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Sample records for monogenic idiopathic epilepsies

  1. Genetics of idiopathic generalized epilepsy: An overview

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    D. K. V. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is a common type of epilepsy. Strong support for a genetic role in IGE comes from twin and family studies. Several subtypes of IGE have been reported but families often have members affected with different subtypes. Major advances have been made in the understanding of genetic basis of monogenic inherited epilepsies. However, most IGEs are complex genetic diseases and some susceptible IGE genes are shared across subtypes that determine subtypes in specific combinations. The high throughput technologies like deoxyribonucleic acid microarrays and sequencing technologies have the potential to identify causative genes or loci in non-familial cases.

  2. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy.

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    Duran, Marcos H C; Guimarães, Catarina A; Montenegro, Maria Augusta; Neri, Marina L; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners' Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%), seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  3. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy

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    Marcos H. C. Duran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners’ Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%, seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  4. Gastaut type idiopathic occipital epilepsy

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    I. V. Volkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic occipital epilepsy is a rare epileptic syndrome. Its incidence in a Novosibirsk cohort of patients with idiopathic focal epilepsy is 0.9%. Objective: to present a clinical description of new cases of Gastaut syndrome, the types of its course, and treatment options in these patients. Patients and methods. The study covers 17 cases of Gastaut type idiopathic occipital epilepsy in 13 women and 4 men aged 11–53 years. Results. Among 17 cases we present 4 family cases with the disease. Three generations in 2 families were observed to have epilepsy, including Gastaut syndrome concurrent with childhood absence epilepsy. The adolescent onset of the disease was seen in most cases. Its main symptoms were focal visual seizures (100%, focal sensory seizures (58.9%, cephalalgia (47.1%, speech disorders (41.2%, and secondarily generalized convulsive seizures (35.3%. According to the frequency of seizures, the investigators identified 5 types of the course: single focal seizures, rare focal seizures with or without convulsions, frequent focal seizures with or without convulsions. The identity of the course of epilepsy was found in familial cases. 76.5% of the patients had a good quality of life: 41.2% of them were untreated while 35.3% were treated; no seizures were noted. 

  5. Qualitative Dermatoglyphics In Idiopathic Epilepsy

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    Ranganath Priya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic aetiology has been proposed for both idiopathic epilepsy and dermatoglyphics. Hence, the present study has been undertaken to find out the existence of any correlation between dermatoglyphics and idiopathic epilepsy. Material consisted of 100 patients (58 males and 42 females and 100 controls (52 males and 48 females. Patient′s age ranged from 5 to 40 years and controls were between 18 and 25 years. Dermatoglyphics were obtained by painting method. Qualitative parameters observed were percentage frequency of fingerprint patterns (loops, whorls and arches,, patterns in hypothenar area/ interdigital are and flexion creases (Simian crease, sydney line. On comparison with controls, in males, with hands combined, loops (52.24% and arches (7.93% were increased and whorls (39.83% were decreased (p<0.05. In females, with hands combined, arches (13.1% and whorls (36.43% were increased and loops (50.48% were decreased (p< 0.03. Significant differences have not been observed for the patterns in hypothenar area /interdigital area and flexion creases. These dermatoglyphics features could be used as additional markers to evaluate patients of epilepsy.

  6. Impaired sense of smell and color discrimination in monogenic and idiopathic Parkinson's disease

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    Kertelge, Lena; Brüggemann, Norbert; Schmidt, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction is typically impaired in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), but its role is uncertain in monogenic PD. Diminished color discrimination has been suggested as another early sign of dopaminergic dysfunction but not been systematically studied. Furthermore, it is unknown whether both def...

  7. A variant of idiopathic epilepsy: Clinical note

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    V. A. Karlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of idiopathic generalized epilepsy with a variable phenotype, a similar type of epileptiform activity in the second stage of sleep, and a similar genotype in siblings. The onset of seizures was observed after closed brain injury in both cases. The sister had myoclonic seizures and her brother had generalized convulsive seizures late in the evening. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized convulsive seizures appears as generalized tonic-clonic seizures on awakening. But in a number of cases, these seizures may occur when going to sleep. The brother has supposedly idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonicclonic seizures and his sister has juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, as indicated by her age, hereditary predisposition, phenobarbital-provoked seizures (the latter are also observed in his brother, an electrographic pattern, and the efficacy of Keppra and Topamax. 

  8. The prognosis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

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    Seneviratne, Udaya; Cook, Mark; D'Souza, Wendyl

    2012-12-01

    Prognosis describes the trajectory and long-term outcome of a condition. Most studies indicate a better prognosis in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in comparison with other epilepsy syndromes. Studies looking at the long-term outcome of different IGE syndromes are relatively scant. Childhood absence epilepsy appears to have a higher rate of remission compared to juvenile absence epilepsy. In absence epilepsies, development of myoclonus and generalized tonic-clonic seizures predicts lower likelihood of remission. Although most patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) achieve remission on antiepileptic drug therapy, remission without treatment. Data on the prognosis of other IGE syndromes are scarce. There are contradictory findings reported on the value of electroencephalography as a predictor of prognosis. Comparisons are made difficult by study heterogeneity, particularly in methodology and diagnostic criteria.

  9. Zonisamide monotherapy for idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

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    Chung, J Y; Hwang, C Y; Chae, J S; Ahn, J O; Kim, T H; Seo, K W; Lee, S Y; Youn, H Y

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of zonisamide as a monotherapy in dogs with idiopathic epileptic seizure. The experiment was conducted on 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that were treated at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals. A diagnosis was conducted based on physical and neurologic examination, complete blood count and chemical analysis, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. Idiopathic epilepsy was diagnosed when all of these examinations were normal. Oral zonisamide was administrated to 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy at 5-15 mg/kg per os every 12 h to achieve a concentration of zonisamide in serum of 10-40 μg/mL. The frequency of seizures before and after the administration of zonisamide therapy was recorded and the concentrations of zonisamide in serum were measured. Six (60%) of the dogs were favourable responders to treatment, showing a ≥50% reduction in monthly frequency of seizures. Of the remaining four, two dogs did not show a reduction and the other two showed an increase in frequency of seizures. The mean dosage of zonisamide for favourable responders was 7.92 (SD 3.79) mg/kg, which was administered orally twice a day. Only one dog, which was one of the unfavourable responders in the whole study, experienced mild side effects. Among the dogs treated with oral zonisamide, 60% responded favourably. The effect of zonisamide as an anticonvulsant drug was demonstrated in this study. Based on these results, zonisamide monotherapy is effective in some dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

  10. Candidate genes for idiopathic epilepsy in four dog breeds

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    Mickelson James R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic epilepsy (IE is a naturally occurring and significant seizure disorder affecting all dog breeds. Because dog breeds are genetically isolated populations, it is possible that IE is attributable to common founders and is genetically homogenous within breeds. In humans, a number of mutations, the majority of which are genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters, or their regulatory subunits, have been discovered to cause rare, specific types of IE. It was hypothesized that there are simple genetic bases for IE in some purebred dog breeds, specifically in Vizslas, English Springer Spaniels (ESS, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs (GSMD, and Beagles, and that the gene(s responsible may, in some cases, be the same as those already discovered in humans. Results Candidate genes known to be involved in human epilepsy, along with selected additional genes in the same gene families that are involved in murine epilepsy or are expressed in neural tissue, were examined in populations of affected and unaffected dogs. Microsatellite markers in close proximity to each candidate gene were genotyped and subjected to two-point linkage in Vizslas, and association analysis in ESS, GSMD and Beagles. Conclusions Most of these candidate genes were not significantly associated with IE in these four dog breeds, while a few genes remained inconclusive. Other genes not included in this study may still be causing monogenic IE in these breeds or, like many cases of human IE, the disease in dogs may be likewise polygenic.

  11. Neocortical gamma oscillations in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

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    Benedek, Krisztina; Berenyi, Antal; Gombkoto, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Absence seizures in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) may in part be explained by a decrease in phasic GABAA (type-A c-aminobutyric acid) receptor function, but the mechanisms are only partly understood. Here we studied the relation between ictal and interictal spike-...

  12. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

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    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

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    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  14. Gastaut type idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy.

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    Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Macedo, Eugenia Fialho; Costa Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Costa, Lívia Vianez; Tudesco, Ivanda S S; Carvalho, Kelly C; Carrete, Henrique; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Yacubian, Elza Marcia; Hamad, Ana Paula

    2013-03-01

    Gastaut type idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy is an uncommon epileptic syndrome characterised by frequent seizures, most commonly presenting as elementary visual hallucinations or blindness. Other occipital (non-visual) symptoms may also occur. Interictal EEG typically shows occipital paroxysms, often with fixation-off sensitivity. Ictal EEG is usually characterised by interruption by paroxysms and sudden appearance of low-voltage, occipital, fast rhythm and/or spikes. Despite well described clinical and EEG patterns, to our knowledge, there are very few reports in the literature with video-EEG recording of either seizure semiology or fixation-off phenomena. We present a video-EEG recording of a 12-year-old girl with Gastaut type epilepsy, illustrating the interictal and ictal aspects of this syndrome. Our aim was to demonstrate the clinical and neurophysiological pattern of a typical seizure of Gastaut type epilepsy, as well as the fixation-off phenomena, in order to further clarify the typical presentation of this syndrome. [Published with video sequences].

  15. Submikroskopiske kromosomforandringer disponerer til epilepsi

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    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Hjalgrim, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic generalised epilepsies (IGEs) affect up to 0.3% of the general population. Genetic factors play a predominant role in the aetiology of IGEs. Molecular genetic studies have mainly identified causative gene mutations in rare monogenic forms of idiopathic epilepsies. However, the genetic ...

  16. Functional neuroimaging abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

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    Megan L. McGill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques have been used to quantitatively assess focal and network abnormalities. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is characterized by bilateral synchronous spike–wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG but normal clinical MRI. Dysfunctions involving the neocortex, particularly the prefrontal cortex, and thalamus likely contribute to seizure activity. To identify possible morphometric and functional differences in the brains of IGE patients and normal controls, we employed measures of thalamic volumes, cortical thickness, gray–white blurring, fractional anisotropy (FA measures from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF in thalamic subregions from resting state functional MRI. Data from 27 patients with IGE and 27 age- and sex-matched controls showed similar thalamic volumes, cortical thickness and gray–white contrast. There were no differences in FA values on DTI in tracts connecting the thalamus and prefrontal cortex. Functional analysis revealed decreased fALFF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC subregion of the thalamus in patients with IGE. We provide minimum detectable effect sizes for each measure used in the study. Our analysis indicates that fMRI-based methods are more sensitive than quantitative structural techniques for characterizing brain abnormalities in IGE.

  17. Ictal epileptic headache as "subtle" symptom in generalized idiopathic epilepsy.

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    Fanella, Martina; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Egeo, Gabriella; Manfredi, Mario; Prencipe, Massimiliano; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    Epilepsy and migraine are common neurologic chronic disorders with episodic manifestations characterized by recurrent attacks and a return to baseline conditions between attacks. Epilepsy and migraine are frequently observed in comorbidity, with the occurrence of one disorder increasing the probability of the other: Migraine occurs in about one-fourth of patients with epilepsy, whereas epilepsy is present in 8-15% of patients with migraine. The link between headache and seizures is controversial and multifactorial. In epilepsy, headache can be seen as a preictal, ictal, or postictal phenomenon. In this report, we describe a case of a 37-year-old patient, affected by both drug-resistant generalized idiopathic epilepsy and headache, who displayed the sudden onset of a headache attack referred during a 24-h electroencephalography (EEG). The EEG tracing during this event revealed the activation of subcontinuous epileptic activity consisting of generalized spike-wave discharges (GSWDs) and generalized polyspike and wave discharges (GPSWDs) that persisted for 60 min, that is, until the disappearance of the headache. The case we describe appears to be original in that it represents one of the few EEG-documented ictal epileptic headaches in generalized idiopathic epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 and 16p13.11 predispose to idiopathic generalized epilepsies

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    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Trucks, Holger; Helbig, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsies account for 30% of all epilepsies. Despite a predominant genetic aetiology, the genetic factors predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsies remain elusive. Studies of structural genomic variations have revealed a significant excess of recurrent microdeletio...

  19. Depression and quality of life in monogenic compared to idiopathic, early-onset Parkinson's disease

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    Kasten, Meike; Kertelge, Lena; Tadic, Vera

    2012-01-01

    , monogenic and IPD cases were comparable in QoL and depression characteristics. The QoL and, possibly, overall prognosis of all PD patients can be improved by appropriate attention and treatment for depression, sleep impairments, and anxiety, even if the treatment of the motor problems cannot be further...... optimized....

  20. Depression and quality of life in monogenic compared to idiopathic, early-onset Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasten, M.; Kertelge, L.; Tadic, V.; Bruggemann, N.; Schmidt, A.; Vegt, J.P.M. van der; Siebner, H.; Buhmann, C.; Lencer, R.; Kumar, K.R.; Lohmann, K.; Hagenah, J.; Klein, C.

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is decreased in PD and is linked with depression and anxiety. However, little is known about QoL in monogenic PD. Subjects with mutations in PD genes were recruited from ongoing family and genetic studies (manifesting carriers, n = 23; nonmanifesting carriers, n = 19). For comp

  1. Mutations in GRIN2A> cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes

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    Lemke, Johannes R; Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic enc...

  2. Behavior and social competency in idiopathic and cryptogenic childhood epilepsy.

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    Berg, Anne T; Vickrey, Barbara G; Testa, Francine M; Levy, Susan R; Shinnar, Shlomo; DiMario, Francis

    2007-07-01

    Behavioral and related disorders are frequently reported in association with childhood epilepsy but the reasons for this are unclear. In a long-term prospective, community-based study of newly-diagnosed childhood epilepsy, behavioral assessments (Child Behavior Checklist) were performed in children 8 to 9 years after the initial diagnosis of epilepsy to determine the impact of remission and medication status on behavioral problems. Children with epilepsy were also compared with sibling controls. A total of 226 children (108 females, 118 males; mean age 13y 1mo [SD 2y 8mo], range 8-17y) with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy were included in the analyses. One hundred and twenty-eight matched pairs were included in analyses of case-sibling differences. Lack of remission and current medication use were associated with worse behavioral problem and competency scores. Lack of remission generally had a greater effect than medication use, except for attention problems; medication status had the more deleterious effect (pChildren with epilepsy had significantly worse behavioral problems and competency scores relative to sibling controls. Even in paris in which the patient was seizure-free and off medication, significant case-sibling differences persisted for most scales (p=0.05 to p=0.001). Lack of remission and continued use of antiepileptic drugs have a negative influence on behavioral problems in children with epilepsy but do not fully explain the worse scores relative to siblings. This suggests an independent effect associated with the epilepsy itself.

  3. Ictal Epileptic Headache with Idiopathic Epilepsy

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Neurologists at the University of Rome, Italy report a 37-year-old woman with drug-resistant generalized epilepsy and headache who had a sudden headache during a 24-h EEG that displayed epileptic activity.

  4. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs

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    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Fischer, Andrea; Mandigers, Paul J. J.;

    2015-01-01

    Canine idiopathic epilepsy is a common neurological disease affecting both purebred and crossbred dogs. Various breed-specific cohort, epidemiological and genetic studies have been conducted to date, which all improved our knowledge and general understanding of canine idiopathic epilepsy, and in ...

  5. EEG features of absence seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Impact of syndrome, age, and state

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    Sadleir, L.G.; Scheffer, I.E.; Smith, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Factors influencing the electroencephalography (EEG) features of absence seizures in newly presenting children with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have not been rigorously studied. We examined how specific factors such as state, provocation, age, and epilepsy syndrome affect the E...

  6. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force's current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Fischer, Andrea; Mandigers, Paul J. J.

    2015-01-01

    of the dog with epilepsy in everyday clinical practice and furthermore may promote canine epilepsy research. The following manuscript reviews the evidence available for breeds which have been identified as being predisposed to idiopathic epilepsy with a proven or suspected genetic background, and highlights...

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of visual aura in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

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    Gungor-Tuncer, Ozlem; Baykan, Betul; Altindag, Ebru; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2012-12-01

    Some patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE) experience visual aura, which can confuse the diagnosis. We sought to determine the frequency and characteristics of visual auras in IGE patients. Among the 176 IGE patients, 4 men and 7 women reported visual auras (mean age - 24 years). Syndromic diagnoses were juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in four, eyelid myoclonia with absences (EMA) in three, juvenile absence epilepsy in three, and other in one. Visual auras consisted of flashing lights, macropsia, illusional movements, and blindness. Eyelid myoclonia with absences was significantly more common in the group with visual aura (3 of 11 patients vs. 8 of 165 IGE patients; P=0.02). Furthermore, photosensitivity was found significantly more common in IGE patients with visual aura (90% vs 46% of the total IGE patients) (P=0.004). In conclusion, the visual auras do not exclude a diagnosis of IGE. The presence of visual aura in the EMA syndrome is also remarkable.

  8. Idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut: report of 12 patients.

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    Wakamoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Hideo; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Shohei; Motoki, Takahiro; Ohmori, Hiromitsu; Ishii, Eiichi

    2011-03-01

    This study sought to present clinical and outcome data of patients with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut, to validate previously reported characteristics of this epilepsy. The study group was comprised of 12 affected children (three boys and nine girls), with a median age of onset at 10.3 years. Common ictal manifestations included elementary visual hallucinations (75.0%), blindness or blurring of vision (50.0%), headache (50.0%), and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures (58.3%). Interictal electroencephalography revealed occipital spike-wave paroxysms reactive to eye closure and opening in all patients, accompanied by spike-wave activity in the extra-occipital areas in four (33.3%), and by generalized spike-wave discharges in two (16.7%). One patient exhibited the onset of occipital lobe seizures 1 year after manifesting absence epilepsy. Seizure remission occurred in 81.8% of cases, in half of which medication was discontinued by late adolescence. This study confirmed the previously delineated electroclinical features of epilepsy syndrome, with additional aspects including the frequent association of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and atypical evolution from childhood absence epilepsy.

  9. Quality-of-life aspects in idiopathic epilepsy in dogs

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    Wessmann, A; Volk, H A; Packer, R M A; Ortega, M.; Anderson, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) plays a significant role in the treatment of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), yet is so far understudied. This study describes the outcome evaluation of an online questionnaire based on the carer's perception focusing on 62 QoL questions in 159 dogs with IE. Results showed that seizure frequency, but not seizure severity or presence of cluster seizures, was significantly associated with carer-perceived dog's QoL. Dogs receiving third-line antiepileptic drugs had a sig...

  10. A study of idiopathic generalised epilepsy in an Irish population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullins, G M

    2012-02-03

    Idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) is subdivided into syndromes based on clinical and EEG features. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to characterise all cases of IGE with supportive EEG abnormalities in terms of gender differences, seizure types reported, IGE syndromes, family history of epilepsy and EEG findings. We also calculated the limited duration prevalence of IGE in our cohort. METHODS: Data on abnormal EEGs were collected retrospectively from two EEG databases at two tertiary referral centres for neurology. Clinical information was obtained from EEG request forms, standardised EEG questionnaires and medical notes of patients. RESULTS: two hundred twenty-three patients met our inclusion criteria, 89 (39.9%) male and 134 (60.1%) females. Tonic clonic seizures were the most common seizure type reported, 162 (72.65%) having a generalised tonic clonic seizure (GTCS) at some time. IGE with GTCS only (EGTCSA) was the most common syndrome in our cohort being present in 94 patients (34 male, 60 female), with 42 (15 male, 27 female) patients diagnosed with Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), 23 (9 male, 14 female) with Juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) and 20 (9 male, 11 female) with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). EEG studies in all patients showed generalised epileptiform activity. CONCLUSIONS: More women than men were diagnosed with generalised epilepsy. Tonic clonic seizures were the most common seizure type reported. EGTCSA was the most frequent syndrome seen. Gender differences were evident for JAE and JME as previously reported and for EGTCSA, which was not reported to date, and reached statistical significance for EGTCA and JME.

  11. [The use of depakene and depakene-chrono in idiopathic generalized epilepsy].

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    Perunova, N Iu

    2003-01-01

    During 5 years, 104 patients with different types of idiopathic generalized epilepsy were treated with depakine and depakine-chrono in monotherapy and polytherapy schedule. Thirty-three patients had childhood absence epilepsy, 34--juvenile absence epilepsy, 33--juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and 3--generalized convulsive seizures in wake up periods. Mean medication dose was 1200 mg daily. Significant improvement of the patient's state was revealed in 50% of the cases, being most efficient in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (60.6%) and in children absence epilepsy (57.5%). Indices of remission formation and quality changed in the same direction--complete remissions were more frequent in juvenile absence epilepsy. Depakine is concluded to be an effective medication for the treatment of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

  12. Obesity and its association with generalised epilepsy, idiopathic syndrome, and family history of epilepsy.

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    Ladino, Lady D; Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2014-09-01

    Aim. Previous studies support the concept that obesity is a common comorbid condition in patients with epilepsy (PWE). In this study, we present the body mass index (BMI) and data from a survey to assess physical activity in a sample of PWE from an epilepsy clinic. Methods. Between June of 2011 and January of 2013, 100 PWE from an adult epilepsy clinic were included. We obtained BMI, waist circumference, and information regarding physical activity using a standardised questionnaire. Clinical, demographic, electrographic, and imaging parameters were collected from charts. Results. Mean age of patients was 40 ± 14 (18-77) years. The BMI distribution was as follows: 2 patients (2%) underweight, 26 (26%) normal weight, 34 (34%) overweight, 25 (25%) obese, and 13 (13%) with morbid obesity. In our study, obesity was defined as having a BMI ≥ 30. We found 38 (38%) patients in this range. There was no difference in the rate of drug-resistant epilepsy between obese and non-obese patients (55 vs. 55%; p=0.05). Leisure time habit was reported in 82% of obese patients and 79% of patients without obesity. Overall, the most frequent activity was walking (70%). Factors associated with obesity were generalised epilepsy (OR: 2.7, 1.1-6.6; p=0.012), idiopathic syndrome (OR: 2.7, 1.04-7; p=0.018), and family history of epilepsy (OR: 6.1, 1.5-24.2; p=0.002). Conclusion. Our study suggests an association between obesity, idiopathic generalised epilepsy, and family history of epilepsy. Our study shows that PWE are physically active and there is no clear relation between exercise and obesity. We could not identify any association between drug-resistant epilepsy and obesity. Absence of direct comparison with a control non-epileptic population; a cross-sectional design not allowing evaluation of a causal association among variables; and reliance on self-reported physical activity are to be considered as limitations of the present study.

  13. White matter microstructural changes of thalamocortical networks in photosensitivity and idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, Sergiu; Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig

    2012-01-01

    Photosensitivity or photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is an electroencephalography trait that is highly associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) and characterized by changes in cortical excitability in response to photic stimulation. Studying functional and structural changes of PPR ...

  14. Abnormal Basal Ganglia Functional Connectivity in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Luo; Yang Xia; Zhi-Wei Guo; Dong Zhou

    2011-01-01

    The basal ganglia have been implicated in a modulation role in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) by an invasive electrophysioigic means.This paper investigates the basal ganglia functional connectivity by using the region-wise functional connection analysis in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRi) in IGE.The increased functional connectivity within basal ganglia,and between the basal ganglia and the thalamus,and decreased functional connectivity between basal ganglia and motor cortex are found in IGE compared with the controls. These findings not only implicate dysfunctional integration in the motor loop in IGE and the enhanced interaction in the modulated loop,but also suggest that the basal ganglia modulate the generalized epileptic discharges with the influence over thalamus in the corticothalamus network.

  15. Identification of a novel idiopathic epilepsy locus in Belgian Shepherd dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Koskinen, Lotta L.E.; Gulløv, Christina Hedal;

    2012-01-01

    collected 159 cases and 148 controls and confirmed the presence of epilepsy through epilepsy questionnaires and clinical examinations. The MRI was normal while interictal EEG revealed abnormalities and variable foci in the clinically examined affected dogs. A genome-wide association study using Affymetrix......, or as primary generalized. Nine genes have been identified for symptomatic (storage diseases) and one for idiopathic epilepsy in different breeds. However, the genetic background of common canine epilepsies remains unknown. We have studied the clinical and genetic background of epilepsy in Belgian Shepherds. We...

  16. Risk factors for cluster seizures in canine idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Shihab, Nadia K; Torres, Bruno B J; Volk, Holger A

    2016-04-01

    Cluster seizures (CS), two or more seizures within a 24-hour period, are reported in 38-77% of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Negative outcomes associated with CS include a reduced likelihood of achieving seizure freedom, decreased survival time and increased likelihood of euthanasia. Previous studies have found factors including breed, sex and neuter status are associated with CS in dogs with IE; however, only one UK study in a multi-breed study of CS in IE patients exists to the author's knowledge, and thus further data is required to confirm these results. Data from 384 dogs treated at a multi-breed canine specific epilepsy clinic were retrospectively collected from electronic patient records. 384 dogs were included in the study, of which nearly half had a history of CS (49.1%). Dogs with a history of CS had a younger age at onset than those without (p = 0.033). In a multivariate model, three variables predicted risk of CS: a history of status epilepticus (p = 0.047), age at seizure onset (p = 0.066) and breed (German Shepherd Dog) (p Dogs with a history of status epilepticus and dogs with an older age at seizure onset were less likely to be affected by cluster seizures. German Shepherd Dogs (71% experiencing CS) were significantly more likely to suffer from CS compared to Labrador Retrievers (25%) (p < 0.001). There was no association between sex, neuter status, body size and CS. Further studies into the pathophysiology and genetics of CS are required to further understand this phenomenon.

  17. Autobiographical memory in children with Idiopathic Generalised Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, Michael B; Barton, Belinda; Webster, Richard; Gill, Deepak; Lah, Suncica

    2015-01-01

    Autobiographical memory involves the recall of both personal facts (semantic memory) and the re-experiencing of past personal events (episodic memory). The recall of autobiographical episodic details has been associated with a specific network, which involves the prefrontal and medial temporal lobes, in addition to posterior regions of the brain. Seizure activity has been previously shown to disrupt the consolidation of newly-learned information into long-term memory, but it is not yet known whether primary generalised seizures alone are also associated with deficits in the recall of autobiographical memories. Here we examined this recall in children who experience generalised rather than localisation-related seizures: children with Idiopathic Generalised Epilepsy (IGE). In this study, 18 children with IGE and 42 healthy controls of comparable age (6-16 years), sex and socio-economic status were administered the Children's Autobiographical Interview (CAI). Compared with controls, children with IGE recalled significantly fewer episodic details, even when retrieval prompts were provided. In contrast, no group difference was found for the recall of semantic autobiographic details. Within the IGE group, hierarchical regression analyses showed that patient age and earlier age of diagnosis were significantly related to the recall of episodic autobiographical details over different conditions of the CAI, explaining up to 37% of variance. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence of autobiographical episodic memory deficits in patients with primary generalised seizures. As no evidence of localisation-related epilepsy is apparent in patients with IGE, our findings suggest that generalised seizures alone, especially when developed at an early age, could compromise memories for personally-experienced events.

  18. Monogenic Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... form of monogenic diabetes? • What type of monogenic diabetes does my child (or do I) have? • What are the treatment options? • What are the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option? • Should I see a diabetes educator? • Should I see an endocrinologist? Resources • Find- ...

  19. Treatment with gabapentin of 11 dogs with refractory idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, S R; Adams, V; Garosi, L S; Abramson, C J; Penderis, J; De Stefani, A; Matiasek, L

    Eleven dogs diagnosed with refractory idiopathic epilepsy were treated orally with gabapentin for a minimum of three months at an initial dose of 10 mg/kg every eight hours. They were all experiencing episodes of generalised tonic-clonic seizures and had been treated chronically with a combination of phenobarbital and potassium bromide at doses sufficient to reach acceptable therapeutic serum levels without causing significant side effects. In each dog, the number of seizures per week, the average duration of the seizures and the number of days on which seizures occurred were compared for the three months before and after they were treated with gabapentin. A minimum 50 per cent reduction in the number of seizures per week was interpreted as a positive response to gabapentin, and six of the dogs showed a positive response. After the addition of gabapentin, both the number of seizures per week (P= 0.005) and the number of days with any seizures in a one-week period (P=0.03) were significantly reduced. Mild side effects of ataxia and sedation were observed in five of the dogs, but they were not severe enough to warrant the treatment being discontinued during the trial.

  20. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Gregory L.; Wechsler, Robert T.; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J.; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel uptitrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving ≥50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Results: Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (−38.4% vs −76.5%; p seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p = 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo-treated patients and 30.9% of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Conclusions: Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE. PMID:26296511

  1. Retrospective clinical comparison of idiopathic versus symptomatic epilepsy in 240 dogs with seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pákozdy, Akos; Leschnik, Michael; Tichy, Alexander G; Thalhammer, Johann G

    2008-12-01

    In the present study, 240 cases of dogs with seizures were analysed retrospectively. The aim was to examine the underlying aetiology and to compare primary or idiopathic epilepsy (IE) with symptomatic epilepsy (SE) concerning signalment, history, ictal pattern, clinical and neurological findings. The diagnosis of symptomatic epilepsy was based on confirmed pathological changes in haematology, serum biochemistry, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and morphological changes of the brain by CT/MRI or histopathological examination. Seizure aetiologies were classified as idiopathic epilepsy (IE, n = 115) and symptomatic epilepsy (SE, n = 125). Symptomatic epilepsy was mainly caused by intracranial neoplasia (39) and encephalitis (23). The following variables showed significant difference between the IE and SE group: age, body weight, presence of partial seizures, cluster seizures, status epilepticus, ictal vocalisation and neurological deficits. In 48% of the cases, seizures were found to be due to IE, while 16% were due to intracranial neoplasia and 10% to encephalitis. Status epilepticus, cluster seizures, partial seizures, vocalisation during seizure and impaired neurological status were more readily seen with symptomatic epilepsy. If the first seizure occurred between one and five years of age or the seizures occurred during resting condition, the diagnosis was more likely IE than SE.

  2. 15q13.3 microdeletions increase risk of idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbig, Ingo; Mefford, Heather C; Sharp, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    We identified 15q13.3 microdeletions encompassing the CHRNA7 gene in 12 of 1,223 individuals with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), which were not detected in 3,699 controls (joint P = 5.32 x 10(-8)). Most deletion carriers showed common IGE syndromes without other features previously associ...

  3. A retrospective study of carbamazepine therapy in the treatment of idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2011-05-01

    Objective: The exacerbation of idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) by some anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) such as carbamazepine (CBZ) has been well documented. However, it is unclear whether IGE is always worsened by the use of CBZ, or whether some patients with IGE benefit from its use. \\r\

  4. Cognitive Dysfunction and Brain Volume Abnormalities in New-Onset Idiopathic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological function and quantitataive volumetric measurement of grey and white matter of cerebrum were determined in 53 children (ages 8-18 years with recent-onset idiopathic epilepsy and compared to controls in a study at University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  5. Cognitive Dysfunction and Brain Volume Abnormalities in New-Onset Idiopathic Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-01-01

    Neuropsychological function and quantitataive volumetric measurement of grey and white matter of cerebrum were determined in 53 children (ages 8-18 years) with recent-onset idiopathic epilepsy and compared to controls in a study at University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  6. Myoclonus precipitated by oral suspension of oxcarbazepine in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Songqing; Luo, Rong; Mao, Meng; Huang, Liang

    2012-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine (OXC) is widely registered for the treatment of partial seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). Myoclonic seizures induced by OXC are uncommon. We report a child with idiopathic generalized epilepsy who developed myoclonic seizures and had an abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) when oral suspension of OXC was introduced. This study suggests that oral suspension of OXC can precipitate myoclonus.

  7. Prevalence of Hypopigmented and Cafe-Au-Lait Spots in Idiopathic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalences of hypopigmented maculae and cafe-au-lait spots were investigated in 210 children with idiopathic epilepsy, between 2 and 17 years of age, and 2754 health controls children, at the Departments of Pediatrics and Dermatology, Hacettepe University and Inonu University Medical Schools, Turkey.

  8. Clinical and neuropsychological assessment of attention and ADHD comorbidity in a sample of children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Regina Carvalho Machado da Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with epilepsy present significant problems concerning attention and comorbidity with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Objective To determine the prevalence of attention complaints, ADHD diagnosis and attention profile in a sample of children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy. Method 36 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy and 37 genre and age matched healthy controls underwent several procedures to diagnose their neuropsychological profile and comorbidity with ADHD. Results The prevalence of ADHD was higher in patients with epilepsy [χ2= 4.1, p = 0.043, 6 (16.7% vs 1 (2.7%], with worse results in attention related WISC items and factors in patients with epilepsy comparing to the controls, but not between patients with and without ADHD. Clinical characteristics did not influence those results. Conclusion This study found a greater prevalence of problems wih attention in pediatric patients with idiopathic epilepsy, but not a distinct profile between those with or without ADHD.

  9. 特发性全面性癫痫的遗传学研究进展%Advance in genetic study for idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜玉武; 谢涵

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a kind of common neurological diseases in the world. Over 50% of epilepsies have genetic basis. We define "idiopathic epilepsy" as a kind of epilepsy or epilepsy syndrome only with genetic factors, and idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) is a major type of idiopathic epilepsies. Susceptibility genes of epilepsies are mainly ion channel genes. Both gene mutation and copy number variation lead to epilepsies. Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is a crucial part of IGEs. Due to the consistency of CAE' s phenotype and results of EEG, studies related to CAE susceptibility genes tend to be easier to conduct. Through these studies about IGEs /CAE susceptibility genes, we can determine pathogenic model of epilepsy genetics, and find the way to diagnose accurately in molecular genetics, to identify types of epilepsies, to detect targets of antiepileptic drugs, and provide a basis for gene therapy.

  10. [Persistence of point-waves in the encephalogram (EEG) in idiopathic generalized epilepsy and therapeutic decisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedespan, J M; Brissaud, O; Loiseau, P

    1998-07-01

    We reviewed the literature on the following issues in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, is there a correlation between the persistence of seizures and electroencephalographic anomalies? Do point-waves observed in well-controlled patients constitute a factor predicting relapse? Do changes in paroxysmal anomalies during the disease course mean poor prognosis? Actually, there is very little literature on these issues and some disagreement in those data which have been published. Documented studies have been conducted in search of factors predicting relapse at treatment withdrawal, but little has been published concerning the role of the EEG. Few studies specifically mention idiopathic generalized epilepsy. In terms of the syndrome studied, they concern heterogeneous groups of patients. Generally, it is accepted that the EEG helps predict clinical course in idiopathic generalized epilepsy as it does in other epilepsies, given the characteristic EEG signs. This is true in patients under treatment and after treatment withdrawal. Risk errors were not however reported. II would appear reasonable to assume that no one EEG anomaly is determinant outside the clinical context.

  11. Recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 and 16p13.11 predispose to idiopathic generalized epilepsies

    OpenAIRE

    de Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Trucks, Holger; Helbig, Ingo; Mefford, Heather C.; Baker, Carl; Leu, Costin; Kluck, Christian; Muhle, Hiltrud; von Spiczak, Sarah; Ostertag, Philipp; Obermeier, Tanja; Kleefuß-Lie, Ailing A.; Hallmann, Kerstin; Steffens, Michael; Gaus, Verena

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsies account for 30% of all epilepsies. Despite a predominant genetic aetiology, the genetic factors predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsies remain elusive. Studies of structural genomic variations have revealed a significant excess of recurrent microdeletions at 1q21.1, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 in various neuropsychiatric disorders including autism, intellectual disability and schizophrenia. Microdeletions at 15q13.3 have recently...

  12. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy and hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a family of South Indian descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Muthiah; Senthil, N; Sujatha, S

    2015-01-01

    Inherited channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels in cellular membranes. They may manifest as diseases affecting skeletal muscle contraction, the conduction system of the heart, nervous system function, and vision syndromes. We describe a family of South Indian descent with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which four members also have idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a genetically heterogeneous channelopathy that has been linked to mutations in genes encoding three ion channels CACNIAS, SCN4A, and KCNJ2 predominantly. Although data on specific gene in idiopathic generalized epilepsy is relatively scarce, mutations of voltage gated sodium channel subunit genes (CACNB4) and nonsense mutations in voltage gated calcium channels (CACNA1A) have been linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in two families. We speculate that gene mutations altering the ability of the beta subunit to interact with the alpha subunit of the CaV1.1 channel and mutations in the pore-forming potassium channel subunit may be possible explanations for the combined manifestation of both diseases. Functional analysis of voltage gated calcium channel and other ion channels mutations may provide additional support and insight for the causal role of these mutations. The understanding of mutations in ion-channel genes will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of such inherited channelopathies.

  13. Social cognition dysfunctions in patients with epilepsy: Evidence from patients with temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realmuto, Sabrina; Zummo, Leila; Cerami, Chiara; Agrò, Luigi; Dodich, Alessandra; Canessa, Nicola; Zizzo, Andrea; Fierro, Brigida; Daniele, Ornella

    2015-06-01

    Despite an extensive literature on cognitive impairments in focal and generalized epilepsy, only a few number of studies specifically explored social cognition disorders in epilepsy syndromes. The aim of our study was to investigate social cognition abilities in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Thirty-nine patients (21 patients with TLE and 18 patients with IGE) and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. All subjects underwent a basic neuropsychological battery plus two experimental tasks evaluating emotion recognition from facial expression (Ekman-60-Faces test, Ek-60F) and mental state attribution (Story-based Empathy Task, SET). In particular, the latter is a newly developed task that assesses the ability to infer others' intentions (i.e., intention attribution - IA) and emotions (i.e., emotion attribution - EA) compared with a control condition of physical causality (i.e., causal inferences - CI). Compared with HCs, patients with TLE showed significantly lower performances on both social cognition tasks. In particular, all SET subconditions as well as the recognition of negative emotions were significantly impaired in patients with TLE vs. HCs. On the contrary, patients with IGE showed impairments on anger recognition only without any deficit at the SET task. Emotion recognition deficits occur in patients with epilepsy, possibly because of a global disruption of a pathway involving frontal, temporal, and limbic regions. Impairments of mental state attribution specifically characterize the neuropsychological profile of patients with TLE in the context of the in-depth temporal dysfunction typical of such patients. Impairments of socioemotional processing have to be considered as part of the neuropsychological assessment in both TLE and IGE in view of a correct management and for future therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Repair of abnormal perfusion foci in idiopathic epilepsy patients under long-term antiepileptic treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Wang; Siyu Zhao; Yaqing Liu

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizure control and the disappearance of epileptiform discharge are not indicative of the absence of abnormal perfusion foci.Perfusion abnormalities are a major cause of epileptic discharge, and the existence of abnormal perfusion foci implies possible relapse.Very little is known about perfusion abnormality repair in epilepsy.The present study selected 43 cases of idiopathic epilepsy under antiepileptic drug control for an average of 24 months.Comparisons between interictal single-photon emission CT (SPECT)images and long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) pre- and post-treatment showed that cases of normal SPECT increased by 48% (12/25) following treatment, with a total number of 15 reduced foci (36%, 15/41).Perfusion foci, i.e., region of interest, were altered following treatment.These changes included:normal to abnormal in 3 cases (7%, 3/43; 2 hyperperfusion and 1 hypoperfusion); abnormal to normal in 14 cases (32%, 14/43; 10 pre-treatment hypoperfusion and 4 hyperperfusion); abnormal to abnormal in 7 cases (16%, 7/43; hyperperfusion to hypoperfusion in 5 cases, hypoperfusion to hyperperfusion in 2 cases).Long-term EEG revealed in an increase in the number of normal cases by 20 (40%, 20/39), and there were 25 fewer cases with epileptiform discharges (66%, 25/38).These findings demonstrate that long-term control of anti-epileptic drugs partially repaired cerebral perfusion abnormalities and reduced epileptiform discharges in idiopathic epilepsy.

  15. Evaluation of creative thinking in children with idiopathic epilepsy (absence epilepsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, T; Parisi, L; Roccella, M

    2012-02-01

    Creativity represents the silent character of human behaviour. In children with epilepsy, cognitive performance of has mainly been investigated under the assumption that the disorder represents a risk factor for the development of intellectual function. In subjects with different forms of epilepsy, neuropsychologic disorders have been detected even when cognitive-global functioning is unimpaired. The cognitive functions of subjects with epilepsy have been widely studied, but their creativity has been never evaluated to date. The aim of this study was to describe the development of creative thinking in a group of children with absence epilepsy. The test battery included: the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-revised (WISC-R) and the Goodenough Human Figure Drawing Test. Statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) showed a statistically significant difference (P test scores between two groups of subjects (children with epilesy vs control group), with higher scores for figure originality, figure fluidity and figure elaboration in the control group. There was a significant correlation (Spearman's rho) between verbal IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscale scores and between performance IQ and figure elaboration, between total IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscales (P 0.30). Low scores on the figure originality subscales seem to confirm the hypothesis that adverse psychodynamic and relational factors impoverish autonomy, flexibility and manipulator interests. The communication channels between subjects with epilepsy and their family members were affected by the disorder, as were the type of emotional dynamics and affective flux.

  16. Developmental dyscalculia in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsies in a Brazilian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Ursula; Paixão Alves, Sandra Regina da; Guerreiro, Sabrina Mendonça; Machado da Costa, Célia Regina Carvalho; Souza Moreira, Fernanda de; Bandeira Lima, Andrea; Ferreira Tavares, Maria Rita; Souza Maia Filho, Heber

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic disorders of childhood which can threaten child development and mental health. Among cognitive disorders, dyscalculia is one of the most important. In this study, 39 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy underwent clinical and neuropsychological assessment to determine the intellectual level, math skills, reading and writing performance and neuropsychological profile. It was observed that the mathematical ability was below schooling expectations in a higher frequency than expected. There were no significant differences in mathematical performance among groups divided by number of antiepileptic drugs used, duration of disease and types and frequency of seizures. There was a positive correlation with intelligence quotient and attentional and reading level. These results suggest the existence not only of dyscalculia, but the concurrence of attentional and reading problems for the poor mathematical performance in this population.

  17. Developmental dyscalculia in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsies in a Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Thomé

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic disorders of childhood which can threaten child development and mental health. Among cognitive disorders, dyscalculia is one of the most important. In this study, 39 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy underwent clinical and neuropsychological assessment to determine the intellectual level, math skills, reading and writing performance and neuropsychological profile. It was observed that the mathematical ability was below schooling expectations in a higher frequency than expected. There were no significant differences in mathematical performance among groups divided by number of antiepileptic drugs used, duration of disease and types and frequency of seizures. There was a positive correlation with intelligence quotient and attentional and reading level. These results suggest the existence not only of dyscalculia, but the concurrence of attentional and reading problems for the poor mathematical performance in this population.

  18. Evaluation of quality of life of carers of Italian spinoni with idiopathic epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    De Risio, Luisa; Freeman, Julia; Shea, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The carers of all UK Kennel Club registered Italian spinoni (IS) born between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011 were invited to participate in the study. The carers of 47 of 63 IS diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) returned the questionnaire, which included numerous questions on various aspects of IE including the effect of IE on the dog's carer's quality of life. Median epileptic seizure number in the three months before study end or death was five epileptic seizures, 72 per cent of...

  19. Transient neuromyopathy after bromide intoxication in a dog with idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmetz Sonja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A seven-year old Australian Shepherd, suffering from idiopathic epilepsy under treatment with phenobarbitone and potassium bromide, was presented with generalised lower motor neuron signs. Electrophysiology and muscle-nerve biopsies revealed a neuromyopathy. The serum bromide concentration was increased more than two-fold above the upper reference value. Clinical signs disappeared after applying diuretics and reducing the potassium bromide dose rate. This is the first case report describing electrophysiological and histopathological findings associated with bromide induced lower motor neuron dysfunction in a dog.

  20. Narcolepsy Type 1 and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in Dual Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Simone; Vandi, Stefano; Pizza, Fabio; Alvisi, Lara; Toscani, Lucia; Zambrelli, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Mayer, Geert; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to describe the possible co-occurrence of narcolepsy type 1 and generalized epilepsy, focusing on diagnostic challenge and safety of dual treatments. Four patients with comorbidity for narcolepsy type 1 and idiopathic generalized epilepsy are reported: in three cases the onset of epilepsy preceded narcolepsy type 1 appearance, whereas in one case epileptic spells onset was subsequent. Patients presented with absences, myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizure type: in the patient with tonic-clonic seizures the dual pathology was easily recognized, in the other cases the first diagnosis caused the comorbid disease to be overlooked, independent of the time-course sequence. All four patients underwent neurological examination, video-electroencephalogram during which ictal and interictal epileptic discharges were recorded, and sleep polysomnographic studies. Repeated sleep onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs) were documented with the multiple sleep latency test (MLST) in all the four cases. All patients had unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging studies and cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 was assessed in two patients, revealing undetectable levels. The association of antiepileptic drugs and substances currently used to treat narcolepsy type 1, including sodium oxybate, was effective in improving seizures, sleep disturbance, and cataplexy. Narcolepsy type 1 may occur in association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, leading to remarkable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Electrophysiological studies as well as a comprehensive somnologic interview can help confirm the diagnosis in patients with ambiguous neurological history. Sodium oxybate in combination with antiepileptic drugs is safe and effective in treating cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  1. Identification of a novel idiopathic epilepsy locus in Belgian Shepherd dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Koskinen, Lotta L.E.; Gulløv, Christina Hedal;

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in dogs, with an incidence ranging from 0.5% to up to 20% in particular breeds. Canine epilepsy can be etiologically defined as idiopathic or symptomatic. Epileptic seizures may be classified as focal with or without secondary generalization...... 50K SNP arrays in 40 cases and 44 controls mapped the epilepsy locus on CFA37, which was replicated in an independent cohort (81 cases and 88 controls; combined p¿=¿9.70×10¿¹°, OR¿=¿3.3). Fine mapping study defined a ~1 Mb region including 12 genes of which none are known epilepsy genes or encode ion...... channels. Exonic sequencing was performed for two candidate genes, KLF7 and ADAM23. No variation was found in KLF7 but a highly-associated non-synonymous variant, G1203A (R387H) was present in the ADAM23 gene (p¿=¿3.7×10¿8, OR¿=¿3.9 for homozygosity). Homozygosity for a two-SNP haplotype within the ADAM23...

  2. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Phenotypic and electroencephalographic observations in a large cohort from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We studied the phenotype and electroencephalographic (EEG features, and therapeutic aspects of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs in South Indian population. Patients and Methods: This prospective cross-sectional hospital-based study was carried out on non-consecutive 287 patients (age 22.2 ± 7.7 years; M:F = 139:148 with IGE syndrome. Their clinical and EEG observations were analyzed. Results: Majority of the patients had onset of seizures <20 years of age (n = 178; 62%. Thirty one patients (10.8% had family history of epilepsy. Nearly half of them (49.9% had <5 years of duration of seizures. The type of IGEs included Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME: 115 (40.1%; IGE with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS only: 102 (39.02%; childhood absence epilepsy (CAE: 35 (12.2%; GTCS on awakening: 15 (5.2%; Juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE: 11 (3.8%; and unclassified seizures: 9 (3.1%. The triggering factors noted in 45% were sleep deprivation (20%, non-compliance and stress in 5% each. The EEG (n = 280 showed epileptiform discharges in about 50% of patients. Epileptiform discharges during activation was observed in 40/249 patients (16.1%: Hyperventilation in 32 (12.8% and photic stimulation in 19 (7.6%. The seizures were well controlled with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs in 232 (80.8% patients and among them, 225 (78.4% patients were on monotherapy. Valproate (n = 131 was the most frequently prescribed as monotherapy. Conclusions: This is one of the largest cohort of patients with IGE. This study reiterates the importance of segregating IGE syndrome and such analysis will aid to the current understanding and management.

