed human alpha1A receptors, were cocultured with CRE-luciferase CHO cells, which expressed human GLP-1 receptors. Calcium mobilization elicited by phenylephrine agonism of the alpha1A receptor was assessed in the same assay as GLP-1-induced activation of adenylyl cyclase. The pEC(50) for each agonist was similar to that observed when the cell lines were not cocultured. The number of different receptors that can be screened per well is limited only by the ability to distinguish different reporter gene signals and fluorescent indicators.

  12. An optimized one-tube, semi-nested PCR assay for Paracoccidioides brasiliensis detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda de Faveri Pitz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Herein, we report a one-tube, semi-nested-polymerase chain reaction (OTsn-PCR assay for the detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Methods We developed the OTsn-PCR assay for the detection of P. brasiliensis in clinical specimens and compared it with other PCR methods. Results The OTsn-PCR assay was positive for all clinical samples, and the detection limit was better or equivalent to the other nested or semi-nested PCR methods for P. brasiliensis detection. Conclusions The OTsn-PCR assay described in this paper has a detection limit similar to other reactions for the molecular detection of P. brasiliensis, but this approach is faster and less prone to contamination than other conventional nested or semi-nested PCR assays.

  13. Resazurin Live Cell Assay: Setup and Fine-Tuning for Reliable Cytotoxicity Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Corrales, José Á; Josan, Jatinder S

    2017-01-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity tests allow for fast and inexpensive screening of drug efficacy prior to in vivo studies. The resazurin assay (commercialized as Alamar Blue(®)) has been extensively utilized for this purpose in 2D and 3D cell cultures, and high-throughput screening. However, improper or lack of assay validation can generate unreliable results and limit reproducibility. Herein, we report a detailed protocol for the optimization of the resazurin assay to determine relevant analytical (limits of detection, quantification, and linear range) and biological (growth kinetics) parameters, and, thus, provide accurate cytotoxicity results. Fine-tuning of the resazurin assay will allow accurate and fast quantification of cytotoxicity for drug discovery. Unlike more complicated methods (e.g., mass spectrometry), this assay utilizes fluorescence spectroscopy and, thus, provides a less costly alternative to observe changes in the reductase proteome of the cells.

  14. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Richard Collins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardising the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature and voltage gradient are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e. cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay, or photosensitiser plus light to oxidise guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites. Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period - for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial - to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation.

  15. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  16. The EpiDerm™ 3D human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay: Historical control data and proof of principle studies for mechanistic assay adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shambhu; Kulkarni, Rohan; Hewitt, Nicola J; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay in EpiDerm™ is a promising novel animal alternative for evaluating genotoxicity of topically applied chemicals. It is particularly useful for assessing cosmetic ingredients that can no longer be tested using in vivo assays. To advance the use of this test especially for regulatory decision-making, we have established the RSMN assay in our laboratory according to Good Laboratory Practice and following the principles of the OECD test guideline 487 in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test. Proficiency with the assay was established by correctly identifying direct-acting genotoxins and genotoxins requiring metabolism, as well as non-genotoxic/non-carcinogenic chemicals. We also report the analysis of our historical control data that demonstrate vehicle control and positive control values for %micronuclei in binucleated cells are in the ranges reported previously. Technical issues including evaluating various solvents with both 48h and 72h treatment regimens were investigated. For the first time, mechanistic studies using CREST analysis revealed that the RSMN assay is suitable for distinguishing aneugens and clastogens. Moreover, the assay is also suitable for measuring cytokines as markers for proliferative and toxic effects of chemicals.

  17. The Comet Assay: Tails of the (Unexpected. Use of the comet assay in pharmaceutical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas-jan Van Der Leede

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by regulatory guidance. In this presentation we want to give insight into the circumstances in vivo comet assay is deployed in a Genetic Toxicology Department of a pharmaceutical company. As the in vivo comet assay is a salvage assay, it means that some events have occurred in an in vitro assay and that the compound (or metabolite responsible for this signal is potentially deselected for further development. More than often the decision to perform an in vivo comet assay is at a very early stage in development and the first time that the compound will be tested in vivo at high/toxic dose levels. As almost no toxicokinetic data and tissue distribution data are available a careful design with maximizes the chances for successful mitigation is necessary. Decisions on acute or repeated dosing need to be made and arrangements for combining the in vivo comet assay with the in vivo micronucleus assay are to be considered. Often synthesis methods need to be scaled up fast to provide the required amount of compound and information on suitable formulations needs to be in place. As exposure data is crucial for interpretation of results, analytical methods need to be brought in place rapidly. An experienced multi skilled and communicative team needs to be available to deploy successfully this kind of assays at an early stage of development. We will present a few scenarios on study conduct and demonstrate how this assay can make a difference for the further development of a new drug.

  18. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  19. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Halusa, Goran N; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John A; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Abbatiello, Susan E; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri R; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Fenyö, David; Hiltke, Tara; Ketchum, Karen A.; Kinsinger, Chris; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel C.; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael J; Qian, Wei-Jun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly V; Scott, Mitchell G; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani; Townsend, R. Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories. PMID:26867747

  20. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-02-12

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories.

  1. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009. The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014. An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster scoring of randomly selected cells.

  2. Research highlights: digital assays on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyuk; Wei, Qingshan; Kong, Janay Elise; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-07

    The ability to break up a volume of fluid into smaller pieces that are confined or separated to prevent molecular communication/transport is a key capability intrinsic to microfluidic systems. This capability has been used to develop or implement digital versions of traditional molecular analysis assays, including digital PCR and digital immunoassays/ELISA. In these digital versions, the concentration of the target analyte is in a range such that, when sampled into smaller fluid volumes, either a single molecule or no molecule may be present. Subsequent amplification is sensitive enough to obtain a digital readout of the presence of these target molecules. Advantages of such approaches that are claimed include quantification without calibration and robustness to variations in reaction conditions or times because the digital readout is less sensitive to absolute signal intensity levels. Weaknesses of digital approaches include a lower dynamic range of concentrations over which the assay is sensitive, which depends on the total volume that can be analyzed. We highlight recent efforts to expand the dynamic range of digital assays based on exploiting reaction/diffusion phenomena. A side-by-side study that evaluates the strengths of digital assays reveals that the majority of these claims are supported, with specific caveats. Finally, we highlight approaches to apply digital assays to analyze new types of reactions, including the active transport of protons across membranes by ATPases at the single protein level - perhaps opening up new biophysical understanding and screening opportunities, similar to widely deployed single-molecule ion channel analysis.

  3. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be

  4. Rapid and specific identification of Brucella abortus using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jin Ju; Lee, Kichan; Sung, So-Ra; Jung, Suk Chan

    2015-06-01

    A rapid and accurate diagnosis of brucellosis is required to reduce and prevent the spread of disease among animals and the risk of transfer to humans. In this study, a Brucella abortus-specific (Ba) LAMP assay was developed, that had six primers designed from the BruAb2_0168 region of chromosome I. The specificity of this LAMP assay was confirmed with Brucella reference strains, B. abortus vaccine strains, B. abortus isolates and phylogenetically or serologically related strains. The detection limit of target DNA was up to 20 fg/μl within 60 min. The sensitivity of the new LAMP assay was equal to or slightly higher than other PCR based assays. Moreover, this Ba-LAMP assay could specifically amplify all B. abortus biovars compared to previous PCR assays. To our knowledge, this is the first report of specific detection of B. abortus using a LAMP assay. The Ba-LAMP assay can offer a rapid, sensitive and accurate diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in the field.

  5. ELISPOT Assay for Monitoring Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL Activity in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Sayers

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The profiling and monitoring of immune responses are key elements in the evaluation of the efficacy and development of new biotherapies, and a number of assays have been introduced for analyzing various immune parameters before, during, and after immunotherapy. The choice of immune assays for a given clinical trial depends on the known or suggested immunomodulating mechanisms associated with the tested therapeutic modality. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity represents a key mechanism in the immune response to various pathogens and tumors. Therefore, the selection of monitoring methods for the appropriate assessment of cell-mediated cytotoxicity is thought to be crucial. Assays that can detect both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL frequency and function, such as the IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT have gained increasing popularity for monitoring clinical trials and in basic research. Results from various clinical trials, including peptide and whole tumor cell vaccination and cytokine treatment, have shown the suitability of the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay for monitoring T cell responses. However, the Granzyme B ELISPOT assay and Perforin ELISPOT assay may represent a more direct analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity as compared to the IFN-γ ELISPOT, since Granzyme B and perforin are the key mediators of target cell death via the granule-mediated pathway. In this review we analyze our own data and the data reported by others with regard to the application of various modifications of ELISPOT assays for monitoring CTL activity in clinical vaccine trials.

  6. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to diagnose Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, N B; Ledezma, L A; Farris, R E; Epstein, M E; Gilligan, T M

    2011-10-01

    A molecular assay for diagnosis of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in North America is reported. The assay multiplexes two TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) probe systems that are designed to target DNA segments of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) and 18S rRNA gene. The RT-PCR probe designed for the 18S target recognizes a DNA sequence conserved in all of the moths included in the study and functions as a control in the assay. The second probe recognizes a segment of the ITS2 specifically found in E. postvittana and not found in the other moths included in the study, i.e., this segment is not conserved. Inclusion of the two markers in a single multiplex reaction did not affect assay performance. The assay was tested against 637 moths representing > 90 taxa in 15 tribes in all three subfamilies in the Tortricidae. The assay generated no false negatives based on analysis of 355 E. postvittana collected from California, Hawaii, England, New Zealand, and Australia. Analysis of a data set including 282 moths representing 41 genera generated no false positives. Only three inconclusive results were generated from the 637 samples. Spike experiments demonstrated that DNA contamination in the assay can affect samples differently. Contaminated samples analyzed with the ITS2 RT-PCR assay and DNA barcode methodology by using the cytochrome oxidase I gene can generate contradictory diagnoses.

  7. [Evaluation of serum PIVKA-II by Lumipulse PrestoII assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takagi, Kazumi; Kani, Satomi; Goto, Takaaki; Takasaka, Yoshimitsu; Matsuura, Kentaro; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Moriyama, Kazushige; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Sachiko; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-03-01

    Measurements of serum concentrations of Des-gamma-carboxy Prothrombin (PIVKA-II) are widely used for diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recently, in Lumipulsef assay, it was reported that antibodies against alkaline phosphatase (ALP) derived from anti bleeding sheets led false high values of PIVKA-II in the patients with HCC resection. To improve the previous issue, newly developed Lumipulse PrestoII assay was examined. (1) The assay was reliable and positively correlated with the previous assays (Lumipulse f and Picolumi, R = 0.997 and 0.994 (n=115), respectively). (2) Eleven cases, which had false high values of PIVKA-II by the Lumipulsef assay, were examined by the PrestoII assay with excess of inactive ALP. The false high values of 10 cases were improved, but only one was still high. False reactivity of this case was stronger than other cases, more effective adsorption was required. (3) Comparing the absorbent activity of inactive ALP among 6 different kinds, we found inactive ALP with much higher adsorbent activity. When this inactive ALP was applied to assay, false high values of PIVKA-II were improved in all 11 cases. In conclusion, the PrestoII assay, which applies the inactive ALP with high activity, is reliable and useful for clinical screening.

  8. European sero-epidemiology network: standardisation of the results of diphtheria antitoxin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hunolstein, C; Aggerbeck, H; Andrews, N; Berbers, G; Fievet-Groyne, F; Maple, P A; Olander, R M; Raux, M; Tischer, A

    2000-08-01

    A European Sero-Epidemiological Network (ESEN) was established with the aim to co-ordinate and harmonise serological surveillance of immunity to communicable diseases in Europe. In this study the inter-laboratory standardisation of diphtheria toxin antibody measurements is reported. A standard panel of 162 sera was tested by the participating laboratories using an in vitro assay of their choice: VERO cell toxin neutralisation assay (NT), double-antigen delayed time-resolved fluorescence immuno-assay (DA-DELFIA), double-antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAE), toxin binding inhibition test (ToBI) and an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results were standardised using regression against the NT. The variations due to inter-laboratory and inter-assay variation, which would otherwise make it difficult directly to compare the main serum bank results by the different laboratories and the various assays were successfully minimised by the standardisation. The regression equations obtained will be used to transform the respective local results of testing the main serum bank into the reference test unitages. This study also gave the opportunity to compare the various assays within and between laboratories. This demonstrated a very high correlation between DA-DELFIA, DAE, ToBI and the NT. The ELISA showed a good correlation, too, however sera below some 0.1 IU/ml were overestimated.

  9. A molecular assay for sensitive detection of pathogen-specific T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria O Kasprowicz

    Full Text Available Here we describe the development and validation of a highly sensitive assay of antigen-specific IFN-γ production using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR for two reporters--monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG and the IFN-γ inducible protein-10 (IP10. We developed and validated the assay and applied it to the detection of CMV, HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB specific responses, in a cohort of HIV co-infected patients. We compared the sensitivity of this assay to that of the ex vivo RD1 (ESAT-6 and CFP-10-specific IFN-γ Elispot assay. We observed a clear quantitative correlation between the two assays (P<0.001. Our assay proved to be a sensitive assay for the detection of MTB-specific T cells, could be performed on whole blood samples of fingerprick (50 uL volumes, and was not affected by HIV-mediated immunosuppression. This assay platform is potentially of utility in diagnosis of infection in this and other clinical settings.

  10. Necessity to critically review the automatic results of the Xpert Flu assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Ilka; Alidjinou, Enagnon Kazali; Lazrek, Mouna; Dewilde, Anny; Hober, Didier

    2017-02-02

    While using the Xpert Flu assay we became aware of false-negative results. The study aimed to analyze the causes of these false-negative results. One hundred fifty-nine respiratory specimens were tested in the Xpert Flu assay and in multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) for respiratory viruses. Discordant specimens were tested in the Influenza A/B r-gene assay. One hundred fifty-two (96%) and 151 (95%) specimens yielded concordant results for influenza A and B, respectively. Fifteen specimens tested negative in the Xpert Flu assay and positive in a multiplex RT-PCR. Positive results were confirmed for 12 of these specimens in the Influenza A/B r-gene assay. Xpert Flu assay amplification curves and endpoints suggested that the false-negative results were mainly due to erroneous automatic result interpretation. We report false-negative results of the Xpert Flu assay due to erroneous automatic result interpretation. Careful analysis of amplification curves and endpoints is needed to avoid reporting of false-negative results.

  11. EDTA interference in electrochemiluminescence ACTH assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Burak; Yalcin, Hulya; Arı, Elif; Colak, Ayfer

    2016-11-01

    Background As plasma is the recommended sample type for Roche adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) assay, we evaluated the effect of EDTA concentration on Cobas ACTH assay. Methods Samples containing twofold and fourfold higher concentrations of EDTA were prepared by adding plasma to empty K2EDTA tubes and by making under-filled EDTA tubes. All measurements were performed with four replicates. Results Increased EDTA concentration resulted in a significant decrease in ACTH concentration. Fifty-per cent-filled EDTA tube showed 19% decrease in ACTH concentration and 25% filled EDTA tube showed 50% decrease in ACTH concentration. Conclusion We recommend that inadequately filled EDTA specimens should be rejected when using Cobas ACTH assay.

  12. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  13. Fungicide resistance assays for fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Gary A; Rivera, Viviana V

    2012-01-01

    Fungicide resistance assays are useful to determine if a fungal pathogen has developed resistance to a fungicide used to manage the disease it causes. Laboratory assays are used to determine loss of sensitivity, or resistance, to a fungicide and can explain fungicide failures and for developing successful fungicide recommendations in the field. Laboratory assays for fungicide resistance are conducted by measuring reductions in growth or spore germination of fungi in the presence of fungicide, or by molecular procedures. This chapter describes two techniques for measuring fungicide resistance, using the sugarbeet leaf spot fungus Cercospora beticola as a model for the protocol. Two procedures are described for fungicides from two different classes; growth reduction for triazole (sterol demethylation inhibitor; DMI) fungicides, and inhibition of spore germination for quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) fungicides.

  14. Pseudohypobicarbonatemia caused by an endogenous assay interferent: a new entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwasser, Philip; Manjappa, Nagarathna G; Luhrs, Carol A; Barth, Robert H

    2011-10-01

    Serum total carbon dioxide, measured using a chemistry analyzer, and gas panel-derived plasma bicarbonate, calculated from the pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide, often are used interchangeably for clinical purposes. When they disagree, there is a tendency to accept total carbon dioxide and discredit gas panel-derived plasma bicarbonate values. We report a patient who, during a 5-month hospitalization, had persistently low total carbon dioxide levels (12.4 ± 2.7 [standard deviation] mEq/L [12.4 ± 2.7 mmol/L]), measured using an enzymatic/photometric assay, and a high anion gap (19.2 ± 3.1 mEq/L [19.2 ± 3.1 mmol/L]), suggesting high-anion-gap metabolic acidosis, but who had gas panel-derived plasma bicarbonate (24.0 ± 0.9 mEq/L [24.0 ± 0.9 mmol/L]) and arterial pH values in the reference range. Organic anion levels in blood and urine were unremarkable. Negative interference with the enzymatic assay by the patient's serum was shown by the findings that total carbon dioxide level was 7.0 ± 0.1 mEq/L (7.0 ± 0.1 mmol/L) higher when measured using the electrode-based method than using the enzymatic method (P < 0.01), and the patient's serum, but not control serum, altered the reaction kinetics of the enzymatic assay by producing turbidity, resulting in an initial increase in absorbance and a falsely low total carbon dioxide value. The turbidity may have resulted from precipitation of 1 of 2 paraproteins in the patient's serum or an endogenous antibody binding with an animal protein included in the assay reagents. In summary, a discrepancy between total carbon dioxide level measured using an enzymatic assay and gas panel-derived plasma bicarbonate level was found to be the result of turbidity caused by an endogenous interferent with the total carbon dioxide assay, a novel artifact. When total carbon dioxide and gas panel-derived plasma bicarbonate values disagree, measurement error in total carbon dioxide level should be considered.

  15. Quantification assays for total and polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Macdonald

    Full Text Available The expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the huntingtin gene, which produces huntingtin protein with an expanded polyglutamine tract, is the cause of Huntington's disease (HD. Recent studies have reported that RNAi suppression of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin (mutant HTT in HD animal models can ameliorate disease phenotypes. A key requirement for such preclinical studies, as well as eventual clinical trials, aimed to reduce mutant HTT exposure is a robust method to measure HTT protein levels in select tissues. We have developed several sensitive and selective assays that measure either total human HTT or polyglutamine-expanded human HTT proteins on the electrochemiluminescence Meso Scale Discovery detection platform with an increased dynamic range over other methods. In addition, we have developed an assay to detect endogenous mouse and rat HTT proteins in pre-clinical models of HD to monitor effects on the wild type protein of both allele selective and non-selective interventions. We demonstrate the application of these assays to measure HTT protein in several HD in vitro cellular and in vivo animal model systems as well as in HD patient biosamples. Furthermore, we used purified recombinant HTT proteins as standards to quantitate the absolute amount of HTT protein in such biosamples.

  16. A Simple and Inexpensive Electrochemical Assay for the Identification of Nitrogen Containing Explosives in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Erickson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a simple and inexpensive electrochemical assay using a custom built hand-held potentiostat for the identification of explosives. The assay is based on a wipe test and is specifically designed for use in the field. The prototype instrument designed to run the assay is capable of performing time-resolved electrochemical measurements including cyclic square wave voltammetry using an embedded microcontroller with parts costing roughly $250 USD. We generated an example library of cyclic square wave voltammograms of 12 compounds including 10 nitroaromatics, a nitramine (RDX, and a nitrate ester (nitroglycine, and designed a simple discrimination algorithm based on this library data for identification.

  17. The chemical-in-plug bacterial chemotaxis assay is prone to false positive responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Mandy J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical-in-plug assays are commonly used to study bacterial chemotaxis, sometimes in the absence of stringent controls. Results We report that non-chemotactic and non-motile mutants in two distinct bacterial species (Shewanella oneidensis and Helicobacter pylori show apparent zones of accumulation or clearing around test plugs containing potential attractants or repellents, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that the chemical-in-plug assay should be used with caution, that non-motile or non-chemotactic mutants should be employed as controls, and that results should be confirmed with other types of assays.

  18. Evaluation of the reliability of maize reference assays for GMO quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazova, Nina; Zhang, David; Gruden, Kristina; Vojvoda, Jana; Yang, Litao; Buh Gasparic, Meti; Blejec, Andrej; Fouilloux, Stephane; De Loose, Marc; Taverniers, Isabel

    2010-03-01

    A reliable PCR reference assay for relative genetically modified organism (GMO) quantification must be specific for the target taxon and amplify uniformly along the commercialised varieties within the considered taxon. Different reference assays for maize (Zea mays L.) are used in official methods for GMO quantification. In this study, we evaluated the reliability of eight existing maize reference assays, four of which are used in combination with an event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay validated and published by the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL). We analysed the nucleotide sequence variation in the target genomic regions in a broad range of transgenic and conventional varieties and lines: MON 810 varieties cultivated in Spain and conventional varieties from various geographical origins and breeding history. In addition, the reliability of the assays was evaluated based on their PCR amplification performance. A single base pair substitution, corresponding to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reported in an earlier study, was observed in the forward primer of one of the studied alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) (70) assays in a large number of varieties. The SNP presence is consistent with a poor PCR performance observed for this assay along the tested varieties. The obtained data show that the Adh1 (70) assay used in the official CRL NK603 assay is unreliable. Based on our results from both the nucleotide stability study and the PCR performance test, we can conclude that the Adh1 (136) reference assay (T25 and Bt11 assays) as well as the tested high mobility group protein gene assay, which also form parts of CRL methods for quantification, are highly reliable. Despite the observed uniformity in the nucleotide sequence of the invertase gene assay, the PCR performance test reveals that this target sequence might occur in more than one copy. Finally, although currently not forming a part of official quantification methods, zein and SSIIb

  19. Detection of Eperythrozoon wenyoni by PCR assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian WANG; Yutao ZHU; Jianhua QIN; Fumei ZHANG; Yuelan ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a detection method for Eperythrozoon wenyoni infection using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay technique. A pair of primers was designed and synthesized according to the conservative sequence 16S rRNA. The PCR assay was performed with the primers. A 985-bp fragment was amplified by using PCR. The amplified fragments with the expected size were identified by EcoR I restriction digestion. The crossing-reaction, specific-reaction and duplicate-reaction indicated that the PCR method is a specific, sensitive, fast and effective method for diagnosing E. Wenyoni infection at group level.

  20. DNA-repair measurements by use of the modified comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godschalk, Roger W L; Ersson, Clara; Riso, Patrizia;

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of DNA-repair activity by extracts from cells or tissues by means of the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has a high potential to become widely used in biomonitoring studies. We assessed the inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA-repair activity...... line as having the highest level of DNA-repair activity. The two laboratories that reported discordant results (with another cell line having the highest level of DNA-repair activity) were those that reported to have little experience with the modified comet assay to assess DNA repair. The laboratories...

  1. Rationale for the real-time and dynamic cell death assays using propidium iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hong; Oczos, Jadwiga; Janowski, Pawel; Trembecka, Dominika; Dobrucki, Jurek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We have recently reported an innovative approach to use charged fluorochromes such as propidium iodide (PI) in the real-time, dynamic cell viability assays. The present study was designed to provide a mechanistic rationale for the kinetic assays using cell permeability markers. Uptake of PI by live cells, effect on the cell cycle, long term proliferation capacity, DNA damage response and pharmacologic interactions with anticancer drugs were studied using both laser scanning microscopy and las...

