WorldWideScience

Sample records for monogamous partners practising

  1. ‘It is not expected for married couples’: a qualitative study on challenges to safer sex communication among polygamous and monogamous partners in southeastern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtenga, Sally Mmanyi; Geubbels, Eveline; Tanner, Marcel; Merten, Sonja; Pfeiffer, Constanze

    2016-01-01

    Background Behavioral change approaches for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention in Tanzania encourage married partners to observe safe sex practices (condom use, avoidance of, or safe sex with multiple partners). To implement this advice, partners need to communicate with each other about safer sex, which is often challenging. Although social-structural factors are crucial in understanding sexual behavior, only a few studies focus on understanding safer sex dialogue in a broader social context. Design Drawing on the WHO-Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (WHO-CSDH) framework, this study explored key social-structural constructs for studying health in the context of improving safer sex dialogue between polygamous and monogamous partners. Twenty-four in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus group discussions (FGDs) with 38 men and women aged 18–60 years were conducted in Ifakara town located in Kilombero district, Tanzania. The study was nested within the community health surveillance project MZIMA (Kiswahili: ‘being healthy’). Partners’ experiences of safer sex dialogue in polygamous and monogamous relations were investigated and the challenges to safer sex dialogue explored. Results The study revealed that open safer sex dialogue in marriage is limited and challenged by social norms about marriage (a view that safer sex dialogue imply that partners are ‘not really’ married); marital status (a belief that safer sex dialogue is not practical in polygamous marriages, the elder wife should be exempted from the dialogue since she is at lower risk of engaging in extramarital affairs); relationship quality (marital conflicts, extramarital affairs, trust, and sexual dissatisfaction); and gender power relations (the notion that females’ initiative to discuss condom use and HIV couple counseling and testing may lead to conflict or divorce). Conclusions Implementing safer sex practices requires interventions beyond promotion messages. HIV

  2. ‘It is not expected for married couples’: a qualitative study on challenges to safer sex communication among polygamous and monogamous partners in southeastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Mmanyi Mtenga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behavioral change approaches for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV prevention in Tanzania encourage married partners to observe safe sex practices (condom use, avoidance of, or safe sex with multiple partners. To implement this advice, partners need to communicate with each other about safer sex, which is often challenging. Although social-structural factors are crucial in understanding sexual behavior, only a few studies focus on understanding safer sex dialogue in a broader social context. Design: Drawing on the WHO-Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (WHO-CSDH framework, this study explored key social-structural constructs for studying health in the context of improving safer sex dialogue between polygamous and monogamous partners. Twenty-four in-depth interviews (IDIs and six focus group discussions (FGDs with 38 men and women aged 18–60 years were conducted in Ifakara town located in Kilombero district, Tanzania. The study was nested within the community health surveillance project MZIMA (Kiswahili: ‘being healthy’. Partners’ experiences of safer sex dialogue in polygamous and monogamous relations were investigated and the challenges to safer sex dialogue explored. Results: The study revealed that open safer sex dialogue in marriage is limited and challenged by social norms about marriage (a view that safer sex dialogue imply that partners are ‘not really’ married; marital status (a belief that safer sex dialogue is not practical in polygamous marriages, the elder wife should be exempted from the dialogue since she is at lower risk of engaging in extramarital affairs; relationship quality (marital conflicts, extramarital affairs, trust, and sexual dissatisfaction; and gender power relations (the notion that females’ initiative to discuss condom use and HIV couple counseling and testing may lead to conflict or divorce. Conclusions: Implementing safer sex practices requires interventions beyond promotion

  3. High prevalence of genital HPV infection among long-term monogamous partners of women with cervical dysplasia or genital warts-Another reason for HPV vaccination of boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Filip; Tachezy, Ruth; Pichlík, Tomáš; Rob, Lukáš; Kružicová, Zuzana; Hamšíková, Eva; Šmahelová, Jana; Hercogová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study on the occurrence of a specific type of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) among long-term monogamous male partners of women with cervical dysplasia and genital warts. The purpose of the study was to improve knowledge with regards to the management of these couples. The presence of genital HPV-DNA was detected by PCR with broad spectrum primers followed by hybridization. 82 males met the study criteria, 41 in each group. Genital HPV-DNA prevalence was 67.5% in the genital warts group and 72.2% in the cervical dysplasia group. The prevalence of high risk HPVs was higher in the cervical dysplasia group, while low risk HPVs were more prevalent in the genital warts group (p HPV in males was independent of the duration of the relationship (73.5% for 6-24 months and 66.7% for longer relationships). In conclusion, our results suggest that the prevalence of the genital HPV infection in both groups of male partners is comparable and very high, but the spectrum of HPV types varies significantly. The presence of the genital HPV infection in male sexual partners seems to be independent of the duration of the relationship. Applying the HPV vaccination to boys may prevent this phenomenon.

  4. Pairing Behavior of the Monogamous King Quail, Coturnix chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Adkins-Regan

    Full Text Available Animals with socially monogamous mating systems are valuable for discovering proximate mechanisms of prosocial behavior and close social relationships. Especially powerful are comparisons between related species that differ in monogamous tendency. Birds are the most socially monogamous vertebrates. Thus far most research on mechanisms of pairing has used zebra finches, which do not have a relative with a different mating system, however. The goal of the experiments reported here was to develop a new comparative avian system by studying the pairing behavior of a reportedly strongly monogamous quail, the king quail (Coturnix chinensis, a species in the same clade as the less monogamous Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica, the subject of much prior research. In Experiment 1 male-female pairs of king quail housed together were initially avoidant or aggressive but most rapidly progressed to allopreening and huddling. A separation-reunion paradigm reliably elicited both of these behaviors in males that had cohabited for one week. In Experiment 2 the allopreening and huddling behavior of males in cohabiting pairs was highly selective, and a majority of the males were aggressive toward a familiar female that was not the cohabitation partner. In Experiment 3 males were separated from their female cohabitation partners for 9-10 weeks and then given two-choice tests. All but one male spent more time near an unfamiliar female, which may have reflected aggression and shows recognition of and memory for the past pairing experience. Thus king quail show robust, selective and easy to measure pairing behavior that can be reliably elicited with simple separation-reunion testing procedures. Copulation is rarely seen during tests. The behavior of king quail is a striking contrast to that of Japanese quail, providing a new comparative system for discovering mechanisms of behavior related to close social relationships and monogamy.

  5. Pairing Behavior of the Monogamous King Quail, Coturnix chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Animals with socially monogamous mating systems are valuable for discovering proximate mechanisms of prosocial behavior and close social relationships. Especially powerful are comparisons between related species that differ in monogamous tendency. Birds are the most socially monogamous vertebrates. Thus far most research on mechanisms of pairing has used zebra finches, which do not have a relative with a different mating system, however. The goal of the experiments reported here was to develop a new comparative avian system by studying the pairing behavior of a reportedly strongly monogamous quail, the king quail (Coturnix chinensis), a species in the same clade as the less monogamous Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), the subject of much prior research. In Experiment 1 male-female pairs of king quail housed together were initially avoidant or aggressive but most rapidly progressed to allopreening and huddling. A separation-reunion paradigm reliably elicited both of these behaviors in males that had cohabited for one week. In Experiment 2 the allopreening and huddling behavior of males in cohabiting pairs was highly selective, and a majority of the males were aggressive toward a familiar female that was not the cohabitation partner. In Experiment 3 males were separated from their female cohabitation partners for 9–10 weeks and then given two-choice tests. All but one male spent more time near an unfamiliar female, which may have reflected aggression and shows recognition of and memory for the past pairing experience. Thus king quail show robust, selective and easy to measure pairing behavior that can be reliably elicited with simple separation-reunion testing procedures. Copulation is rarely seen during tests. The behavior of king quail is a striking contrast to that of Japanese quail, providing a new comparative system for discovering mechanisms of behavior related to close social relationships and monogamy. PMID:27257681

  6. The puzzle of monogamous marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Joseph; Boyd, Robert; Richerson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The anthropological record indicates that approximately 85 per cent of human societies have permitted men to have more than one wife (polygynous marriage), and both empirical and evolutionary considerations suggest that large absolute differences in wealth should favour more polygynous marriages. Yet, monogamous marriage has spread across Europe, and more recently across the globe, even as absolute wealth differences have expanded. Here, we develop and explore the hypothesis that the norms and institutions that compose the modern package of monogamous marriage have been favoured by cultural evolution because of their group-beneficial effects—promoting success in inter-group competition. In suppressing intrasexual competition and reducing the size of the pool of unmarried men, normative monogamy reduces crime rates, including rape, murder, assault, robbery and fraud, as well as decreasing personal abuses. By assuaging the competition for younger brides, normative monogamy decreases (i) the spousal age gap, (ii) fertility, and (iii) gender inequality. By shifting male efforts from seeking wives to paternal investment, normative monogamy increases savings, child investment and economic productivity. By increasing the relatedness within households, normative monogamy reduces intra-household conflict, leading to lower rates of child neglect, abuse, accidental death and homicide. These predictions are tested using converging lines of evidence from across the human sciences. PMID:22271782

  7. The puzzle of monogamous marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Joseph; Boyd, Robert; Richerson, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    The anthropological record indicates that approximately 85 per cent of human societies have permitted men to have more than one wife (polygynous marriage), and both empirical and evolutionary considerations suggest that large absolute differences in wealth should favour more polygynous marriages. Yet, monogamous marriage has spread across Europe, and more recently across the globe, even as absolute wealth differences have expanded. Here, we develop and explore the hypothesis that the norms and institutions that compose the modern package of monogamous marriage have been favoured by cultural evolution because of their group-beneficial effects-promoting success in inter-group competition. In suppressing intrasexual competition and reducing the size of the pool of unmarried men, normative monogamy reduces crime rates, including rape, murder, assault, robbery and fraud, as well as decreasing personal abuses. By assuaging the competition for younger brides, normative monogamy decreases (i) the spousal age gap, (ii) fertility, and (iii) gender inequality. By shifting male efforts from seeking wives to paternal investment, normative monogamy increases savings, child investment and economic productivity. By increasing the relatedness within households, normative monogamy reduces intra-household conflict, leading to lower rates of child neglect, abuse, accidental death and homicide. These predictions are tested using converging lines of evidence from across the human sciences.

  8. Social Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tikkanen, Tarja; Hansen, Leif Emil; Guðmundsson, Bernharður

    2012-01-01

    based on a survey carried out in the Nordic countries in the regie of Nordic Council of Ministries the article deals with the role of social partners in senior and older workers policies and practises...

  9. Trading up: the fitness consequences of divorce in monogamous birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Antica; Radersma, Reinder; Sheldon, Ben C

    2015-11-01

    Social and genetic mating systems play an important role in natural and sexual selection, as well as in the dynamics of populations. In socially monogamous species different genetic mating patterns appear when individuals mate outside the breeding pair within a breeding season (extra-pair mating) or when they change partners between two breeding seasons (widowing or divorce). Divorce can be defined as having occurred when two previously paired individuals are alive during the next breeding season and at least one of them has re-mated with a new partner. In socially monogamous birds divorce is widespread, but it is not clear whether it is a behavioural adaptation to improve the quality of a mating decision or whether, alternatively, it results as a non-selected consequence of other processes: existing studies suggest a heterogeneous set of results with respect to this central question. This heterogeneity could result from a number of factors, ranging from the methodological approaches used, to population- or species-specific characters. In this review we use phylogenetic meta-analyses to assess the evidence that divorce is adaptive (in terms of breeding success) across 64 species of socially monogamous birds. Second, we explore biological and methodological reasons for the heterogeneity in the results of previous studies. Results of our analyses supported the hypothesis that divorce is, in general, an adaptive behavioural strategy as: (1) divorce is triggered by relatively low breeding success; (2) there is a positive change in breeding success as a result of divorce. More specifically, while controlling for methodological moderators, we show that: (i) earlier stages of breeding are better predictors of divorce than later stages (r = 0.231; 95% CI: 0.061-0.391 for clutch size; similar for laying date); (ii) females benefited from divorce more than males in terms of increasing breeding success between successive breeding attempts, with different stages of the

  10. Partnering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    to meet the de- successful despite the site challenges and sign intent, business changes during the project. (Groves was acquired by the Torno ...34 Complete the contract without need for America company during construction- litigation. Torno embraced Partnering and continued the process which was

  11. Should Entanglement Measures be Monogamous or Faithful?

    CERN Document Server

    Lancien, Cécilia; Huber, Marcus; Piani, Marco; Adesso, Gerardo; Winter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    "Is entanglement monogamous?" asks the title of a popular article [B. Terhal, IBM J. Res. Dev. 48, 71 (2004)], celebrating C. H. Bennett's legacy on quantum information theory. While the answer is certainly affirmative in the qualitative sense, the situation is far less clear if monogamy is intended as a quantitative limitation on the distribution of bipartite entanglement in a multipartite system, given some particular measure of entanglement. Here, we clarify the most general form of a universal quantitative monogamy relation for a bipartite measure of entanglement. We then go on to show that an important class of entanglement measures fail to be monogamous in this most general sense of the term, with monogamy violations becoming generic with increasing dimension. In particular, we show that entanglement measures cannot satisfy monogamy while at the same time faithfully capturing the entanglement of the fully antisymmetric state in arbitrary dimension. Nevertheless, monogamy can be recovered if one allows f...

  12. Till death (or an intruder do us part: intrasexual-competition in a monogamous primate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandez-Duque

    Full Text Available Polygynous animals are often highly dimorphic, and show large sex-differences in the degree of intra-sexual competition and aggression, which is associated with biased operational sex ratios (OSR. For socially monogamous, sexually monomorphic species, this relationship is less clear. Among mammals, pair-living has sometimes been assumed to imply equal OSR and low frequency, low intensity intra-sexual competition; even when high rates of intra-sexual competition and selection, in both sexes, have been theoretically predicted and described for various taxa. Owl monkeys are one of a few socially monogamous primates. Using long-term demographic and morphological data from 18 groups, we show that male and female owl monkeys experience intense intra-sexual competition and aggression from solitary floaters. Pair-mates are regularly replaced by intruding floaters (27 female and 23 male replacements in 149 group-years, with negative effects on the reproductive success of both partners. Individuals with only one partner during their life produced 25% more offspring per decade of tenure than those with two or more partners. The termination of the pair-bond is initiated by the floater, and sometimes has fatal consequences for the expelled adult. The existence of floaters and the sporadic, but intense aggression between them and residents suggest that it can be misleading to assume an equal OSR in socially monogamous species based solely on group composition. Instead, we suggest that sexual selection models must assume not equal, but flexible, context-specific, OSR in monogamous species.