  3. Familial and sporadic 15q13.3 microdeletions in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: precedent for disorders with complex inheritance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dibbens, Leanne M; Mullen, Saul; Helbig, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    Microdeletion at chromosomal position 15q13.3 has been described in intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and recently in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Using independent IGE cohorts, we first aimed to confirm the association of 15q13.3 deletions and IGE. We th...

  4. INTERRELATION OF P300 COGNITIVE POTENTIALS AND NEURO-IMMUNOLOGIC VALUES OF PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC AND SYMPTOMATIC EPILEPSY

    OpenAIRE

    Azizova, Rano

    2014-01-01

    The inverse relation of latent period prolongation degree and amplitude to the presence and expression of neuro-immunologic values was detected in the analysis of interrelation of the latest ones and cognitive initiated potentials in the patients with symptomatic and idiopathic epilepsy.

  5. Effects of a ketogenic diet on ADHD-like behavior in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Law, Tsz Hong; Davies, Emma; Zanghi, Brian; Pan, Yuanlong; Volk, Holger A

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy in humans and rodent models of epilepsy can be associated with behavioral comorbidities including an increased prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and seizure frequency have been successfully reduced in humans and rodents using a ketogenic diet (KD). The aims of this study were (i) to describe the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) while on a standardized nonketogenic placebo diet, to determine whether ADHD-like behaviors are present, and (ii) to examine the effect of a ketogenic medium chain triglyceride diet (MCTD) on the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) compared with the standardized placebo control diet, including ADHD-like behaviors. A 6-month prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover dietary trial comparing the effects of the MCTD with a standardized placebo diet on canine behavior was carried out. Dogs diagnosed with IE, with a seizure frequency of at least 3 seizures in the past 3months (n=21), were fed the MCTD or placebo diet for 3months and were then switched to the alternative diet for 3months. Owners completed a validated behavioral questionnaire to measure 11 defined behavioral factors at the end of each diet period to report their dogs' behavior, with three specific behaviors hypothesized to be related to ADHD: excitability, chasing, and trainability. The highest scoring behavioral factors in the placebo and MCTD periods were excitability (mean±SE: 1.910±0.127) and chasing (mean±SE: 1.824±0.210). A markedly lower trainability score (mean±SE: 0.437±0.125) than that of previously studied canine populations was observed. The MCTD resulted in a significant improvement in the ADHD-related behavioral factor chasing and a reduction in stranger-directed fear (pdiet. The latter effect may be attributed to previously described anxiolytic effects of a KD. These data support the supposition that

  6. Clinical course and seizure outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy: determinants of early and long-term prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoumi, Pinelopi; Tzetzi, Olga; Vargiami, Efthimia; Pavlou, Evangelos; Krikonis, Konstantinos; Kontopoulos, Eleftherios; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2013-12-18

    Idiopathic epilepsies and epileptic syndromes predominate childhood and adolescence epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical course and outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy and identify variables determining both early and long-term prognosis. We followed 303 children with newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy aged 1-14 years old, both prospectively and retrospectively. Outcome was defined at one, 2 and 4 years of follow-up, as well as at the end of the study period for all patients. Based on the data collected, patients were classified in four patterns of clinical course: "excellent", "improving", "relapsing" and "poor". Variables defined at intake and after the initial year of treatment were analyzed for their prognostic relevance towards the clinical course and outcome of the patients. The mean age at seizure onset was 6.7 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 8.3 years (range 2,0-22,0,SD 4,24). During the initial year of treatment, 70,3% of patients were seizure-free. The course of epilepsy was "excellent" in 53,1% of the subjects, "improving" in 22,8%, "relapsing" in 22,1% whereas only 6 children with idiopathic epilepsy (2%) had a "poor" clinical course exhibiting drug-resistance. After multivariate analysis, variables predictive of a poor initial response to therapy were early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and history of status epilepticus. At the end of follow-up, early response to treatment was of significant positive predictive value, while the presence of multiple seizure types and the history of migraine had a negative impact on prognosis. In the vast majority of children, the long-term prognosis of idiopathic epilepsy is favorable. More than half of the patients attain seizure freedom immediately and their clinical course is considered "excellent". About one fifth exhibit either an improving or a fluctuating course. Early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and status epilepticus are predictive of an

  7. Screening of GABRB3 in French-Canadian families with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Martin, Caroline; Poulin, Chantal; Gravel, Micheline; Carmant, Lionel; Cossette, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Mutations in the GABRB3 have been recently associated with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) in families from Honduras and Mexico. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of mutation in this gene in our cohort of families with CAE and other related idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) syndromes. We screened the open reading frame of GABRB3 in 183 French-Canadian individuals with IGE, including 88 with CAE. A total of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified,five of which are novel. The previously described P11S missense mutation was found in three affected and one unaffected individuals from a French-Canadian family. However, the P11S variant was also found in one of our 190 control individuals of French-Canadian origin, suggesting that this variant is rather a rare polymorphism in this population. Further screening of other IGE cohorts from various ethnic origins would help to confirm the association between this rare functional variant and epilepsy.

  8. Suggestive evidence for association of two potassium channel genes with different idiopathic generalised epilepsy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioza, B; Osei-Lah, A; Wilkie, H; Nashef, L; McCormick, D; Asherson, P; Makoff, A J

    2002-12-01

    Several potassium channel genes have been implicated in epilepsy. We have investigated three such genes, KCNJ3, KCNJ6 and KCNQ2, by association studies using a broad sample of idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) unselected by syndrome. One of the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) examined in one of the inward rectifying potassium channel genes, KCNJ3, was associated with IGE by genotype (P=0.0097), while its association by allele was of borderline significance (P=0.051). Analysis of the different clinical subgroups within the IGE sample showed more significant association with the presence of absence seizures (P=0.0041) and which is still significant after correction for multiple testing. Neither SNP in the other rectifying potassium channel gene, KCNJ6, was associated with IGE or any subgroup. None of the three SNPs in the voltage-gated potassium channel gene, KCNQ2, was associated with IGE. However, one SNP was associated with epilepsy with generalised tonic clonic seizures only (P=0.016), as was an SNP approximately 56 kb distant in the closely linked nicotinic acetylcholine gene CHRNA4 (P=0.014). These two SNPs were not in linkage disequilibrium with each other, suggesting that if they are not true associations they have independently occurred by chance. Neither association remains significant after correcting for multiple testing.

  9. EEG after sleep deprivation is a sensitive tool in the first diagnosis of idiopathic generalized but not focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzel, Roland; Baumann, Christian R; Poryazova, Rositsa

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an essential tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. EEG after sleep deprivation might increase the likelihood of finding specific epileptiform abnormalities. However conflicting data exist concerning the sensitivity and specificity of this method. We aimed to evaluate the role of EEG after sleep deprivation in the first diagnosis of epilepsy. We analyzed retrospectively the medical histories of patients who underwent at least one unspecific standard EEG and a subsequent EEG after sleep deprivation during the time period from 2001 to 2014 at the University Hospital Zurich because of suspected epilepsy. Out of 237 patients who fulfilled all inclusion criteria, 69 were finally diagnosed with epilepsy. Seventeen of them showed interictal epileptiform patterns in EEGs after sleep deprivation, giving this method an overall sensitivity of 25%. Sensitivity of EEG after sleep deprivation was superior in patients with primary generalized epilepsies compared to patients with focal epilepsies (64% vs. 17%, p=0.0011). Overall EEG after sleep deprivation was not more sensitive than a subsequent repeated standard EEG in a subgroup of 55 patients (22% vs. 9%; p=0.065). After an unspecific standard EEG, EEG after sleep deprivation is a useful tool to increase diagnostic sensitivity in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy but not in those with focal epilepsy. This study provides further evidence about the usefulness of EEG after sleep deprivation as an additional diagnostic tool in epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. GABAergic neuron deficit as an idiopathic generalized epilepsy mechanism: the role of BRD2 haploinsufficiency in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Velíšek

    Full Text Available Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE syndromes represent about 30% of all epilepsies. They have strong, but elusive, genetic components and sex-specific seizure expression. Multiple linkage and population association studies have connected the bromodomain-containing gene BRD2 to forms of IGE. In mice, a null mutation at the homologous Brd2 locus results in embryonic lethality while heterozygous Brd2+/- mice are viable and overtly normal. However, using the flurothyl model, we now show, that compared to the Brd2+/+ littermates, Brd2+/- males have a decreased clonic, and females a decreased tonic-clonic, seizure threshold. Additionally, long-term EEG/video recordings captured spontaneous seizures in three out of five recorded Brd2+/- female mice. Anatomical analysis of specific regions of the brain further revealed significant differences in Brd2+/- vs +/+ mice. Specifically, there were decreases in the numbers of GABAergic (parvalbumin- or GAD67-immunopositive neurons along the basal ganglia pathway, i.e., in the neocortex and striatum of Brd2+/- mice, compared to Brd2+/+ mice. There were also fewer GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR, yet there was a minor, possibly compensatory increase in the GABA producing enzyme GAD67 in these SNR cells. Further, GAD67 expression in the superior colliculus and ventral medial thalamic nucleus, the main SNR outputs, was significantly decreased in Brd2+/- mice, further supporting GABA downregulation. Our data show that the non-channel-encoding, developmentally critical Brd2 gene is associated with i sex-specific increases in seizure susceptibility, ii the development of spontaneous seizures, and iii seizure-related anatomical changes in the GABA system, supporting BRD2's involvement in human IGE.

  11. Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Electroencephalographic Findings in Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar ASADI-POOYA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveSeveral antiepileptic drugs (AEDs such as phenobarbital (Pb, carbamazepine (CBZ, and valproate (VPA may suppress interictal epileptiform activity. We investigated the effects of AEDs on electroencephalography (EEG data from patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE.Materials & MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, all patients electroclinically diagnosed with IGE were recruited in the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from September 2008 through August 2010. A routine EEG was requested at the time of referral for all patients. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi square and Fisher’s exact test.ResultsThis study comprised of 336 patients. For about 20.8% (70 patients of them, the initial EEG appeared normal. The first EEG was normal in 14.2% of the patients who had newly diagnosed IGE (19 patients. Normal EEG was also detected for 27.6% of the patients who received VPA monotherapy (16 patients, 31% of the patients who received CBZ monotherapy (9 patients, 29.4% of the patients who received Pb monotherapy (5 patients, and 11.1% of the patients who received lamotrigine (LTG (1 patient.ConclusionThis study shows that compared to LTG, VPA suppresses generalized interictal epileptiform activity in patients with IGE more effectively. Theoretically, if a drug can frequently induce normalization of EEG, then it may be a better drug for treating IGEs.

  12. CLINICAL AND ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF IDIOPATHIC CHILDHOOD FOCAL EPILEPSY WITH CENTROTEMPORAL SPIKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic childhood focal epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, which is more known as rolandic epilepsy (RE, is age- and localization-related epilepsy with childhood onset, which is characterized mainly by short-lasting hemifacial and oropharyngeal seizures generally occurring when awakening or falling asleep, by the normal neurological status of patients, by specific electroencephalographic changes and complete arrest of seizures during therapy or when achieving puberty.RE is the most common epilepsy in childhood. Its prevalence is 21 per 100,000 healthy children. It is characterized by an onset that is clearly related to age. In 85 % of cases, RE occurs at 4–10 years of age with its peak at about 9 years. The clinical manifestations of this form of epilepsy are several types of seizures, such as oropharyngolaryngeal, hemifacial, faciobrachial, secondarily generalized convulsive, unilateral seizures with the possible development of short duration Todd’s paresis. Other types of seizures (absence, atonic, and myoclonic ones are uncharacteristic of RE. They may occur occasionally on aggravation resulting from the use of carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine or permanently on transformation into pseudo-Lennox syndrome. According to the definition, focal neurological symptoms and behavioral and intellectual disorders are absent in patients with RE. However, there have been recent observations suggesting that speech, cognitive, and behavioral disorders may occur (at the same time rarely in children with RE. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI fails to reveal the abnormality in the vast majority of cases. The described MRI changes in nearly 10 % of the patients with RE are an incidental finding and irrelevant to the course of the disease. Valproate in small doses is a first-choice drug; if it is inefficient, levetiracetam, topiramate, or a combination of valproate and ethosuximide are administered. Sulthiame (ospolot as monotherapy is used in Germany

  13. Clinical evaluation of a combination therapy of imepitoin with phenobarbital in dogs with refractory idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neßler, Jasmin; Rundfeldt, Chris; Löscher, Wolfgang; Kostic, Draginja; Keefe, Thomas; Tipold, Andrea

    2017-01-25

    Imepitoin was tested as a combination treatment with phenobarbital in an open-label mono-centre cohort study in dogs with drug-resistant epilepsy. Diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy was based on clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Three cohorts were treated. In cohort A, dogs not responding to phenobarbital with or without established add-on treatment of potassium bromide or levetiracetam were treated add-on with imepitoin, starting at 10 mg/kg BID, with titration allowed to 30 mg/kg BID. In cohort B, the only difference to cohort A was that the starting dose of imepitoin was reduced to 5 mg/kg BID. In cohort C, animals not responding to imepitoin at >20 mg/kg BID were treated with phenobarbital add-on starting at 0.5 mg/kg BID. The add-on treatment resulted in a reduction in monthly seizure frequency (MSF) in all three cohorts. A reduction of ≥50% was obtained in 36-42% of all animals, without significant difference between cohorts. The lower starting dose of 5 mg/kg BID imepitoin was better tolerated, and an up-titration to on average of 15 mg/kg BID was sufficient in cohort A and B. In cohort C, a mean add-on dose of 1.5 mg/kg BID phenobarbital was sufficient to achieve a clinically meaningful effect. Six dogs developed a clinically meaningful increase in MSF of ≥ 50%, mostly in cohort A. Neither imepitoin nor phenobarbital add-on treatment was capable of suppressing cluster seizure activity, making cluster seizure activity an important predictor for drug-resistance. A combination treatment of imepitoin and phenobarbital is a useful treatment option for a subpopulation of dogs with drug-resistant epilepsy, a low starting dose with 5 mg/kg BID is recommended.

  14. Long-Term Clinical and Electroencephalography (EEG) Consequences of Idiopathic Partial Epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörtcan, Nimet; Tekin Guveli, Betul; Dervent, Aysin

    2016-05-03

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic partial epilepsies of childhood (IPE) affect a considerable proportion of children. Three main electroclinical syndromes of IPE are the Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centro-temporal Spikes (BECTS), Panayiotopoulos Syndrome (PS), and Childhood Epilepsy with Occipital Paroxysms (CEOP). In this study we investigated the long-term prognosis of patients with IPE and discussed the semiological and electroencephalography (EEG) data in terms of syndromic characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study included a group of consecutive patients with IPE who had been followed since 1990. Demographic and clinical variables were investigated. Patients were divided into 3 groups - A: Cases suitable for a single IPE (BECTS, PS and CEOP); B: cases with intermediate characteristics within IPEs; and C: cases with both IPE and IGE characteristics. Long-term data regarding the individual seizure types and EEG findings were re-evaluated. RESULTS A total of 61 patients were included in the study. Mean follow-up duration was 7.8 ± 4.50 years. The mean age at onset of seizures was 7.7 years. There were 40 patients in group A 40, 14 in group B, and 7 in group C. Seizure and EEG characteristics were also explored independently from the syndromic approach. Incidence of autonomic seizures is considerably high at 2-5 years and incidence of oromotor seizures is high at age 9-11 years. The EEG is most abnormal at 6-8 years. The vast majority (86%) of epileptic activity (EA) with parietooccipital is present at 2-5 years, whereas EA with fronto-temporal or multiple sites become more abundant between ages 6 and 11. CONCLUSIONS Results of the present study provide support for the age-related characteristics of the seizures and EEGs in IPE syndromes. Acknowledgement of those phenomena may improve the management of IPEs and give a better estimate of the future consequences.

  15. Monogenic diabetes and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Rinki

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic diabetes is frequently mistakenly diagnosed as either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, yet accounts for approximately 1–2% of diabetes. Identifying monogenic forms of diabetes has practical implications for specific therapy, screening of family members and genetic counselling. The most common forms of monogenic diabetes are due to glucokinase (GCK), hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1A and HNF-4A, HNF-1B, m.3243A>G gene defects. Practical aspects of their recognition, diagnosis and manageme...

  16. Effect of Vitamin E on Oxidative Stress Markers of Proteins and Lipids in Children with Idiopathic Epilepsy

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    S Rezaei Tireh Shabankareh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epilepsy is regarded as one of the prevalent neurological disorders in children. The role of anti-oxidants in protection of epilepsy has been discussed in several studies. Vitamin E can be mentioned as a natural antioxidant to neutralize free radicals. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of vitamin E on oxidative stress markers such as malone dialdehyde(MDA and protein carbonyl(PC in children suffering from idiopathic epilepsy and vitamin D deficiency. Methods: In the current study, children suffering from idiopathic epilepsy and vitamin D deficiency were randomly divided into two groups. One group was treated with 50000 units of vitamin D oral capsules (per week for 8 weeks and the other  group was treated with 100 units of vitamin E (per day for one month as well as 50000 unit of vitamin D for 8 weeks. The amount of MDA and PC were measured by the spectrophotometer method. The obtained data were analyzed via the  SPSS software (ver, 19 using t-test. Results: The results indicated that the amount of  MAD and PC revealed a significant decrease after the treatment. In fact, in the group treated with vitamin E, the amount of PC decreased significantly compared with the other group, though MDA reduction was not proved to be significant. Discussion: The findings of the present study revealed that treatment with vitamin E could reduce the PC amount in regard with epileptic patients.

  17. Functional Network Connectivity Patterns between Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy with Myoclonic and Absence Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifu Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extensive cerebral cortex and subcortical structures are considered as the major regions related to the generalized epileptiform discharges in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. However, various clinical syndromes and electroencephalogram (EEG signs exist across generalized seizures, such as the loss of consciousness during absence seizures (AS and the jerk of limbs during myoclonic seizures (MS. It is presumed that various functional systems affected by discharges lead to the difference in syndromes of these seizures. Twenty epileptic patients with MS, 21 patients with AS, and 21 healthy controls were recruited in this study. The functional network connectivity was analyzed based on the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The statistical analysis was performed in three groups to assess the difference in the functional brain networks in two types of generalized seizures. Twelve resting-state networks were identified in three groups. Both patient groups showed common abnormalities, including decreased functional connectivity in salience network (SN, cerebellum network, and primary perceptional networks and decreased connection between SN and visual network, compared with healthy controls. Interestingly, the frontal part of high-level cognitive resting-state networks showed increased functional connectivity (FC in patients with MS, but decreased FC in patients with AS. Moreover, patients with MS showed decreased negative connections between high-level cognitive networks and primary system. The common alteration in both patient groups, including SN, might reflect a similar mechanism associated with the loss of consciousness during generalized seizures. This study provided the evidence of brain network in generalized epilepsy to understand the difference between MS and AS.

  18. Resting motor threshold in idiopathic generalized epilepsies: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Storti, Monica; Benedetti, Maria Donata; Rossini, Fabio; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Fiaschi, Antonio; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Manganotti, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Resting motor threshold (rMT) assessed by means of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is thought to reflect trans-synaptic excitability of cortico-spinal neurons. TMS studies reporting rMT in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) yielded discrepant results, so that it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion on cortico-spinal excitability in IGEs by simple summation of previous results regarding this measure. Our purpose was to carry out a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies evaluating rMT values obtained during single-pulse TMS in patients with IGEs. Controlled studies measuring rMT by single-pulse TMS in drug-naive patients older than 12 years affected by IGEs were systematically reviewed. rMT values were assessed calculating mean difference and odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Fourteen trials (265 epileptic patients and 424 controls) were included. Patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) have a statistically significant lower rMT compared with controls (mean difference: -6.78; 95% CI -10.55 to -3.00); when considering all subtypes of IGEs and IGEs other than JME no statistically significant differences were found. Overall considered, the results are indicative of a cortico-spinal hyper-excitability in JME, providing not enough evidence for motor hyper-excitability in other subtypes of IGE. The considerable variability across studies probably reflects the presence of relevant clinical and methodological heterogeneity, and higher temporal variability among rMT measurements over time, related to unstable cortical excitability in these patients.

  19. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy.

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    Adham Elshahabi

    Full Text Available Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease.

  20. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease.

  1. Monogenic human obesity syndromes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-01-01

    .... This chapter will consider the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterized to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  2. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Krauss, Gregory L; Wechsler, Robert T; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-09-15

    To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel up titrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving $50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (238.4%vs 276.5%; p , 0.0001) and greater 50%PGTC seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p 5 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo treated patients and 30.9%of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE.

  3. Idiopathic generalised epilepsies with 3 Hz and faster spike wave discharges: a population-based study with evaluation and long-term follow-up in 71 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siren, Auli; Eriksson, Kai; Jalava, Heli; Kilpinen-Loisa, Päivi; Koivikko, Matti

    2002-09-01

    For several years we have been following patients with intractable, childhood-onset idiopathic generalised epilepsies with > or = 3 Hz spike-wave discharges. Our need to find explanations for their intractability was the starting point for this study. We were interested in identifying characteristics, which would predict intractability; evaluating how these patients were treated and whether polytherapy was useful. We identified patients with > or = 3 Hz spike-wave discharges by reviewing EEG reports recorded between 1983 and 1992. Data were collected from medical records and through personal interviews. We identified 82 patients with tentative idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Eleven were excluded. Thirty-eight patients had childhood absence epilepsy, 18 had juvenile absence epilepsy, 13 had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and two had eyelid myoclonia with absences: 89.5, 78, 38 and 0% of the patients in each group, respectively, had been seizure free for more than 2 years. Twenty percent of the patients had intractable seizures. All intractable patients with juvenile absence epilepsy had rhythmic, random eyelid blinking and generalised tonic-clonic seizures. A history of more than ten generalised tonic-clonic seizures was associated with intractability in juvenile myoclonic patients. Monotherapy with ethosuximide or valproate resulted in seizure control in 65% of patients. Seventeen patients (24%) were treated with polytherapy, six achieved remission. These six patients had childhood absence epilepsy and juvenile absence epilepsy. Positive outcome was found in childhood absence epilepsy and juvenile absence epilepsy. Intractable seizures were more frequent among patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. None of them benefited from polytherapy with conventional anti-epileptic drugs.

  4. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain.

  5. Effectiveness of Rufinamide in the Treatment of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy With Atypical Evolution: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Mariarita; Morano, Alessandra; Fanella, Martina; Lapenta, Leonardo; Casciato, Sara; Fattouch, Jinane; Manfredi, Mario; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Rufinamide (RFD) is a novel drug that was recently approved as an adjunctive treatment for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Despite its reported effectiveness in generalized seizures (tonic, atonic, or tonic-clonic) in this syndrome, few data on its use in idiopathic generalized epilepsy are available. Indeed, the scientific evidence to date is limited to anecdotal cases or isolated clinical experiences. We report an uncommon, though paradigmatic, case of a woman affected by juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) who, following a prolonged seizure-freedom period and the consequent withdrawal of valproate, presented a seizure relapse accompanied by a worsening in her electroclinical pattern. In view of this atypical evolution of JAE, characterized by drug-resistant seizures (absence and generalized tonic-clonic) and the progressive increase in electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities, several antiepileptic drugs were used, though to no benefit. The use of RFD instead led to a gradual control of the seizures and normalization of the EEG findings. In addition to this clinical experience, we briefly review the literature on the use of RFD in refractory generalized epilepsy.

  6. Monogenic human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2008-01-01

    We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptinmelanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterisation of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  7. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. The epilepsies have many ... sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. The epilepsies have many ...

  8. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  9. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of epilepsy medicines Use of alcohol or other recreational drugs Other considerations: People with epilepsy should wear medical ... panel Dementia Diabetes Encephalitis Head injury - first aid HIV/AIDS Meningitis Neurosyphilis Phenylketonuria Prerenal azotemia Seizures Stroke ...

  10. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and clas......-sification. More than two thirds of patients with epilepsy can obtain complete seizure control. The remainders, counting around 12.000 patients in Denmark, having medical refractory epilepsy should be considered for other treatment options; epilepsy surgery or other non-pharmacological treatment....

  11. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: A Meta-Analysis of Voxel-Based Morphology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongwu; He, Xiaoming; Li, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Bingsheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to identify the consistent regions of gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), and to study the difference of GMV abnormalities among IGE subsyndromes by applying activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis. Methods A systematic review of VBM studies on GMV of patients with absence epilepsy (AE), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), IGE and controls indexed in PubMed and ScienceDirect from January 1999 to June 2016 was conducted. A total of 12 IGE studies, including 7 JME and 3 AE studies, were selected. Meta-analysis was performed on these studies by using the pooled and within-subtypes analysis (www.brainmap.org). Based on the above results, between-subtypes contrast analysis was carried out to detect the abnormal GMV regions common in and unique to each subtype as well. Results IGE demonstrated significant GMV increase in right ventral lateral nucleus (VL) and right medial frontal gyrus, and significant GMV decrease in bilateral pulvinar. For JME, significant GMV increase was seen in right medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), while significant GMV decrease was found in right pulvinar. In AE, the most significant GMV increase was found in right VL, and slight GMV reduction was seen in right medial dorsal nucleus, right subcallosal gyrus, left caudate and left precuneus. No overlapped and unique regions with significant GMV abnormalities were found between JME and AE. Significance This meta-analysis demonstrated that thalamo-frontal network was a structure with significant GMV abnormality in IGE, and the IGE subsyndromes showed different GMV abnormal regions. These observations may provide instructions on the clinical diagnosis of IGE. PMID:28060866

  12. A prospective study of the modified Atkins diet for adults with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kverneland, Magnhild; Selmer, Kaja K; Nakken, Karl O; Iversen, Per O; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-12-01

    For children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is an established treatment option worldwide. However, for adults, this treatment is less frequently offered, and its efficacy less well-documented. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and tolerability of such a diet as an adjuvant therapy to antiepileptic drugs for adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. Thirteen patients (12 women) aged 16-57 years were included prospectively. They were treated with a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks. Nine of the 13 participants had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two had childhood absence epilepsy, one had Jeavons syndrome, and one had generalized epilepsy of unknown type. Six participants, all with JME, completed the 12-week study period. Among these six, four had >50% seizure reduction. Their seizure severity, using the revised Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale, was reduced by 1, 5, 57.5, and 70 points, respectively (scale: 1-100 points). In three of these four responders, quality of life, assessed by QOLIE-89, increased more than 20 points (scale: 0-100 points). Mean reduction of body weight after 12 weeks on diet was 6.5 (range: 4.3-8.1) kg. Lack of motivation, poor compliance, and seizure aggravation were the main reasons for premature termination of the diet. Apart from one patient who developed gallstones when ending the treatment after 10 months, no adverse effects were noted. In conclusion, using a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks led to a clinically relevant reduction of seizure frequency in four of thirteen adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. All responders were diagnosed with JME. In three of the four, the benefits of diet were so considerable that they chose to continue the treatment.

  13. A randomised trial of a medium-chain TAG diet as treatment for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Tsz Hong; Davies, Emma S S; Pan, Yuanlong; Zanghi, Brian; Want, Elizabeth; Volk, Holger A

    2015-11-14

    Despite appropriate antiepileptic drug treatment, approximately one-third of humans and dogs with epilepsy continue experiencing seizures, emphasising the importance for new treatment strategies to improve the quality of life of people or dogs with epilepsy. A 6-month prospective, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over dietary trial was designed to compare a ketogenic medium-chain TAG diet (MCTD) with a standardised placebo diet in chronically antiepileptic drug-treated dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Dogs were fed either MCTD or placebo diet for 3 months followed by a subsequent respective switch of diet for a further 3 months. Seizure frequency, clinical and laboratory data were collected and evaluated for twenty-one dogs completing the study. Seizure frequency was significantly lower when dogs were fed the MCTD (2·31/month, 0-9·89/month) in comparison with the placebo diet (2·67/month, 0·33-22·92/month, P=0·020); three dogs achieved seizure freedom, seven additional dogs had ≥50 % reduction in seizure frequency, five had an overall seizures (38·87 %, 35·68-43·27 %) and six showed no response. Seizure day frequency were also significantly lower when dogs were fed the MCTD (1·63/month, 0-7·58/month) in comparison with the placebo diet (1·69/month, 0·33-13·82/month, P=0·022). Consumption of the MCTD also resulted in significant elevation of blood β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in comparison with placebo diet (0·041 (sd 0·004) v. 0·031 (sd 0·016) mmol/l, P=0·028). There were no significant changes in serum concentrations of glucose (P=0·903), phenobarbital (P=0·422), potassium bromide (P=0·404) and weight (P=0·300) between diet groups. In conclusion, the data show antiepileptic properties associated with ketogenic diets and provide evidence for the efficacy of the MCTD used in this study as a therapeutic option for epilepsy treatment.

  14. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) induced by oxcarbazepine in idiopathic focal epilepsy in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlidis, Elena; Rubboli, Guido; Nikanorova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    , carbamazepine and phenobarbital have been reported. We describe a child with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) in whom treatment with oxcarbazepine (OXC) induced ESES. The patient was studied through repeated clinical-neuropsychological evaluations and 24-hour EEG recordings. He was treated...

  15. Genome arrays for the detection of copy number variations in idiopathic mental retardation, idiopathic generalized epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders: lessons for diagnostic workflow and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstenbach, R; Buizer-Voskamp, J E; Vorstman, J A S; Ophoff, R A

    2011-01-01

    We review the contributions and limitations of genome-wide array-based identification of copy number variants (CNVs) in the clinical diagnostic evaluation of patients with mental retardation (MR) and other brain-related disorders. In unselected MR referrals a causative genomic gain or loss is detected in 14-18% of cases. Usually, such CNVs arise de novo, are not found in healthy subjects, and have a major impact on the phenotype by altering the dosage of multiple genes. This high diagnostic yield justifies array-based segmental aneuploidy screening as the initial genetic test in these patients. This also pertains to patients with autism (expected yield about 5-10% in nonsyndromic and 10-20% in syndromic patients) and schizophrenia (at least 5% yield). CNV studies in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, major depressive disorder and Tourette syndrome indicate that patients have, on average, a larger CNV burden as compared to controls. Collectively, the CNV studies suggest that a wide spectrum of disease-susceptibility variants exists, most of which are rare (<0.1%) and of variable and usually small effect. Notwithstanding, a rare CNV can have a major impact on the phenotype. Exome sequencing in MR and autism patients revealed de novo mutations in protein coding genes in 60 and 20% of cases, respectively. Therefore, it is likely that arrays will be supplanted by next-generation sequencing methods as the initial and perhaps ultimate diagnostic tool in patients with brain-related disorders, revealing both CNVs and mutations in a single test. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Resting-state connectivity of the sustained attention network correlates with disease duration in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Maneshi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE, a normal electroencephalogram between generalized spike and wave (GSW discharges is believed to reflect normal brain function. However, some studies indicate that even excluding GSW-related errors, IGE patients perform poorly on sustained attention task, the deficit being worse as a function of disease duration. We hypothesized that at least in a subset of structures which are normally involved in sustained attention, resting-state functional connectivity (FC is different in IGE patients compared to controls and that some of the changes are related to disease duration. METHOD: Seeds were selected based on a sustained attention study in controls. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data was obtained from 14 IGE patients and 14 matched controls. After physiological noise removal, the mean time-series of each seed was used as a regressor in a general linear model to detect regions that showed correlation with the seed. In patients, duration factor was defined based on epilepsy duration. Between-group differences weighted by the duration factor were evaluated with mixed-effects model. Correlation was then evaluated in IGE patients between the FC, averaged over each significant cluster, and the duration factor. RESULTS: Eight of 18 seeds showed significant difference in FC across groups. However, only for seeds in the medial superior frontal and precentral gyri and in the medial prefrontal area, average FC taken over significant clusters showed high correlation with the duration factor. These 3 seeds showed changes in FC respectively with the premotor and superior frontal gyrus, the dorsal premotor, and the supplementary motor area plus precentral gyrus. CONCLUSION: Alterations of FC in IGE patients are not limited to the frontal areas. However, as indicated by specificity analysis, patients with long history of disease show changes in FC mainly within the frontal areas.

  17. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I S

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes, and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. Others and we have also recently identified several single gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have been in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. I will review the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterised to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  18. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C) 199

  19. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  20. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008481 Application of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation to the temporal lobe epilepsy with bilateral hippocampal sclerosis: an fMRI study. ZHANG Zhiqiang(张志强), et al.Dept Med Imaging, Clin Sch, Med Coll, Nanjing Univ, Nanjing 210002.Natl Med J China 2008;88(23):1594-1598. Objective To study the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of the resting-fMRI in the mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) with

  1. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008115 Effect of commonly used antiepileptic drugs on cognitive functions of rats with pentylenetetrazol-induced epilepsy. WANG Xiaopeng(王晓鹏), et al. Dept Neurol, 2nd Hosp, Hebei Med Univ, Shijiazhuang 050000. Shanghai Med J 2007;30(12):920-923. Objective To observe the effect of antiepileptic drugs on the cognitive functions of rats with induced epilepsy. Methods Seventy male SD rats in their puberty were randomized into 7 groups,

  2. Cerebellum abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    Full Text Available Although there is increasing evidence suggesting that there may be subtle abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE patients using modern neuroimaging techniques, most of these previous studies focused on the brain grey matter, leaving the underlying white matter abnormalities in IGE largely unknown, which baffles the treatment as well as the understanding of IGE. In this work, we adopted multiple methods from different levels based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to analyze the white matter abnormalities in 14 young male IGE patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS only, comparing with 29 age-matched male healthy controls. First, we performed a voxel-based analysis (VBA of the fractional anisotropy (FA images derived from DTI. Second, we used a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS method to explore the alterations within the white matter skeleton of the patients. Third, we adopted region-of-interest (ROI analyses based on the findings of VBA and TBSS to further confirm abnormal brain regions in the patients. At last, considering the convergent evidences we found by VBA, TBSS and ROI analyses, a subsequent probabilistic fiber tractography study was performed to investigate the abnormal white matter connectivity in the patients. Significantly decreased FA values were consistently observed in the cerebellum of patients, providing fresh evidence and new clues for the important role of cerebellum in IGE with GTCS.

  3. Clinical, Biological, and Imaging Features of Monogenic Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pilotto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of monogenic forms of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD associated with mutations within PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP genes is giving a big contribution in the understanding of the underpinning mechanisms of this complex disorder. Compared with sporadic form, the phenotype associated with monogenic cases is somewhat broader including behavioural disturbances, epilepsy, myoclonus, and focal presentations. Structural and functional imaging show typical early changes also in presymptomatic monogenic carriers. Amyloid imaging and CSF tau/Aβ ratio may be useful in the differential diagnosis with other neurodegenerative dementias, especially, in early onset cases. However, to date any specific biomarkers of different monogenic cases have been identified. Thus, in clinical practice, the early identification is often difficult, but the copresence of different elements could help in recognition. This review will focus on the clinical and instrumental markers useful for the very early identification of AD monogenic cases, pivotal in the development, and evaluation of disease-modifying therapy.

  4. First-drug treatment failures in 42 Turkish children with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The early and late benign occipital epilepsies of childhood (BOEC are described as two discrete electro-clinical syndromes, eponymously known as Panayiotopoulos and Gastaut syndromes. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of failure to respond to the initial antiepileptic drug (AED. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 children with BOEC were enrolled. Predictive factors were analyzed by survival methods. Results: Among the 42, 25 patients (59.5% were boys and 17 (40.5% were girls and the mean age at the seizure onset was 7.46 ± 2.65 years (4-14 years. Of the 42 patients, 34 (81.0% were treated relatively successfully with the first AED treatment, and 8 (19.0% were not responded initial AED treatment. There was no correlation between response to initial AED treatment and sex, consanguinity, epilepsy history of family, age of seizure onset, frequency of seizures, history of status epilepticus, duration of starting first treatment, findings on electroencephalogram. However, history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC were significantly associated with failure risk. Conclusions: Factors predicting failure to respond to the AED were history of febrile seizure and type of BOEC in children with BOEC.

  5. Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005267 Expression and their clinical significances of five multidrug resistance gene products in refractory epilepsy brain tissues. XIAO Zheng (肖争), et al. Dept Neurol,Lab, Affili Hosp, Chongqing Med Univ, Chongqing 400016, Chin J Neurol, 2004;37(6) 500-503. Objective: To investigate the expression and their clinical significances of five multidrug resistance gene products in human epileptogenic pathologies. Methods: 17 refractory epilepsy patients were divided into two groups: long course group (≥10 years) and short course group (<10 years). The expression

  6. Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  7. Epilepsie aktuell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Hüelsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.

    2016-01-01

    of the consensus statements “IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals” and “IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in German language to inform German veterinarians and professional...... circles about new knowledge and innovations in these fields. In the first part of the article, it is explained, why a new classification system of epilepsy and a common language to describe the disease is necessary. The proposals of the IVETF regarding the classification system and the terminology...... animals” und „IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in deutscher Sprache zusammengefasst, um die deutsche Tierärzteschaft über aktuelle Erkenntnisse und Neuerungen auf diesen Gebieten zu informieren. Im ersten Teil des Artikels werden...

  8. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  9. The contribution of next generation sequencing to epilepsy genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Dahl, Hans A.; Helbig, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    to as epileptic encephalopathies. The increased knowledge about causative genetic variants has had a major impact on diagnosis of genetic epilepsies and has already been translated into treatment recommendations for a few genes. This article provides an overview of how next generation sequencing has advanced our......During the last decade, next generation sequencing technologies such as targeted gene panels, whole exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing have led to an explosion of gene identifications in monogenic epilepsies including both familial epilepsies and severe epilepsies, often referred...... understanding of epilepsy genetics and discusses some of the recently discovered genes in monogenic epilepsies....

  10. [Photosensitive epilepsy and television epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, D; Blondeau, C

    2000-01-01

    Photosensitivity is defined by the appearance of occipital or more diffuse electroencephalographic spikes and waves induced by intermittent light stimulation (ILS), particular patterns, TV-watching, and video games. Photosensitivity is a genetic characteristic. Only the diffuse spikes and waves induced by ILS are correlated with epilepsy. Pure photogenic epilepsy is characterized by seizures which are only visually induced, usually by watching TV. Video games sometimes add a trigger effect due to slowly moving patterns or intense brightness. Several epileptic syndromes are associated with a photosensitivity with or without visually-induced seizures, mainly generalized idiopathic epilepsy.

  11. Animal models of monogenic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Tolner, Else A; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder with a strong genetic component. Rare monogenic forms of migraine, or syndromes in which migraine frequently occurs, help scientists to unravel pathogenetic mechanisms of migraine and its comorbidities. Transgenic mouse models for rare monogenic mutations causing familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome (FASPS), have been created. Here, we review the current state of research using these mutant mice. We also discuss how currently available experimental approaches, including epigenetic studies, biomolecular analysis and optogenetic technologies, can be used for characterization of migraine genes to further unravel the functional and molecular pathways involved in migraine. © International Headache Society 2016.

  12. Monogenic Functions in Conformal Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eastwood

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic functions are basic to Clifford analysis. On Euclidean space they are defined as smooth functions with values in the corresponding Clifford algebra satisfying a certain system of first order differential equations, usually referred to as the Dirac equation. There are two equally natural extensions of these equations to a Riemannian spin manifold only one of which is conformally invariant. We present a straightforward exposition.

  13. Phenobarbital or potassium bromide as an add-on antiepileptic drug for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy refractory to imepitoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Broeckx, B J G; Van Soens, I; Gielen, I; Deforce, D; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-02-01

    Imepitoin has recently been approved in Europe for the management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based information available on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs used as additions to the therapeutic regimen in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that are not well controlled with imepitoin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) as add-on antiepileptic drugs for controlling dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin (30 mg/kg twice daily). The study was performed as a prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital and KBr was evaluated by comparing monthly seizure frequency (MSF), monthly seizure day frequency (MSDF), the presence of cluster seizures during a retrospective 2-month period with a prospective follow-up of 6 months, and the overall responder rate. Twenty-seven dogs were included in the study, 14 dogs in the phenobarbital group and 13 dogs in the KBr group. Both median MSF and MSDF decreased in the phenobarbital group (both P = 0.001) and in the KBr group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Overall, the number of dogs with cluster seizures decreased (P = 0.0005). The responder rate was 79% vs. 69% in the phenobarbital and KBr groups, respectively. We conclude that phenobarbital or KBr add-on treatment decreases median MSF and MSDF in epileptic dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated and resulted in an improvement in seizure management in the majority of the dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddmund Søvika

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we review data on monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway based on the Norwegian MODY Registry at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen. This registry comprises established or suspected cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY referred to our laboratory for genetic testing. We also present data on neonatal diabetes, another group of monogenic diabetes. To date, we have genetically diagnosed nearly 500 MODY cases in Norway. Mutations in the HNF1A gene (MODY3 were detected in about 50% of families with clinical MODY. GCK-MODY (MODY2 was the second most prevalent type, but may be underreported. We have also found mutations in the monogenic genes ABCC8, CEL, HNF1B, HNF4A, INS, KCNJ11 and NEUROD1. Based on genetic screening in the Norwegian MODY Registry and HUNT2, we estimate the number of MODY cases in Norway to be at least 2500-5000. Founder effects may determine the geographical distribution of MODY mutations in Norway. The molecular genetic testing of MODY and neonatal diabetes is mandatory for correct diagnosis and prognosis as well as choice of therapy

  15. Peri-ictal and inter-ictal headache in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy: a multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Coppola, Giangennaro; Spalice, Alberto; Di Fonzo, Alessia; Bruschi, Raffaella; Tozzi, Elisabetta; Iannetti, Paola; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2011-09-01

    Headache in epileptic population ranges from 8% to 15%. The aim of this paper was to study the clinical and temporal characteristics of primary headache comorbidity in idiopathic epileptic children. From June 2006 to June 2009, a cross-sectional multi-center study involving five Italian Child Neurology University Centers (two in Rome, one in Chieti, one in Naples, and one in L'Aquila) was conducted. Among 1,264 consecutively newly diagnosed, idiopathic, partial, or generalized, epileptic children, according to ILAE diagnostic criteria (aged between 5 and 15 years of age), we selected 142 children (11.2%) (130 of whom completed the study) who showed an associated peri-ictal and/or inter-ictal headache diagnosed according to the International Headache Society Criteria. Rare cases of "ictal epileptic headache", in which headache represents the sole ictal epileptic manifestation, were excluded from this study. Post-ictal headaches were most frequent (62%). Pre-ictal headaches were less common (30%). Inter-ictal headaches were described in 57.6%. Clear migrainous features were present in 93% of pre-ictal and 81.4% of post-ictal headaches. Inter-ictal headaches meet criteria for migraines in 87%. The association between partial epilepsy and migraine without aura is most common and reported in 82% of our patients with peri-ictal headache and in 76.5% of patients with post-ictal headache.

  16. Long-Term Social Outcomes in Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Population-based longitudinal and cross-sectional studies of social outcomes of children with epilepsy in different countries are reviewed by researchers at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.Epilepsy, Chronic Disease, Idiopathic Epilepsy.

  17. The state of the art in the genetic analysis of the epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David A; Pal, Deb K

    2007-07-01

    Genetic influences as causal factors in the epilepsies continue to be vigorously investigated, and we review several important studies of genes reported in 2006. To date, mutations in ion channel and neuroreceptor component genes have been reported in the small fraction of cases with clear Mendelian inheritance. These findings confirm that the so-called "channelopathies" are generally inherited as monogenic disorders. At the same time, the literature in common epilepsies abounds with reports of associations and reports of nonreplication of those association studies, primarily with channel genes. These contradictory reports can mostly be explained by confounding factors unique to genetic studies. The methodology of genetic studies and their common biases and confounding factors are also explained in this review. Amid the controversy, steady progress is being made on the epilepsies of complex inheritance, which represent the most common idiopathic epilepsy. Recent discoveries show that genes influencing the developmental assembly of neural circuits and neuronal metabolism may play a more prominent role in the common epilepsies than genes affecting membrane excitability and synaptic transmission.

  18. Common pediatric epilepsy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun T; Shahid, Asim M; Jammoul, Adham

    2015-02-01

    Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), childhood idiopathic occipital epilepsy (CIOE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) are some of the common epilepsy syndromes in the pediatric age group. Among the four, BRE is the most commonly encountered. BRE remits by age 16 years with many children requiring no treatment. Seizures in CAE also remit at the rate of approximately 80%; whereas, JME is considered a lifelong condition even with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Neonates and infants may also present with seizures that are self-limited with no associated psychomotor disturbances. Benign familial neonatal convulsions caused by a channelopathy, and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, have a favorable outcome with spontaneous resolution. Benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, also referred to as "fifth-day fits," are an example of another epilepsy syndrome in infants that carries a good prognosis. BRE, CIOE, benign familial neonatal convulsions, benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, and benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy are characterized as "benign" idiopathic age-related epilepsies as they have favorable implications, no structural brain abnormality, are sensitive to AEDs, have a high remission rate, and have no associated psychomotor disturbances. However, sometimes selected patients may have associated comorbidities such as cognitive and language delay for which the term "benign" may not be appropriate.

  19. Effects of hippocampal low-frequency stimulation in idiopathic non-human primate epilepsy assessed via a remote-sensing-enabled neurostimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozny, Thomas A; Lipski, Witold J; Alhourani, Ahmad; Kondylis, Efstathios D; Antony, Arun; Richardson, R Mark

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with pharmacoresistant epilepsy remain a large and under-treated patient population. Continued technologic advancements in implantable neurostimulators have spurred considerable research efforts directed towards the development of novel antiepileptic stimulation therapies. However, the lack of adequate preclinical experimental platforms has precluded a detailed understanding of the differential effects of stimulation parameters on neuronal activity within seizure networks. In order to chronically monitor seizures and the effects of stimulation in a freely-behaving non-human primate with idiopathic epilepsy, we employed a novel simultaneous video-intracranial EEG recording platform using a state-of-the-art sensing-enabled, rechargeable clinical neurostimulator with real-time seizure detection and wireless data streaming capabilities. Using this platform, we were able to characterize the electrographic and semiologic features of the focal-onset, secondarily generalizing tonic-clonic seizures stably expressed in this animal. A series of acute experiments exploring low-frequency (2Hz) hippocampal stimulation identified a pulse width (150μs) and current amplitude (4mA) combination which maximally suppressed local hippocampal activity. These optimized stimulation parameters were then delivered to the seizure onset-side hippocampus in a series of chronic experiments. This long-term testing revealed that the suppressive effects of low-frequency hippocampal stimulation 1) diminish when delivered continuously but are maintained when stimulation is cycled on and off, 2) are dependent on circadian rhythms, and 3) do not necessarily confer seizure protective effects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy in EL mice with caloric restriction and the ketogenic diet: role of glucose and ketone bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantis John G

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD was developed as an alternative to fasting for seizure management. While the mechanisms by which fasting and the KD inhibit seizures remain speculative, alterations in brain energy metabolism are likely involved. We previously showed that caloric restriction (CR inhibits seizure susceptibility by reducing blood glucose in the epileptic EL mouse, a natural model for human multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy. In this study, we compared the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant efficacy of the KD with that of CR in adult EL mice with active epilepsy. EL mice that experienced at least 15 recurrent complex partial seizures were fed either a standard diet unrestricted (SD-UR or restricted (SD-R, and either a KD unrestricted (KD-UR or restricted (KD-R. All mice were fasted for 14 hrs prior to diet initiation. A new experimental design was used where each mouse in the diet-restricted groups served as its own control to achieve a 20–23% body weight reduction. Seizure susceptibility, body weights, and the levels of plasma glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured once/week over a nine-week treatment period. Results Body weights and blood glucose levels remained high over the testing period in the SD-UR and the KD-UR groups, but were significantly (p Conclusions The results indicate that seizure susceptibility in EL mice is dependent on plasma glucose levels and that seizure control is more associated with the amount than with the origin of dietary calories. Also, CR underlies the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant action of the KD in EL mice. A transition from glucose to ketone bodies for energy is predicted to manage EL epileptic seizures through multiple integrated changes of inhibitory and excitatory neural systems.