  2. Human Cell Chips: Adapting DNA Microarray Spotting Technology to Cell-Based Imaging Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Traver Hart; Alice Zhao; Ankit Garg; Swetha Bolusani; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe human spotted cell chips, a technology for determining cellular state across arrays of cells subjected to chemical or genetic perturbation. Cells are grown and treated under standard tissue culture conditions before being fixed and printed onto replicate glass slides, effectively decoupling the experimental conditions from the assay technique. Each slide is then probed using immunofluorescence or other optical reporter and assayed by automated microscopy. We show potential ap...

  3. Hemizona Assay and Sperm Penetration Assay in the Prediction of IVF Outcome: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Vogiatzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The limited predictive value of semen analysis in achieving natural conception or in IVF outcome confirms the need for sperm function tests to determine optimal management. We reviewed HZA and SPA predictive power in IVF outcome, with statistical significance of diagnostic power of the assays. HZA was readily efficient in predicting IVF outcome, while evident inconsistency among the studies analysed framed the SPA’s role in male fertility evaluation. Considerable variation was noted in the diagnostic accuracy values of SPA with wide sensitivity (52–100%, specificity (0–100%, and PPV (18–100% and NPV (0–100% together with fluctuation and notable differentiation in methodology and cutoff values employed by each group. HZA methodology was overall consistent with minor variation in cutoff values and oocyte source, while data analysis reported strong correlation between HZA results with IVF outcome, high sensitivity (75–100%, good specificity (57–100%, and high PPV (79–100% and NPV (68–100%. HZA correlated well with IVF outcome and demonstrated better sensitivity/specificity and positive/negative predictive power. Males with normal or slightly abnormal semen profiles could benefit by this intervention and could be evaluated prior to referral to assisted reproduction. HZA should be used in a sequential fashion with semen analysis and potentially other bioassays in an IVF setting.

  4. Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal - Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides instructions for configuring and uploading data files to the CPTAC Assay Portal. It is divided into sections, with an overview checklist provided at the end. If help is needed at any stage of the process, please use the support page: https://assays.cancer.gov/support/

  5. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  6. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Soufan

    Full Text Available High-throughput screening (HTS experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  7. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  8. Simultaneous assay of pigments, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yimin; Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman

    2013-05-07

    Biochemical compositional analysis of microbial biomass is a useful tool that can provide insight into the behaviour of an organism and its adaptational response to changes in its environment. To some extent, it reflects the physiological and metabolic status of the organism. Conventional methods to estimate biochemical composition often employ different sample pretreatment strategies and analytical steps for analysing each major component, such as total proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, making it labour-, time- and sample-intensive. Such analyses when carried out individually can also result in uncertainties of estimates as different pre-treatment or extraction conditions are employed for each of the component estimations and these are not necessarily standardised for the organism, resulting in observations that are not easy to compare within the experimental set-up or between laboratories. We recently reported a method to estimate total lipids in microalgae (Chen, Vaidyanathan, Anal. Chim. Acta, 724, 67-72). Here, we propose a unified method for the simultaneous estimation of the principal biological components, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, chlorophyll and carotenoids, in a single microalgae culture sample that incorporates the earlier published lipid assay. The proposed methodology adopts an alternative strategy for pigment assay that has a high sensitivity. The unified assay is shown to conserve sample (by 79%), time (67%), chemicals (34%) and energy (58%) when compared to the corresponding assay for each component, carried out individually on different samples. The method can also be applied to other microorganisms, especially those with recalcitrant cell walls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A simple new competition assay for heparin binding in serum applied to multivalent PAMAM dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromfield, Stephen M; Posocco, Paola; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina; Rodríguez-López, Julián; Smith, David K

    2013-05-25

    We report a competition assay using our recently reported dye Mallard Blue, which allows us to identify synthetic heparin binders in competitive media, including human serum - using this we gain insight into the ability of PAMAM dendrimers to bind heparin, with the interesting result that low-generation G2-PAMAM is the preferred heparin binder.

  10. Drugs and brain death: drug assay perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R G

    1996-08-01

    The ability to make any meaningful interpretation of a drug assay result is very dependent upon a knowledge of the limitations of the method(s) used (sensitivity, specificity etc.), and the concentration that may be measured in plasma and its relationship to CNS effects. We need more information about 'critical' concentrations for each drug and sedation in the setting of the brain-injured patient before meaningful interpretation can be applied to such data. While the above discussion is critical of screen-type assays, the alternative specific assays are not easily provided for, as obviously the resourcing of laboratories to be able to deliver such specialized services for a range of therapeutic drugs, in addition to 'social' drugs or other toxins (e.g. glues, pesticides, solvents, environmental substances etc), becomes an increasingly complex issue in the current economic climate. Hence, the analytical laboratory can offer valuable support to the clinical team however, the interpretation of such results must be assessed in the light of many limitations of such assay methods and not seen as the 'gold standard' for assessment of brain function.

  11. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors.

  12. Endoproteolytic activity assay in malting barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Gómez Guerrero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of barley proteins into peptides and amino acids is one of the most important processes during barley germination.The degradation of the endosperm stored proteins facilitates water and enzyme movements, enhances modification, liberates starch granules and increases soluble amino nitrogen. Protease activity is the result of the activities of a mixture of exo- and endo-proteases. The barley proteins are initially solubilized by endo-proteases and the further by exo-proteases. Four classes of endo-proteases have been described: serine-proteases, cysteine-proteases, aspartic-proteases and metallo-proteases. The objective of this work was to develop a rapid and colorimetric enzymatic assay to determine the endo-proteolytic activity of the four endo-protease classes using two different substrates: azo-gelatin and azo-casein. Optimum conditions for the assays such as: pH,reaction time and temperature and absorbance scale were determined. Azo-gelatin presented several difficulties in standardizing an “in solution” assay. On the other hand, azo-casein allowed standardization of the assay for the four enzyme classes to produce consistent results. The endo-proteoteolytic method developed was applied to determine the endo-protease activity in barley, malt and wort.

  13. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity...

  14. In vitro solubility assays in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Edward H; Di, Li; Carter, Guy T

    2008-11-01

    The solubility of a compound depends on its structure and solution conditions. Structure determines the lipophilicity, hydrogen bonding, molecular volume, crystal energy and ionizability, which determine solubility. Solution conditions are affected by pH, co-solvents, additives, ionic strength, time and temperature. Many drug discovery experiments are conducted under "kinetic" solubility conditions. In drug discovery, solubility has a major impact on bioassays, formulation for in vivo dosing, and intestinal absorption. A good goal for the solubility of drug discovery compounds is >60 ug/mL. Equilibrium solubility assays can be conducted in moderate throughput, by incubating excess solid with buffer and agitating for several days, prior to filtration and HPLC quantitation. Kinetic solubility assays are performed in high throughput with shorter incubation times and high throughput analyses using plate readers. The most frequently used of these are the nephelometric assay and direct UV assay, which begin by adding a small volume of DMSO stock solution of each test compound to buffer. In nephelometry, this solution is serially diluted across a microtitre plate and undissolved particles are detected via light scattering. In direct UV, undissolved particles are separated by filtration, after which the dissolved material is quantitated using UV absorption. Equilibrium solubility is useful for preformulation. Kinetic solubility is useful for rapid compound assessment, guiding optimization via structure modification, and diagnosing bioassays. It is often useful to customize solubility experiments using conditions that answer specific research questions of drug discovery teams, such as compound selection and vehicle development for pharmacology and PK studies.

  15. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  16. Improved TLC Bioautographic Assay for Qualitative and Quantitative Estimation of Tyrosinase Inhibitors in Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinge; Tang, Qingjiu; Wu, Tao; Cheng, Zhihong

    2017-03-01

    TLC bioautography for tyrosinase inhibitors has made recent progress; however, an assay with a relative low consumption of enzyme and quantitative capability would greatly advance the efficacy of related TLC bioautographic assays. An improved TLC bioautographic assay for detecting tyrosinase inhibitors was developed and validated in this study. L-DOPA (better water-solubility than L-tyrosine) was used as the substrate instead of reported L-tyrosine. The effects of enzyme and substrate concentrations, reaction temperatures and times, and pH values of the reaction system as well as different plate types on the TLC bioautographic assay were optimised. The quantitative analysis was conducted by densitometric scanning of spot areas, and expressed as the relative tyrosinase inhibitory capacity (RTIC) using a positive control (kojic acid) equivalent. The limit of detection (LOD) of this assay was 1.0 ng for kojic acid. This assay has acceptable accuracy (101.73-102.90%), intra- and inter-day, and intra- and inter-plate precisions [relative standard deviation (RSD), less than 7.0%], and ruggedness (RSD, less than 3.5%). The consumption of enzyme (75 U/mL) is relatively low. Two tyrosinase inhibitory compounds including naringenin and 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-4-allylbenzene have been isolated from Rhodiola sacra guided by this TLC bioautographic assay. Our improved assay is a relatively low-cost, sensitive, and quantitative method compared to the reported TLC bioautographic assays. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Optimization and Performance Assessment of the Chorion-Off [Dechorinated] Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Zhang, Cindy X; Augustine-Rauch, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    The Dechorinated Zebrafish Embryo Developmental toxicity assay was originally developed from a training set of 31 compounds and reported to be 87% concordant with in vivo teratogenicity data (Brannen, K. C., Panzica-Kelly, J. M., Danberry, T. L., and Augustine-Rauch, K. A. (2010). Development of a zebrafish embryo teratogenicity assay and quantitative prediction model. Birth Defects Res. 89, 66-77.). The assay includes scoring larva treated in a concentration range for malformations of specific morphological structures/organ systems. The model includes identifying a no-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and the concentration resulting in 25% lethality (LC25) at 5 days postfertilization. An LC25/NOAEL ratio ≥10 classifies a compound positive for teratogenic potential. A consortium effort evaluated a modified version of this assay which involved enzymatic chorion treatment instead of manual dissection and used experimental replicates for final classification. The modified assay achieved an 85% overall predictivity (Gustafson, A. L., Stedman, D. B., Ball, J., Hillegass, J. M., Flood, A., Zhang, C. X., Panzica-Kelly, J., Cao, J., Coburn, A., Enright, B. P., et al. (2012). Inter-laboratory assessment of a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay - progress report on phase I. Reprod. Toxicol. 33, 155-164.). The objective of this study was to perform a thorough performance evaluation of the dechorinated assay by repeating the original training set and testing additional compounds in experimental replicates. When the initial training set was repeated with inclusion of experimental replicates, the overall predictivity was 83%. Model performance was tested with an additional 34 compounds and achieved overall predictivity of 74%. When the training and test sets were combined (63 compounds) the assay's final sensitivity was 83% and the specificity was 71%. Total predictivity was 78% with relatively balanced predictivity for nonteratogens (77%) and teratogens (78%). The

  18. 基于报告基因技术的MDR1转录抑制剂高通量筛选模型的建立和应用%Development and application of high throughput report gene assay for MDR1 transcriptional inhibitor screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎廷元; 晏菊芳; 胡昌华

    2011-01-01

    MDR1, also known as ABCB1 (ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1), is a recognized target for cancer multidrug resistance. To identify novel transcriptional inhibitor of MDR1, we developed a high throughput reporter gene assay that utilizes -434-+158 region of MDR1 promoter to drive luciferase expression in HepG2 cells. A total of 480 extracts from Traditional Chinese Medicine were screened. Two extracts, Lesser Galangal Rhizome extract(EC50: 16.37 mg L-1) and Fructus Galangae extract (EC50: 14.96 mg L-1), have shown stable transcriptional inhibitory effects of MDR1 gene. RT-PCR was conducted to identify the activity of positive extracts.%MDR1基因是引起肿瘤多药耐药的主要基因,其编码的P-gp蛋白可持续将药物由胞内排出胞外以降低胞内药物浓度导致多药耐药,MDR1基因的转录抑制剂可抑制MDR1基因在癌细胞中的表达,从而逆转肿瘤多药耐药.通过克隆MDR1基因的启动子,将其插入pGL3-basic质粒构建MDR1-luc+报告基因载体,再将重组载体转染入HepG2肝癌细胞并筛选单克隆细胞株,构建了MDR1启动子的高通量筛选模型,Z’因子为0.75;通过对中药样品库的筛选,得到两种中药提取物高良姜水提物、红豆蔻醇提物有明显耐药逆转效果,EC50值分别为高良姜水提物16.37 mg L-1和红豆蔻醇提物14.96 mg L-1,RT-PCR验证上述两种阳性样品具有明显的抑制MDR1基因表达的作用.以上结果为MDR1基因的转录抑制剂高通量筛选奠定了基础.

  19. Conditional Dependence in Microbial Forensic Assays - A Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, Stephan P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-11-08

    This report provides an introduction to the topic of conditional dependence in the context of microbial forensic assays. Conditional dependence between two items of evidence E1 and E2 occurs when they are both used to support a hypothesis, but E1 affects the probability of E2 and vice versa. Ignoring this dependence can lead to very large errors in estimating the diagnosticity of the combined evidence. To introduce readers to this concept, a number of definitions of conditional dependence that have been used by authors in the past have been collected together and compared. Formal mathematical relationships that constrain conditional dependence are summarized. There are several specific scenarios in which unrecognized conditional dependence can arise in microbial forensic contexts. This report provides some notional examples that illustrate dramatic effects of conditional dependence on the weight of microbial forensic evidence, and discusses the relevance of these observations for the validation of microbial forensic assays. A two-­parameter model that describes the transition between various limiting forms of conditional dependence relations is provided in an appendix.

  20. The alkaline comet assay: towards validation in biomonitoring of DNA damaging exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Generation of DNA damage is considered to be an important initial event in carcinogenesis. The single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay is a technically simple and fast method that detects genotoxicity in virtually any mammalian cell type without requirement for cell culture. This review discusses the strength of the comet assay in biomonitoring at its present state of validation. The simple version of the alkaline comet assay detects DNA migration caused by strand breaks, alkaline labile sites, and transient repair sites. By incubation with bacterial glycosylase/endonuclease enzymes, broad classes of oxidative DNA damage, alkylations, and ultraviolet light-induced photoproducts are detected as additional DNA migration. The most widely measured enzyme sensitive sites have been those detected by formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (ENDOIII). Reports from biomonitoring studies show that the basal level of DNA damage in leukocytes is influenced be a variety of lifestyle and environmental exposures, including exercise, air pollution, sunlight, and diet. Although not all types of carcinogenic exposures should be expected to damage DNA in leukocytes, the comet assay is a valuable method for detection of genotoxic exposure in humans. However, the predictive value of the comet assay is unknown because it has not been investigated in prospective cohort studies. Also, it is important that the performance of the assay is investigated in multi-laboratory validation trials. As a tool in risk assessment the comet assay can be used in characterization of hazards.

  1. A quantitative infection assay for human type I, II, and III interferon antiviral activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon virus infection, cells secrete a diverse group of antiviral molecules that signal proximal cells to enter into an antiviral state, slowing or preventing viral spread. These paracrine signaling molecules can work synergistically, so measurement of any one antiviral molecule does not reflect the total antiviral activity of the system. Results We have developed an antiviral assay based on replication inhibition of an engineered fluorescent vesicular stomatitis virus reporter strain on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Our assay provides a quantitative functional readout of human type I, II, and III interferon activities, and it provides better sensitivity, intra-, and inter-assay reproducibility than the traditional crystal violet based assay. Further, it eliminates cell fixation, rinsing, and staining steps, and is inexpensive to implement. Conclusions A dsRed2-strain of vesicular stomatitis virus that is sensitive to type I, II, and III interferons was used to develop a convenient and sensitive assay for interferon antiviral activity. We demonstrate use of the assay to quantify the kinetics of paracrine antiviral signaling from human prostate cancer (PC3) cells in response to viral infection. The assay is applicable to high-throughput screening for anti-viral compounds as well as basic studies of cellular antiviral signaling. PMID:23829314

  2. Sample preparation composite and replicate strategy case studies for assay of solid oral drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Beverly; Harrington, Brent; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Michele Xuemei

    2017-08-16

    Drug product assay is one of several tests required for new drug products to ensure the quality of the product at release and throughout the life cycle of the product. Drug product assay testing is typically performed by preparing a composite sample of multiple dosage units to obtain an assay value representative of the batch. In some cases replicate composite samples may be prepared and the reportable assay value is the average value of all the replicates. In previously published work by Harrington et al. (2014) [5], a sample preparation composite and replicate strategy for assay was developed to provide a systematic approach which accounts for variability due to the analytical method and dosage form with a standard error of the potency assay criteria based on compendia and regulatory requirements. In this work, this sample preparation composite and replicate strategy for assay is applied to several case studies to demonstrate the utility of this approach and its application at various stages of pharmaceutical drug product development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2011-09-01

    This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

  4. Lump corrections for radioactive waste assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T J

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that automated radioactive waste assay techniques, such as segmented gamma scanner (SGS) and automated qualitative and quantitative (AQ2), have severely underestimated fissile material due to either the malfunction or absence of appropriate lump correction routines. This paper examines the application of manual techniques, such as Monte Carlo N particle (MCNP) and spectral non-destructive assay platform (SNAP) software, to lump corrections in plutonium (Pu), enriched uranium (EU) and depleted uranium (DU) waste streams. Excellent results have been obtained when comparing MCNP with SNAP and applying the SNAP lump correction routine to a range of simulated and typical wastes containing various Pu and EU lump sizes. It has been concluded that the need for lump corrections was relatively rare and usually apparent from abnormal gamma ray peak area ratios, since most AWE waste streams are only lightly shielded.

  5. Transient expression assays in tobacco protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Bossche, Robin; Demedts, Brecht; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Goossens, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The sequence information generated through genome and transcriptome analysis from plant tissues has reached unprecedented sizes. Sequence homology-based annotations may provide hints for the possible function and roles of particular plant genes, but the functional annotation remains nonexistent or incomplete for many of them. To discover gene functions, transient expression assays are a valuable tool because they can be done more rapidly and at a higher scale than generating stably transformed tissues. Here, we describe a transient expression assay in protoplasts derived from suspension cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) for the study of the transactivation capacities of transcription factors. To enhance throughput and reproducibility, this method can be automated, allowing medium-throughput screening of interactions between large compendia of potential transcription factors and gene promoters.

  6. Identification of irradiated pepper with comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique Fco.; Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Carro Palacio, Sandra [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear. (CEADEN), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: efprieto@ceaden.edu.cu; damaris@ceaden.edu.cu; Iglesia Enriquez, Isora [Instituto de Investigacion para la Industria Alimenticia (IIIA), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing radiations is a technological process utilized in order to increase the hygienic quality and the storage time of the foods. Several methods of detection of irradiated foods have been recommended. The comet assay of DNA is one fast and economical technique for the qualitative identification of irradiated foods. The objective of the present paper was to identify with the comet assay technique the modifications of the DNA molecule of irradiated pepper storage at environment and refrigeration temperatures and different post-irradiation times for different absorbed dose values, (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 kGy). It was demonstrated that for the high absorbed dose values was observed a greater break into fragments of the DNA molecule, which shows the application of this technique for the identification of irradiated foods. (author)

  7. Posttranslational Modification Assays on Functional Protein Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiswinger, Johnathan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Cox, Eric; Rho, HeeSool; Jeong, Jun Seop; Zhu, Heng

    2016-10-03

    Protein microarray technology provides a straightforward yet powerful strategy for identifying substrates of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and studying the specificity of the enzymes that catalyze these reactions. Protein microarray assays can be designed for individual enzymes or a mixture to establish connections between enzymes and substrates. Assays for four well-known PTMs-phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation-have been developed and are described here for use on functional protein microarrays. Phosphorylation and acetylation require a single enzyme and are easily adapted for use on an array. The ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cascades are very similar, and the combination of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes plus ubiquitin or SUMO protein and ATP is sufficient for in vitro modification of many substrates.

  8. Comparative assay of Vipera ammodytes antivenom potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanescu, Cristian; Macovei Oprescu, Anca Monica; Supeanu, Alexandru; Coculescu, Bogdan Ioan; Strambu, Victor; Macovei, Radu Alexandru; Manole, Gheorghe

    2016-12-01

    The finding of the most appropriate way to assess precisely the antivenom efficacy represents one of the major issues for antivenom standardization and success increasing of antivenom therapy. The efficacy of experimental Vipera ammodytes antivenom raised in sheep was determined using in vivo mouse lethality test, respectively, L-aminoacid oxidase, total proteinase and phospholipase A2 antienzymatic effectiveness. The values gained for the antivenom potency depend on the method of measure. So, some of the most toxic venom proteins own phospholipase A2 activity and provide the highest antivenom potency (lowest effective dose) values by antienzymatic assay method. This value is similar with total antiproteolytic antivenom potency value, but almost three times higher than value obtained by L-aminoacid oxidase (low toxic viper venom protein) antienzymatic assay method.

  9. A new fluorescent assay for sialyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Y; Kamitani, T; Sakakibara, T

    2001-04-23

    A new fluorescent assay for the sialyltransferase reaction was established. After incubation of the sialyltransferase reaction, the sialyloligosaccharide obtained was treated by acid hydrolysis, and then the NeuAc that was released was labeled with 1,2-diamino-4,5-methylenedioxibenzene. The fluorescent-labeled NeuAc could be estimated by HPLC (excitation: 373 nm; emission: 448 nm) and a Lineweaver-Burk plot could be plotted with the data from this analysis.

  10. Delivery of High-Quality Biomarker Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian N. Swanson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker measurements now support key decisions throughout the drug development process, from lead optimization to regulatory approvals. They are essential for documenting exposure-response relationships, specificity and potency toward the molecular target, untoward effects, and therapeutic applications. In a broader sense, biomarkers constitute the basis of clinical pathology and laboratory medicine. The utility of biomarkers is limited by their specificity and sensitivity toward the drug or disease process and by their overall variability. Understanding and controlling sources of variability is not only imperative for delivering high-quality assay results, but ultimately for controlling the size and expense of research studies. Variability in biomarker measurements is affected by: biological and environmental factors (e.g., gender, age, posture, diet and biorhythms, sample collection factors (e.g., preservatives, transport and storage conditions, and collection technique, and analytical factors (e.g., purity of reference material, pipetting precision, and antibody specificity. The quality standards for biomarker assays used in support of nonclinical safety studies fall under GLP (FDA regulations, whereas, those assays used to support human diagnostics and healthcare are established by CLIA (CMS regulations and accrediting organizations such as the College of American Pathologists. While most research applications of biomarkers are not regulated, biomarker laboratories in all settings are adopting similar laboratory practices in order to deliver high-quality data. Because of the escalation in demand for biomarker measurements, the highly-parallel (multi-plexed assay platforms that have fueled the rise of genomics will likely evolve into the analytical engines that drive the biomarker laboratories of tomorrow.

  11. Methods and devices for protein assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Swapnil; Cintron, Jose M.; Shediac, Renee

    2009-11-03

    Methods and devices for protein assays based on Edman degradation in microfluidic channels are disclosed herein. As disclosed, the cleaved amino acid residues may be immobilized in an array format and identified by detectable labels, such as antibodies, which specifically bind given amino acid residues. Alternatively, the antibodies are immobilized in an array format and the cleaved amino acids are labeled identified by being bound by the antibodies in the array.