  13. Evidence that pairing with genetically similar mates is maladaptive in a monogamous bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulard, Hervé; Danchin, E.; Talbot, S.L.; Ramey, A.M.; Hatch, Shyla A.; White, J.F.; Helfenstein, F.; Wagner, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Evidence of multiple genetic criteria of mate choice is accumulating in numerous taxa. In many species, females have been shown to pair with genetically dissimilar mates or with extra-pair partners that are more genetically compatible than their social mates, thereby increasing their offsprings' heterozygosity which often correlates with offspring fitness. While most studies have focused on genetically promiscuous species, few studies have addressed genetically monogamous species, in which mate choice tends to be mutual. Results. Here, we used microsatellite markers to assess individual global heterozygosity and genetic similarity of pairs in a socially and genetically monogamous seabird, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla. We found that pairs were more genetically dissimilar than expected by chance. We also identified fitness costs of breeding with genetically similar partners: (i) genetic similarity of pairs was negatively correlated with the number of chicks hatched, and (ii) offspring heterozygosity was positively correlated with growth rate and survival. Conclusion. These findings provide evidence that breeders in a genetically monogamous species may avoid the fitness costs of reproducing with a genetically similar mate. In such species that lack the opportunity to obtain extra-pair fertilizations, mate choice may therefore be under high selective pressure. ?? 2009 Mulard et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. Evidence that pairing with genetically similar mates is maladaptive in a monogamous bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramey Andrew M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence of multiple genetic criteria of mate choice is accumulating in numerous taxa. In many species, females have been shown to pair with genetically dissimilar mates or with extra-pair partners that are more genetically compatible than their social mates, thereby increasing their offsprings' heterozygosity which often correlates with offspring fitness. While most studies have focused on genetically promiscuous species, few studies have addressed genetically monogamous species, in which mate choice tends to be mutual. Results Here, we used microsatellite markers to assess individual global heterozygosity and genetic similarity of pairs in a socially and genetically monogamous seabird, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla. We found that pairs were more genetically dissimilar than expected by chance. We also identified fitness costs of breeding with genetically similar partners: (i genetic similarity of pairs was negatively correlated with the number of chicks hatched, and (ii offspring heterozygosity was positively correlated with growth rate and survival. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that breeders in a genetically monogamous species may avoid the fitness costs of reproducing with a genetically similar mate. In such species that lack the opportunity to obtain extra-pair fertilizations, mate choice may therefore be under high selective pressure.

  15. Practising French grammar a workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dr Roger Hawkins; Towell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This new edition of Practising French Grammar offers a set of varied and accessible exercises for developing a practical awareness of French as it is spoken and written today. The lively examples and authentic texts and cartoons have been updated to reflect current usage. A new companion website provides a wealth of additional interactive exercises to help consolidate challenging grammar points. Practising French Grammar provides concise summaries of key grammatical points at the beginning of each exercise, as well as model answers to the exercises and translations of difficult words, making i

  16. Should Entanglement Measures be Monogamous or Faithful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancien, Cécilia; Di Martino, Sara; Huber, Marcus; Piani, Marco; Adesso, Gerardo; Winter, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    "Is entanglement monogamous?" asks the title of a popular article [B. Terhal, IBM J. Res. Dev. 48, 71 (2004)], celebrating C. H. Bennett's legacy on quantum information theory. While the answer is affirmative in the qualitative sense, the situation is less clear if monogamy is intended as a quantitative limitation on the distribution of bipartite entanglement in a multipartite system, given some particular measure of entanglement. Here, we formalize what it takes for a bipartite measure of entanglement to obey a general quantitative monogamy relation on all quantum states. We then prove that an important class of entanglement measures fail to be monogamous in this general sense of the term, with monogamy violations becoming generic with increasing dimension. In particular, we show that every additive and suitably normalized entanglement measure cannot satisfy any nontrivial general monogamy relation while at the same time faithfully capturing the geometric entanglement structure of the fully antisymmetric state in arbitrary dimension. Nevertheless, monogamy of such entanglement measures can be recovered if one allows for dimension-dependent relations, as we show explicitly with relevant examples.

  17. Divorce in the socially monogamous zebra finch: Hormonal mechanisms and reproductive consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crino, Ondi L; Buchanan, Katherine L; Fanson, Benjamin G; Hurley, Laura L; Smiley, Kristina O; Griffith, Simon C

    2017-01-01

    Up to 80% of all bird species are socially monogamous. Divorce (switching partners) or pair disruption (due to the death of a partner) has been associated with decreased reproductive success, suggesting social monogamy is a strategy that may maximize fitness via coordination between partners. Previous studies have demonstrated the effects of divorce and pair disruption on immediate reproductive success. Here, we used a paired experimental design in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) to examine the hormonal mechanisms that modulate parental behavior and reproductive success in response to a partnership change (hereafter divorce). Specifically, we examined the effects of divorce on the avian stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) in both parents and nestlings, parental behaviors (incubation and nestling provisioning), prolactin (PRL), and reproductive success. We found that divorce resulted in delayed clutch initiation, reduced clutch mass, and an increase in nestling CORT response to a standardized stressor. These effects on reproductive investment and chick CORT response were not clearly determined by parental endocrine responses. Divorce had no effect on the level of parental CORT. PRL levels were highly correlated within a pair regardless of treatment, were negatively related to the investment that males made in incubation, and increased in experimental males as a result of pair disruption. This study demonstrates the fundamental impact which divorce has not only on reproduction, but also the physiological stress responses of offspring and suggests that in socially monogamous animals the maintenance of a stable partnership over time could be advantageous for long term fitness.

  18. Similar Patterns of Parental Provisioning in a Monogamous and a Polygynous Population of the House Wren

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paulo E. Llambías; Katie LaBarbera; Andrea A. Astié

    2012-01-01

    .... We predicted that if patterns of parental care are related to variation in the social mating system, monogamous males should contribute more in the monogamous population than in the polygynous...

  19. Evolution of monogamous marriage by maximization of inclusive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, L; Archetti, M

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human societies allow polygynous marriage, and the prevalence of this practice is readily understood in evolutionary terms. Why some societies prescribe monogamous marriage is however not clear: current evolutionary explanations--that social monogamy increases within-group co-operation, giving societies an advantage in competition with other groups--conflict with the historical and ethnographic evidence. We show that, within the framework of inclusive fitness theory, monogamous marriage can be viewed as the outcome of the strategic behaviour of males and females in the allocation of resources to the next generation. Where resources are transferred across generations, social monogamy can be advantageous if partitioning of resources among the offspring of multiple wives causes a depletion of their fitness value, and/or if females grant husbands higher fidelity in exchange for exclusive investment of resources in their offspring. This may explain why monogamous marriage prevailed among the historical societies of Eurasia: here, intensive agriculture led to scarcity of land, with depletion in the value of estates through partitioning among multiple heirs. Norms promoting high paternity were common among ancient societies in the region, and may have further facilitated the establishment of social monogamy. In line with the historical and ethnographic evidence, this suggests that monogamous marriage emerged in Eurasia following the adoption of intensive agriculture, as ownership of land became critical to productive and reproductive success.

  20. Fully nonlocal, monogamous and random genuinely multipartite quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Aolita, Leandro; Cabello, Adán; Acín, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Local measurements on bipartite maximally entangled states can yield correlations that are maximally nonlocal, monogamous, and associated to fully random outcomes. This makes these states ideal for bipartite cryptographic tasks. Genuine-multipartite nonlocality constitutes a stronger notion of nonlocality that appears in the multipartite case. Maximal genuine-multipartite nonlocality, monogamy and full random outcomes are thus highly desired properties for multipartite correlations in intrinsically genuine-multipartite cryptographic scenarios. We prove that local measurements on Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, for all local dimension and number of parts, can produce correlations that are fully genuine-multipartite nonlocal, monogamous and with fully random outcomes. A key ingredient in our proof is a multipartite chained Bell inequality detecting genuine-multipartite nonlocality, which we introduce. Finally, we discuss the applications of our results for intrinsically genuine-multipartite cryptographic pr...

  1. Experimental improvisation practise and notation. Addenda 2000-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    Addenda to Experimental improvisation practise and notation (please see this title for more information!) Stichwörter: experimentelle Musik, offenes Werk, grafische Notation, musikalische Notation, musikalische Aufführungspraxis, freie Improvisation, Musikpädagogik, Geschichte der Musik, Musikäst...

  2. Experimental improvisation practise and notation. Addenda 2000-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    Addenda to Experimental improvisation practise and notation (please see this title for more information!) Stichwörter: experimentelle Musik, offenes Werk, grafische Notation, musikalische Notation, musikalische Aufführungspraxis, freie Improvisation, Musikpädagogik, Geschichte der Musik, Musikäst...

  3. Alternative Life Styles to Monogamous Marriage: Variants of Normal Behavior in Psychotherapy Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Shelley Ann

    1982-01-01

    Discusses three alternative life styles to monogamous marriage: swinging, open marriage, and group marriage. Includes brief reviews of both the critique of monogamous marriage as not fulfilling intimacy needs, and research on individuals in alternative life styles as displaying potentially normal behavior. (Author)

  4. Interactions between parents and parents and pups in the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl S Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available The California mouse (Peromyscuscalifornicus may be a valuable animal model to study parenting as it is one of the few monogamous and biparental rodent species. By using automated infra-red imaging and video documentation of established pairs spanning two days prior to birth of the litter until d 5 of post natal development (PND, it was possible to follow interactions between parents and between parents and pups. The paired males were attentive to their partners in the form of grooming and sniffing throughout the time period studied. Both these and other activities of the partners, such as eating and drinking, peaked during late light/ mid-dark period. Beginning the day before birth, and most significantly on PND 0, the female made aggressive attempts to exclude the male from nest-attending, acts that were not reciprocated by the male, although he made repeated attempts to mate his partner during that period. By PND 1, males were permitted to return to the nest, where they initiated grooming, licking, and huddling over the litter, although time spent by the male on parental care was still less than that of the female. Male and female pups were of similar size and grew at the same rate. Pups, which are believed to be exothermic for at least the first two weeks post-natally, maintained a body temperature higher than that of their parents until PND 16. Data are consistent with the inference that the male California mouse parent is important in helping retain pup body heat and permit dams increased time to procure food to accommodate her increased energy needs for lactation. These assessments provide indices that may be used to assess the effects of extrinsic factors, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals, on biparental behaviors and offspring development.

  5. Why pair? Evidence of aggregative mating in a socially monogamous marine fish (Siganus doliatus, Siganidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rebecca J; Bellwood, David R; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Many species live in stable pairs, usually to breed and raise offspring together, but this cannot be assumed. Establishing whether pairing is based on mating, or an alternative cooperative advantage, can be difficult, especially where species show no obvious sexual dimorphism and where the act of reproduction itself is difficult to observe. In the tropical marine fishes known as rabbitfish (Siganidae), half of extant species live in socially monogamous, territorial pairs. It has been assumed that partnerships are for mating, but the reproductive mode of pairing rabbitfish is currently unconfirmed. Using passive acoustic telemetry to track movements of fishes belonging to one such species (Siganus doliatus), we provide the first evidence that paired adult fish undertake highly synchronized migrations with multiple conspecifics on a monthly cycle. All tagged individuals migrated along the same route in three consecutive months and were absent from home territories for 2-3 days just after the new moon. The timing and directionality of migrations suggest that S. doliatus may form spawning aggregations, offering the potential for exposure to multiple reproductive partners. The finding raises fundamental questions about the basis of pairing, mate choice and partnership longevity in this family.

  6. Drama in the classroom: fitness to practise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The fitness to practise hearing was brought to students at the University of East Anglia. The day was a mock up, as close to real events as possible, with interim orders and substantive hearings. It enabled students to engage with aspects of practice in a different way from the traditional 'chalk and talk' methods. The cases chosen reflected all disciplines. Electronic voting systems were used to determine what the students felt outcomes should have been, and then they had an opportunity to hear what outcome the panel decided upon. Evaluative data were obtained following the event to see what impact this approach had on students' learning and their appreciation of the importance of professional practice. The comments we received were overwhelmingly positive and as a result we shall be repeating the day for students, supervisors of midwives and post registration nurses and midwives.

  7. Prevalence and associated factors of mental health problems among monogamous Chinese female patients with sexually transmitted diseases in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Phoenix K H; Gu, Jing; Lau, Joseph T F; You, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Sexually transmitted disease (STD) increases risk of HIV infection and has profound psychological consequences. The present study examined the mental health problems (poor emotional well-being, insomnia, probable depression) and their associated factors among monogamous Chinese female STD patients. A total of 537 Chinese female STD patients who self-reported having had only one male sex partner in the last 12 months were recruited from a STD clinic in Hong Kong. They completed a survey including measures of mental health, STD-related history, perceptions, feelings related to STD infection, and perceptions toward condom use. Results showed that 22% had poor emotional well-being, 25.7% had insomnia, and 43% were probable cases of depression. Unemployment, worsened relationship with partners after STD diagnosis, STD history in last three months, finding STD examinations embarrassing, and feelings of helplessness were significant risk factors for poor emotional well-being and insomnia. Also, unemployment, worsened relationships with partners after STD diagnosis, and perceived high chance of STD in the coming six months were significant risk factors for probable depression. Perceived efficacy of condom use for STD prevention was a significant protective factor against poor emotional well-being and probable depression. Findings suggest that interventions are warranted to improve the mental health among this population.

  8. Proactive Student Engagement with Fitness to Practise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Lo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fitness to practise (FTP is fundamental to health professional education and health service delivery, impacting on both practitioner and client wellbeing. Literature exploring FTP support policies primarily identifies retrospective student support and management. This study describes student perceptions of an innovative FTP policy which supports students and staff to proactively identify FTP management strategies prior to entering the clinical environment. Forty-nine final year physiotherapy students were surveyed regarding their perceptions of self-declaring FTP. Ordinal data from Likert scales were reported using descriptive statistics. Thematic analysis was undertaken for open text responses. The response rate was 88%. Forty-two percent of students stated that they had experienced FTP concerns during the course. Concerns included physical and mental impairment and clinical competence issues. The majority of students (80% indicated that they were “comfortable” or “very comfortable” in self-declaring FTP issues. Confidentiality, positive relationships with staff and a supportive environment enhanced likelihood of declaration. Eight students (19% met with university staff to develop management strategies and all rated these meetings as “helpful” or “very helpful.” Students had positive perceptions of self-declaring their FTP to enable early development of management strategies. This strategy successfully navigates sensitive ethicolegal issues, empowering students to take responsibility for their own FTP.

  9. Multiple paternity in a salamander with socially monogamous behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebgold, Eric B; Cabe, Paul R; Jaeger, Robert G; Leberg, Paul L

    2006-11-01

    In the majority of birds and mammals, social monogamy is not congruent with genetic monogamy. No research to date has compared social and genetic monogamy in amphibians. We analysed paternity in clutches of red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus), a species in which social monogamy has been demonstrated in the laboratory, and 28% of individuals in the forest are found in male-female pairs in the noncourtship season. We collected 16 clutches of eggs of P. cinereus in the southern Appalachian Mountains of Virginia and collected tail clippings from attending mothers. We genotyped embryos and adults at five microsatellite loci in order to analyse paternity of clutches. Most clutches (84.6%) had multiple sires, with two to three sires per clutch. In this study, 25% of clutches had males in addition to females attending eggs. None of the mothers of these clutches were genetically monogamous. All attending males sired some of the offspring in the clutch that they attended (between 9% and 50%) but never sired a majority in that clutch. We conclude that, at least in this population, social monogamy in P. cinereus is not concomitant with genetic monogamy.

  10. Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldridge Jocelyne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care students. Findings All 31 medical schools responded. 19 medical schools had a fitness to practise committee dealing with medical students only. Three had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and dentistry. One had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and veterinary medicine. Eight had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and two or more other programmes, such as dentistry, nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, dietetics, social work, pharmacy, psychology, audiology, speech therapy, operating department practice, veterinary medicine and education. Conclusion All 31 UK medical schools with undergraduate programmes have a fitness to practise committee to deal with students whose behaviour has given rise to concern about their fitness to practise. The variation in governance structures for student fitness to practise committees/panels can in part be explained by variations in University structures and the extent to which Universities co-manage undergraduate medicine with other courses.