  1. Recognition of facial emotions and identity in patients with mesial temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsy: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ibañez, Asier; Urrestarazu, Elena; Viteri, Cesar

    2014-11-01

    To describe visual scanning pattern for facial identity recognition (FIR) and emotion recognition (FER) in patients with idiopathic generalized (IGE) and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Secondary endpoint was to correlate the results with cognitive function. Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT) and Ekman&Friesen series were performed for FIR and FER respectively in 23 controls, 20 IGE and 19 MTLE patients. Eye movements were recorded by a Hi-Speed eye-tracker system. Neuropsychological tools explored cognitive function. Correct FIR rate was 78% in controls, 70.7% in IGE and 67.4% (p=0.009) in MTLE patients. FER hits reached 82.7% in controls, 74.3% in IGE (p=0.006) and 73.4% in MTLE (p=0.002) groups. IGE patients failed in disgust (p=0.005) and MTLE ones in fear (p=0.009) and disgust (p=0.03). FER correlated with neuropsychological scores, particularly verbal fluency (r=0.542, p<0.001). Eye-tracking revealed that controls scanned faces more diffusely than IGE and MTLE patients for FIR, who tended to top facial areas. A longer scanning of the top facial area was found in the three groups for FER. Gap between top and bottom facial region fixation time decreased in MTLE patients, with more but shorter fixations in bottom facial region. However, none of these findings were statistically significant. FIR was impaired in MTLE patients, and FER in both IGE and MTLE, particularly for fear and disgust. Although not statistically significant, those with impaired FER tended to perform more diffuse eye-tracking over the faces and have cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Circadian phase typing in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Dim light melatonin onset and patterns of melatonin secretion-Semicurve findings in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, Raffaele; De Icco, Roberto; Cremascoli, Riccardo; Ferrera, Giulia; Furia, Francesca; Zambrelli, Elena; Canevini, Maria Paola; Terzaghi, Michele

    2016-08-01

    It has been debated in the literature whether patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have a distinctive, evening-oriented chronotype. The few questionnaire-based studies that are available in the literature have conflicting results. The aim of our study was to define chronotype in patients with IGE by determining dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Twenty adults diagnosed with IGE (grand mal on awakening [GM] in 7 cases and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in 13 cases) were investigated by means of a face-to-face semistructured sleep interview, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire, and a melatonin salivary test with DLMO determination. Eighteen healthy subjects (HC) and 28 patients affected with cryptogenic focal epilepsy (FE) served as controls. The mean MEQ score was significantly lower in patients with IGE than that in patients with FE (49.1±5.9 versus 56.1±8.7 P<0.01) but not significantly lower than that in HC (49.1±5.9 versus 49.3±8.6). Midsleep on free days corrected for sleep duration did not differ significantly between the three subject groups (04:59±01:21h, 04:37±01:17h, 04:29±00:52h). The mean DLMO time in patients with IGE (22:13±01:34h) occurred 49min later than that in HC (21.24±1h), and the melatonin surge within the 30-minute time interval after DLMO in patients with IGE was significantly lower than that in HC (1.51±2.7 versus 3.8±3.6pg/mL P=0.045). Subjective measures of chronotype do not indicate a definite evening-oriented chronotype in patients with IGE. However, the data concerning endogenous melatonin secretion indicate that patients with IGE tend to have a late circadian phase. Further studies are warranted in order to better define the late pattern of endogenous melatonin secretion in patients with IGE and to ascertain the role of this pattern in influencing behavioral chronotype in these subjects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. 儿童特发性癫痫与睡眠的相关性研究%Study on correlation of children idiopathic epilepsy and sleep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤春辉; 杨景晖

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨儿童特发性癫痫样放电与睡眠时相的关系及癫痫对睡眠结构的影响.方法 对55例癫痫患者的动态脑电图(AEEG)监测,并对结果进行分析.结果 55例癫痫患儿中痫样放电共49例(89.1%),睡眠期出现45例(91.8%),以NREMⅠ、Ⅱ期最多见.睡眠中全身性发作35例、部分性发作继发全身性发作4例均出现于NREMⅠ、Ⅱ期.与对照组比较,癜痫患儿总睡眠时间、REM期较正常对照组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),但NREM Ⅰ、Ⅱ期显著延长,而NREMⅢ、Ⅳ期明显缩短,睡眠潜伏期延长(P<0.01).癫痫患者睡眠纺锤波出现不对称、减少或消失.结论 瘸样放电主要发生于睡眠期NREMⅠ、Ⅱ期,癫痫也改变着睡眠结构,引起睡眠障碍.不同癫痫发作类型与睡眠时相有一定的关系.%OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between idiopathic epileptiform discharge and sleep phase, and the effect of epilepsy on sleep architecture. METHODS Monitored and analyzed active EEG of 55 patients with epilepsy. RESULTS Among 55 cases, epileptiform discharge was found in 49 cases (89.1%), of which, 45 cases showed in sleep stage, and NREM Ⅰ and Ⅱ stage were most common. Both 35 generalized seizure and 4 partial seizure with secondarily generalized seizure appeared in NREM Ⅰ and Ⅱ stage. Compared with the control group, total sleep time and REM phase in epileptic children were not different (P> 0.05). However, NREM Ⅰ and Ⅱ stage prolonged obviously, NREM Ⅲ and Ⅳ stage shortened significantly, and sleep latency prolonged (P < 0.01). Sleep spindles in epileptic children appeared asymmetry, reduced or disappeared. CONCLUSION Epileptiform discharge mainly appears in NREM Ⅰ and Ⅱ stage, and epilepsy changes sleep architecture and results in sleep disorders. There are some relations between seizure types and sleep phases.

  4. High-density SNP screen of sodium channel genes by haplotype tagging and DNA pooling for association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoff, Andrew; Lai, Teck; Barratt, Catherine; Valentin, Antonio; Moran, Nick; Asherson, Philip; Nashef, Lina

    2010-04-01

    We have investigated seven voltage-gated sodium channel genes for association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Probands and control DNA were grouped into pools and used to screen 85 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), mostly HapMap SNPs tagging the common variation in these genes. Twelve SNPs exhibiting an allele frequency difference between pools were genotyped individually in our sample of 232 probands, 313 controls, and 95 parent-proband trios. Two SNPs, in SCN1A and SCN8A, were associated by allele and genotype at nominal level of significance, but were not significant after Bonferroni correction. Two SCN2A SNPs (rs3943809 and rs16850331) were associated by case-control with a subgroup with IGE and history of febrile seizures and also by transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) in parent-proband trios. Both SNPs are part of a linkage disequilibrium (LD) cluster of 38 SNPs, but none are obvious functional variants. The association of rs3943809 with the febrile seizure subgroup (p = 0.0004) remains significant after the conservative Bonferroni correction for multiple testing.

  5. Dissociation between affective and cognitive empathy in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy%原发性癫痫患者共情能力的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡颖; 蒋玉宝; 胡盼盼; 汪凯

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore different aspects of empathy in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy and to study the effect of epileptiform discharges from different areas of the brain on empathy.Methods One hundred and fifty healthy controls and 62 patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy were administered with a neuropsychological battery for basic cognitive assessment and an empathy scale after 24-hour electroencephalography monitoring.Results Compared with healthy controls,patients with epilepsy obtained significantly lower total scores and the cognitive empathy scores including perspectivetaking and fantasy subscale of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index-China (46.39 ± 9.74 vs 50.99 ± 9.97,t =-2.893,P=0.004; 23.31 ±7.10 vs 27.24 ±6.22,t =-3.974,P =0.000; 10.18 ±4.21 vs 11.84 ± 3.67,t =-2.838,P =0.005 ; 13.13 ± 4.46 vs 15.40 ± 3.84,t =-3.698,P =0.000,respectively).In contrast,the individuals with epilepsy did not score significantly different on the affective empathy,empathic concern and personal distress (P > 0.05,respectively).Patients with frontal epileptiform discharges suffered the most on the total empathy scores,cognitive empathy and perspective-taking subscale when compared with other three groups of individuals (P <0.05,respectively),whereas the groups did not differ from each other in affective empathy,empathic concern and personal distress (P >0.05,respectively).No correlation was found between the empathy ability and other cognitive neuropsychological tests.Conclusions Patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy is not associated with a general empathy deficit,but rather with a dissociated pattern combining impaired cognitive empathy and preserved affective one,which leads to a double-dissociation,supports the notion that affective and cognitive empathies are two distinct abilities.The activation of epileptiform discharges from the frontal lobe is a key factor that could diminish the empathy ability.%目的 通过对不同部位

  6. Idiopathic Calcium Nephrolithiasis And Hypercalciuria: The Role Of Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaro, Giovanni; Abaterusso, Cataldo

    2007-04-01

    Idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis and hypercalciuria are multifactorial disease conditions, the pathogenesis of which involves the interaction of environmental and individual factors. Data support a strong role of genes in the pathogenesis of these two conditions. Findings obtained in monogenic disorders characterized by renal calcium stones, and/or hypercalciuria, and/or nephrocalcinosis have proposed a number of genes as candidate genes in the pathogenesis of the common idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis and hypercalciuria. The physiological role of these genes, and findings in monogenic disorders and idiopathic, multifactorial disorders will be presented.

  7. Early onset (childhood) monogenic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) with onset in childhood are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission and, in selected cases, pathological findings. Especially relevant to pediatrics are the items "secondary" versus "primary" neuropathy, "syndromic versus nonsyndromic," and "period of life." Different combinations of these parameters frequently point toward specific monogenic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first concern in pediatrics. As a rule, metabolic diseases include additional, orienting symptoms or signs, and their biochemical diagnosis is based on logical algorithms. Primary, motor sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating autosomal dominant (AD) forms (CMT1). Other forms include demyelinating autosomal recessive (AR) forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Peripheral motor neuron disorders are dominated by AR SMN-linked spinal muscular atrophies. (Distal) hereditary motor neuropathies represent 40 genes with various biological functions have been found to be responsible for primary HN. Many are responsible for various phenotypes, including some without the polyneuropathic trait, and some for various types of transmission.

  8. 原发性癫痫情绪识别能力的研究%A study on emotion recognition in patients with idiopathic epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡颖; 蒋玉宝; 马慧娟; 余凤琼; 汪凯

    2014-01-01

    目的 研究原发性癫痫患者情绪加工和社会认知功能,并探讨其相关影响因素.方法 经神经心理学背景测试后对70例不同脑区痫样放电的原发性癫痫患者和153例健康对照进行眼区基本情绪(喜、怒、悲、恐、厌、惊)和复杂情绪识别评分比较.结果 原发性癫痫组在六种眼区基本情绪识别正确数、总情绪识别正确数及眼区复杂情绪识别正确数[分别喜(19.3±2.0)分、怒(17.9±2.0)分、悲(18.1±2.3)分、恐(16.4±1.9)分、厌(17.6±2.1)分、惊(18.3±1.5)分、总基本情绪(107.7±8.1)分、复杂情绪(23.3±4.2)分]上均显著低于健康对照组[分别喜(19.9±0.2)分、怒(18.9±1.0)分、悲(19.2±1.0)分、恐(17.6±1.3)分、厌(18.6±1.2)分、惊(19.1±1.1)分、总基本情绪(113.4±3.4)分、复杂情绪(27.1±2.8)分],差异均有统计学意义(均P<0.05);在男女性别判断任务上与健康对照组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);癫痫组眼区基本和复杂情绪识别得分之间存在正相关(r=0.444,P=0.000),基本情绪识别得分与正序、逆序数字广度得分正相关(P<0.05),复杂情绪识别与逆序数字广度、Stroop效应相关(P<0.05),同时基本和复杂情绪都与贝克抑郁评分和汉密尔顿焦虑评分负相关(均P<0.05).结论 原发性癫痫病人存在情绪加工和心理理论受损,执行功能和焦虑抑郁水平可能是影响社会认知能力的因素.%Objective To investigate the abilities of emotion recognition and social cognition in patients with idiopathic epilepsy and further explore the factors related to the impairments.Methods After 24-hour EEG monitoring,70 people with idiopathic epilepsy were administered with a neuropsychological battery for basic cognitive assessment and then were tested with the Eye Basic Emotion Discrimination Task (EBEDT) and the Eye Complex Emotion Discrimination Task (ECEDT).Results Compared with health controls,people with epilepsy got significantly

  9. Aplicación del nuevo esquema diagnóstico en niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticas Application of the new diagnostic scheme for children with idiopathic focal epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albia J. Pozo Alonso

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Nos propusimos con este trabajo aplicar, en 101 niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticas, el nuevo esquema diagnóstico propuesto para personas con crisis epilépticas y epilepsia, correspondiente al año 2001. La edad promedio de inicio de la epilepsia focal fue de 6,4 años. Las crisis epilépticas focales más frecuentes fueron las secundariamente generalizadas (35,6 %, seguidas por las crisis motoras (30,7 % y las sensoriales (20,8 %. Entre las crisis focales motoras predominaron las de signos motores clónicos elementales (48,4 %, y a continuación las crisis motoras tónicas asimétricas (35,5 %. En las crisis focales sensoriales predominaron las crisis con síntomas elementales (95,2 %. El síndrome epiléptico que se identificó con más frecuencia fue la epilepsia benigna de la infancia con puntas centrotemporales (10,9 %, seguido por las crisis infantiles benignas de la infancia no familiares (5 %. El trazado electroencefalográfico inicial interictal anormal más frecuente fue el focal (36,4 %. La aplicación de este nuevo esquema diagnóstico resultó útil en niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticasThe aim of this paper was to apply in 101 children with focal idiopathic epilepsies, the new diagnostic scheme proposed for persons with epilepsy seizures and epilepsy in 2001. The average age at the onset of focal epilepsy was 6.4 years old. The most frequent focal epileptic seizures were the secondarily generalized (35.6 %, followed by the motor seizures (30.7 % and the sensory seizures (20.8 %. Among the focal motor seizures, it was observed a predominance of those of elementary clonic motor signs (48.4 % and of the asymmetric tonic motor seizures (35.5 %. As regards the focal sensory seizures, there was a prevalence of the seizures with elementary symptoms (95.2 %. The most commonly identified epileptic syndrome was the infantile benign epilepsy with centrotemporal points (10.9 %, followed by the non-family infantile benign

  10. Monogenic Diabetes: A Diagnostic Algorithm for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W. Carroll

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic forms of beta cell diabetes account for approximately 1%–2% of all cases of diabetes, yet remain underdiagnosed. Overlapping clinical features with common forms of diabetes, make diagnosis challenging. A genetic diagnosis of monogenic diabetes in many cases alters therapy, affects prognosis, enables genetic counseling, and has implications for cascade screening of extended family members. We describe those types of monogenic beta cell diabetes which are recognisable by distinct clinical features and have implications for altered management; the cost effectiveness of making a genetic diagnosis in this setting; the use of complementary diagnostic tests to increase the yield among the vast majority of patients who will have commoner types of diabetes which are summarised in a clinical algorithm; and the vital role of cascade genetic testing to enhance case finding.

  11. Epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S T; Dodson, W E

    1996-12-01

    Childhood epilepsies comprise a broad range of disorders which vary from benign to progressive and disabling. Accurate diagnosis of epilepsy type and determination of aetiology, when possible, are essential for appropriate treatment. The most common seizure type encountered in children is febrile seizures. These represent a benign condition which is not, in fact, epilepsy and usually does not require antiepileptic medication. When partial seizures occur in childhood, benign syndromes with spontaneous remission, such as rolandic epilepsy, must be distinguished from symptomatic epilepsies which may be refractory to medical management. Complex partial seizures in young children may appear different than in adults. The adverse effect profiles and dosing regimens of antiepileptic drugs in children are also different than in adults, and influence the choice of treatment. Epilepsy surgery should be considered for some children with intractible partial seizures. Generalized epilepsies also have a broader spectrum in children. The idiopathic generalized absence epilepsies are usually easy to control with medication. They range from childhood absence epilepsy which tends to remit in adolescence to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy which is a lifelong condition. In contrast, the seizures of West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome are difficult to control, and treatment involves therapeutic modalities rarely used in adults such as ACTH and the ketogenic diet. Many childhood epilepsy syndromes have a familial predisposition, and the genetic bases for several disorders have been described.

  12. Correlation analysis between parental rearing and behavioral problems in children with idiopathic epilepsy%父母教养方式与特发性癫痫儿童行为问题的相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙悦; 周农

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨特发性癫痫儿童行为问题及其与父母教养方式的相关性.方法 选取42例特发性癫痫儿童和34例性别、年龄、教育程度相匹配的正常儿童为研究对象,应用Achenbach儿童行为量表(CBCL)和父母教养方式评价量表(EMBU)进行评定,对其行为问题结果 进行对比,并就父母教养方式与儿童行为问题的相关性进行分析.结果 特发性癫痫儿童的行为异常检出率(76.19%)高于正常儿童(26.47%,P<0.01);癫痫儿童父母惩罚严厉(P<0.01)、父母拒绝否认(P<0.05)、母干涉保护(P<0.05)显著高于正常儿童父母;相关性分析显示父母教养方式中的母拒绝否认因子与特发性癫痫儿童行为问题呈正相关(r=0.46,P<0.01).结论 特发性癫痫儿童存在较多的行为问题,其父母多采用限制性教育方式,其中母亲拒绝否认的教养方式与特发性癫痫儿童行为问题相关.%Objective To explore the correlation between parental rearing patterns and behavioral problems in children with idiopathic epilepsy. Methods Totally 42 children with idiopathic epilepsy and 34 normal controls that match the gender, age, education level were inquired and assessed with Achenbach ' s child behavior checklist ( CBCL ) and Egma minnen av bardndosnauppforstran ( EMBU ). The results were compared and the regression analyze was comformed. Results The ratio of the abnormal behavior in children with idiopathic epilepsy was 76. 19% , which was significantly higher than the normal controls ( 26.47% , P < 0. 01 ). In study group, parental punishment ( P < 0. 01 ), parental denial ( P < 0. 05 ), maternal interfere ( P < 0. 05 ) scores were higher than normal controls. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between the maternal denial and behavioral disorders ( r = 0. 46,P <0. 01 ). Conclusion The children with idiopathic epilepsy have the higher frequency in behavioral disorders, and their parental rearing patterns are more

  13. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  14. The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the complexities of assigning cause in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorvon, Simon

    2014-03-01

    The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the difficulties in assigning cause in epilepsy are described. A historical review is given, emphasizing aspects of the history which are relevant today. The historical review is divided into three approximately semicentenial periods (1860-1910, 1910-1960, 1960-present). A definition of symptomatic epilepsy and this is followed by listing of causes of symptomatic epilepsy. The fact that not all the causes of idiopathic epilepsy are genetic is discussed. A category of provoked epilepsy is proposed. The complexities in assigning cause include the following: the multifactorial nature of epilepsy, the distinction between remote and proximate causes, the role of nongenetic factors in idiopathic epilepsy, the role of investigation in determining the range of causes, the fact that not all symptomatic epilepsy is acquired, the nosological position of provoked epilepsy and the view of epilepsy as a process, and the differentiation of new-onset and established epilepsy. The newly proposed ILAE classification of epilepsy and its changes in terminologies and the difficulties in the concept of acute symptomatic epilepsy are discussed, including the inconsistencies and gray areas and the distinction between idiopathic, symptomatic, and provoked epilepsies. Points to be considered in future work are listed.

  15. Molekylaer patogenese ved monogen og polygen fedme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Philip J; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2006-01-01

    During the last few years, studies of the molecular pathogenesis of obesity both in mouse models and in the rare cases of monogenic obesity in humans have added significantly to our understanding of the key role of the hypothalamus in mediating hunger and satiety. These insights have brought us...

  16. 特发性全面性癫痫患者的元记忆监测研究%Metamemory monitoring ability in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴娇南; 蒋玉宝; 朱一鸣; 贾婷; 卫玲; 汪凯

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the memory monitoring ability in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and explore the mechanism of the memory impairment.Methods The feeling of knowing (FOK) paradigm of episodic memory (EM) and semantic memory (SM) were established and subsequently administered in 31 patients with IGE (IGE group) and 30 healthy controls (HC group) participants who were matched in age,sex and educational level.Results Compared with HC group (feeling of knowing of episodic memory (FOK-EM) FOK accuracy (85.29± 16.84) %;feeling of knowing of sematic memory (FOK-SM) recall (76.61± 18.66) %),the FOK-EM FOK accuracy ((64.03± 22.10) %) and FOK-SM recall ((53.27±26.91) %) in IGE group were significantly decreased(t=-4.215,P<0.01;t=-3.677,P<0.01).The correct judgment and correct recognition of FOK-EM ((51.16±32.93) %) and the false judgment and correct recognition ((21.07±24.38) %) of FOK-EM in the IGE group were significantly different with the HC group (the correct judgment and correct recognition of FOK-EM:(79.34±27.26)% and the false judgment and correct recognition of FOK-EM:(2.45±5.38) %;t=-3.634,P<0.01;t=4.149,P<0.01).Most importantly,the false judgment and correct recognition of FOK-EM were correlated with the Digital Span Test,Vocabulary Fluency Test and the Stroop effect in IGE group (r=-0.309,P<0.05;r=-0.355,P<0.01;r=-0.354,P<0.05;r=0.602,P<0.01).Conclusion The results show that the IGE group made less accurate metamemory monitoring than the HC group by underestimating their memoU performance on FOK-EM,whereas the semantic metamemory monitoring is not impaired in IGE group.More importantly,the impairment of memory monitoring was correlated with the deficit of executive function,indicating that this mechanism can be an influential factor of memory disorder in IGE.It also indicates that the episodic and semantic metamemory monitoring depend on different neural networks.%目的 研究特发性全面性癫痫(idiopathic

  17. The attention of children with newly diagnosed idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy%新诊断原发性或隐源性癫痫儿童注意功能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周锐; 董斌; 周农

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the character of attention in schoolchildren with newly diagnosed idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy . Methods A battery of tasks comprised Stroop Word-Color task, Trail making (A and B)and Letter cancellation task. Results There were significant differences in reaction time of color test and in inaccuracy of word test and color -word interference test. But children with epilepsy could not be distinguished from controls in Stroop interference effects ,Trail making and Letter cancellation task. Linear Regression estimated the coefficients of the linear equation ,involving age,gender,education level,duration,age at onset of epilepsy and seizure frequency, and age was the main factor that best predicted the value of the reaction time of word -color test. Conclusions Children with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy have selective attention deficits . And the risk of attention deficits is higher when the patient is younger .%目的 研究原发性或隐源性癫痫儿童注意功能的特点.方法 采用Stroop字色干扰测试、连线测试A、B以及数字划消测试对新诊断原发性或隐源性癫痫儿童注意功能进行评定.结果 新诊断原发性或隐源性癫痫儿童组与正常儿童比较,Stroop测试的读色时间,读字和读字色的错误率存在显著性差异(P0.05).两组儿童连线测试的反应时间、错误步数以及数字划消测试的划消效率无显著性差异(P>0.05).多元线性回归分析发现,在年龄、性别、受教育程度、病程、起病年龄和发作频率等多个变量中,年龄是影响读字色测试反应时间最主要的因素.结论 原发性或隐源性癫痫儿童具有选择性注意损害.年龄越小的患者选择注意受损的可能性大.

  18. Lattice isomorphisms of bisimple monogenic orthodox semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Goberstein, Simon M

    2011-01-01

    Using the classification and description of the structure of bisimple monogenic orthodox semigroups obtained in \\cite{key10}, we prove that every bisimple orthodox semigroup generated by a pair of mutually inverse elements of infinite order is strongly determined by the lattice of its subsemigroups in the class of all semigroups. This theorem substantially extends an earlier result of \\cite{key25} stating that the bicyclic semigroup is strongly lattice determined.

  19. Imaging of the epilepsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Imaging of epilepsy patients is challenging, since epileptogenic lesions (defined as structural lesions causally related to the epilepsy syndrome) may be small and often do not change during life. Prior clinical information about the epilepsy syndrome and the semiology of the seizures is needed in order to plan the examination properly. The effort to detect an epileptogenic lesion is directed to partial (focal) epilepsy syndromes whereas - by definition - no lesion is identified in idiopathic epilepsies. Most patients with partial epilepsies suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsies. In these patients, 2- to 3-mm-thick T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) fast spin echo slices along or perpendicular to the temporal lobe length axis have the highest diagnostic efficacy. In contrast, in patients with extratemporal lobe epilepsies perpendicular FLAIR slices through the anatomic region, from which, due to clinical and EEG criteria, the seizures are likely to originate, are preferred. The imaging features of common epileptogenic lesions (hippocampal sclerosis, long-term epilepsy-associated tumours, focal cortical dysplasias, vascular malformations, encephalitis including limbic and Rasmussen's encephalitis, gyral scarring including ulegyria) are detailed in the second section of this paper. (orig.)

  20. Precision diabetes: learning from monogenic diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattersley, Andrew T; Patel, Kashyap A

    2017-05-01

    The precision medicine approach of tailoring treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient or subgroup has been a great success in monogenic diabetes subtypes, MODY and neonatal diabetes. This review examines what has led to the success of a precision medicine approach in monogenic diabetes (precision diabetes) and outlines possible implications for type 2 diabetes. For monogenic diabetes, the molecular genetics can define discrete aetiological subtypes that have profound implications on diabetes treatment and can predict future development of associated clinical features, allowing early preventative or supportive treatment. In contrast, type 2 diabetes has overlapping polygenic susceptibility and underlying aetiologies, making it difficult to define discrete clinical subtypes with a dramatic implication for treatment. The implementation of precision medicine in neonatal diabetes was simple and rapid as it was based on single clinical criteria (diagnosed precision diabetes approach in type 2 diabetes will require simple, quick, easily accessible stratification that is based on a combination of routine clinical data, rather than relying on newer technologies. Analysing existing clinical data from routine clinical practice and trials may provide early success for precision medicine in type 2 diabetes.

  1. NEW ASPECTS OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rano Bahodirovna Azizova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied 52 patients with epilepsy with the average age of 36.2±14.7 years old. Of them, 38 patients had idiopathic epilepsy, 14 patients had symptomatic epilepsy. Our study has shown that epilepsy is accompanied with increased levels of autoantibodies to NF-200, GFAP, S100, MBP, DNA, GABA and dopamine receptors, testifying to the important role of autoimmune disturbances in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. More severe attacks are accompanied by worsening of neuroimmune dysregulation. The degree and duration of autoimmune process can serve additional diagnostic and prognostic criteria for epilepsies.

  2. Harmonic and Monogenic Potentials in Euclidean Halfspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackx, F.; De Bie, H.; De Schepper, H.

    2011-09-01

    In the framework of Clifford analysis a chain of harmonic and monogenic potentials is constructed in the upper half of Euclidean space Rm+1. Their distributional limits at the boundary are computed, obtaining in this way well-known distributions in Rm such as the Dirac distribution, the Hilbert kernel, the square root of the negative Laplace operator, and the like. It is shown how each of those potentials may be recovered from an adjacent kernel in the chain by an appropriate convolution with such a distributional limit.

  3. Epilepsy Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become an Advocate for SUDEP Awareness Wellness Institute Healthy Eating Studio E: The Epilepsy Art Therapy Program Fitness and Exercise Important Information about epilepsy and seizures… About Epilepsy: ...

  4. Phenotypic heterogeneity of monogenic frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eBenussi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disorder characterized by personality changes, language impairment and deficits of executive functions associated with frontal and temporal lobe degeneration. Different phenotypes have been defined on the basis of presenting clinical symptoms, i.e. the behavioral variant of FTD (bvFTD, the agrammatic variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia (avPPA and the semantic variant of PPA (svPPA. Some patients have an associated movement disorder, either parkinsonism, as in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP and Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS, or motor neuron disease (FTD-MND. A family history of dementia is found in 40% of cases of FTD and about 10% have a clear autosomal dominant inheritance. Genetic studies have identified several genes associated to monogenic FTD: microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT, progranulin (GRN, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARBDP, valosin-containing protein (VCP, charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B, fused in sarcoma (FUS and the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72. Patients often present with an extensive phenotypic variability, even among different members of the same kindred carrying an identical disease mutation. The objective of the present work is to review and evaluate available literature data in order to highlight recent advances in clinical, biological and neuroimaging features of monogenic frontotemporal lobar degeneration and try to identify different mechanisms underlying the extreme phenotypic heterogeneity that characterizes this disease.

  5. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian

    2015-01-01

    mutations by investigating patients with the two most common epilepsy syndromes: (i) idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and (ii) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Whole exome sequencing data of 238 patients with IGE as well as Sanger sequencing of 84 patients with TLE were evaluated for GRIN2A sequence...

  6. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes The most common forms of diabetes, type 1 ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  7. 原发性癫痫90例睡眠结构及脑电事件分析%Analysis on sleep structures and EEG events in 90 patients with idiopathic epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桂花; 张晓馨; 徐江涛; 杨俊; 宋永斌; 梁晓慧; 于春芳; 张立群; 吕芸

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨原发性癫痫患者睡眠结构及脑电事件特点.方法 对90例符合原发性癫痫诊断标准的患者进行多导睡眠图(PSG)检查,分析患者的睡眠结构、夜间激醒事件及异常脑电事件.结果本组病人PSG睡眠结构特点表现为患者睡眠阶段的转换增加,睡眠片断及睡眠效率减低,睡眠质量低下,结构紊乱.REM期比例减少例数76例(占84.44%),REM潜伏期增加例数70例(占77.78%),Ⅰ+Ⅱ期比例增加例数64例(占71.11%),Ⅲ+Ⅳ比例减少例数44例(占48.89%),入睡潜伏期增加例数为41例(占45.56%).整夜激醒次数为(103.20±131.76)次,激醒次数增多者占88.89%.睡眠脑电图(EEG)监测结果显示有异常放电者占38.30%, 尤其以浅睡期发放显著.结论 原发性癫痫患者存在睡眠结构紊乱.%Objective To investigate the sleep structures and characteristics of EEG events in patients with idiopathic epilepsy.Methods The sleep architectures wake up events at night and abnormal EEG events were analyzed in 90 patients who met the diagnostic criteria of idiopathic epilepsy by polysomnography ( PSG ) examination. Results The sleep structures of this group of patients in PSG characterized as increased sleep stages conversion, reduced sleep fragments and sleep efficiency, poor sleep quality and disorder sleep structures. 76( 84.44% ) cases were reduced in REM stage,70 ( 77.78% ) cases were increased in REM latency, 64 ( 71.11% ) cases were increased in Ⅰ + Ⅱ stages, 44 ( 48.89% ) cases were reduced in Ⅲ + Ⅳ stages, 41 ( 45.56% ) cases were increased in sleep latency. Night waking times were( 103.20 ± 131.76 ). There were 88.89% patients whose night waking tine in creased. Sleep electroencephalogram ( EEG ) monitoring showed abnormal discharge accounted for 38.30%, especially in light sleep stage. Conclusion The patients with idiopathic epilepsy have disturbance of sleep structure.

  8. The WAG/Rij strain: A genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depressiony

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkisova, K.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    A great number of clinical observations show a relationship between epilepsy and depression. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy, including absence epilepsy, has a genetic basis. The review provides evidence that WAG/Rij rats can be regarded as a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comor

  9. 45例Panayiotopoulos综合征的临床特征及脑电图分析%Clinical analysis and electroencephalography features in idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Panayiotopoulos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕娟; 王江涛; 杨诺; 梁东; 陈银波

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨45例Panayiotopoulos综合征的脑电图及临床特征、预后情况.方法 收集我院小儿神经科2010年6月~2013年6月Panayiotopoulos综合征45例临床资料,并进行分析.结果 其中33例以发作性呕吐为主要症状就诊.20例患儿癫痫发作持续半小时以上,28例发作开始于睡眠期.28例患儿发作间期脑电图为枕区或后头部棘波、棘慢波发放.32例患儿一种药物可有效控制发作.结论 Panayiotopoulos综合征临床表现以自主神经发作及自主神经持续状态多见,发作间期脑电图大部分为后头部功能性尖波、尖慢波发放,抗癫痫药控制良好,预后好.%Objective To investigate the clinical electroencephalography features and prognosis in children with idiopathic occipital epilepsy of Panayiotopoulos.Methods A retrospective review of 45 children patients who are diagnosed as idiopathic occipital epilepsy of Panayiotopoulos from June 2010 to June 2013 was conducted.Results 33 patients starts with ictal emetic.Nearly half of these seizures last more than 30 min,62.2% of seizures start in sleep.Interictal EEG(62.2%)showed high-amplitude sharp,spike and wave discharge on the unilateral or bilateral occipital and posterior regions.Most of them were treated monotherapy.Conclusion Panayiotopoulos syndrome is mainly autonomic seizures and autonomic status epilepticus.Most of EEG reveals functional,mainly multi-focal,sharp,sharp-slow wave complexes.Spikes often occurs at posterior locations.The outcome of treatment with antiepileptic drugs is always good,and the prognosis is mostly favorable.

  10. Risk Factors for Survival in a University Hospital Population of Dogs with Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredso, N.; Koch, B. C.; Toft, Nils

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundAlthough a common neurological disorder in dogs, long-term outcome of epilepsy is sparsely documented. ObjectivesTo investigate risk factors for survival and duration of survival in a population of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy or epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause....... AnimalsOne hundred and two client owned dogs; 78 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and 24 dogs with epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause. MethodsA retrospective hospital based study with follow-up. Dogs diagnosed with epilepsy between 2002 and 2008 were enrolled in the study. Owners were...

  11. The RH boundary value problem of the k-monogenic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yude; Du, Jinyuan

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we study the Riemann and Hilbert problems of k-monogenic functions. By using Euler operator, we transform the boundary value problem of k-monogenic functions into the boundary value problems of monogenic functions. Then by the Almansi-type theorem of k-monogenic functions, we get the solutions of these problems.

  12. A Boundary Value Problem for Hermitian Monogenic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes JuanBory

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We study the problem of finding a Hermitian monogenic function with a given jump on a given hypersurface in . Necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability of this problem are obtained.

  13. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  14. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: concept and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary "periodic fever syndromes", familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) and 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency.

  15. Comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a pediatric headache center

    OpenAIRE

    Toldo, Irene; Perissinotto, Egle; Menegazzo, Francesca; Boniver, Clementina; Sartori, Stefano; Salviati, Leonardo; Clementi, Maurizio; Montagna, Pasquale; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a large series of children with headache (1,795). Fifty-six cases (3.1%) suffered from idiopathic headache and idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy or unprovoked seizures. There was a strong association between migraine and epilepsy: in migraineurs (46/56) the risk of epilepsy was 3.2 times higher when compared with tension-type headache, without significant difference between migraine with and without aur...

  16. Comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a pediatric headache center

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a large series of children with headache (1,795). Fifty-six cases (3.1%) suffered from idiopathic headache and idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy or unprovoked seizures. There was a strong association between migraine and epilepsy: in migraineurs (46/56) the risk of epilepsy was 3.2 times higher when compared with tension-type headache, without significant difference between migraine with and without aur...

  17. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment....... RESULTS: A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment...

  18. Managing Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Managing Epilepsy Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... support strategies to use to empower PLWMCC. Managing Epilepsy Well Network The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network ...

  19. Comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a pediatric headache center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldo, Irene; Perissinotto, Egle; Menegazzo, Francesca; Boniver, Clementina; Sartori, Stefano; Salviati, Leonardo; Clementi, Maurizio; Montagna, Pasquale; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a large series of children with headache (1,795). Fifty-six cases (3.1%) suffered from idiopathic headache and idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy or unprovoked seizures. There was a strong association between migraine and epilepsy: in migraineurs (46/56) the risk of epilepsy was 3.2 times higher when compared with tension-type headache, without significant difference between migraine with and without aura (P = 0.89); children with epilepsy had a 4.5-fold increased risk of developing migraine than tension-type headache. In cases with comorbidity, focal epilepsies prevailed (43/56, 76.8%). Migraineurs affected by focal epilepsies (36/56) had a three times higher risk of having a cryptogenic epilepsy (27/36, 75%) than an idiopathic epilepsy (9/36, 25%) (P = 0.003). In migraine with aura, epilepsy preceded migraine in 71% of cases. Photosensitivity (7/56, 12.5%) and positive family history for epilepsy (22/56, 39%) were frequent in cases with comorbidity.

  20. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Larsen, Line H G; Johannesen, Katrine M

    2016-01-01

    -causing variant in 49 (23%) of the 216 patients. The variants were found in 19 different genes including SCN1A, STXBP1, CDKL5, SCN2A, SCN8A, GABRA1, KCNA2, and STX1B. Patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies had the highest rate of positive findings (57%). The overall yield for patients with EEs was 32%, compared...... to 17% among patients with generalized epilepsies and 16% in patients with focal or multifocal epilepsies. By the use of a gene panel consisting of 46 epilepsy genes, we were able to find a disease-causing genetic variation in 23% of the analyzed patients. The highest yield was found among patients......In recent years, several genes have been causally associated with epilepsy. However, making a genetic diagnosis in a patient can still be difficult, since extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity has been observed in many monogenic epilepsies. This study aimed to analyze the genetic basis...

  1. Gastaut型特发性儿童枕叶癫痫的临床及脑电图分析%Clinical analysis and electroencephalograghy features in idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of gastaut.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文家伦; 廖建湘; 陈彦; 陈黎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical, electroencephalograghy (EEG) features and prognosis in children with idiopathic occipital epilepsy of Gastaut (COE-G). Methods A retrospective review was conducted of 13 children patients who were diagnosed as idiopathic occipital epilepsy of gastaut (COE-G). All of them were treated with antiepileptic drugs according to the seizure typies. The prognosis were reviewed. The clinical feature and EEG were analysed. Results In total, 13 children (6 boys and 7 girls) with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of gastaut were enrolled in this study. The median age at seizure onset was 8.7 years. The ictal clinical manifestations involve frequent diurnal visual seizures in all patients, elementary visual hallucinations in nine (69.2%), blindness or blurring of vision in seven (53.8%), headache in five (38.5%), and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures in three (23.1%). Frequent deviation of eyes and head were common, 1 patient had seizures at night also. Interictal EEG showed high-amplitude spikes, spike and wave discharge on the unilateral or bilateral occipital regions which had often been induced by eyes closed, inhibited by eyes open. Posterior temporal spikes occured in 4 cases (30.1%), brief generalized discharges of spike-wave in 1 case (7.7%). Ictal EEG showed continuing low-amplitude sharp wave rhythm originated from one hemisphere of the occipital or posterior temporal lobe, with its amplitude increasing gradually and spread to the former head of the same hemisphere or lateral head of the contralateral hemisphere during progress. 11 cases (84.6%) had seizure free, in half of whom the medication was terminated in late adolescence. Most of them was treated monotherapy, some required combination therapy, 2 cases had poor response to multiple antiepileptic drugs, and 1 case had mild cognitive impairment. Conclusion COE-G had relatively late onset, characterized by prominent diurnal visual seizures, more

  2. Reproductive endocrine function in women with epilepsy: the role of epilepsy type and medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Eeva; Mikkonen, Kirsi; Tolonen, Uolevi; Pakarinen, Arto; Koivunen, Riitta; Myllyla, Vilho V; Tapanainen, Juha S; Isojärvi, Jouko I T

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of the analysis described here was to assess reproductive endocrine disorders in 148 women with epilepsy (WWE) by epilepsy type and antiepileptic drug use. Women with idiopathic generalized epilepsy had a higher prevalence of reproductive endocrine disorders than control subjects. In addition, hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries, and polycystic ovary syndrome were more prevalent in WWE on valproate than in WWE taking other drugs or control women. The use of VPA was a predictor of the development of polycystic ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome, and the use of valproate and younger age predicted the development of hyperandrogenism. In conclusion, both idiopathic generalized epilepsy and valproate were associated with an increased risk of reproductive endocrine disorders in WWE in this post hoc reanalysis of data on a large number of WWE. This was especially evident if the epilepsy was active and required treatment early in life.

  3. A Multi-Model Stereo Similarity Function Based on Monogenic Signal Analysis in Poisson Scale Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A stereo similarity function based on local multi-model monogenic image feature descriptors (LMFD is proposed to match interest points and estimate disparity map for stereo images. Local multi-model monogenic image features include local orientation and instantaneous phase of the gray monogenic signal, local color phase of the color monogenic signal, and local mean colors in the multiscale color monogenic signal framework. The gray monogenic signal, which is the extension of analytic signal to gray level image using Dirac operator and Laplace equation, consists of local amplitude, local orientation, and instantaneous phase of 2D image signal. The color monogenic signal is the extension of monogenic signal to color image based on Clifford algebras. The local color phase can be estimated by computing geometric product between the color monogenic signal and a unit reference vector in RGB color space. Experiment results on the synthetic and natural stereo images show the performance of the proposed approach.

  4. Comorbidity headache and epilepsy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, L E; Montenegro, M A; Guerreiro, M M

    2004-04-01

    Epilepsy and headache are both frequent in childhood. Because seizures are frequently a frightening event, other medical conditions--including headache--are often neglected not only by the patient, but also by the physician. The objective of this study was to verify the comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in childhood. This was a prospective study conducted at the pediatric epilepsy clinic of our university hospital. Fifty children with epilepsy and ability to describe their symptoms, between 5 and 18 years old, were interviewed according to a semi-structured questionnaire. The headache was classified according to the International Headache Society. The frequency of headache was compared with the findings of a control group composed by children without epilepsy, siblings of children with epilepsy. Fifty children were evaluated, 29 boys, mean age 11 years. Twenty-three (46 %) patients presented with headache, as opposed to only 1 (2.5 %) in the control group ( p headache and in 9 (39.1 %) the type of headache could not be established. In 9/23 (39 %) a temporal relationship between headache and epilepsy was present, 6 postictal and 3 preictal. There was no difference in gender, age, type of seizure and family history of headache in the groups of patients with or without headache. However, most patients with headache were older than 10 years (54.5 %) and had idiopathic epilepsy (65.2 %; p headache usually started in the same year or after the diagnosis of epilepsy (95 %; p Headache and epilepsy are a common comorbidity in childhood, and occur mostly in children older than 10 years with idiopathic epilepsy. The headache usually starts in the same year or after the diagnosis of epilepsy.

  5. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana E.; Watson, Ryann; Sheth, Raj; Caplan, Rochelle; Koehn, Monica; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution, timing, and risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recent onset epilepsy. Children aged 8 to 18 years with recent onset epilepsy (less than 1 year in duration) of idiopathic etiology (n=53) and a healthy comparison group (n=50) underwent a structured psychiatric…

  6. [Generalized or focal photosensitive epilepsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, D

    1998-11-01

    Photosensitivity is defined by a pattern of occipital or more diffuse spikes and waves. Several techniques are needed for exploration: intermittent light stimulation (ILS), patterns, TV-screen, video games. Photosensitivity is a genetic characteristic. Only diffuse spikes and waves induced by ILS are correlated with epilepsy. Pure photogenic epilepsy is characterized by seizures induced by visual stimuli alone, usually by TV-screen. Video games may also have a triggering effect due to the slow-moving patterns or intense brightness. Several epileptic syndromes are associated with photosensitivity with or without visually-induced seizures. These syndromes are most often generalized and idiopathic.

  7. Single-Gene Determinants of Epilepsy Comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2015-11-02

    Common somatic conditions are bound to occur by chance in individuals with neurological disorders as prevalent as epilepsy, but when biological links underlying the comorbidity can be uncovered, the relationship may provide clues into the origin and mechanisms of both. The expanding list of monogenic epilepsies and their associated clinical features offer a remarkable opportunity to mine the epilepsy genome for coordinate neurodevelopmental phenotypes and examine their pathogenic mechanisms. Defined single-gene-linked epilepsy syndromes identified to date include all of the most frequently cited comorbidities, such as cognitive disorders, autism, migraine, mood disorders, late-onset dementia, and even premature lethality. Gene-linked comorbidities may be aggravated by, or independent of, seizure history. Mutations in these genes establish clear biological links between abnormal neuronal synchronization and a variety of neurobehavioral disorders, and critically substantiate the definition of epilepsy as a complex spectrum disorder. Mapping the neural circuitry of epilepsy comorbidities and understanding their single-gene risk should substantially clarify this challenging aspect of clinical epilepsy management.

  8. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecila P. Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Method Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A and 31 paired children (group B underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment performed with several standardized protocols. Our findings were categorized as: a dyslexia; b other difficulties; c without difficulties. Our results were compared and statistically analyzed. Results Our data showed that dyslexia occurred in 19.4% and other difficulties in 74.2% of our patients. This was highly significant when compared with the control group (p<0.001. Phonological awareness, writing, reading, arithmetic, and memory tests showed a statistically significant difference when comparing both groups. Conclusion Our findings show significant evidence of the occurrence of dyslexia in patients with BECTS.

  9. Voltage-Gated Channels as Causative Agents for Epilepsies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Problem statement: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that afflicts 1-2% of the general population worldwide. It encompasses a variety of disorders with seizures. Approach: Idiopathic epilepsies were defined as a heterogeneous group of seizure disorders that show no underlying cause .Voltage-gated ion channels defect were recognized etiology of epilepsy in the central nervous system. The aim of this article was to provide an update on voltage-gated ...

  10. Idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Onur; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Scoliosis refers to curves exceeding 10 degrees observed through posterioanterior direct radiography. In fact, the diagnosis for idiopathic scoliosis is accepted to exclude already available causes. The aim of this paper was to review the etiopathogenesis, classification systems and the treatment management of idiopathic scoliosis. A search in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) database using the key words 'idiopathic' and 'scoliosis' was performed. For the literature review, papers concerning the etiopathogenesis, classification and treatment were selected among these articles. A search in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) database using the key words 'idiopathic' and 'scoliosis' yielded 4518 articles published between 1947 and 2013. The main hypothesis put forward included genetic factors, hormonal factors, bone and connective tissue anomalies. King, Lenke, Coonrad and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) classifications were the main classification systems for idiopathic scoliosis. Exercise, bracing and anterior, posterior or combined surgery when indicated are the choices for the treatment. Every idiopathic scoliosis case has to be managed to its own characteristics. It is the post-operative appearance that the surgeons are perhaps the least interested but the adolescent patients the most interested in. The aim of scoliosis surgery is to restore the spine without neurological deficit.

  11. A Boundary Value Problem for Hermitian Monogenic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Abreu Blaya

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of finding a Hermitian monogenic function with a given jump on a given hypersurface in ℝm, m=2n. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability of this problem are obtained.