  12. Immunoreagents and competitive assays to fludioxonil

    OpenAIRE

    Abad Fuentes, Antonio; Agulló, Consuelo; Esteve Turrillas, Francesc Albert; Abad Somovilla, Antonio; Mercader Badia, Josep Vicent

    2014-01-01

    Fludioxonil is a new-generation fungicide widely used for postharvest fruit protection. The aim of this study was to produce hitherto unreported immunoreagents for Fludioxonil analysis by immunoassay. Derivatives of this agrochemical were synthesized with different linker tethering sites. Those functionalized haptens were activated, and the purified active esters were efficiently conjugated to different carrier proteins for immunogen and assay antigen preparation. Antibodies to Fludioxonil we...

  13. Cell based assay for hypoglycemic drugs screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZHANG; Juan-juanHU; Guan-huaDU

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a cell based assay for hypoglyc emicdrugs. METHODS: The five cell lines, BALB/c3T3, HepG2, NIH3T3, Be17402, and L929 were incubated with insulin (0-125n mol/L) for 48 h. Their sensitivities to insulin were studied by detecting glucose consumption. The dose-response and time-response relationship between the sensitive cell line (BALB/c 3T3)

  14. An ECVAG trial on assessment of oxidative damage to DNA measured by the comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Clara; Møller, Peter; Forchhammer, Lykke;

    2010-01-01

    The increasing use of single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay) highlights its popularity as a method for detecting DNA damage, including the use of enzymes for assessment of oxidatively damaged DNA. However, comparison of DNA damage levels between laboratories can be difficult due...... assay end points to number of lesions/10(6) bp by calibration with ionizing radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-laboratory variation in assessment of oxidatively damaged DNA by the comet assay in terms of oxidized purines converted to strand breaks with formamidopyrimidine DNA...... to differences in assay protocols (e.g. lysis conditions, enzyme treatment, the duration of the alkaline treatment and electrophoresis) and in the end points used for reporting results (e.g. %DNA in tail, arbitrary units, tail moment and tail length). One way to facilitate comparisons is to convert primary comet...

  15. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein-phosphorylation assay in patients on clopidogrel: does standardisation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Bruno, Veronika; Willheim, Martin; Hübl, Wolfgang; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    The vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein-phosphorylation (VASP-P) flow-cytometric assay is mainly used in clinical trials to measure thienopyridine effects. However, there are remarkable differences in the reported optimal cut-offs, ranging from 48-61% platelet reactivity index (PRI). We therefore investigated whether a lack of standardisation might explain the differences in the cut-offs. We measured VASP-P in 62 individuals. PRI was calculated using the mean, geometric mean and median fluorescence intensities (FI). Stability of the blood-samples (time-to-assay, 0-2 days) and stability of the processed samples (0-120 minutes) within the recommended time-span were tested. Time-to-assay significantly influenced the PRI (pprecise standardisation is inevitable, as the PRI significantly depends on the method of calculation, the time-to-assay as well as on the lag time after processing. Tolerably stable results were obtained for the PRI from the median FI.

  16. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication.

  17. Implementing a technique to improve the accuracy of shuffler assays of waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinard, P.M.

    1996-07-01

    The accuracy of shuffler assays for fissile materials is generally limited by the accuracy of the calibration standards, but when the matrix in a large drum has a sufficiently high hydrogen density (as exists in paper, for example) the accuracy in the active mode can be adversely affected by a nonuniform distribution of the fissile material within the matrix. This paper reports on a technique to determine the distribution nondestructively using delayed neutron signals generated by the shuffler itself. In assays employing this technique, correction factors are applied to the result of the conventional assay according to the distribution. Maximum inaccuracies in assays with a drum of paper, for example, are reduced by a factor of two or three.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV.

  19. Diagnostic Certified Assay: Neuromuscular and Cardiac Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Valaperta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of the specific trinucleotide sequence, [CTG], is the molecular pathological mechanism responsible for the clinical manifestations of DM1. Many studies have described different molecular genetic techniques to detect DM1, but as yet there is no data on the analytical performances of techniques used so far in this disease. We therefore developed and validated a molecular method, “Myotonic Dystrophy SB kit,” to better characterize our DM1 population. 113 patients were examined: 20 DM1-positive, 11 DM1/DM2-negative, and13 DM1-negative/DM2-positive, who had a previous molecular diagnosis, while 69 were new cases. This assay correctly identified 113/113 patients, and all were confirmed by different homemade assays. Comparative analysis revealed that the sensitivity and the specificity of the new kit were very high (>99%. Same results were obtained using several extraction procedures and different concentrations of DNA. The distribution of pathologic alleles showed a prevalence of the “classical” form, while of the 96 nonexpanded alleles 19 different allelic types were observed. Cardiac and neuromuscular parameters were used to clinically characterize our patients and support the new genetic analysis. Our findings suggest that this assay appears to be a very robust and reliable molecular test, showing high reproducibility and giving an unambiguous interpretation of results.

  20. Assessment of plaque assay methods for alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Diana; Long, Kanya C; Aguilar, Patricia; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Halsey, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses from the Alphavirus genus are responsible for numerous arboviral diseases impacting human health throughout the world. Confirmation of acute alphavirus infection is based on viral isolation, identification of viral RNA, or a fourfold or greater increase in antibody titers between acute and convalescent samples. In convalescence, the specificity of antibodies to an alphavirus may be confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization test. To identify the best method for alphavirus and neutralizing antibody recognition, the standard solid method using a cell monolayer overlay with 0.4% agarose and the semisolid method using a cell suspension overlay with 0.6% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) overlay were evaluated. Mayaro virus, Una virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) were selected to be tested by both methods. The results indicate that the solid method showed consistently greater sensitivity than the semisolid method. Also, a "semisolid-variant method" using a 0.6% CMC overlay on a cell monolayer was assayed for virus titration. This method provided the same sensitivity as the solid method for VEEV and also had greater sensitivity for WEEV titration. Modifications in plaque assay conditions affect significantly results and therefore evaluation of the performance of each new assay is needed.

  1. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  2. A single step protein assay that is both detergent and reducer compatible: The cydex blue assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabilloud, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    Determination of protein concentration is often an absolute prerequisite in preparing samples for biochemical and proteomic analyses. However, current protein assay methods are not compatible with both reducers and detergents, which are however present simultaneously in most denaturing extraction buffers used in proteomics and electrophoresis, and in particular in SDS electrophoresis. It was found that inclusion of cyclodextrins in a Coomassie blue-based assay made it compatible with detergents, as cyclodextrins complex detergents in a 1:1 molecular ratio. As this type of assay is intrinsically resistant to reducers, a single-step assay that is both detergent and reducer compatible was developed. Depending on the type and concentration of detergents present in the sample buffer, either beta-cyclodextrin or alpha-cyclodextrin can be used, the former being able to complex a wider range of detergents and the latter being able to complex higher amounts of detergents due to its greater solubility in water. Cyclodextrins are used at final concentrations of 2-10 mg/mL in the assay mix. This typically allows to measure samples containing as little as 0.1 mg/mL protein, in the presence of up to 2% detergent and reducers such as 5% mercaptoethanol or 50 mM DTT in a single step with a simple spectrophotometric assay.

  3. Assessing HTS performance using BioAssay Ontology: screening and analysis of a bacterial phospho-N-acetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide translocase campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Andreas; Zander Balderud, Linda; Hansson, Eva; Boyd, Helen

    2014-01-01

    With the public availability of biochemical assays and screening data constantly increasing, new applications for data mining and method analysis are evolving in parallel. One example is BioAssay Ontology (BAO) for systematic classification of assays based on screening setup and metadata annotations. In this article we report a high-throughput screening (HTS) against phospho-N-acetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide translocase (MraY), an attractive antibacterial drug target involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. The screen resulted in novel chemistry identification using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. To address a subset of the false positive hits, a frequent hitter analysis was performed using an approach in which MraY hits were compared with hits from similar assays, previously used for HTS. The MraY assay was annotated according to BAO and three internal reference assays, using a similar assay design and detection technology, were identified. Analyzing the assays retrospectively, it was clear that both MraY and the three reference assays all showed a high false positive rate in the primary HTS assays. In the case of MraY, false positives were efficiently identified by applying a method to correct for compound interference at the hit-confirmation stage. Frequent hitter analysis based on the three reference assays with similar assay method identified additional false actives in the primary MraY assay as frequent hitters. This article demonstrates how assays annotated using BAO terms can be used to identify closely related reference assays, and that analysis based on these assays clearly can provide useful data to influence assay design, technology, and screening strategy.

  4. Rapid and sensitive detection of cholera toxin using gold nanoparticle-based simple colorimetric and dynamic light scattering assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadia Afrin; DeGrasse, Jeffrey A; Yakes, Betsy Jean; Croley, Timothy R

    2015-09-10

    Herein, a rapid and simple gold nanoparticle based colorimetric and dynamic light scattering (DLS) assay for the sensitive detection of cholera toxin has been developed. The developed assay is based on the distance dependent properties of gold nanoparticles which cause aggregation of antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles in the presence of cholera toxin resulting discernible color change. This aggregation induced color change caused a red shift in the plasmon band of nanoparticles which was measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, we employed DLS assay to monitor the extent of aggregation in the presence of different concentration of cholera toxin. Our assay can visually detect as low as 10 nM of cholera toxin which is lower than the previously reported colorimetric methods. The reported assay is very fast and showed an excellent specificity against other diarrhetic toxins. Moreover, we have demonstrated the feasibility of our method for cholera toxin detection in local lake water.

  5. Micropatterned comet assay enables high throughput and sensitive DNA damage quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Chow, Danielle N; Fessler, Jessica L; Weingeist, David M; Wood, David K; Engelward, Bevin P

    2015-01-01

    The single cell gel electrophoresis assay, also known as the comet assay, is a versatile method for measuring many classes of DNA damage, including base damage, abasic sites, single strand breaks and double strand breaks. However, limited throughput and difficulties with reproducibility have limited its utility, particularly for clinical and epidemiological studies. To address these limitations, we created a microarray comet assay. The use of a micrometer scale array of cells increases the number of analysable comets per square centimetre and enables automated imaging and analysis. In addition, the platform is compatible with standard 24- and 96-well plate formats. Here, we have assessed the consistency and sensitivity of the microarray comet assay. We showed that the linear detection range for H2O2-induced DNA damage in human lymphoblastoid cells is between 30 and 100 μM, and that within this range, inter-sample coefficient of variance was between 5 and 10%. Importantly, only 20 comets were required to detect a statistically significant induction of DNA damage for doses within the linear range. We also evaluated sample-to-sample and experiment-to-experiment variation and found that for both conditions, the coefficient of variation was lower than what has been reported for the traditional comet assay. Finally, we also show that the assay can be performed using a 4× objective (rather than the standard 10× objective for the traditional assay). This adjustment combined with the microarray format makes it possible to capture more than 50 analysable comets in a single image, which can then be automatically analysed using in-house software. Overall, throughput is increased more than 100-fold compared to the traditional assay. Together, the results presented here demonstrate key advances in comet assay technology that improve the throughput, sensitivity, and robustness, thus enabling larger scale clinical and epidemiological studies.

  6. A novel pyrogallol red-based assay to assess catalase activity: Optimization by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrahim, Mohamed; Arribas, Silvia M; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2017-05-01

    Pyrogallol red (PGR) was identified as a novel optical probe for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed oxidation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied as a tool to optimize the concentrations of PGR (100µmolL(-1)), HRP (1UmL(-1)) and H2O2 (250µmolL(-1)) and used to develop a sensitive PGR-based catalase (CAT) activity assay (PGR-CAT assay). N-ethylmaleimide -NEM- (102mmolL(-1)) was used to avoid interference produced by thiol groups while protecting CAT activity. Incubation time (30min) for samples or CAT used as standard and H2O2 as well as signal stability (stable between 5 and 60min) were also evaluated. PGR-CAT assay was linear within the range of 0-4UmL(-1) (R(2)=0.993) and very sensitive with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.005UmL(-1) and quantitation (LOQ) of 0.01UmL(-1). PGR-CAT assay showed an adequate intra-day RSD=0.6-9.5% and inter-day RSD=2.4-8.9%. Bland-Altman analysis and Passing-Bablok and Pearson correlation analysis showed good agreement between CAT activity as measured by the PRG-CAT assay and the Amplex Red assay. The PGR-CAT assay is more sensitive than all the other colorimetric assays reported, particularly the Amplex Red assay, and the cost of PGR is a small fraction (about 1/1000) of that of an Amplex Red probe, so it can be expected to find wide use among scientists studying CAT activity in biological samples.

  7. Cell based assays for anti-Plasmodium activity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgethi-Morule, Thabang; N'Da, David D

    2016-03-10

    Malaria remains one of the most common and deadly infectious diseases worldwide. The severity of this global public health challenge is reflected by the approximately 198 million people, who were reportedly infected in 2013 and by the more than 584,000 related deaths in that same year. The rising emergence of drug resistance towards the once effective artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) has become a serious concern and warrants more robust drug development strategies, with the objective of eradicating malaria infections. The intricate biology and life cycle of Plasmodium parasites complicate the understanding of the disease in such a way that would enhance the development of more effective chemotherapies that would achieve radical clinical cure and that would prevent disease relapse. Phenotypic cell based assays have for long been a valuable approach and involve the screening and analysis of diverse compounds with regards to their activities towards whole Plasmodium parasites in vitro. To achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of malaria eradication by 2020, new generation drugs that are active against all parasite stages (erythrocytic (blood), exo-erythrocytic (liver stages and gametocytes)) are needed. Significant advances are being made in assay development to overcome some of the practical challenges of assessing drug efficacy, particularly in the liver and transmission stage Plasmodium models. This review discusses primary screening models and the fundamental progress being made in whole cell based efficacy screens of anti-malarial activity. Ongoing challenges and some opportunities for improvements in assay development that would assist in the discovery of effective, safe and affordable drugs for malaria treatments are also discussed.

  8. A novel assay detecting recall response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Comparison with existing assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Denise C; Zaunders, John J; Plit, Marshall; Leeman, Craig; Ip, Susanna; Iampornsin, Thatri; Pett, Sarah L; Bailey, Michelle; Amin, Janaki; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2012-07-01

    A strategy to reduce the burden of active TB is isoniazid preventive therapy for latent TB infection (LTBI). However, current assays used to diagnose LTBI all have limitations. In these proof of concept studies, we compared the agreement of a novel flow cytometry assay detecting CD25/CD134 co-expression with QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFN-GIT) and Tuberculin skin test (TST) in the detection of recall immune response to TB. The CD25/CD134 assay, QFN-GIT and TST were performed on 74 participants referred for TB screening in Sydney and on 50 participants with advanced HIV infection (CD4 ≤ 350 × 10(6) cells/L) in Bangkok. The agreement between CD25/CD134 assay and QFN-GIT was 93.2% (Kappa 0.631 95% CI 0.336-0.926) in Sydney and 90% (Kappa 0.747 95% CI 0.541-0.954) in Bangkok. Discordant results occurred around the cut off of both tests. The agreement between CD25/CD134 assay and TST was 73.6% (Kappa 0.206 95% CI 0.004-0.409) in Sydney and 84% (Kappa 0.551 95% CI 0.296-0.806) in Bangkok. The CD25/CD134 assay showed good agreement with QFN-GIT in detecting recall response to TB both in well and less resourced setting as well as in persons with advanced HIV infection. Further study into the performance of this assay is thus warranted.

  9. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using N-nitrosomorpholine in young adult rats: report on collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS)-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study (MMS) Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Aya; Kosaka, Mizuki; Kimura, Aoi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (LMN) assay in young adult rats as a collaborative study by the Mammalian mutagenicity study (MMS) group. All procedures were performed in accordance with the standard protocols of the MMS Group. Six-week-old male Crl:CD(SD) rats (5 animals/group) received oral doses of the hepatocarcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) at 0 (control), 5, 10, and 30mg/kg/day (10mL/kg) for 14 days. Control animals received vehicle (water). Hepatocytes were collected from the liver 24h after the last dose, and the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was determined by microscopy. The number of micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) in the femoral bone marrow was also determined. The liver was examined using histopathologic methods after formalin fixation. The results showed statistically significant and dose-dependent increases in the number of MNHEPs in the liver at doses of 10mg/kg and greater when compared with the vehicle control. However, no significant increase was noted in the number of MNIMEs in the bone marrow at doses of up to 30mg/kg. Histopathology of the liver revealed hypertrophy and single cell necrosis of hepatocytes at doses of 5mg/kg and above. These results showed that the induction of micronuclei by NMOR was detected by the repeated-dose LMN assay, but not by the repeated-dose bone marrow micronucleus assay.

  10. Mechanism of PTC124 activity in cell-based luciferase assays of nonsense codon suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Douglas S.; Thorne, Natasha; Maguire, William F.; Inglese, James

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays used in drug discovery frequently use reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (FLuc) as indicators of target activity. An important caveat to consider, however, is that compounds can directly affect the reporter, leading to nonspecific but highly reproducible assay signal modulation. In rare cases, this activity appears counterintuitive; for example, some FLuc inhibitors, acting through posttranslational Fluc reporter stabilization, appear to activate gene expression. Previous efforts to characterize molecules that influence luciferase activity identified a subset of 3,5-diaryl-oxadiazole-containing compounds as FLuc inhibitors. Here, we evaluate a number of compounds with this structural motif for activity against FLuc. One such compound is PTC124 {3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid}, a molecule originally identified in a cell-based FLuc assay as having nonsense codon suppression activity [Welch EM, et al., Nature (2007) 447:87–91]. We find that the potency of FLuc inhibition for the tested compounds strictly correlates with their activity in a FLuc reporter cell-based nonsense codon assay, with PTC124 emerging as the most potent FLuc inhibitor (IC50 = 7 ± 1 nM). However, these compounds, including PTC124, fail to show nonsense codon suppression activity when Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) is used as a reporter and are inactive against the RLuc enzyme. This suggests that the initial discovery of PTC124 may have been biased by its direct effect on the FLuc reporter, implicating firefly luciferase as a molecular target of PTC124. Our results demonstrate the value of understanding potential interactions between reporter enzymes and chemical compounds and emphasize the importance of implementing the appropriate control assays before interpreting HTS results. PMID:19208811

  11. A focus reduction neutralization assay for hepatitis C virus neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowski Czeslaw

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim The role of humoral immunity in hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is poorly understood. Nevertheless, there is increasing interest in characterizing the neutralizing antibodies in the serum of HCV-infected patients. Focus reduction assays have been widely used to evaluate neutralizing antibody responses against a range of non-cytopathic viruses. Based on the recent development of a HCV cell culture system using the genotype 2 JFH-1-strain, we developed a focus reduction assay for HCV-neutralizing antibodies. Methods The focus reduction assay was based on a standard microneutralization assay in which immunostained foci on tissue culture plates are counted. The neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies titers of purified serum immunoglobulin samples from seventy-seven individuals were determined using a 50% focus reduction neutralization assay. Each titer was determined as the log value of the reciprocal antibody dilution that reduced the number of viral foci by 50%. IgG antibodies were first purified from each serum in order to avoid the facilitating effect of HDL on HCV entry. Results The assay's cut-off using an ELISA and RNA HCV-negative samples was found to be 1.25 log, corresponding to a dilution of 1:18. The assay was compared with a commercial HCV ELISA and exhibited specificity and sensitivity values of 100% and 96.5%, respectively, and good reproducibility (with intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation of 6.7% and 12.6%, respectively. The assay did not show any cross-reactivity with anti-HIV, anti-HBs or heterophile antibody-positive samples. The neutralizing antibodies titers were 2.13 log (1:134 for homologous samples from HCV genotype 2 infected patients harboring the same genotype as JFH-1 and 1.93 log (1:85 for heterologous samples from patients infected by genotypes other than type 2. These results confirm the presence of broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies already reported using the HCV pseudoparticles

  12. Bacterial assay of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, D E; Hosmer, M; Georgescu, M; Farris, R L

    1996-03-01

    The goal of the project was to determine the quantity of bacteria on the contact lens and adjacent areas of the eye. This paper is a quantitative study of the contact lens and ocular aerobic microbiota in a mixed group of daily and extended wear disposable contact lens users. The contact lens, the lower fornix, tears collecting at the lower fornix, and edge of the lower lid at the Meibomian gland margin were assayed for the quantity of bacterial colony forming units (CFU). Eighteen patients wearing 49 disposable high water content hydrogel contact lenses were assayed and the mean lens age was 8.8 +/- 4.6 days. Three patients wore their lenses on a daily wear basis and 15 on an extended wear schedule. Tear samples were obtained with sterile microbial loops and the lens was macerated into small particles with a tissue grinder. The samples were poured onto the surface of chocolate agar plates and incubated at 35 degrees C for 48 h in 5% Co2. The lid margin revealed the greatest bacterial presence (mean = 9.7 CFU; median = 2 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The lens showed the next greatest presence of CFU (mean = 4.5 CFU; median = 1 CFU; mode = 0). The fornix and tears revealed the least bacterial presence (fornix: mean = 2.6 CFU; median = 0 CFU; mode = 0 CFU). The bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci. The bacterial assay of disposable lens wearing contact lens subjects indicates that the lid margins are the greatest source of bacteria with the tears being the lowest. These studies support the concept that in the eye, the lens typically does not possess a large number of bacteria under normal conditions.

  13. Nondestructive boxed transuranic (TRU) waste assay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, John T.; Jones, Stephanie A.; Lucero, Randy F.

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of boxed waste assay systems (primarily those developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) is presented. The characteristics and design process involved with current generation systems--as practiced by BII--are also discussed in some detail. Finally, a specific boxed waste assay system and acceptance test results are presented. This system was developed by BII and installed at the Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility in Hanford, Washington in early 1997. The WRAP system combines imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) techniques with gamma- ray energy analysis (GEA) to assay crates up to 2.5 m X 2.5 m X 6.5 m in size. (Systems that incorporate both these methodologies are usually denoted IPAN/GEA types.) Two separate gamma-ray measurements are accomplished utilizing 16 arrayed NaI detectors and a moveable HPGe detector, while 3He detectors acquire both active and passive neutron data. These neutron measurements use BII's proprietary imaging methodology. Acceptance testing of the system was conducted at Hanford in January 1998. The system's operating performance was evaluated based on accuracy and sensitivity requirements for three different matrix types. Test results indicate an average 13% active mode accuracy for 10 nCi/g loadings of Pu waste and 5% passive mode accuracy for 10 g loadings of Pu waste. Sensitivity testing demonstrated an active mode lower limit of detection of less than 5 nCi/g of 239Pu for the medium matrix and less than 20 pCi/g of fission and activation products at 3(sigma) above background.

  14. Smartphone-enabled filterless fluorescence assay utilizing the pyrene excimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, John P.; White, Ian M.