  11. Gender differences in the risk of HIV infection among persons reporting abstinence, monogamy, and multiple sexual partners in northern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Z Landman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monogamy, together with abstinence, partner reduction, and condom use, is widely advocated as a key behavioral strategy to prevent HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined the association between the number of sexual partners and the risk of HIV seropositivity among men and women presenting for HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT in northern Tanzania. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Clients presenting for HIV VCT at a community-based AIDS service organization in Moshi, Tanzania were surveyed between November 2003 and December 2007. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, reasons for testing, sexual behaviors, and symptoms were collected. Men and women were categorized by number of lifetime sexual partners, and rates of seropositivity were reported by category. Factors associated with HIV seropositivity among monogamous males and females were identified by a multivariate logistic regression model. Of 6,549 clients, 3,607 (55% were female, and the median age was 30 years (IQR 24-40. 939 (25% females and 293 (10% males (p<0.0001 were HIV seropositive. Among 1,244 (34% monogamous females and 423 (14% monogamous males, the risk of HIV infection was 19% and 4%, respectively (p<0.0001. The risk increased monotonically with additional partners up to 45% (p<0.001 and 15% (p<0.001 for women and men, respectively with 5 or more partners. In multivariate analysis, HIV seropositivity among monogamous women was most strongly associated with age (p<0.0001, lower education (p<0.004, and reporting a partner with other partners (p = 0.015. Only age was a significant risk factor for monogamous men (p = 0.0004. INTERPRETATION: Among women presenting for VCT, the number of partners is strongly associated with rates of seropositivity; however, even women reporting lifetime monogamy have a high risk for HIV infection. Partner reduction should be coupled with efforts to place tools in the hands of sexually active women to reduce their risk

  12. Practising Research, Researching Practice: Thinking Through Contemporary Dance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Sally May

    2011-01-01

    ... dance values which can perhaps have wider resonance. These values relate to concepts and ideas that can be found articulated by many practising artists and a number of other thinkers and practitioners including Winnicott, Alexander and Arendt...

  13. Better the devil you know: common terns stay with a previous partner although pair bond duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebke, Maren; Becker, Peter H; Colchero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a monogamous species two partners contribute to the breeding process. We study pair formation as well as the effect of pair bond length and age on breeding performance, incorporating individual heterogeneity, based on a high quality dataset of a long-lived seabird, the common tern (Sterna hiru...

  14. Monotonically increasing functions of any quantum correlation can make all multiparty states monogamous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salini, K. [School of Physics, IISER TVM, CET Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 016 (India); Prabhu, R.; Sen, Aditi [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Sen, Ujjwal, E-mail: ujjwal@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Monogamy of quantum correlation measures puts restrictions on the sharability of quantum correlations in multiparty quantum states. Multiparty quantum states can satisfy or violate monogamy relations with respect to given quantum correlations. We show that all multiparty quantum states can be made monogamous with respect to all measures. More precisely, given any quantum correlation measure that is non-monogamic for a multiparty quantum state, it is always possible to find a monotonically increasing function of the measure that is monogamous for the same state. The statement holds for all quantum states, whether pure or mixed, in all finite dimensions and for an arbitrary number of parties. The monotonically increasing function of the quantum correlation measure satisfies all the properties that are expected for quantum correlations to follow. We illustrate the concepts by considering a thermodynamic measure of quantum correlation, called the quantum work deficit.

  15. Challenges to the pair bond: neural and hormonal effects of separation and reunion in a monogamous primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Hinde

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social monogamy at its most basic is a group structure in which two adults form a unit and share a territory. However, many socially monogamous pairs display attachment relationships known as pair bonds, in which there is a mutual preference for the partner and distress upon separation. The neural and hormonal basis of this response to separation from the adult pair mate is under-studied. In this project, we examined this response in male titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus, a socially monogamous New World primate. Males underwent a baseline scan, a short separation (48 hours, a long separation (app. two weeks, a reunion with the female pair mate, and an encounter with a female stranger (with nine males completing all five conditions. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was measured via positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG co-registered with structural MRI, and region of interest analysis was carried out. In addition, plasma was collected and assayed for cortisol, oxytocin (OT, vasopressin (AVP, glucose, and insulin concentrations. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was collected and assayed for OT and AVP. We used generalized estimating equations to examine significant changes from baseline. Short separations were characterized by decreases in FDG uptake, in comparison to baseline, in the lateral septum (LS, ventral pallidum (VP, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, periaqueductal gray (PAG, and cerebellum, as well as increases in CSF OT, and plasma cortisol and insulin. Long separations differed from baseline in reduced FDG uptake in the central amygdala (CeA, reduced whole brain FDG uptake, increased CSF OT and increased plasma insulin. The response on encounter with a stranger female depended on whether or not the male had previously reproduced with his pair mate, suggesting that transitions to fatherhood contribute to the neurobiology underlying response to a novel female. Reunion with the partner

  16. Challenges to the Pair Bond: Neural and Hormonal Effects of Separation and Reunion in a Monogamous Primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Katie; Muth, Chelsea; Maninger, Nicole; Ragen, Benjamin J.; Larke, Rebecca H.; Jarcho, Michael R.; Mendoza, Sally P.; Mason, William A.; Ferrer, Emilio; Cherry, Simon R.; Fisher-Phelps, Marina L.; Bales, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Social monogamy at its most basic is a group structure in which two adults form a unit and share a territory. However, many socially monogamous pairs display attachment relationships known as pair bonds, in which there is a mutual preference for the partner and distress upon separation. The neural and hormonal basis of this response to separation from the adult pair mate is under-studied. In this project, we examined this response in male titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus), a socially monogamous New World primate. Males underwent a baseline scan, a short separation (48 h), a long separation (approximately 2 weeks), a reunion with the female pair mate and an encounter with a female stranger (with nine males completing all five conditions). Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was measured via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) co-registered with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and region of interest (ROI) analysis was carried out. In addition, plasma was collected and assayed for cortisol, oxytocin (OT), vasopressin (AVP), glucose and insulin concentrations. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected and assayed for OT and AVP. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine significant changes from baseline. Short separations were characterized by decreases in FDG uptake, in comparison to baseline, in the lateral septum (LS), ventral pallidum (VP), paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), periaqueductal gray (PAG), and cerebellum, as well as increases in CSF OT, and plasma cortisol and insulin. Long separations differed from baseline in reduced FDG uptake in the central amygdala (CeA), reduced whole brain FDG uptake, increased CSF OT and increased plasma insulin. The response on encounter with a stranger female depended on whether or not the male had previously reproduced with his pair mate, suggesting that transitions to fatherhood contribute to the neurobiology underlying response to a

  17. Scholastic Achievement and Family Marital Structure: Bedouin-Arab Adolescents from Monogamous and Polygamous Families in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; Bart, William M.; Hektner, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the scholastic achievement in Arabic, English, Hebrew, and mathematics of 240 Bedouin-Arab adolescents from monogamous and polygamous families in Negev (Israel). Reveals that adolescents from monogamous and polygamous families demonstrate equivalent levels of scholastic achievement, although boys in polygamous families and girls in…

  18. Learning Achievement, Social Adjustment, and Family Conflict among Bedouin-Arab Children from Polygamous and Monogamous Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, Ernie S.; Al-Krenawi, Alean

    2000-01-01

    Compares learning achievement, social adjustment, and family conflict among 146 Bedouin-Arab students from polygamous and monogamous families. Reveals that children from monogamous families had higher levels of learning achievement, and they adjusted better to the school framework. The mean conflict rating was higher for children from polygamous…

  19. Exploring the diversity of Gardnerella vaginalis in the genitourinary tract microbiota of monogamous couples through subtle nucleotide variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Murat Eren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial vaginosis (BV is an enigmatic disease of unknown origin that affects a large percentage of women. The vaginal microbiota of women with BV is associated with serious sequelae, including abnormal pregnancies. The etiology of BV is not fully understood, however, it has been suggested that it is transmissible, and that G. vaginalis may be an etiological agent. Studies using enzymatic assays to define G. vaginalis biotypes, as well as more recent genomic comparisons of G. vaginalis isolates from symptomatic and asymptomatic women, suggest that particular G. vaginalis strains may play a key role in the pathogenesis of BV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore G. vaginalis diversity, distribution and sexual transmission, we developed a Shannon entropy-based method to analyze low-level sequence variation in 65,710 G. vaginalis 16S rRNA gene segments that were PCR-amplified from vaginal samples of 53 monogamous women and from urethral and penile skin samples of their male partners. We observed a high degree of low-level diversity among G. vaginalis sequences with a total of 46 unique sequence variants (oligotypes, and also found strong correlations of these oligotypes between sexual partners. Even though Gram stain-defined normal and some Gram stain-defined intermediate oligotype profiles clustered together in UniFrac analysis, no single G. vaginalis oligotype was found to be specific to BV or normal vaginal samples. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a novel method for investigating G. vaginalis diversity at a low level of taxonomic discrimination. The findings support cultivation-based studies that indicate sexual partners harbor the same strains of G. vaginalis. This study also highlights the fact that a few, reproducible nucleotide variations within the 16S rRNA gene can reveal clinical or epidemiological associations that would be missed by genus-level or species-level categorization of 16S rRNA data.

  20. Acoustic signalling in a small, socially monogamous canid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darden, Safi-Kirstine; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Animals that actively defend all or part of their home range for the exclusive use of members of their social group are considered territorial. Defended areas may contain resources such as dens or nests, key foraging sites, or sexual partners that vary in value by season. We investigated territor......Animals that actively defend all or part of their home range for the exclusive use of members of their social group are considered territorial. Defended areas may contain resources such as dens or nests, key foraging sites, or sexual partners that vary in value by season. We investigated...... to the boundary of the pair's home range core (50% kernel contour isoline of estimated home range). Similarly, male resident foxes responded more intensely with barking if a playback simulating intrusion by a rival occurred inside of the core compared to outside of it. However, it was common for home range cores...

  1. Breastfeeding duration related to practised contraception in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouwe, J.P. van; Lanting, C.I.; Dommelen, P. van; Treffers, P.E.; Buuren, S. van

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to gain insight into contraception practised and related to breastfeeding duration. Methods: Mothers with infants up to 6 months received a questionnaire on infant feeding (breast or formula feeding) and contraception (hormonal or non-hormonal methods). Estimates of th

  2. Practising Empathy: Enacting Alternative Perspectives through Imaginative Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Sue; Rees, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a collaborative study using an innovative methodology, based on "insiders" who are Steiner practitioners knowledgeable and practised in Steiner philosophy and "outsiders" from UK mainstream early years and primary perspectives. Although the study as a whole focused on assessment and observation used in…

  3. Breastfeeding duration related to practised contraception in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouwe, J.P. van; Lanting, C.I.; Dommelen, P. van; Treffers, P.E.; Buuren, S. van

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to gain insight into contraception practised and related to breastfeeding duration. Methods: Mothers with infants up to 6 months received a questionnaire on infant feeding (breast or formula feeding) and contraception (hormonal or non-hormonal methods). Estimates of th

  4. KNOWLEDGE SHARING IN PARTNERING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    This paper adopts practicebased theory for understanding interorganisational knowledge work and extents it with a discussion of the role of redundancy. The paper presents a case study of a project partnership in construction using the partnering concept. The project group responsible...... on arenas (e.g. meetings), brokers (e.g. design manager), and boundary objects (e.g. drawings) . The constellation of firms is interpreted as a multiple configuration of communities of practices, characterised by overlapping practises, multiple memberships and different levels of participation....... The diversity and disjunct feature of the practices is a condition of possibility of knowledge handling as it is a prerequisite for the synthesis of various forms of knowledge in the building construct. Here an orchestrated combination of relationbased interaction with boundary objects and brokers, requisite...

  5. Mate replacement entails a fitness cost for a socially monogamous seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismar, Stefanie M. H.; Daniel, Claire; Stephenson, Brent M.; Hauber, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the selective advantages of divorce in socially monogamous bird species have unravelled extensive variation among different lineages with diverse ecologies. We quantified the reproductive correlates of mate retention, mate loss and divorce in a highly philopatric, colonially breeding biparental seabird, the Australasian gannet Morus serrator. Estimates of annual divorce rates varied between 40-43% for M. serrator and were high in comparison with both the closely related Morus bassanus and the range of divorce rates reported across monogamous avian breeding systems. Mate retention across seasons was related to consistently higher reproductive success compared with mate replacement, while divorce per se contributed significantly to lower reproductive output only in one of two breeding seasons. Prior reproductive success was not predictive of mate replacement overall or divorce in particular. These patterns are in accordance with the musical chairs hypothesis of adaptive divorce theory, which operates in systems characterised by asynchronous territorial establishment.

  6. Reproductive preferences and contraceptive use: a comparison of monogamous and polygamous couples in northern Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    BASCHIERI, A.; Cleland, J; Floyd, S; Dube, A; Msona, A; Molesworth, A; Glynn, JR; French, N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary There is now widespread agreement on the importance of men's role in reproductive decision-making. Several studies have argued that fertility preferences and their translation into behaviour differ between polygamous and monogamous unions. Studies investigating the dominance of men's preferences over women's preferences, in cases of couple disagreement, found mixed evidence of the effect of polygamy. However, an often cited limitation of these studies has been the inability to link hu...

  7. Behavioural Economics, Neuroscience, and the Unfair Commercial Practises Directive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trzaskowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This article suggests how and to what extent insights from behavioural economics and neuroscience may be used for the interpretation of the 2005 Unfair Commercial Practices Directive. These disciplines provide useful insight in how the average consumer’s decisions are influenced by commercial...... information and conducts. As the Directive focuses on whether a commercial practise distorts the economic behaviour of consumers, arguments for whether a particular commercial practise should be considered unfair may be found within these disciplines. It is important to bear in mind that the assessment...... that courts are to make is normative, and that behavioural economics and neuroscience is of a more descriptive nature. Thus these disciplines may not help draw the fine line between the legitimate influence of commercial activities and the illegal distortion of the average consumer’s behaviour. However...

  8. Rules about casual sex partners, relationship satisfaction, and HIV risk in partnered gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Starks, Tyrel J; Rendina, H Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The authors used latent class analysis to investigate rules guiding nonmonogamy in partnered gay and bisexual men. Data are from a 2010 survey (N = 463) from which those in relationships (n = 191) were analyzed. More than half (56%) were nonmonogamous, and these men responded to 13 rules about sex outside of their relationship. The safe anonymous sex group (34%) included men who indicated that they must use condoms for anal sex and not have sex with people they know. The communication mandate group (19%) included men who indicated that they must talk about outside partners before sex occurs, disclose their relationship status to outside partners, and use condoms for anal sex. The play together group (9%) included men who indicated that they must play with others as a couple, not have anal sex with outside partners, and not spend the night with outside partners. Those in the no salient rule group (37%) were individuals who did not endorse a clear set of rules. These 4 groups (and compared with monogamous men) differed in age, agreement formality and flexibility, relationship satisfaction, and whether anal sex recently occurred with casual partners. This study provides a novel approach for understanding nonmonogamous same-sex relationships and highlights their complexity.

  9. [Measuring airway inflammation in clinical practise - application and interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, O; Buhl, R; Hausen, T; von Berg, A; Weber, M; Worth, H; Magnussen, H

    2007-03-01

    Airway inflammation plays a major role in the pathology of both asthma and COPD and is the target of corticosteroid treatment. In daily routine practise, however, airway inflammation is still not often considered by pneumologists to support the diagnostic process or to aid in disease management, despite studies showing that patients could benefit. Eosinophilic airway inflammation is of special interest, as it is not restricted to allergen-induced airway diseases, and because it generally responds well to anti-inflammatory treatment with corticosteroids. Therefore, the early detection of this kind of underlying inflammatory process can have a positive impact on finding a diagnosis as well as for disease management. The non-invasive detection of eosinophilic airway inflammation using induced sputum is too time consuming and therefore too expensive in outpatient settings. As sputum eosinophils correlate with the concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), its measurement could serve as a more economic alternative, especially as new small handheld analysers are available now, that allow the rapid FeNO analysis, even in children. This review will cover some basics and technical aspects of FeNO measurements, which should be known to correctly interprete results in clinical practise. In the second part, the clinical value and the limits of FeNO measurements, as well as the potential interpretation of results are discussed based on recently published literature.