  12. A study of brain MRI findings in children with epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Sachiko; Sumida, Sawako; Muto, Ayako; Osawa, Makiko; Ono, Yuko [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan); Uchida, Moriyasu; Maruyama, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging in the brain was performed in 293 patients with childhood-onset (<15 y.o.) epilepsy who had been classified into 4 groups, idiopathic localization-related epilepsy (ILRE), 78 patients; idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), 116 patients; symptomatic localization-related epilepsy (SLRE), 68 patients and symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), 31 patients, with the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndrome (1989 International League Against Epilepsy). The examination was performed with a 1.5 T magnet. One hundred twenty-five patients (42.7%) showed abnormal findings, and the incidence in each group was as follows: Idiopathic epilepsy: The rate of abnormal findings in the ILRE and IGE groups was 21.8% and 20.7%, respectively. Most of the abnormal findings were secondary changes, such as diffuse or localized brain atrophy. Of the congenital abnormalities, the main finding was arachnoid cyst. Symptomatic epilepsy: The rate of abnormality in the SLRE patients was 88.2%, and 85% of the findings were secondary changes, i.e., brain atrophy, or degeneration of the white matter. In the SGE group, the rate was 77.4%, with an almost equal percentage of congenital and secondary changes. Of 255 patients who were examined by electroencephalography (EEG) on the same day as MRI, about 50% showed a correlation between the EEG records and the MRI abnormalities. However, only 8 patients showed a correlation in localization between the EEG and MRI abnormalities. (author)

  13. RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 mutations in rolandic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M; Altmüller, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Partial deletions of the gene encoding the neuronal splicing regulator RBFOX1 have been reported in a range of neurodevelopmental diseases, including idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The RBFOX1 protein and its homologues (RBFOX2 and RBFOX3) regulate alternative splicing of many neuronal transcripts...... involved in the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability. In this study, we explored if structural microdeletions and exonic sequence variations in RBFOX1, RBFOX2, RBFOX3 confer susceptibility to rolandic epilepsy (RE), a common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. By high-density SNP array screening...... that exon deletions and truncating mutations of RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 contribute to the genetic variance of partial and generalized idiopathic epilepsy syndromes....

  14. Epilepsy kills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Alexandre Scorza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available People with epilepsy are more likely to die prematurely, and the most common epilepsy-related category of death is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP. Thus, the purpose of this article was to alert the scientific community about SUDEP.

  15. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena;

    2015-01-01

    be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging......Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials...... for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special...

  16. Orthogonal basis for spherical monogenics by step two branching

    CERN Document Server

    Lavicka, R; Van Lancker, P

    2010-01-01

    Spherical monogenics can be regarded as a basic tool for the study of harmonic analysis of the Dirac operator in Euclidean space R^m. They play a similar role as spherical harmonics do in case of harmonic analysis of the Laplace operator on R^m. Fix the direct sum R^m = R^p x R^q. In this paper we will study the decomposition of the space M_n(R^m;C_m) of spherical monogenics of order n under the action of Spin(p) x Spin(q). As a result we obtain a Spin(p) x Spin(q)-invariant orthonormal basis for M_n(R^m;C_m). In particular, using the construction with p = 2 inductively, this yields a new orthonormal basis for the space M_n(R^m;C_m).

  17. Scalp fibroblasts have a shared expression profile in monogenic craniosynostosis

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background Craniosynostosis can be caused by both genetic and environmental factors, the relative contributions of which vary between patients. Genetic testing identifies a pathogenic mutation or chromosomal abnormality in ∼21% of cases, but it is likely that further causative mutations remain to be discovered. Objective To identify a shared signature of genetically determined craniosynostosis by comparing the expression patterns in three monogenic syndromes with a control group of patients w...

  18. Polar Body Diagnosis for Monogenic Disorders in Regensburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehr A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar body diagnosis (PBD is currently the only legal option to perform a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD in Germany. The results of PBD for monogenic disorders performed at our center in Regensburg since 2001 are reported. Our data show that PBD can be safely performed on first and second polar bodies within the tight timeframe provided by the German Embryo Protection Act. It requires extensive interdisciplinary counseling of the couple, good and close cooperation between the IVF center and the genetics laboratory as well as meticulous development, validation, and performance of the individual genetic assay. Provided that these prerequisites are met, PBD can today be an acceptable option for German couples at high risk for a particular monogenic disorder in their offspring. Main arguments pro PBD usually include a decline of both conventional prenatal diagnosis and subsequently induced abortion of an affected offspring as well as the birth of an affected child. Major disadvantages of PBD in this situation include the requirement of assisted reproduction for couples in the absence of any obvious fertility problems with their immanent obstacles like pregnancy rate, remaining recurrence risk for the particular monogenic disorder, costs etc. Furthermore, PBD can only be offered for mutations, which are passed on by the female partner with her nuclear DNA (autosomal dominant, X-chromosomal as well as autosomal recessive traits. For heterozygous female mutation carriers of autosomal recessive or X-chromosomal inherited disorders PBD requires discarding all oocytes carrying the mutation, although they may result in healthy offspring if the sperm does not carry the mutation or the Y chromosome, respectively. Finally, both PBD as well as PGD can substantially reduce the recurrence risk for a particular monogenic disorder but not diminish it entirely. Therefore, conventional prenatal diagnosis (PND should still be offered and in fact has been

  19. EATING EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rudakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating epilepsy (EE is one of the types of reflex epilepsy. The authors give the definition, classification position, possible pathogenic mechanisms and etiological factors associated with EE, as well as the semiology of seizures, the data of neuroimaging and electroencephalography and approaches to patient management and drug treatment. They also describe their observation of an 11-month-old girl with symptomatic focal temporal lobe epilepsy with focal dialeptic seizures provoked by eating.

  20. Genetics of Epilepsy: What for and How to Examine Children with Epilepsy E.D. Belousova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Belousova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on problems of genetic examination of children with epilepsy. The major types of monogenic epilepsies in children are described; clinical and research justification of molecular-genetic examination in these patients is given. Priority in molecular diagnosis should be given to epileptic syndromes with clear phenotype. In individuals with Dravet syndrome, detection of a typical mutation allows one to clarify the diagnosis and provides important data concerning prognosis and treatment strategy. If the phenotype is less clear, diagnostic panels need to be used to determine the most frequent mutations that cause severe epilepsy (epileptic encephalopathies. Thus, genetic studies provide new insights into epileptic encephalopathies with prolonged spike-wave activity during sleep: the GRIN2A gene encoding the alpha subunit of NMDA receptors was muted in 17.6% of children with this syndrome. The need for supplementing the examination algorithm of a child with severe epilepsy with comparative genomic hybridization is emphasized. In practical terms, detection of an epilepsy-causing muta- tion allows one to refuse further expensive diagnostic procedures, to predict the disease course more accurately (in some cases, to optimize the therapeutic strategy, and to determine the prognosis of further reproductive potential in some cases. Scientifically, studies into the sequelae of the known mutations (and their effect on child's brain development allow one to refine the key processes of epileptogenesis. These data may be used to design new therapy methods (the so-called target therapy for epilepsy in future. 

  1. Idiopathic Scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Idiopathic scoliosis is a structural and lateral curvature of the spine for which a currently recognizable cause has not been found and there is no basic evidence for physical and radiographic pathology. Complications. Scoliosis could be a cause of the back pain, deformities, respiratory and cardiology problems. There is a higher risk for decreasing of bone mineral density. Diagnosis and Management. Physical examination, radiography and stereophotogrametry are used in diag...

  2. THE STRUCTURE OF COSTS OF ANTIEPILEPTIC THERAPY ACCORDING TO THE DATA OF CENTER FOR CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shagrova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyzed the direct and indirect costs of treating epilepsy in 611 children aged from 1 month to 18 years in urban outpatient treatment and diagnostic center for the treatment of epilepsy in children based on the individual characteristics of each patient: forms of epilepsy, used regimen of therapy, effectiveness of therapy, body mass. The pharmacoeconomic aspects in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, idiopathic partial epilepsy, epileptic encephalopathies, symptomatic partial epilepsy and cryptogenic partial epilepsy were analyzed. It turned out that in patients with 50% effectiveness of treatment costs increase by more than twice, and in cases of non- effectiveness of treatment — more than three times — in all forms of epilepsy. Indirect costs in cases of loss of control for seizures exceed the direct costs saving

  3. Current Progress in Therapeutic Gene Editing for Monogenic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Versha; Moore, Marc; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2016-03-01

    Programmable nucleases allow defined alterations in the genome with ease-of-use, efficiency, and specificity. Their availability has led to accurate and widespread genome engineering, with multiple applications in basic research, biotechnology, and therapy. With regard to human gene therapy, nuclease-based gene editing has facilitated development of a broad range of therapeutic strategies based on both nonhomologous end joining and homology-dependent repair. This review discusses current progress in nuclease-based therapeutic applications for a subset of inherited monogenic diseases including cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, diseases of the bone marrow, and hemophilia and highlights associated challenges and future prospects.

  4. Cingulate Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawadri, Rafeed; So, Norman K.; Van Ness, Paul C.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The literature on cingulate gyrus epilepsy in the magnetic resonance imaging era is limited to case reports and small case series. To our knowledge, this is the largest study of surgically confirmed epilepsy arising from the anterior or posterior cingulate region. OBJECTIVE To characterize the clinical and electrophysiological findings of epilepsies arising from the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied consecutive cingulate gyrus epilepsy cases identified retrospectively from the Cleveland Clinic and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center epilepsy databases from 1992 to 2009. Participants included 14 consecutive cases of cingulate gyrus epilepsies confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was improvement in seizure frequency following surgery. The clinical, video electroencephalography, neuroimaging, pathology, and surgical outcome data were reviewed. RESULTS All 14 patients had cingulate epilepsy confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. They were divided into 3 groups based on anatomical location of the lesion and corresponding seizure semiology. In the posterior cingulate group, all 4 patients had electroclinical findings suggestive of temporal origin of the epilepsy. The anterior cingulate cases were divided into a typical (Bancaud) group (6 cases with hypermotor seizures and infrequent generalization with the presence of fear, laughter, or severe interictal personality changes) and an atypical group (4 cases presenting with simple motor seizures and a tendency for more frequent generalization and less-favorable long-term surgical outcome). All atypical cases were associated with an underlying infiltrative astrocytoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Posterior cingulate gyrus epilepsy may

  5. Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Ivar Brox

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic scoliosis (IS is a lifetime condition and is defined as a structural, lateral rotated curvature of the spine of >10° on standing coronal plane radiographs. It should be distinguished from other causes of scoliosis. It can be classified as infantile, juvenile, and adolescent according to age. As a rule of thumb, about 80% of all curves are idiopathic, right convex thoracic, and present in otherwise healthy girls at the beginning of puberty. A family member most commonly detects scoliosis. The structural asymmetry of the spine is best observed by asking the patient to bend forward. IS is often seen in more than one member of a family, but the aetiology remains unknown. Multiple genes are likely to be involved with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Early detection by screening allows for monitoring curve progression and timely initiation of bracing, but school screening is controversial and practises vary worldwide. Most patients have minor scoliosis and treatment is generally not recommended for patients with curves 45°. Scoliosis surgery was not successful until the introduction of Harrington’s instrumentation in the 1960s. Modern instrumentation has evolved from the Cotrel-Dubousset system in the 1980s, and a variety of methods are available today. Although scoliosis may be a burden, long-term studies suggest that a good quality of life is maintained in most patients.

  6. Targeting Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... productivity) each year. Adults with epilepsy report worse mental health, more cognitive impairment, barriers in social participation, and ... to care, such as lack of transportation or stigma. Health professionals can also earn continuing education credits for ...

  7. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2012:chap 50. Freeman J, Harvey S. Seizures and epilepsies. In: South M, Ashwal S, Isaacs ... School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  8. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of DNA-diagnosis for four monogenic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.P.M. van der Riet; B.A. van Hout (Ben); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper the costs and benefits associated with DNA-diagnosis of individuals who are at risk of a child with a monogenic disease and who seek genetic counselling because of their reproductive plans are predicted under various assumptions using a mathematical model. Four monogenic

  10. Cost-effectiveness of DNA-diagnosis for four monogenic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.P.M. van der Riet; B.A. van Hout (Ben); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper the costs and benefits associated with DNA-diagnosis of individuals who are at risk of a child with a monogenic disease and who seek genetic counselling because of their reproductive plans are predicted under various assumptions using a mathematical model. Four monogenic

  11. A dichotomy for upper domination in monogenic classes

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2014-01-01

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal (with respect to set inclusion) dominating set of maximum cardinality. The problem of finding an upper dominating set is NP-hard for general graphs and in many restricted graph families. In the present paper, we study the computational complexity of this problem in monogenic classes of graphs (i.e. classes defined by a single forbidden induced subgraph) and show that the problem admits a dichotomy in this family. In particular, we prove that if the only forbidden induced subgraph is a P4 or a 2K2 (or any induced subgraph of these graphs), then the problem can be solved in polynomial time. Otherwise, it is NP-hard.

  12. Management of suspected monogenic lung fibrosis in a specialised centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Borie

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available At least 10% of patients with interstitial lung disease present monogenic lung fibrosis suspected on familial aggregation of pulmonary fibrosis, specific syndromes or early age of diagnosis. Approximately 25% of families have an identified mutation in genes mostly involved in telomere homeostasis, and more rarely in surfactant homeostasis. Beyond pathophysiological knowledge, detection of these mutations has practical consequence for patients. For instance, mutations involved in telomere homeostasis are associated with haematological complications after lung transplantation and may require adapted immunosuppression. Moreover, relatives may benefit from a clinical and genetic evaluation that should be specifically managed. The field of genetics of pulmonary fibrosis has made great progress in the last 10 years, raising specific problems that should be addressed by a specialised team.

  13. Genes e epilepsia I: epilepsia e alterações genéticas Genes and epilepsy I: epilepsy and genetic alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. G. Gitaí

    2008-06-01

    hypersynchronous electrical activity, preferentially in cortical areas, caused by panoply of structural and neurochemical dysfunctions. Recent advances in the field have focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in the epileptogenic process. OBJECTIVES: In the present review, we describe the main genetic alterations associated to the process of epileptogenesis and discuss the new findings that are shedding light on the molecular substrates of monogenic idiopathic epilepsies (MIE and on genetically complex epilepsies (GCE. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Linkage and association studies have shown that mutations in ion channel genes are the main causes of MIE and of predisposition for GCE. Moreover, mutations in genes involved in neuronal migration, glycogen metabolism and respiratory chain are associated to other syndromes involving seizures. Therefore, different gene classes contribute to the epileptic trait. The identification of epilepsy-related gene families can help us understand the molecular mechanisms of neuronal hyperexcitability and recognize markers of early diagnosis as well as new treatments for these epilepsies.

  14. Monogenic and chromosomal causes of isolated speech and language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnett, C.P.; Bon, B.W.M. van

    2015-01-01

    The importance of a precise molecular diagnosis for children with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder and epilepsy has become widely accepted and genetic testing is an integral part of the diagnostic evaluation of these children. In contrast, children with an isolated speech or languag

  15. Prevalence of epilepsy in rural Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Liu, Yi; Paschal, Angelia M; Hawley, Suzanne; Thurman, David; Hauser, W Allen

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of active epilepsy in two southeastern rural Kansas counties. Medical records were abstracted from the emergency rooms, out- and inpatient services and clinics of 9 hospitals, from 10 doctors' offices, and 1 nursing home in and surrounding the two counties. Letters were mailed from hospitals and doctors' offices to invite their potentially eligible patients to participate in an interview. Medical record information and the interview, when available, were used for the final determination of active epilepsy, seizure type, etiology, syndrome, age, and gender in consensus conferences. Prevalence of epilepsy was calculated, and capture-recapture methodology, which estimates prevalence based on what is known about the population, was employed to assess active epilepsy in the two counties. This study identified 404 individuals with active prevalent epilepsy who visited at least one of the 20 facilities during the observation period. The overall prevalence of active epilepsy was 7.2 per 1000. The seizure type for 71.3% of prevalent cases was unknown; among the 76 cases with known and classifiable seizure type, 55.3% had focal with secondary generalized seizures. Among the 222 cases with classifiable etiology, 53.1% were idiopathic/cryptogenic. About 75% (n=301) were captured at only one center, 72% (n=75) of the remaining 103 patients were captured at two centers, and 28 patients were identified at three or more centers. The capture-recapture assessment yielded an estimation of 982 prevalent patients. The overall estimated prevalence of epilepsy in the two Kansas counties using capture-recapture was 17 per 1000. The crude prevalence of epilepsy, using medical record survey methods, was similar to, but on the high end, of other total population prevalence studies in the United States. The capture-recapture assessment suggested that epilepsy prevalence might be considerably higher than the crude prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  16. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Deep PATTANAYAK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Pattanayak RD, Sagar R. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012;6(2:9-18.Childhood epilepsy is a chronic, recurrent disorder of unprovoked seizures. Theonset of epilepsy in childhood has significant implications for brain growth anddevelopment. Seizures may impair the ongoing neurodevelopmental processes and compromise the child’s intellectual and cognitive functioning, leading totremendous cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial consequences. Children with epilepsy are at increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems. In addition to the direct effects of epilepsy, there are multiple contributory factors including the underlying neurological abnormalities and adverse effects of medication. This review discusses the current understanding of various psychiatric aspects of childhood epilepsy, including the neuropsychological, behavioral and psychosocial concomitants of childhood epilepsy.References1. Shinnar S, Pellock JM. Update on the epidemiology and prognosis of pediatric epilepsy. J Child Neurol 2002;7 suppl 1:4-17.2. Murphy CC, Trevathan E, Yeargin-Allsopp M. Prevalence of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in 10-year-old children: results from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study. Epilepsia 1995;36(9:866-72.3. Placencia M, Shorvon SD, Paredes V, Bimos C, Sander JW, Suarez J, et al. Epileptic seizures in an Andean region of Ecuador ncidence and prevalence and regional variation. Brain 1992;115:771-82.4. Henkin Y, Sadeh M, Kivity S, Shabtai E, KishonRabin L, Gadoth N. Cognitive function in idiopathic generalized epilepsy of childhood. Dev Med Child Neurol 2005;47:126-32.5. Rodenburg R, Stams GJ, Meijer AM, Aldenkamp AP, Dekovic M. Psychopathology in children with epilepsy: a meta-analysis. J Pediatr Psychol 2005;30(6:453-68.6. Caplan R, Siddarth P, Gurbani S, Ott D, Sankar R, Shields WD. Psychopathology and pediatric complex partial seizures: seizure

  17. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed.

  18. History of epilepsy: nosological concepts and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the development of the nosological views of the epilepsies, from prehistoric times to the present, and highlight how these views are reflected by terminology and classification. Even the earliest written documents reveal awareness that there are multiple forms of epilepsy, and it is surprising that they should be included under the same disease concept, perhaps because the generalised tonic-clonic seizure served as a common denominator. The Hippocratic doctrine that the seat of epilepsy is in the brain may be rooted in earlier knowledge of traumatic seizures. Galenus differentiated cases where the brain was the primary site of origin from others where epilepsy was concomitant with illness in other parts of the body. This laid the fundament for the distinction between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies, the definition of which changed considerably over time. The description of the multiple seizure types as they are known at present started in the late 18th century. Attempts to classify seizure types began in the late 19th century, when Jackson formulated a comprehensive pathophysiological definition of epilepsy. Electroencephalography supported a second dichotomy, between seizures with localised onset and others with immediate involvement of both hemispheres which became known as "generalised". In recent years, advanced methods of studying brain function in vivo, including the generation of both spontaneous and reflex epileptic seizures, have revolutionised our understanding of focal and "generalised" human ictogenesis. Both involve complex neuronal networks which are currently being investigated.

  19. Frequency and Etiology of ADHD in New Onset Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence, complications and etiology of ADHD were determined in 75 children (age 8-18 years) with new/recent onset idiopathic epilepsy nd 62 healthy first-degree cousin controls, in a study at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI; and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL.

  20. Frequency and Etiology of ADHD in New Onset Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence, complications and etiology of ADHD were determined in 75 children (age 8-18 years with new/recent onset idiopathic epilepsy nd 62 healthy first-degree cousin controls, in a study at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI; and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL.

  1. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian; Sander, Thomas; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Thiele, Holger; Krause, Roland; Lehesjoki, Anna Elina; Nürnberg, Peter; Palotie, Aarno; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Helbig, Ingo; Becker, Albert J.; Schoch, Susanne; Hansen, Jörg; Dorn, Thomas; Hohl, Christin; Lüscher, Nicole; von Spiczak, Sarah; Lemke, Johannes R.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Claes, Lieve; Deprez, Liesbet; Smets, Katrien; Dyck, Tine Van; Deconinck, Tine; De Jonghe, Peter; Møller, Rikke S.; Klitten, Laura L.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Campus, Kiel; Ostertag, Philipp; Trucks, Hol ger; Elger, Christian E.; Kleefuß-Lie, Ailing A.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Gaus, Verena; Janz, Dieter; Schmitz, Bettina; Klein, Karl Martin; Reif, Philipp S.; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Hamer, Hajo M.; Rosenow, Felix; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Koeleman, Bobby P C; de Kovel, Carolien; Lindhout, Dick; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Steinboeck, Hannelore; Neo-phytou, Birgit; Geldner, Julia; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Haberlandt, Edda; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Altmueller, Janine; Nuernberg, Peter; Neubauer, Bernd; Sirén, Auli

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A mutatio

  2. Antiepileptic drug withdrawal in dogs with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kaspar Gesell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. In humans with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, 4 of these dogs remained seizure free, 7 dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only 3 dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  3. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  4. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAJAFI, Mohammad Reza; NAJAFI, Mohammad Amin; SAFAEI, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients’ demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. Materials & Methods From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. Results JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). Conclusion A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME. PMID:27247579

  5. Two epileptic syndromes, one brain: childhood absence epilepsy and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminara, Caterina; Coniglio, Antonella; El-Malhany, Nadia; Casarelli, Livia; Curatolo, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS), or benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), are the most common forms of childhood epilepsy. CAE and BCECTS are well-known and clearly defined syndromes; although they are strongly dissimilar in terms of their pathophysiology, these functional epileptic disturbances share many features such as similar age at onset, overall good prognosis, and inheritance factors. Few reports are available on the concomitance of CAE and BCECTS in the same patients or the later occurrence of generalized epilepsy in patients with a history of partial epilepsy. In most cases described in the literature, absence seizures always started after the onset of benign focal epilepsy but the contrary has never occurred yet. We describe two patients affected by idiopathic generalized epileptic syndrome with typical absences, who experienced BCECTS after remission of seizures and normalization of EEG recordings. While the coexistence of different seizure types within an epileptic syndrome is not uncommon, the occurrence of childhood absence and BCECTS in the same child appears to be extremely rare, and this extraordinary event supports the hypothesis that CAE and BCECTS are two distinct epileptic conditions. However, recent interesting observations in animal models suggest that BCECTS and CAE could be pathophysiologically related and that genetic links could play a large role.

  6. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Safaei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients' demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME.

  7. Monogenic forms of systemic lupus erythematosus: new insights into SLE pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belot Alexandre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is complex and remains poorly understood. Infectious triggers, genetic background, immunological abnormalities and environmental factors are all supposed to interact for the disease development. Familial SLE as well as early-onset juvenile SLE studies make it possible to identify monogenic causes of SLE. Identification of these rare inherited conditions is of great interest to understand both SLE pathogenesis and molecular human tolerance mechanisms. Complement deficiencies, genetic overproduction of interferon-α and apoptosis defects are the main situations that can lead to monogenic SLE. Here, we review the different genes involved in monogenic SLE and highlight their importance in SLE pathogenesis.

  8. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Timothy E

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common epilepsy syndrome that begins most frequently in the early teenage years. It is officially classified as a type of idiopathic generalized epilepsy and is often under-recognized or misdiagnosed. This syndrome has a strong genetic component with multiple gene mutations being associated with the clinical presentation. Based upon genetic associations, there may be multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms for the disorder; the pathophysiology has not been clearly defined. A diagnosis of JME is made using the clinical history and EEG findings. Valproic acid is the primary antiepileptic drug (AED) used for JME, but some newer AEDs may be effective alternatives. Selection of an appropriate AED is essential to the proper management of JME, because of the possibility of exacerbation of seizures by some AEDs and the adverse effect profiles of effective drugs. It is important for clinicians to understand JME to correctly diagnose and manage patients with this syndrome.

  9. Epilepsy diagnostic and treatment needs identified with a collaborative database involving tertiary centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Szurhaj, William; Vercueil, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Cances, Claude; Auvin, Stéphane; Chassagnon, Serge; Napuri, Sylvia; Allaire, Catherine; Derambure, Philippe; Marchal, Cécile; Caubel, Isabelle; Ricard-Mousnier, Brigitte; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Pinard, Jean-Marc; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; de Baracé, Claire; Kahane, Philippe; Gautier, Agnès; Hamelin, Sophie; Coste-Zeitoun, Delphine; Rosenberg, Sarah-Dominique; Clerson, Pierre; Nabbout, Rima; Kuchenbuch, Mathieu; Picot, Marie-Christine; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-05-01

    To obtain perspective on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers in France, and describe etiology, epilepsy syndromes, and identify factors of drug resistance and comorbidities. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the characteristics of 5,794 pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy included in a collaborative database in France between 2007 and 2013. Comparisons between groups used Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test for binary or categorical variables. Factors associated with drug resistance and intellectual disability were evaluated in multi-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean age at inclusion was 17.9 years; children accounted for 67%. Epilepsy was unclassified in 20% of patients, and etiology was unknown in 65%, including those with idiopathic epilepsies. Etiologies differed significantly in adult- when compared to pediatric-onset epilepsy; however, among focal structural epilepsies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis began as often in the pediatric as in adult age range. Drug resistance concerned 53% of 4,210 patients evaluable for seizure control and was highest in progressive myoclonic epilepsy (89%), metabolic diseases (84%), focal cortical dysplasia (70%), other cortical malformations (69%), and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (67%). Fifty-nine percent of patients with focal structural epilepsy and 69% with epileptic encephalopathies were drug resistant; however, 40-50% of patients with West syndrome and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep were seizure-free. Ages at onset in infancy and in young adults shared the highest risk of drug resistance. Epilepsy onset in infancy comprised the highest risk of intellectual disability, whereas specific cognitive impairment affected 36% of children with idiopathic focal epilepsy. Our study provides a snapshot on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers and discloses needs for diagnosis and treatment

  10. Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of Idiopathic Occipital Epilepsy and Electrical Status Epilepticus in Sleeping Children%特发性儿童枕叶癫(癎)伴睡眠期癫(癎)性电持续状态的临床特征及预后

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜; 罗序峰; 付四毛; 朱建平; 吴涛

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical manifestations, electroencephalogram(EEG) characteristics, treatment response and prognosis of children with idiopathic occipital epilepsy and electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) . Methods Clinical and EEG data of 8 cases with idiopathic occipital epilepsy and ESES were analyzed together with follow - up for treatment and prognosis. Results The onset age varied from 5 years and 8 months to 8 years and 4 months in the 8 cases. All the 8 cases had neuropsychological injury and motor regression, but had no history of family epilepsy and clear abnormalities by brain imaging examination. Seven patients had seizures, performing exercise - induced limited seizures after waking up; seizures could also attack during awaking period ,including exercise - induced limited seizures (5/7 cases) and overall tonic -clonic seizures (2/7 cases). Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) reduced attacks in 4 cases,but did not improve the psychological damage to nerve and motor rcgression obviously. Mild improvement in neuropsychological injury and EEG were observed in 3 cases treated with single drug Oxcarbazepine ( OXC). Six cases, who were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone shock therapy, had ideal control, and 1 case had marked improvement of nerve injury and psychological setback in movement. Eight patients were followed up by EEG for 0. 5 -2. 0 years,and 2 cases improved in ESES phenomenon. Up to follow - up,the 8 cases of patients still had mental retardation compared with healthy children in the same age. Conclusions Idiopathic occipital epilepsy is an age - dependent benign epilepsy in children; AEDs are often ineffective when the EEG showes ESES of the patients; hormones can reduce the clinical attack, but can not improve the psychological nerve damage and phenomenon of EEG ESES. Children with poor response to corticosteroids can be treated with OXC monothe-rapy or combined therapy.%目的 探讨特发性枕叶癫(癎)伴睡眠期

  11. Ictal consciousness in epilepsy and nonepileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fizzah; Rickards, Hugh; Bagary, Manny; Greenhill, Lyn; McCorry, Doug; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2010-11-01

    Exploration of subjective experiences during seizures may enhance knowledge of the differing natures of epilepsy and nonepileptic attack disorder (NEAD). We performed a quantitative evaluation of both the general level of awareness and the specific contents of consciousness during seizures using the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI). Ninety-five adult outpatients attending general neuropsychiatry and epilepsy clinics with established diagnoses of either epilepsy (n = 66) or NEAD (n = 29) completed one ICI for each witnessed seizure recalled. Patients with a dubious/dual diagnosis were excluded. ICI Level (ICI-L) and ICI Content (ICI-L) scores were calculated for the 167 questionnaires generated by patients with epilepsy (n = 119, of which 58 from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 14 frontal lobe epilepsy, and 47 idiopathic 30 generalized epilepsy) and patients with NEAD (n = 48). Mann-Whitney U tests revealed statistically significant higher ICI-L and ICI-C scores for patients with NEAD (both P = 0.01). Subjective reports of consciousness experiences varied between epilepsy and NEAD, with patients with NEAD reporting significantly greater levels of general awareness/responsiveness and more vivid subjective experiences during attacks. The ICI is proposed as a potentially useful self-report instrument to supplement clinical and instrumental tests for the differential diagnosis of epilepsy and NEAD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Possible relationship between phenylthiocarbamide taste sensitivity and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S K; Sharma, K; Pathak, A; Sawhney, I M S; Prabhakar, S

    2004-06-01

    The study was based on the data of a sample of 400 epileptic patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic) and 100 normal healthy individuals serving as controls. The PTC threshold distribution was bimodal. The number of non-tasters among idiopathic epileptics (35.5%) and symptomatic epileptics (32.5%) was significantly higher than controls (20%). The relative incidence of non-tasters in idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies was 2.20 and 1.93 respectively. There is evidence that non-tasters tend to ingest a greater quantity of bitter tasting goitrogenic substances present naturally in edible plants which in turn exert greater thyroid stress in non-tasters or less sensitive tasters. Such a stress during intrauterine or early childhood growth and development might have affected neurological maturation which in turn made them more susceptible to epilepsy than tasters, who faced lesser stress.

  13. Possible relationship between phenylthiocarbamide taste sensitivity and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was based on the data of a sample of 400 epileptic patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic and 100 normal healthy individuals serving as controls. The PTC threshold distribution was bimodal. The number of non-tasters among idiopathic epileptics (35.5% and symptomatic epileptics (32.5% was significantly higher than controls (20%. The relative incidence of non-tasters in idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies was 2.20 and 1.93 respectively. There is evidence that non-tasters tend to ingest a greater quantity of bitter tasting goitrogenic substances present naturally in edible plants which in turn exert greater thyroid stress in non-tasters or less sensitive tasters. Such a stress during intrauterine or early childhood growth and development might have affected neurological maturation which in turn made them more susceptible to epilepsy than tasters, who faced lesser stress.

  14. An epidemiologic study of 389 children with epilepsy in southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveApproximately 4% of the world's population experience one or more febrile seizures during their lifetime, and 0.5-1% of the population has active epilepsy.Less than one-third of the reported seizures are categorized as epilepsy. The cause of established epilepsy is important in determining the treatment and prognosis.Materials & MethodsWe studied 389 cases of documented epilepsy in children aged 2 months to 18 years who visited the hospital for neurologic examination during 2005-2010.Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was performed for categorical variables.ResultsThe most common age for the first seizure was below 2 years, and the most common type of epilepsy was generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Electroencephalography (EEG showed an epileptic pattern in 60%, 29.8%, and 51% of the patients with idiopathic, symptomatic, and cryptogenic epilepsy, respectively. This pattern was significantly different among these 3 categories of epilepsy.ConclusionThe most common type of seizure was cryptogenic; however, in most industrialized countries, idiopathic epilepsies were more frequent. With respect to the age and sex of patients, the prevalence of epilepsy in southern Iran is not so much different from that of patients in other parts of the world. As to generalized or partial epilepsy, there are different reports from different part ofthe world; however, generalized tonic-clonic seizures were more common in our area.

  15. Paraneoplastic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Anna; Lukas, Rimas V; VanHaerents, Stephen; Warnke, Peter; Tao, James X; Rose, Sandra; Wu, Shasha

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy can be a manifestation of paraneoplastic syndromes which are the consequence of an immune reaction to neuronal elements driven by an underlying malignancy affecting other organs and tissues. The antibodies commonly found in paraneoplastic encephalitis can be divided into two main groups depending on the target antigen: 1) antibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens, such as against neurotransmitter (N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) receptors, ion channels (voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)), and channel-complex proteins (leucine rich, glioma inactivated-1 glycoprotein (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2)) and 2) antibodies against intracellular neuronal antigens (Hu/antineuronal nuclear antibody-1 (ANNA-1), Ma2/Ta, glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), less frequently to CV2/collapsin response mediator protein 5 (CRMP5)). In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of the current literature on paraneoplastic epilepsy indexed by the associated onconeuronal antibodies. While a range of seizure types can be seen with paraneoplastic syndromes, temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common because of the association with limbic encephalitis. Early treatment of the paraneoplastic syndrome with immune modulation/suppression may prevent the more serious potential consequences of paraneoplastic epilepsy.

  16. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View the poster schedule and more information here . Epilepsy Currents Generic Substitution of AEDs: Is it Time ... provides seizure protection in genetic epilepsy models More Epilepsy Professional News AES Releases New Guildeline for Treatment ...

  17. Epilepsy and tobacco smoking: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, Omar; Vuilleumier, Frédéric; Perneger, Thomas; Despland, Paul-Andre; Maeder, Malin; Héritier-Barras, Anne-Chantal; Vulliemoz, Serge; Seeck, Margitta; Rossetti, Andrea O; Picard, Fabienne

    2016-10-01

    There is little data concerning the prevalence of smoking in the population of people with epilepsy. The present study addresses this aspect in a sample of 429 unselected adults with epilepsy living in French-speaking Switzerland. The criterion of at least one cigarette per day for the past 6 months was used to define the status of "current" smoker. The questionnaires included questions about the type of epilepsy and tobacco consumption and were prospectively filled by attending neurologists in the presence of their patient, ensuring a reliable diagnosis of epilepsy. Data were compared with those of the "Tabakmonitoring" data collection, which gives annually detailed information about tobacco use habits in the Switzerland's population according to the different linguistic regions. Among patients suffering from epilepsy, the prevalence of current smoking was 32.1 % (28.8 % among women and 35 % among men), while the prevalence of smoking was 19.0 % in the general population in French-speaking Switzerland in the same period [OR 2.0, confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.5, p < 0.001]. The subgroup of patients with epilepsy suffering from idiopathic (genetic) generalized epilepsy had the highest prevalence of smoking: 44.3 versus 27.8 % in the other types of epilepsy-p = 0.03. Epilepsy appears significantly correlated to smoking. The possible causal relationship, such as common genetic susceptibility to epilepsy and to nicotine addiction, indirect comorbidity through stress or depression associated with epilepsy, beneficial effect of nicotine on epilepsy, still remains unclear and deserves further studies.

  18. A Population-Based Study of Long-term Outcomes of Cryptogenic Focal Epilepsy in Childhood: Cryptogenic Epilepsy is NOT Probably Symptomatic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Grossardt, Brandon R; So, Elson L; Nickels, Katherine C

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term outcome in a population-based group of children with cryptogenic vs symptomatic focal epilepsy diagnosed from 1980–2004 and to define the course of epilepsy in the cryptogenic group. Methods We identified all children residing in Olmsted County, MN, 1 month through 17 years with newly diagnosed, non-idiopathic focal epilepsy from 1980–2004. Children with idiopathic partial epilepsy syndromes were excluded. Medical records were reviewed to determine etiology, results of imaging and EEG studies, treatments used, and long-term outcome. Children were defined as having symptomatic epilepsy if they had a known genetic or structural/metabolic etiology, and as cryptogenic if they did not. Key Findings Of 359 children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy, 215 (60%) had non-idiopathic focal epilepsy. Of these, 206 (96%) were followed for more than 12 months. Ninety five children (46%) were classified as symptomatic. Median follow-up from diagnosis was similar in both groups, being 157 months (25%ile, 75%ile 89, 233) in the cryptogenic group vs 134 months (25%ile, 75%ile 78, 220) in the symptomatic group (p=0.26). Of 111 cryptogenic cases, 66% had normal cognition. Long-term outcome was significantly better in those with cryptogenic vs symptomatic etiology (intractable epilepsy at last follow-up, 7% vs 40%, pseizure-freedom at last follow-up, 81% vs 55%, pseizure-freedom at final follow-up, 68% of the cryptogenic group versus only 46% of the symptomatic group were off antiepileptic medications (p=0.01). One third of the cryptogenic group had a remarkably benign disorder, with no seizures seen after initiation of medication, or in those who were untreated, after the second afebrile seizure. A further 5% had seizures within the first year but remained seizure-free thereafter. With the exception of perinatal complications, which predicted against seizure remission, no other factors were found to significantly predict outcome in the cryptogenic group

  19. Voltage-Gated Channels as Causative Agents for Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem Abuhamed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that afflicts 1-2% of the general population worldwide. It encompasses a variety of disorders with seizures. Approach: Idiopathic epilepsies were defined as a heterogeneous group of seizure disorders that show no underlying cause .Voltage-gated ion channels defect were recognized etiology of epilepsy in the central nervous system. The aim of this article was to provide an update on voltage-gated channels and their mutation as causative agents for epilepsies. We described the structures of the voltage-gated channels, discuss their current genetic studies, and then review the effects of voltage-gated channels as causative agents for epilepsies. Results: Channels control the flow of ions in and out of the cell causing depolarization and hyper polarization of the cell. Voltage-gated channels were classified into four types: Sodium, potassium calcium ands chloride. Voltage-gated channels were macromolecular protein complexes within the lipid membrane. They were divided into subunits. Each subunit had a specific function and was encoded by more than one gen. Conclusion: Current genetic studies of idiopathic epilepsies show the importance of genetic influence on Voltage-gated channels. Different genes may regulate a function in a channel; the channel defect was directly responsible for neuronal hyper excitability and seizures.

  20. Mutations affecting GABAergic signaling in seizures and epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2010-01-01

    The causes of epilepsies and epileptic seizures are multifactorial. Genetic predisposition may contribute in certain types of epilepsies and seizures, whether idiopathic or symptomatic of genetic origin. Although these are not very common, they have offered a unique opportunity to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. Among the implicated gene mutations, a number of GABAA receptor subunit mutations have been recently identified that contribute to several idiopathic epilepsies, febrile seizures, and rarely to certain types of symptomatic epilepsies, like the severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy. Deletion of GABAA receptor genes has also been linked to Angelman syndrome. Furthermore, mutations of proteins controlling chloride homeostasis, which indirectly defines the functional consequences of GABAA signaling, have been identified. These include the chloride channel 2 (CLCN2) and the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC3. The pathogenic role of CLCN2 mutations has not been clearly demonstrated and may represent either susceptibility genes or, in certain cases, innocuous polymorphisms. KCC3 mutations have been associated with hereditary motor and sensory polyneuropathy with corpus callosum agenesis (Andermann syndrome) that often manifests with epileptic seizures. This review summarizes the recent progress in the genetic linkages of epilepsies and seizures to the above genes and discusses potential pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to the age, sex, and conditional expression of these seizures in carriers of these mutations. PMID:20352446

  1. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging......Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials...... sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification...

  2. The electroclinical-semiology of generalized tonic-clonic seizures among different epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S P; Wang, F; Zhang, Y; Wang, J

    2015-11-01

    The study reported here discusses the duration of the generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) among frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The study was done by analyzing the data from patients who had undergone video-EEG in 2009 and had GTCS during the monitoring. The patients were selected for the frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Once they met the criteria, the durations of all the phases were measured, then discussed if there were any difference in duration for different epilepsies. On comparison of the total duration of various types of seizures it was found that the duration of FLE (177 ± 212.6 sec.) was significantly different from the duration of MTLE (104.6 ± 51.8 sec.) and IGE (63.9 ± 28.2 sec.). It can be found in the comparison of GTCS that the duration of phase 6,7 of FLE (63.5 ± 30.9 sec.) was statistically significant compared with MTLE (37.3 ± 13.8 sec.) and IGE (46.4 ± 30.1 sec.). The duration of various types of epilepsy in the generalized tonic-clonic period was not statistically significant. Through this study, we found the differences of the duration of different types of epilepsies that provide the clinical basis for further studies of seizure mechanism and neural network conduction.

  3. Idiopathic chondrolysis - diagnostic difficulties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Scougall, J.

    1984-07-01

    Four cases of idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip in three white girls and one Maori girl are reported. The authors stress the causes why a disease with characteristic clinical and radiographic appearances and normal biochemical findings presents diagnostic difficulties. It is suspected that idiopathic chondrolysis is a metabolic disorder of chondrocytes, triggered by environment circumstances in susceptible individuals. Idiopathic chondrolysis is probably one of the most common causes of coxarthrosis in women.

  4. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective...

  5. Attention deficits in children with epilepsy: Preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, Michael B; Smith, Mary Lou; Barton, Belinda; Webster, Richard; Gill, Deepak; Lah, Suncica

    2017-02-01

    Attention difficulties are a common clinical complaint among children with epilepsy. We aimed to compare a range of attentional abilities between groups of children with two common epilepsy syndromes, Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy (IGE), and to healthy controls. We also investigated whether epilepsy factors (laterality of seizure focus, epilepsy onset, duration, and severity) were related to attentional abilities. Multiple dimensions of attention (selective, sustained, and divided attention and attentional control) were assessed directly with standardized neuropsychological measures in 101 children aged 6-16years (23 children with TLE, 20 with IGE and 58 healthy controls). Attention was also assessed indirectly, via a parent-report measure. Children with TLE performed worse than children with IGE (p=0.013) and healthy controls (pattentional control, but no between-group differences were apparent on tests of other attentional abilities. Compared to healthy controls, greater attention problems were reported by parents of children with TLE (p=0.006) and IGE (p=0.012). Left-hemisphere seizure focus and greater epilepsy severity were associated with poorer attentional control and sustained-divided attention, respectively, but no other epilepsy factors were associated with attentional abilities. These findings suggest that children with localization-related epilepsy, but not generalized epilepsy, may be at risk of deficits in attentional control. Interventions aimed at improving attentional control may be targeted at children with localization-related epilepsy, particularly those with a left-hemisphere seizure focus, who appear to be particularly susceptible to this type of attentional deficit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementat...

  7. A Dutch family with 'familial cortical tremor with epilepsy' - Clinical characteristics and exclusion of linkage to chromosome 8q23.3-q24.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, F; Callenbach, PMC; Hottenga, JJ; Vermeulen, FLMG; Speelman, HD; Brouwer, OF; Tijssen, MAJ

    Objectives To describe the clinical characteristics of a large Dutch family with cortical tremor with epilepsy (FCTE) and to test for genetic linkage of FCTE to chromosome 8q23.3-q24.1. Background FCTE is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy of adult onset with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is

  8. Genome wide high density SNP-based linkage analysis of childhood absence epilepsy identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 3p23-p14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chioza, Barry A; Aicardi, Jean; Aschauer, Harald;

    2009-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE) characterised by typical absence seizures manifested by transitory loss of awareness with 2.5-4 Hz spike-wave complexes on ictal EEG. A genetic component to the aetiology is well recognised but the mechanism of inheritance...

  9. Multi-vector Spherical Monogenics, Spherical Means and Distributions in Clifford Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fred BRACKX; Bram De KNOCK Hennie; De SCHEPPER

    2005-01-01

    New higher-dimensional distributions have been introduced in the framework of Clifford analysis in previous papers by Brackx, Delanghe and Sommen. Those distributions were defined using spherical co-ordinates, the "finite part" distribution Fp xμ+ on the real line and the generalized spherical means involving vector-valued spherical monogenics. In this paper, we make a second generalization,leading to new families of distributions, based on the generalized spherical means involving a multivector-valued spherical monogenic. At the same time, as a result of our attempt at keeping the paper self-contained, it offers an overview of the results found so far.

  10. Evaluation of a target region capture sequencing platform using monogenic diabetes as a study-model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, R.; Liu, Y. X.; Gjesing, A. P.;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Monogenic diabetes is a genetic disease often caused by mutations in genes involved in beta-cell function. Correct sub-categorization of the disease is a prerequisite for appropriate treatment and genetic counseling. Target-region capture sequencing is a combination of genomic region...... diabetes as a study-model. Results: The performance of the assay was evaluated in 70 patients carrying known disease causing mutations previously identified in HNF4A, GCK, HNF1A, HNF1B, INS, or KCNJ11. Target regions with a less than 20-fold sequencing depth were either introns or UTRs. When only...... of monogenic diabetes....

  11. Biological Treatments: New Weapons in the Management of Monogenic Autoinflammatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vitale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders, an expanding group of hereditary diseases characterized by apparently unprovoked recurrent episodes of inflammation, without high-titre autoantibodies or antigen-specific T cells, has been revolutionized by the discovery that several of these conditions are caused by mutations in proteins involved in the mechanisms of innate immune response, including components of the inflammasome, cytokine receptors, receptor antagonists, and oversecretion of a network of proinflammatory molecules. Aim of this review is to synthesize the current experience and the most recent evidences about the therapeutic approach with biologic drugs in pediatric and adult patients with monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

  12. Analytic information processing style in epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonfiglio, Marzia; Di Sabato, Francesco; Mandillo, Silvia; Albini, Mariarita; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Giallonardo, Annateresa; Avanzini, Giuliano

    2017-08-01

    Relevant to the study of epileptogenesis is learning processing, given the pivotal role that neuroplasticity assumes in both mechanisms. Recently, evoked potential analyses showed a link between analytic cognitive style and altered neural excitability in both migraine and healthy subjects, regardless of cognitive impairment or psychological disorders. In this study we evaluated analytic/global and visual/auditory perceptual dimensions of cognitive style in patients with epilepsy. Twenty-five cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients matched with 25 idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) sufferers and 25 healthy volunteers were recruited and participated in three cognitive style tests: "Sternberg-Wagner Self-Assessment Inventory", the C. Cornoldi test series called AMOS, and the Mariani Learning style Questionnaire. Our results demonstrate a significant association between analytic cognitive style and both IGE and TLE and respectively a predominant auditory and visual analytic style (ANOVA: p values <0,0001). These findings should encourage further research to investigate information processing style and its neurophysiological correlates in epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Video game epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh R

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflex epilepsy is the commonest form of epilepsy in which seizures are provoked by specific external stimulus. Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is provoked by environmental flicker stimuli. Video game epilepsy is considered to be its variant or a pattern sensitive epilepsy. The mean age of onset is around puberty and boys suffer more commonly as they are more inclined to play video games. Television set or computer screen is the commonest precipitants. The treatment remains the removal of the offending stimulus along with drug therapy. Long term prognosis in these patients is better as photosensitivity gradually declines with increasing age. We present two such case of epilepsy induced by video game.