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy offers a number of advantages for cell- and biomarker-based diagnostics with regards to ease of use and interpretation, sensitivity, and specificity. However, its use in low-resource settings is often hindered by the need for bulky microscopes with expensive excitation and filter setups. While many advances have been made towards utilizing smartphones as microscopes, there remains a reliance on complex attachments to facilitate fluorescence microscopy. Here, we report progress towards a filter-less fluorescent assay utilizing ultraviolet light, an unmodified smartphone, and pyrene-labeled aptamers. The pyrene monomer is excited at a wavelength of 350 nm and emits at approximately 390 nm; when two pyrene molecules are brought into close proximity, however, they form an excimer which emits at approximately 490 nm. We have engineered pyrene-conjugated DNA sequences such that the fluorophores, normally in monomeric configuration, are brought into proximity upon binding of the DNA to its target. The large Stokes shift between excitation and emission of the excimer allows us to detect such biorecognition events with an unfiltered smartphone camera, enabling the use of this assay in low-resource settings where portability and easeof- use are paramount.

  15. Calibrated user-friendly reverse transcriptase-PCR assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bor, M V; Sørensen, B S; Rammer, P

    1998-01-01

    We report a competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) assay and a calibrated user-friendly RT-PCR assay (CURT-PCR) for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. A calibrator was prepared from isolated rat liver RNA, and the amount of EGFR mRNA was determined by competitive RT-PCR. In CUR...... and to accept or reject the results according to existing rules for quality assurance....... and the corresponding RNA internal standard. Competitive RT-PCR and CURT-PCR were used for rat liver samples from 21 different animals. Comparable results were obtained by the two methods. The imprecision of the CURT-PCR method was 8% (n = 20), and the imprecision of the traditional competitive RT-PCR was 16% (n = 17......). We conclude that the CURT-PCR method developed is suitable for routine applications such as quantitation of EGFR expression in tumor biopsies. The imprecision is relatively low. Furthermore, the use of a calibration curve makes it possible to analyze a large number of samples in one analytical run...

  16. Lipase assay in soils by copper soap colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisuburamaniyan, N; Krithika, L; Dileena, K P; Sivasubramanian, S; Puvanakrishnan, R

    2004-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method for the estimation of lipase activity in soils is reported. In this method, 50mg of soil is incubated with emulsified substrate, the fatty acids liberated are treated with cupric acetate-pyridine reagent, and the color developed is measured at 715 nm. Use of olive oil in this protocol leads to an estimation of true lipase activity in soils. The problem of released fatty acids getting adsorbed onto the soil colloids is obviated by the use of isooctane, and separate standards for different soils need not be developed. Among the various surfactants used for emulsification, polyvinyl alcohol is found to be the most effective. Incubation time of 20 min, soil concentration of 50 mg, pH 6.5, and incubation temperature of 37 degrees C were found to be the most suitable conditions for this assay. During the process of enrichment of the soils with oil, interference by the added oil is avoided by the maintenance of a suitable control, wherein 50 mg of soil is added after stopping the reaction. This assay is sensitive and it could be adopted to screen for lipase producers from enriched soils and oil-contaminated soils before resorting to isolation of the microbes by classical screening methods.

  17. ABAP: antibody-based assay for peptidylarginine deiminase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendman, Albert J W; Raijmakers, Reinout; Nijenhuis, Suzanne; Vossenaar, Erik R; Tillaart, Marloes van den; Chirivi, Renato G S; Raats, Jos M H; van Venrooij, Walther J; Drijfhout, Jan W; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2007-10-15

    Members of the family of peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs, EC 3.5.3.15) catalyze the posttranslational modification of peptidylarginine into peptidylcitrulline. Citrulline-containing epitopes have been shown to be major and specific targets of autoantibodies produced by rheumatoid arthritis patients. Recently, the citrullination of histone proteins by PAD enzyme was reported to influence gene expression levels. These findings greatly increase the interest in the PAD enzymes and their activities. A few procedures to monitor PAD activity in biological samples have been described previously. However, these assays either have low sensitivity or are rather laborious. Here we describe a reliable and reproducible method for the determination of PAD activity in both purified and crude samples. The method is based on the quantification of PAD-dependent citrullination of peptides, immobilized in microtiter plates, using antibodies that are exclusively reactive with the reaction product(s). Our results demonstrate that this antibody-based assay for PAD activity, called ABAP, is very sensitive and can be applied to monitor PAD activity in biological samples.

  18. A novel and rapid microbiological assay for ciprofloxacin hydrochloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edith Cristina Laignier Cazedey; Hérida Regina Nunes Salgado

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports a simple, fast and sensitive microbiological assay applying the turbidimetric method for the determination of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CIPRO HCl) in ophthalmic solutions. The validation method yielded good results and included excellent linearity, precision, accuracy and specificity. The bioassay is based on the inhibitory effect of CIPRO HCl upon the strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 used as the test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and were found to be linear (r¼0.9994, in the range of 14.0-56.0 mg/mL), precise (intraday RSD%¼2.06;interday RSD%¼2.30) and accurate (recovery ¼ 99.7%). The turbidimetric assay was compared to the UV spectrophotometric and HPLC methods for the same drug. The turbidimetric bioassay described on this paper for determination of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride in ophthalmic solution is an alternative to the physicochemical methods disclosed in the literature and can be used in quality control routine.

  19. Total Measurement Uncertainty for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System

    CERN Document Server

    Fazzari, D M

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for the Canberra manufactured Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) as employed at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In this document, TMU embodies the combined uncertainties due to all of the individual random and systematic sources of measurement uncertainty. It includes uncertainties arising from corrections and factors applied to the analysis of transuranic waste to compensate for inhomogeneities and interferences from the waste matrix and radioactive components. These include uncertainty components for any assumptions contained in the calibration of the system or computation of the data. Uncertainties are propagated at 1 sigma. The final total measurement uncertainty value is reported at the 95% confidence level. The SGSAS is a gamma assay system that is used to assay plutonium and uranium waste. The SGSAS system can be used in a stand-alone mode to perform the NDA characterization of a containe...

  20. Antibacterial effect of protamine assayed by impedimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Gill, T.; Gram, Lone

    1995-01-01

    Impedimetric measurements were used to assay the antibacterial effect of protamine. A good linear correlation between the impedance detection time and the initial cell counts was obtained (r = 0 . 99, n = 2). As basic peptides may cause clumping of cells, this correlation curve was used when esti...... A suspended in buffer was not lethal as was the effect on growing cells; however, protamine (50-500 mu g ml(-1)) killed the Gram-negative fish spoilage bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens when the live cells were suspended in buffer....

  1. Test procedure for boxed waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-07

    This document, prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratory`s NMT-4 group, details the test methodology and requirements for Acceptance/Qualification testing of a Boxed Waste Assay System (BWAS) designed and constructed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation. Testing of the BWAS at the Plutonium Facility (TA55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be performed to ascertain system adherence to procurement specification requirements. The test program shall include demonstration of conveyor handling capabilities, gamma ray energy analysis, and imaging passive/active neutron accuracy and sensitivity. Integral to these functions is the system`s embedded operating and data reduction software.

  2. Purification and kinase assay of PKN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hideyuki; Ono, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    PKN is a serine/threonine protein kinase, which has a catalytic domain highly homologous to that of protein kinase C (PKC) in the carboxyl-terminal region and three repeats of the antiparallel coiled coil (ACC) domain in the amino-terminal region. Mammalian PKN has three isoforms each derived from different genes, PKN1 (PKNalpha/PRK1/PAK1), PKN2 (PRK2/PAK2/PKNgamma), and PKN3 (PKNbeta). PKN isoforms show different enzymatic properties and tissue distributions and have been implicated in various distinct cellular processes (reviewed in Mukai [2003]). This chapter discusses methods to prepare purified enzymes and to assay substrate phosphorylation activities.

  3. Bicarbonate alters cellular responses in respiration assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krycer, James R; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Muoio, Deborah M; James, David E

    2017-08-05

    Metabolic assay buffers often omit bicarbonate, which is susceptible to alkalinisation in an open environment. Here, we assessed the effect of including bicarbonate in respirometry experiments. By supplementing HEPES-buffered media with low concentrations of bicarbonate, we found increased respiration in adipocytes and hepatocytes, but not myotubes. This was observed across multiple respirometry platforms and was independent of effects on enhanced insulin sensitivity, pH drift, or mitochondrial function. Permeabilised cell experiments suggest that bicarbonate increases substrate availability, likely by acting as a cofactor for carboxylase enzymes. This emphasises the importance of buffer choice in experimental biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mass-based readout for agglutination assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunara, Rumi; Godin, Michel; Knudsen, Scott M.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-11-01

    We present a mass-based readout for agglutination assays. The suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) is used to classify monomers and dimers that are formed during early stage aggregation, and to relate the total count to the analyte concentration. Using a model system of streptavidin functionalized microspheres and biotinylated antibody as the analyte, we obtain a dose-response curve over a concentration range of 0.63-630nM and show that the results are comparable to what has been previously achieved by image analysis and conventional flow cytometry.

  5. [Human angiogenin: expression, purification, biological assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Zhang, Y Q; Yan, Z; Han, W; Yao, L B; Su, C Z

    2001-01-01

    Angiogenin cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR, and cloned into the fusion expression vector pRSETB. The recombinant Angiogenin protein was fused with His6 at its N-terminal and expressed as inclusion body. The expression level was about 10% of the total bacteria protein. After dissolved in 8 mol/L urea, the recombinant protein was purified by Ni2(+)-NTA chelating resin, according to the high affinity of His6 with Ni2+. The biological assay indicated that purified rhANG could induced the new blood vessel formation of CAM and degraded tRNA in vitro.

  6. Standardization of cytokine flow cytometry assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Josephine

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine flow cytometry (CFC or intracellular cytokine staining (ICS can quantitate antigen-specific T cell responses in settings such as experimental vaccination. Standardization of ICS among laboratories performing vaccine studies would provide a common platform by which to compare the immunogenicity of different vaccine candidates across multiple international organizations conducting clinical trials. As such, a study was carried out among several laboratories involved in HIV clinical trials, to define the inter-lab precision of ICS using various sample types, and using a common protocol for each experiment (see additional files online. Results Three sample types (activated, fixed, and frozen whole blood; fresh whole blood; and cryopreserved PBMC were shipped to various sites, where ICS assays using cytomegalovirus (CMV pp65 peptide mix or control antigens were performed in parallel in 96-well plates. For one experiment, antigens and antibody cocktails were lyophilised into 96-well plates to simplify and standardize the assay setup. Results (CD4+cytokine+ cells and CD8+cytokine+ cells were determined by each site. Raw data were also sent to a central site for batch analysis with a dynamic gating template. Mean inter-laboratory coefficient of variation (C.V. ranged from 17–44% depending upon the sample type and analysis method. Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC yielded lower inter-lab C.V.'s than whole blood. Centralized analysis (using a dynamic gating template reduced the inter-lab C.V. by 5–20%, depending upon the experiment. The inter-lab C.V. was lowest (18–24% for samples with a mean of >0.5% IFNγ + T cells, and highest (57–82% for samples with a mean of Conclusion ICS assays can be performed by multiple laboratories using a common protocol with good inter-laboratory precision, which improves as the frequency of responding cells increases. Cryopreserved PBMC may yield slightly more

  7. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  8. Review-evaluating the molecular assays for measuring the oxidative potential of particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayat F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several cell-free assays are currently used to quantify and detect the Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. All of them have certain limitations, do not provide direct comparison of results and, to date, none of these assays have been acknowledged as the most suitable acellular assay and none has yet been adopted for investigation of potential PM toxicity. These assays include DTT, ascorbic acid, DCFHDA and PFN assays which have been used in measurements of the particles generated from various combustion sources such as diesel engine, wood smoke (or biomass burning and cigarette smoke, as well as for outdoor measurements. All the probes use different units for expressing redox properties of PM. Also, their reactivity is being triggered by different types of ROS. This limits the direct comparison of the results that are reporting the toxicity of the same aerosol type measured with various probes. This study is evaluating and comparing the various assays in order to develop deeper understanding of their capabilities, selectivity as well as improve understanding of the underlying chemical mechanisms.

  9. Development of an improved RT-LAMP assay for detection of currently circulating rubella viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, H; Okamoto, K; Anraku, M; Otsuki, N; Sakata, M; Icenogle, J; Zheng, Q; Kurata, T; Kase, T; Komase, K; Takeda, M; Mori, Y

    2014-10-01

    Rubella virus is the causative agent of rubella. The symptoms are usually mild, and characterized by a maculopapular rash and fever. However, rubella infection in pregnant women sometimes can result in the birth of infants with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Global efforts have been made to reduce and eliminate CRS. Although a reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for detection of rubella virus has been reported, the primers contained several mismatched nucleotides with the genomes of currently circulating rubella virus strains. In the present study, a new RT-LAMP assay was established. The detection limit of this assay was 100-1000PFU/reaction of viruses for all rubella genotypes, except for genotype 2C, which is not commonly found in the current era. Therefore, the new RT-LAMP assay can successfully detect all current rubella virus genotypes, and does not require sophisticated devices like TaqMan real-time PCR systems. This assay should be a useful assay for laboratory diagnosis of rubella and CRS.

  10. Method Modification Study for the Thermo Scientific SureTect™ Listeria Species Assay-Matrix Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Evans, Katharine; Crabtree, David; Hughes, Annette; Simpson, Helen; Holopainen, Jani; Wickstrand, Nina; Kauppinen, Mikko; Leon-Velarde, Carlos; Larson, Nathan; Dave, Keron; Chen, Yi; Ryser, Elliot; Carter, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Thermo Scientific™ SureTect™ Listeria species assay is a new real-time PCR assay for the detection of all species of Listeria in food and environmental samples. The assay was originally certified as Performance Tested Methods(SM) (PTM) 071304 in 2013. This report details the method modification study undertaken to extend the performance claims of the assay for matrixes of raw ground turkey, raw ground pork, bagged lettuce, raw pork sausages, pasteurized 2% fat milk, raw cod, pasteurized brie cheese, and ice cream. The method modification study was conducted using the AOAC Research Institute (RI) PTM program to validate the SureTect PCR assay in comparison to the reference method detailed in ISO 11290-1:1996 including amendment 1:2004. All matrixes were tested by Thermo Fisher Scientific (Basingstoke, United Kingdom). In addition, three matrixes (raw cod, bagged lettuce, and pasteurized brie cheese) were analyzed independently as part of the AOAC RI-controlled independent laboratory study by the University of Guelph, Canada. Using probability of detection statistical analysis, there was no significant difference in the performance between the SureTect assay and the International Organization for Standardization reference method for any of the matrixes analyzed in this study.

  11. Resazurin metabolism assay is a new sensitive alternative test in isolated pig cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Sébastien; Dutertre-Catella, Hélène; Martin, Chantal; Rat, Patrice; Warnet, Jean-Michel

    2003-03-01

    The main object of our study was to investigate whether the resazurin metabolism assay is a sensitive surfactant and alcohol toxicity test in isolated pig cornea and to compare this recently developed fluorometric assay with the data collected in the eye irritation reference chemical data bank. Resazurin is a substrate that changes color in response to metabolic activity. Isolated pig corneas were immersed for 10 min in surfactants and alcohol irritant solutions. After incubation, resorufin fluorescence was read and corneal viability was assessed. This corneal viability was compared with the maximal modified average score published in the report of ECETOC. This assay highlighted different concentration-dependent irritation potentials of the three surfactants tested, and the same results were obtained with corneas treated with the alcohols. We observed that the degree of surfactant- and alcohol-induced decrease in corneal viability, using the resazurin reduction test, was correlated with the in vivo irritancy measurements as determined by the Draize test and scored with the Modified Maximum Average Score (MMAS). This assay allowed us to classify the ocular irritancy of the tested surfactants and alcohols in the same ranking order as the Draize classification. Corneal viability measurement can be used as a potential alternative for the toxicological assessment of surfactants and alcohols. The nontoxic, nonradioactive resazurin metabolism assay allows rapid assessment of many samples with simple equipment and at reduced cost for continuous monitoring of corneal viability. This assay seems to be suitable as a toxicological screening test for eye irritation determination.

  12. A comparison of sugar indicators enables a universal high-throughput sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Rocco; Thorson, Jon S

    2008-06-15

    A systematic comparison of six sugar indicators for their sensitivity, specificity, cross-reactivity, and suitability in the context of crude lysates revealed para-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide (pHBH) to be best suited for application in a plate-based phosphatase-assisted universal sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay. The addition of a general phosphatase to nucleotidyltransferase reaction aliquots enabled the conversion of remaining sugar-1-phosphate to free sugar, the concentration of which could be rapidly assessed via the pHBH assay. The assay was validated using the model glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase from Salmonella enterica (RmlA) and compared favorably with a previously reported HPLC assay. This coupled discontinuous assay is quantitative, high throughput, and robust; relies only on commercially available enzymes and reagents; does not require chromatography, specialized detectors (e.g., mass or evaporative light scattering detectors), or radioisotopes; and is capable of detecting less than 5 nmol of sugar-1-phosphate. It is anticipated that this high-throughput assay system will greatly facilitate nucleotidyltransferase mechanistic and directed evolution/engineering studies.

  13. Modification of the diphenylamine assay for cell quantification in three-dimensional biodegradable polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Edward A; Ho, Won Jin; Kamei, Daniel T; Wu, Benjamin M

    2010-02-01

    As three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems gain popularity in biomedical research, reliable assays for cell proliferation within 3D matrices become more important. Although many cell quantification techniques have been established for cells cultured on nondegradable plastic culture dishes and cells suspended in media, it is becoming increasingly clear that cell quantification after prolonged culture in 3D polymeric scaffolds imposes unique challenges because the added presence of polymeric materials may contribute to background signal via various mechanisms including autofluorescence, diffusion gradients, and sequestering effects. Thus, additional steps are required to ensure complete isolation of cells from the 3D scaffold. The diphenylamine assay isolates cellular DNA, degrades the polymeric matrix materials, and reacts with the DNA to yield a colorimetric response. Thus, we report here a practical modification of the diphenylamine assay and show that the assay quantifies cells in 3D polyester scaffolds reliably and reproducibly as long as the necessary amount of the acidic working reagent is present. Our study also demonstrates that the sensitivity of the assay can be optimized by controlling the dimensions of the sampling volume. Overall, the DPA assay offers an attractive solution for challenges associated with 3D cell quantification.

  14. Detection and quantification of tau aggregation using a membrane filter assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2008-02-15

    Aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary lesions in Alzheimer's disease and is a useful marker of disease progression. Although filter trap assays have been employed to assess the extent of tau aggregation in cells and tissues as well as in vitro, their performance relative to other assay modalities has not been reported. To clarify this issue, the ability of the filter trap approach to quantify aggregation of purified recombinant full-length tau protein in vitro was examined as a function of membrane chemistry in a 96-well format. Results showed that nitrocellulose yielded the greatest assay sensitivity relative to polyvinylidene fluoride or cellulose acetate at equal membrane porosity. However, all combinations of filter chemistries, porosities, and monoclonal detection antibodies yielded nonlinear correlations between signal intensity and analyte concentration. When corrected for nonlinearity, the filter trap assay determined a value for the critical monomer concentration for tau aggregation that was statistically identical to determinations made by electron microscopy assay. The data suggest conditions under which filter trap assays can be used to estimate tau aggregation kinetics.

  15. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth.

  16. 基于报告基因检测的PXR、FXR和LXRα激动剂高通量筛选模型的建立%Establishment of cell models for PXR, FXR and LXRαagonists high-throughput screening based on reporter gene assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄嘉琅; 曾行; 钟国平; 金晶; 苟晓丽; 毕惠嫦; 黄民

    2015-01-01

    Aim To develop an in vitro high throughput drug screening system based on reporter gene assay for identification of novel compounds with PXR, FXR and LXRα agonist activity. Methods The expressions of exogenous PXR, FXR and LXRαgene in HEK293, HepG2 and LS174T cells were examined by Real-Time quantity PCR. pSG5-hPXR and pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4, pEGFP-N3-hFXR and EcRE-TK-Luc, pCMX-FLAG-hLXRα and pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4 were cotransfected into cells and the optimal ratio of three plasmids was determined. The dose-response relationship between the positive drug and the fold induction was determined. The specificity of the model was ex-amined, and the repeatability was also determined by Z′ value. Results ① The PXR, FXR and LXRα mRNA expression in HEK293 cell is low among three different cells. ②reporter gene vector and expression plasmid ratio of 1∶ 1, 2∶ 1 and 2∶ 1 were proved to be suitable for highest relative luciferase activity for PXR, FXR or LXRα agonist screening model. ③ The relative luciferase activity was induced by Rif, CDCA or T0901317 in a dose-dependent manner. ④Only Rif, CDCA or T0901317 could significantly increase the relative luciferase activity in PXR,FXR or LXRα agonist screening model, no effect of other nuclear re-ceptors agonist was observed, and the values of Z′-factor for PXR, FXR and LXRαagonist screening model were 0. 58, 0. 66 and 0. 63, respectively. Conclusion An in vitro PXR, FXR and LXRα agonist high-throughput screening models are devel-oped with acceptable specificity and repeatability, and the mod-els can be used to screen PXR, FXR and LXRα agonist.%目的:建立基于报告基因法的高通量筛选细胞模型,用来发现PXR、FXR和LXRα受体激动剂。方法利用Re-al-time定量PCR方法比较HEK293、HepG2和LS174T细胞中内源性核受体 PXR、FXR 和 LXRα的表达量,将 pSG5-hPXR 和 pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4、pEGFP-N3-hFXR 和 EcRE-TK-Luc、 pCMX-FLAG-hLXRα和 pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4等质粒分别共转染到工

  17. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D; Huffnagle, Ian M; Besser, John M; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  18. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rudel

    Full Text Available Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water, we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  19. Response definition criteria for ELISPOT assays revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodie, Z; Price, L; Gouttefangeas, C; Mander, A; Janetzki, S; Löwer, M; Welters, M J P; Ottensmeier, C; van der Burg, S H; Britten, Cedrik M

    2010-10-01

    No consensus has been reached on how to determine if an immune response has been detected based on raw data from an ELISPOT assay. The goal of this paper is to enable investigators to understand and readily implement currently available methods for response determination. We describe empirical and statistical approaches, identifying the strengths and limitations of each approach to allow readers to rationally select and apply a scientifically sound method appropriate to their specific laboratory setting. Five representative approaches were applied to data sets from the CIMT Immunoguiding Program and the response detection and false positive rates were compared. Simulation studies were also performed to compare empirical and statistical approaches. Based on these, we recommend the use of a non-parametric statistical test. Further, we recommend that six medium control wells or four wells each for both medium control and experimental conditions be performed to increase the sensitivity in detecting a response, that replicates with large variation in spot counts be filtered out, and that positive responses arising from experimental spot counts below the estimated limit of detection be interpreted with caution. Moreover, a web-based user interface was developed to allow easy access to the recommended statistical methods. This interface allows the user to upload data from an ELISPOT assay and obtain an output file of the binary responses.

  20. Standardization of anti-DNA antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and represent important biomarkers for clinical and research purposes. These antibodies are part of a family of antibodies to nucleosomes and bind to conserved sites widely present on DNA. While the value of anti-DNA as a biomarker is well established, the assay for these antibodies has involved a variety of DNA sources and systems to detect DNA-anti-DNA interactions. The influence of these variations on antibody detection has complicated assay standardization. As an antigen, DNA has unique features since it is a highly charged polymer that has structural heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can affect antigenicity which can vary on the basis of DNA origin, size, conformation and mobility. In addition, as a polymer, DNA can promote patterns of antibody binding based on monogamous or bivalent interaction which require an extended polynucleotide structure. Understanding the nature of DNA as an antigen can facilitate interpretation of serological tests and underpin efforts at better standardization.