  10. Age and sex-specific mortality of wild and captive populations of a monogamous pair-bonded primate (Aotus azarae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Sam; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen

    2016-01-01

    In polygynous primates, a greater reproductive variance in males has been linked to their reduced life expectancy relative to females. The mortality patterns of monogamous pair-bonded primates, however, are less clear. We analyzed the sex differences in mortality within wild (NMales = 70, NFemales...... = 73) and captive (NMales = 25, NFemales = 29) populations of Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarae), a socially and genetically monogamous primate exhibiting bi-parental care. We used Bayesian Survival Trajectory Analysis (BaSTA) to test age-dependent models of mortality. The wild and captive populations...

  11. Characteristics of African American Women and their Partners with Perceived Concurrent Partnerships in Four Rural Counties in the Southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludema, Christina; Doherty, Irene A.; White, Becky L.; Simpson, Cathy; Villar-Loubet, Olga; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; O'Daniels, Christine M.; Adimora, Adaora A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Among African American women from four rural Southeastern counties, partner's concurrency was associated with intimate partner violence, and forced sex, but not economic benefit. Background To the individual with concurrent partners, it is thought that having concurrent partnerships confers no greater risk of acquiring HIV than having multiple consecutive partnerships. However, an individual whose partner has concurrent partnerships (partner's concurrency) is at increased risk of incident HIV infection. We sought to better understand relationships characterized by partner's concurrency among African American women. Methods A total of 1,013 African American women participated in a cross-sectional survey from four rural Southeastern counties. Results Older age at first sex was associated with lower prevalence of partner's concurrency (PR, 95% CI: 0.70, 0.57-0.87), but the participant's age was not associated with partner's concurrency. After adjusting for covariates, ever having experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) or forced sex were most strongly associated with partner's concurrency (PRs, 95% CIs: 1.61, 1.23-2.11; 1.65, 1.20-2.26, respectively). Women in mutually monogamous partnerships were the most likely to receive economic support from their partners; women whose partners had concurrent partnerships did not report more economic benefit than those whose partners were monogamous. Conclusions Associations between history of IPV and forced sex with partner's concurrency suggest that women with these experiences may particularly benefit from interventions to reduce partner's concurrency in addition to support for reducing IPV and other sexual risks. To inform these interventions, further research to understand partnerships characterized by partner's concurrency is warranted. PMID:26267876

  12. Correlates of genetic monogamy in socially monogamous mammals: insights from Azara's owl monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Maren; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Babb, Paul; Schurr, Theodore

    2014-05-07

    Understanding the evolution of mating systems, a central topic in evolutionary biology for more than 50 years, requires examining the genetic consequences of mating and the relationships between social systems and mating systems. Among pair-living mammals, where genetic monogamy is extremely rare, the extent of extra-group paternity rates has been associated with male participation in infant care, strength of the pair bond and length of the breeding season. This study evaluated the relationship between two of those factors and the genetic mating system of socially monogamous mammals, testing predictions that male care and strength of pair bond would be negatively correlated with rates of extra-pair paternity (EPP). Autosomal microsatellite analyses provide evidence for genetic monogamy in a pair-living primate with bi-parental care, the Azara's owl monkey (Aotus azarae). A phylogenetically corrected generalized least square analysis was used to relate male care and strength of the pair bond to their genetic mating system (i.e. proportions of EPP) in 15 socially monogamous mammalian species. The intensity of male care was correlated with EPP rates in mammals, while strength of pair bond failed to reach statistical significance. Our analyses show that, once social monogamy has evolved, paternal care, and potentially also close bonds, may facilitate the evolution of genetic monogamy.

  13. Speaking of home truth: (re)productions of dyadic-containment in non-monogamous relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Mark; Malson, Helen

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a critical exploration of the discursive and socio-historical practice of 'dyadic-containment' as a principle index for how we know, experience, and authenticate romantic relationships. Making intelligible an 'authentic' relationship as something which is fixed, enclosed and exclusive, the pervasive principle of dyadic-containment has considerable implications for what it means to live out 'authentic' but ostensibly liberated relationships. Using post-structuralist discourse analysis to explore ways in which people can account for their consensual non-monogamous relationships (same and cross-sex, dyadic and non-dyadic), we critique the liberal-humanist framework from which such relationships can be played out. In that dyadic-containment as an aspect of an ontology of interiorized and contained 'realness' can be viewed as serving to characterize and authorize monogamous relationships (as we illustrate), practices of consensual non-monogamy that reproduce dyadic-containment as an organizing and authenticating principle are problematized. Limits to understandings and practices of some 'alternative' romantic relationships are therefore expounded and consideration is given to how relational difference might be otherwise premised.

  14. Sleep health awareness in pharmacy undergraduates and practising community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tze-Min Ang, K; Saini, B; Wong, K

    2008-12-01

    Pharmacists are in an optimal position to provide health care to patients with sleep disorders, however, at present their involvement in sleep services is limited. This study aimed to (i) establish an understanding of baseline levels of sleep health awareness, and attitudes towards sleep health in pharmacists and pharmacy undergraduate students in comparison with sleep physicians and (ii) collate the expressed preferences for sleep health training by final year pharmacy undergraduate students and practising community pharmacists. Two previously validated instruments, the Dartmouth sleep knowledge survey and the ASKME (attitudes section) were used to construct a self-report style questionnaire. Data from respondents were collated and analysed to evaluate differences in responses and test scores between the groups, using the statistical software package-spss 14.0. Responses from 14 specialized sleep pharmacists, 14 general community pharmacists, 134 final-year undergraduate pharmacy students and 26 sleep physicians were obtained. The mean knowledge score per cent (35.5 +/- 14.0% for students, 48.2 +/- 19.5% for general and 50.6 +/- 16.6% for specialized sleep pharmacists, 86.7 +/- 9.3% for sleep physicians) and attitudes scores (37.3 +/- 4.0 for students, 37.2 +/- 5.4 for general and 40.3 +/- 5.3 for sleep specialist pharmacists, 42.6 +/- 4.7 for sleep physicians, expressed as a score out of 50) were significantly different between groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, P preferences for future training formats and topics. There is a need to improve practising pharmacists' as well as undergraduate students' knowledge of sleep health. The positive attitude reported by the respondents indicates a high level of interest in acquiring knowledge and suggests that a tailored educational programme would be well received and timely. These results provide a valid indication of the pharmacy profession's expressed and actual training needs, and should be used to inform the design

  15. Practising science communication in the information age theorising professional practices

    CERN Document Server

    Holliman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    What is the impact of open access on science communication? How can scientists effectively engage and interact with the public? What role can science communication have when scientific controversies arise? Practising science communication in the information age is a collection of newly-commissioned chapters by leading scholars and practitioners of science communication. It considers how scientists communicate with each other as part of their professional practice, critically evaluating how this forms the basis of the documenting of scientific knowledge, and investigating how open access publication and open review are influencing current practices. It also explores how science communication can play a crucial role when science is disputed, investigating the role of expertise in the formation of scientific controversy and consensus. The volume provides a theoretically informed review of contemporary trends and issues that are engaging practitioners of science communication, focusing on issues such as the norms...

  16. Practising Research, Researching Practice: Thinking Through Contemporary Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally May Gardner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Practice as research is now an accepted mode whereby artists can obtain a higher degree in our universities. But what conditions pertain for them there? Daily experiences of the misfit between the university, particularly in its current corporate guise, and the embodied practices upon which I draw have helped me, paradoxically, to clarify certain dance values which can perhaps have wider resonance. These values relate to concepts and ideas that can be found articulated by many practising artists and a number of other thinkers and practitioners including Winnicott, Alexander and Arendt. Focusing on here and now practicalities and issues, such as the nature of the studio floor, this article explores and argues for the importance of aesthetic experience and attention to life as we are living it: to experience, paradox, action, and sensation.

  17. Socialisation of new graduate nurses to practising nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rung-Fen; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the socialisation experiences of new graduate baccalaureate nurses to practising nurses. How nurses contend with the stress of their professional role has been of interest to both researchers and healthcare administrators over the past 30 years. Work stress of clinical nurses comes mainly from organisational and professional factors. However, few studies have explored the professional and organisational socialisation experiences of new graduate nurses. A qualitative descriptive approach was adopted. Participants were graduates of a baccalaureate nursing programme and employed full time at four medical centres in Taiwan, their first full-time work experience. Data were collected through semi-structured, open-ended, in-depth interviews, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed by content analysis. Three themes were identified: overwhelming chaos, learning by doing and being an insider. Although the professional socialisation process was hard for the new graduate nurses, they needed much time to increase their knowledge and clinical skills to fulfil clinical needs. However, the hardest work was the organisational socialisation process, which involved fitting into the bureaucratic system, such as maintaining interpersonal relationships with colleagues and familiarising themselves with the ward rules and culture. Neophyte nurse participants were also frustrated by the conflict between professional and organisational values. The study findings show that the transition from new graduate nurse to practising nurse was stressful for these participants, particularly due to the clash between the professional value of patient-oriented nursing care and the organisational value of task-oriented nursing. Senior clinical nurses can consider this study's descriptions of new graduate nurses' experiences to help them become insiders and provide quality care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. A Comparison of Sexual Function, Psychological Status, and Sociodemographic Characteristics of Turkish Men within Polygamous and Monogamous Marriages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerbiçer, Hasan Çetin; Resim, Sefa; Efe, Erkan; Bahar, Mustafa Remzi; Altunören, Özlem; Küçükdurmaz, Faruk; Benlioğlu, Can

    2016-01-01

    Background: A limited number of studies within the literature have entailed objective evaluations of psychological, sexual, and emotional features of women within polygamous marriages. However, there is a lack of studies reporting these features among polygamous and monogamous men. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate sociodemographic characteristics, sexual function, and psychological status of polygamously and monogamously married men. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The study sample comprised two groups: 35 polygamous and 45 monogamous men in Kahramanmaraş Province, Turkey. Door-to-door surveys covered sociodemographic factors and adopted Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and International Index of Erectile Function – Erectile Function Domain (IIEF-EFD) scales. Results: Polygamous men showed considerably higher IIEF-EFD scores (p0.05). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of monogamous men for erectile dysfunction and depression were 14.4 (95% CI: 3.1–67.5) and 7.4 (95% CI: 0.9–61.9), respectively. The main reasons for multiple marriages reported by polygamous men, in descending order, were: 1) decreased satisfaction of sexual desires by a wife (37.1%); 2) falling in love with the second wife (22.8%); and 3) incompatibility with the first wife (17.1%). However, 62.9% of them responded negatively to the question: “Would you recommend polygamous marriage to other men?” Conclusion: Our results showed that polygamous men had higher erectile function and lower depression scores than monogamous men. Further studies investigating the effects of polygamy on men’s psychosexual function are warranted. Additionally, studies that address the perspectives of offspring and women’s expectations within polygamous marriages should be conducted. PMID:27606132

  19. Young parents' relationship characteristics, shared sexual behaviors, perception of partner risks, and dyadic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Huang, Rong; Lesser, Janna; Gonzalez-Figueroa, Evelyn; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Cumberland, William G

    2009-01-01

    Rising rates of heterosexually transmitted HIV among youth and young adults, particularly from ethnic minorities, create an urgent need to understand risk factors and perceptions of risk within the context of couple relationships. This study examined reports of young mothers and fathers (predominantly Latino) about background characteristics, relationship quality and length, HIV-related risk factors, and perceptions of partners' behaviors and personal history. Higher concordance was found for relationship characteristics and partners' personal history (e.g., incarceration) than on shared sexual behaviors. Most males and females stated that they were monogamous; however, those whose partners reported concurrency were unaware of this. Many were unaware of their partners' HIV testing status. Relationship quality was higher when females accurately perceived their partners' self-reported HIV-related risk behaviors. Length of the relationship did not influence concordance. Findings support the need for HIV prevention programs to promote open discussion about condom use and HIV testing within sexual partnerships.

  20. Individual heterogeneity determines sex differences in mortality in a monogamous bird with reversed sexual dimorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colchero, Fernando; Aliaga, Alix; Jones, Owen;

    2017-01-01

    . Although we found that variables that relate to the cost of reproduction and sexual dimorphism are at least partially involved in determing these sex differences, it is through their effect on the level of frailty that they affect age patterns of mortality. Therefore, our results raise the possibility...... in shaping demographic trajectories in wild populations. The link between these two processes has seldom been explored. 2. We used Bayesian survival trajectory analysis to study age-specific mortality trajectories in the Eurasian sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), a monogamous raptor with reversed sexual size...... dimorphism. We tested the effect of individual heterogeneity on age-specific mortality, and the extent by which this heterogeneity was determined by average reproductive output and wing length as measures of an individual’s frailty. 3. We found that sex differences in age-specific mortality were primarily...

  1. Mental health aspects of Arab-Israeli adolescents from polygamous versus monogamous families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Krenawi, Alean; Graham, John R; Slonim-Nevo, Vered

    2002-08-01

    The authors considered the mental health consequences of polygamy in a sample of 101 Arab Muslim adolescents (19 from polygamous and 82 from monogamous families) at Juarish (Ramla), Israel. The respondents completed the Self-Esteem Scale (SE; M. Rosenberg, 1979), the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI; L. Derogatis & N. Melsavados, 1983; L. Derogatis & P. Spencer, 1982), and the McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD; N. B. Epstein, M. N. Baldwin, & D. S. Bishop, 1983). The respondents from polygamous families had lower SE scores, statistically significant higher scores in 2 BSI dimensions, higher scores in all other BSI dimensions, and higher levels of self-reported family dysfunction. The respondents from polygamous families reported lower levels of socioeconomic status, academic achievement, and parental academic attainment. Those variables may have had a more direct impact on mental health than did parental marital status. The data also indicated that perceived family functioning was the best predictor of mental health.

  2. Extraordinarily long sperm in the socially monogamous cichlid fish Pelvicachromis taeniatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thünken, Timo; Bakker, Theo C. M.; Kullmann, Harald

    2007-06-01

    The main function of the spermatozoon is the transfer of the male haploid genome during fertilisation. In animals in general and in fishes in particular, there is huge variation in sperm size. In fishes, sperm size ranges from 13 μm in Mugil cephlus to nearly 100 μm in the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. We examined intra-specific variation in sperm morphometry in the socially monogamous cichlid Pelvicachromis taeniatus using scanning electron microscopy. The mean total sperm length of nearly 70 μm was extraordinarily large for cichlids. Furthermore, within-male variation was remarkably high. To our knowledge, P. taeniatus produces the longest cichlid sperm ever documented. Several hypotheses concerning the adaptive significance of these results are presented.