  14. Familial risk of epilepsy: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peljto, Anna L.; Barker-Cummings, Christie; Vasoli, Vincent M.; Leibson, Cynthia L.; Hauser, W. Allen; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Almost all previous studies of familial risk of epilepsy have had potentially serious methodological limitations. Our goal was to address these limitations and provide more rigorous estimates of familial risk in a population-based study. We used the unique resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all 660 Rochester, Minnesota residents born in 1920 or later with incidence of epilepsy from 1935–94 (probands) and their 2439 first-degree relatives who resided in Olmsted County. We assessed incidence of epilepsy in relatives by comprehensive review of the relatives’ medical records, and estimated age-specific cumulative incidence and standardized incidence ratios for epilepsy in relatives compared with the general population, according to proband and relative characteristics. Among relatives of all probands, cumulative incidence of epilepsy to age 40 was 4.7%, and risk was increased 3.3-fold (95% confidence interval 2.75–5.99) compared with population incidence. Risk was increased to the greatest extent in relatives of probands with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (standardized incidence ratio 6.0) and epilepsies associated with intellectual or motor disability presumed present from birth, which we denoted ‘prenatal/developmental cause’ (standardized incidence ratio 4.3). Among relatives of probands with epilepsy without identified cause (including epilepsies classified as ‘idiopathic’ or ‘unknown cause’), risk was significantly increased for epilepsy of prenatal/developmental cause (standardized incidence ratio 4.1). Similarly, among relatives of probands with prenatal/developmental cause, risk was significantly increased for epilepsies without identified cause (standardized incidence ratio 3.8). In relatives of probands with generalized epilepsy, standardized incidence ratios were 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.93–15.31) for generalized epilepsy and 2.5 (95% confidence interval 0.92–4.00) for focal epilepsy. In relatives of

  15. Relation between sexual dysfunctions and epilepsy, type of epilepsy, type of antiepileptic drugs: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Carlo; Giacalone, Ninfa; Vella, Marco; Urso, Lidia; Zummo, Leila; Fierro, Brigida

    2017-04-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of sexual dysfunctions in males with epilepsy, the type of epilepsy, the frequency of seizures, the type of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the serum hormonal profile and the presence of psychiatric comorbidity. Sixty-one patients focused on type of epilepsy, frequency of seizures, AEDs, hormonal profile and presence of mood disorders. We excluded all patients with severe neurologic and psychiatric impairment and patient who were not able to fill questionnaires. Mean age was 31.2 years (range 18-50 years); 31 patients (50.8%) had an idiopathic generalised epilepsy and 30 (49.2%) a focal epilepsy; among them, latter 18 (60%) had probably symptomatic type and 12 (40%) symptomatic type. Sexual functions were evaluated by "International Inventory of Erectile Function" questionnaire. Out of 61 enrolled patients, 22 (36.7%) showed sexual dysfunctions: erectile dysfunctions in 14 (23%), orgasmic dysfunctions in (11.5%) and sexual drive dysfunctions in 12 (19.7%). Out of 61 patients, 36 were subjected to blood measurement of sexual hormones and 21 (58.3%) showed hormonal modifications. Sexual dysfunction are present in 36.7% of enrolled males with epilepsy; there is any association between sexual dysfunctions and various AEDs in the treatment, except for carbamazepine (CBZ); there is not any association between sexual dysfunctions and frequency of seizures; hormonal changes are associated with sexual dysfunction in males with epilepsy treated with AEDs but not with the orgasmic dysfunction; there is not any association between hormonal changes and type of AEDs, except for CBZ; depression is associated with sexual dysfunctions.

  16. Management in refractory epilepsy: Beyond epilepsy surgery...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roop Gursahani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although definititions of refractory epilepsy vary, about 40% of prevalent cases of epilepsy are not controlled by anti-epileptic drugs. A substantial proportion of this population requires palliative therapy since only a minority are candidates for epilepsy surgery. Drug therapy can be optimised after accurate classification of the epilepsy. Monotherapy is often as effective as polytherapy with fewer adverse effects. Depression and CNS adverse effects significantly impact quality of life and must be systematically screened for and treated. The ketogenic diet and vagal nerve stimulation provide substantial seizure control in a significant number of cases and may be used synergistically. Deep brain stimulation is another promising modality.

  17. Transcriptional, microscopic and macroscopic investigations into monogenic and polygenic interactions of tomato and powdery mildew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li Chengwei,

    2005-01-01

    Powdery mildew ( Oidium neolycopersici) is a worldwide obligate fungal disease of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ). Six monogenic Ol genes and three major QTLs were identified and mapped on tomato genome. In this thesis, the mechanisms of both compatible and incompatible interactions of tomato and O.

  18. Clinical genetics in 2014: New monogenic diseases span the immunological disease continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Sinisa; McDermott, Michael F

    2015-02-01

    Three monogenic diseases, with features of both autoinflammation and autoimmunity, were described for the first time in 2014. As well as providing insights into the molecular basis of several rare immunological disorders, the discoveries have implications for their diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Characterization of rice blast resistance genes in rice germplasm with monogenic lines and pathogenicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance (R) genes have been effectively deployed in preventing rice crop losses due to the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In the present study, we studied the interaction between 24 monogenic lines carrying at least one major R gene, Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pi...

  20. Evaluation of a target region capture sequencing platform using monogenic diabetes as a study-model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Rui; Liu, Yanxia; Gjesing, Anette Marianne Prior;

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic diabetes is a genetic disease often caused by mutations in genes involved in beta-cell function. Correct sub-categorization of the disease is a prerequisite for appropriate treatment and genetic counseling. Target-region capture sequencing is a combination of genomic region enrichment...

  1. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  2. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Ekinci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is called idiopathic when no other underlying disease can be identified. The etiology of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is still unknown despite many years of research effort. Theories on AIS's etiology have included mechanical, hormonal, metabolic, neuromuscular, growth, and genetic abnormalities. Skeletally immature patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are at risk of curve progression. The adolescent onset of severe idiopathic scoliosis has traditionally been evaluated using standing posteroanterior radiographs of the full spine to assess lateral curvature with the Cobb method. Scoliosis in children of school age and above primarily occurs in girls. The therapeutic goal in children is to prevent progression. In children, scoliosis of 20 and deg; or more should be treated with a brace, and scoliosis of 45 and deg; or more with surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(3.000: 174-182

  3. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins,autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted.

  4. The role of SCL2A1 in Early Onset and Childhood Absence Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus

    Introduction: Early onset absence epilepsy (EOAE) constitutes an idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome with typical absences starting before the age of four years. Mutations in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter of the blood-brain barrier (GLUT-1), account for approximately 10% of EOAE......>C) leading to an amino acid exchange (336Leu>Val), the family history was unremarkable. The other EOAE patient with a very early onset of a severe epilepsy phenotype and movement disorder had a base exchange at position c.1189C>T causing a stop codon (p.Q397X) in exon 9. Familial GTCS were reported in his...

  5. Surgery for childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In about 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with antiepileptic drugs; such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and the major proportion is in the pediatric group (18 years old or less. Epilepsy surgery in children who have been carefully chosen can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90% reduction in seizures in approximately two-thirds of children with intractable seizures. Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging, neurosurgery, and neuroanaesthesia have improved the outcomes of surgery for children with intractable epilepsy. Early surgery improves the quality of life and cognitive and developmental outcome and allows the child to lead a normal life. Surgically remediable epilepsies should be identified early and include temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, lesional temporal and extratemporal epilepsy, hemispherical epilepsy, and gelastic epilepsy with hypothalamic hamartoma. These syndromes have both acquired and congenital etiologies and can be treated by resective or disconnective surgery. Palliative procedures are performed in children with diffuse and multifocal epilepsies who are not candidates for resective surgery. The palliative procedures include corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation while deep brain stimulation in epilepsy is still under evaluation. For children with "surgically remediable epilepsy," surgery should be offered as a procedure of choice rather than as a treatment of last resort.

  6. Neuroimaging in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahina Bano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease worldwide and is second only to stroke in causing neurological morbidity. Neuroimaging plays a very important role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with epilepsy. This review article highlights the specific role of various imaging modalities in patients with epilepsy, and their practical applications in the management of epileptic patients.

  7. Epilepsy is a disease!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition of disease, epilepsy shall not be considered neither a symptom nor a syndrome. Epilepsy is a generic term for a group of diseases characterized by seizures. It implies a state quite distinct from health. Therefore it seems worthy to keep epilepsy as such in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD.

  8. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    formulae for the spherical mean radon transform,” Inverse Probl. 23(1), 373–383 (2007). 5. D. Finch, S. Patch, and Rakesh, “Determining a Function from...Vickrey, B.G., 2007. Stopping antiepileptic drugs after epilepsy surgery: a survey of U.S. epilepsy center neurologists. Epilepsy Behav. 10, 219– 222

  9. A cohort study of epilepsy among 665,000 insured dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heske, L.; Nødtvedt, A.; Jäderlund, K. Hultin

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the incidence and mortality rates of epilepsy in a large population of insured dogs and to evaluate the importance of a variety of risk factors. Survival time after a diagnosis of epilepsy was also investigated. The Swedish animal insurance database...... used in this study has previously been helpful in canine epidemiological investigations. More than 2,000,000 dog-years at-risk (DYAR) were available in the insurance database. In total, 5013 dogs had at least one veterinary care claim for epilepsy, and 2327 dogs were euthanased or died because...... of epilepsy. Based on veterinary care claims the incidence rate of epilepsy (including both idiopathic and symptomatic cases) was estimated to be 18 per 10,000 DYAR. Dogs were followed up until they were 10 (for life insurance claims) or 12 years of age (veterinary care claims). Among the 35 most common...

  10. Atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood with acquired neurocognitive, lexical semantic, and autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nicholas M; Conroy, Judith; Deonna, Thierry; McCreary, Dara; McGettigan, Paul; Madigan, Cathy; Carter, Imogen; Ennis, Sean; Lynch, Sally A; Shahwan, Amre; King, Mary D

    2016-01-01

    Atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE) of childhood or pseudo-Lennox syndrome is a form of idiopathic focal epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types, focal and/or generalized epileptiform discharges, continuous spike-wave during sleep (CSWS), and sometimes reversible neurocognitive deficits. There are few reported cases of ABPE describing detailed correlative longitudinal follow-up of the various associated neurocognitive, language, social communicative, or motor deficits, in parallel with the epilepsy. Furthermore, the molecular inheritance pattern for ABPE and the wider spectrum of epilepsy aphasia disorders have yet to be fully elucidated. We describe the phenotype-genotype study of a boy with ABPE with follow-up from ages 5 to 13 years showing acquired oromotor and, later, a specific lexical semantic and pervasive developmental disorder. Exome sequencing identified variants in SCN9A, CPA6, and SCNM1. A direct role of the epilepsy in the pathogenesis of the oromotor and neurocognitive deficits is apparent.

  11. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  12. Oxcarbazepine-induced myoclonic status epilepticus in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanella, Martina; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2013-06-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a frequent idiopathic generalised epilepsy syndrome with typical clinical and EEG features that can usually be controlled by valproate monotherapy. JME may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed; in the latter case, it may be mistaken for partial epilepsy. The incorrect diagnosis of JME is likely to result in inappropriate therapy, which may, in turn, worsen the seizures. While a number of studies have documented that carbamazepine aggravates idiopathic generalised epilepsy, few have shown a worsening of symptoms following the administration of oxcarbazepine (OXC). We report the case of a 44-year-old male affected by JME in which the inappropriate use of OXC precipitated a dramatic worsening of myoclonic seizures. In this case, video-EEG monitoring documented myoclonic status epilepticus with positive and negative myoclonus, correlating with repetitive, continuous, rhythmic, generalised polyspike-and-wave discharges. This is the first case of myoclonic status epilepticus induced by OXC in a patient with JME which is clearly documented by video-EEG. A review of the literature with regards to OXC-induced worsening of seizures is also presented. [Published with video sequences].

  13. CLINICAL AND ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHANGES IN JUVENILE MYOCLONIC EPILEPSY (A LECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME is a form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by adolescent onset with massive myoclonicseizures and, in most cases, convulsive seizures occurring mainly on awakening. According to the Proposed Diagnostic Schema for Peoplewith Epileptic Seizures and with Epilepsy (2001, JME is classified into a group of idiopathic generalized epilepsy with a variable phenotype. The authors give the genetic bases of the disease, describe its clinical picture in detail, including the atypical course of JME, and consider diagnostic criteria, approaches to patient management, and principles of medical therapy. By taking into account the most common precipitating factors, along with drug therapy, the sleep and wake regimen must be strictly adhered to and household photo stimulation be avoided. Complete medical remission is achieved in about 90 % of patients (on correctly chosen therapy, in most cases on monotherapy. However, the problem resides in high recurrence rates after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs. The major predictors of increased risk for a recurrence aftertherapy discontinuation are considered.

  14. Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

  15. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Møller, R S; Christensen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    or signs are found. Mutations in the NIPA1 gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) in 10 families. SPG6 is a rare form of autosomal dominantly inherited HSP associated with a pure phenotype; however, in one complex SPG6 family, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been...... reported missense mutation c.316G>A, p.Gly106Arg, was identified in a complex HSP patient with spastic dysarthria, facial dystonia, atrophy of the small hand muscles, upper limb spasticity, and presumably IGE. The epilepsy co-segregated with HSP in the family. Conclusion: NIPA1 mutations were rare in our...... population of patients with HSP, but can be found in patients with complex HSP. Epilepsy might be more common in SPG6 than in other forms of HSP because of a genetic risk factor closely linked to NIPA1....

  16. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and......Two groups of epilepsy patients (28 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 15 patients with primary generalized epilepsy) entered a study of personality traits related to epilepsy, based on a modification of Bellak's semistructured interview for assessment of ego strength. Two groups of subjects...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  17. Clinical characteristics of adult epilepsy patients in the 1997 Hong Kong epilepsy registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics of 2952 patients with epilepsy who had received drug treatment from the neurology outpatient clinics of eight major hospitals in Hong Kong. Methods Retrospective review of outpatient records. Results 1601 (54.3%) males and 1351 (45.7%) females with a median age of 35.8 years (range, 10-94.8) were studied. Seizure types included generalized tonic-clonic in 80.7% of patients, complex partial in 28.3%, simple partial in 14.4%, atypical absence in 2.6% and myoclonic in 1.4%, and 30.4% of patients had more than one seizure type. EEG, CT brain, MRI brain and neuropsychological evaluation were obtained in 81.2%, 61.7%, 17.0% and 2.2% of patients, respectively. The etiology of epilepsy was cryptogenic in 59.9%, symptomatic in 35.1% and idiopathic in 3.9%; the commonest were intracranial infection, cerebral vascular disease, cranial trauma and perinatal insult. Phenytoin, carbamazepine and valproate were the most frequently used drugs and 25.9% of patients were taking more than two drugs. 48.3% of patients had active seizures in the past six months and 26.4% were considered to have unsatisfactory control of their epilepsy. Medical refractoriness of epilepsy was associated with a history of perinatal insult, intracranial infection, congenital brain malformation, intracranial neoplasm, cerebral vascular disease, hippocampal sclerosis, mental retardation and a history of status epilepticus (P<0.05). Conclusion In this local cohort of adult patients with epilepsy under specialist care, there were a considerable number of patients falling into the category of cryptogenic epilepsy. Risk factors associated with medical refractoriness are similar to previous studies.

  18. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo;

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class...

  19. [Current management of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Global neurological knowledge is essential for differential diagnosis of epileptic syndromes due to the diversity of ictal semiology, causes and syndromes. Neurologists play an important role in planning the medical care for patients with epilepsy, as medication is the most fundamental therapeutic strategy. Some patients with early-onset epilepsy require joint care by pediatric neurologists, those with intractable epilepsy by neurosurgeons, and those with psychological comorbidity by psychiatrists, and neurologists should play a coordinating role. While there is a great need for neurologists to participate in epilepsy care, neurologists in Japan currently do not participate substantially in the epilepsy management system. It is necessary to train more neurologists who can provide epilepsy care and conduct basic and clinical research on epilepsy by providing continuous education on epilepsy for general neurologists as well as pre- and post-graduate medical students. Most of the patients who require long-term treatment experience many medical problems and social handicaps, such as adverse effects of medication, social stigma, educational disadvantages and difficulties in obtaining driver's license. To improve the quality of life of patients with epilepsy, it is desirable to build broad medical-social networks participated by patients, doctors, neurological nurses, psychologists, social workers, school teachers, managers of employment support facilities and care givers.

  20. OCCIPITAL LOBE EPILEPSY OR MIGRAINE HEADACHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrijelj Fadil E

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occipital lobe epilepsies are rarely met in clinical practice, but when they occur, they can be misdiagnosed as migraine-like headache. Their prevalence ranges from 5%to 10% of all epilepsies. Seizures can occur at any age; etiologically speaking they can be symptomatic, cryptogenic and idiopathic (most often onsetis in childhood. Clinical symptomatology is manifested by partial epileptic seizures in the sense of visual elementary and/or complex manifestations, palinopsia, amaurosis, tonic head deviation, bulbus, nistagmus and headache. Propagation discharge to neighbour areas (temporal, parietal and frontal is a frequent occurrence appearing with complex partial seizures frequently finishing with secondary generalized tonic-clonic (GTC seizures. Case report: We are presenting a17-year-old male patient who has suffered from attacks of visual problemswith headache since 10 years of age. All the time it is treated as a migraine headache. During the last attack of headache the patient also had a loss of consciousness, EEG that was performed for the first time evidenced epileptic discharges of the occipital area. The therapy also included treatment with antiepileptic drug pregabalin resulting in seizure withdrawal. Conclusion: The appearance of visual symptoms followed by headache is most frequently qualified as migraine triggered headache. However, when antimigraine therapy does not give favorable results epileptic headache should be suspected, with obligatory performance of EEG recording. Occipital lobe epilepsy often presents diagnostic dilemmas due to clinical manifestations that are similar to that of non-migraine headache.

  1. Determinants of Power in Gene-Based Burden Testing for Monogenic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Michael H; Dauber, Andrew; Lippincott, Margaret F; Chan, Yee-Ming; Salem, Rany M; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has enabled new approaches for discovering genes associated with monogenic disorders. One such approach is gene-based burden testing, in which the aggregate frequency of "qualifying variants" is compared between case and control subjects for each gene. Despite substantial successes of this approach, the genetic causes for many monogenic disorders remain unknown or only partially known. It is possible that particular genetic architectures lower rates of discovery, but the influence of these factors on power has not been rigorously evaluated. Here, we leverage large-scale exome-sequencing data to create an empirically based simulation framework to evaluate the impact of key parameters (background variation rates, locus heterogeneity, mode of inheritance, penetrance) on power in gene-based burden tests in the context of monogenic disorders. Our results demonstrate that across genes, there is a wide range in sample sizes needed to achieve power due to differences in the background rate of rare variants in each gene. Increasing locus heterogeneity results in rapid increases in sample sizes needed to achieve adequate power, particularly when individual genes contribute to less than 5% of cases under a dominant model. Interestingly, incomplete penetrance as low as 10% had little effect on power due to the low prevalence of monogenic disorders. Our results suggest that moderate incomplete penetrance is not an obstacle in this gene-based burden testing approach but that dominant disorders with high locus heterogeneity will require large sample sizes. Our simulations also provide guidance on sample size needs and inform study design under various genetic architectures.

  2. An online monogenic diabetes discussion group: supporting families and fueling new research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Marie E; Carmody, David; Philipson, Louis H; Greeley, Siri Atma W

    2015-11-01

    Many online support groups are available for patients with rare disorders, but scant evidence is available on how effectively such groups provide useful information or valuable psychosocial support to their participants. It is also unclear to what extent physicians and researchers may learn more about these disorders by participating in such groups. To formally assess the utility of the Kovler Monogenic Diabetes Registry online discussion group for patients and families affected by KATP channel-related monogenic neonatal diabetes in providing psychosocial and informational support and in identifying concerns unique to patients with this rare form of diabetes. We qualitatively analyzed all 1,410 messages from the online group that consisted of 64 participants affected by KATP channel monogenic diabetes and 11 researchers. We utilized the Social Behavior Support Code to assign each message to a support category and deductive thematic analysis to identify discussion topics addressed by each message. 44% of messages provided/requested informational support, whereas 31.4% of the messages contained psychosocial/emotional support. The most popular topics of postings to the forums were diabetes treatment (503 messages) and neurodevelopmental concerns (472 messages). Participation in the discussion led researchers to modify survey instruments and design new studies focusing on specific topics of concern, such as sleep. We demonstrate that an online support group for a monogenic form of diabetes is an effective informational tool that also provides psychosocial support. Participation by researchers and care providers can inform future research directions and highlight issues of patient concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy in Adults with TSC Individuals with tuberous sclerosis ... being well controlled for long periods of time. Epilepsy and Seizures Epilepsy is any brain disorder that ...

  4. 77 FR 59197 - Epilepsy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Epilepsy Program AGENCY: Health Resources... to the Epilepsy Foundation of America. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration will be issuing noncompetitive supplemental funding under the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's Epilepsy...

  5. LipidSeq: a next-generation clinical resequencing panel for monogenic dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Christopher T; Dubé, Joseph B; Loyzer, Melissa N; MacDonald, Austin; Carter, David E; McIntyre, Adam D; Cao, Henian; Wang, Jian; Robinson, John F; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    We report the design of a targeted resequencing panel for monogenic dyslipidemias, LipidSeq, for the purpose of replacing Sanger sequencing in the clinical detection of dyslipidemia-causing variants. We also evaluate the performance of the LipidSeq approach versus Sanger sequencing in 84 patients with a range of phenotypes including extreme blood lipid concentrations as well as additional dyslipidemias and related metabolic disorders. The panel performs well, with high concordance (95.2%) in samples with known mutations based on Sanger sequencing and a high detection rate (57.9%) of mutations likely to be causative for disease in samples not previously sequenced. Clinical implementation of LipidSeq has the potential to aid in the molecular diagnosis of patients with monogenic dyslipidemias with a high degree of speed and accuracy and at lower cost than either Sanger sequencing or whole exome sequencing. Furthermore, LipidSeq will help to provide a more focused picture of monogenic and polygenic contributors that underlie dyslipidemia while excluding the discovery of incidental pathogenic clinically actionable variants in nonmetabolism-related genes, such as oncogenes, that would otherwise be identified by a whole exome approach, thus minimizing potential ethical issues.

  6. [Monogenic obesity - current status of molecular genetic research and clinical importance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Včelák, Josef; Zamrazilová, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities represent one of the major health problems worldwide. A positive energy balance due to inappropriate life-style changes plays a key role in the current obesity epidemic. The influence of genetic factors is also significant - several studies concluded that genes contribute to the development of obesity by 40-70%. Genetic variability predisposes an individual to tendency or resistance to increase body weight in obesogenic environment. Polygenic type of inheritance is responsible in most of obese individuals. However, an intensive research of the past 20 years has led to an identification of several genes causing monogenic forms of obesity. To date, several monogenic genes (leptin, leptin receptor, prohormon convertase 1, proopiomelanocortin, melanocortin 4 receptor, single-minded homolog 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2) that are either involved in the neuronal differentiation of the paraventricular nucleus or in the leptin-melanocortin pathway are known to cause obesity. Mutation carriers apart from severe early onset obesity manifest with additional phenotypic characteristics as adrenal insufficiency, impaired immunity and impaired fertility. This review provides an overview of molecular-genetic and clinical research in the field of monogenic obesities including therapeutical approaches.

  7. Clinical Pregenetic Screening for Stroke Monogenic Diseases: Results From Lombardia GENS Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Anna; Markus, Hugh Stephen; Quaglini, Silvana; Arbustini, Eloisa; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Micieli, Giuseppe; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Taroni, Franco; Gellera, Cinzia; Baratta, Silvia; Penco, Silvana; Mosca, Lorena; Grasso, Maurizia; Carrera, Paola; Ferrari, Maurizio; Cereda, Cristina; Grieco, Gaetano; Corti, Stefania; Ronchi, Dario; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Obici, Laura; Parati, Eugenio A; Pezzini, Alessando; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Verrengia, Elena P; Bono, Giorgio; Mazucchelli, Francesca; Zarcone, Davide; Calloni, Maria Vittoria; Perrone, Patrizia; Bordo, Bianca Maria; Colombo, Antonio; Padovani, Alessandro; Cavallini, Anna; Beretta, Simone; Ferrarese, Carlo; Motto, Cristina; Agostoni, Elio; Molini, Graziella; Sasanelli, Francesco; Corato, Manuel; Marcheselli, Simona; Sessa, Maria; Comi, Giancarlo; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Guidotti, Mario; Uccellini, Davide; Capitani, Erminio; Tancredi, Lucia; Arnaboldi, Marco; Incorvaia, Barbara; Tadeo, Carlo Sebastiano; Fusi, Laura; Grampa, Giampiero; Merlini, Giampaolo; Trobia, Nadia; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Braga, Massimiliano; Vitali, Paolo; Baron, Pierluigi; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Candelise, Livia

    2016-07-01

    Lombardia GENS is a multicentre prospective study aimed at diagnosing 5 single-gene disorders associated with stroke (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, Fabry disease, MELAS [mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes], hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and Marfan syndrome) by applying diagnostic algorithms specific for each clinically suspected disease We enrolled a consecutive series of patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted in stroke units in the Lombardia region participating in the project. Patients were defined as probable when presenting with stroke or transient ischemic attack of unknown etiopathogenic causes, or in the presence of genetic analysis. In 209 patients (57.4±14.7 years), the application of the disease-specific algorithm identified 227 patients with possible monogenic disease. Genetic testing identified pathogenic mutations in 7% of these cases. Familial history of stroke was the only significant specific feature that distinguished mutated patients from nonmutated ones. The presence of cerebrovascular risk factors did not exclude a genetic disease. In patients prescreened using a clinical algorithm for monogenic disorders, we identified monogenic causes of events in 7% of patients in comparison to the 1% to 5% prevalence reported in previous series. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  9. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosillo-de la Torre, Argelia; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; García, Perla; Lazarowski, Alberto; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders. Furthermore, it is associated to diminished health-related quality of life and is thus considered a major public health problem. In spite of the large number of available and ongoing development of several new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a high percentage of patients with epilepsy (35-40%) are resistant to pharmacotherapy. A hypothesis to explain pharmacoresistance in epilepsy suggests that overexpression of multidrug resistance proteins, such as P-glycoprotein, on the endothelium of the blood brain barrier represents a challenge for effective AED delivery and concentration levels in the brain. Proven therapeutic strategies to control pharmacoresistant epilepsy include epilepsy surgery and neuromodulation. Unfortunately, not all patients are candidates for these therapies. Nanotechnology represents an attractive strategy to overcome the limited brain access of AEDs in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This manuscript presents a review of evidences supporting this idea.

  10. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    Background A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Methods Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...... and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of seizure clusters in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Wong, Rebecca A; Jiang, Alfred; Kato, Kenneth; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-07-01

    In the current study, we explored the prevalence of physician-confirmed seizure clusters. We also investigated potential clinical factors associated with the occurrence of seizure clusters overall and by epilepsy type. We reviewed medical records of 4116 adult (≥16years old) outpatients with epilepsy at our centers for documentation of seizure clusters. Variables including patient demographics, epilepsy details, medical and psychiatric history, AED history, and epilepsy risk factors were then tested against history of seizure clusters. Patients were then divided into focal epilepsy, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), or symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), and the same analysis was run. Overall, seizure clusters were independently associated with earlier age of seizure onset, symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), central nervous system (CNS) infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, absence of 1-year seizure freedom, and having failed 2 or more AEDs (Pseizure clusters than patients with focal epilepsy (16.3%) and IGE (7.4%; all Pepilepsy type showed that absence of 1-year seizure freedom since starting treatment at one of our centers was associated with seizure clustering in patients across all 3 epilepsy types. In patients with SGE, clusters were associated with perinatal/congenital brain injury. In patients with focal epilepsy, clusters were associated with younger age of seizure onset, complex partial seizures, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, CNS infection, and having failed 2 or more AEDs. In patients with IGE, clusters were associated with presence of an aura. Only 43.5% of patients with seizure clusters were prescribed rescue medications. Patients with intractable epilepsy are at a higher risk of developing seizure clusters. Factors such as having SGE, CNS infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus or an early seizure onset, can also independently increase one's chance of having seizure clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published

  12. Social Cognition in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Mccagh, J T

    2011-01-01

    Some of the psychological problems associated with epilepsy have their origins in the ability of people with epilepsy (PWE) to engage in meaningful and appropriate social interactions. PWE often report difficulties in social settings, yet there is a paucity of research investigating the socio-cognitive skills of this group. This thesis aimed to investigate these skills and relate them to the patient's perceived impact of epilepsy on their social competence. An additional objective was to see ...

  13. 16p11.2 600 kb Duplications confer risk for typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinthaler, Eva M; Lal, Dennis; Lebon, Sebastien;

    2014-01-01

    ) and atypical (ARE; n = 54) RE compared with the prevalence in 65,046 European population controls (5/393 cases versus 32/65,046 controls; Fisher's exact test P = 2.83 × 10(-6), odds ratio = 26.2, 95% confidence interval: 7.9-68.2). In contrast, the 16p11.2 duplication was not detected in 1738 European epilepsy...... patients with either temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 330) and genetic generalized epilepsies (n = 1408), suggesting a selective enrichment of the 16p11.2 duplication in idiopathic focal childhood epilepsies (Fisher's exact test P = 2.1 × 10(-4)). In a subsequent screen among children carrying the 16p11.2 600......Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. Its molecular basis is largely unknown and a complex genetic etiology is assumed in the majority of affected individuals. The present study tested whether six large recurrent copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q13...

  14. New genes for focal epilepsies with speech and language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Samantha J; Morgan, Angela T; Perez, Eliane Roulet; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2015-06-01

    The last 2 years have seen exciting advances in the genetics of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and related disorders, encompassed within the epilepsy-aphasia spectrum (EAS). The striking finding of mutations in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit gene GRIN2A as the first monogenic cause in up to 20% of patients with EAS suggests that excitatory glutamate receptors play a key role in these disorders. Patients with GRIN2A mutations have a recognizable speech and language phenotype that may assist with diagnosis. Other molecules involved in RNA binding and cell adhesion have been implicated in EAS; copy number variations are also found. The emerging picture highlights the overlap between the genetic determinants of EAS with speech and language disorders, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and more complex developmental phenotypes.

  15. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanavana Subbareddy Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  16. Approaches to refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Engel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions, and 30 to 40% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are not controlled by medication. Patients are considered to have refractory epilepsy if disabling seizures continue despite appropriate trials of two antiseizure drugs, either alone or in combination. At this point, patients should be referred to multidisciplinary epilepsy centers that perform specialized diagnostic testing to first determine whether they are, in fact, pharmacoresistant, and then, if so, offer alternative treatments. Apparent pharmacoresistance can result from a variety of situations, including noncompliance, seizures that are not epileptic, misdiagnosis of the seizure type or epilepsy syndrome, inappropriate use of medication, and lifestyle issues. For patients who are pharmacoresistant, surgical treatment offers the best opportunity for complete freedom from seizures. Surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes have been identified, but patients with more complicated epilepsy can also benefit from surgical treatment and require more specialized evaluation, including intracranial EEG monitoring. For patients who are not surgical candidates, or who are unwilling to consider surgery, a variety of other alternative treatments can be considered, including peripheral or central neurostimulation, ketogenic diet, and complementary and alternative approaches. When such alternative treatments are not appropriate or effective, quality of life can still be greatly improved by the psychological and social support services offered by multidisciplinary epilepsy centers. A major obstacle remains the fact that only a small proportion of patients with refractory epilepsy are referred for expert evaluation and treatment.

  17. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R;

    1989-01-01

    as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3......Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... dysfunction in the epilepsy group, the mere presence of a chronic disorder with potential social stigmatization influences personality....

  18. Epilepsy: Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Nandanavana Subbareddy; Sinha, Sanjib; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-01

    There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  19. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore; Martini, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterised by arthritis of unknown origin with onset before age of 16 years. Pivotal studies in the past 5 years have led to substantial progress in various areas, ranging from disease classification to new treatments. Gene expres

  20. Idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia: two topographic facial pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado, María L; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gili, Pablo; Caminero, Ana B; Cebrián, José L

    2010-09-01

    To describe 2 topographic facial pain conditions with the pain clearly localized in the eye (idiopathic ophthalmodynia) or in the nose (idiopathic rhinalgia), and to propose their distinction from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Persistent idiopathic facial pain, burning mouth syndrome, atypical odontalgia, and facial arthromyalgia are idiopathic facial pain syndromes that have been separated according to topographical criteria. Still, some other facial pain syndromes might have been veiled under the broad term of persistent idiopathic facial pain. Through a 10-year period we have studied all patients referred to our neurological clinic because of facial pain of unknown etiology that might deviate from all well-characterized facial pain syndromes. In a group of patients we have identified 2 consistent clinical pictures with pain precisely located either in the eye (n=11) or in the nose (n=7). Clinical features resembled those of other localized idiopathic facial syndromes, the key differences relying on the topographic distribution of the pain. Both idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia seem specific pain syndromes with a distinctive location, and may deserve a nosologic status just as other focal pain syndromes of the face. Whether all such focal syndromes are topographic variants of persistent idiopathic facial pain or independent disorders remains a controversial issue.

  1. Is routine electroencephalography (EEG) a useful biomarker for pharmacoresistant epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Scholly, Julia; Dentel, Christel; Staack, Anke Maren

    2013-05-01

    People with seizure disorders who have been treated at the Kork Epilepsy Center over a prolonged time period and who thus provide data concerning the chronic course of epilepsy were investigated in order to address the potential role of electroencephalography (EEG) as a biomarker for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Clinical course and the corresponding findings from their first recorded EEG, their first EEG following appropriate treatment, and their last EEG were compared. Furthermore, we investigated if interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) differ in amplitude and morphology if recorded in long-term seizure-free patients. The early cessation of IEDs was a relatively good marker for a good prognosis, especially in idiopathic generalized epilepsies. However, persistent IEDs had no major impact on the long-term prognosis. We found no differences between IEDs in seizure-free patients or patients with ongoing seizures. Therefore, in our hands, routine EEG was not an appropriate biomarker for the prediction of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Additional factors such as etiology and pathophysiology also need to be considered.

  2. Clinical utility of a 377 gene custom next-generation sequencing epilepsy panel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JEN BEVILACQUA; ANDREW HESSE; BRIAN CORMIER; JENNIFER DAVEY; DEVANSHI PATEL; KRITIKA SHANKAR; HONEY V. REDDI

    2017-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders with about 500 genes thought to be involved across the phenotypic spectrum (Busch et al. 2014; Ran et al. 2014), which includes monogenic, multigenic, epistatic and pleiotropic phenotype manifestations (Busch et al. 2014; Thomas et al. 2014), driving the need for a comprehensive diagnostic test. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows for the simultaneous investigation of a large number of genes, making it a very attractive option for a condition as diverse as epilepsy at a low cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing (Lemke et al. 2012; Németh et al. 2013). Our 377 gene epilepsy NGS test was developed to include genes known to cause or have published association with epilepsy and seizure-related disorders. Given the scale of information that is generated, the efficacy of an NGS panel depends on a number of factors, including the genes present on the panel, prebioinformatic and postbioinformatic analysis protocols, as well as reporting criteria, prompting the current study, a retrospective analysis of 305 cases tested for the epilepsy panel.

  3. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...... genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance...

  4. Clinical risk factors associated with anti-epileptic drug responsiveness in canine epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena M A Packer

    Full Text Available The nature and occurrence of remission, and conversely, pharmacoresistance following epilepsy treatment is still not fully understood in human or veterinary medicine. As such, predicting which patients will have good or poor treatment outcomes is imprecise, impeding patient management. In the present study, we use a naturally occurring animal model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy to investigate clinical risk factors associated with treatment outcome. Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy, for which no underlying cause was identified, were treated at a canine epilepsy clinic and monitored following discharge from a small animal referral hospital. Clinical data was gained via standardised owner questionnaires and longitudinal follow up data was gained via telephone interview with the dogs' owners. At follow up, 14% of treated dogs were in seizure-free remission. Dogs that did not achieve remission were more likely to be male, and to have previously experienced cluster seizures. Seizure frequency or the total number of seizures prior to treatment were not significant predictors of pharmacoresistance, demonstrating that seizure density, that is, the temporal pattern of seizure activity, is a more influential predictor of pharmacoresistance. These results are in line with clinical studies of human epilepsy, and experimental rodent models of epilepsy, that patients experiencing episodes of high seizure density (cluster seizures, not just a high seizure frequency pre-treatment, are at an increased risk of drug-refractoriness. These data provide further evidence that the dog could be a useful naturally occurring epilepsy model in the study of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  5. An appraisal of the new operational definition of epilepsy--then and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Ashish; Beran, Roy G

    2014-12-01

    The focus to define epilepsy in the newly proposed classification has shifted from the conceptual perspective to practical application thought to better reflect that which is happening to the patient. Within the new definition, a single unprovoked or reflex seizure can be considered as epilepsy if the recurrence risk is similar to that following two unprovoked seizures. Epilepsy is considered to be resolved if the individual had an age-dependent epilepsy syndrome and has passed the applicable age or if the person has remained seizure-free for the last ten years without seizure medications for the last five years. This new operational definition of epilepsy may change the epileptologist's approach regarding when and how long to treat patients with seizures. The new definition also has significant psychosocial and employment-related implications for the patients. With regard to etiology, the terms idiopathic, symptomatic, and cryptogenic have been replaced by genetic, structural/metabolic, and unknown. This reflects a better understanding of the underlying cause of epilepsy based on genetic tests and better neuroimaging. The terms 'simple partial' and 'complex partial' seizures have been replaced by 'focal motor/sensory' and 'focal dyscognitive' seizures, thereby ending the ambiguity associated with the former terms and the difficulty encountered with definitions of altered states of consciousness. These changes, reflective of a better insight into the pathogenesis of seizures and epilepsy, are expected to be more pragmatic and assist when managing patients with epilepsy.

  6. Determinants of intelligence in childhood-onset epilepsy: a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungmee; Yum, Mi-Sun; Choi, Hae-won; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the intelligence of children with epilepsy and to determine the clinical factors associated with intellectual impairment. The medical records of patients diagnosed with childhood-onset epilepsy at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The Korean Education Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children or Korean Wechsler Intelligence Scale for adults was used to quantify the level of intelligence. Age at seizure onset, etiology, epilepsy duration, number of seizures in the last year, use of antiepileptic drugs, EEG/MRI findings, and epilepsy classification were recorded. The association between clinical factors and the intelligence was determined using logistic regression. Three hundred and twenty-two patients were included in the analysis. One hundred and seventy-six (54.7%) patients had low intelligence (intelligence quotient [IQ]intelligence in multivariate logistic regression (pintelligence in children with idiopathic epilepsy. The most important factors associated with low intelligence in childhood-onset epilepsy are the underlying etiology and, in cryptogenic and symptomatic epilepsy, seizure burden. The results of this study underscore the importance of seizure control to alleviate the harmful impact of epilepsy on cognition. © 2013.

  7. Rare Deletions at 16p13.11 Predispose to a Diverse Spectrum of Sporadic Epilepsy Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Deletions at 16p13.11 are associated with schizophrenia, mental retardation, and most recently idiopathic generalized epilepsy. To evaluate the role of 16p13.11 deletions, as well as other structural variation, in epilepsy disorders, we used genome-wide screens to identify copy number variation in 3812 patients with a diverse spectrum of epilepsy syndromes and in 1299 neurologically-normal controls. Large deletions (> 100 kb) at 16p13.11 were observed in 23 patients, whereas no c...

  8. Epilepsy and oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  9. Epilepsi og orale manifestationer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Endrup; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John Rosendahl

    2016-01-01

    Risiko for sygdom I mundhulen hos patienter med epilepsy Epilepsi er en kronisk neurologisk lidelse, der ofte vil kræve medicinsk behandling for at holde patienterne fri for anfald. Lidelsen kan have betydning for patientens psykosociale og kognitive udvikling, der indirekte kan have betydning...

  10. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served as cont...

  11. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological mecha

  12. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological

  13. Analysis of adult patients with epilepsy in the age continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karlov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the presence of comorbidities and to investigate quality of life in patients with main types of epilepsy in relation to age.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 150 patients aged 17 to 64 years with idiopathic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic types of epilepsy. The investigators studied the presence of sleep disorders using the questionnaires designed by the Somnology Center, Ministry of Health of Russia, and that of daytime sleepiness by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, determined the level of anxiety and depression by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and assessed the severity of seizures by the National Hospital Seizure Severity Scale. Quality of life was investigated using the QOLIE-89 questionnaire. A cluster analysis was carried out to divide all the patients into three age groups (mean age, 27.3; 30.7; and 37.7 years.Results and discussion. A positive relationship was obtained between some indicators of sleep disorders, level of anxiety, and age. There were significant differences between the above three age groups in the following indicators: sleep disorders; daytime sleepiness; level of anxiety, severity of seizures, and scores of the QOLIE-89 questionnaire (p<0.001. Since the patients suffer from different basic types of epilepsy (cryptogenic, idiopathic, and symptomatic, the findings testify to age as an independent factor that modifies quality of life in epileptic patients.

  14. Rational management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkataraman

    2014-09-01

    Management of epilepsies in children has improved considerably over the last decade, all over the world due to the advances seen in the understanding of the patho-physiology of epileptogenesis, availability of both structural and functional imaging studies along with better quality EEG/video-EEG recordings and the availability of a plethora of newer anti-epileptic drugs which are tailormade to act on specific pathways. In spite of this, there is still a long way to go before one is able to be absolutely rational about which drug to use for which type of epilepsy. There have been a lot of advances in the area of epilepsy surgery and is certainly gaining ground for specific cases. Better understanding of the genetic basis of epilepsies will hopefully lead to a more rational treatment plan in the future. Also, a lot of work needs to be done to dispel various misunderstandings and myths about epilepsy which still exists in our country.

  15. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization.

  16. Sex, epilepsy, and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders that are associated with a wide range of pathogenic mechanisms, seizure manifestations, comorbidity profiles, and therapeutic responses. These characteristics are all influenced quite significantly by sex. As with other conditions exhibiting such patterns, sex differences in epilepsy are thought to arise-at the most fundamental level-from the "organizational" and "activational" effects of sex hormones as well as from the direct actions of the sex chromosomes. However, our understanding of the specific molecular, cellular, and network level processes responsible for mediating sex differences in epilepsy remains limited. Because increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are involved both in epilepsy and in brain sexual dimorphism, we make the case here that analyzing epigenetic regulation will provide novel insights into the basis for sex differences in epilepsy.

  17. Definition of intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shobhit; Siddiqui, Khurram A

    2011-01-01

    Defining intractable epilepsy is essential not only to identify up to 40% of patients refractory to pharmacological management, but also to facilitate selection and comparison of such patients for research purposes. The ideal definition still eludes us. Multiple factors including number of antiepileptic drug (AED) failures, seizure frequency and duration of unresponsiveness, etiology, and epilepsy syndromes are considered in formulating the definition of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Most definitions used in the literature agree on the number of AED failures, which seem to be 2 or 3, however, the seizure frequency and time factor are varied. The International League Against Epilepsy proposed a definition of drug-resistant epilepsy as a failure of adequate trials of 2 tolerated and appropriately chosen and used AED schedules. This for now, could provide an operational definition for clinical and research settings. However, with emergence of new data and novel treatments the criteria for intractability may change.

  18. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing Epilepsy in Pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Dwyer, V

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest medical conditions affecting women of childbearing age1. In the most recent triennial report into maternal deaths in Ireland and the UK, two thirds of women who died had a medical condition. In this report, 14 maternal deaths during pregnancy and up to 42 days postpartum were attributable to epilepsy or seizures; a rate of 0.4 per 100,000 maternities. In 12 of these women’ the cause was sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. Thus, epilepsy remains a high-risk condition in pregnancy. The gold standard of care is a multidisciplinary approach involving obstetricians, a neurologist and an epilepsy nurse specialist2. Like other units in Ireland this multidisciplinary service is currently provided in the National Maternity Hospital’s maternal medicine clinic, in conjunction with neurology services in Beaumont Hospital.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions adolescent idiopathic scoliosis adolescent idiopathic scoliosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine that ...

  2. [Clinical presentations of the secondary bilateral synchronization syndrome in adults with epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedin, A I; Generalov, V O; Amcheslavskaia, E V; Mishniakova, L P; Sadykov, T R

    2008-01-01

    One thousand eight hundreds and eighty patients with symptomatic and cryptogenic forms of focal epilepsy have been studied. Ninety patients (4.7%) had the secondary bilateral synchronization (SBS) syndrome in the EEG. Criteria of the syndrome are the presence of focal epileptiform activity in the EEG and SBS detected during the long-term video-EEG monitoring. In this group of patients, secondary generalized tonic-clonic, myoclonic and complex partial seizures were found. The clinical presentations of focal epilepsy were similar to the syndromes of idiopathic epilepsy in most cases. Long-term video-EEG monitoring is a method of choice in the instrumental diagnostics of these forms of epilepsy which are different in genesis and prognosis but similar in the kinematic characteristics.

  3. Epilepsy: Asia versus Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Tan, Chong Tin; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-09-01

    Is epilepsy truly an "African ailment"? We aimed to determine this, since international health agencies often refer to epilepsy as an African disease and the scientific literature has spoken the same tone. Various published materials, mainly reports, articles, were used to gather Asian and African evidence on various aspects of epilepsy and many of its risk and associated factors. Our results suggest that in no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment and such characterization is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. In comparison to Africa, Asia has a 5.0% greater burden from all diseases, and is 17.0% more affected from neuropsychiatric disorders (that include epilepsy). Given that more countries in Asia are transitioning, there may be large demographic and lifestyle changes in the near future. However these changes are nowhere close to those expected in Africa. Moreover, 23 million Asians have epilepsy in comparison to 3.3 million Africans and 1.2 million sub-Saharan Africans. In comparison to Africa, Asia has more untreated patients, 55.0% more additional epilepsy cases every year, because of its larger population, with greater treatment cost and possibly higher premature mortality. Of several associated factors discussed herein, many have more importance for Asia than Africa. The current state of epilepsy in Asia is far less than ideal and there is an urgent need to recognize and accept the importance of epilepsy in Asia. In no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment. This is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here.

  4. Awakening epilepsy ('Aufwach-Epilepsie') revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, E

    1991-01-01

    The concept of 'awakening epilepsy' (introduced by Janz, 1953) occupies a crucial position for the comprehension of primary generalized epilepsy. The associated electroencephalographic manifestations are discussed and the role of abnormal (paroxysmal) arousal responses ('dyshormia') is stressed. The origin of these bilateral-synchronous discharges appears to be located below the frontal midline scalp region in mesial portions of the supplementary motor region. 'Awakening epilepsy' is also interesting from the viewpoint of sleep research. There is also an important age factor; these seizures (mostly grand mal and classical petit mal absences) are most common in older children, adolescents and young adults. The general management of these patients has to take into account the patient's special vulnerability after a night of poor sleep.