  1. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  2. Cryptosporidium cell culture infectivity assay design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B J; Keegan, A R; Robinson, B S; Monis, P T

    2011-05-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium, which cause the gastrointestinal disease cryptosporidiosis, still represent a significant cause of water-borne disease worldwide. While intensive efforts have been invested in the development of techniques for parasite culture, in vitro growth has been hampered by a number of factors including low levels of infectivity as well as delayed life-cycle development and poor synchronicity. In this study we examined factors affecting the timing of contact between excysted sporozoites and target host cells and the subsequent impact of this upon the establishment of infection. We demonstrate that excystation rate impacts upon establishment of infection and that in our standard assay format the majority of sporozoites are not close enough to the cell monolayer when they are released from the oocyst to successfully establish infection. However, this can be easily overcome by centrifugation of oocysts onto the cell monolayer, resulting in approximately 4-fold increases in sporozoite attachment and subsequent infection. We further demonstrate that excystation procedures can be tailored to control excystation rate to match the assay end purpose and that excystation rate can influence data interpretation. Finally, the addition of both a centrifugation and washing step post-sporozoite attachment may be appropriate when considering the design of in vitro culture experiments for developmental analysis and stage-specific gene expression as this appears to increase the synchronicity of early developmental stages.

  3. A Calorimetric Assay For Enzymatic Saccharification Of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Leigh; Borch, Kim; McFarland, K.C.;

    2010-01-01

    A limited selection of assay and screening methodologies for cellulolytic enzymes has been stated as a restriction in biomass research. In this report we test the potential of isothermal calorimetry for this purpose. The primary observable in this technique (the heat flow in Watts), scales...... with the rate of hydrolysis, and unlike other approaches, it provides a continuous picture of the hydrolytic rate. It was found that the activity of a standard enzyme cocktail against purified cellulose substrates and dilute acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) was readily detected in calorimeters of different...... types, and that the calorimetric signal scaled with the enzyme activity measured by established analytical techniques. Hence, it was concluded that the heat flow provided a valid measure of the hydrolytic rate also in a complex biomass. The hydrolysis process was consistently found to be exothermic...

  4. Detection of Shiga Toxins by Lateral Flow Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn H. Ching

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC produce shiga toxins (Stxs that can cause human disease and death. The contamination of food products with STEC represents a food safety problem that necessitates rapid and effective detection strategies to mitigate risk. In this manuscript, we report the development of a colorimetric lateral flow assay (LFA for the rapid detection of Stxs in <10 min using a pair of monoclonal antibodies that bind epitopes common to Stx1 and six Stx2 variants. This LFA provides a rapid and sensitive test for the detection of Stxs directly from STEC culture supernatants or at risk food samples with a 0.1 ng/mL limit of detection (LOD for Stx2a. This Stx LFA is applicable for use in the rapid evaluation of Stx production from cultured E. coli strains or as a tool to augment current methods as part of food safety testing.

  5. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-09-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time.

  6. A Spectrophotometric Assay Optimizing Conditions for Pepsin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ethelynda E.; Kimsey, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol optimizing the conditions for the assay of pepsin activity using the Coomasie Blue dye binding assay of protein concentration. The dye bonds through strong, noncovalent interactions to basic and aromatic amino acid residues. (DDR)

  7. Assay Method for 235U in Low-Density Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>235U assay method will provide a semi-quantitative assay for any uranium lumps that might exist in low-density, low-Z material waste boxes within a short count time. These materials will consist of

  8. Discordance with 3 Cardiac Troponin I and T Assays: Implications for the 99th Percentile Cutoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerer, Jacobus Petrus Johannes; Tate, Jillian Russyll; Pretorius, Carel Jacobus

    2016-08-01

    We compared the 99th percentile reference intervals with 3 modern cardiac troponin assays in a single cohort and tested the hypothesis that the same individuals will be identified as above the cutoff and that differences will be explained by analytical imprecision. Blood was collected from 2005 apparently healthy blood donors. Cardiac troponin was measured with Abbott Architect STAT high sensitive troponin I, Beckman Coulter Access AccuTnI+3, and Roche Elecsys troponin T highly sensitive assays. The 99th percentile cutoff limits were as follows: Abbott cardiac troponin I (cTnI) 28.9 ng/L; Beckman Coulter cTnI 31.3 ng/L; and Roche cardiac troponin T (cTnT) 15.9 ng/L. Correlation among the assays was poor: Abbott cTnI vs Beckman Coulter cTnI, R(2) = 0.18; Abbott cTnI vs Roche cTnT, R(2) = 0.04; and Beckman Coulter cTnI vs Roche cTnT R(2) = 0.01. Of the results above the cutoff 50% to 70% were unique to individual assays, with only 4 out of 20 individuals above the cutoff for all 3 assays. The observed differences among assays were larger than predicted from analytical imprecision. The 99th percentile cutoff values were in agreement with those reported elsewhere. The poor correlation and concordance amongst the assays were notable. The differences found could not be explained by analytical imprecision and indicate the presence of inaccuracy (bias) that is unique to sample and assay combinations. Based on these findings we recommend less emphasis on the cutoff value and greater emphasis on δ values in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  9. Application of a fluorometric microplate algal toxicity assay for riverine periphytic algal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takashi; Taya, Kiyoshi; Annoh, Hirochica; Ishihara, Satoru

    2013-08-01

    Although riverine periphytic algae attached to riverbed gravel are dominant species in flowing rivers, there is limited toxicity data on them because of the difficulty in cell culture and assays. Moreover, it is well known that sensitivity to pesticides differ markedly among species, and therefore the toxicity data for multiple species need to be efficiently obtained. In this study, we investigated the use of fluorometric microplate toxicity assay for testing periphytic algal species. We selected five candidate test algal species Desmodesmus subspicatus, Achnanthidium minutissimum, Navicula pelliculosa, Nitzschia palea, and Pseudanabaena galeata. The selected species are dominant in the river, include a wide range of taxon, and represent actual species composition. Other additional species were also used to compare the sensitivity and suitability of the microplate assay. A 96-well microplate was used as a test chamber and algal growth was measured by in-vivo fluorescence. Assay conditions using microplate and fluorometric measurement were established, and sensitivities of 3,5-dichlorophenol as a reference substance were assayed. The 50 percent effect concentrations (EC50s) obtained by fluorometric microplate assay and those obtained by conventional Erlenmeyer flask assay conducted in this study were consistent. Moreover, the EC50 values of 3,5-dichlorophenol were within the reported confidence intervals in literature. These results supported the validity of our microplate assay. Species sensitivity distribution (SSD) analysis was conducted using the EC50s of five species. The SSD was found to be similar to the SSD obtained using additional tested species, suggesting that SSD using the five species largely represents algal sensitivity. Our results provide a useful and efficient method for high-tier probabilistic ecological risk assessment of pesticides.

  10. Evaluation of using composite HPV genotyping assay results to monitor human papillomavirus infection burden through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Carol Y

    2015-03-12

    Researchers often group various HPV types into composite measures based on vaccine subtypes, oncogenic potential, or phylogenetic position. Composite prevalence estimates based on PCR genotyping assay results have been calculated to assess HPV infection burden and to monitor HPV vaccine effectiveness. While prevention and intervention strategies can be made based on these prevalence estimates, the discussion on how well these prevalence estimates measure the true underlying infection burdens is limited. A simulation study was conducted to evaluate accuracy of using composite genotyping assay results to monitor HPV infection burden. Data were generated based on mathematical algorithms with prespecified type-specific infection burdens, assay sensitivity, specificity, and correlations between various HPV types. Estimated-to-true prevalence rate ratios and percent reduction of vaccine types were calculated. When "true" underlying type-specific infection burdens were prespecified as the reported prevalence in U.S. and genotyping assay with sensitivity and specificity (0.95, 0.95) was used, estimated-to-true infection prevalence ratios were 2.35, 2.29, 2.18, and 1.46, for the composite measures with 2 high-risk vaccine, 4 vaccine, 14 high-risk and 37 HPV types, respectively. Estimated-to-true prevalence ratios increased when prespecified "true" underlying infection burdens or assay specificity declined. When prespecified "true" type-specific infections of HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 were reduced by 50%, the composite prevalence estimate of 4 vaccine types only decreased by 17% which is much lower than 48% reduction in the prespecified "true" composite prevalence. Composite prevalence estimates calculated based on panels of genotyping assay results generally over-estimate the "true" underlying infection burdens and could under-estimate vaccine effectiveness. Analytical specificity of genotyping assay is as or more important than analytical sensitivity and should be considered in

  11. Development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay to Detect Chicken Parvovirus Specific Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report the development and application of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect parvovirus-specific antibodies in chicken sera. We used an approach previously described for other parvoviruses to clone and express viral structural proteins in insect cells from recombinant baculovirus...

  12. Effect of extraction and assay media on analysis of airborne endotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, S.; Doekes, G.; Heederik, D.; Thorne, P.S.; Wouters, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of airborne endotoxins is thus far not standardized. Earlier studies reported higher endotoxin yields when Tween 20 was added to the media used for filter extraction and in the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. This study compared four common media and assessed the effects of Twe

  13. GENOTOXICITY OF TEN CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES IN FOUR TEST SYSTEMS: COMPARISONS BETWEEN ASSAYS AND CONDENSATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is the study? This the first assessment of a set of cigarette smoke condensates from a range of cigarette types in a variety (4) of short-term genotoxicity assays. Why was it done? No such comparative study of cigarette smoke condensates has been reported. H...

  14. A Multiplexed, Probe-Based Quantitative PCR Assay for DNA of Phytophthora sojae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora sojae (Kaufm. & Gerd.) causes seed rot, pre- and post-emergence damping off, and sometimes foliar blight in soybean (Glycine max). Crop loss may approach 100% with susceptible cultivars. We report here the development of a unique quantitative PCR assay specific to DNA of P. sojae, and a...

  15. Targeted MS Assay Predicting Tamoxifen Resistance in Estrogen-Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Tissues and Sera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Kuhn, Erik; Dekker, Lennard J; Stingl, Christoph; Braakman, Rene B H; Opdam, Mark; Linn, Sabine C; Sweep, Fred C G J; Span, Paul N; Luider, Theo M; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Carr, Steven A; Umar, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported on the development of a 4-protein-based classifier (PDCD4, CGN, G3BP2, and OCIAD1) capable of predicting outcome to tamoxifen treatment in recurrent, estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer based on high-resolution MS data. A precise and high-throughput assay to measure these

  16. The Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: The Stethoscope of Genetic Toxicology for the 21 st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVES: According to the 2007 National Research Council report Toxicology for the Twenty-first Century, modem methods ("omics," in vitro assays, high-throughput testing, computational methods, etc.) will lead to the emergence of a new approach to toxicology. The Salmonella ma...

  17. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  18. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  19. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human ATAD5 is an excellent biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATADS protein levels increase post-transcriptionally following exposure to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Here we report a novel quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-Iuciferase assay that can moni...

  20. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay: Aquaporin-4 antibodies in neuromyelitis optica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Waters (Patrick); M. Reindl (Markus); A. Saiz (Albert Abe); K. Schanda (Kathrin); F. Tuller (Friederike); V. Kral (Vlastimil); P. Nytrova (Petra); O. Sobek (Ondrej); H.H. Nielsen (Helle Hvilsted); T. Barington (Torben); S.T. Lillevang (Søren T.); Z. Illes (Zsolt); K. Rentzsch (Kristin); A. Berthele (Achim); T. Berki (Tímea); L. Granieri; A. Bertolotto (Antonio); B. Giometto; L. Zuliani (Luigi); D. Hamann (Dörte); J.L. Van Pelt (Joost L.); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier); R. Höftberger (Romana); C. Costa (Carme); M. Comabella (Manuel); X. Montalban (Xavier); M. Tintoré; A. Siva (Aksel); A. Altintas (Ayse); G. Deniz (Gunnur); M. Woodhall (Mark); J. Palace (Jacqueline); F. Paul (Friedemann); H.P. Hartung; O. Aktas (Orhan); S. Jarius (Sven); B. Wildemann (Brigitte); C. Vedeler (Christian); A. Ruiz (Anne); M.I. Leite (M. Isabel); P. Trillenberg (Peter); M. Probst (Monika); S. Saschenbrecker (Sandra); A.J.P.E. Vincent (Arnoud); R. Marignier (Romain)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Antibodies to cell surface central nervous system proteins help to diagnose conditions which often respond to immunotherapies. The assessment of antibody assays needs to reflect their clinical utility. We report the results of a multicentre study of aquaporin (AQP) 4 antibody (

  1. Is the Comet Assay a Sensitive Procedure for Detecting Genotoxicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Kawaguchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Comet assay, a procedure for quantitating DNA damage in mammalian cells, is considered sensitive, it has never been ascertained that its sensitivity is higher than the sensitivity of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells. To determine whether the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to those of other genotoxicity assays in mammalian cells, we compared the results of Comet assay with those of micronucleus test (MN test. WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells were exposed to methyl nitrosourea (MNU, ethyl nitrosourea (ENU, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS, bleomycin (BLM, or UVC. In Comet assay, cells were exposed to each mutagen with (Comet assay/araC and without (Comet assay DNA repair inhibitors (araC and hydroxyurea. Furthermore, acellular Comet assay (acellular assay was performed to determine how single-strand breaks (SSBs as the initial damage contributes to DNA migration and/or to micronucleus formation. The lowest genotoxic dose (LGD, which is defined as the lowest dose at which each mutagen causes a positive response on each genotoxicity assay, was used to compare the power of the Comet assay to detect a low level of genotoxic potential and that of MN test; that is, a low LGD indicates a high power. Results are summarized as follows: (1 for all mutagens studied, LGDs were MN test ≦ Comet assay; (2 except for BLM, LGDs were Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test; (3 except for UVC and MNU, LGDs were acellular assay ≦ Comet assay/araC ≦ MN test ≦ Comet assay. The following is suggested by the present findings: (1 LGD in the Comet assay is higher than that in MN test, which suggests that the power of the MN test to detect a low level of genotoxic potential is superior to that of the Comet assay; (2 for the studied mutagens, all assays were able to detect all mutagens correctly, which suggests that the sensitivity of the Comet assay and that of the MN test were

  2. An enzyme-coupled continuous fluorescence assay for farnesyl diphosphate synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Jonathan K; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-02-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS) catalyzes the conversion of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate to farnesyl diphosphate, a crucial metabolic intermediate in the synthesis of cholesterol, ubiquinone, and prenylated proteins; consequently, much effort has gone into developing inhibitors that target FDPS. Currently most FDPS assays either use radiolabeled substrates and are discontinuous or monitor pyrophosphate release and not farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) creation. Here we report the development of a continuous coupled enzyme assay for FDPS activity that involves the subsequent incorporation of the FPP product of that reaction into a peptide via the action of protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase). By using a dansylated peptide whose fluorescence quantum yield increases upon farnesylation, the rate of FDPS-catalyzed FPP production can be measured. We show that this assay is more sensitive than existing coupled assays, that it can be used to conveniently monitor FDPS activity in a 96-well plate format, and that it can reproduce IC(50) values for several previously reported FDPS inhibitors. This new method offers a simple, safe, and continuous method to assay FDPS activity that should greatly facilitate the screening of inhibitors of this important target.

  3. Assays for determining heparan sulfate and heparin O-sulfotransferase activity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Eric; Li, Lingyun; Paul, Priscilla; Beaudet, Julie M; Liu, Jian; Linhardt, Robert J; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    O-sulfotransferases (OSTs) are critical enzymes in the cellular biosynthesis of the biologically and pharmacologically important heparan sulfate and heparin. Recently, these enzymes have been cloned and expressed in bacteria for application in the chemoenzymatic synthesis of glycosaminoglycan-based drugs. OST activity assays have largely relied on the use of radioisotopic methods using [(35)S] 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate and scintillation counting. Herein, we examine alternative assays that are more compatible with a biomanufacturing environment. A high throughput microtiter-based approach is reported that relies on a coupled bienzymic colorimetric assay for heparan sulfate and heparin OSTs acting on polysaccharide substrates using arylsulfotransferase-IV and p-nitrophenylsulfate as a sacrificial sulfogroup donor. A second liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric assay, for heparan sulfate and heparin OSTs acting on structurally defined oligosaccharide substrates, is also reported that provides additional information on the number and positions of the transferred sulfo groups within the product. Together, these assays allow quantitative and mechanistic information to be obtained on OSTs that act on heparan sulfate and heparin precursors.

  4. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ting-Ting; Lu, Chen-Chen; Lu, Jing; Dong, SuoMeng; Ye, WenWu; Wang, YuanChao; Zheng, XiaoBo

    2012-09-01

    Phytophthora sojae is a devastating pathogen that causes soybean Phytophthora root rot. This study reports the development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the A3aPro element for visual detection of P. sojae. The A3aPro-LAMP assay efficiently amplified the target element in Phytophthora spp., Pythium spp., and true fungi isolates. Magnesium pyrophosphate resulting from the LAMP of P. sojae could be detected by real-time measurement of turbidity. Phytophthora sojae DNA products were visualized as a ladder-like banding pattern on 2% gel electrophoresis. A positive colour (sky blue) was only observed in the presence of P. sojae with the addition of hydroxynaphthol blue prior to amplification, whereas none of other isolates showed a colour change. The detection limit of the A3aPro-specific LAMP assay for P. sojae was 10 pg μL(-1) of genomic DNA per reaction. The assay also detected P. sojae from diseased soybean tissues and residues. These results suggest that the A3aPro-LAMP assay reported here can be used for the visual detection of P. sojae in plants and production fields.

  5. An inexpensive, scalable behavioral assay for measuring ethanol sedation sensitivity and rapid tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Simran; Kollah, Arnavaz P; Lewellyn, Lara; Chan, Robin F; Grotewiel, Mike

    2015-04-15

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a serious health challenge. Despite a large hereditary component to AUD, few genes have been unambiguously implicated in their etiology. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a powerful model for exploring molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying alcohol-related behaviors and therefore holds great promise for identifying and understanding the function of genes that influence AUD. The use of the Drosophila model for these types of studies depends on the availability of assays that reliably measure behavioral responses to ethanol. This report describes an assay suitable for assessing ethanol sensitivity and rapid tolerance in flies. Ethanol sensitivity measured in this assay is influenced by the volume and concentration of ethanol used, a variety of previously reported genetic manipulations, and also the length of time the flies are housed without food immediately prior to testing. In contrast, ethanol sensitivity measured in this assay is not affected by the vigor of fly handling, sex of the flies, and supplementation of growth medium with antibiotics or live yeast. Three different methods for quantitating ethanol sensitivity are described, all leading to essentially indistinguishable ethanol sensitivity results. The scalable nature of this assay, combined with its overall simplicity to set-up and relatively low expense, make it suitable for small and large scale genetic analysis of ethanol sensitivity and rapid tolerance in Drosophila.

  6. Assay optimization: a statistical design of experiments approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altekar, Maneesha; Homon, Carol A; Kashem, Mohammed A; Mason, Steven W; Nelson, Richard M; Patnaude, Lori A; Yingling, Jeffrey; Taylor, Paul B

    2007-03-01

    With the transition from manual to robotic HTS in the last several years, assay optimization has become a significant bottleneck. Recent advances in robotic liquid handling have made it feasible to reduce assay optimization timelines with the application of statistically designed experiments. When implemented, they can efficiently optimize assays by rapidly identifying significant factors, complex interactions, and nonlinear responses. This article focuses on the use of statistically designed experiments in assay optimization.

  7. Performance Characteristics of Xpert Flu/RSV XC Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowitch, Elena B; Miller, Melissa B

    2015-08-01

    The Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay was compared to laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) (n = 207) and the Xpert Flu assay (n = 147) using archived nasopharyngeal swabs. The percentages of positive agreements with LDTs were 97.8% for influenza A, 97.2% for influenza B, and 89.3% for RSV. The sensitivity of influenza detection was improved with the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay compared to the Xpert Flu assay.

  8. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile.

  9. Measurement of factor v activity in human plasma using a microplate coagulation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Derek; Levit, Irina; Samis, John A

    2012-09-09

    In response to injury, blood coagulation is activated and results in generation of the clotting protease, thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin which forms an insoluble clot that stops hemorrhage. Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical cofactor for the protease FXa and accelerator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation as part of prothrombinase (1, 2). Manual FV assays have been described (3, 4), but they are time consuming and subjective. Automated FV assays have been reported (5-7), but the analyzer and reagents are expensive and generally provide only the clot time, not the rate and extent of fibrin formation. The microplate platform is preferred for measuring enzyme-catalyzed events because of convenience, time, cost, small volume, continuous monitoring, and high-throughput (8, 9). Microplate assays have been reported for clot lysis (10), platelet aggregation (11), and coagulation Factors (12), but not for FV activity in human plasma. The goal of the method was to develop a microplate assay that measures FV activity during fibrin formation in human plasma. This novel microplate method outlines a simple, inexpensive, and rapid assay of FV activity in human plasma. The assay utilizes a kinetic microplate reader to monitor the absorbance change at 405 nm during fibrin formation in human plasma (Figure 1) (13). The assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation. It requires only μl quantities of plasma, is complete in 6 min, has high-throughput, is sensitive to 24-80 pM FV, and measures the amount of unintentionally activated (1-stage activity) and thrombin-activated FV (2-stage activity) to obtain a complete assessment of its total functional activity (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity). Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired coagulopathy that most often develops from pre-existing infections (14). DIC is associated with a poor prognosis and increases mortality

  10. Development of a rapid cell-fusion-based phenotypic HIV-1 tropism assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phairote Teeranaipong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A dual split reporter protein system (DSP, recombining Renilla luciferase (RL and green fluorescent protein (GFP split into two different constructs (DSP1–7 and DSP8–11, was adapted to create a novel rapid phenotypic tropism assay (PTA for HIV-1 infection (DSP-Pheno. Methods: DSP1–7 was stably expressed in the glioma-derived NP-2 cell lines, which expressed CD4/CXCR4 (N4X4 or CD4/CCR5 (N4R5, respectively. An expression vector with DSP8–11 (pRE11 was constructed. The HIV-1 envelope genes were subcloned in pRE11 (pRE11-env and transfected into 293FT cells. Transfected 293FT cells were incubated with the indicator cell lines independently. In developing the assay, we selected the DSP1–7-positive clones that showed the highest GFP activity after complementation with DSP8–11. These cell lines, designated N4R5-DSP1–7, N4X4-DSP1–7 were used for subsequent assays. Results: The env gene from the reference strains (BaL for R5 virus, NL4-3 for X4 virus, SF2 for dual tropic virus subcloned in pRE11 and tested, was concordant with the expected co-receptor usage. Assay results were available in two ways (RL or GFP. The assay sensitivity by RL activity was comparable with those of the published phenotypic assays using pseudovirus. The shortest turnaround time was 5 days after obtaining the patient's plasma. All clinical samples gave positive RL signals on R5 indicator cells in the fusion assay. Median RLU value of the low CD4 group was significantly higher on X4 indicator cells and suggested the presence of more dual or X4 tropic viruses in this group of patients. Comparison of representative samples with Geno2Pheno [co-receptor] assay was concordant. Conclusions: A new cell-fusion-based, high-throughput PTA for HIV-1, which would be suitable for in-house studies, was developed. Equipped with two-way reporter system, RL and GFP, DSP-Pheno is a sensitive test with short turnaround time. Although maintenance of cell lines and

  11. Analysis of a transcription factor using transient assay in Arabidopsis protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yuji; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors is a fundamental mechanism in essentially all aspects of cellular processes. Transient expression assay of a reporter plasmid containing a reporter gene driven by a promoter of interest and an effector plasmid expressing a transcription factor has been a powerful tool for analyzing transcription factors. Here we present a protocol for polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis protoplasts. It details preparation of protoplasts from Arabidopsis suspension cultured cells or leaves of soil-grown Arabidopsis plants and subsequent PEG-mediated transformation with reporter and effector plasmids. This protocol can be completed within 24 h from protoplast preparation to reporter assay. As an example, analysis of the membrane-bound transcription factor AtbZIP60 and its target BiP3 promoter is shown.