  3. Practising alchemy: the transmutation of evidence into best health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear-Smith, Felicity

    2011-04-01

    Alchemy was the synthesis or transmutation of all elements in perfect balance to obtain the philosopher's stone, the key to health. Just as alchemists sought this, so health practitioners always seek the best possible practice for optimal health outcomes for our patients. Best practice requires full knowledge--a little information can be dangerous. We need to serve our apprenticeship before we master our profession. Our profession is about improving health care. While the journey may start at medical school, the learning never ceases. It is not only about practising medicine, it is about the development of the practitioner. Professional practice requires systematic thinking combined with capacity to deal morally and creatively in areas of complexity and uncertainty appropriate to a specific context. It requires exemplary communication skills to interact with patients to facilitate collaborative decision making resulting in best practice. The synthesis of scientific and contextual evidence is a concept which applies to all disciplines where theoretical knowledge needs to be transferred to action to inform best practice. Decisions need to be made which take into account a complex array of factors, such as social and legal issues and resource constraints. Therefore, journey towards best practice involves transmutation of these three elements: scientific knowledge, the context in which it is applied and phronesis, the practical wisdom of the practitioner. All science has its limitations and we can never know all possible contextual information. Hence, like the philosopher's stone, best practice is a goal to which we aspire but never quite attain.

  4. PARTNER Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Ballantine, A; Dixon-Altaber, H; Dosanjh, M; Kuchina, L

    2011-01-01

    Hadrontherapy uses particle beams to treat tumours located near critical organs and tumours that respond poorly to conventional radiation therapy. It has become evident that there is an emerging need for reinforcing research in hadrontherapy and it is essential to train professionals in this rapidly developing field. PARTNER is a 4-year Marie Curie Training project funded by the European Commission with 5.6 million Euros aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies are participating in PARTNER, that is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network. The project offers research and training opportunities to 25 young biologists, engineers, physicians and physicists and is allowing them to actively develop modern techniques for treating cancer in close collaboration with leading European Institutions. For this purpose PARTNER relies on cutting edge research and technology development, ef...

  5. Relationship quality of partners in heterosexual married, heterosexual cohabiting, and gay and lesbian relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, L A; Schmitt, J P

    1986-10-01

    The relationship quality of partners in 44 married, 35 heterosexual cohabiting, 50 gay, and 56 lesbian monogamous couples was studied. Each couple lived together and did not have children living with them. Relationship quality was dimensionalized as love for partner, liking of partner, and relationship satisfaction. Cohabiting partners had the lowest Love for Partner and Relationship Satisfaction scores. Differences were also found among partner types on: barriers to leaving the relationship, alternatives to the relationship, a belief that mindreading is expected in the relationship, masculinity, femininity, androgyny, dyadic attachment, shared decision making, and perceived social support from family. The four partner groups did not differ in psychological adjustment. For each type of partner, love for partner was related to many barriers to leaving the relationship and high dyadic attachment; liking of partner was related to few alternatives to the relationship, high dyadic attachment, and high shared decision making; and relationship satisfaction was related to many attractions, few alternatives, few beliefs regarding disagreement is destructive to the relationship, high dyadic attachment, and high shared decision making. Stepwise multiple regression procedures were used to identify the best set of predictors for each partner type. Results are discussed in the context of existing models of relationship quality.

  6. Defining fitness to practise in Australian radiation therapy: A focus group study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Caroline A., E-mail: caroline.wright@med.monash.edu.a [Monash University, Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Clayton Campus, Wellington Road Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Jolly, Brian [Monash University, Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education (Australia); Schneider-Kolsky, Michal E.; Baird, Marilyn A. [Monash University, Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Clayton Campus, Wellington Road Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to investigate how Australian radiation therapists define fitness to practise. Method: A qualitative approach was taken to data collection with focus groups being employed to gather the data. Analysis was informed by grounded theory. Following ethics approval, three homogeneous focus groups were conducted comprising a total of 21 participants, with 5-8 participants per group. The discussions were transcribed, verified by the researcher and participants, then unitised, coded and a sample checked by a second coder. Findings: There was no consensus on the definition of fitness to practise. The terms professionalism and competence were used interchangeably in some definitions. Four themes emerged from the data, these were; fitness as a continuum (individual differences and longevity in the profession), fitness as behaviour and conduct (professionalism and competence), fitness as a state of mind (attitudes and intangible elements) and fitness as being qualified (course completion means fitness to practise). Three concepts which were not raised were illegal behaviour, impaired practice and dose errors. Conclusion: There is no consensus among radiation therapists about fitness to practise. There was confusion with how Fitness to practise relates to professionalism and competence with little mention of how impairment is interwoven into the notion of fitness to practise. Without an unambiguous definition and robust criteria, making the 'judgement call' as to whether a practitioners' fitness to practise is impaired will continue to be a challenge for educators, departmental managers and registration boards.

  7. Using narrative pedagogy: learning and practising interpretive thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironside, Pamela M

    2006-08-01

    This paper reports a hermeneutic study undertaken to explicate students' experiences in educational courses in which teachers enact Narrative Pedagogy. International interest in developing and implementing discipline-specific pedagogies is becoming commonplace as teachers respond to the challenges of preparing students for contemporary practice. Lifeworld Pedagogy, developed in Scandinavia, and Narrative Pedagogy, developed in the United States of America, Canada and New Zealand, are two approaches developed from nursing research for nursing education that provide teachers with research-based alternatives to conventional pedagogy. Further research is needed, however, that addresses how new pedagogies are experienced in schools of nursing. Teachers and students from 22 schools of nursing in the United States of America were interviewed over a 4-year period between 2002 and 2005. Using interpretive phenomenology as the philosophical background and Heideggerian hermeneutics as the method, accounts from 52 participants were analysed by a research team. The theme Learning and Practising Interpretive Thinking reveals how reform is occurring in schools of nursing that use Narrative Pedagogy. It documents how Narrative Pedagogy helps students challenge their assumptions and think through and interpret situations they encounter from multiple perspectives. Findings suggest that by focusing teachers' and students' attention on thinking and interpreting as communal experiences, interpretive pedagogies such as Narrative Pedagogy engage teachers and students in pooling their wisdom, challenging their preconceptions, envisioning new possibilities for providing care and engaging with others to ensure patient-centred care and safety. By documenting students' experiences in courses in which Narrative Pedagogy is used, this study provides teachers with research-based evidence to guide their pedagogical decisions. It extends international efforts to develop discipline

  8. Statistics teaching in medical school: opinions of practising doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Susan; Price, Gill M; Swift, Louise; Shepstone, Lee; Leinster, Sam J

    2010-11-04

    The General Medical Council expects UK medical graduates to gain some statistical knowledge during their undergraduate education; but provides no specific guidance as to amount, content or teaching method. Published work on statistics teaching for medical undergraduates has been dominated by medical statisticians, with little input from the doctors who will actually be using this knowledge and these skills after graduation. Furthermore, doctor's statistical training needs may have changed due to advances in information technology and the increasing importance of evidence-based medicine. Thus there exists a need to investigate the views of practising medical doctors as to the statistical training required for undergraduate medical students, based on their own use of these skills in daily practice. A questionnaire was designed to investigate doctors' views about undergraduate training in statistics and the need for these skills in daily practice, with a view to informing future teaching. The questionnaire was emailed to all clinicians with a link to the University of East Anglia Medical School. Open ended questions were included to elicit doctors' opinions about both their own undergraduate training in statistics and recommendations for the training of current medical students. Content analysis was performed by two of the authors to systematically categorize and describe all the responses provided by participants. 130 doctors responded, including both hospital consultants and general practitioners. The findings indicated that most had not recognised the value of their undergraduate teaching in statistics and probability at the time, but had subsequently found the skills relevant to their career. Suggestions for improving undergraduate teaching in these areas included referring to actual research and ensuring relevance to, and integration with, clinical practice. Grounding the teaching of statistics in the context of real research studies and including examples of

  9. Statistics teaching in medical school: Opinions of practising doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepstone Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The General Medical Council expects UK medical graduates to gain some statistical knowledge during their undergraduate education; but provides no specific guidance as to amount, content or teaching method. Published work on statistics teaching for medical undergraduates has been dominated by medical statisticians, with little input from the doctors who will actually be using this knowledge and these skills after graduation. Furthermore, doctor's statistical training needs may have changed due to advances in information technology and the increasing importance of evidence-based medicine. Thus there exists a need to investigate the views of practising medical doctors as to the statistical training required for undergraduate medical students, based on their own use of these skills in daily practice. Methods A questionnaire was designed to investigate doctors' views about undergraduate training in statistics and the need for these skills in daily practice, with a view to informing future teaching. The questionnaire was emailed to all clinicians with a link to the University of East Anglia Medical School. Open ended questions were included to elicit doctors' opinions about both their own undergraduate training in statistics and recommendations for the training of current medical students. Content analysis was performed by two of the authors to systematically categorise and describe all the responses provided by participants. Results 130 doctors responded, including both hospital consultants and general practitioners. The findings indicated that most had not recognised the value of their undergraduate teaching in statistics and probability at the time, but had subsequently found the skills relevant to their career. Suggestions for improving undergraduate teaching in these areas included referring to actual research and ensuring relevance to, and integration with, clinical practice. Conclusions Grounding the teaching of statistics

  10. A comparison study of psychological, family function marital and life satisfactions of polygamous and monogamous women in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Krenawi, Alean; Graham, John R; Al Gharaibeh, Fakir

    2011-10-01

    This study surveyed a 2009 convenience sampling of 199 women, 93 of whom were first (or senior) wives in polygamous marriages and 106 were wives in monogamous marriages. We deployed the McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD), ENRICH marital satisfaction questionnaire, SCL-90 mental health symptoms checklist, Rosenberg self-esteem (SE) scale, and Diener, Emmons, Larsen, and Griffin life satisfaction scale, a basic sociodemographic scale, including attitudes towards polygamy. Women from polygamous families experienced more problems in family functioning, marital relations, and reported low self-esteem, less satisfaction with life, and more somatization, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, paranoid ideation, psychoticism and their general severity index was higher (GSI). More women in polygamous marriages agreed with the practice of polygamy, as compared to their monogamous counterparts. The conclusion considers implications for mental health practice, policy, and further research.

  11. Intelligence and family marital structure: the case of adolescents from monogamous and polygamous families among Bedouin Arabs in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; Bart, William M; Hektner, Joel

    2003-02-01

    The levels of intelligence among Bedouin Arab adolescents from monogamous and polygamous families living in the Negev region of Israel were examined. A shortened version of the Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM) test (S. Elbedour, T. J. Bouchard, & Y. Hur, 1997; J. Raven, J. C. Raven, & J. H. Court, 1998) was used to assess intelligence. There were no significant test score differences between adolescents from monogamous families and adolescents from polygamous families. In addition, participants with 2 mothers tended to have lower RPM scores than those with 3 or 4 mothers, and participants with related parents tended to have lower RPM scores than participants with unrelated parents. One major finding of this study is that polygamous family marital structures tended not to have deleterious effects on the Bedouin Arab adolescents' RPM test scores.

  12. A study of psychological symptoms, family function, marital and life satisfactions of polygamous and monogamous women: the Palestinian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Krenawi, Alean

    2012-01-01

    Polygamy is defined as a marriage in which a spouse of either gender has more than one mate at the same time. Polygamy is considered a valid form of marriage in many countries and communities around the globe. The purpose of this study is to examine the psychological symptoms, family function, marital satisfaction, life satisfaction and the degree of agreement with the practice of polygamy among 'senior wives' - the first wife in the polygamous marriage - and women in monogamous marriages in the West Bank, Palestine. A convenience sample of 309 women, 187 from polygamous and 122 from monogamous families, participated in this study. All women from polygamous families were senior wives. The following instruments were deployed: the McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD), the ENRICH marital satisfaction questionnaire, the SCL-90 mental health symptoms checklist, the Rosenberg self-esteem (SE) scale, the Diener et al. (1985), a life satisfaction scale, and a basic socio-demographic scale, including the degree of agreement of the practice of polygamy. The findings revealed significant differences between senior wives in polygamous marriages and wives in monogamous marriages with regard to family functioning, marital satisfaction, self-esteem and life satisfaction. Likewise, many of the mental health symptoms were different. Particularly noteworthy were somatization, depression, hostility psychotism and the General Severity Index (a global index of distress). More women in polygamous marriages agreed with the practice of polygamy than their monogamous counterparts. Practitioners and policy makers need to be aware of the consequences of polygamy on first wives and on society as whole.

  13. Prevalence of HPV Infection and High Risk HPV Genotypes (16, 18, among Monogamous and Polygamous Women, In Zabol, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Shahramian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was performed to compare the prevalence of HPV infection and high risk HPV genotypes [16, 18] between monogamous and polygamous women, in Zabol, Iran.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Zabol in 2006 - 2007. Two hundred sixty five married women attend­ing the Gynecology Clinic for Cervical Disease Screening entered to this study. One hundred sixty two cases had mo­nogamous, and 103 had polygamous husbands. HPV PCR samples were obtained from scrape of papsmear speci­mens. The biotinylated primers MY09/MY11, GP5+/GP6+, were utilized to enable amplification and detection of posi­tive PCR products. Confirmation of HPV-16 and -18 were done by type-specific PCR primers HPV-16/F, HPV-16/R and HPV-18/F, HPV-18/R.Results: Prevalence of HPV infection in monogamous and polygamous groups was 29% and 37.9%, respectively. The most HPV infection was found in 15-25 years group. The most prevalence of infection in monogamous group was HPV-18 and HPV- non16, 18 in 15-25 years, and HPV-16 in 26-35 years group. In polygamous group the most preva­lent type was HPV-16, 18 in 15-25 years group. The most prevalent HPV-16 was seen in sever inflammation and dys­plasia cytology in both groups.Conclusion: Prevalence of HPV infection in Zabol is high, and in women with polygamous husbands group is slightly more than monogamous. Screening for this infection must be recommended in this region of Iran.

  14. The role of monogamous bivalency and Fc interactions in the binding of anti-DNA antibodies to DNA antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Nancy A; Pisetsky, David S

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies can bind DNA avidly by monogamous bivalency, a mechanism which requires the interaction of both Fab combining regions with antigenic determinants on the same polynucleotide. To explore further this mechanism, we tested Fab and F(ab')2 fragments prepared from IgG from patient plasmas in an ELISA with native DNA antigen, detecting antibody with a peroxidase conjugated anti-Fab reagent. These studies showed that Fab fragments, which can only bind monovalently, had negligible activity. Although bivalent F(ab')2 fragments would be predicted to bind DNA, these fragments also showed poor anti-DNA activity. Control studies showed that the fragments retained antibody activity to tetanus toxoid and an EBV antigen preparation. Together, these findings suggest that anti-DNA avidity depends on monogamous bivalency, with the antibody Fc portion also influencing DNA binding, in a mechanism which can be termed Fc-dependent monogamous bivalency.

  15. UNDERCOVER PARTNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru MARIAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The undercover partner takes part in the process of providing the investigating bodies with information. This institution carries out activities similar to undercover investigator. These both represent a proactive investigating instrument used by criminal authorities to obtain better results concerning the fight against criminality. Under the cover another identity, they carefully search for crimes or favorable circumstances for commitment of others new.

  16. UNDERCOVER PARTNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian ALEXANDRU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The undercover partner takes part in the process of providing the investigating bodies with information. This institution carries out activities similar to undercover investigator. These both represent a proactive investigating instrument used by criminal authorities to obtain better results concerning the fight against criminality. Under the cover another identity, they carefully search for crimes or favorable circumstances for commitment of others new.

  17. Influences on the choice of health professionals to practise in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influences on the choice of health professionals to practise in rural areas. ... Training health care professionals (HCPs) to work in rural areas is a ... Themes identified included personal, facilitating, contextual, staying and reinforcing factors.