  5. Revealing the complexity of a monogenic disease: rett syndrome exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Grillo

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (OMIM#312750 is a monogenic disorder that may manifest as a large variety of phenotypes ranging from very severe to mild disease. Since there is a weak correlation between the mutation type in the Xq28 disease-gene MECP2/X-inactivation status and phenotypic variability, we used this disease as a model to unveil the complex nature of a monogenic disorder. Whole exome sequencing was used to analyze the functional portion of the genome of two pairs of sisters with Rett syndrome. Although each pair of sisters had the same MECP2 (OMIM*300005 mutation and balanced X-inactivation, one individual from each pair could not speak or walk, and had a profound intellectual deficit (classical Rett syndrome, while the other individual could speak and walk, and had a moderate intellectual disability (Zappella variant. In addition to the MECP2 mutation, each patient has a group of variants predicted to impair protein function. The classical Rett girls, but not their milder affected sisters, have an enrichment of variants in genes related to oxidative stress, muscle impairment and intellectual disability and/or autism. On the other hand, a subgroup of variants related to modulation of immune system, exclusive to the Zappella Rett patients are driving toward a milder phenotype. We demonstrate that genome analysis has the potential to identify genetic modifiers of Rett syndrome, providing insight into disease pathophysiology. Combinations of mutations that affect speaking, walking and intellectual capabilities may represent targets for new therapeutic approaches. Most importantly, we demonstrated that monogenic diseases may be more complex than previously thought.

  6. Revealing the complexity of a monogenic disease: rett syndrome exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Elisa; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Bianciardi, Laura; Bizzarri, Veronica; Baldassarri, Margherita; Spiga, Ottavia; Furini, Simone; De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Ciccoli, Lucia; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Hayek, Joussef; Meloni, Ilaria; Ariani, Francesca; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (OMIM#312750) is a monogenic disorder that may manifest as a large variety of phenotypes ranging from very severe to mild disease. Since there is a weak correlation between the mutation type in the Xq28 disease-gene MECP2/X-inactivation status and phenotypic variability, we used this disease as a model to unveil the complex nature of a monogenic disorder. Whole exome sequencing was used to analyze the functional portion of the genome of two pairs of sisters with Rett syndrome. Although each pair of sisters had the same MECP2 (OMIM*300005) mutation and balanced X-inactivation, one individual from each pair could not speak or walk, and had a profound intellectual deficit (classical Rett syndrome), while the other individual could speak and walk, and had a moderate intellectual disability (Zappella variant). In addition to the MECP2 mutation, each patient has a group of variants predicted to impair protein function. The classical Rett girls, but not their milder affected sisters, have an enrichment of variants in genes related to oxidative stress, muscle impairment and intellectual disability and/or autism. On the other hand, a subgroup of variants related to modulation of immune system, exclusive to the Zappella Rett patients are driving toward a milder phenotype. We demonstrate that genome analysis has the potential to identify genetic modifiers of Rett syndrome, providing insight into disease pathophysiology. Combinations of mutations that affect speaking, walking and intellectual capabilities may represent targets for new therapeutic approaches. Most importantly, we demonstrated that monogenic diseases may be more complex than previously thought.

  7. Monogenic Diabetes: What It Teaches Us on the Common Forms of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yisheng; Chan, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    To date, more than 30 genes have been linked to monogenic diabetes. Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified > 50 susceptibility loci for common type 1 diabetes (T1D) and approximately 100 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D). About 1-5% of all cases of diabetes result from single-gene mutations and are called monogenic diabetes. Here, we review the pathophysiological basis of the role of monogenic diabetes genes that have also been found to be associated with common T1D and/or T2D. Variants of approximately one-third of monogenic diabetes genes are associated with T2D, but not T1D. Two of the T2D-associated monogenic diabetes genes-potassium inward-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11 (KCNJ11), which controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the β-cell; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG), which impacts multiple tissue targets in relation to inflammation and insulin sensitivity-have been developed as major antidiabetic drug targets. Another monogenic diabetes gene, the preproinsulin gene (INS), is unique in that INS mutations can cause hyperinsulinemia, hyperproinsulinemia, neonatal diabetes mellitus, one type of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY10), and autoantibody-negative T1D. Dominant heterozygous INS mutations are the second most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. Moreover, INS gene variants are strongly associated with common T1D (type 1a), but inconsistently with T2D. Variants of the monogenic diabetes gene Gli-similar 3 (GLIS3) are associated with both T1D and T2D. GLIS3 is a key transcription factor in insulin production and β-cell differentiation during embryonic development, which perturbation forms the basis of monogenic diabetes as well as its association with T1D. GLIS3 is also required for compensatory β-cell proliferation in adults; impairment of this function predisposes to T2D. Thus, monogenic forms of diabetes are invaluable "human models" that have

  8. Representation of distributions by harmonic and monogenic potentials in Euclidean space

    OpenAIRE

    Brackx, Fred; De Bie, Hendrik; De Schepper, Hennie

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of Clifford analysis, a chain of harmonic and monogenic potentials in the upper half of Euclidean space $R^{m+1}_+$ was recently constructed, including a higher dimensional analogue of the logarithmic function in the complex plane, and their distributional boundary values were computed. In this paper we determine these potentials in lower half-space $R^{m+1}_-$ and investigate whether they can be extended through the boundary $R^m$. This is a stepping stone to the representat...

  9. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” ...

  10. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Rath

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case report of a 14-year-old female patient with idiopathic gingival fibromatosis in the maxillary region with radiographic feature of congenitally missing maxillary permanent left lateral incisor, maxillary left and right permanent canine, mandibular right second premolar, all third molars along with overretained primary maxillary left lateral incisor and primary mandibular second molar. The treatment rendered in this patient comprised of surgical excision of the hyperplasia under general anesthesia.

  11. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  12. Acute Idiopathic Scrotal Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheál Breen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute idiopathic scrotal edema (AISE in a 4-year-old boy who presented with acute scrotal pain and erythema. The clinical features, ultrasound appearance, and natural history of this rare diagnosis are reviewed. In this report, we highlight the importance of good ultrasound technique in differentiating the etiology of the acute scrotum and demonstrate the color Doppler “Fountain Sign” that is highly suggestive of AISE.

  13. Epilepsy is Dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-10-01

    In "Epilepsy is Dancing", in Antony and the Johnsons' album "The Crying Light"(2009), the lyrics and accompanying music video depicts an epileptic seizure in which the person is transferred to another beautiful and magical world. This may be called "enchanted epilepsy"; i.e., the experience of epilepsy as deeply nourishing and (positively) transforming, is conveyed not only in the lyrics but also the visual and auditory qualities of the video. The seizure in the video gives associations to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's dream". If epilepsy appears in music lyrics, the focus is mostly on negative aspects of the illness, such as horror, fear and repulsive sexuality associated with the fits [1,2]. Contradictory to these lyrics, Anthony and the Johnsons' song is an example of a positive portrayal of epilepsy. It is open to a multitude of meanings, emotional valence and appraisal of epilepsy. By widening the experiential range associated with epileptic seizures, these lyrics highlight the inherently construed nature of epileptic experience. The song stands out in several ways. First, it describes epilepsy in positive terms, prioritising the euphoric, ecstatic, potentially empowering and enhancing aspects of epileptic seizures. Second, the lyrics and accompanying video point to divine experiences associated with epileptic seizures. Through the lyrics and the music video we are, as an audience, able to sense a snicket of an epileptic seizure, but also the universal experience of loosing control.

  14. Psychosocial aspects of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pravina

    2002-05-01

    Social attitudes towards epilepsy cause more distress to the patient and his/her near and dear ones, than the disease itself. The major psychosocial issues related to epilepsy are: Quality of medical management, overprotection, education, employment, marriage and pregnancy. Inadequate treatment is the major reason involved in psychosocial issues. Constant overprotection and pampering leads to behavioural pattern which makes epileptic patient dependent for ever. Education is hampered in epileptic persons. Teachers and students should have proper information regarding seizures. If seizures are well controlled, job opportunities increase. Employers and employees need to be educated about epilepsy. Self-employment is the best in epileptic patients. Regarding marriage, each patient is to be judged on individual merits and type of epilepsy. Society needs to be educated about the facts and consequences of epilepsy. Risk of anti-epileptic drug's usage is very insignificant compared to risk of seizures in pregnancy. So girls are advised to seek medical advice before pregnancy and during follow-up. With more and more support from the society, persons with epilepsy will have the courage and confidence to speak about themselves and their illness. It is only then that we will realise that persons with epilepsy are 'normal' or 'near-normal' and this will break the vicious cycle of stigma.

  15. Experimental models of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojlović Olivera P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction An epileptic seizure is a clinical event and epilepsy is rather a group of symptoms than a disease. The main features all epilepsies have in common include: spontaneous occurrence, repetitiveness, and ictal correlation within the EEG. Epilepsies are manifested with distinct EEG changes, requiring exact clinical definition and consequential treatment. Current data show that 1% of the world's population (approximately 50 million people suffers from epilepsy, with 25% of patients being refractory to therapy and requiring search for new substances in order to decrease EEG and behavioral manifestations of epilepsies. Material and methods In regard to discovery and testing of anticonvulsant substances the best results were achieved by implementation of experi- mental models. Animal models of epilepsy are useful in acquiring basic knowledge regarding pathogenesis, neurotransmitters (glutamate, receptors (NMDA/AMPA/kainate, propagation of epileptic seizures and preclinical assessment of antiepileptics (competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists. Results and conclusions In our lab, we have developed a pharmacologic model of a (metaphit, NMDA and remacemide-cilastatin generalized, reflex, and audiogenic epilepsy. The model is suitable for testing various anticonvulsant substances (e.g. APH, APV, CPP, Mk-801 and potential antiepileptics (e.g. DSIP, its tetra- and octaanalogues.

  16. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process.

  17. [Migraine and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are both common episodic disorders that share many clinical features and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The comorbidity of these two conditions is well known. However, the temporal association between migraine and epilepsy is a controversial issue, since these two conditions may occur in numerous ways. Four types of association between headache and epileptic seizure are recognized: pre-ictal headache, headache as the expression of an epileptic manifestation, post-ictal headache, and inter-ictal headache. The classification of epilepsy by the International League Against Epilepsy did not refer to the epileptic headache. On the other hand, the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD-3) defines three entities: migraine aura-triggered seizure which sometimes referred to as migralepsy, hemicrania epileptica, and post-ictal headache. However, ICHD-3 mentions that there is a complex and bidirectional association between migraine and epilepsy. Most of the previous reports of migralepsy corresponded to occipital seizures that mimic migraine with aura. The term migralepsy has recently been criticized. Migraine and epilepsy share several pathophysiological mechanisms which involve neurotransmitters and iron channel dysfunctions. There is the hypothesis of a shared genetic susceptibility to migraine and epilepsy. Strong support of a shared genetic basis comes from familial hemiplegic migraine.

  18. Prognosis of pediatric epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish C Nair

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a significant and commonplace neurological disability in the pediatric population. Data from increasingly larger and more representative studies have brought about noteworthy changes in our understanding of the prognosis of epilepsy in the pediatric age-group. Prevalence rates for epilepsy in both the developing and the developed world are surprisingly similar despite distinct differences in incidence and large treatment gaps in the developing world; this strongly points towards the possibility of spontaneous remission, at least in some patients. Prognosis after an isolated first seizure is generally quite favorable, but worsens with recurring seizures, remote symptomatic etiology, and the presence of abnormalities on EEG. Presently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are at best seizure suppressant in their action and have not been shown to be antiepileptic in the sense that they alter the long-term prognosis of the epilepsy for the better. Epilepsy syndromes can be considered to belong to distinct groups on the basis of their prognosis. Some have an excellent outcome in terms of seizure freedom and neurological development; yet others have a grim prognosis with respect to these variables. Factors that impact on the prognosis of treated epilepsy are being understood and include the specific etiology, age of onset of epilepsy, and EEG findings. Epileptics, especially those with remote symptomatic seizures and refractory epilepsy, suffer higher mortality as compared to the general population. While the outcomes in terms of seizure freedom in patients with epilepsy appear favorable, disturbing data on psychosocial morbidity are coming to light and are reflected in the lower rates of higher education, employment, marriage, and fertility among epileptics.

  19. Medical Marijuana for Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolikonda, Murali K; Srinivasan, Kavitha; Enja, Manasa; Sagi, Vishwanath; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-refractory epilepsy remains an important clinical problem. There is considerable recent interest by the public and physicians in using medical marijuana or its derivatives to treat seizures. The endocannabinoid system has a role in neuronal balance and ictal control. There is clinical evidence of success in diminishing seizure frequencies with cannabis derivatives, but also documentation about exacerbating epilepsy or of no discernible effect. There are lay indications and anecdotal reports of success in attenuating the severity of epilepsy, but without solid investigational corroboration. Marijuana remains largely illegal, and may induce adverse consequences. Clinical applications are not approved, thus are restricted and only recommended in selected treatment unresponsive cases, with appropriate monitoring.

  20. Distribution of GST-pi single nucleotide polymorphism in idiopathic epilepsy patients and its association with electroencephalogram%谷胱甘肽硫转移酶pi基因型在隐源性癫(癎)患者中的分布特征及其与脑电图的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨娟; 谢正祥; 王学峰; 张婧; 席志芹; 黄祖春

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the distribution patterns of the SNPs for the 3 sites (Ⅱe105Val, Ala114Val and Asp147Tyr) of glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) in epilepsy patients without definite etiological factors. Methods At the same time, the possible relationship of GST-pi gene mutation with the vulnerability of drug-resistant epilepsy, drug-responsive epilepsy and EEG feature were explored. The SNPs of GST-pi for healthy people, drug-responsive epilepsy patients and drug-resistant epilepsy patients were genotyped by sequence-specific primers (SSP)-based PCR technologies (PCR-SSP). Results In drugresponsive epilepsy group, the frequency for 3 sites of mutated SNP of GST-pi was 59.62%, 55.32% and 50.94%, while it was 58.33%, 51.19% and 45.92% in drug-resistant epilepsy group. The difference of genotype and allele between normal group and foregoing epilepsy group was significant ( P0.05 ). There was a difference of genotype distribution between groups with typical and untypical epilepsy EEG ( F = 0.0294, 8.867 × 10-6, 1.366 × 10-5, P<0.05 ). Conclusions The results indicate that the SNPs of GST-pi are associated with an increased risk of epilepsy, but not associated with an increased risk of drugresistant epilepsy. The patients present EEG characteristic of typical epilepsy.%目的 探讨谷胱甘肽硫转移酶(GST)-pi基因3个位点(lle105Val、Ala114Val、Asp147Tyr)的单核苷酸多态性(SNP)与癫(癎)及难治性癫(癎)易息性的相关性.方法 采用等位基因特异性引物PCR技术检测GST-pi SNP,分析其在隐源性癫(癎)患者中的频率分布特征及其相关性.结果 在非难治性癫(癎)组中GST-pi基因变异的SNP在3个位点分布频率分别为59.62%、55.32%、50.94%,在难治性癫(癎)组中为58.33%、51.19%、45.92%.两组中GST-pi的3个位点变异基因型及变异等位基因分布频率均较健康对照组高(P<0.01).典型癫(癎)波脑电图组与不典型的异常脑电图组的基因型频率分布比

  1. Insights from Mendelian Interferonopathies: Comparison of CANDLE, SAVI with AGS, Monogenic Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna; Sanchez, Gina A Montealegre; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2016-10-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders are sterile inflammatory conditions characterized by episodes of early-onset fever and disease-specific patterns of organ inflammation. Recently, the discoveries of monogenic disorders with strong type I interferon (IFN) signatures caused by mutations in proteasome degradation and cytoplasmic RNA and DNA sensing pathways suggest a pathogenic role of IFNs in causing autoinflammatory phenotypes. The IFN response gene signature (IGS) has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. In this review, we compare the clinical presentations and pathogenesis of two IFN-mediated autoinflammatory diseases, CANDLE and SAVI, with Aicardi Goutières syndrome (AGS) and monogenic forms of SLE (monoSLE) caused by loss-of-function mutations in complement 1 (C1q) or the DNA nucleases, DNASE1 and DNASE1L3. We outline differences in intracellular signaling pathways that fuel a pathologic type I IFN amplification cycle. While IFN amplification is caused by predominantly innate immune cell dysfunction in SAVI, CANDLE, and AGS, autoantibodies to modified RNA and DNA antigens interact with tissues and immune cells including neutrophils and contribute to IFN upregulation in some SLE patients including monoSLE, thus justifying a grouping of "autoinflammatory" and "autoimmune" interferonopathies. Understanding of the differences in the cellular sources and signaling pathways will guide new drug development and the use of emerging targeted therapies.

  2. Monogenic Auto-inflammatory Syndromes: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Khadem Azarian, Shahin; Nazeri, Sepideh; Mosayebian, Ali; Ghiasy, Saleh; Sadri, Ghazal; Mohebi, Ali; Khan Nazer, Nikoo Hossein; Afraei, Sanaz; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    Auto-inflammatory syndromes are a new group of distinct hereditable disorders characterized by episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation (most commonly in skin, joints, gut, and eye), the absence of a high titer of auto-antibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and an inborn error of innate immunity. A narrative literature review was carried out of studies related to auto-inflammatory syndromes to discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation of these syndromes. This review showed that the main monogenic auto-inflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), Blau syndrome, TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), and pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA). The data suggest that correct diagnosis and treatment of monogenic auto-inflammatory diseases relies on the physicians' awareness. Therefore, understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of auto-inflammatory syndromes, and especially the fact that these disorders are mediated by IL-1 secretion stimulated by monocytes and macrophages, facilitated significant progress in patient management.

  3. Intrusion detection on oil pipeline right of way using monogenic signal representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Binu M.; Santhaseelan, Varun; Cui, Chen; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2013-05-01

    We present an object detection algorithm to automatically detect and identify possible intrusions such as construction vehicles and equipment on the regions designated as the pipeline right-of-way (ROW) from high resolution aerial imagery. The pipeline industry has buried millions of miles of oil pipelines throughout the country and these regions are under constant threat of unauthorized construction activities. We propose a multi-stage framework which uses a pyramidal template matching scheme in the local phase domain by taking a single high resolution training image to classify a construction vehicle. The proposed detection algorithm makes use of the monogenic signal representation to extract the local phase information. Computing the monogenic signal from a two dimensional object region enables us to separate out the local phase information (structural details) from the local energy (contrast) thereby achieving illumination invariance. The first stage involves the local phase based template matching using only a single high resolution training image in a local region at multiple scales. Then, using the local phase histogram matching, the orientation of the detected region is determined and a voting scheme gives a certain weightage to the resulting clusters. The final stage involves the selection of clusters based on the number of votes attained and using the histogram of oriented phase feature descriptor, the object is located at the correct orientation and scale. The algorithm is successfully tested on four different datasets containing imagery with varying image resolution and object orientation.

  4. Human induced pluripotent stem cells for monogenic disease modelling and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola; Spitalieri; Valentina; Rosa; Talarico; Michela; Murdocca; Giuseppe; Novelli; Federica; Sangiuolo

    2016-01-01

    Recent and advanced protocols are now available toderive human induced pluripotent stem cells(hi PSCs)from patients affected by genetic diseases.No curative treatments are available for many of these diseases;thus,hiP SCs represent a major impact on patient’health.hiP SCs represent a valid model for the in vitro study of monogenic diseases,together with a better comprehension of the pathogenic mechanisms of the pathology,for both cell and gene therapy protocol applications.Moreover,these pluripotent cells represent a good opportunity to test innovative pharmacological treatments focused on evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of novel drugs.Today,innovative gene therapy protocols,especially gene editingbased,are being developed,allowing the use of these cells not only as in vitro disease models but also as an unlimited source of cells useful for tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine,eluding ethical and immune rejection problems.In this review,we will provide an upto-date of modelling monogenic disease by using hiP SCs and the ultimate applications of these in vitro models for cell therapy.We consider and summarize some peculiar aspects such as the type of parental cells used for reprogramming,the methods currently used to induce the transcription of the reprogramming factors,and the type of iP SC-derived differentiated cells,relating them to the genetic basis of diseases and to their inheritance model.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile myoclonic epilepsy juvenile myoclonic epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy). ...

  6. The Impact of Next-Generation Sequencing on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Epilepsy in Paediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Davide; Parrini, Elena; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo

    2017-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has contributed to the identification of many monogenic epilepsy syndromes and is favouring earlier and more accurate diagnosis in a subset of paediatric patients with epilepsy. The cumulative information emerging from NGS studies is rapidly changing our comprehension of the relations between early-onset severe epilepsy and the associated neurological impairment, progressively delineating specific entities previously gathered under the umbrella definition of epileptic encephalopathies, thereby influencing treatment choices and limiting the most aggressive drug regimens only to those conditions that are likely to actually benefit from them. Although ion channel genes represent the gene family most frequently causally related to epilepsy, other genes have gradually been associated with complex developmental epilepsy conditions, revealing the pathogenic role of mutations affecting diverse molecular pathways that regulate membrane excitability, synaptic plasticity, presynaptic neurotransmitter release, postsynaptic receptors, transporters, cell metabolism, and many formative steps in early brain development. Some of these discoveries are being followed by proof-of-concept laboratory studies that might open new pathways towards personalized treatment choices. No specific treatment is available for most of the monogenic disorders that can now be diagnosed early using NGS, and the main benefits of knowing the specific cause include etiological diagnosis, better prognostication and genetic counselling; however, for a limited number of disorders, timely treatment based on their known molecular pathology is already possible and sometimes decisive. Discovery of a causative gene defect associated with a non-progressive course may reduce the need for further diagnostic investigations in the search for a progressive disorder at the biochemical and imaging level. NGS has also improved the turnaround time for molecular diagnosis and allowed more

  7. PECULIARITIES OF TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY AT GIRLS AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pylaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epilepsy treatment is to be based on existing general principles and standards of therapy with differential approach to each patient. Besides peculiarities of treatment of different types of seizures and forms of epilepsy there are also differential approaches to special groups of patients. To one of such groups are referred to women of reproductive age. These patients are referred to special group of risk due to the development of certain side effects of antiepileptic drugs (АED. This article focuses in details on peculiarities of treatment of women of reproductive age with epilepsy with accent made on tolerability and safety of the antiepileptic therapy. It is necessary to take into consideration, that at women neuroendocrinal disorders can be caused both by the disease itself – epilepsy (in such case disorders depend on the starting age, form of epilepsy, focal localization, duration of disorder and other factors, referred to the disease, as well as by the undertaken therapy. The articlehereunder considers only issues, referred to the treatment, i. e. AED side effects and its input in the decrease of life quality of women with epilepsy. As women’s reproductive function starts forming long ago before childbearing age, it is necessary for this category to comprise not only women and adolescents, but girls as well. Notwithstanding the fact that so called benign forms of epilepsy pass before the pubescence period (idiopathic focal epilepsies, several forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, in many cases the epilepsy, which has started in childhood, continues in the adult age as well. In the same time there can be possible remote negative consequences of the antiepileptic therapy, which can show at a woman of a reproductive age. The data, given in the article, witnesses the need of the right AED selection at women of reproductive age, suffering from epilepsy. The AED should be selected not only depending on the form of the

  8. Memory Functioning in Children with Epilepsy: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Childhood Absence Epilepsy, and Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Filipa Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE, childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children, aged 6–15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  9. Memory functioning in children with epilepsy: frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Robalo, Conceição; Simões, Mário Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS)) and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children), aged 6-15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  10. Idiopathic venous thromboembolism and thrombophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Sinescu, C; Hostiuc, M; Bartos, D.

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade idiopathic venous thromboembolism has become a separate entity, a chronic illness which has required prolonged anticoagulation and other prevention strategies to avoid recurrences. This article reviews recent developments regarding unprovoked venous thromboembolism and its relation with thrombophilia. In the beginning, the latest definition of idiopathic venous thromboembolism is presented. The article continues with statistics about thrombophilia, related venous thromb...

  11. Theory of Mind in Patients with Epilepsy: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Catroppa, Cathy; Lah, Suncica

    2016-03-01

    The ability to understand our own thoughts, intentions, beliefs and emotions and those of others (Theory of Mind; ToM) is a high-order social cognitive skill that is vital for social interaction and which has been found to be impaired in patients with epilepsy. Studies examining ToM in patients with epilepsy, however, have yielded inconsistent findings. The main aim of this study is to determine whether the magnitude of ToM deficits varies as a function of the site of epilepsy focus and/or the type of ToM task used. Electronic databases searches included Psychinfo, Medline/PubMed and EMBASE. Studies were included if they examined a group of patients with epilepsy and a group of healthy controls, reported original research, were published in the English language in peer reviewed journals, and used one of five empirically validated measures of ToM: False Belief, Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (RMET), Faux-pas, Strange Stories, Cartoon ToM vignettes. Twelve studies were identified, ten included adults and two included children with epilepsy. Findings revealed marked ToM deficits in adults with focal seizures emanating from core brain regions underpinning ToM: temporal and frontal lobes (frontal lobe epilepsy, FLE; temporal lobe epilepsy, TLE), but not in adults with focal seizures outside the temporal and frontal lobes (extra-TLE/FLE). ToM deficits were also observed in children with generalised seizures (idiopathic generalised epilepsy, IGE). ToM deficits were documented across ToM tasks. In conclusion, ToM deficits represent a robust finding in adults with frontal and temporal epilepsy, but are also found in children with generalised seizures. Further research into ToM is needed, especially in children with epilepsy as early ToM may have cumulative, negative effects on development of social skills that continues into adulthood.

  12. Comorbidities of epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    H Srinivas; Urvashi Shah

    2017-01-01

    .... This article besides addressing these issues also explores the therapeutic management. A systematic search of PubMed from Jan 2006 to August 2016 was undertaken using the terms "comorbidities" and "epilepsy...

  13. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593. Read More Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Epilepsy - overview Seizures Stereotactic radiosurgery - ...

  14. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...... dimensions, healthy volunteers the lowest, while the psoriasis group repeatedly held an intermediate position in all sets of assessment (subjects, interviewers and relatives). A logistic regression analysis showed ixoide features being most important when the entire epilepsy group was compared with other...

  15. [Treatment of pediatric epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the treatment strategy for pediatric epilepsy has been dramatically changed in Japan, because of the approval of new-generation antiepileptic drugs. Since 2006, a total of 6 new antiepileptic drugs, including gabapentin (GBP; adults/pediatric patients: 2006/2011 [year of approval]), topiramate (TPM; 2007/2013), lamotrigine (LTG; 2008/2008), levetiracetam (LEV; 2010/2013), stiripentol (STP; 2012/2012), and rufinamide (RUF; 2013/2013), have been introduced. Thus far, valproate (VPA) and carbamazepine (CBZ) have been first indicated for "generalized" epilepsy and "focal" epilepsy syndromes/types, respectively, in Japan. However, the approval of these new drugs could allow us to choose more effective and less toxic ones at an early stage of treatment. In this chapter, we describe the latest domestic and foreign guidelines for the treatment of pediatric epilepsy.

  16. Epilepsy and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Sarah; Forty, Liz; Craddock, Nick; Thomas, Rhys H

    2015-11-01

    It is well recognized that mood disorders and epilepsy commonly co-occur. Despite this, our knowledge regarding the relationship between epilepsy and bipolar disorder is limited. Several shared features between the two disorders, such as their episodic nature and potential to run a chronic course, and the efficacy of some antiepileptic medications in the prophylaxis of both disorders, are often cited as evidence of possible shared underlying pathophysiology. The present paper aims to review the bidirectional associations between epilepsy and bipolar disorder, with a focus on epidemiological links, evidence for shared etiology, and the impact of these disorders on both the individual and wider society. Better recognition and understanding of these two complex disorders, along with an integrated clinical approach, are crucial for improved evaluation and management of comorbid epilepsy and mood disorders.

  17. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  18. Employees with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alert systems to send message Other Accommodations Attendance/Absenteeism: Seizure activity can affect a person’s attendance at ... JAN suggested using a two‑way radio. A student with epilepsy used hedge-cutters and other landscaping ...

  19. Study of fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation and regional homogeneity in idiopathic generalized epilepsy based on resting-state functional MRI%特发性全身性癫痫分数低频振幅及局部一致性的静息态f MR I研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婧婧; 鲁毅; 赵卫; 孙学进; 孔瑞华

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the changes of whole brain function in idiopathic generalized epilepsy(IGE).Methods Three-dimensional structure scan and resting-state functional scan were performed in 23 cases of IGE patients and 23 health controls at 3.0T super-conducting MRI scanner.Brain functional analysis by fALFF and ReHo methods were obtained and the changes of brain areas were compared.Correlation analysis between different brain regions of IGE patients with the course of disease were performed.Results Compared with normal controls,IGE group showed increasd fALFF in the bilateral precentral gyrus,left supplementary motor area, left cingulate gyrus,left paracentral lobule,left superior occipital gyrus,left calcarine cortex,left middle occipital gyrus and right precuneus;decreased fALFF in the bilateral inferior temporal gyrus,right parahippocampa gyrus,right insula,right precuneus and left inferior parietal lobule(P<0.005).IGE group showed increasd ReHo in the left calcarine cortex,left superior parietal lobule, left postcentral gyrus,right precentral gyrus;decreased ReHo in the right fusiform gyrus,left lentiform nucleus,right inferior frontal gyrus,right superior medial frontal gyrus,left middle occiptal gyrus,right insula and bilateral inferior parietal lobule(P<0.005). These different brain regions in fALFF and ReHo results for IGE patients were no correlated with the course of disease.Conclusion IGE patients having wide range of brain areas with abnormal changes in function is the basis of the IGE complex clinical manifestations of the nerve.Combined application of two analysis methods of RS-fMRI can evaluate the change of brain function more comprehensively, and provide functional neuroanatomical evidence for the researches on neuro pathogenesis mechanism of IGE.%目的:观察特发性全身性癫痫(IGE)患者静息状态下全脑功能改变情况。方法采用3.0T MR扫描仪对23例 IGE患者(IGE组)及23例健康志愿者(对照组)行全脑3D 结构相

  20. The idiosyncratic aspects of the epilepsy of Fyodor Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2005-11-01

    The goal of this article is to review the idiosyncratic aspects of the epilepsy of Fyodor Dostoevsky, one of the greatest writers of all time. The onset of his seizures is controversial, with some evidence pointing to his childhood and other reports that would place the onset in his teens or his twenties. His life in prison in Siberia and then in the Russian army is reviewed. His lifestyle included many factors that exacerbated his epilepsy, especially stress and sleep deprivation. His compulsion for gambling played an important role in producing great stress in his life, as he tried to reverse his poverty in the casinos. The most idiosyncratic aspect of his epilepsy was his so-called ecstatic aura. The etiology of his seizures was probably inherited as revealed by the seizures of his father and the status epilepticus and death of his young son. This great writer died from lung hemorrhages in 1891. Discussed in this review is that he did not likely have an aura of ecstasy; only a few such possible cases can be found in the world literature. For those few cases, evidence from electrical self-stimulation studies in animals and humans, investigating "pleasure centers," can be found to involve the limbic system, especially the septal nucleus. Data from the human amygdala provide evidence why almost all auras are, in fact, unpleasant and not pleasant. A review of recent data on the risks to offspring of epileptic fathers confirms that the etiology of Dostoevsky's epilepsy was probably inherited and that he probably had an idiopathic generalized epilepsy with minor involvement of the temporal lobe. A relationship is seen between his severe obsession with gambling and his epilepsy. Finally, Fyodor Dostoevsky is an excellent example of the "temporal lobe personality."

  1. Sex, epilepsy, and epigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders that are associated with a wide range of pathogenic mechanisms, seizure manifestations, comorbidity profiles, and therapeutic responses. These characteristics are all influenced quite significantly by sex. As with other conditions exhibiting such patterns, sex differences in epilepsy are thought to arise—at the most fundamental level—from the “organizational” and “activational” effects of sex hormones as well as from the direct actions of ...

  2. Epigenetics and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Seizures can give rise to enduring changes that reflect alterations in gene expression patterns, intra and inter cellular signaling and ultimately network alterations that are a hallmark of epilepsy. A growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with epilepsy are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. One transcription factor in particular, REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor), has received a lot of attention due to...

  3. GEM THERAPY AND EPILEPSY

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The authors present in this paper the status of treatment and cause of epilepsy. They propose further research to be undertaken to document the data and a study of human magnetic aura followed by blood spectral studies. They have suggested that based upon these studies it should be possible to determine the cause of epilepsy and its treatment by the physical application of suitable precious and semi-previous stones followed by administration of Ayurvedic formulation.

  4. Idiopathic short stature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlaški Jovan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth is a complex process and the basic characteristic of child- hood growth monitoring provides insight into the physiological and pathological events in the body. Statistically, the short stature means departure from the values of height for age and sex (in a particular environment, which is below -2 standard deviation score, or less than -2 standard deviation, i.e. below the third percentile. Advances in molecular genetics have contributed to the improvement of diagnostics in endocrinology. Analysis of patients’ genotypes should not be performed before taking a classical history, detailed clinical examination and appropriate tests. In patients with idiopathic short stature specific causes are excluded, such as growth hormone deficiency, Turner syndrome, short stature due to low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation, small for gestational age, dysmorphology syndromes and chronic childhood diseases. The exclusion of abovementioned conditions leaves a large number of children with short stature whose etiology includes patients with genetic short stature or familial short stature and those who are low in relation to genetic potential, and who could also have some unrecognized endocrine defect. Idiopathic short stature represents a short stature of unknown cause of heterogeneous etiology, and is characterized by a normal response of growth hormone during stimulation tests (>10 ng/ml or 20 mJ/l, without other disorders, of normal body mass and length at birth. In idiopathic short stature standard deviation score rates <-2.25 (-2 to -3 or <1.2 percentile. These are also criteria for the initiation of growth hormone therapy. In children with short stature there is also the presence of psychological and social suffering. Goals of treatment with growth hormone involve achieving normal height and normal growth rate during childhood.

  5. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: A system disorder of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Avanzini, Giuliano; Sander, Thomas; Schmitz, Bettina; Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing understanding of generalized epilepsy is shaped by the traditional definition that "the responsible neuronal discharge takes place, if not throughout the entire grey matter, then at least in the greater part of it and simultaneously on both sides". This view is no longer tenable since concurrent findings using multiple methods have accumulated to reveal the role of bilateral networks of distributed and selective cortical and subcortical structures in so-called generalized ictogenesis. Most of this research has been focused on juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), which today is commonly considered the archetypical syndrome of the idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Based upon recent research in the fields of clinical epileptology, neuropsychology and psychiatry, clinical neurophysiology, neuroimaging and epilepsy genetics this article, for the first time, unites these new findings into a comprehensive nosological view. Genetically determined dysfunctions of important cognitive systems like visuomotor coordination and linguistic communication appear now as key mechanisms of seizure generation in JME. This review suggests a new paradigm to consider JME as a system disorder of the brain analogous to other neurological system disorders.

  6. Epilepsy and homicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Neil S; Vrbancic, Mirna; Ladino, Lady Diana; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy. Patients and methods We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides. Results We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility. Conclusion The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse. PMID:23700367

  7. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Epigenetics and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopra, Avtar; Dingledine, Raymond; Hsieh, Jenny

    2012-12-01

    Seizures can give rise to enduring changes that reflect alterations in gene-expression patterns, intracellular and intercellular signaling, and ultimately network alterations that are a hallmark of epilepsy. A growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with epilepsy are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. One transcription factor in particular, repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), has received a lot of attention due to the possibility that it may control fundamental transcription patterns that drive circuit excitability, seizures, and epilepsy. REST represses a suite of genes in the nervous system by utilizing nuclear protein complexes that were originally identified as mediators of epigenetic inheritance. Epigenetics has traditionally referred to mechanisms that allow a heritable change in gene expression in the absence of DNA mutation. However a more contemporaneous definition acknowledges that many of the mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are utilized by neurons to control activity-dependent gene expression. This review surveys what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in epilepsy. We discuss how REST controls gene expression to affect circuit excitability and neurogenesis in epilepsy. We also discuss how the repressor methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and activator cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) regulate neuronal activity and are themselves controlled by activity. Finally we highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and epilepsy.

  9. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  10. Is "Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes” Always Benign?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad SAEED

    2014-07-01

    centrotemporal spikes. Seizure. 2010; 19:12–16.Genizi J, Shamay-Tsoory SG, Shahar E, Yaniv S, Aharon- Perez J. Impaired social behavior in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. J Child Neurol. 2012; 27:156–161.Zenkov LR, Konstantinov PA, Shiriaeva IIu, Miasnikov VN, Sirazitdinova EB, Shevel’chisnkiĭ SI. Mental and behavioral disorders in idiopathic focal epileptiform spikes. Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S Korsakova. 2007; 107:39–49.Winckler MIB, Rotta NT. Prognostic factors for recurrence of a first seizure during childhood. Arq Neuropsiquiatr.1997; 55:749-756.Holmes GL. Rolandic epilepsy: clinical and electroencephalographic features. In: Degen R, Dreifuss FE, editors. Benign localized and generalized epilepsies of early childhood. Amsterdam: Elsevier ;1992: p.29-43.Gregory DL, Wong PKH. Clinical relevance of a dipole field in rolandic spikes. Epilepsia. 1992; 33:36-44.Bouma PAD, Bovenkerk AC, Westendorp RGJ, Brouwer OF. The course of benign partial epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes: a meta- analysis. Neurology. 1997; 48: 430-437.Fejerman N, Caraballo R, Tenembaum S. Atypical evolutions of benign -localization-related epilepsies in children: are they predictable? Epilepsia. 2000; 4: 380-390.Peters JM, Camfield CS, Camfield PR. Population study of benign rolandic epilepsy: is treatment needed? Neurology. 2001; 57: 537-539.Holmes GL. Rolandic epilepsy: clinical and electroencephalographic features. In Degen R, Dreifuss FE. editors. Benign localized and generalized epilepsies of early childhood. Amsterdam: Elsevier 1992:p. 29-43.Laub MC, Funke R, Kirsch CM, Oberst U. BECT: comparison of cerebral blood flow imaging, neuropsychological testing and long-term EEG findings. Epilepsy Res Suppl. 1992;6:95-98.Coppola G. Cognitive and linguistic abnormalities in benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. Acta Paediatr. 2011;100(5:768-772.Sarco DP, Boyer K, Lundy-Krigbaum SM, Takeoka M, Jensen F, Gregas M, Waber DP. Benign rolandic

  11. Hypercalcemia in idiopathic myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Schmidt, K; Hasselbalch, H;

    1992-01-01

    A case of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) presenting with hypercalcemia and hypercalcitriolemia is reported. It is proposed that ectopic production of the active vitamin D metabolite related to ongoing clonal expansion in the bone marrow accounts for the hypercalcemic state. Consistently low level...... of circulating type I procollagen propeptide (PICP) and lack of progression of the bone marrow fibrosis during almost 6 months of follow-up point to an in vivo inhibition of type I collagen synthesis by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3....

  12. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Hemchandra Dani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth.

  13. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth. PMID:26941525

  14. Idiopathic granulomatous orchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somak; Hooda, Shveta; Parwani, Anil V

    2011-05-15

    Idiopathic granulomatous orchitis is a rare inflammatory process of the testis of unknown etiology. It is characterized by presence of non-specific granulomatous inflammation and admixed multinucleated giant cells. It usually presents as a testicular mass which is highly suspicious of malignancy. Histologically, there is extensive destruction of seminiferous tubules with tubular or interstitial pattern of granulomatous inflammation and prominent collagen fibrosis. Trauma and possible auto-antibodies against sperms have been postulated to be the underlying mechanism. Differential diagnoses include intratubular germ-cell neoplasia, malignant lymphomas, and malakoplakia. Orchiectomy is currently the most appropriate therapy for this condition.

  15. [Idiopathic progressive subglottic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittel, C

    2014-07-01

    Idiopathic subglottic stenosis is causing a narrowing of the central airway at the laryngotracheal junction. Etiology is remaining unclear at large. There is a marked preponderance for women in the fertile age, an association to estrogene or progesterone metabolism remains doubtful. Suggested treatment varies from repeated endoscopic interventions to primary open resection. Therapy selection in this heterogeneous condition should be based on the individual patient situation as well as surgeon's expertise. This complex entity is prone to complications and should preferably be managed in a referral center.

  16. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. A genética das epilepsias The genetics of epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iscia Lopes-Cendes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Discutir alguns dos aspectos genéticos clínicos e moleculares de novas descobertas no campo da genética das epilepsias e relacioná-las com indicações importantes para a melhor compreensão dos mecanismos subjacentes a algumas síndromes epilépticas monogênicas. FONTES DOS DADOS: Muitos desenhos de estudo foram usados através dos anos, incluindo estudos familiares e pesquisas genético-epidemiológicas. Mais recentemente, estudos de genética molecular e estratégias de descoberta de genes foram usados para revelar os mecanismos moleculares e celulares envolvidas em diversas síndromes epilépticas mendelianas. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A importância dos fatores genéticos em epilepsias é reconhecida desde os tempos de Hipócrates. CONCLUSÕES: Nos tempos modernos, muitos estudos demonstraram a existência de um componente hereditário nas epilepsias generalizadas e focais. Nas últimas duas décadas, diversas famílias segregando diferentes tipos de epilepsia monogência foram descritas, o que levou ao progresso na caracterização dos defeitos moleculares nestas famílias.OBJECTIVES: To discuss some of the clinical and molecular genetic aspects of new discoveries in the field of the genetics of the epilepsies and relate these with relevant clues for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying some of the monogenic epilepsy syndromes. SOURCES: Many study designs have been performed over the years and these include family-based studies, genetic-epidemiology surveys. More recently, molecular genetics studies and gene discovery strategies have been used to unravel the molecular and cell mechanisms involved in several Mendelian epilepsy syndromes. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The importance of genetic factors in the epilepsies has been recognized since the time of Hippocrates. CONCLUSIONS: In the modern era, many studies have demonstrated the existence of an inherited component in the generalized and focal epilepsies and in the

  18. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... International TSC Research Conference Text Size Get Involved EPILEPSY IN ADULTS WITH TSC Download a PDF of ... age, including either new-onset seizures or ongoing epilepsy. Recent studies indicate that more than 80% of ...

  19. Epilepsy and homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya NS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neil S Pandya,1 Mirna Vrbancic,2 Lady Diana Ladino,3,4 José F Téllez-Zenteno31Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellin, ColombiaPurpose: We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy.Patients and methods: We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides.Results: We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility.Conclusion: The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse.Keywords: aggression, crime, epilepsy

  20. Metabolic differences in ripening of Solanum lycopersicum 'Ailsa Craig' and three monogenic mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisken, Stephan; Earll, Mark; Baxter, Charles; Portwood, David; Ament, Zsuzsanna; Kende, Aniko; Hodgman, Charlie; Seymour, Graham; Smith, Rebecca; Fraser, Paul; Seymour, Mark; Salek, Reza M; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Application of mass spectrometry enables the detection of metabolic differences between groups of related organisms. Differences in the metabolic fingerprints of wild-type Solanum lycopersicum and three monogenic mutants, ripening inhibitor (rin), non-ripening (nor) and Colourless non-ripening (Cnr), of tomato are captured with regard to ripening behaviour. A high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry system coupled to liquid chromatography produced a time series of the ripening behaviour at discrete intervals with a focus on changes post-anthesis. Internal standards and quality controls were used to ensure system stability. The raw data of the samples and reference compounds including study protocols have been deposited in the open metabolomics database MetaboLights via the metadata annotation tool Isatab to enable efficient re-use of the datasets, such as in metabolomics cross-study comparisons or data fusion exercises.

  1. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Compagnone, Adele; Caso, Paolo; Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs) are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists. PMID:24282415

  2. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists.

  3. Metabolic dysregulation in monogenic disorders and cancer - finding method in madness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Ayelet; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is a prime example of a disease process in which carcinogenic and metabolic changes are intertwined to promote cell survival and growth. One approach to unravel this complex relationship is by studying rare, monogenic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding metabolic enzymes or regulators. There are hundreds of these diseases, most of which manifest in childhood and are collectively termed 'inborn errors of metabolism' (IEMs). Several IEMs demonstrate the consequences of chronic, systemic loss of a particular metabolic activity that can result in malignancy. In this Opinion article, we present a conceptual categorization of IEMs associated with cancer and discuss how assessment of these rare diseases might inform us about the biological foundations of common types of cancer and opportunities for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Seizure metaphors in children with epilepsy: A study based on a multiple-choice self-report questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelosante, Valentina; Tommasi, Marco; Casadio, Claudia; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    The advantages of metaphorical representation are pointed out in many fields of clinical research (e.g. cancer, HIV, psychogenic nonepileptic seizures). This study aimed at offering a novel contribution showing how children with epilepsy describe the symptomatology of their seizure experiences by means of particular kinds of cognitive metaphors. Twenty-three children with idiopathic generalized epilepsy and thirty-one healthy children were recruited for this study and interviewed with a multiple-choice questionnaire asking them to describe their epileptic seizures by means of suitable metaphors. A psychologist blinded to medical diagnosis assessed and categorized all metaphors. By considering the 89 metaphors produced by the children with epilepsy and the 147 ones by the healthy controls, Agent/Force was the primary metaphor assessed by children with epilepsy, followed by Event/Situation as the second preference. Moreover, comparing the results of the control group with those of the subjects with epilepsy, it was found that controls were oriented towards selecting exogenous forces, while subjects with epilepsy tended to select endogenous forces. In particular, children with epilepsy showed a peculiar preference for an endogenous force resembling the waggle metaphor, which is similar to the effect of a quake's shaking (earthquake or seaquake). The metaphors identified by this research are a useful resource to better understand the seizure experiences of patients with epilepsy, helping to improve clinical treatment.

  5. National epilepsy movement in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    P T Fernandes; Noronha, A. L. A.; Sander, J. W.; L. M. Li

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a social network of epilepsy lay organization in Brazil to provide advocacy for people with epilepsy and eventually forma powerful National Epilepsy movement. Method.-We actively searched for any associations, support groups or organizations related to epilepsy in the country by personal contacts, internet search and by telephone search. Contact was then established with any entity found. Results: The first meeting was held in Campinas in March 2003, and was attended by ...

  6. Idiopathic erythermalgia: a congenital disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, J J; van Joost, T; Vuzevski, V D

    1989-11-01

    Idiopathic erythermalgia during early childhood and adolescence is characterized by red, congested, burning pain of the lower extremities provoked by exercise or exposure to warmth. The clinical symptoms of idiopathic erythermalgia in a young woman and her mother are described. Histopathologic and immunofluorescence findings in biopsy specimens of affected areas of skin were consistent with a nonspecific inflammatory process. The condition was completely refractory to any treatment. Even the long-lasting relief of pain with one low dose of aspirin, which is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of thrombocytemic erythromelalgia, was lacking. Idiopathic erythermalgia appears to be a separate clinical entity and congenital disorder.