  12. Systems, devices, and methods for agglutination assays using sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-01-26

    Embodiments of the present invention include methods for conducting agglutination assays using sedimentation. Aggregates may be exposed to sedimentation forces and travel through a density medium to a detection area. Microfluidic devices, such as microfluidic disks, are described for conducting the agglutination assays, as are systems for conducting the assays.

  13. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from either...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section... Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A glycosylated hemoglobin assay is a device used to measure the glycosylated hemoglobins (A1a, A1b, and A1c) in a patient's blood by a column...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7400 - Hemoglobin A2 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin A2 assay. 864.7400 Section 864.7400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7400 Hemoglobin A2 assay. (a) Identification. A hemoglobin A2 assay is a device used to determine the hemoglobin A2...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7415 - Abnormal hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abnormal hemoglobin assay. 864.7415 Section 864... hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. An abnormal hemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents... hemoglobin types. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  18. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866... Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. (a) Identification. A Plasmodium species antigen detection assay... malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium...

  19. 40 CFR 79.64 - In vivo micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... micronucleus assay. (a) Purpose. The micronucleus assay is an in vivo cytogenetic test which uses erythrocytes...) Test evaluation. (i) Positive results in the micronucleus test provide information on the ability of a..., Mammalian Bone Marrow Cytogenetics Tests: Micronucleus Assay. (2) Cihak, R. “Evaluation of Benzidine by...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305 Herpes simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  2. Validation of a quantitative flow cytometer assay for monitoring HER-2/neu expression level in cell-based cancer immunotherapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randlev, Britta; Huang, Li-chun; Watatsu, Mitsuko; Marcus, Matthew; Lin, Andy; Shih, Shian-Jiun

    2010-03-01

    GVAX immunotherapy for prostate cancer is comprised of two genetically modified prostate cancer cell lines, CG1940 and CG8711, engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor. As part of the matrix of potency assays, CG1940 and CG8711 are tested for the expression level of cell surface HER-2/neu using a quantitative flow cytometer assay. This assay reports the antibody binding capacity value of the cells as a measure of HER-2/neu expression using cells immediately after thawing from cryogenic storage. With optimized cell handling and staining procedure and appropriate system suitability controls, the assay was validated as a quantitative assay. The validation results showed that assay accuracy, specificity, precision, linearity, and range were suitable for the intended use of ensuring lot-to-lot consistency of HER-2/neu expression. Assay robustness was demonstrated using design of experiments that evaluated critical assay parameters. Finally, the assay was successfully transferred to a current good manufacturing practice Quality Control laboratory in a separate facility. Since the overall precision of this assay is better than that of ELISA methods and it can be performed with ease and high throughput, quantitative flow cytometer-based assays may be an appropriate immunological assay platform for Quality Control laboratories for characterization and release of cell-based therapies.

  3. Laboratory intercomparison of the dicentric chromosome analysis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinke, C; Barnard, S; Boulay-Greene, H; De Amicis, A; De Sanctis, S; Herodin, F; Jones, A; Kulka, U; Lista, F; Lloyd, D; Martigne, P; Moquet, J; Oestreicher, U; Romm, H; Rothkamm, K; Valente, M; Meineke, V; Braselmann, H; Abend, M

    2013-08-01

    The study design and obtained results represent an intercomparison of various laboratories performing dose assessment using the dicentric chromosome analysis (DCA) as a diagnostic triage tool for individual radiation dose assessment. Homogenously X-irradiated (240 kVp, 1 Gy/min) blood samples for establishing calibration data (0.25-5 Gy) as well as blind samples (0.1-6.4 Gy) were sent to the participants. DCA was performed according to established protocols. The time taken to report dose estimates was documented for each laboratory. Additional information concerning laboratory organization/characteristics as well as assay performance was collected. The mean absolute difference (MAD) was calculated and radiation doses were merged into four triage categories reflecting clinical aspects to calculate accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The earliest report time was 2.4 days after sample arrival. DCA dose estimates were reported with high and comparable accuracy, with MAD values ranging between 0.16-0.5 Gy for both manual and automated scoring. No significant differences were found for dose estimates based either on 20, 30, 40 or 50 cells, suggesting that the scored number of cells can be reduced from 50 to 20 without loss of precision of triage dose estimates, at least for homogenous exposure scenarios. Triage categories of clinical significance could be discriminated efficiently using both scoring procedures.

  4. Evaluation of a 5-tier scheme proposed for classification of sequence variants using bioinformatic and splicing assay data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Logan C; Whiley, Phillip J; Houdayer, Claude;

    2013-01-01

    of results, and the lack of quantitative data for the aberrant transcripts. We propose suggestions for minimum reporting guidelines for splicing assays, and improvements to the 5-tier splicing classification system to allow future evaluation of its performance as a clinical tool.......Splicing assays are commonly undertaken in the clinical setting to assess the clinical relevance of sequence variants in disease predisposition genes. A 5-tier classification system incorporating both bioinformatic and splicing assay information was previously proposed as a method to provide...... consistent clinical classification of such variants. Members of the ENIGMA Consortium Splicing Working Group undertook a study to assess the applicability of the scheme to published assay results, and the consistency of classifications across multiple reviewers. Splicing assay data were identified for 235...

  5. Duplex Real-Time RT-PCR Assays for the Detection and Typing of Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viarouge, Cyril; Breard, Emmanuel; Zientara, Stephan; Vitour, Damien; Sailleau, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) may cause severe clinical episodes in some species of deer and sometimes in cattle. Laboratory diagnosis provides a basis for the design and timely implementation of disease control measures. There are seven distinct EHDV serotypes, VP2 coding segment 2 being the target for serotype specificity. This paper reports the development and validation of eight duplex real-time RT-PCR assays to simultaneously amplify the EHDV target (S9 for the pan-EHDV real-time RT-PCR assay and S2 for the serotyping assays) and endogenous control gene Beta-actin. Analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, inter- and intra-assay variation and efficiency were evaluated for each assay. All were shown to be highly specific and sensitive. PMID:26161784

  6. Best practice recommendations for the transfer of cell-based assays for the measurement of neutralizing anti-drug antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belouski, Shelley S; Born, Danika; Jacques, Susan; Harder, Brandon; Reynhardt, Kai; Kaliyaperumal, Arunan; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-09-01

    We recommend the application of a strategically designed step-wise approach to transfer cell-based assays that includes assessing analytical performance (through a fit for purpose validation and/or design of experiment robustness characterization), clinical performance (i.e., concordance) and performance or proficiency testing for long-term method monitoring. Here we focus on the application of this strategy to cell-based assays for the measurement of neutralizing anti-drug antibodies. This application is unique in that it requires a custom cell-based assay to be used over a long period of time (potentially phase 1a through the life of a marketed product) with the confidence of consistent method performance and result reporting. But, the process is adaptable to a variety of assay types and applications. We present lessons learned from two cell-based assay transfers that met relevant challenges while implementing alternative permutations of the recommended method transfer process.

  7. Assays for investigating deSUMOylation enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Chen, Yuan

    2012-07-01

    Post-translational modifications by the SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier) family of proteins are recently discovered essential regulatory mechanisms. All SUMO proteins are synthesized as larger precursors that are matured by SUMO-specific proteases, known as SENPs, which remove several C-terminal amino acids of SUMO to expose the Gly-Gly motif. SENPs also remove SUMO modifications from target proteins, making this modification highly dynamic. At least six deSUMOylation enzymes, all of which are encoded by essential genes, have been identified in mammals. SENP1 has been shown to play an important role in the development of prostate cancer and in angiogenesis. This unit describes and discusses methods for characterizing the deSUMOylation enzymes. These assays enable the identification of inhibitors of these enzymes and investigation of their mechanism of inhibition in order to develop research tools and future therapeutics.

  8. Assay of Endocannabinoid Oxidation by Cyclooxygenase-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudalkar, Shalley N.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonylethanolamide (AEA) are endogenous ligands for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and are implicated in a wide array of physiological processes. These neutral arachidonic acid (AA) derivatives have been identified as efficient substrates for the second isoform of the cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-2). A diverse family of prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) and prostaglandin ethanolamides (PG-EAs) is generated by the action of COX-2 (and downstream prostaglandin synthases) on 2-AG and AEA. As the biological importance of the endocannabinoid system becomes more apparent, there is a tremendous need for robust, sensitive and efficient analytical methodology for the endocannabinoids and their metabolites. In this chapter we describe methodology suitable for carrying out oxygenation of endocannabinoids by COX-2, and analysis of products of endocannabinoid oxygenation by COX-2 and of endocannabinoids themselves from in-vitro and cell assays. PMID:27245906

  9. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan [Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Lebensmittelchemie der Technischen, Garching (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis. (orig.)

  10. Lab-on-a-Chip Multiplex Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Harald; Wienke, Julia; Bier, Frank F

    2017-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip multiplex assays allow a rapid identification of multiple parameters in an automated manner. Here we describe a lab-based preparation followed by a rapid and fully automated DNA microarray hybridization and readout in less than 10 min using the Fraunhofer in vitro diagnostics (ivD) platform to enable rapid identification of bacterial species and detection of antibiotic resistance. The use of DNA microarrays allows a fast adaptation of new biomarkers enabling the identification of different genes as well as single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes. In this protocol we describe a DNA microarray developed for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA resistance gene.

  11. Development of a Radioactive Waste Assay System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Duck Won; Song, Myung Jae; Shin, Sang Woon; Sung, Kee Bang; Ko, Dae Hach [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Jeong; Park, Jong Mook; Jee, Kwang Yoong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear Act of Korea requires the manifest of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated at nuclear power plants prior to disposal sites.Individual history records of the radioactive waste should be contained the information about the activity of nuclides in the drum, total activity, weight, the type of waste. A fully automated nuclide analysis assay system, non-destructive analysis and evaluation system of the radioactive waste, was developed through this research project. For the nuclides that could not be analysis directly by MCA, the activities of the representative {gamma}-emitters(Cs-137, Co-60) contained in the drum were measured by using that system. Then scaling factors were used to calculate the activities of {alpha}, {beta}-emitters. Furthermore, this system can automatically mark the analysis results onto the drum surface. An automated drum handling system developed through this research project can reduce the radiation exposure to workers. (author). 41 refs., figs.

  12. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis.

  13. Universal fieldable assay with unassisted visual detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelyapov, Nicolas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A universal detection system based on allosteric aptamers, signal amplification cascade, and eye-detectable phrase transition. A broadly applicable homogeneous detection system is provided. It utilizes components of the blood coagulation cascade in the presence of polystyrene microspheres (MS) as a signal amplifier. Russell's viper venom factor X activator (RVV-X) triggers the cascade, which results in an eye-visible phase transition--precipitation of MS bound to clotted fibrin. An allosteric RNA aptamer, RNA132, with affinity for RVV-X and human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF.sub.165) was created. RNA132 inhibits enzymatic activity of RVV-X. The effector molecule, VEGF.sub.165, reverses the inhibitory activity of RNA132 on RVV-X and restores its enzymatic activity, thus triggering the cascade and enabling the phase transition. Similar results were obtained for another allosteric aptamer modulated by a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The assay is instrumentation-free for both processing and readout.

  14. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MILK CASEIN ASSAY METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA CĂPRIłĂ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Casein, the main milk protein was determined by different assay methods: the gravimetric method, the method based on the neutralization of the NaOH excess used for the casein precipitate solving and the method based on the titration of the acetic acid used for the casein precipitation. The last method is the simplest one, with the fewer steps, and also with the lowest error degree. The results of the experiment revealed that the percentage of casein from the whole milk protein represents between 72.6–81.3% in experiment 1, between 73.6–81.3% in experiment 2 and between 74.3–81% in experiment 3.

  15. Enzymatic assay for methotrexate in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H; Heinsvig, E M

    1985-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) accumulates in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients. We present a modified enzymatic assay measuring MTX concentrations between 10 and 60 nmol/l in erythrocytes, adapted for a centrifugal analyser (Cobas Bio). About 40 patient's samples could be analysed within 1 h. The detection...... limit was 3 nmol/l. Within run and between-run precision was 7.4% and 13.5% for control 10 nmol/l and 1.2% and 3.2% for control 50 nmol/l. Recovery was 85-115% of MTX added to haemolysed erythrocytes. We found the method useful for pharmacokinetic studies of MTX in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients...

  16. Advancement in biochemical assays in andrology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolf-BernhardSchill; RaftHenkel

    1999-01-01

    Determination of maikers of sperm function, accessory sex gland secretion and silent male genital tract inflammation is of considerable diagnostic value in the evaluation of male infertility. The introduction of biochemical tests into the analysis of male factor has the advantage that standardized assays with a coefficient of variafion characteristic of clinical chemistry are performed, in contrast to biological test systems with a large variability .Biochemical parameters may be used in clinical practice to evaluate the sperm fertitizing capacity (acrosin, aniline blue,ROS), to characterize male accessory sex gland secretinns (fructose, a-glucosidase, PSA), and to identify men with silent genital tract inflammation (elastase, C'3 complement component, coeruloplasmin, IgA, IgG, ROS). (As/an J Androl 1999 Jun; 1: 45-51)

  17. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  18. Antioxidant assay using genetically engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Macalino, Bernadette; Pastoral, Ian Lemuel; Sevilla, Fortunato, III

    2006-02-01

    A new antioxidant activity assay based on the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducible bacterial strain (E. coli DPD2511) is described. The strain harbors the plasmid pKatG::luxCDABE and responds to hydrogen peroxide treatment by increasing light emission at 490 nm. Antioxidant capacity is evaluated through the ability of an agent to inhibit the hydrogen peroxide-induced bioluminescence of E. coli DPD2511. Applicability of the developed assay in detecting levels of antioxidants in various aqueous plant extracts is demonstrated. The assay was validated against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a known antioxidant assay.

  19. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  20. Performance of MycAssay Aspergillus DNA real-time PCR assay compared with the galactomannan detection assay for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis from serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylo, Alexis; Courtemanche, Chantal; Pelletier, René; Boudreault, Alexandre A

    2014-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a major problem in the immunocompromised population, and its diagnosis is difficult due to the low sensitivity of available tests. Detection of Aspergillus nucleic acid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples is a promising diagnostic tool; however, use of multiple "in-house" methods precludes standardization. The first commercial PCR assay, MycAssay Aspergillus (Myconostica, Ltd), became available recently, and its performance in the diagnosis of IA was evaluated and compared with the galactomannan (GM) assay. Serum samples obtained from patients with hematological cancer were tested retrospectively with MycAssay Aspergillus PCR. Per-episode and per-test analyses were undertaken with 146 sera from 35 hematological patients. Sixteen patients had proven or probable IA and 19 had possible or no IA. In per-episode analysis, MycAssay Aspergillus had a sensitivity of 43.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.8%-70.1%) and a specificity of 63.2% (95% CI, 38.4%-83.7%) for IA diagnosis. In per-test analyses, MycAssay Aspergillus had a lower specificity than the GM assay (83.3% vs. 93.1%, P = 0.04). The addition of PCR to routine clinical practice would have permitted the diagnosis of one additional probable IA in our cohort. Use of PCR instead of GM assay would have delayed the diagnosis in two cases. Aspergillus DNA detection by PCR with serum specimens using MycAssay showed a lower specificity than the GM assay and was associated with a low sensitivity for IA diagnosis. More studies are needed to determine the exact role of MycAssay in IA diagnosis in patients with hematological malignancy.

  1. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhao

    Full Text Available Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications.

  2. Cellular Assays with a Molecular Endpoint Measured by SAMDI Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Eric J; Cabezas, Maria D; Mrksich, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Cell-based, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are increasingly important tools used in drug discovery, but frequently rely on readouts of gene expression or phenotypic changes and require development of specialized, labeled reporters. Here a cell-based, label-free assay compatible with HTS is introduced that can report quantitatively on enzyme activities by measuring mass changes of substrates with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The assay uses self-assembled monolayers to culture cells on arrays presenting substrates, which serve as reporters for a desired enzyme activity. Each spot of cells is treated with a compound, cultured and lysed, enabling endogenous enzymes to act on the immobilized peptide substrate. It is demonstrated that the assay can measure protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity from as few as five cells and a screen is described that identifies a compound that reduces PTP activity in cell lysates. This approach offers a valuable addition to the methods available for cell-based screening.

  3. Clinical evaluation of new automated cytomegalovirus IgM and IgG assays for the Elecsys(®) analyser platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revello, M G; Vauloup-Fellous, C; Grangeot-Keros, L; van Helden, J; Dickstein, Y; Lipkin, I; Mühlbacher, A; Lazzarotto, T

    2012-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading cause of physical and neurological abnormalities in newborns. Hence, the diagnosis of CMV infection in pregnant women is necessary in order to allow appropriate management of their pregnancy. New assays have been developed for the Roche Elecsys® immunoassay platform that detect CMV-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG, with the IgM assay designed to target IgM produced at the start of infection rather than IgM persisting later in infection. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the new assays compared with other commercial kits widely distributed in laboratories. The performance of the Elecsys and comparator CMV IgM and IgG assays was assessed using 967 preselected patient samples characterised by CMV infection status, as well as being compared using 1,668 unselected clinical samples. The Elecsys CMV IgM and IgG assays performed consistently with comparator assays using the preselected samples. The Elecsys CMV IgM assay showed improved sensitivity compared with the Enzygnost® assay in primary infection (91.2 % vs. 79.4 %) and improved specificity over the Architect® assay in potentially cross-reacting samples (94.1 % vs. 82.4 %). The Elecsys IgM assay reported fewer positive results in the later stages of CMV infection compared with ETI-CYTOK-M ELISA, while the Elecsys IgG assay reported slightly fewer negative results in the early stages of infection compared with ETI-CYTOK-G ELISA. There was good agreement between Elecsys and comparator assays using unselected clinical samples (range 90.4-99.4 %). The Elecsys CMV IgM and IgG assays compare well with routinely used assays and are suitable for clinical use.

  4. Lysine-promoted colorimetric response of gold nanoparticles: a simple assay for ultrasensitive mercury(II) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-07

    Although numerous methods have been reported for the analysis of toxic mercury (Hg(2+)) ions in drinking water, development of simple, rapid, inexpensive, and sensitive sensors still remains a great challenge. Here, we report a simple yet very sensitive colorimetric assay for rapid detection of Hg(2+) in water. The colorimetric assay is based on the aggregation of as-prepared citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the presence of Hg(2+) ions and the positively charged amino acid, lysine. The detection limit of this inexpensive colorimetric assay is 2.9 nM, which is below the limit value (10 nM) defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in drinkable water. Also, the colorimetric response of citrate-capped AuNPs in the presence of lysine is very selective to the Hg(2+). In addition, the colorimetric assay is very fast, and all analyses can be completed within a few minutes.

  5. Technical note: comparison of the PrestoBlue and LDH release assays with the MTT assay for skin viability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Sonia; Jarraya, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    MTT assay is the gold standard for assessing skin sample viability but it is time-consuming. Here we compared the MTT test with two other assays for the assessment of skin viability. The MTT, PrestoBlue (colorimetric method) and LDH release assays were applied to fresh and cryopreserved skin. Skin viability was considered proportional to the optical density values of the relevant analytes. PrestoBlue did not reliably distinguish between fresh and cryopreserved skin. The LDH release assay did not allow us to establish a viability index. We recommend the MTT assay for assessing skin viability.

  6. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, E-mail: christine.hendren@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Lowry, Gregory V., E-mail: glowry@andrew.cmu.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 119 Porter Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Unrine, Jason M., E-mail: jason.unrine@uky.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Agricultural Science Center, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States); Wiesner, Mark R., E-mail: wiesner@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, 121 Hudson Hall PO Box 90287, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical–chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical–chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. - Highlights: • Approaches to predict risk directly from nanomaterial (NM) properties are problematic. • We propose

  7. Development of a versatile organophosphorous-hydrolase-based assay for organophosphate pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Wang, Yi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Mulchandani, P.; Chen, Wilfred

    1999-02-01

    We report a rapid and versatile organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphate pesticides. This assay is based on a substrate-dependant change in pH near the active site of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) which is covalently immobilized to the enzyme. This method employs FITC-labeled enzyme adsorbed to polymethylmethacrylate beads. Analytes were measured using a microbead fluorescence analyzer. The dynamic concentration range for the assay extends from 25 (mu) M to 400 (mu) M for paraoxon with a detection limit of 8 (mu) M. This assay compared favorably to an HPLC method for monitoring the concentration of coumaphos in bioremediation filtrate samples.

  8. [Changes in serum vitamin D assay usage and the need for evidence-based recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, Antoine; Lim, Soo-Kyung; Guéchot, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Result of renewed interest due to the large amount of literature that reported numerous epidemiological data demonstrating the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, the number of prescriptions of serum vitamin D assays has grown exponentially in recent years with a cost for health insurance that increased almost fivefold in four years. The quantitative and qualitative analysis of assays carried out from 2007 to 2011 in a French university adult short-stay hospital shows changes in practices not only quantitatively but also qualitatively resulting in an overtime increase in the frequency of prescriptions in patients younger, less vitamin D deficient and more frequently male. In the absence of French guidelines, this development cannot be qualified as deviant but justifies the urgent need to establish evidence-based recommendations for good prescriptions and adequate assays of blood vitamin D.

  9. Evaluation of a novel PCR-based diagnostic assay for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, M; Glennon, M; Martinazzo, G; Turchetti, E; Marcolini, S; Smith, T; Dawson, M T

    1996-01-01

    We report on a PCR-based assay we have developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples. One hundred sputum specimens, which included 34 culture-positive and 66 culture-negative specimens, were evaluated with this system. Of the 34 culture-positive specimens, 31 were PCR positive, and 60 of the culture-negative specimens were PCR negative. An internal standard has been included in the assay system to monitor PCR inhibition and to confirm the reliability of the PCR assay. PMID:8862607

  10. High-Content Positional Biosensor Screening Assay for Compounds to Prevent or Disrupt Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Intermediary Factor 2 Protein–Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Yun; Shun, Tong Ying; Strock, Christopher J.; Johnston, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor–transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (AR-TIF2) positional protein–protein interaction (PPI) biosensor assay described herein combines physiologically relevant cell-based assays with the specificity of binding assays by incorporating structural information of AR and TIF2 functional domains along with intracellular targeting sequences and fluorescent reporters. Expression of the AR-red fluorescent protein (RFP) “prey” and TIF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) “bait” compon...