  18. The relationship between monogamous/polygamous family structure and the mental health of bedouin Arab adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, S; Bart, William; Hektner, Joel

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies of polygamy and child mental health have primarily focused on younger children. The present studies are among the first to focus on adolescents. The first study involved 210 randomly selected Bedouin Arab adolescents (mean age 15.9), who were administered instruments assessing their family environment and mental health. The second study involved 182 Bedouin Arab adolescents in which the student participants completed a single instrument about themselves and in which the teachers of the students completed the Teachers' Report Form of the Child Behaviour Checklist by Achenbach. The Bedouin Arab adolescents fell into two groups: (a) adolescents in monogamous family structures and (b) adolescents in polygamous family structures. The findings of the first study suggest that the two groups did not differ significantly in the majority of the assessed variables, even though there were significant differences obtained between groups for 4 of the 13 assessed variables. The two groups did not differ significantly in the second study. Results were discussed in terms of their cultural and developmental significance.

  19. Chronic social isolation enhances reproduction in the monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Adam N; Carter, C Sue; Cushing, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    Chronic stressors are generally considered to disrupt reproduction and inhibit mating. Here we test the hypothesis that a chronic stressor, specifically social isolation, can facilitate adaptive changes that enhance/accelerate reproductive effort. In general, monogamous species display high levels of prosociality, delayed sexual maturation, and greater parental investment in fewer, higher quality offspring compared with closely related polygynous species. We predicted that chronic social isolation would promote behavioral and neurochemical patterns in prairie voles associated with polygyny. Male and female prairie voles were isolated for four weeks and changes in mating behavior, alloparental care, estrogen receptor (ER) α expression and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in brain regions regulating sociosexual behavior were examined. In males, isolation accelerated copulation, increased ERα in the medial amygdala (MEApd) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTpm), and reduced TH expression in the MEApd and BSTpm, but had no effect on alloparental behavior. In females, isolation resulted in more rapid estrus induction and reduced TH expression in the MEApd and BSTpm, but had no effect on estradiol sensitivity or ERα expression. The results support the hypothesis that ERα expression in the MEApd and BSTpm is a critical determinant of male copulatory behavior and/or mating system. The lack of change in alloparental behavior suggests that changes in prosocial behavior are selective and regulated by different mechanisms. The results also suggest that TH in the MEApd and BSTpm may play a critical role in determining mating behavior in both sexes.

  20. Evidence of polygamy in the socially monogamous Amazonian fish Arapaima gigas (Schinz, 1822 (Osteoglossiformes, Arapaimidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izeni Pires Farias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Arapaima gigas is one of the largest freshwater fishes of the world. It is socially monogamous, forming pairs, constructing a nest and providing parental care. We performed a paternity analysis under three scenarios in captive, semi-natural and natural areas using 10 microsatellite markers. As a positive control, we analyzed three pairs and their offspring isolated individually in artificial breeding ponds (a priori very high probability of monogamy. We then analyzed two samples of offspring from large artificial ponds with multiple adults but only one reproductive pair (a priori high probability of monogamy, two samples from semi-natural breeding station with multiple adults but only one reproductive pair (a priori high probability of monogamy, and a sample from a natural lake with multiple adults, some potentially breeding (a priori medium probability of monogamy. Analysis of patterns of Mendelian heredity suggested an extra-pair contribution for all broods except the positive controls. Similarly, results based on multilocus analysis estimated at least two sib-groups per nest. These results reject monogamy as a system of breeding in Arapaima gigas. From a management perspective, this behavior may be exploited to maintain genetic diversity in captive and as well in wild populations of Arapaima gigas.

  1. The social-psychological outcomes of martial arts practise among youth: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertonghen, Jikkemien; Theeboom, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Martial arts involvement among the youth has been described in controversial terms. Studies regarding the effects of martial arts practise on youth show contrasting images. While some refer to enhanced personal and social opportunities for those that participate, others warn against increased levels of aggressiveness and antisocial behavior among its participants. The aim of the present review is to provide, firstly, an overview of the major findings of studies concerning the social-psychological outcomes of martial arts practise. Secondly, the limitations of those studies are discussed. From more than 350 papers, collected during a two-year lasting literature study, 27 papers met all criteria to be included in this study. This review revealed that even though a considerable amount of research on social-psychological outcomes of martial arts practise has been conducted over the years, to date, it has not brought clarity in the existing duality regarding the possible effects of martial arts involvement. It is proposed that a better understanding can be provided if specific influential factors are taken into account in future research (i.e., participants' characteristics, type of guidance, social context and structural qualities of the sport). Key pointsMany common beliefs exist about the positive and negative outcomes of martial arts practise.Studies regarding the effects of martial arts practise on youth show contrasting images.Several influential factors have to be taken into account when examining the social-psychological outcomes of martial arts practise.

  2. The impact of early life family structure on adult social attachment, alloparental behavior, and the neuropeptide systems regulating affiliative behaviors in the monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd H Ahern

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Early social attachments lie at the heart of emotional and social development in many mammals, including humans. In nature, monogamous prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster experience considerable natural variation in early social attachment opportunities due to differences in family structure (e.g., single-mothers, solitary breeding pairs, and communal groups. We exploited some of this natural variation in family structure to examine the influence of early social environment on the development of adult social behavior. First, we characterized the parental care received by pups reared biparentally (BP or by a single-mother (SM in the laboratory. Second, we examined whether BP- and SM-reared offspring differed in adult nurturing, bonding, and emotional behaviors. Finally, we investigated the effects of rearing condition on neuropeptide systems that regulate adult social behavior (oxytocin, vasopressin, and corticotropin-releasing factor [CRF]. Observations revealed that SM-reared pups were exposed more frequently (P<0.01, licked and groomed less (P<0.01, and matured more slowly (P<0.01 than BP-reared pups. In adulthood, there were striking socio-behavioral differences: SM-reared females showed low spontaneous, pup-directed alloparental behavior (P<0.01 and both males and females from the SM-reared condition showed delayed partner preference formation. While rearing did not impact neuropeptide receptor densities in the ventral forebrain as we predicted, SM-reared animals, particularly females, had increased OT content (P<0.01 and greater dorsal raphe CRF2 densities (P<0.05 and both measures correlated with licking and grooming experienced during the first 10 days of life. These results suggest that naturalistic variation in social rearing conditions can introduce diversity into adult nurturing and attachment behaviors.

  3. Mate fidelity and breeding site tenacity in a monogamous sandpiper, the black turnstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, C.M.; Gill, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between mate fidelity and breeding site tenacity during a 5-year study of the black turnstone, Arenaria melanocephala, a socially monogamous sandpiper breeding in subarctic Alaska. We tested the predictions of several hypotheses regarding the incidence of divorce and the benefits of fidelity to mate and breeding site. Interannual return rates to the breeding grounds (88% for males, 79% for females) were among the highest yet recorded for any scolopacid sandpiper, and 88% of returning birds nested on their previous year's territory. The annual divorce rate was only 11%, and mate fidelity was significantly linked to fidelity to territory but independent of sex and year. Males arrived in spring significantly earlier than their mates and interannual fidelity was influenced by the relative timing of arrival of pair members. Reunited pairs had significantly higher fledging success than new pairs formed after death or divorce. The incidence of divorce was unrelated to reproductive success the previous year, although birds nested significantly further away after failure than after a successful nesting attempt. Sightings of marked individuals suggested that members of pairs do not winter together, and breeding site tenacity provides a mechanism through which pair members can reunite. We reject the 'incompatibility' hypothesis for divorce in turnstones, and our data contradict predictions of the 'better option' hypothesis. Alternatively, we propose the 'bet-hedging' hypothesis to explain the occurrence of divorce, which transpires when an individual pairs with a new mate to avoid the cost of waiting for a previous mate to return. Such costs can include remaining unmated, if the former mate has died, or experiencing lower reproductive success because of delayed breeding.

  4. Multiple deleterious effects of experimentally aged sperm in a monogamous bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J.; Wagner, R.H.; Helfenstein, F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Mulard, Hervé; Naves, L.C.; Danchin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Sperm aging is known to be detrimental to reproductive performance. However, this apparently general phenomenon has seldom been studied in an evolutionary context. The negative impact of sperm aging on parental fitness should constitute a strong selective pressure for adaptations to avoid its effects. We studied the impact of sperm aging on black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), a monogamous seabird. Kittiwakes comprise a model system because (i) of evidence that females eject their mates' sperm to prevent fertilization by sperm that would be old and degraded by the time of fertilization and result in reduced reproductive performance and (ii) the lack of extra-pair fertilization in this species makes cryptic female choice an unlikely explanation of postcopulatory sperm ejection by females. We experimentally manipulated the age of the sperm fertilizing kittiwake eggs by fitting males with anti-insemination rings for variable periods of time preceding egg-laying. We found evidence that sperm aging negatively affected four sequential stages of reproduction: fertilization potential, rate of embryonic development, embryonic mortality, and chick condition at hatching. These results may be produced by a continuum of a single process of sperm aging that differentially affects various aspects of development, depending on the degree of damage incurred to the spermatozoa. The marked impact of sperm age on female fitness may thus drive postcopulatory sperm ejection by females. These results provide experimental evidence of deleterious effects of sperm aging on a nondomestic vertebrate, underlining its taxonomic generality and its potential to select for a wide array of adaptations. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  5. Social Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Leif Emil

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present findings from a new Nordic survey on social partners’ policy and practice in regards older workers. The goal of the survey was to find out to what extent the social partners have developed policies and outlined strategies, which explicitly address...... the demographic change and promote opportunities for lifelong learning and career development among their senior members (45+). Workforce in the Nordic countries tend to be highly organised – especially the older workers. The social partners’ involvement in the discussion of sustainable society...... difficult position” regarding this matter, but also that they should develop clearer strategy in response to demographic change, and communicate it to their members. The OWNsurvey was carried out as a part of the work in the network Older workers in the Nordic countries (OWN) supported by the Nordic Council...

  6. Monogamous nature of symmetric N-qubit states of the W class:Concurrence and negativity tangle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. J. Geetha; K. O. Yashodamma; Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Using Majorana representation of symmetric N-qubit pure states, we have examined the monogamous nature of the family of states with two-distinct spinors, the W class of states. We have evaluated the N-concurrence tangle and showed that all the states in this family have vanishing concurrence tangle. The negativity tangle for the W class of states is shown to be non-zero, illustrating the fact that the concurrence tangle is always lesser than or equal to the negativity tangle in a pure N-qubit state.

  7. Parent-Adolescent Conflict and Its Resolution in Monogamous and Polygamous Bedouin Arab Families in Southern Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Elbedour

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (1 to compare whether children from polygamous family structures significantly differ from children from monogamous family structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict, and (2 whether children from these two structures employ different patterns of family conflict resolution.To address these questions, a random sample of 212 high school students (60.8% monogamous completed a self-administered survey. The results of MANOVA show no significant differences (p > 0.05 between these two structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict. The results also show similar conflict management styles between these two family structures within each of the following five domains (privacy, school and career, money spending, going out and leisure, and physical appearance.This study is unique in that it is the first empirical research to be conducted in the field of conflict resolution among youth and adolescents in polygamous marital structures and therefore, further investigation is needed to replicate these results utilizing different cross-cultural populations practicing polygamy.

  8. Parent-adolescent conflict and its resolution in monogamous and polygamous Bedouin Arab families in southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; Hektner, Joel M; Morad, Mohammed; Abu-Bader, Soleman H

    2003-12-05

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to compare whether children from polygamous family structures significantly differ from children from monogamous family structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict, and (2) whether children from these two structures employ different patterns of family conflict resolution. To address these questions, a random sample of 212 high school students (60.8% monogamous) completed a self-administered survey. The results of MANOVA show no significant differences (p > 0.05) between these two structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict. The results also show similar conflict management styles between these two family structures within each of the following five domains (privacy, school and career, money spending, going out and leisure, and physical appearance). This study is unique in that it is the first empirical research to be conducted in the field of conflict resolution among youth and adolescents in polygamous marital structures and therefore, further investigation is needed to replicate these results utilizing different cross-cultural populations practicing polygamy.

  9. A survey of evidence-based practise among Dutch occupational therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dopp, C.M.E.; Steultjens, E.M.J.; Radel, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how the evidenced-based practise (EBP) is perceived by Dutch occupational therapists (OTs), what sources of research data are used to make clinical decisions, and what barriers are identified in implementing EBP. A self-administered, pre-tested, questionnaire was distributed thro

  10. Experimental improvisation practise and notation 1945-1999. An annotated bibliography (2002f). Pdf edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    Please see also addenda: Experimental improvisation practise and notation. Addenda 2002-: Pdf edition. (Deutsches Resumée - siehe bitte unten) (Resumé en Francais, voire ci-dessous svp.) This is an attempt to make a broad and comprehensive mapping of existing material, the vast majority being...

  11. Läänemaa ettevõtjad rahvusvahelise projekti INTO-PRACTISE innovatsiooni uuringus / Eva Makienko

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Makienko, Eva

    2010-01-01

    2009. a. tehti rahvusvahelise projekti Into-Practise raames innovatsiooni käsitlev uuring, et leida vastus küsimusele, kuidas tagada konkurentsivõime ja innovatiivsus organisatsioonides. Uuringus osalesid Kesk-Läänemere piirkonna ettevõtjad ja koolijuhid. Artiklis antakse ülevaade ettevõtjate arvamustest konkurentsivõime tegurite ja innovatsiooni kohta

  12. The IMF programs that practised developing countries and welfare state perceptive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faik Çelik

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study IMF policies have examined with different aspects and policy practisies are analyzed. IMF policies putting into practise for long-term stability but in the long and short term income distribution/welfare are damaged.

  13. Practising Gender When Networking: The Case of University–Industry Innovation Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, L.J.; Benschop, Y.W.M.; Brink, M.C.L. van den

    2015-01-01

    This paper gains insight into the role of gender in interpersonal networks, which is largely neglected in research on networking. We do so by exploring the concept of ‘practising gender’, the spatial-temporal accomplishment of gender practices, when people build, maintain and exit social networks. T

  14. Metacognitive strategies in student learning: do students practise retrieval when they study on their own?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D; Butler, Andrew C; Roediger, Henry L

    2009-05-01

    Basic research on human learning and memory has shown that practising retrieval of information (by testing the information) has powerful effects on learning and long-term retention. Repeated testing enhances learning more than repeated reading, which often confers limited benefit beyond that gained from the initial reading of the material. Laboratory research also suggests that students lack metacognitive awareness of the mnemonic benefits of testing. The implication is that in real-world educational settings students may not engage in retrieval practise to enhance learning. To investigate students' real-world study behaviours, we surveyed 177 college students and asked them (1) to list strategies they used when studying (an open-ended free report question) and (2) to choose whether they would reread or practise recall after studying a textbook chapter (a forced report question). The results of both questions point to the same conclusion: A majority of students repeatedly read their notes or textbook (despite the limited benefits of this strategy), but relatively few engage in self-testing or retrieval practise while studying. We propose that many students experience illusions of competence while studying and that these illusions have significant consequences for the strategies students select when they monitor and regulate their own learning.