  7. Parietal lobe epilepsy: the great imitator among focal epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić, Aleksandar J; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; So, Norman; Wong, Chong; Najm, Imad M

    2012-03-01

    Comprising large areas of association cortex, the parietal lobe is part of an extensive synaptic network elaborately intertwined with other brain regions. We hypothesize that such widespread projections are responsible for producing inaccurate localisation readings on scalp EEG and clinical semiology in patients with parietal lobe epilepsies, as opposed to frontal or temporal lobe epilepsies. Our study included 50 patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, who were subsequently rendered seizure-free for ≥12 months (median: 23 months) following resections limited to the frontal (n=17), temporal (n=17), or parietal (n=16) lobes. Interictal and ictal EEG data with accompanying seizure video recordings were extracted from archived files of scalp video-EEG monitoring. Two blinded raters independently reviewed the EEG according to predetermined criteria. Videos of seizures were then observed, as raters formulated their final electroclinical impression (ECI), identifying patients' abnormal neuronal activities with parietal, temporal, and frontal lobe epilepsy, or unspecified localisation. Groups did not differ significantly in demographics, age at epilepsy onset, or presence of MRI abnormalities. Interictal discharges in parietal lobe epilepsy showed the greatest magnitude of scatter outside the lobe of origin; the majority of patients with parietal lobe epilepsy had more than one spike population (pparietal lobe epilepsy cases (p=0.024). Whenever raters confidently limited their ECI to one lobar subtype, overall accuracy was excellent. Lobar classifications by ECI were highly accurate for temporal lobe epilepsy, vacillating in frontal lobe epilepsy, and least accurate in parietal lobe epilepsy subjects. Scalp EEG readings of parietal lobe epilepsy patients showed a more variable scatter of interictal discharges and a lower localisation value of ictal recordings compared to temporal and frontal lobe epilepsy subjects, suggesting an increased likelihood of

  8. APPROACH TO EPILEPSY IN CHILDHOOD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    their epilepsy (symptomatic), while the remainder were cryptogenic or ... access to medical resources and the continuing stigma around epilepsy.1-3 ... try and define the type of epilepsy as early as possible. .... Therapy is not always necessary and the natural history is for spontaneous .... and infantile spasms but has lost.

  9. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor M. Dostoevsky (Moscow, 1821-Saint Petersburg, 1881) suffered epilepsy throughout his whole literary career. The aim here is to understand his condition in light of his novels, correspondence, and his contemporaries' accounts as well as through the eyes of later generations of neurologists. From Murin (The landlady, 1847) to Smerdyakov (The brothers Karamazov, 1880), Dostoevsky portrayed up to six characters with epilepsy in his literature. The first symptoms of the disease presented in early adulthood, but he was only diagnosed with epilepsy a decade later. In 1863 he went abroad seeking expert advice from the famous neurologists Romberg and Trousseau. Dostoevsky made an intelligent use of epilepsy in his literature (of his experiential auras or dreamy states particularly) and through it found a way to freedom from perpetual military servitude. His case offers an insight into the natural history of epilepsy (a cryptogenic localization related one of either fronto-medial or temporal lobe origin using contemporary medical terms), thus inspiring later generations of writers and neurologists. Furthermore, it illustrates the good use of an ordinary neurological disorder by an extraordinary writer who transformed adversity into opportunity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Parietal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, Vicenta

    2012-10-01

    Patients with parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE) exhibit an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome that is rarely seen even at large epilepsy centers. Clinically, most patients with PLE exhibit a somatosensory aura that may include painful dysesthesias, though vertigo, aphasia, disturbances of one's body image also occur, when ictal propagation occurs from the parietal lobe to the supplementary motor area, hypermotor manifestations are noted. When temporolimbic propagation occurs, complex visual or auditory hallucinations and automatisms may appear. Scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is often nonlocalizing. Ictal EEG is rarely localizing in PLE, and invasive EEG is often required for definitive localization and functional mapping. Recent advances in clinical neurophysiology during the evaluation of patients with refractory partial epilepsy include Ictal magnetic source imaging (MSI). Combined EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) may be useful for patients with PLE to refine the localization in patients undergoing a presurgical evaluation. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are more concentrated inside the seizure onset zone (SOZ), indicating that they may be used as interictal scalp EEG biomarker for the SOZ. When medical therapy fails, resective epilepsy surgery can result in seizure freedom or significant reduction especially when a lesion is present.

  11. Disruptions in cortico-subcortical covariance networks associated with anxiety in new-onset childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Garcia-Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders represent a prevalent psychiatric comorbidity in both adults and children with epilepsy for which the etiology remains controversial. Neurobiological contributions have been suggested, but only limited evidence suggests abnormal brain volumes particularly in children with epilepsy and anxiety. Since the brain develops in an organized fashion, covariance analyses between different brain regions can be investigated as a network and analyzed using graph theory methods. We examined 46 healthy children (HC and youth with recent onset idiopathic epilepsies with (n = 24 and without (n = 62 anxiety disorders. Graph theory (GT analyses based on the covariance between the volumes of 85 cortical/subcortical regions were investigated. Both groups with epilepsy demonstrated less inter-modular relationships in the synchronization of cortical/subcortical volumes compared to controls, with the epilepsy and anxiety group presenting the strongest modular organization. Frontal and occipital regions in non-anxious epilepsy, and areas throughout the brain in children with epilepsy and anxiety, showed the highest centrality compared to controls. Furthermore, most of the nodes correlating to amygdala volumes were subcortical structures, with the exception of the left insula and the right frontal pole, which presented high betweenness centrality (BC; therefore, their influence in the network is not necessarily local but potentially influencing other more distant regions. In conclusion, children with recent onset epilepsy and anxiety demonstrate large scale disruptions in cortical and subcortical brain regions. Network science may not only provide insight into the possible neurobiological correlates of important comorbidities of epilepsy, but also the ways that cortical and subcortical disruption occurs.

  12. Idiopathic Bilateral Bloody Tearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrullah Beyazyıldız

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloody tear is a rare and distinct clinic phenomenon. We report a case presenting with the complaint of recurrent episodes of bilateral bloody tearing. A 16-year-old girl presented to our clinic with complaint of bloody tearing in both eyes for 3 months. Bloody tearing was not associated with her menses. A blood-stained discharge from the punctum was not observed during the compression of both nasolacrimal ducts. Nasolacrimal passage was not obstructed. Imaging studies such as dacryocystography and gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of nasolacrimal canal were normal. Intranasal endoscopic evaluation was normal. We collected samples from bloody tears two times and pathological examination was performed. Pathological analysis showed lots of squamous cells and no endometrial cells; dysplastic cells were found. Further evaluations for underlying causes were unremarkable. No abnormalities were found in ophthalmologic, radiologic, and pathologic investigations. This condition is likely a rare abnormality and the least recognized aetiology for the idiopathic phenomenon.

  13. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-08-19

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In addition to the clinical characteristics, genetic and biochemical differences suggest that JIA could be regarded as a general term covering various diseases. Complications described are uveitis, temporomandibular joint affection and growth disturbances. The therapeutic strategy should be planned individually according to age, subtype and disease activity and carried out as teamwork with several specialties. Drugs showing significant effectiveness in controlled studies are primarily methotrexate and sulphasalazine. An immunomodulating agent, etanercept, a soluble TNF alpha-receptor fusion protein, has shown a promising effect in severe polyarticular JIA refractory to methotrexate treatment.

  14. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant R. Nassar BS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH.

  15. Idiopathic short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquino, A M; Albanese, A; Bozzola, M; Butler, G E; Buzi, F; Cherubini, V; Chiarelli, F; Cavallo, L; Drop, S L; Stanhope, R; Kelnar, C J

    2001-07-01

    Idiopathic short stature (ISS) is a term used to describe the status of children with short stature that cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Many children diagnosed as having ISS have partial GH insensitivity, which can result from disturbances at various points of the GH-IGF-I axis. Several clinical studies on spontaneous growth in ISS showed that adult height was almost in the range of target height. GH treatment led to adult height not significantly higher than the pretreatment predicted adult height in most reports. No metabolic side effects have been observed, even when the dose was higher than in GH deficiency. Manipulation of puberty with gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogues reported by a few authors in a small number of children has shown conflicting results. Long-term psychological benefits of GH therapy for short normal children have not been demonstrated to date.

  16. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant R. Nassar BS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH.

  17. Idiopathic isolated orbicularis weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVie, O P; Majid, M A; Husssin, H M; Ung, T; Manners, R M; Ormerod, I; Pawade, J; Harrad, R A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Orbicularis weakness is commonly associated with seventh nerve palsy or neuromuscular and myopathic conditions such as myotonic dystrophy and myasethenia gravis. We report four cases of idiopathic isolated orbicularis weakness. Methods All four cases were female and the presenting symptoms of ocular irritation and epiphora had been present for over 7 years in three patients. All patients had lagophthalmos and three had ectropion. Three patients underwent full investigations which excluded known causes of orbicularis weakness. Two patients underwent oribularis oculi muscle biopsy and histological confirmation of orbicularis atrophy. Results All patients underwent surgery to specifically address the orbicularis weakness with satisfactory outcomes and alleviation of symptoms in all cases. Isolated orbicularis weakness may be a relatively common entity that is frequently overlooked. Conclusion Early recognition of this condition may lead to better management and prevent patients undergoing unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:22322997

  18. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Kayal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is defined as a hematologic disorder, characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia without a clinically apparent cause. The major causes of accelerated platelet consumption include immune thrombocytopenia, decreased bone marrow production, and increased splenic sequestration. The clinical presentation may be acute with severe bleeding, or insidious with slow development with mild or no symptoms. The initial laboratory tests useful at the first visit to predict future diagnosis were erythrocyte count, leukocyte count, anti-glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antibodies, reticulated platelets, plasma thrombopoietin level. Treatment should be restricted to those patients with moderate or severe thrombocytopenia who are bleeding or at risk of bleeding. We present a case report on ITP with clinical presentation, diagnosis and management.

  19. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa H Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  20. The Epilepsy Foundation's 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Schachter, Steven C; Sirven, Joseph; Porter, Roger

    2015-05-01

    On June 5 and 6, 2014, the Epilepsy Foundation held its 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference, an initiative of the Epilepsy Therapy Project, which showcased the most promising epilepsy innovations from health-care companies and academic laboratories dedicated to pioneering and advancing drugs, biologics, technologies, devices, and diagnostics for epilepsy. Speakers and attendees included emerging biotech and medical technology companies, major pharmaceutical and device companies, as well as investigators and innovators at the cutting-edge of epilepsy. The program included panel discussions on collaboration between small and large companies, how to get products in need of funding to the marketplace, who is currently funding epilepsy and CNS innovation, and how the NIH facilitates early-stage drug development. Finally, the conference featured the third annual "Shark Tank" competition. The presentations are summarized in this paper, which is followed by a compilation of the meeting poster abstracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children and tends to be “secondary” which affects males and females equally. The second group, post pubescent teenagers, tends to fit the adult stereotype. How is pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension diagnosed? If ...

  2. Neuroimaging of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  3. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H;

    1988-01-01

    served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and......, to a lesser extent, compared with the psoriasis group. Areas of ego functioning most affected were "reality testing", "cognitive functioning", "integrative functioning" and "regulation and control of drives". Patients with more than one type of seizure were the most affected, as were patients who were younger...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  4. Cannabinoids and Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Evan C; Tsien, Richard W; Whalley, Benjamin J; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for centuries to treat seizures. Recent anecdotal reports, accumulating animal model data, and mechanistic insights have raised interest in cannabis-based antiepileptic therapies. In this study, we review current understanding of the endocannabinoid system, characterize the pro- and anticonvulsive effects of cannabinoids [e.g., Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (CBD)], and highlight scientific evidence from pre-clinical and clinical trials of cannabinoids in epilepsy. These studies suggest that CBD avoids the psychoactive effects of the endocannabinoid system to provide a well-tolerated, promising therapeutic for the treatment of seizures, while whole-plant cannabis can both contribute to and reduce seizures. Finally, we discuss results from a new multicenter, open-label study using CBD in a population with treatment-resistant epilepsy. In all, we seek to evaluate our current understanding of cannabinoids in epilepsy and guide future basic science and clinical studies.

  5. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and......, to a lesser extent, compared with the psoriasis group. Areas of ego functioning most affected were "reality testing", "cognitive functioning", "integrative functioning" and "regulation and control of drives". Patients with more than one type of seizure were the most affected, as were patients who were younger...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  6. Insular epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprasert, Pramote; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Handler, Michael H

    2017-04-01

    Since it was originally described nearly 70 years ago, insular epilepsy has been increasingly recognized and may explain failures after apparently well-planned operations. We review the history of awareness of the phenomenon, techniques for its assessment, and its surgical management. Insular epilepsy can mimic features of frontal, parietal, or temporal seizures. It should be considered when a combination of somatosensory, visceral, and motor symptoms is observed early in a seizure. Extraoperative intracranial recordings are required to accurately diagnose insular seizures. Stereo-electroencephalography (EEG) or craniotomy with implantation of surface and depth electrodes have been used successfully to identify insular onset of seizures. Surgical resection of an insular focus may be performed with good success and acceptable risk. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  8. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: treatment update.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, Oisin J

    2011-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Despite multiple recent clinical trials, there is no strong evidence supporting a survival advantage for any agent in the management of patients with IPF. The limited effectiveness of current treatment regimes has led to a search for novel therapies including antifibrotic strategies. This article reviews the evidence supporting the treatments currently used in the management of IPF.

  10. Adenosinergic signaling in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boison, Detlev

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of at least 20 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) into clinical practice over the past decades, about one third of all epilepsies remain refractory to conventional forms of treatment. In addition, currently used AEDs have been developed to suppress neuronal hyperexcitability, but not necessarily to address pathogenic mechanisms involved in epilepsy development or progression (epileptogenesis). For those reasons endogenous seizure control mechanisms of the brain may provide alternative therapeutic opportunities. Adenosine is a well characterized endogenous anticonvulsant and seizure terminator of the brain. Several lines of evidence suggest that endogenous adenosine-mediated seizure control mechanisms fail in chronic epilepsy, whereas therapeutic adenosine augmentation effectively prevents epileptic seizures, even those that are refractory to conventional AEDs. New findings demonstrate that dysregulation of adenosinergic mechanisms are intricately involved in the development of epilepsy and its comorbidities, whereas adenosine-associated epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in epileptogenesis. The first goal of this review is to discuss how maladaptive changes of adenosinergic mechanisms contribute to the expression of seizures (ictogenesis) and the development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis) by focusing on pharmacological (adenosine receptor dependent) and biochemical (adenosine receptor independent) mechanisms as well as on enzymatic and transport based mechanisms that control the availability (homeostasis) of adenosine. The second goal of this review is to highlight innovative adenosine-based opportunities for therapeutic intervention aimed at reconstructing normal adenosine function and signaling for improved seizure control in chronic epilepsy. New findings suggest that transient adenosine augmentation can have lasting epigenetic effects with disease modifying and antiepileptogenic outcome. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled

  11. Abdominal epilepsy and foreign body in the abdomen--dilemma in diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topno, Noor; Gopasetty, Mahesh S; Kudva, Annappa; B, Lokesh

    2005-12-31

    There are many medical causes of abdominal pain; abdominal epilepsy is one of the rarer causes. It is a form of temporal lobe epilepsy presenting with abdominal aura. Temporal lobe epilepsy is often idiopathic, however it may be associated with mesial temporal lobe sclerosis, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors and other benign tumors, arterio-venous malformations, gliomas, neuronal migration defects or gliotic damage as a result of encephalitis. When associated with anatomical abnormality, abdominal epilepsy is difficult to control with medication alone. In such cases, appropriate neurosurgery can provide a cure or, at least, make this condition easier to treat with medication. Once all known intra-abdominal causes have been ruled out, many cases of abdominal pain are dubbed as functional. If clinicians are not aware of abdominal epilepsy, this diagnosis is easily missed, resulting in inappropriate treatment. We present a case report of a middle aged woman presenting with abdominal pain and episodes of unconsciousness. On evaluation she was found to have an intra-abdominal foreign body (needle). Nevertheless, the presence of this entity was insufficient to explain her episodes of unconsciousness. On detailed analysis of her medical history and after appropriate investigations, she was diagnosed with temporal lobe epilepsy which was treated with appropriate medications, and which resulted in her pain being relieved.

  12. The social competence and behavioral problem substrate of new- and recent-onset childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almane, Dace; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce P

    2014-02-01

    This study examined patterns of syndrome-specific problems in behavior and competence in children with new- or recent-onset epilepsy compared with healthy controls. Research participants consisted of 205 children aged 8-18, including youth with recent-onset epilepsy (n=125, 64 localization-related epilepsy [LRE] and 61 idiopathic generalized epilepsy [IGE]) and healthy first-degree cousin controls (n=80). Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist for children aged 6-18 (CBCL/6-18) from the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA). Dependent variables included Total Competence, Total Problems, Total Internalizing, Total Externalizing, and Other Problems scales. Comparisons of children with LRE and IGE with healthy controls were examined followed by comparisons of healthy controls with those having specific epilepsy syndromes of LRE (BECTS, Frontal/Temporal Lobe, and Focal NOS) and IGE (Absence, Juvenile Myoclonic, and IGE NOS). Children with LRE and/or IGE differed significantly (pcompetence (Total Competence including School and Social). Similarly, children with specific syndromes of LRE and IGE differed significantly (pcompetence (Total Competence including School). Only on the Thought Problems scale were there syndrome differences. In conclusion, children with recent-onset epilepsy present with significant behavioral problems and lower competence compared with controls, with little syndrome specificity whether defined broadly (LRE and IGE) or narrowly (specific syndromes of LRE and IGE).

  13. Epilepsy in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J J; McArdle, N S; Wilson, M H; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition characterised by seizure activity. It has an approximate incidence of 1%. General dental practitioners will encounter these patients in practice. This article discusses the types of epilepsy, the medical management and considerations in dental management of epileptic patients. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence, with respect to prescribing of medications. The management of an epileptic seizure is discussed. Status epilepticus is a rare but serious complication of epileptic seizures. An easy-to-follow algorithm is provided to assist the practitioner in managing seizures.

  14. Epilepsy, behavior, and art (Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind, part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rektor, Ivan; Schachter, Steven C; Arzy, Shahar; Baloyannis, Stavros J; Bazil, Carl; Brázdil, Milan; Engel, Jerome; Helmstaedter, Gerhard; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Kesner, Ladislav; Komárek, Vladimír; Krämer, Günter; Leppik, Ilo E; Mann, Michael W; Mula, Marco; Risse, Gail L; Stoker, Guy W; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; Trimble, Michael; Tyrliková, Ivana; Korczyn, Amos D

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Brain diseases, structural and/or functional, underlie the appearance of epilepsy, but the notion of epilepsy is larger and cannot be reduced exclusively to the brain. We can therefore look at epilepsy from two angles. The first perspective is intrinsic: the etiology and pathophysiology, problems of therapy, impact on the brain networks, and the "mind" aspects of brain functions - cognitive, emotional, and affective. The second perspective is extrinsic: the social interactions of the person with epilepsy, the influence of the surrounding environment, and the influences of epilepsy on society. All these aspects reaching far beyond the pure biological nature of epilepsy have been the topics of two International Congresses of Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind that were held in Prague, Czech Republic, in 2010 and 2012 (the third Congress will be held in Brno, Czech Republic on April 3-5, 2014; www.epilepsy-brain-mind2014.eu). Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the 2012 Congress that focused on epilepsy, behavior, and art.

  15. A comparison of the efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine oral suspension between infants and children with epilepsy: a retrospective chart review at a single medical center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shu-Hao; Liu, Cheng-Chao; Fan, Pi-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    Few clinical studies have assessed the efficacy and safety of oxcarbazepine (OXC) oral suspension in Asian pediatric patients and particularly in infants. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the efficacy, tolerability, and side effects of OXC oral suspension in Taiwanese infants and children with various types of epilepsy. A retrospective review of the efficacy, tolerability, and side effects of OXC oral suspension in a tertiary medical center in Taiwan was conducted and included children (1-9 years old) and infants (epilepsy, which was classified into idiopathic partial, symptomatic partial, or multifocal subtypes. The OXC oral suspension (Trileptal(®); Novartis) was given in a gradual dose titration, from an initial 7.5 mg/kg/day to 30 mg/kg/day within 1 month in all cases. A total of 20 infants and 38 children were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the children and infants in efficacy (75 vs. 82 %, p = 0.734) and adverse effects (30 vs. 21 %, p = 0.525) after OXC oral suspension treatment. The efficacy was significantly correlated with the epilepsy subtype (p epilepsy responded better to OXC oral suspension than those with multifocal epilepsy. OXC oral suspension is effective and well tolerated in both infants and children with partial epilepsy in Taiwan. Treatment efficacy was related to epilepsy subtype and number of combined AEDs before OXC treatment. Monotherapy had an excellent therapeutic response in partial epilepsy but not in multifocal epilepsy.

  16. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  17. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...

  18. 20.5.Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920184 Clinical analysis of 25 cases ofchronic alcoholic intoxication with epilepsy.PANG Zhixing (庞治兴),et al.Dept Psychol,1stTeaching Hosp.Norman Bethune Med Univ,130021 Chin J Nerv & Ment Dis 1991; 17 (5):289-291.The clinical manifestations of 25 cases (male)

  19. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects...

  20. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L;

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects ...

  1. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Tolmacheva, E.A.; Budziszewska, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime, es

  2. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Budziszewska, B.; Tolmacheva, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime, es

  3. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; Putten, van M.J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative t

  4. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  5. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Semiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. G. Blair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE. Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  6. Epilepsy and Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A large consanguinous family from Saudi Arabia with 4 affected children presenting with an autosomal recessive ataxia, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation is reported from the Institut de Genetique, Universite Louis Pasteur, Illkirch, France; Division of Pediatric Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and other centers.

  7. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Paul W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a non-neoplastic pulmonary disease that is characterized by the formation of scar tissue within the lungs in the absence of any known provocation. IPF is a rare disease which affects approximately 5 million persons worldwide. The prevalence is estimated to be slightly greater in men (20.2/100,000 than in women (13.2/100,000. The mean age at presentation is 66 years. IPF initially manifests with symptoms of exercise-induced breathless and dry coughing. Auscultation of the lungs reveals early inspiratory crackles, predominantly located in the lower posterior lung zones upon physical exam. Clubbing is found in approximately 50% of IPF patients. Cor pulmonale develops in association with end-stage disease. In that case, classic signs of right heart failure may be present. Etiology remains incompletely understood. Some environmental factors may be associated with IPF (cigarette smoking, exposure to silica and livestock. IPF is recognized on high-resolution computed tomography by peripheral, subpleural lower lobe reticular opacities in association with subpleural honeycomb changes. IPF is associated with a pathological lesion known as usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP. The UIP pattern consists of normal lung alternating with patches of dense fibrosis, taking the form of collagen sheets. The diagnosis of IPF requires correlation of the clinical setting with radiographic images and a lung biopsy. In the absence of lung biopsy, the diagnosis of IPF can be made by defined clinical criteria that were published in guidelines endorsed by several professional societies. Differential diagnosis includes other idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, connective tissue diseases (systemic sclerosis, polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, forme fruste of autoimmune disorders, chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other environmental (sometimes occupational exposures. IPF is typically progressive and leads to significant

  8. Three to four years after diagnosis: cognition and behaviour in children with 'epilepsy only'. A prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostrom, K J; van Teeseling, H; Smeets-Schouten, A; Peters, A C B; Jennekens-Schinkel, A

    2005-07-01

    A 3.5-year follow-up study of cognition and behaviour in 42 children with newly diagnosed idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy ('epilepsy only') attending mainstream education and 30 healthy gender-matched classmate controls was carried out to identify differences between groups, to detect factors that contribute to the difference and its change over time, and to establish the proportion of poorly performing children. The neuropsychological battery covered the major domains of cognition, mental and motor speed and academic language skills. Children were tested at the time of diagnosis (before any anti-epileptic drug treatment started) and 3, 12 and approximately 42 months later. Parents and teachers completed behaviour checklists, for which the scoring was adapted to prevent any influence of epilepsy-related ambiguity. Based on parental interviews at the time of diagnosis, children with epilepsy were categorized as having longstanding behavioural and/or learning problems, as belonging to a troubled family, as being exposed to 'off-balance' parenting starting at the time of epilepsy onset and/or as reacting maladaptively to the changes in relation to the onset of epilepsy. Throughout follow-up, the group of children with epilepsy only performed less well than healthy classmates on measures of learning, memory span for words, attention and behaviour. After controlling for school delay, proactive interference (number of responses to the same images as in the learning trials, but now presented in reordered locations) was the only remaining variable that distinguished the group of children with epilepsy only. Group-wise, no changes in cognitive and behavioural differences over time were found, but instability in individual performances appeared to characterize children with epilepsy only. Rather than intrinsically epilepsy-related variables, such as idiopathic versus cryptogenic aetiology, seizure control or anti-epileptic drug treatment, the child's prediagnostic

  9. Genetics Home Reference: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis, chronic form Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 ... area? Other Names for This Condition cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis, chronic form IPF usual interstitial ...

  10. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  11. Clinical efficacy and safety of lamotrigine monotherapy in newly diagnosed pediatric patients with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Han

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To verify the efficacy and safety of lamotrigine (LTG monotherapy in newly diagnosed children with epilepsy. Methods : We prospectively enrolled 148 children who had undergone LTG monotherapy at our institution between September 2002 and June 2009. Twenty-nine patients were excluded: 19 due to incomplete data and 10 were lost to follow up. The data of the remaining 119 patients was analyzed. Results : We enrolled 119 pediatric epilepsy patients (aged 2.8-19.3 years; 66 males and 53 females in this study. Out of 119 patients, 29 (25.2% had generalized epilepsy and 90 (74.8% had partial epilepsy. The responses of seizure reduction were as follows: Seizure freedom (no seizure attack for at least 6 months in 87/111 (78.4%, n=111 patients; partial response (reduced seizure frequency compared to baseline in 13 (11.7% patients; and persistent seizure in 11 (9.9% patients. The seizure freedom rate was in 81.6% in patients with partial seizure (75.9% for complex partial seizure and 90.9% for benign rolandic epilepsy and 44.8% in patients with generalized epilepsy (30.0% for absence seizure, 35.7% for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients, and 100.0% for idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients. Adverse reactions were reported in 17 (14.3% patients, and 8 patients (6.7% discontinued LTG because of rash and tic. No patient experienced severe adverse reaction such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Conclusion : LTG showed excellent therapeutic response and had few significant adverse effects. Our findings report may contribute in promoting the use of LTG monotherapy in epileptic children.

  12. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Abe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe abdominal pain in a flank distribution. A large mass was palpable in the right upper quadrant on physical examination. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a well-defined, right-sided, retroperitoneal cystic lesion located between the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava (IVC. The tumor size was 55 × 58 mm, and it compressed the gallbladder and the duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal radiography revealed a stricture of the second portion of the duodenum by the tumor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that the whole part was hyperintense with hypointense rims, but the inner was partially hypointense. Based on the radiological findings, the preoperative differential diagnosis included retroperitoneal teratoma, Schwannoma, abscess, and primary retroperitoneal tumor. On laparotomy, the tumor was located in the right retroperitoneal cavity. Kocher maneuver and medial visceral rotation, which consists of medial reflection of the upper part of right colon and duodenum by incising their lateral peritoneal attachments, were performed. Although a slight adhesion to the IVC was detected, the tumor was removed safely. Thin-section histopathology examination detected neither tumor tissues nor any tissues such as adrenal gland, ovarian tissue, or endometrial implants. The final pathological diagnosis was idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma; the origin of the bleeding was unclear. The patient was discharged without any complication 5 days after the operation.

  13. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000222.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures ( ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning in ...

  16. Future directions in the neuropsychology of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Carrie R; Taylor, Joanne; Hamberger, Marla; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Hermann, Bruce P; Schefft, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    Two important themes for future clinical research in the neuropsychology of epilepsy are proposed: (1) the neurobiological abnormalities that underlie neuropsychological impairment in people with epilepsy, and (2) neuropsychological status of persons with new-onset epilepsy.

  17. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: current understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvin, Stéphane; Bellavoine, Vanina; Merdariu, Dana; Delanoë, Catherine; Elmaleh-Bergés, Monique; Gressens, Pierre; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-09-01

    Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia (HH) syndrome is an uncommon consequence of prolonged focal febrile convulsive seizures in infancy and early childhood. It is characterized by the occurrence of prolonged clonic seizures with unilateral predominance occurring in a child and followed by the development of hemiplegia. Neuroradiological studies showed unilateral edematous swelling of the epileptic hemisphere at the time of initial status epilepticus (SE). This acute phase is followed by characteristic cerebral hemiatrophy with subsequent appearance of epilepsy, so called Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy (HHE) syndrome. The etiologies and the underlying mechanisms remain to be understood. Using a review of the literature, we summarized the data of the last 20 years. It appears that idiopathic HH/HHE syndrome is the most common reported form. The basic science data suggest that immature brain is relatively resistant to SE-induced cell injury. Several factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of HH/HHE syndrome: 1. prolonged febrile seizure in which inflammation may worsen the level of cell injury; 2. inflammation and prolonged ictal activity that act on blood-brain-barrier permeability; 3. predisposing factors facilitating prolonged seizure such as genetic factors or focal epileptogenic lesion. However, these factors cannot explain the elective involvement of an entire hemisphere. We draw new hypothesis that may explain the involvement of one hemisphere such as maturation of brain structure such as corpus callosum or genetic factors (CACNA1A gene) that are specifically discussed. An early diagnosis and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of HHE are needed to improve the outcome of this condition.

  18. Disease-modifying genes and monogenic disorders: experience in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallati S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sabina Gallati Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, and Department of Clinical Research, Inselspital, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland Abstract: The mechanisms responsible for the determination of phenotypes are still not well understood; however, it has become apparent that modifier genes must play a considerable role in the phenotypic heterogeneity of Mendelian disorders. Significant advances in genetic technologies and molecular medicine allow huge amounts of information to be generated from individual samples within a reasonable time frame. This review focuses on the role of modifier genes using the example of cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, and discusses the advantages and limitations of candidate gene approaches versus genome-wide association studies. Moreover, the implications of modifier gene research for other monogenic disorders, as well as its significance for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches are summarized. Increasing insight into modifying mechanisms opens up new perspectives, dispelling the idea of genetic disorders being caused by one single gene. Keywords: modifier genes, cystic fibrosis, genome wide association studies, candidate gene approach, genotype, phenotype

  19. Q8IYL2 is a candidate gene for the familial epilepsy syndrome of Partial Epilepsy with Pericentral Spikes (PEPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschziner, Guy D; Coffey, Alison J; Andrew, Toby; Gregorio, Sheila P; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Calafato, Maria; Bentley, David R; Kinton, Lucy; Sander, Josemir W; Johnson, Michael R

    2011-09-01

    Partial Epilepsy with Pericentral Spikes (PEPS) is a novel Mendelian idiopathic epilepsy with evidence of linkage to Chromosome 4p15. Our aim was to identify the causative mutation in this epilepsy syndrome. We re-annotated all 42 genes in the linked chromosomal region and sequenced all genes within the linked interval. All exons, intron-exon boundaries and untranslated regions were sequenced in the original pedigree, and novel changes segregating correctly were subjected to bioinformatic analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine for potential copy number variation (CNV). 29 previously undescribed variants correctly segregating with the linked haplotype were identified. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that six variants were non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphisms, one of which, in Q8IYL2 (Gly400Ala), was found in neither Caucasian (n=243) and ancestry-matched Brazilian (n=180) control samples, nor subjects from the 1000 Genome Project. No gene duplications or deletions were identified in the linked region. We postulate that Q8IYL2 is a causative gene for PEPS, after exhaustive resequencing and bioinformatic analysis. The function of this gene is unknown, but it is expressed in brain tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  1. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination.

  2. An epidemiologic study of 389 children with epilepsy in southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Inaloo S, Katibeh P. An epidemiologic study of 389 children with epilepsy in southern Iran.Iranian Journal of Child Neurology2011;5(4:15-20Objective Approximately 4% of the world's population experience one or more febrile seizures during their lifetime, and 0.5-1% of the population has active epilepsy.Less than one-third of the reported seizures are categorized as epilepsy. The cause of established epilepsy is important in determining the treatment and prognosis.Materials & Methods We studied 389 cases of documented epilepsy in children aged 2 months to 18 years who visited the hospital for neurologic examination during 2005-2010.Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was performed for categorical variables.Results The most common age for the first seizure was below 2 years, and the most common type of epilepsy was generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Electroencephalography (EEG showed an epileptic pattern in 60%, 29.8%, and 51% of the patients with idiopathic, symptomatic, and cryptogenic epilepsy, respectively. This pattern was significantly different among these 3 categories of epilepsy.Conclusion The most common type of seizure was cryptogenic; however, in most industrialized countries, idiopathic epilepsies were more frequent. With respect to the age and sex of patients, the prevalence of epilepsy in southern Iran is not so much different from that of patients in other parts of the world. As to generalized or partial epilepsy, there are different reports from different part ofthe world; however, generalized tonic-clonic seizures were more common in our area.References Hauser, Hesdorffer DC. Epilepsy, frequency, causes and consequences. New WA York, NY: Demos Publications;1990.P.1–51.Jallon P. Epilepsy in developing countries. Epilepsia 1997; 38: 1143-51.King M, Newton M, Jackson G, Fitt G, Mitchell L, Silvapulle M, Berkovic S. Epileptology of the first-seizure presentation: a clinical

  3. Occult maxillofacial trauma in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, C E; Burneo, J G; Helman, J

    2001-11-15

    Epilepsy is a relatively common neurological disorder with incidence in both developed and developing countries. Head, facial, and oral injuries can result from seizures experienced by the epileptic patient. Patients with severe epilepsy often experience other dental disease due to their inability to properly maintain their oral hygiene. This paper presents a case of a chronic mandibular fracture following an episode of seizures in a patient with epilepsy in whom the fracture was discovered when he developed a fistula in the submandibular region.

  4. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  5. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  6. LIN28B, LIN28A, KISS1, and KISS1R in idiopathic central precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koivu Rosanna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pubertal timing is a strongly heritable trait, but no single puberty gene has been identified. Thus, the genetic background of idiopathic central precocious puberty (ICPP is poorly understood. Overall, the genetic modulation of pubertal onset most likely arises from the additive effect of multiple genes, but also monogenic causes of ICPP probably exist, as cases of familial ICPP have been reported. Mutations in KISS1 and KISSR, coding for kisspeptin and its receptor, involved in GnRH secretion and puberty onset, have been suggested causative for monogenic ICPP. Variation in LIN28B was associated with timing of puberty in genome-wide association (GWA studies. LIN28B is a human ortholog of the gene that controls, through microRNAs, developmental timing in C. elegans. In addition, Lin28a transgenic mice manifest the puberty phenotypes identified in the human GWAS. Thus, both LIN28B and LIN28A may have a role in pubertal development and are good candidate genes for monogenic ICPP. Methods Thirty girls with ICPP were included in the study. ICPP was defined by pubertal onset before 8 yrs of age, and a pubertal LH response to GnRH testing. The coding regions of LIN28B, LIN28A, KISS1, and KISS1R were sequenced. The missense change in LIN28B was also screened in 132 control subjects. Results No rare variants were detected in KISS1 or KISS1R in the 30 subjects with ICPP. In LIN28B, one missense change, His199Arg, was found in one subject with ICPP. However, this variant was also detected in one of the 132 controls. No variation in LIN28A was found. Conclusions We did not find any evidence that mutations in LIN28B or LIN28A would underlie ICPP. In addition, we confirmed that mutations in KISS1 and KISS1R are not a common cause for ICPP.

  7. LIN28B, LIN28A, KISS1, and KISS1R in idiopathic central precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommiska, Johanna; Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise; Koivu, Rosanna; Puhakka, Lea; Juul, Anders; Raivio, Taneli

    2011-09-22

    Pubertal timing is a strongly heritable trait, but no single puberty gene has been identified. Thus, the genetic background of idiopathic central precocious puberty (ICPP) is poorly understood. Overall, the genetic modulation of pubertal onset most likely arises from the additive effect of multiple genes, but also monogenic causes of ICPP probably exist, as cases of familial ICPP have been reported. Mutations in KISS1 and KISSR, coding for kisspeptin and its receptor, involved in GnRH secretion and puberty onset, have been suggested causative for monogenic ICPP. Variation in LIN28B was associated with timing of puberty in genome-wide association (GWA) studies. LIN28B is a human ortholog of the gene that controls, through microRNAs, developmental timing in C. elegans. In addition, Lin28a transgenic mice manifest the puberty phenotypes identified in the human GWAS. Thus, both LIN28B and LIN28A may have a role in pubertal development and are good candidate genes for monogenic ICPP. Thirty girls with ICPP were included in the study. ICPP was defined by pubertal onset before 8 yrs of age, and a pubertal LH response to GnRH testing. The coding regions of LIN28B, LIN28A, KISS1, and KISS1R were sequenced. The missense change in LIN28B was also screened in 132 control subjects. No rare variants were detected in KISS1 or KISS1R in the 30 subjects with ICPP. In LIN28B, one missense change, His199Arg, was found in one subject with ICPP. However, this variant was also detected in one of the 132 controls. No variation in LIN28A was found. We did not find any evidence that mutations in LIN28B or LIN28A would underlie ICPP. In addition, we confirmed that mutations in KISS1 and KISS1R are not a common cause for ICPP.

  8. Male idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio Cavallini

    2006-01-01

    Idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (iOAT) affects approximately 30% of all infertile men. This mini-review discussed recent data in this field. Age, non-inflammatory functional alterations in post-testicular organs, infective agents (Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes virus and adeno-associated viruses), alterations in gamete genome, mitochondrial alterations, environmental pollutants and "subtle" hormonal alterations are all considered possible causes of iOAT.Increase of reactive oxygen species in tubules and in seminal plasma and of apoptosis are reputed to affect sperm concentration, motility and morphology. iOAT is commonly diagnosed by exclusion, nevertheless spectral traces of the main testicular artery may be used as a diagnostic tool for iOAT. The following can be considered therapies for iOAT: 1) tamoxifen citrate (20 mg/d) + testosterone undecanoate (120 mg/d) (pregnancy rate per couple/month [prcm]:3.8%); 2) folic acid (66 mg/d) + zinc sulfate (5 mg/d); 3) L-carnitine (2 g/d) alone or in combination with acetyl-L-carnitine (1 g/d) (prcm: 2.3%); and 4) both carnitines + one 30 mg cinnoxicam suppository every 4 days (prcm: 8.5%).Alpha-blocking drugs improved sperm concentration but not morphology, motility or pregnancy rate. Tranilast (300 mg/d) increased sperm parameters and pregnancy rates in an initial uncontrolled study. Its efficacy on sperm concentration (but not on sperm motility, morphology or prcm) was confirmed in subsequent published reports. The efficacy of tamoxifen + testosterone undecanoate, tamoxifen alone, and recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone is still a matter for discussion.

  9. Male idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Giorgio

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (iOAT) affects approximately 30% of all infertile men. This mini-review discussed recent data in this field. Age, non-inflammatory functional alterations in post-testicular organs, infective agents (Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes virus and adeno-associated viruses), alterations in gamete genome, mitochondrial alterations, environmental pollutants and "subtle" hormonal alterations are all considered possible causes of iOAT. Increase of reactive oxygen species in tubules and in seminal plasma and of apoptosis are reputed to affect sperm concentration, motility and morphology. iOAT is commonly diagnosed by exclusion, nevertheless spectral traces of the main testicular artery may be used as a diagnostic tool for iOAT. The following can be considered therapies for iOAT: 1) tamoxifen citrate (20 mg/d) + testosterone undecanoate (120 mg/d) (pregnancy rate per couple/month [prcm]: 3.8%); 2) folic acid (66 mg/d) + zinc sulfate (5 mg/d); 3) L-carnitine (2 g/d) alone or in combination with acetyl-L-carnitine (1 g/d) (prcm: 2.3%); and 4) both carnitines = one 30 mg cinnoxicam suppository every 4 days (prcm: 8.5%). Alpha-blocking drugs improved sperm concentration but not morphology, motility or pregnancy rate. Tranilast (300 mg/d) increased sperm parameters and pregnancy rates in an initial uncontrolled study. Its efficacy on sperm concentration (but not on sperm motility, morphology or prcm) was confirmed in subsequent published reports. The efficacy of tamoxifen + testosterone undecanoate, tamoxifen alone, and recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone is still a matter for discussion.

  10. [Neuropsychological disorders and childhood epilepsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Louis

    2012-12-01

    Neuropsychological consequences of epilepsy will be function of the specific anamnesis of the child, characteristics of epilepsy syndromes, and treatment. The effects of recurrent seizures, iatrogenic effects of medications, and school adaptation are reviewed. The neurodevelopmental origins of comorbidities are detailed, how they develop over time. Despite the good prognosis and the remission of seizures before adulthood with normal neurological and intellectual development, some subtle cognitive and behavioural deficits in children with benign epilepsy seem to occur. Cognition can be impaired leading to long-term intellectual disabilities. One factor that could potentially cause cognitive deficits is the frequent seizures that characterize intractable epilepsy.

  11. Yoga for control of epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yardi, Nandan

    2001-01-01

    ...). This paper reviews articles related to yoga and epilepsy, seizures, EEG, autonomic changes, neuro-psychology, limbic system, arousal, sleep, brain plasticity, motor performance, brain imaging studies...

  12. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyanji F

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Firoz MiyanjiBritish Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS remains a common and potentially severe musculoskeletal disorder. Although its etiology is largely unknown, ongoing research endeavors continue to improve our understanding of its potential origin and its natural history. Advances in understanding its true three-dimensional nature have sought to improve classification and management strategies. This review will attempt to highlight and give an overview of the current concepts in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.Keywords: AIS, current, natural history, management strategies

  13. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant......Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...

  14. [A study of epilepsy according to the age at onset and monitored for 3 years in a regional reference paediatric neurology unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Gómez, Laura; López-Pisón, Javier; Lapresta Moros, Carlos; Fuertes Rodrigo, Cristina; Fernando Martínez, Ruth; Samper-Villagrasa, Pilar; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; García-Jiménez, María Concepción

    2017-01-01

    A study of epilepsy, according to the age at onset of the crisis and its causes, monitored by a Paediatric Neurology Unit over a period of three years. Historical cohorts study was conducted by reviewing the Paediatric Neurology medical records data base of epileptic children followed-up from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010. A total of 4,595 children were attended during the study period. The diagnosis of epilepsy was established in 605 (13.17%): 277 (45.79%) symptomatic, 156 (25.79%) idiopathic, and 172 (28.43%) with cryptogenic epilepsy. Absence epilepsy and benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes are the idiopathic epileptic syndromes most prevalent, and the most prevalent symptomatic epilepsies are prenatal encephalopathies. More than one-quarter (26.12%) of epilepsies began in the first year of life, and 67.72% were symptomatic. Refractory epilepsy was observed in 25.29%, 42.46% with cognitive impairment, 26.45% with motor involvement, and 9.92% with an autism spectrum disorder, being more frequent at an earlier age of onset. The absence of a universally accepted classification of epileptic syndromes makes tasks like this difficult, starting with the terminology. A useful classification would be aetiological, with two groups: a large group with established aetiology, or very likely genetic syndromes, and another with no established cause. The age of onset of epilepsy in each aetiological group helps in the prognosis, which is worsened by refractoriness and associated neurodevelopmental disorders, and are generally worse at an earlier onset and in certain aetiologies. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Dietary therapy of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Katsumi; Ishihara, Eiko; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2014-05-01

    Reappraisal of ketogenic diets (KD) were delayed in Japan compared to USA and Korea. The reasons are unknown, but possible explanations are (1) Japanese food culture prefers rice and less fat and (2) ACTH therapy is preferred for West syndrome in Japan. Since Japanese child neurologists were surprised at dramatic effects on glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut-1DS) in 2003, KD have been slowly accepted for treatment of epilepsy in Japan. New generation KD including modified Atkins diet (mAD) are preferred to classical KD. KD can be causal therapy in Glut-1DS and some of mitochondrial disorders, though anti-epileptic drugs are symptomatic therapy. KD can alleviate intractable seizures in epilepsies with brain malformation in addition to West syndrome and Dravet syndrome, etc. KD may work for brain tumor, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. C7-8 triglycerides or fatty acid esters are under development as medicines replacing KD.

  16. Epilepsy and videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Michelle; Hirsch, Edouard; Vigevano, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Since the first case of videogame (VG) epilepsy was reported in 1981, many cases of seizures triggered by VGs were reported, not only in photosensitive, but also in non-photosensitive children and adolescents with epilepsy. We provide an overview of the literature with overall conclusions and recommendations regarding VG playing. Specific preventive measures concerning the physical characteristics of images included in commercially available VGs (flash rate, choice of colors, patterns, and contrast) can lead in the future to a clear decrease of this problem. In addition to the positive effect of such measures, the collaborative studies performed in France and in the rest of Europe have stressed the importance of a safe distance to the screen of > or = 2 m, and the less provocative role of 100-Hz screens.

  17. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  18. Die Psychosen bei Epilepsie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauninger G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In einer Übersicht werden die verschiedenen Formen psychotischer Zustandsbilder bei Epilepsiepatienten, deren Ätiopathogenese und Möglichkeiten der Behandlung dieser Störungen beschrieben. Risikofaktoren finden sich durch neurobiologische Gegebenheiten - besonders bei Mitbeteiligung des Temporallappens, durch psychosoziale Einflüsse und manchmal auch durch medikamentöse Behandlung. Anhand von Fallbeispielen sollen dem Leser typische Krankheitsverläufe von psychotischen Episoden bei Epilepsiepatienten, die zumeist erst bei einer schon länger dauernden Epilepsie auftreten, nähergebracht werden. Es wird deutlich, daß sich die Beschwerden von Patienten mit Epilepsie nicht auf iktale Phänomene beschränken. Bei der Behandlung dieser Patienten kommt einer guten interdisziplinären Zusammenarbeit besondere Bedeutung zu.

  19. [Biofeedback treatment for epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko

    2014-05-01

    Pharmacological treatment is the mainstay for the treatment of epilepsy. However concerns regarding long-term side effects of drugs are increasingly voiced. Behavioral treatments including biofeedback, represents an alternative management option for the control of epilepsy. Biofeedback is a non-invasive bio-behavioral procedure through which patients can learn to gain psychophysiological control over seizures. This article will first overview seizure precipitation from a psychological perspective, and then introduce three major biofeedback treatments. Sensory motor rhythm (SMR) and slow cortical potential(SCP) biofeedback uses electroencephalographic parameters and are categorized as neurofeedback. Electrodermal activity (EDA) biofeedback focuses on modulation of peripheral sympathetic tone. The neural mechanisms underlying biofeedback treatment will be discussed in relation to thalamo-cortical regulation(of neural excitability across brain networks).

  20. Phytocannabinoids and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, R G; Hallak, J E C; Leite, J P; Zuardi, A W; Crippa, J A S

    2015-04-01

    Antiepileptic drugs often produce serious adverse effects, and many patients do not respond to them properly. Phytocannabinoids produce anticonvulsant effects in preclinical and preliminary human studies, and appear to produce fewer adverse effects than available antiepileptic drugs. The present review summarizes studies on the anticonvulsant properties of phytocannabinoids. Literature search using the PubMed database to identify studies on phytocannabinoids and epilepsy. Preclinical studies suggest that phytocannabinoids, especially cannabidiol and cannabidivarin, have potent anticonvulsant effects which are mediated by the endocannabinoid system. Human studies are limited in number and quality, but suggest that cannabidiol has anticonvulsant effects in adult and infantile epilepsy and is well tolerated after prolonged administration. Phytocannabinoids produce anticonvulsant effects through the endocannabinoid system, with few adverse effects. Cannabidiol and cannabidivarin should be tested in randomized, controlled clinical trials, especially in infantile epileptic syndromes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manonmani, V; Wallace, S J

    1994-04-01

    The cases are described of eight children, five of them girls, who had epilepsy with myoclonic absences. The mean age of onset was 4.9 years. Brief episodes of loss of awareness with bilateral clonic jerking of the upper limbs were associated with rhythmic 3 cycles/second spike-wave discharges on electroencephalogram. Generalised tonic-clonic or astatic seizures, or both, also occurred in seven patients. All now have learning difficulties, and seven have behavioural problems. Conventional treatment for absences was effective in only two children. Of six patients treated with lamotrigine, five have improved substantially, but only one is in sustained complete remission. One recently diagnosed patient continues to have frequent myoclonic absences. As the response to treatment and long term outcome are much poorer, it is important to differentiate myoclonic absences from typical childhood absence epilepsy.