  11. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-11-10

    Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemann–Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between existing

  12. Differentiating Botulinum Neurotoxin-Producing Clostridia with a Simple, Multiplex PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Charles H D; Vazquez, Adam J; Hill, Karen; Smith, Theresa J; Nottingham, Roxanne; Stone, Nathan E; Sobek, Colin J; Cocking, Jill H; Fernández, Rafael A; Caballero, Patricia A; Leiser, Owen P; Keim, Paul; Sahl, Jason W

    2017-09-15

    Diverse members of the genus Clostridium produce botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which cause a flaccid paralysis known as botulism. While multiple species of clostridia produce BoNTs, the majority of human botulism cases have been attributed to Clostridium botulinum groups I and II. Recent comparative genomic studies have demonstrated the genomic diversity within these BoNT-producing species. This report introduces a multiplex PCR assay for differentiating members of C. botulinum group I, C. sporogenes, and two major subgroups within C. botulinum group II. Coding region sequences unique to each of the four species/subgroups were identified by in silico analyses of thousands of genome assemblies, and PCR primers were designed to amplify each marker. The resulting multiplex PCR assay correctly assigned 41 tested isolates to the appropriate species or subgroup. A separate PCR assay to determine the presence of the ntnh gene (a gene associated with the botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster) was developed and validated. The ntnh gene PCR assay provides information about the presence or absence of the botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster and the type of gene cluster present (ha positive [ha(+)] or orfX(+)). The increased availability of whole-genome sequence data and comparative genomic tools enabled the design of these assays, which provide valuable information for characterizing BoNT-producing clostridia. The PCR assays are rapid, inexpensive tests that can be applied to a variety of sample types to assign isolates to species/subgroups and to detect clostridia with botulinum neurotoxin gene (bont) clusters.IMPORTANCE Diverse clostridia produce the botulinum neurotoxin, one of the most potent known neurotoxins. In this study, a multiplex PCR assay was developed to differentiate clostridia that are most commonly isolated in connection with human botulism cases: C. botulinum group I, C. sporogenes, and two major subgroups within C. botulinum group II. Since BoNT-producing and

  13. Prevalidation of the rat CFU-GM assay for in vitro toxicology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, Augusto; Bonomi, Arianna; Cavicchini, Loredana; Albella, Beatriz; Cerrato, Laura; Parent-Massin, Dominique; Sibiril, Yann; Parchment, Ralph; Behrsing, Holger; Verderio, Paolo; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Giangreco, Manuela; Baglio, Carolina; Coccè, Valentina; Sisto, Francesca; Gribaldo, Laura

    2010-05-01

    In vitro haematotoxicity assays are thought to have the potential to significantly reduce and refine the use of animals for haematotoxicity testing. These assays are used successfully in all types of studies - however, their use is not so common in human toxicology studies in the preclinical setting, as they are not required for regulatory testing in this case. Furthermore, these assays could play a key role in bridging the gap between preclinical toxicology studies in animal models and clinical investigations. In previous studies, the Colony Forming Unit-Granulocyte Macrophage (CFU-GM) assay has been validated for testing drug haematotoxicity (with both mouse bone-marrow and human cord blood) and for predicting the in vivo human maximal tolerated dose (MTD) by adjusting in vivo data on mouse toxicity. Recently, a Colony Forming Unit-Megakaryocyte (CFU-MK) assay has also been prevalidated for testing drug toxicity toward megakaryocytes. The rat CFU-GM assay has been used by many researchers for its ability to evaluate in vitro haematotoxicity. Although it is not yet available, a standardised procedure for data comparison could be very important, since the rat is the most widely-used species for the in vivo testing of toxicants. This report presents the results of the prevalidation study developed to analyse the intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory variability of a standardised operating procedure for this assay and its performance for the in vitro determination of the inhibitory concentration (IC) values of drugs on rat myeloid progenitors (CFU-GM). The results demonstrate that the CFU-GM assay can be performed with cryopreserved rat bone-marrow cells (rBMC). The assay represents a useful tool for evaluating the toxicity of a compound, in terms of both relative toxicity (when different molecules are compared) and the prediction of the degree of in vivo toxicity. The use of this assay could greatly reduce the number of rats used in experimental procedures, and

  14. Response of CEDIA amphetamines assay after a single dose of bitter orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, DiemThuy T; Bui, Linda T; Ambrose, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Bitter orange has recently been substituted as an ingredient in many "ephedra-free" dietary supplements used for weight loss. The primary active ingredient in bitter orange is synephrine. Previous reports have documented false-positive results from ephedrine with urine amphetamine assays. Because of the similarity in chemical structure of ephedrine and synephrine, it is hypothesized that ingestion of a bitter orange supplement may have the potential to cause false-positive results with urine amphetamine assays. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay after ingestion of bitter orange. Six healthy adult male volunteers were administered a single oral dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange, a 900-mg dietary supplement extract standardized to 6% synephrine. Urine specimens were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 hours post-administration. Additional urine specimens were collected from 1 subject at 9, 12, and 15 hours after administration. All specimens were analyzed by the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity and pH also were measured. All urine specimens demonstrated a negative response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. Urine specific gravity ranged from 1.007 to 1.028, and pH ranged from 5.0 to 7.0; thus, reducing the possibility that the negative results were caused by diluted specimens or reduced excretion of synephrine into alkaline urine. This information will be of value when health care providers or those who interpret drug screens are asked to provide consultation regarding the interference of bitter orange supplements with the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay. A single-dose of Nature's Way Bitter Orange was not found to cause a false-positive response to the CEDIA Amphetamines Assay in 6 healthy adult male volunteers.

  15. Ultraminiaturized assay for rapid, low cost detection and quantification of clinical and biochemical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we report a simple, sensitive, rapid and low-cost ultraminiaturized assay technique for quantitative detection of 1 μl of clinical or biochemical sample on a novel ultraminiaturized assay plate (UAP). UAP is prepared by making tiny cavities on a polypropylene sheet. As UAP cannot immobilize a biomolecule through absorption, we have activated the tiny cavities of UAP by 1-fluoro-2-nitro-4-azidobenzene in a photochemical reaction. Activated UAP (AUAP) can covalently immobilize any biomolecule having an active nucleophilic group such as amino group. Efficacy of AUAP is demonstrated by detecting human IgE, antibody of hepatitis C virus core antigen and oligonucleotides. Quantification is performed by capturing the image of the colored assay solution and digitally quantifying the image by color saturation without using costly NanoDrop spectrophotometer. Image - based detection of human IgE and an oligonucleotide shows an excellent correlation with absorbance - based assay (recorded in a NanoDrop spectrophotometer); it is validated by Pearson's product-moment correlation with correlation coefficient of r = 0.9545088 and r = 0.9947444 respectively. AUAP is further checked by detecting hepatitis C virus Ab where strong correlation of color saturation with absorbance with respect to concentration is observed. Ultraminiaturized assay successfully detects target oligonucleotides by perfectly hybridizing with their respective complementary oligonucleotide probes but not with a random oligonucleotide. Ultraminiaturized assay technique has substantially reduced the requirement of reagents by 100 times and assay timing by 50 times making it a potential alternative to conventional method.

  16. The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay as an indicator of cytotoxicity for the in vitro comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Vesely, Alexandra; Schütz, Petra; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Bausinger, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay (LMW assay) has been recommended as a measure for cytotoxicity for the in vivo comet assay. To better understand the relationship between effects in the LMW assay, DNA migration in the comet assay and effects in established cytotoxicity tests, we performed in vitro experiments with cultured human cell lines (TK6, A549) and comparatively investigated five test substances (methyl methanesulfonate, (±)-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, sodium dodecyl sulphate, menthol and sodium arsenite). We measured DNA migration (tail intensity) in the comet assay and the frequency of 'hedgehogs' (cells with almost all DNA in the tail), DNA diffusion in the LMW assay, cell viability (trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide staining) and inhibition of proliferation (relative cell counts). Our in vitro experiments indicate that effects in the LMW assay occur independently from DNA effects in the comet assay and are not related to the occurrence of hedgehogs. Results from the LMW assay are in good agreement with results from viability assays and seem to allow discriminating genotoxic from non-genotoxic substances when appropriate preparation times are considered. Measurements of cytotoxicity by these methods only at an early preparation time after exposure to genotoxic substances may lead to erroneous results.

  17. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Lowry, Gregory V; Unrine, Jason M; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical-chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical-chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Methods for transient assay of gene function in floral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathirana Nilangani N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable interest in rapid assays or screening systems for assigning gene function. However, analysis of gene function in the flowers of some species is restricted due to the difficulty of producing stably transformed transgenic plants. As a result, experimental approaches based on transient gene expression assays are frequently used. Biolistics has long been used for transient over-expression of genes of interest, but has not been exploited for gene silencing studies. Agrobacterium-infiltration has also been used, but the focus primarily has been on the transient transformation of leaf tissue. Results Two constructs, one expressing an inverted repeat of the Antirrhinum majus (Antirrhinum chalcone synthase gene (CHS and the other an inverted repeat of the Antirrhinum transcription factor gene Rosea1, were shown to effectively induce CHS and Rosea1 gene silencing, respectively, when introduced biolistically into petal tissue of Antirrhinum flowers developing in vitro. A high-throughput vector expressing the Antirrhinum CHS gene attached to an inverted repeat of the nos terminator was also shown to be effective. Silencing spread systemically to create large zones of petal tissue lacking pigmentation, with transmission of the silenced state spreading both laterally within the affected epidermal cell layer and into lower cell layers, including the epidermis of the other petal surface. Transient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of petal tissue of tobacco and petunia flowers in situ or detached was also achieved, using expression of the reporter genes GUS and GFP to visualise transgene expression. Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of using biolistics-based transient RNAi, and transient transformation of petal tissue via Agrobacterium infiltration to study gene function in petals. We have also produced a vector for high throughput gene silencing studies, incorporating the option of using T-A cloning to

  19. Pre-Clinical Testing of Real-Time PCR Assays for Diarrheal Disease Agents of Genera Escherichia and Shigella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-16

    FOR DIARRHEAL DISEASE AGENTS OF GENERA ESCHERICHIA AND SHIGELLA May 16, 2014 Reporting Period: October 1, 2010 to September 30, 2013...10-2010 - 30-09-2013 PRE-CLINICAL TESTING OF REAL-TIME PCR ASSAYS FOR DIARRHEAL DISEASE AGENTS OF GENERA ESCHERICHIA AND SHIGELLA ...Texas (MOA 2007 - 2013. Agreement No.: DODI 4000.19; AFI 25-201). Pre-clinical test results qualify ETEC and Shigella real-time PCR assays as lead

  20. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other.

  1. A robotics-based automated assay for inorganic and organic phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, E B; Birrell, G B; Griffith, O H

    1999-06-15

    Phosphate analyses are fundamental to a broad range of biochemical applications involving inorganic phosphate and organic phosphoesters such as phospholipids, phosphorylated proteins, and nucleic acids. A practical automated method utilizing robotics is described in this report. Five colorimetric methods of phosphate analyses based on formation of a phosphomolybdate complex and compatible with the automated assay were tested, and the fundamental chemistry is discussed. The relative sensitivities are malachite green > crystal violet > quinaldine red > ascorbate reduction > antimony-modified ascorbate reduction, although only a fourfold improvement was observed in going from the modified ascorbate procedure to malachite green. Malachite green was selected to optimize the assay because this dye provided the highest sensitivity. However, where color stability and low blanks are more important than sensitivity, the ascorbate reduction and quinaldine red methods were found to be better choices than malachite green. Automation using a robotic liquid-handling system substantially reduces the labor required to process large arrays of samples. The result is a sensitive, nonradioactive assay of inorganic phosphate with high throughput. A digestion step in an acid-resistant 96-well plate was developed to extend the assay to phosphate esters. The robotic-based assay was demonstrated with inorganic phosphate and a common phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine.

  2. Hydroxyethyl disulfide as an efficient metabolic assay for cell viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Donglan; Ward, Kathleen M; Prendergast, George C; Ayene, Iraimoudi S

    2012-06-01

    Cell viability assays have a variety of well known practical and technical limitations. All the available approaches have disadvantages, such as non-linearity, high background and cumbersome protocols. Several commonly used tetrazolium chemicals rely upon generation of a colored formazan product formed by mitochondrial reduction of these compounds via phenazine methosulfate (PMS). However, sensitivity is inherently limited because their reduction relies on mitochondrial bioreduction and cellular transport of PMS, as well as accessibility to tetrazolium chemicals. In this study, we identify hydroxethyldisulfide (HEDS) as an inexpensive probe that can measure cellular metabolic activity without the need of PMS. In tissue culture medium, HEDS accurately quantitated metabolically active live cells in a linear manner superior to tetrazolium based and other assays. Cell toxicity produced by chemotherapeutics (cisplatin, etoposide), oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, acetaminophen), toxins (phenyl arsine oxide, arsenite) or ionizing radiation was rapidly determined by the HEDS assay. We found that HEDS was superior to other commonly used assays for cell viability determinations in its solubility, membrane permeability, and intracellular conversion to a metabolic reporter that is readily transported into the extracellular medium. Our findings establish the use of HEDS in a simple, rapid and low cost assay to accurately quantify viable cells.

  3. Application of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) diffusion assay to transgenic plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, C; Velten, J

    1992-02-01

    Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity was quantified in crude extracts from tobacco callus tissues using a modification of a previously reported diffusion assay. We describe here the alterations necessary in applying this rapid and simple assay procedure to plant materials. Due to the high concentration of nonspecific oxidases present in most plant tissues, some type of protective agent is required to maintain enzyme activity. We have tested beta-mercaptoethanol, cysteine, dithiothreitol, ascorbic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidone as protective agents within the initial extraction buffer. We also investigated the effect of heat (60 degrees C, 10 min) and 5 mM EDTA on CAT activity. The highest CAT activity was obtained using 5 mM cysteine plus 5 mM EDTA in 40 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.8) as the initial extraction buffer followed by a heat treatment. Using this buffer, CAT activity was stable on ice for more than two hours. In our hands, total acetyl-coenzyme A concentration within the assay mixture was found to be saturating at 250 microM and the Km determined to be 100 microM. Assays performed using the same crude plant extract indicate that 1) duplicate assays show less than 1.5% variation in activities and 2) CAT activity increases linearly with respect to volume of extract used.

  4. Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2007-10-15

    Application of the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Assay to Genotoxicity Evaluation in Plants and Animals. Recently, the importance of ionizing radiation and chemicals has been recognized since radio- and chemical therapy is directly related to the control of various diseases such as cancer. Radiation and the chemicals can cause biological damages while they have great applicability. It is of necessity to analyze rapidly, easily and accurately the biological effects, especially DNA damage due to those factors. Recently SCGE (single cell gel electrophoresis assay, alias comet assay) has been developed for the efficient evaluation of DNA damage. In this report, the comprehensive review will be given on the rationale, the technical applications and the advantages and shortcomings of SCGE assay. This method can be directly applied to study on toxicity, cancer, and aging in terms of the evaluation of DNA damages due to radiation and chemicals on human cellular level. It is also suggested that comet assay be used for testing genotoxicity of suspected substances, detecting irradiated foods, screening radioprotective candidates, and studying DNA repair process in various biological systems.

  5. Sediment toxicity screening with cost-effective microbiotests and conventional assays: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanciheluwe, M.L.; Janssen, C.R.; Persoone, G. [Univ. of Ghent (Belgium). Lab. for Biological Research in Aquatic Pollution

    1995-12-31

    A large monitoring study of freshwater sediments, using the TRIAD approach, was conducted in Flanders (Belgium). This paper reports on the results of the toxicity assessment of 80 sediment samples evaluated with a battery of microbiotests and conventional assays. Sediment pore waters, extracted by squeezing, were tested with the Microtox{reg_sign} (Vibrio fischerii) and Thamnotoxkit{trademark} F (Thamnocephalus platyurus) microbiotests and the conventional (acute) assays with algae (Selenastrum capricornutum) and daphnids (Daphnia magna). A newly developed 5 day ELS test with the catfish Clarias gariepinus was also applied to the pore waters. Solid-phase testing was performed with the Microtox Sp{reg_sign} assay and the 10 day tests with Chironomus riparius and Hyalella azteca. Uni- and multivariate statistical techniques were applied to the data matrix to select a minimal test battery from the water phase and solid phase assays and from all tests combined. The influence of sediment associated confounding factors on the validity of the test results obtained with the various assays will be discussed. Finally a comparison of the predictive power of the selected battery of signal tests and that of the complete battery will be made and the potential use of the minimal battery for the initial hazard assessment of contaminated sediments will be reviewed.

  6. Immunoassay screening of diphenhydramine (Benadryl®) in urine and blood using a newly developed assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Warren C; Castro, Catherine; Catbagan, Philip; Moore, Christine; Wang, Guohong

    2012-03-01

    Diphenhydramine (DPH) is a common over the counter antihistamine that produces drowsiness and has the potential to cause driving under the influence of drugs-related accidents. To date there are no commercially available immunoassay screening kits for its detection in biological fluids such as urine and/or blood. We describe a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screen and report on its utility in the analysis of authentic specimens taken from volunteers. The assay is specific for detection of DPH and does not detect closely related antihistamines like brompheniramine, chlorpheniramine, and doxylamine. There is a varying amount of cross-reactivity seen with certain tricyclic compounds, due to similarities in side chain structure with DPH. Intra- and interday precision of the assay were determined to be less than 10%. The assay is highly sensitive and has a working range from 1 to 500 ng/mL for urine and 1 to 250 ng/mL for blood. The assay was further validated with authentic urine and blood specimens obtained from volunteers and coroner's laboratories.

  7. Reassessing the reliability of the salivary cortisol assay for the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Dou, Jingtao; Gu, Weijun; Yang, Guoqing; Lu, Juming

    2013-10-01

    The cortisol concentration in saliva is 10-fold lower than total serum cortisol and accurately reflects the serum concentration, both levels being lowest around midnight. The salivary cortisol assay measures free cortisol and is unaffected by confounding factors. This study analysed published data on the sensitivity and specificity of salivary cortisol levels in the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. Data from studies on the use of different salivary cortisol assay techniques in the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome, published between 1998 and 2012 and retrieved using Ovid MEDLINE®, were analysed for variance and correlation. For the 11 studies analysed, mean sensitivity and specificity of the salivary cortisol assay were both >90%. Repeated measurements were easily made with this assay, enabling improved diagnostic accuracy in comparison with total serum cortisol measurements. This analysis confirms the reliability of the saliva cortisol assay as pragmatic tool for the accurate diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. With many countries reporting a rising prevalence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and obesity--in which there is often a high circulating cortisol level--salivary cortisol measurement will help distinguish these states from Cushing syndrome.

  8. Development and preliminary validation of a plate-based CB1/CB2 receptor functional assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossou, K S S; Devkota, K P; Kavanagh, P V; Beutler, J A; Egan, J M; Moaddel, R

    2013-06-15

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors are being targeted therapeutically for the treatment of anxiety, obesity, movement disorders, glaucoma, and pain. More recently, cannabinoid agonists have displayed antiproliferative activity against breast cancer and prostate cancer in animal models. To study cannabinoid receptor ligands, we have developed a novel plate-based assay that measures internalization of CB1/CB2 receptors by determining the change in the intracellular levels of the radiolabeled agonists: [(3)H]Win55-212-2 for CB1 and [(3)H]CP55-940 for CB2. The developed plate-based assay was validated by determining IC50 values for known antagonists: AM251, AM281, AM630, and AM6545. The data obtained were consistent with previously reported values, thereby confirming that the assay can be used to determine the functional binding activities (IC50) of antagonists for the CB1 and CB2 receptors. In addition, we demonstrated that the plate-based assay may be used for screening against complex matrices. Specifically, we demonstrated that the plate-based assay was able to identify which extracts of several species of the genus Zanthoxylum had activity at the CB1/CB2 receptors.

  9. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A specific cell-based potency assay to replace the mouse bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Wang, Joanne; Molina, Yanira; Nelson, Jeremy B; Jacky, Birgitte P S; Aoki, K Roger

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), a potent therapeutic used to treat various disorders, inhibits vesicular neurotransmitter exocytosis by cleaving SNAP25. Development of cell-based potency assays (CBPAs) to assess the biological function of BoNT/A have been challenging because of its potency. CBPAs can evaluate the key steps of BoNT action: receptor binding, internalization-translocation, and catalytic activity; and therefore could replace the current mouse bioassay. Primary neurons possess appropriate sensitivity to develop potential replacement assays but those potency assays are difficult to perform and validate. This report describes a CBPA utilizing differentiated human neuroblastoma SiMa cells and a sandwich ELISA that measures BoNT/A-dependent intracellular increase of cleaved SNAP25. Assay sensitivity is similar to the mouse bioassay and measures neurotoxin biological activity in bulk drug substance and BOTOX® product (onabotulinumtoxinA). Validation of a version of this CBPA in a Quality Control laboratory has led to FDA, Health Canada, and European Union approval for potency testing of BOTOX®, BOTOX® Cosmetic, and Vistabel®. Moreover, we also developed and optimized a BoNT/A CBPA screening assay that can be used for the discovery of novel BoNT/A inhibitors to treat human disease.

  10. Discovery of novel PDE10 inhibitors by a robust homogeneous screening assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun-yi LI; Ming-kai XU; Gang LIU; Claus Tornby CHRISTOFFERSEN; Ming-wei WANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To develop a homogeneous assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 10 (PDE10).Methods:Purified human PDE10 enzyme derived from E coli,[3H]-cAMP and yttrium silicate microbeads were used to develop an HTS assay based on the scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology.This method was applied to a large-scale screening campaign against a diverse compound library and subsequent confirmation studies.Preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were initiated through limited structural modifications of the hits.Results:The IC50 value of the control compound (papaverine) assessed with the SPA approach was comparable and consistent with that reported in the literature.Signal to background (S/B) ratio and Z' factor of the assay system were evaluated to be 5.24 and 0.71,respectively.In an HTS campaign of 71 360 synthetic and natural compounds,67 hits displayed reproducible PDE10 inhibition,of which,8 were chosen as the scaffold for structural modifications and subsequent SAR analysis.Conclusion:The homogeneous PDE10 SPA assay is an efficient and robust tool to screen potential PDE10 inhibitors.Preliminary SAR studies suggest that potent PDE10 inhibitors could be identified and developed through this strategy.

  11. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of ADAMTS1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs-1 (ADAMTS1 plays a crucial role in inflammatory joint diseases and its inhibitors are potential candidates for anti-arthritis drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, we reported the development and validation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of the ADAMTS1 inhibitors. A FRET substrate was designed for a quantitative assay of ADAMTS1 activity and enzyme kinetics studies. The assay was developed into a 50-µL, 384-well assay format for high throughput screening of ADAMTS1 inhibitors with an overall Z’ factor of 0.89. ADAMTS1 inhibitors were screened against a diverse library of 40,960 total compounds with the established HTS system. Four structurally related hits, naturally occurring compounds, kuwanon P, kuwanon X, albafuran C and mulberrofuran J, extracted from the Chinese herb Morus alba L., were identified for further investigation. The results suggest that this FRET assay is an excellent tool, not only for measurement of ADAMTS1 activity but also for discovery of novel ADAMTS1 inhibitors with HTS.