  15. Australian Public Universities: Are They Practising a Corporate Approach to Governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on the multi-theoretical approach to governance and a qualitative research method to examine the extent to which the corporate approach is practised in Australian public universities. The findings reveal that in meeting the needs of multiple stakeholders, universities are faced with a number of structural, legalistic, and…

  16. A survey of evidence-based practise among Dutch occupational therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dopp, C.M.E.; Steultjens, E.M.J.; Radel, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how the evidenced-based practise (EBP) is perceived by Dutch occupational therapists (OTs), what sources of research data are used to make clinical decisions, and what barriers are identified in implementing EBP. A self-administered, pre-tested, questionnaire was distributed thro

  17. Läänemaa ettevõtjad rahvusvahelise projekti INTO-PRACTISE innovatsiooni uuringus / Eva Makienko

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Makienko, Eva

    2010-01-01

    2009. a. tehti rahvusvahelise projekti Into-Practise raames innovatsiooni käsitlev uuring, et leida vastus küsimusele, kuidas tagada konkurentsivõime ja innovatiivsus organisatsioonides. Uuringus osalesid Kesk-Läänemere piirkonna ettevõtjad ja koolijuhid. Artiklis antakse ülevaade ettevõtjate arvamustest konkurentsivõime tegurite ja innovatsiooni kohta

  18. Addressing the Baseline: Erving Goffman and Ethics in a Postgraduate Degree for Practising Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Geraldine; Higgins, Joanna; Shuker, Mary Jane

    2008-01-01

    In response to the claim that students who have received an undergraduate degree in education lack adequate preparation for postgraduate study, the designers of a masters course in research methods set an assignment at the first meeting which asked practising teachers to match Goffman's dramaturgical concepts to observation of behaviour in public.…

  19. Experimental improvisation practise and notation 1945-1999. An annotated bibliography (2002f). Pdf edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    Please see also addenda: Experimental improvisation practise and notation. Addenda 2002-: Pdf edition. (Deutsches Resumée - siehe bitte unten) (Resumé en Francais, voire ci-dessous svp.) This is an attempt to make a broad and comprehensive mapping of existing material, the vast majority being...

  20. Australian Public Universities: Are They Practising a Corporate Approach to Governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on the multi-theoretical approach to governance and a qualitative research method to examine the extent to which the corporate approach is practised in Australian public universities. The findings reveal that in meeting the needs of multiple stakeholders, universities are faced with a number of structural, legalistic, and…

  1. CONSULAR ASSISTANCE FOR NATIONALS DETAINED BY A FOREIGN GOVERNMENT: STATES’ POLICIES AND PRACTISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Avilia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Vienna Convention on Consular Relations of 1963 outlined the rights of a state to exercise its obligation to protect the interests of its nationals abroad. The protection given by states to their nationals is commonly referred to as consular assistance. The main objective of consular assistance is to help nationals facing difficulties abroad. In the event of an arrest, the aim of the provision of consular assistance is to protect the inalienable rights of a foreign detainee. The inalienable rights inherent to all detainees are the right retain counsel, and to receive due process of law. Although the 1963 Convention on Consular Relations is the codification of international customary law with regard to states’ practises in protecting their nationals, the practises may vary from one state to another. This paper analyses the policy and practises adopted by a state to protect its nationals detained abroad and suggests effective policies to provide consular assistance based on the reviewed state practises and policies.

  2. Using TV white space spectrum to practise telemedicine: A promising technology to enhance broadband internet connectivity within healthcare facilities in rural regions of developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Afton; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Ndlovu, Kagiso; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2016-06-01

    The following correspondence provides an overview of TV White Space (TVWS) technology, regulations, and potential applications to the health care sector. This report also introduces "Project Kgolagano," a Botswana-based initiative representing the first endeavour to utilize TVWS internet connection for practising telemedicine. TV "white space" refers to the previously unused, wasted spectrum within TV radiofrequency channels that can now be leveraged to obtain broadband internet access. TVWS represents a less costly, faster, and farther-reaching internet connection that is a promising option for connecting the previously unconnected populations of remote and underserved areas. The Botswana-University of Pennsylvania Partnership, Microsoft, Botswana Innovation Hub, Vista Life Sciences, and Global Broadband Solutions have partnered together to bring TVWS wireless broadband access to healthcare facilities in poorly connected regions of Botswana (Lobatse, Francistown, Maun, Gaborone) in order to improve healthcare delivery and facilitate telemedicine in dermatology, cervical cancer screening, and family medicine (HIV/AIDS, TB, general adult and pediatric medicine).

  3. Coital frequency and condom use in monogamous and concurrent sexual relationships in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Delva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A decreased frequency of unprotected sex during episodes of concurrent relationships may dramatically reduce the role of concurrency in accelerating the spread of HIV. Such a decrease could be the result of coital dilution – the reduction in per-partner coital frequency from additional partners – and/or increased condom use during concurrency. To study the effect of concurrency on the frequency of unprotected sex, we examined sexual behaviour data from three communities with high HIV prevalence around Cape Town, South Africa. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey from June 2011 to February 2012 using audio computer-assisted self-interviewing to reconstruct one-year sexual histories, with a focus on coital frequency and condom use. Participants were randomly sampled from a previous TB and HIV prevalence survey. Mixed effects logistic and Poisson regression models were fitted to data from 527 sexually active adults reporting on 1210 relationship episodes to evaluate the effect of concurrency status on consistent condom use and coital frequency. Results: The median of the per-partner weekly average coital frequency was 2 (IQR: 1–3, and consistent condom use was reported for 36% of the relationship episodes. Neither per-partner coital frequency nor consistent condom use changed significantly during episodes of concurrency (aIRR=1.05; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.99–1.24 and aOR=1.01; 95% CI: 0.38–2.68, respectively. Being male, coloured, having a tertiary education, and having a relationship between 2 weeks and 9 months were associated with higher coital frequencies. Being coloured, and having a relationship lasting for more than 9 months, was associated with inconsistent condom use. Conclusions: We found no evidence for coital dilution or for increased condom use during concurrent relationship episodes in three communities around Cape Town with high HIV prevalence. Given the low levels of self-reported consistent

  4. These terrifying three words: A qualitative, mixed methods study of students' and mentors' understandings of 'fitness to practise'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock-Stuart, Elaine; MacLaren, Jessica; McLachlan, Alison; James, Christine

    2016-08-01

    There is little empirical published research pertaining to fitness to practise and pre-registration nursing students. Much of the existing fitness to practise literature focuses on medical students and there is a preponderance of literature reviews and descriptive or discursive papers. The multicentre study aimed to explore students' and mentor's understandings of fitness to practise processes in pre-registration nursing programmes. A qualitative study in the interpretive paradigm with interpretive analysis involving 6 focus groups and 4 face-to-face interviews with nursing students and mentors. Eleven Higher Education Institutions providing pre-registration nursing education in the UK. Data were collected January 2014-March 2015 following ethical approval. Purposive sampling was used to recruit mentors and nursing (but not midwifery) students from pre-registration nursing programmes at different stages of educational preparation. Qualitatively driven semi-structured focus groups (n=6) and interviews (n=4) were conducted with a total of 35 participants (17 pre-registration nursing students and 18 nursing mentors). Three themes identified from the student and mentor data are considered: Conceptualising Fitness to Practise; Good Health and Character; and Fear and Anxiety Surrounding Fitness to Practise Processes. Uncertainty about understandings of fitness to practise contributed to a pervasive fear among students and reluctance among mentors to raise concerns about a student's fitness to practise. Both students and mentors expressed considerable anxiety and engaged in catastrophic thinking about fitness to practise processes. Higher Education Institutes should reinforce to students that they are fit to practise the majority of the time and reduce the negative emotional loading of fitness to practise processes and highlight learning opportunities. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Selection on male longevity in a monogamous human population: late-life survival brings no additional grandchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdenperä, M; Lummaa, V; Russell, A F

    2011-05-01

    Humans are exceptionally long-lived for mammals of their size. In men, lifespan is hypothesized to evolve from benefits of reproduction throughout adult life. We use multi-generational data from pre-industrial Finland, where remarriage was possible only after spousal death, to test selection pressures on male longevity in four monogamous populations. Men showed several behaviours consistent with attempting to accrue direct fitness throughout adult life and sired more children in their lifetimes if they lost their first wife and remarried. However, remarriage did not increase grandchild production because it compromised the success of motherless first-marriage offspring. Overall, grandchild production was not improved by living beyond 51 years and was reduced by living beyond 65. Our results highlight the importance of using grandchild production to understand selection on human life-history traits. We conclude that selection for (or enforcement of) lifetime monogamy will select for earlier reproductive investment and against increased lifespan in men.

  6. Initiating undergraduate medical students into communities of research practise: what do supervisors recommend?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Simon C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been written in the educational literature on the value of communities of practise in enhancing student learning. Here, we take the experience of senior undergraduate medical students involved in short-term research as a member of a team as a paradigm for learning in a community of practise. Based on feedback from experienced supervisors, we offer recommendations for initiating students into the research culture of their team. In so doing, we endeavour to create a bridge between theory and practise through disseminating advice on good supervisory practise, where the supervisor is perceived as an educator responsible for designing the research process to optimize student learning. Methods Using the questionnaire design tool SurveyMonkey and comprehensive lists of contact details of staff who had supervised research projects at the University of Edinburgh during 1995 - 2008, current and previous supervisors were invited to recommend procedures which they had found successful in initiating students into the research culture of a team. Text responses were then coded in the form of derivative recommendations and categorized under general themes and sub-themes. Results Using the chi-square tests of linear trend and association, evidence was found for a positive trend towards more experienced supervisors offering responses (χ2 = 16.833, p 2 = 0.482, p = 0.487, n = 203, respectively. A total of 126 codes were extracted from the text responses of 65 respondents. These codes were simplified to form a complete list of 52 recommendations, which were in turn categorized under seven derivative overarching themes, the most highly represented themes being Connecting the student with others and Cultivating self-efficacy in research competence. Conclusions Through the design of a coding frame for supervisor responses, a wealth of ideas has been captured to make communities of research practise effective mediums for undergraduate

  7. μ and κ opioid receptor distribution in the monogamous titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus): implications for social behavior and endocrine functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragen, B J; Freeman, S M; Laredo, S A; Mendoza, S P; Bales, K L

    2015-04-02

    The opioid system is involved in infant-mother bonds and adult-adult bonds in many species. We have previously shown that μ opioid receptors (MORs) and κ opioid receptors (KORs) are involved in regulating the adult attachment of the monogamous titi monkey. The present study sought to determine the distribution of MOR and KOR in the titi monkey brain using receptor autoradiography. We used [(3)H][D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) to label MORs and [(3)H]U69,593 to label KORs. MOR binding was heterogeneous throughout the titi monkey brain. Specifically, MOR binding was observed in the cingulate gyrus (CG), striatum, septal regions, diagonal band, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and thalamus. Binding was particularly dense in the septum, medial amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, mediodorsal thalamus with moderate binding in the nucleus accumbens. Consistent with other primate species, MOR were also observed in "neurochemically unique domains of the accumbens and putamen" (NUDAPs). In general KOR binding was more homogenous. KORs were primarily found in the CG, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus. Dense KOR binding was observed in the claustrum. Relative MOR and KOR binding in the titi monkey striatum was similar to other humans and primates, but was much lower compared to rodents. Relative MOR binding in the titi monkey hypothalamus was much greater than that found in rodents. This study was the first to examine MOR and KOR binding in a monogamous primate. The location of these receptors gives insight into where ligands may be acting to regulate social behavior and endocrine function.

  8. Practising mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsenan, Irene

    2017-08-16

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The article examined the use of mindfulness techniques and how by learning to care for themselves, nurses can enhance the care they provide for patients. The concept of mindfulness has had widespread publicity, from meditation courses to adult colouring books, but I wanted to learn how mindfulness can be applied to nursing.

  9. Perception of the older adults regarding the practise of physical activity and healthy eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Rosso Krug

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the perception of regular physical activity and healthy eating among the older adults. Methods: This descriptive study (qualitative approach included 36 older adults (69 to 91 years residents in a rural community in southern Brazil. A semi-structured interview was used and the information were recorded, transcribed and interpreted (content analysis technique. Results: The following categories of analysis were identified: a facilitators and barriers for the practising PA, b benefits of regular PA, and c healthy eating habits-consumption of food (beneficial and harmful for health. Facilitating factors were related to social interaction, motivation, willpower, practise enjoying, having company, and being encouraged. Barriers perceived were diseases, physical limitations, pain, lack of willingness and age. The PA benefits were wellbeing, pain reduction, increased willingness, treatment and disease prevention. Fruits, vegetables, vitamin D, calcium, and water were cited as important to health. The consumption of foods rich in fat and sugars was associated with the occurrence of diseases. Conclusion: Personal aspects, of coexistence and motivation, are factors cited as facilitators for the practise of physical activities, while the barriers are related to health, unwillingness, and age. Health promotion strategies may be multidisciplinary and should consider personal aspects, of coexistence, motivation and health. Strategies should focus on the benefits of regular PA and healthy eating.

  10. THE SOCIAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL OUTCOMES OF MARTIAL ARTS PRACTISE AMONG YOUTH: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikkemien Vertonghen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Martial arts involvement among the youth has been described in controversial terms. Studies regarding the effects of martial arts practise on youth show contrasting images. While some refer to enhanced personal and social opportunities for those that participate, others warn against increased levels of aggressiveness and antisocial behavior among its participants. The aim of the present review is to provide, firstly, an overview of the major findings of studies concerning the social-psychological outcomes of martial arts practise. Secondly, the limitations of those studies are discussed. From more than 350 papers, collected during a two-year lasting literature study, 27 papers met all criteria to be included in this study. This review revealed that even though a considerable amount of research on social-psychological outcomes of martial arts practise has been conducted over the years, to date, it has not brought clarity in the existing duality regarding the possible effects of martial arts involvement. It is proposed that a better understanding can be provided if specific influential factors are taken into account in future research (i.e., participants' characteristics, type of guidance, social context and structural qualities of the sport.

  11. Methods for Practising Ethics in Research and Innovation: A Literature Review, Critical Analysis and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijers, Wessel; Wright, David; Brey, Philip; Weber, Karsten; Rodrigues, Rowena; O'Sullivan, Declan; Gordijn, Bert

    2017-09-12

    This paper provides a systematic literature review, analysis and discussion of methods that are proposed to practise ethics in research and innovation (R&I). Ethical considerations concerning the impacts of R&I are increasingly important, due to the quickening pace of technological innovation and the ubiquitous use of the outcomes of R&I processes in society. For this reason, several methods for practising ethics have been developed in different fields of R&I. The paper first of all presents a systematic search of academic sources that present and discuss such methods. Secondly, it provides a categorisation of these methods according to three main kinds: (1) ex ante methods, dealing with emerging technologies, (2) intra methods, dealing with technology design, and (3) ex post methods, dealing with ethical analysis of existing technologies. Thirdly, it discusses the methods by considering problems in the way they deal with the uncertainty of technological change, ethical technology design, the identification, analysis and resolving of ethical impacts of technologies and stakeholder participation. The results and discussion of our literature review are valuable for gaining an overview of the state of the art and serve as an outline of a future research agenda of methods for practising ethics in R&I.

  12. Partnering and contracting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnstedt, Kristian Ditlev

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - Partnering is often, by economists, and construction managerial literature related to more incomplete contracts. This can be explained by seeing partnering as something that neutralizes opportunism. The aim is to uncover whether partnering neutralizes opportunism when there is an incomp......Purpose - Partnering is often, by economists, and construction managerial literature related to more incomplete contracts. This can be explained by seeing partnering as something that neutralizes opportunism. The aim is to uncover whether partnering neutralizes opportunism when...... outcomes with the conception of being repaid later in accordance to reciprocity. Value - Seeing partnering as the willingness to renegotiate complete contracts can reduce the risk for the contractor and lead to lower prices for a given service. Keywords Partnering, Contracting, Pareto efficiency...

  13. Olympic Partner Programme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Olympic Partner Programme (TOP) is an international Olympic marketing programme created by the International Olympic Committee (IOC),which includes the Organising Committees of the Games,the National Olympic Committees and the TOP Partners.