  2. Tuberous Sclerosis with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    50% of individuals with TS have learning difficulties that include autism , attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), behavioral issues...These findings of TS manifest themselves symptomatically as seizures, epilepsy, and learning disabilities including autism , ADHD, behavioral...molecular pathogenesis to rationale for treatment”. J Child Neurol 2005; 20:318 –325. 15) Chandra PS, Salamon N, Huang J, et al. “FDG-PET/MRI

  3. PET studies in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients...

  4. [Gelastic and cursive epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, K O

    1989-02-20

    When the most prominent ictal symptom in an epileptic seizure is laughing or running the condition has been termed respectively gelastic or cursive epilepsy. The article presents five patients with these ictal symptoms and discusses their clinical and EEG-features, etiology, and localisation of lesions responsible for the seizures. Laughter and running as ictal symptoms are usually part of complex partial seizures involving limbic structures or their efferent or afferent pathways.

  5. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  6. Neuropeptides in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Stjepana; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-12-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in modulating seizures and epilepsy. Unlike neurotransmitters which operate on a millisecond time-scale, neuropeptides have longer half lives; this leads to modulation of neuronal and network activity over prolonged periods, so contributing to setting the seizure threshold. Most neuropeptides are stored in large dense vesicles and co-localize with inhibitory interneurons. They are released upon high frequency stimulation making them attractive targets for modulation of seizures, during which high frequency discharges occur. Numerous neuropeptides have been implicated in epilepsy; one, ACTH, is already used in clinical practice to suppress seizures. Here, we concentrate on neuropeptides that have a direct effect on seizures, and for which therapeutic interventions are being developed. We have thus reviewed the abundant reports that support a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY), galanin, ghrelin, somatostatin and dynorphin in suppressing seizures and epileptogenesis, and for tachykinins having pro-epileptic effects. Most in vitro and in vivo studies are performed in hippocampal tissue in which receptor expression is usually high, making translation to other brain areas less clear. We highlight recent therapeutic strategies to treat epilepsy with neuropeptides, which are based on viral vector technology, and outline how such interventions need to be refined in order to address human disease.

  7. Epilepsie und polyzystisches Ovarialsyndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rösing B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsien sind gehäuft mit endokrinen Funktionsstörungen vergesellschaftet. Bei Frauen gehören Zyklusstörungen, Hyperandrogenismus, Gewichtszunahme und Subfertilität dazu. Die vorliegende Übersicht zeigt aktuelle Daten und pathophysiologische Vorstellungen zum Zusammenhang zwischen einer Erkrankung mit Epilepsie, ihrer Therapie, dem polyzstischen Ovarialsyndrom (PCOS, sowie assoziierten metabolischen Abweichungen. Mögliche Ursachen für das Auftreten endokriner Störungen bei Epilepsie sind (1. der direkte Einfluss temporal gelegener epileptogener Läsionen oder der antiepileptischen Medikamente (AED auf die hypothalamisch-hypophysär gonadale Achse (HHG, (2. der Einfluss von AED auf die ovarielle Funktion, (3. der Einfluss der AED auf den Steroidhormonmetabolismus inklusive ihrer Serumeiweißbindung und (4. AED-bedingte sekundäre endokrine Störungen durch Gewichtszunahme und veränderten Insulinmetabolismus. Die regelmäßige ärztliche Kontrolle klinischer endokriner Parameter wie Gewichtsentwicklung, Regeltempostörungen und Hirsutismus ist bei Frauen mit Epilepsie obligat. Einzelne auffällige Laborparameter (z. B. sinkendes sexualhormonbindendes Globulin [SHBG], ansteigende Testosteronwerte, Dysbalance der Gonadotropine luteinisierendes Hormon zu follikelstimulierendem Hormon (LH/FSH oder bildgebende Befunde (polyzystische Ovarien ohne klinisches Korrelat sollten engmaschig, zunächst 1–3-monatlich kontrolliert werden, um entstehende Endokrinopathien frühzeitig behandeln zu können.

  8. The epilepsy of Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiloh, L G

    1986-01-01

    The evidence in favour of a diagnosis of limbic epilepsy in the case of Dostoevsky is reviewed. Independent records from numerous biographical sources support the widely held view that Dostoevsky had frequent convulsive episodes, that the episodes began in childhood and continued throughout his life and that Dostoevsky himself was able accurately to record the premonitory aura and sequelae of such episodes. In addition the increasing memory impairment he suffered both for recent and remote events from the age of 40 supports the presence of progressive brain damage. This information renders implausible the analytic interpretations of Freud and his followers, that Dostoevsky's epilepsy was hysterical in origin, where epileptiform somatization was presumed to dispose of excessive psychic excitation, and that this process had its roots in Dostoevsky's unconscious hatred of his father and latent homosexuality. Nevertheless, Dostoevsky's neuroticism is clearly supported by his life-long hypochondriasis, obsessionality, paranoid traits, tendency to reactive depressions, and experience of quasi-hallucinatory episodes which were probably not epileptic in origin. Neither his epilepsy nor his neuroticism can explain or detract from the profundity and wisdom of the literary monuments which clearly attest Dostoevsky's ample genius.

  9. DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koralia Todorova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Depressive disorders are the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy but very often remain unrecognized and untreated. We examined 103 epileptic patients, aged 18-60 years, 40 males and 63 females, for the presence of interictal depressive disorder. All subjects underwent clinical psychiatric examination, including evaluation on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17. A questionnaire for demographic and seizure-related variables was also completed. Concurrent depressive disorder (clinically presented according to ICD-10 diagnostic criteria affected 28.3% of all evaluated patients. Based on HAM-D-17 scores depression was defined as mild - 80% of all depressed patients, moderate - 17% and severe - 3%. Atypical presentation of interictal depressive disorder was frequent. Depression has a tremendous effect on one’s family, social and psychological functioning, even more than the actual seizure frequency and severity. Diagnostic difficulties come through the atypical mode of presentation of depressive disorders in epilepsy. Proper neuropsychiatric evaluation is essential for improving treatment and quality of life for patients with epilepsy.

  10. Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy includes surgery, vagal nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet, and other alternative/complementary therapies, e.g., yoga, Ayurveda, electroencephalography (EEG biofeedback technique, aerobic exercise, music therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, acupuncture, and herbal remedies (traditional Chinese medicine. Alternative therapies, despite the term, should not be considered as an alternative to antiepileptic medication; they complement accepted drug treatment. Alternative therapies like yoga, through techniques that relax the body and mind, reduce stress, improve seizure control, and also improve quality of life. Ketogenic diet is a safe and effective treatment for intractable epilepsies; it has been recommended since 1921. The diet induces ketosis, which may control seizures. The most successful treatment of epilepsy is with modern antiepileptic drugs, which can achieve control of seizures in 70-80% cases. Patients opt for alternative therapies because they may be dissatisfied with antiepileptic drugs due to their unpleasant side effects, the long duration of treatment, failure to achieve control of seizures, cultural beliefs and, in the case of women, because they wish to get pregnant Surgical treatment may lead to physical and psychological sequelae and is an option only for a minority of patients. This article presents supportive evidence from randomized controlled trials done to assess the benefit of non-pharmacological treatment.

  11. Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Kossoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  12. Aetiology and long-term outcome of juvenile epilepsy in 136 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrol, L; Penderis, J; Garosi, L; Cripps, P; Gutierrez-Quintana, R; Gonçalves, R

    2012-03-01

    The aetiology and outcome of dogs with juvenile-onset seizures were investigated. One hundred and thirty-six dogs whose first seizure occurred before the age of one year were investigated. One hundred and two dogs were diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), 23 with symptomatic epilepsy (SE), nine with reactive seizures (RS) and two with probable symptomatic epilepsy (pSE). The outcome was known in 114 dogs; 37 per cent died or were euthanased as a consequence of seizures. The mean survival time of this population of dogs was 7.1 years. Factors that were significantly associated with survival outcome included the diagnosis of SE and the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used before investigation. The use of one AED before investigation and a diagnosis of SE were associated with a negative outcome, whereas receiving no AED medications before referral was associated with a longer survival. For dogs with IE, survival time was shortened if the dog was a border collie or with a history of status epilepticus;receiving no AEDs before referral in the IE group was associated with a positive outcome. Seizure-free status was achieved in 22 per cent of dogs diagnosed with IE. While the survival times were longer than previously reported in canine epilepsy, similar remission rates to those reported in childhood epilepsy, where a 70 per cent remission rate is documented, were not seen in the canine juvenile population.

  13. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  14. EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY OF LEVETIRACETAM (KEPPRA® IN THE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of substantial progress in epileptology, complete seizure control cannot be achieved in a considerable proportion of patients (about 30 %; in this regard, the synthesis of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and rational combinations of available AEDs in view of their mechanisms of action remains relevant. Of particular interest are drugs with different mechanisms of action in relation to other AEDs (these drugs include levetiracetam, lacosamide, perampanel, etc.. The authors provide a literature review dealing with one of the new drugs – levetiracetam (Keppra that has a different mechanism of action, as compared with other AEDs. Levetiracetam has been approved for use as initial monotherapy for partial-onset epilepsy with or without secondary generalization in patients who are at least 16 years of age, as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with and without secondary generalization in babies who are at least 1 month old (oral solution or in children who are at least 6 years old (tablets, and in patients who are at least 12 years of age as adjunctive treatment of myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and as therapy for generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The review details the mechanism of action of levetiracetam, its pharmacokinetics, and data on its efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of epilepsy. The findings have led to the conclusion that levetiracetam is a well-studied and promising drug used in the monoand polytherapy of different forms of epilepsy

  15. Satisfaction with antiepileptic drugs in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed and chronic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Ettore; Messina, Paolo; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Zamponi, Nelia; Casellato, Susanna; Margari, Lucia; Cianchetti, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    To assess incidence, indicators and outcome of satisfaction with antiepileptic drugs in children. Multicenter, observational, open, prospective survey of children and adolescents with epilepsy with three-month follow-up. Included were patients aged 3-17 years with newly diagnosed ("new diagnosis") or chronic epilepsy ("old diagnosis") requiring treatment start or change. Satisfaction was assessed with the Hedonic Visual Scale or direct questions, depending on patient's age. Quality of life of adolescents (QOLIE-48) and of caregivers (SF-36) and predictors of (dis)satisfaction were also assessed. 293 patients completed the study. Most had generalized idiopathic epilepsy, and a disease lasting satisfaction were 70.6% at one month and 75.8% at three months. Compared to old diagnosis, new diagnosis carried a higher satisfaction rate and improved satisfaction at end of follow-up. Independent predictors of dissatisfaction were an old diagnosis, adverse events and SF-36 score. The latter remained the only independent predictor of persisting dissatisfaction when adjusting for the presence of and the interaction with adverse events. About one-fourth of children and adolescents with epilepsy are dissatisfied with treatment. Chronic epilepsy, adverse events, and parents/caregivers with poor quality of life predict dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reading epilepsy: report of five new cases and further considerations on the pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, P; Mayer, T; Reker, M

    1998-08-01

    Five new cases of reading epilepsy (RE) are reported. This is an epilepsy syndrome belonging to the group of idiopathic localization-related epilepsies. They all have some interesting features which contribute to the understanding of the pathomechanism and nosology of this specific type of reflex epilepsy. In our first patient the precipitating effect of texts in unknown languages depended upon phonematic intricacy. With our second case, changes of script within the text (Latin to Greek) increased the precipitating effect. The visual aura experiences reported in vague terms by some patients with RE may represent ictal dyslexia. For case three RE had been misdiagnosed as phobic neurosis. Even if a patient has a history of development dyslexia, and ictal dyslexia is a feature of the seizures, the onset of RE is not during primary school age but at puberty. Our fourth patient's manifestation factor of (late-onset) RE was a change of scriptural environment (Kyrillic to Latin) . Unilateral myocloni were observed with bilateral spike wave discharge in RE, and carbamazepine possibly increased the epileptic response in RE. With the co-occurrence of RE and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in case five, the clinical features of both syndromes remained separate. All five patients responded well to treatment with valproic acid, and all confirmed that the syndrome has no tendency to deteriorate in long-term follow-up.

  17. Understanding of Epilepsy by Children and Young People with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann; Parsons, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    There is a striking dearth of studies focusing sensitively and in depth on the mainstream educational experiences of children with epilepsy, as viewed by those children themselves. The one-year project (2006-7) reported here addresses that gap. Children's perceptions about mainstream teachers' understanding of epilepsy and school-based needs are…

  18. Understanding of Epilepsy by Children and Young People with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann; Parsons, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    There is a striking dearth of studies focusing sensitively and in depth on the mainstream educational experiences of children with epilepsy, as viewed by those children themselves. The one-year project (2006-7) reported here addresses that gap. Children's perceptions about mainstream teachers' understanding of epilepsy and school-based needs are…

  19. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  20. Cannabinoids for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, David; Vickrey, Barbara

    2014-03-05

    Marijuana appears to have anti-epileptic effects in animals. It is not currently known if it is effective in patients with epilepsy. Some states in the United States of America have explicitly approved its use for epilepsy. To assess the efficacy and safety of cannabinoids when used as monotherapy or add-on treatment for people with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (9 September 2013), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 8), MEDLINE (Ovid) (9 September 2013), ISI Web of Knowledge (9 September 2013), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (9 September 2013), and ClinicalTrials.gov (9 September 2013). In addition, we included studies we personally knew about that were not found by the searches, as well as searched the references in the identified studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) whether blinded or not. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted the data. The primary outcome investigated was seizure freedom at one year or more, or three times the longest interseizure interval. Secondary outcomes included responder rate at six months or more, objective quality of life data, and adverse events. We found four randomized trial reports that included a total of 48 patients, each of which used cannabidiol as the treatment agent. One report was an abstract and another was a letter to the editor. Anti-epileptic drugs were continued in all studies. Details of randomisation were not included in any study report. There was no investigation of whether the control and treatment participant groups were the same or different. All the reports were low quality.The four reports only answered the secondary outcome about adverse effects. None of the patients in the treatment groups suffered adverse effects. No reliable conclusions can be drawn at present regarding the efficacy of cannabinoids as a treatment for epilepsy. The dose of 200 to 300 mg daily of cannabidiol was

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis monogenic strains: screening and interactions with insecticides used against rice pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M.N. Pinto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The screening of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt Cry proteins with high potential to control insect pests has been the goal of numerous research groups. In this study, we evaluated six monogenic Bt strains (Bt dendrolimus HD-37, Bt kurstaki HD-1, Bt kurstaki HD-73, Bt thuringiensis 4412, Bt kurstaki NRD-12 and Bt entomocidus 60.5, which codify the cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ba, cry1C, cry2A genes respectively as potential insecticides for the most important insect pests of irrigated rice: Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, Oryzophagus oryzae, Oebalus poecilus and Tibraca limbativentris. We also analyzed their compatibility with chemical insecticides (thiamethoxam, labdacyhalothrin, malathion and fipronil, which are extensively used in rice crops. The bioassay results showed that Bt thuringiensis 4412 and Bt entomocidus 60.5 were the most toxic for the lepidopterans, with a 93% and 82% mortality rate for S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis, respectively. For O. oryzae, the Bt kurstaki NRD-12 (64% and Bt dendrolimus HD-37 (62% strains were the most toxic. The Bt dendrolimus HD-37 strain also caused high mortality (82% to O. poecilus, however the strains assessed to T. limbativentris caused a maximum rate of 5%. The assays for the Bt strains interaction with insecticides revealed the compatibility of the six strains with the four insecticides tested. The results from this study showed the high potential of cry1Aa and cry1Ba genes for genetic engineering of rice plants or the strains to biopesticide formulations.

  2. Acute administration of benzodiazepines as part of treatment strategies for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Ad-hoc administration of benzodiazepines (BZD) is well established in status epilepticus, but intermittent BZD use in the treatment of chronic epilepsy is little known beyond catamenial epilepsy. We aim to assess the use of acute drug administration (ADA) in the treatment of 24 patients with epilepsy (9 idiopathic generalized, 14 focal symptomatic/cryptogenic, 1 migraine-epilepsy) receiving ADA for (1) prevention of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) after minor seizures, (2) prevention of seizures at perceived risk, (3) prevention of seizure clusters. Standard ADA was 10 mg oral clobazam (CLB); one patient received 10 mg rectal diazepam. Concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AED) remained unchanged whenever possible. Ten patients used ADA always correctly, 7 mostly, 7 sporadically or not. Outcome considering seizure control was positive in 44% of all patients (59% of those who actually used ADA): 5 patients seizure free, 1 free of disabling seizures, 4 with >50% reduction in seizure frequency. Eleven had minor or no improvement, 3 patients could not be rated. Thirteen (of 19 possible) patients attempted prevention of seizures or clusters, 10 with full or >50% success (52.6 resp. 76.9%). Prevention of clusters sometimes required higher or repetitive CLB dosing. Self rating of patients who did use ADA was positive or very positive in 88.2%. Retention rate was 66.7% of all patients, and 88.2% of those using ADA. The best results were obtained in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) patients with seizures habitually triggered by typical factors (sleep deprival, alcohol) but also some others were successful. The only adverse effect was gait ataxia in a multiple-handicapped patient. ADA is an elegant and often successful but underused treatment option for selected patient groups where it can make the difference between becoming seizure free or not. Depending on the individual case it can be applied as monotherapy or in combination with a basis AED. A controlled

  3. Idiopathic atrophie blanche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Lauretta; Chiarini, Caterina; Berti, Samantha; Massi, Daniela; Fabbri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    clinical, serologic, histopathologic, and immunopathologic findings, a diagnosis of idiopathic atrophie blanche was made. The patient was treated with dapsone (50 mg p.o. q.d.) and pentoxifylline (400 mg p.o. t.i.d.) with pain relief and complete resolution of the ulcerations after 6 weeks of therapy.

  4. Cough in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.G. Van Manen (Mirjam J.G.); S.S. Birring (Surinder S.); C. Vancheri (Carlo); V. Cottin (Vincent); Renzoni, E.A. (Elisabetta A.); Russell, A.-M. (Anne-Marie); M.S. Wijsenbeek (Marlies)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMany patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) complain of chronic refractory cough. Chronic cough is a distressing and disabling symptom with a major impact on quality of life. During recent years, progress has been made in gaining insight into the pathogenesis of cough in IPF,

  5. Genetics in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Heleen Marion

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a non-common disease in children that can persist into adulthood. JIA is considered to be an auto-immune disease. Genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis. In a new cohort of JIA patients from North-West European descent genetic candidate gene associatio

  6. Antioxidant therapy in idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Majzoub

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Additional randomized controlled studies are required to confirm the efficacy and safety of antioxidant supplementation in the medical treatment of idiopathic male infertility as well as the dosage required to improve semen parameters, fertilization rates, and pregnancy outcomes in iOAT.

  7. Cough in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.G. Van Manen (Mirjam J.G.); S.S. Birring (Surinder S.); C. Vancheri (Carlo); V. Cottin (Vincent); Renzoni, E.A. (Elisabetta A.); Russell, A.-M. (Anne-Marie); M.S. Wijsenbeek (Marlies)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMany patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) complain of chronic refractory cough. Chronic cough is a distressing and disabling symptom with a major impact on quality of life. During recent years, progress has been made in gaining insight into the pathogenesis of cough in IPF,

  8. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Motamedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the problem of seizures requires knowledge of the clinical details and features of the seizures, the functional abnormality in the brain as shown on the EEG, and the structural assessment of the brain with an MRI study optimized for epilepsy. Usually MRI or computed tomographic (CT scan should be performed in evaluating the cause of a newly diagnosed seizure disorder. MRI is preferred over CT because of its greater sensitivity and specificity for identifying small lesions."nBecause there is an option of surgical excision of the "seizure focus," which may cure the patient, the detection of a focal abnormality of the brain is important for the formulation of the reason for the seizures and the options available for treatment. Knowledge of the brain abnormalities early in the course of treating the patient greatly helps the management of each individual. The challenge to epileptologists is that the problem of epilepsy is a special one, which requires optimized protocols dedicated to it."nMRI interpretation is different when used in a screening way and when viewed in the context of other investigations. This is particularly important when the patient has partial seizures and may be considered for surgical treatment."nMost centers that deal with epilepsy spend a great deal of time in ensuring the quality of their EEG and EEG interpretation. However, unless there is a radiologist with an interest in epilepsy or an epileptologist who spends time with radiologist colleagues, it can be difficult to establish good epilepsy-focused MRI with appropriate sequences, radiography, and interpretation. MRI acquisition and interpretation need to be focused on the problem of epilepsy."nIndication"nThe American academy of neurology has published practice parameters for neuroimaging (NI studies (MRI, CT of patients having a first seizure. Emergent NI (scan immediately should be performed when a health care provider suspects a serious

  9. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination.

  10. The Music Student with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Matthew C.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Laverghetta, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship can afford the music educator an opportunity to be the first to identify behaviors associated with epilepsy. A case of a student with epilepsy, based on the authors' experience, is described in which the music educators were the first and only individuals to become aware of a change in the student's behavior, after…

  11. The Music Student with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Matthew C.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Laverghetta, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship can afford the music educator an opportunity to be the first to identify behaviors associated with epilepsy. A case of a student with epilepsy, based on the authors' experience, is described in which the music educators were the first and only individuals to become aware of a change in the student's behavior, after…

  12. Electroencephalography in dogs with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Høgenhaven, H; Flagstad, Annette Borgbjerg

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder.......To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder....

  13. The Mozart Effect and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at Kaohsiung Medical University and other centers in Taiwan studied the long-term effect of listening to Mozart K-448 (Sonata for Two Pianos in D major) on the frequency of epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy, and analyzed the relationship between the number of epileptiform discharges and foci of origin, epilepsy etiology, age, IQ, and gender.

  14. Genetic association study identifies HSPB7 as a risk gene for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Stark

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a structural heart disease with strong genetic background. Monogenic forms of DCM are observed in families with mutations located mostly in genes encoding structural and sarcomeric proteins. However, strong evidence suggests that genetic factors also affect the susceptibility to idiopathic DCM. To identify risk alleles for non-familial forms of DCM, we carried out a case-control association study, genotyping 664 DCM cases and 1,874 population-based healthy controls from Germany using a 50K human cardiovascular disease bead chip covering more than 2,000 genes pre-selected for cardiovascular relevance. After quality control, 30,920 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP were tested for association with the disease by logistic regression adjusted for gender, and results were genomic-control corrected. The analysis revealed a significant association between a SNP in HSPB7 gene (rs1739843, minor allele frequency 39% and idiopathic DCM (p = 1.06 × 10⁻⁶, OR  = 0.67 [95% CI 0.57-0.79] for the minor allele T. Three more SNPs showed p < 2.21 × 10⁻⁵. De novo genotyping of these four SNPs was done in three independent case-control studies of idiopathic DCM. Association between SNP rs1739843 and DCM was significant in all replication samples: Germany (n =564, n = 981 controls, p = 2.07 × 10⁻³, OR = 0.79 [95% CI 0.67-0.92], France 1 (n = 433 cases, n = 395 controls, p =3.73 × 10⁻³, OR  = 0.74 [95% CI 0.60-0.91], and France 2 (n = 249 cases, n = 380 controls, p = 2.26 × 10⁻⁴, OR  = 0.63 [95% CI 0.50-0.81]. The combined analysis of all four studies including a total of n = 1,910 cases and n = 3,630 controls showed highly significant evidence for association between rs1739843 and idiopathic DCM (p = 5.28 × 10⁻¹³, OR= 0.72 [95% CI 0.65-0.78]. None of the other three SNPs showed significant results in the replication stage.This finding of the HSPB7 gene from a genetic search for idiopathic DCM using

  15. Epilepsy, language, and social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Rochelle

    2017-10-04

    Language and social skills are essential for intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning and quality of life. Since epilepsy impacts these important domains of individuals' functioning, understanding the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the relationship among epilepsy, language, and social skills has important theoretical and clinical implications. This review first describes the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the association between language and social behavior in children and in adults and their relevance for epilepsy. It reviews the findings of studies of social skills and the few studies conducted on the inter-relationship of language and social skills in pediatric and adult epilepsy. The paper concludes with suggested future research and clinical directions that will enhance early identification and treatment of epilepsy patients at risk for impaired language and social skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Definition and classification of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibiki, Itsuki

    2014-05-01

    The concept or definition of epilepsy was mentioned as a chronic disease of the brain consisting of repetitions of EEG paroxysm and clinical seizures caused by excessive discharges of the cerebral neurons, in reference with Gastaut's opinion and the other statements. Further, we referred to diseases to be excluded from epilepsy such as isolated, occasional and subclinical seizures and so on. Next, new classifications of seizures and epilepsies were explained on the basis of revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies in Report of the ILAE Communication in Classification and Terminology, 2005-09, in comparison with the Classification of Epileptic Seizures in 1981 and the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes in 1989.

  17. Gelastic epilepsy: Beyond hypothalamic hamartomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Uribe-San-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelastic epilepsy or laughing seizures have been historically related to children with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report three adult patients who had gelastic epilepsy, defined as the presence of seizures with a prominent laugh component, including brain imaging, surface/invasive electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and medical/surgical outcomes. None of the patients had hamartoma or other hypothalamic lesion. Two patients were classified as having refractory epilepsy (one had biopsy-proven neurocysticercosis and the other one hippocampal sclerosis and temporal cortical dysplasia. The third patient had no lesion on MRI and had complete control with carbamazepine. Both lesional patients underwent resective surgery, one with complete seizure control and the other one with poor outcome. Although hypothalamic hamartomas should always be ruled out in patients with gelastic epilepsy, laughing seizures can also arise from frontal and temporal lobe foci, which can be surgically removed. In addition, we present the first case of gelastic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

  18. The social and economic consequences of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy.......Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy....

  19. The social and economic consequences of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy.......Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy....

  20. 38 CFR 4.122 - Psychomotor epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Psychomotor epilepsy. 4... Psychomotor epilepsy. The term psychomotor epilepsy refers to a condition that is characterized by seizures... psychomotor epilepsy vary from patient to patient and in the same patient from seizure to seizure. (b) A...

  1. Epilepsie und psychiatrische Erkrankungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumgartner C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatrische Erkrankungen treten bei Epilepsiepatienten signifikant häufiger auf als in der Allgemeinbevölkerung und als bei Patienten mit anderen chronischen Erkrankungen. Die Depression stellt die häufigste psychiatrische Begleiterkrankung bei Epilepsie dar. Die Häufigkeit von Depressionen korreliert mit der Anfallskontrolle: Sie liegt zwischen 3 und 9 % bei gut kontrollierter Epilepsie, jedoch zwischen 20 und 55 % bei Patienten mit therapieresistenten Epilepsien. Umgekehrt ist bei Patienten mit neu diagnostizierten Epilepsien anamnestisch signifikant häufiger eine Depression zu erheben als in einem Vergleichskollektiv. Diese bidirektionale Beziehung zwischen Epilepsie und Depression könnte durch gemeinsame Pathomechanismen beider Erkrankungen erklärt werden. Obwohl das Vorliegen und der Schweregrad einer Depression die wichtigsten Prädiktoren für die Lebensqualität bei Epilepsiepatienten darstellen, werden Depressionen bei Epilepsiepatienten unterdiagnostiziert und unterbehandelt. Eine psychopharmakologische Behandlung sollte bei Vorliegen einer Begleitdepression deshalb unverzüglich initiiert werden, das epileptogene Potential von Antidepressiva stellt dabei ein vernachlässigbares Risiko dar. Die Prävalenz psychotischer Störungen bei Epilepsiepatienten liegt zwischen 2 und 8 %, wobei sogenannte episodische Psychosen (iktale, postiktale und Alternativpsychosen, die in einem zeitlichen Bezug zum Anfallsgeschehen stehen, und chronische Psychosen (interiktale Psychosen ohne zeitlichen Bezug zu den Anfällen, unterschieden werden können. Die Prävalenz von Angststörungen bei Epilepsiepatienten liegt zwischen 15 und 25 %. Man kann zwischen präiktaler, iktaler, postiktaler und interiktaler Angst unterscheiden.

  2. Epilepsy and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly de Albuquerque

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed 155 subjects with STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory: 75 epileptic patients and 80 normal subjects used as a control group. A higher trait-anxiety score (chronic anxiety than that of controls was found for the epileptic group. For the epileptic group higher levels of the A-trait occurred in patients with EEG abnormalities with left temporal localization. We have also observed that the shorter the epilepsy lasts (less than two years, the higher the trait-anxiety levels. Convulsions and awareness loss during epileptic seizures do not modify state and trait-anxiety scores.

  3. Epilepsy in Dante's poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Dante Alighieri is the greatest Italian poet and one of the most important writers in Western literature. He is best known for the epic poem "Commedia", later named "La Divina Commedia" that has profoundly influenced not only poetic imagination but also all subsequent allegorical creations of imaginary worlds in literature. This paper examines the poetic description of some episodes of loss of consciousness in Dante's poetry discussing how and why typical elements of epileptic seizures have been used. On the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth, his poetry still remains to be an inspiring source of debate and reflection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  4. Yoga for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Sridharan, Kalpana; Ramaratnam, Sridharan

    2015-05-02

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002.Yoga may induce relaxation and stress reduction, and influence the electroencephalogram and the autonomic nervous system, thereby controlling seizures. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy if proved effective. To assess whether people with epilepsy treated with yoga:(a) have a greater probability of becoming seizure free;(b) have a significant reduction in the frequency or duration of seizures, or both; and(c) have a better quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (26 March 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 26 March 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 26 March 2015), SCOPUS (1823 to 9 January 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (26 March 2015), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (26 March 2015), and also registries of the Yoga Biomedical Trust and the Research Council for Complementary Medicine. In addition, we searched the references of all the identified studies. No language restrictions were imposed. The following study designs were eligible for inclusion: randomised controlled trials (RCT) of treatment of epilepsy with yoga. Eligible participants were adults with uncontrolled epilepsy comparing yoga with no treatment or different behavioural treatments. Three review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. The following outcomes were assessed: (a) percentage of people rendered seizure free; (b) seizure frequency and duration; (c) quality of life. Analyses were on an intention-to-treat basis. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% Cl) were estimated for the outcomes. Two unblinded trials recruited a total of 50 people (18 treated with yoga and 32 to control interventions). Antiepileptic drugs were continued in all the participants. Baseline phase lasted 3 months

  5. Estimation of cardiac motion in cine-MRI sequences by correlation transform optical flow of monogenic features distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Liu, Wanyu; Wang, Liang; Liu, Zhengjun; Croisille, Pierre; Delachartre, Philippe; Clarysse, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Cine-MRI is widely used for the analysis of cardiac function in clinical routine, because of its high soft tissue contrast and relatively short acquisition time in comparison with other cardiac MRI techniques. The gray level distribution in cardiac cine-MRI is relatively homogenous within the myocardium, and can therefore make motion quantification difficult. To ensure that the motion estimation problem is well posed, more image features have to be considered. This work is inspired by a method previously developed for color image processing. The monogenic signal provides a framework to estimate the local phase, orientation, and amplitude, of an image, three features which locally characterize the 2D intensity profile. The independent monogenic features are combined into a 3D matrix for motion estimation. To improve motion estimation accuracy, we chose the zero-mean normalized cross-correlation as a matching measure, and implemented a bilateral filter for denoising and edge-preservation. The monogenic features distance is used in lieu of the color space distance in the bilateral filter. Results obtained from four realistic simulated sequences outperformed two other state of the art methods even in the presence of noise. The motion estimation errors (end point error) using our proposed method were reduced by about 20% in comparison with those obtained by the other tested methods. The new methodology was evaluated on four clinical sequences from patients presenting with cardiac motion dysfunctions and one healthy volunteer. The derived strain fields were analyzed favorably in their ability to identify myocardial regions with impaired motion.

  6. [Monogenic form of diabetes mellitus due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1) - the first case in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermendy, György; Balogh, István; Gaál, Zsolt

    2016-03-20

    The classification of diabetes mellitus in adolescents and young adults is often difficult. The diagnosis of the monogenic form of diabetes may have substantial influence on quality of life, prognosis and the choice of the appropriate treatment of affected patients. Among MODY (maturity-onset of diabetes in the young) MODY-1 is rarely detected, only 13 families were described in 2000, and 103 different mutations in 173 families were known in 2013 worldwide. The authors present the first Hungarian case of a monogenic form of diabetes due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1). The diabetes of the index patient No. 1 (42-year-old woman with insulin treated diabetes) was diagnosed as gestational diabetes at age of 20 when she was treated with diet only. Later, insulin treatment has been initiated when marked hyperglycaemia was detected during an episode of acute pneumonia at age of 26. The diabetes of the index patient No. 2 (20-year-old daughter of the index patient No. 1, treated also with insulin) was diagnosed as type 2 diabetes at age of 13 and the patient was treated with diet only. Later the classification was modified to type 1 and insulin therapy was initiated at age of 14. The manifestation of diabetes, the familial occurrence and the low dose insulin requirement were suggestive for monogenic diabetes. Using molecular genetic method a mutation (c.869G>A, p.R290H) of HNF4α gene was found and MODY-1 was diagnosed in both cases. Insulin therapy was switched to treatment with low dose sulfanylurea and an excellent glycaemic control was achieved and sustained at follow-up of 1-year. No further positive cases were found during screening of other family members.

  7. Evaluation of PCR-based preimplantation genetic diagnosis applied to monogenic diseases: a collaborative ESHRE PGD consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreesen, Jos; Destouni, Aspasia; Kourlaba, Georgia; Degn, Birte; Mette, Wulf Christensen; Carvalho, Filipa; Moutou, Celine; Sengupta, Sioban; Dhanjal, Seema; Renwick, Pamela; Davies, Steven; Kanavakis, Emmanouel; Harton, Gary; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2014-08-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders currently involves polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, which must be robust, sensitive and highly accurate, precluding misdiagnosis. Twelve adverse misdiagnoses reported to the ESHRE PGD-Consortium are likely an underestimate. This retrospective study, involving six PGD centres, assessed the validity of PCR-based PGD through reanalysis of untransferred embryos from monogenic-PGD cycles. Data were collected on the genotype concordance at PGD and follow-up from 940 untransferred embryos, including details on the parameters of PGD cycles: category of monogenic disease, embryo morphology, embryo biopsy and genotype assay strategy. To determine the validity of PCR-based PGD, the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. Stratified analyses were also conducted to assess the influence of the parameters above on the validity of PCR-based PGD. The analysis of overall data showed that 93.7% of embryos had been correctly classified at the time of PGD, with Se of 99.2% and Sp of 80.9%. The stratified analyses found that diagnostic accuracy is statistically significantly higher when PGD is performed on two cells versus one cell (P=0.001). Se was significantly higher when multiplex protocols versus singleplex protocols were applied (P=0.005), as well as for PGD applied on cells from good compared with poor morphology embryos (P=0.032). Morphology, however, did not affect diagnostic accuracy. Multiplex PCR-based methods on one cell, are as robust as those on two cells regarding false negative rate, which is the most important criteria for clinical PGD applications. Overall, this study demonstrates the validity, robustness and high diagnostic value of PCR-based PGD.

  8. Effectiveness and tolerability of rufinamide in children and adults with refractory epilepsy: first European experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Gerhard; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Haberlandt, Edda; Ernst, Jan-Peter; Runge, Uwe; Schneider, Felix; Makowski, Christine; Boor, Rainer; Bast, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the effectiveness and tolerability of rufinamide in a heterogeneous group of patients with refractory epilepsies in Europe, immediately after the drug became available as an orphan drug for the adjunctive treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). This observational study was conducted as a collection of retrospective data from multiple centers in Germany and Austria. Clinical course in patients treated with rufinamide was documented. Initial dosage and titration schedule of rufinamide were at the discretion of the treating physician according to medical need. The observation period was 12 weeks. Effectiveness was evaluated by comparing the frequency of seizures with limitations to the countability between baseline and the last 4-week period of observation. The study population consisted of 45 children and 15 adults (mean age: 14.5+/-11.6 years, range: 1-50) with various severe and inadequately controlled epilepsy syndromes, that is, LGS (n=31), idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndromes (n=5), cryptogenic unclassified generalized epilepsy (n=7), and partial epilepsy (n=17). The response rate (50% reduction in countable seizures) was 46.7% (28 of 60 patients) in total; 25.0% experienced a 75% reduction in seizure frequency and 21.7% experienced a 50-75% reduction. Complete seizure control was achieved by 8.3%. The highest response rate was observed in patients with LGS (17/31, 54.8%), and the lowest in patients with partial epilepsy (4/17, 23.5%). Response rate in patients with unclassified generalized epilepsy was 42.8% (3/7 patients). A total of 67 adverse events were reported by 35 of 60 patients. The most frequently occurring adverse events were fatigue (18.3%), vomiting (13.3%), and loss of appetite (10.0%). No serious adverse events were observed. These preliminary data suggest that rufinamide may be effective and well tolerated in the treatment of children and adults with various epilepsy syndromes and difficult

  9. Treatment of epilepsy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakgazi, Evren; French, Jacqueline A

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder in adults and requires treatment with antiepileptic medication. While the majority of patients with epilepsy can be treated with medication, about one third will fail on medical treatment. Therefore, other treatment options such as surgery, devices, and the ketogenic diet are other options to consider, in addition to medical treatment. The treatment of epilepsy requires many other factors to be taken into consideration, and these include, but are not limited to, age, gender, coexistent medical conditions, and the use of concomitant medications. The goal of treatment is to provide optimal seizure control while using the least possible number of medications, particularly for young females at reproductive age or the elderly who may suffer from other medical diseases and receive other concomitant medications. Certain conditions may co-exist with epilepsy, such as migraine, mood disorder, and memory disturbances, therefore the decision to choose the most appropriate medication for epilepsy patients should also involve treatment of these conditions. Here, we review current clinical practice in epilepsy and focus on the most common problems and conditions that clinicians face on a daily basis to treat adult patients with epilepsy. Side effect profiles, spectrum of efficacy and optimal choices per predominant type of seizures are summarized and can be used for educational purposes.

  10. Priorities in pediatric epilepsy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Christine B.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Dlugos, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The Priorities in Pediatric Epilepsy Research workshop was held in the spirit of patient-centered and patient-driven mandates for developing best practices in care, particularly for epilepsy beginning under age 3 years. The workshop brought together parents, representatives of voluntary advocacy organizations, physicians, allied health professionals, researchers, and administrators to identify priority areas for pediatric epilepsy care and research including implementation and testing of interventions designed to improve care processes and outcomes. Priorities highlighted were 1) patient outcomes, especially seizure control but also behavioral, academic, and social functioning; 2) early and accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment; 3) role and involvement of parents (communication and shared decision-making); and 4) integration of school and community organizations with epilepsy care delivery. Key factors influencing pediatric epilepsy care included the child's impairments and seizure presentation, parents, providers, the health care system, and community systems. Care was represented as a sequential process from initial onset of seizures to referral for comprehensive evaluation when needed. We considered an alternative model in which comprehensive care would be utilized from onset, proactively, rather than reactively after pharmacoresistance became obvious. Barriers, including limited levels of evidence about many aspects of diagnosis and management, access to care—particularly epilepsy specialty and behavioral health care—and implementation, were identified. Progress hinges on coordinated research efforts that systematically address gaps in knowledge and overcoming barriers to access and implementation. The stakes are considerable, and the potential benefits for reduced burden of refractory epilepsy and lifelong disabilities may be enormous. PMID:23966254

  11. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  12. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, J; Fitzsimons, M; Delanty, N; Collins, C; Boland, M; Normand, C

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  13. [Memory and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease that begins in the early age and that is associated with frequent and disturbing memory deficits. Repeated seizures will lead to the formation of an epileptogenic network that may interfere with physiological neuronal networks and thus with normal brain function: by direct activation or indirectly by deactivation during a seizure, see for example the dreamy state or the ''déja vécu'' phenomenon during temporal seizures; by ictal or post-ictal inhibition, see for example ictal or post-ictal amnesia; by a repetitive and chronic modulation leading to a reorganization of the physiological neuronal networks. The study of these interactions between epileptic and physiological neural networks must lead to better explore the patient's memory and predict memory worsening before temporal lobe surgery and to better understand the reorganization of memory networks in chronic epilepsy. The goal is double: (1) improve the prediction of post-operative memory worsening and guide rehabilitation in epileptic clinical practice; (2) improve the pathophysiological knowledge about memory processes. © Société de Biologie, 2010.

  14. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky's novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuil, Piet H A

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881) suffered from epilepsy. Some type of psychopathology can be found in about 25% of the characters of his novels. Some of them have seizures. In at least five of them Dostoevsky clearly intends them to have epilepsy. Others are more likely to be created as people with hysteria or sometimes, for instance, possession. In this essay an inventory is given by more or less comprehensive quotes of different types of seizures in five novels. The seizures are named in the novels with a varying vocabulary based on the concepts of nosology in the 19th century, the knowledge of Dostoevsky of these concepts, his own experiences, and problems in translation and transliteration. In the discussion, analysis of the role these factors played in the understanding of what Dostoevsky really expressed is given attention. Special attention is given to the so-called ecstatic aura. This element of focal epileptic seizures is so rare that in the past the description of it raised doubts on its existence as such and therefore the embellishment by Dostoevsky, describing his own experience and/or that of his epileptic characters Kirillov and Myshkin. The consequence of this analytic approach, however, should not be losing one's amazement of the genius polyphonic creativity of Dostoevsky to integrate so many profound aspects of the human and especially the Russian soul in the characters of his novels. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Machado de Assis's epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C A

    1992-09-01

    Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is considered the most important Brazilian writer and a great universal literary figure. Little is know about his medical, personal and family history. He hid his "disease" as much as possible. Machado referred to "strange things" having happened to him in his childhood. He described seizures as "nervous phenomena", "absenses", "my illness". Laet observed a seizure and described it as: "... when Machado approached us and spoke to me in disconnected words. I looked at him in surprise and found his features altered. Knowing that from time to time he had nervous problems, ... and only permitted Machado take the Laranjeiras Street car, when I saw that he was completely well". A photographically documented seizure is shown. Alencar wrote, "The preoccupation with health was frequent: either he was having the consequences of a fit or was foreboding one". It is clear that Machado presented localized symptomatic epilepsy with complex partial seizures secondarily generalized of unknown etiology. The seizures which began in infancy or childhood had remission in adolescence and then recurred in his thirties and became more frequent in his later years. His depression got markedly worse with age. In our opinion, the greatest consequence of Machado's epilepsy, was his psychological suffering due to the prejudice of the times. Despite this Machado showed all his genius, which is still actual and universal.

  16. Natural approaches to epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaby, Alan R

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews research on the use of diet, nutritional supplements, and hormones in the treatment of epilepsy. Potentially beneficial dietary interventions include identifying and treating blood glucose dysregulation, identifying and avoiding allergenic foods, and avoiding suspected triggering agents such as alcohol, aspartame, and monosodium glutamate. The ketogenic diet may be considered for severe, treatment-resistant cases. The Atkins diet (very low in carbohydrates) is a less restrictive type of ketogenic diet that may be effective in some cases. Nutrients that may reduce seizure frequency include vitamin B6, magnesium, vitamin E, manganese, taurine, dimethylglycine, and omega-3 fatty acids. Administration of thiamine may improve cognitive function in patients with epilepsy. Supplementation with folic acid, vitamin B6, biotin, vitamin D, and L-carnitine may be needed to prevent or treat deficiencies resulting from the use of anticonvulsant drugs. Vitamin K1 has been recommended near the end of pregnancy for women taking anticonvulsants. Melatonin may reduce seizure frequency in some cases, and progesterone may be useful for women with cyclic exacerbations of seizures. In most cases, nutritional therapy is not a substitute for anticonvulsant medications. However, in selected cases, depending on the effectiveness of the interventions, dosage reductions or discontinuation of medications may be possible.

  17. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  18. Managing epilepsy in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are close to one and half million women with epilepsy (WWE in reproductive age group in India. WWE have several unique gender-specific problems in the biological and social domains. Women experience more social stigma from epilepsy and have more difficulty with education and employment. They have more difficulty to get married and sustain successful family life. Reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone have opposing effect on seizure threshold. WWE have increased risk of infertility. About 10% of their babies may have major congenital malformations. Most of the adverse biological outcomes for WWE are related to adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. Traditional AEDs like phenobarbitone and sodium valproate are probably associated with increased risk of fetal malformations or other adverse fetal outcomes. Polytherapy and use of high dose of any AED is associated with higher risk fetal complications. It is very important that all WWE have a preconception evaluation done by a neurologist, when the need to continue AEDs or possibility of reducing AED load could be assessed. All WWE need to take folic acid 5 mg daily during preconception period and pregnancy. They should undergo a detailed screening for fetal malformations between 12 and 18 weeks of pregnancy. The neurologist, gynecologist, imageologist and pediatrician need to work as a team while managing pregnancy in WWE. It is important to reassure WWE and their relatives that pregnancy is safe in WWE and their children are healthy in more than 90% instances.

  19. Managing epilepsy in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2011-01-01

    There are close to one and half million women with epilepsy (WWE) in reproductive age group in India. WWE have several unique gender-specific problems in the biological and social domains. Women experience more social stigma from epilepsy and have more difficulty with education and employment. They have more difficulty to get married and sustain successful family life. Reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone have opposing effect on seizure threshold. WWE have increased risk of infertility. About 10% of their babies may have major congenital malformations. Most of the adverse biological outcomes for WWE are related to adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Traditional AEDs like phenobarbitone and sodium valproate are probably associated with increased risk of fetal malformations or other adverse fetal outcomes. Polytherapy and use of high dose of any AED is associated with higher risk fetal complications. It is very important that all WWE have a preconception evaluation done by a neurologist, when the need to continue AEDs or possibility of reducing AED load could be assessed. All WWE need to take folic acid 5 mg daily during preconception period and pregnancy. They should undergo a detailed screening for fetal malformations between 12 and 18 weeks of pregnancy. The neurologist, gynecologist, imageologist and pediatrician need to work as a team while managing pregnancy in WWE. It is important to reassure WWE and their relatives that pregnancy is safe in WWE and their children are healthy in more than 90% instances.

  20. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, Erik H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, the field of neuroimaging has undergone dramatic development. Specifically, of importance for clinicians and researchers managing patients with epilepsies, new methods of brain imaging in search of the seizure-producing abnormalities have been implemented, and older methods have undergone additional refinement. Methodology to predict seizure freedom and cognitive outcome has also rapidly progressed. In general, the image data processing methods are very different and more complicated than even a decade ago. In this review, we identify the recent developments in neuroimaging that are aimed at improved management of epilepsy patients. Advances in structural imaging, diffusion imaging, fMRI, structural and functional connectivity, hybrid imaging methods, quantitative neuroimaging, and machine-learning are discussed. We also briefly summarize the potential new developments that may shape the field of neuroimaging in the near future and may advance not only our understanding of epileptic networks as the source of treatment-resistant seizures but also better define the areas that need to be treated in order to provide the patients with better long-term outcomes.