  12. Comparison of five assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Kimberle C; Dickenson, Roberta A; Wu, Fongman; Andrea, Sarah B

    2011-07-01

    Performance characteristics of five assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin were compared using fresh stool samples from patients with C. difficile infection (CDI). Assays were performed simultaneously and according to the manufacturers' instructions. Patients were included in the study if they exhibited clinical symptoms consistent with CDI. Nonmolecular assays included glutamate dehydrogenase antigen tests, with positive findings followed by the Premier Toxin A and B Enzyme Immunoassay (GDH/EIA), and the C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test. Molecular assays (PCR) included the BD GeneOhm Cdiff Assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, and the ProGastro Cd assay. Specimens were considered true positive if results were positive in two or more assays. For each method, the Youden index was calculated and cost-effectiveness was analyzed. Of 81 patients evaluated, 26 (32.1%) were positive for CDI. Sensitivity of the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, the ProGastro Cd assay, C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test, and two-step GDH/EIA was 96.2%, 96.2%, 88.5%, 61.5%, and 42.3%, respectively. Specificity of the Xpert C. difficile test was 96.4%, and for the other four assays was 100%. Compared with nonmolecular methods, molecular methods detected 34.7% more positive specimens. Assessment of performance characteristics and cost-effectiveness demonstrated that the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay yielded the best results. While costly, the Xpert C. difficile test required limited processing and yielded rapid results. Because of discordant results, specimen processing, and extraction equipment requirements, the ProGastro Cd assay was the least favored molecular assay. The GDH/EIA method lacked sufficient sensitivity to be recommended. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluoride assay methodology for carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Judith R; Levy, Steven M; Wefel, James S; Patterson, Kristine Y; Cutrufelli, Rena; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Holden, Joanne M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review different methodological techniques used for the assessment of fluoride in carbonated beverages, and compare results using a fluoride ion electrode direct read method with and without a prior decarbonation treatment. The carbonated beverages in this study were either purchased locally at grocery stores in Iowa City, Iowa, or purchased as part of a national representative sampling approach included in the National Fluoride Database and Intake Assessment Study (NFDIAS). The samples were compared with and without a decarbonating process. Soda pop and beer samples were analyzed by removing a 1-ml sample and adding a 1-ml buffer solution. The fluoride concentration of the sample and buffer combination was then determined using a fluoride ion specific electrode. There was no significant difference in the fluoride concentration of the samples with or without prior decarbonation. The mean absolute difference between the soda pop group with and without decarbonation was 0.01 ppm F, while results from the beer samples showed variation of 0.00 to 0.02 parts per million fluoride (ppm F). These differences were not statistically significant for the soda pop or beer groups (P=.50 and P=.74, respectively). Whether or not decarbonation was conducted prior to analysis, the fluoride assay results were the same. Therefore, decarbonation of soda pop and beer was deemed unnecessary prior to fluoride analysis.

  14. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  15. Prandiology of Drosophila and the CAFE assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ja, William W.; Carvalho, Gil B.; Mak, Elizabeth M.; de la Rosa, Noelle N.; Fang, Annie Y.; Liong, Jonathan C.; Brummel, Ted; Benzer, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Studies of feeding behavior in genetically tractable invertebrate model systems have been limited by the lack of proper methodology. We introduce the Capillary Feeder (CAFE), a method allowing precise, real-time measurement of ingestion by individual or grouped fruit flies on the scale of minutes to days. Using this technique, we conducted the first quantitative analysis of prandial behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results allow the dissection of feeding into discrete bouts of ingestion, defining two separate parameters, meal volume and frequency, that can be uncoupled and thus are likely to be independently regulated. In addition, our long-term measurements show that flies can ingest as much as 1.7× their body mass over 24 h. Besides the study of appetite, the CAFE can be used to monitor oral drug delivery. As an illustration, we used the CAFE to test the effects of dietary supplementation with two compounds, paraquat and ethanol, on food ingestion and preference. Paraquat, a prooxidant widely used in stress tests, had a strong anorexigenic effect. In contrast, in a feeding preference assay, ethanol-laced food, but not ethanol by itself, acted as an attractant. PMID:17494737

  16. Assaying Visual Memory in the Desert Locust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senne Dillen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of associative learning cues has been demonstrated in several stages of feeding and food selection. Short neuropeptide F (sNPF, an insect neuropeptide whose effects on feeding behavior have previously been well established, may be one of the factors bridging feeding and learning behavior. Recently, it was shown in Drosophila melanogaster that the targeted reduction of Drome-sNPF transcript levels significantly reduced sugar-rewarded olfactory memory. While Drosophila mainly relies on olfactory perception in its food searching behavior, locust foraging behavior is likely to be more visually orientated. Furthermore, a feeding-dependent regulation of Schgr-sNPF transcript levels has previously been observed in the optic lobes of the locust brain, suggesting a possible involvement in visual perception of food and visual associative memory in this insect species. In this study, we describe the development of a robust and reproducible assay allowing visual associative memory to be studied in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Furthermore, we performed an exploratory series of experiments, studying the role of Schgr-sNPF in this complex process.

  17. Liquid chromatographic assay for dicloxacillin in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, Oscar; González-Esquivel, Dinora F; Del Rivero, L Misael; Castro Torres, Nelly

    2004-06-15

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of dicloxacillin in plasma has been developed. The method only requires 0.5 ml of plasma, phosphate buffer solution (pH = 4.7), acidification with 0.5N hydrochloride acid and liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Posterior evaporation of organic under nitrogen steam and redissolution in mobile phase is carried out. The analysis was performed on a Spherisorb C18 (5 microm) column, using methanol -0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH = 4.7 (75:25; v/v) as mobile phase, with ultraviolet detection at 220 nm. Results showed that the assay is sensitive: 0.5 microg/ml. The response is linear in the range of 0.5 - 10 microg/ml. Maximum inter-day coefficient of variation was 12.4%. Mean extraction recovery obtained was 96.95%. Stability studies showed that the loss was not higher than 10%, samples are stable at room temperature for 6 h, at -20 Celsius for 2 months, processed samples were stable at least for 24 h and also after two freeze-thaw cycles. The method has been used to perform pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in humans.

  18. Fluorometric enzymatic assay of L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Yepremyan, Hasmik; Stepien, Agnieszka; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2017-01-01

    The enzymes of L-arginine (further - Arg) metabolism are promising tools for elaboration of selective methods for quantitative Arg analysis. In our study we propose an enzymatic method for Arg assay based on fluorometric monitoring of ammonia, a final product of Arg splitting by human liver arginase I (further - arginase), isolated from the recombinant yeast strain, and commercial urease. The selective analysis of ammonia (at 415 nm under excitation at 360 nm) is based on reaction with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of sulfite in alkali medium: these conditions permit to avoid the reaction of OPA with any amino acid. A linearity range of the fluorometric arginase-urease-OPA method is from 100 nM to 6 μМ with a limit of detection of 34 nM Arg. The method was used for the quantitative determination of Arg in the pooled sample of blood serum. The obtained results proved to be in a good correlation with the reference enzymatic method and literature data. The proposed arginase-urease-OPA method being sensitive, economical, selective and suitable for both routine and micro-volume formats, can be used in clinical diagnostics for the simultaneous determination of Arg as well as urea and ammonia in serum samples.

  19. PARALLEL ASSAY OF OXYGEN EQUILIBRIA OF HEMOGLOBIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Laura E.; Blinebry, Sara K.; Viscardi, Chelsea M.; Perez, Luis; Bonaventura, Joe; McMahon, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    Methods to systematically analyze in parallel the function of multiple protein or cell samples in vivo or ex vivo (i.e. functional proteomics) in a controlled gaseous environment have thus far been limited. Here we describe an apparatus and procedure that enables, for the first time, parallel assay of oxygen equilibria in multiple samples. Using this apparatus, numerous simultaneous oxygen equilibrium curves (OECs) can be obtained under truly identical conditions from blood cell samples or purified hemoglobins (Hbs). We suggest that the ability to obtain these parallel datasets under identical conditions can be of immense value, both to biomedical researchers and clinicians who wish to monitor blood health, and to physiologists studying non-human organisms and the effects of climate change on these organisms. Parallel monitoring techniques are essential in order to better understand the functions of critical cellular proteins. The procedure can be applied to human studies, wherein an OEC can be analyzed in light of an individual’s entire genome. Here, we analyzed intraerythrocytic Hb, a protein that operates at the organism’s environmental interface and then comes into close contact with virtually all of the organism’s cells. The apparatus is theoretically scalable, and establishes a functional proteomic screen that can be correlated with genomic information on the same individuals. This new method is expected to accelerate our general understanding of protein function, an increasingly challenging objective as advances in proteomic and genomic throughput outpace the ability to study proteins’ functional properties. PMID:23827235

  20. Microrheological Coagulation Assay Exploiting Micromechanical Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Francesco; Duffy, James; Hegner, Martin

    2017-01-03

    Rheological measurements in biological liquids yield insights into homeostasis and provide information on important molecular processes that affect fluidity. We present a fully automated cantilever-based method for highly precise and sensitive measurements of microliter sample volumes of human blood plasma coagulation (0.009 cP for viscosity range 0.5-3 cP and 0.0012 g/cm(3) for density range 0.9-1.1 g/cm(3)). Microcantilever arrays are driven by a piezoelectric element, and resonance frequencies and quality factors of sensors that change over time are evaluated. A highly accurate approximation of the hydrodynamic function is introduced that correlates resonance frequency and quality factor of cantilever beams immersed in a fluid to the viscosity and density of that fluid. The theoretical model was validated using glycerol reference solutions. We present a surface functionalization protocol that allows minimization of unspecific protein adsorption onto cantilevers. Adsorption leads to measurement distortions and incorrect estimation of the fluid parameters (viscosity and density). Two hydrophilic terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) sensor surfaces are compared to a hydrophobic terminated SAM coating. As expected, the hydrophobic modified surfaces induced the highest mass adsorption and could promote conformational changes of the proteins and subsequent abnormal biological activity. Finally, the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assay was performed, and the viscosity, density, and coagulation rate of human blood plasma were measured along with the standard coagulation time. The method could extend and improve current coagulation testing.

  1. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  2. Background Assay and Rejection in DRIFT

    CERN Document Server

    Brack, Jeff; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Monte, Alissa; Murphy, Alex; Paling, Sean; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Steve; Scarff, Andrew; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil; Telfer, Sam; Walker, Daniel; Williams, Matt; Yuriev, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The DRIFT-IId dark matter detector is a m$^3$-scale low-pressure TPC with directional sensitivity to WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Its primary backgrounds were due to alpha decays from contamination on the central cathode. Efforts to reduce these backgrounds led to replacing the 20 \\mu m wire central cathode with one constructed from 0.9 \\mu m aluminized mylar, which is almost totally transparent to alpha particles. Detailed modeling of the nature and origin of the remaining backgrounds led to an in-situ, ppt-sensitive assay of alpha decay backgrounds from the central cathode. This led to further improvements in the thin-film cathode resulting in over 2 orders of magnitude reduction in backgrounds compared to the wire cathode. Finally, the addition of O$_2$ to CS$_2$ gas was found to produce multiple species of electronegative charge carriers, providing a method to determine the absolute position of nuclear recoils and reject all known remaining backgrounds while retaining a high efficiency for nuclear recoil...

  3. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  4. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  5. A comprehensive company database analysis of biological assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Christian; Dahl, Göran; Tyrchan, Christian; Ulander, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of data from various compounds measured in diverse biological assays is a central part of drug discovery research projects. However, no systematic overview of the variability in biological assays has been published and judgments on assay quality and robustness of data are often based on personal belief and experience within the drug discovery community. To address this we performed a reproducibility analysis of all biological assays at AstraZeneca between 2005 and 2014. We found an average experimental uncertainty of less than a twofold difference and no technologies or assay types had higher variability than others. This work suggests that robust data can be obtained from the most commonly applied biological assays.

  6. Optimization of cell motility evaluation in scratch assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotsulyak N. Ya.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scratch test is one of the most popular methods of classical cell migration assay in a monolayer culture. At the same time, the scratch assay has some disadvantages that can be easily corrected. Aim. Optimization the existent scratch assay on the base of detection of scratch wound surface area and the length of the field of observation which is more objective and less time consuming. Methods. Scratch assay. Results. The modification of scratch assay enables to perform measurement more accurately and rapidly. This approach is more simple and eliminates the main disadvantages of the classical method. Conclusions. The procedure of scratch wound width measurement calculated on the base of detection of cell free area and the length of the field of observation is more effective than the classical wound healing assay. It will be useful for the estimation of cell migration dynamics in monolayer culture for a wide range of live cell based experiments.

  7. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The applications of this assay suggest that it is a useful assay to assess aquatic genotoxicants. However, there are some factors, which should be taken into account when using this assay as aquatic ecotoxicological assessment device such as inter-animal and cell variability.

  8. Establishment of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Neonatal Thyrotropin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive and specific ELISA for neonatal thyrotropin(Neonatal TSH) is established with using twoanti-TSH monoclonal antibody. One of them is coated on the microtiter plate, the other is conjugate ofbiotin. The label is horseradish peroxidase(HRP) conjugate of streptavidin. TMB-H2O2 solution is used asthe substrate of HRP.The sensitivity of the assay is 0.5 mIU/L, the intra-assay CVs and the intre-assay

  9. Validation of Laboratory-Developed Molecular Assays for Infectious Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Molecular technology has changed the way that clinical laboratories diagnose and manage many infectious diseases. Excellent sensitivity, specificity, and speed have made molecular assays an attractive alternative to culture or enzyme immunoassay methods. Many molecular assays are commercially available and FDA approved. Others, especially those that test for less common analytes, are often laboratory developed. Laboratories also often modify FDA-approved assays to include different e...

  10. An ultrasensitive rapid immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting Clostridium difficile toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangyun; Wang, Jufang; Steele, Jennifer; Sun, Xingmin; Nie, Weijia; Tzipori, Saul; Feng, Hanping

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel ultrasensitive cell-based immunocytotoxicity assay for detecting less then 1 pg/ml of Clostridium difficile toxins in porcine clinical samples. The assay is simple to perform with a turnaround time of approximately 3 hours and capable of detecting less then 1 pg/ml of toxin A. Using this assay, we were able to detect the presence of C. difficile toxins in the fecal and serum specimens of experimentally infected piglets. PMID:19393695

  11. The Spheroplast Lysis Assay for Yeast in Microtiter Plate Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Rafael; Spencer, Moyah; Thiwanont, Monthiwa; Lipke, Peter N.

    1999-01-01

    A yeast lysis assay in the microtiter plate format improved precision and throughput and led to an improved algorithm for estimating lag time. The assay reproducibly revealed differences of 10% or greater in the maximal lysis rate and 50% or greater in the lag time. Clonal differences were determined to be the major source of variation. Microtiter-based assays should be useful for screening for drug susceptibility and for analyzing mutant phenotypes. PMID:10427014

  12. A rapid method for assaying thiaminase I activity in diverse biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford E Kraft

    Full Text Available Vitamin B1 (thiamine deficiencies can lead to neurological disorders, reproductive failure and death in wild and domestic animal populations. In some cases, disease is brought about by the consumption of foods high in thiaminase I activity. Levels of thiaminase activity in these foods are highly variable and the factors leading to production of this enzyme are poorly understood. Here we describe improvements in a spectrophotometric thiaminase I activity assay that measures the disappearance of 4-nitrothiophenol, a favored nucleophile co-substrate that replaces the thiazole portion of thiamine during the inactivation of thiamine by the enzyme. Scalable sample processing protocols and a 96-well microtiter plate format are presented that allow the rapid evaluation of multiple, replicated samples in the course of only a few hours. Observed levels of activity in bacterial culture supernatant, fish, ferns and molluscs using this colorimetric assay were similar to previously published reports that employed a radiometric method. Organisms devoid of thiaminase I, based upon previous work, showed no activity with this assay. In addition, activity was found in a variety of fishes and one fern species from which this enzyme had not previously been reported. Overall, we demonstrate the suitability of this technique for measuring thiaminase I activity within small amounts of tissue and environmental samples with replication levels that were heretofore prohibitive. The assay provides a considerable improvement in the ability to examine and understand the properties of an enzyme that has a substantial influence on organism and ecosystem health.

  13. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Scrap Cans Used in 321-M Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaymeh, S. R.; Dewberry, R. A.; Casella, V.

    2001-12-01

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG&G DART system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel gamma-ray spectra to assay for 235U content. The system was used to assay a large number of scrap cans used to store highly enriched uranium (HEU) chips and filings. This report includes a description of two efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  14. BROMATOMATRIC ASSAY OF GATIFLOXACIN IN PHARMACEUTICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KALSANG THARPA

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Three new, simple, and cost-effective visible spectrophotometric methods are proposed for determination of gatifloxacin (GTF using bromate-bromide mixture, and three dyes, methyl orange, indigocarmine and thymol blue, as reagents.The methods engross the addition of a known excess of bromate-bromide mixture to GTF in hydrochloric acid medium followed by determination of residual bromine by reacting with a fixed amount of either methyl orange andmeasuring the absorbance at 520 nm (method A or indigo carmine and measuring the absorbance at 610 nm (method B or thymol blue and measuring the absorbance at 550 nm (method C. In all the methods, the amount of brominereacted corresponds to the amount of GTF, and the absorbance is found to increase linearly with the concentration of GTF. Under the optimum conditions, GTF could be assayed in the concentration range 0.25-1.5, 0.5-6.0, and 0.5-10μg/mL by method A, method B and method C, respectively. The apparent molar absorptivities are calculated to be 1.6x105, 4.0x104 and 3.2x104 L mol-1 cm-1 for the method A, method B and method C, respectively, and the corresponding Sandell sensitivity values are 0.0025, 0.010 and 0.012 μg/cm2. The intra-day and inter-day precision, and the accuracy of the methods were evaluated as per the current ICH guidelines. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of GTF in pharmaceutical preparations without the interference from any of the pharmaceutical adjuvants.

  15. Inferring Protein Associations Using Protein Pulldown Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Borkowski, John J.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-02-01

    Background: One method to infer protein-protein associations is through a “bait-prey pulldown” assay using a protein affinity agent and an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry)-based protein identification method. False positive and negative protein identifications are not uncommon, however, leading to incorrect inferences. Methods: A pulldown experiment generates a protein association matrix wherein each column represents a sample from one bait protein, each row represents one prey protein and each cell contains a presence/absence association indicator. Our method evaluates the presence/absence pattern across a prey protein (row) with a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), computing its p-value with simulated LRT test statistic distributions after a check with simulated binomial random variates disqualified the large sample 2 test. A pulldown experiment often involves hundreds of tests so we apply the false discovery rate method to control the false positive rate. Based on the p-value, each prey protein is assigned a category (specific association, non-specific association, or not associated) and appraised with respect to the pulldown experiment’s goal and design. The method is illustrated using a pulldown experiment investigating the protein complexes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results: The Monte Carlo simulated LRT p-values objectively reveal specific and ubiquitous prey, as well as potential systematic errors. The example analysis shows the results to be biologically sensible and more realistic than the ad hoc screening methods previously utilized. Conclusions: The method presented appears to be informative for screening for protein-protein associations.

  16. Comparative investigation of various cellulase assay procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canevascini, G.; Gattlen, C.

    1981-07-01

    The cellulolytic activity of crude enzyme preparations from different cellulolytic fungi (namely Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma koningii, Fusarium solani, Sporotrichum pulverulentum, Sporotrichum thermophile) was assayed comparatively with several common analytical procedures described in the literature. The investigation was carried out with the objective of evaluating, with raw culture filtrates, the different cellulase tests in relation to their specificity for endo- and exo-cellulase action as well as to allow comparisons to be made between results from different research groups using different methods. 1) Cellulase activity was tested viscometrically as well as chemically (determination of reducing end groups) with different carboxymethylcelluloses as substrates. Essentially constant ratios between both kinds of activities were obtained, indicating that they are directly related. By estimating cellulase activity with insoluble cellulosic substrates no direct relationship could be established with the above-described activities except in the case where the cellulose was amorphous. The ratio profile between activities thus obtained and endo-cellulase activities determined viscometrically shows that some enzyme preparations (such as those from both Trichoderma sp.) are clearly more active than others against crystalline cellulose reflecting quantitative differences in enzyme composition. Nevertheless, for a biological understanding of cellulolysis, analytical procedures using crystalline celluloses are not adequate for specifically monitoring exo-cellulase activity in crude enzyme solutions for essentially two reasons: a) they are not sufficiently sensitive to detect small changes in enzyme activity during the early phase of growth, and b) exo-cellulase activity in crude enzyme solutions also depends on the endo-cellulase activity present. (Refs. 39).

  17. Robust versatile tyrosine kinase assay for HTS in drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sudhir S.; Mineyev, I.; Owicki, John C.

    1999-04-01

    A fluorescence polarization assay was developed as an alternative to the radiolabeled SPA assays currently used to monitor the activity of tyrosine kinases in drug discovery. The assay can be used with enzymes having substrate specificity similar to that of the insulin receptor, the EGF receptor and the Src kinase receptor enzymes. The assay is easy to configure in 96, 384 and 1536-well microplates in assay volumes ranging from (mu) L with minimal efforts. The reconstituted reagents are stable for up to 24 hr at ambient temperatures, thereby minimizing the need for replenishing the stock solutions during the course of a high-throughput screen. Because of the stability and equilibrium kinetics, the assay allows the user the luxury of scheduling the reading of plates any time up to 24 hr after the completion of the assay without substantial deterioration in the assay signal. The antibody and the tracer solutions can also be premixed and added as a preformed complex in a single step. The performance of the assay with the insulin receptor kinase is described. In addition, given the diversity of the substrates used in measuring the activity of different tyrosine kinases, LJL's on-going efforts to provide different antibodies of wide ranging specificity and sensitivity are described.

  18. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation...

  19. A Multi-detection Assay for Malaria Transmitting Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoosook; Weakley, Allison M.; Nieman, Catelyn C.; Malvick, Julia; Lanzaro, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The Anopheles gambiae species complex includes the major malaria transmitting mosquitoes in Africa. Because these species are of such medical importance, several traits are typically characterized using molecular assays to aid in epidemiological studies. These traits include species identification, insecticide resistance, parasite infection status, and host preference. Since populations of the Anopheles gambiae complex are morphologically indistinguishable, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is traditionally used to identify species. Once the species is known, several downstream assays are routinely performed to elucidate further characteristics. For instance, mutations known as KDR in a para gene confer resistance against DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. Additionally, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) or Plasmodium parasite DNA detection PCR assays are used to detect parasites present in mosquito tissues. Lastly, a combination of PCR and restriction enzyme digests can be used to elucidate host preference (e.g., human vs. animal blood) by screening the mosquito bloodmeal for host-specific DNA. We have developed a multi-detection assay (MDA) that combines all of the aforementioned assays into a single multiplex reaction genotyping 33SNPs for 96 or 384 samples at a time. Because the MDA includes multiple markers for species, Plasmodium detection, and host blood identification, the likelihood of generating false positives or negatives is greatly reduced from previous assays that include only one marker per trait. This robust and simple assay can detect these key mosquito traits cost-effectively and in a fraction of the time of existing assays. PMID:25867057

  20. Biosensor Assay Enhancement Through AC Electrokinetic Microstirring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    can limit test duration is diffusion rate of analyte to the reporter. This is particularly true for high sensitivity ELISA tests ( Stenberg ... Stenberg , M. and H. Nygren, 1988: Kinetics of antigen- antibody reactions at solid-liquid interfaces. Journal of Immunological Methods, 113, 3-15. Wang