  14. The Constitution of Partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    The constitution of partnering. Afhandlingen behandler konstitueringen af ledelseskonceptet partnering og dets anvendelse i dansk byggeri. Partnering er et udbredt koncept i byggeriet som betoner samarbejde, tillid og gensidighed mellem de deltagende parter, og konceptet har de senere år har været...

  15. Erotica viewing effects on intimate relationships and self/partner evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Cameron; Prause, Nicole

    2013-05-01

    Viewing visual sexual stimuli (VSS) has been documented to have both positive (e.g., increased sexual arousal and sexual behaviors) and negative (e.g., higher anxiety, devaluing of partner attractiveness) effects. Excitation transfer and social comparison theories were used to generate hypotheses that could explain these mixed findings. Forty-four monogamous, heterosexual couples viewed erotic, exciting (non-erotic films), and nature films both alone and together. They rated their feelings of general arousal and relationship satisfaction as well as perceptions of self and partner sexual behaviors and attractiveness. Participants viewing both the erotic and exciting films reported equivalent increases in excitement; however, the erotic film was rated as slightly more generally arousing and increased participant's desire to be close to their partner. Viewing the erotic films also induced greater reports of negative affect, guilt, and anxiety. These findings moderately support a transfer of excitation interpretation. No effects of partner presence or absence while viewing the films was found. Viewing erotic films led to more positive evaluations of one's own sexual behaviors. These findings provide mixed support in regard to self and partner social comparisons. Co-occurring positive and negative emotional reactions were explored as possible explanation to the complex reactions to VSS.

  16. Fitness Benefits of Mate Choice for Compatibility in a Socially Monogamous Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihle, Malika; Kempenaers, Bart; Forstmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Research on mate choice has primarily focused on preferences for quality indicators, assuming that all individuals show consensus about who is the most attractive. However, in some species, mating preferences seem largely individual-specific, suggesting that they might target genetic or behavioral compatibility. Few studies have quantified the fitness consequences of allowing versus preventing such idiosyncratic mate choice. Here, we report on an experiment that controls for variation in overall partner quality and show that zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) pairs that resulted from free mate choice achieved a 37% higher reproductive success than pairs that were forced to mate. Cross-fostering of freshly laid eggs showed that embryo mortality (before hatching) primarily depended on the identity of the genetic parents, whereas offspring mortality during the rearing period depended on foster-parent identity. Therefore, preventing mate choice should lead to an increase in embryo mortality if mate choice targets genetic compatibility (for embryo viability), and to an increase in offspring mortality if mate choice targets behavioral compatibility (for better rearing). We found that pairs from both treatments showed equal rates of embryo mortality, but chosen pairs were better at raising offspring. These results thus support the behavioral, but not the genetic, compatibility hypothesis. Further exploratory analyses reveal several differences in behavior and fitness components between "free-choice" and "forced" pairs.

  17. PRACTISE – Photo Rectification And ClassificaTIon SoftwarE (V.1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Härer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial photography is a cost-effective and easy-to-use method for measuring and monitoring spatially distributed land surface variables. It can be used to continuously investigate remote and often inaccessible terrain. We focus on the observation of snow cover patterns in high mountainous areas. The high temporal and spatial resolution of the photographs have various applications, for example validating spatially distributed snow hydrological models. However, the analysis of a photograph requires a preceding georectification of the digital camera image. To accelerate and simplify the analysis, we have developed the "Photo Rectification And ClassificaTIon SoftwarE" (PRACTISE that is available as a Matlab code. The routine requires a digital camera image, the camera location and its orientation, as well as a digital elevation model (DEM as input. If the viewing orientation and position of the camera are not precisely known, an optional optimisation routine using ground control points (GCPs helps to identify the missing parameters. PRACTISE also calculates a viewshed using the DEM and the camera position. The visible DEM pixels are utilised to georeference the photograph which is subsequently classified. The resulting georeferenced and classified image can be directly compared to other georeferenced data and can be used within any geoinformation system. The Matlab routine was tested using observations of the north-eastern slope of the Schneefernerkopf, Zugspitze, Germany. The results obtained show that PRACTISE is a fast and user-friendly tool, able to derive the microscale variability of snow cover extent in high alpine terrain, but can also easily be adapted to other land surface applications.

  18. Psychosocial determinants of nurses' intention to practise euthanasia in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mireille; Godin, Gaston; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Blondeau, Danielle; Martineau, Isabelle; Roy, Louis

    2016-02-01

    Most studies on euthanasia fail to explain the intentions of health professionals when faced with performing euthanasia and are atheoretical. The purpose of this study was to identify the psychosocial determinants of nurses' intention to practise euthanasia in palliative care if it were legalised. A cross-sectional study using a validated anonymous questionnaire based on an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A random sample of 445 nurses from the province of Quebec, Canada, was selected for participation in the study. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec. The response rate was 44.2% and the mean score for intention was 4.61 ± 1.90 (range: 1-7). The determinants of intention were the subjective (odds ratio = 3.08; 95% confidence interval: 1.50-6.35) and moral (odds ratio = 2.95; 95% confidence interval: 1.58-5.49) norms. Specific beliefs which could discriminate nurses according to their level of intention were identified. Overall, nurses have a slightly positive intention to practise euthanasia. Their family approval seems particularly important and also the approval of their medical colleagues. Nurses' moral norm was related to beneficence, an ethical principle. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify nurses' motivations to practise euthanasia in palliative care using a validated psychosocial theory. It also has the distinction of identifying the ethical principles underlying nurses' moral norm and intention. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Simulating changes in cropping practises in conventional and glyphosate-tolerant maize. I. Effects on weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbach, Nathalie; Fernier, Alice; Le Corre, Valérie; Messéan, Antoine; Darmency, Henri

    2017-04-01

    Herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops such as those tolerant to glyphosate simplify weed management and make it more efficient, at least at short-term. Overreliance on the same herbicide though leads to the spread of resistant weeds. Here, the objective was to evaluate, with simulations, the impact on the advent of glyphosate resistance in weeds of modifications in agricultural practises resulting from introducing HT maize into cropping systems. First, we included a single-gene herbicide resistance submodel in the existing multispecific FLORSYS model. Then, we (1) simulated current conventional and probable HT cropping systems in two European regions, Aquitaine and Catalonia, (2) compared these systems in terms of glyphosate resistance, (3) identified pertinent cultural practises influencing glyphosate resistance, and (4) investigated correlations between cultural practises and species traits, using RLQ analyses. The simulation study showed that, during the analysed 28 years, (1) glyphosate spraying only results in glyphosate resistance in weeds when combined with other cultural factors favouring weed infestation, particularly no till; (2) pre-sowing glyphosate applications select more for herbicide resistance than post-sowing applications on HT crops; and (3) glyphosate spraying selects more for species traits avoiding exposure to the herbicide (e.g. delayed early growth, small leaf area) or compensating for fitness costs (e.g. high harvest index) than for actual resistance to glyphosate, (4) actual resistance is most frequent in species that do not avoid glyphosate, either via plant size or timing, and/or in less competitive species, (5) in case of efficient weed control measures, actual resistance proliferates best in outcrossing species. An advice table was built, with the quantitative, synthetic ranking of the crop management effects in terms of glyphosate-resistance management, identifying the optimal choices for each management technique.

  20. Pharmacogenomics--how close/far are we to practising individualized medicine for children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Chor-Wing; Cheung, Ching-Lung; Wong, Ian C K

    2015-03-01

    The translation of pharmacogenomics into clinical practice is a key approach for practising individualized medicine, which aims to maximize drug efficacy and minimize drug toxicity. Since the completion of both the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap project, the development of pharmacogenomics has been greatly facilitated. However, progress in translating pharmacogenomics into clinical practice, especially in paediatric medicine, is unexpectedly slow. Many challenges from different areas remain. This paper discusses the existing applications and the limitations to the implementation of paediatric pharmacogenomics, as well as possible solutions for overcoming these limitations and challenges.

  1. Body attributes of both parents jointly affect offspring sex allocation in a socially monogamous, size-monomorphic passerine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LU; Xianhai ZENG; Bo DU

    2013-01-01

    Theory predicts that because males are more variable in reproductive success than females,a mother should produce more sons to maximize fitness return from the sex allocation if she is of high-quality (the female quality hypothesis) or mates with a high-quality male (the male quality hypothesis).While most previous studies have looked at each hypothesis,we tested both of them simultaneously in the white-rumped snowfinch Montifringilla taczanowskii,a socially monogamous,sexually monomorphic passerine where body size is a potential indicator of individual quality in intrasexual competition and territory defense.Brood sex ratios at the population level did not deviate from random expectation.Among individual broods,the proportion of sons did not depend on body size of either male or female parent,but on interaction of this trait of both parents.Further analyses revealed that brood sex ratios were independent of body size of male or female parents when their mates were smaller,but positively related with body size of male or female parents when their mates were larger.These results suggest that mechanisms underlying the two hypotheses may act jointly on offspring sex allocation.The mechanisms are expected to evolve through size-assortative mating which is often reached by sexual selection.

  2. Nurse turnover in New Zealand: costs and relationships with staffing practises and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Nicola; Leung, William; Ashton, Toni; Rasmussen, Erling; Hughes, Frances; Finlayson, Mary

    2013-04-01

    To determine the rates and costs of nurse turnover, the relationships with staffing practises, and the impacts on outcomes for nurses and patients. In the context of nursing shortages, information on the rates and costs of nursing turnover can improve nursing staff management and quality of care. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected prospectively for 12 months. A re-analysis of these data used descriptive statistics and correlational analysis techniques. The cost per registered nurse turnover represents half an average salary. The highest costs were related to temporary cover, followed by productivity loss. Both are associated with adverse patient events. Flexible management of nursing resources (staffing below budgeted levels and reliance on temporary cover), and a reliance on new graduates and international recruitment to replace nurses who left, contributed to turnover and costs. Nurse turnover is embedded in staffing levels and practises, with costs attributable to both. A culture of turnover was found that is inconsistent with nursing as a knowledge workforce. Nurse managers did not challenge flexible staffing practices and high turnover rates. Information on turnover and costs is needed to develop strategies that retain nurses as knowledge-based workers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Practise patterns of Malaysian speech-language pathologists in managing children with speech and language delay/disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joginder Singh, Susheel; Chan, Min Yen; Ahmad Rusli, Yazmin

    2016-12-01

    Children with speech and language delay/disorder (SLD) in the developing language stage (DLS) are one of the largest populations served by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in paediatric settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the practise patterns adopted by Malaysian SLPs when managing these children. A web-based questionnaire was developed to obtain information about SLPs' practises during assessment, planning and treatment. A total of 53 SLPs completed the questionnaire. When assessing the children, participants either always or usually involved parents, suggesting that they understood the importance of family involvement in services provided. When planning goals, the SLPs relied mostly on their clinical experience and less on research evidence. Participants reported that, most often, they employed a one-to-one approach when providing treatment. There was, however, great variation in the frequency of treatment provided, reflecting the different workplaces of participants. Generally, findings from this study indicated that some practises employed by Malaysian SLPs when managing children with SLD in the DLS are on par with the best practise guidelines, but there is still room for improvement in certain areas such as team collaboration and evidence-based practise. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  4. PublisherPartners webshop

    OpenAIRE

    Piferrer Torres, Enric

    2013-01-01

    Projecte realitzat en col·laboració amb Fontys University of Applied Sciences i l'empresa PublisherPartners. The main goal in the project was to build a website where the company PublisherPartners could sell and offer its products online to the customer

  5. In the Eye of the Betrothed: Perceptual Downgrading of Attractive Alternative Romantic Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shana; Trope, Yaacov; Balcetis, Emily

    2016-07-01

    People in monogamous relationships can experience a conflict when they interact with an attractive individual. They may have a desire to romantically pursue the new person, while wanting to be faithful to their partner. How do people manage the threat that attractive alternatives present to their relationship goals? We suggest that one way people defend their relationships against attractive individuals is by perceiving the individual as less attractive. In two studies, using a novel visual matching paradigm, we found support for a perceptual downgrading effect. People in relationships perceived threatening attractive individuals as less attractive than did single participants. The effect was exacerbated among participants who were highly satisfied with their current relationships. The studies provide evidence for a perceptual bias that emerges to protect long-term goals. We discuss the findings within the context of a broader theory of motivated perception in the service of self-control.

  6. Effects of developmental bisphenol A exposure on reproductive-related behaviors in California mice (Peromyscus californicus: a monogamous animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Williams

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA, a pervasive, endocrine disrupting compound (EDC, acts as a mixed agonist-antagonist with respect to estrogens and other steroid hormones. We hypothesized that sexually selected traits would be particularly sensitive to EDC. Consistent with this concept, developmental exposure of males from the polygynous deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, to BPA resulted in compromised spatial navigational ability and exploratory behaviors, while there was little effect on females. Here, we have examined a related, monogamous species, the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus, where we predicted that males would be less sensitive to BPA in terms of navigational and exploratory behaviors, while displaying other traits related to interactions with females and territorial marking that might be vulnerable to disruption. As in the deer mouse experiments, females were fed either a phytoestrogen-free CTL diet through pregnancy and lactation or the same diet supplemented with BPA (50 mg/kg feed weight or ethinyl estradiol (EE (0.1 part per billion to provide a "pure" estrogen control. After weaning, pups were maintained on CTL diet until they had reached sexual maturity, at which time behaviors were evaluated. In addition, territorial marking was assessed in BPA-exposed males housed alone and when a control male was visible in the testing arena. In contrast to deer mice, BPA and EE exposure had no effect on spatial navigational skills in either male or female California mice. While CTL females exhibited greater exploratory behavior than CTL males, BPA exposure abolished this sex difference. BPA-exposed males, however, engaged in less territorial marking when CTL males were present. These studies demonstrate that developmental BPA exposure can disrupt adult behaviors in a sex- and species-dependent manner and are consistent with the hypothesis that sexually selected traits are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption and should be a

  7. Adult male replacement and subsequent infant care by male and siblings in socially monogamous owl monkeys (Aotus azarai).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Juárez, Cecilia Paola; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Owl monkeys (Aotus azarai) are small, territorial, socially monogamous primates that show intense infant care by the adult male in the group. It has been hypothesized that male care may be adaptive because it increases offspring survival and/or reduces the metabolic costs to the female of raising the offspring. Alternatively, males may provide care even when they are not related to the infants to increase future reproductive opportunities. We describe changes in infant care patterns that took place after the eviction of the resident male by a solitary male in an owl monkey population in the Argentinean Chaco. The resident male and mother provided all infant care during the first month of life of the infant, until the male was evicted. During the three-day male replacement event, care of the infant was shared among the mother, a four-year-old sister, and a one-year-old brother. The new male began contributing to infant care soon after entering the group, carrying, and interacting socially with the infant in much the same way as any male regularly does. However, despite receiving biparental care from both the original and new resident males, the infant disappeared at the age of four months and was presumed dead. These are the first reports of care by sibling and by non-putative fathers in wild owl monkeys. Given the significant amount of time that new pairs of owl monkeys spend before reproducing, it is possible that male care in owl monkeys functions as mating effort as much as or more than parenting effort.

  8. Practising engagement: Infusing communication with empathy and compassion in medical students' clinical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmington, Sally

    2012-05-01

    Patients commonly experience some physicians' ways of interacting with them as detached and indicating a lack of concern for their welfare. This is likely to add to the distress experienced by a person seeking healing, as well as interfering with the exchange of information required for good medical care. Despite contemporary medical schools' focus on clinical communication, and on training for 'patient-centred' practice, problems with the relations between doctors and patients are still widely acknowledged. The importance of demonstrating empathy, compassion and caring has been highlighted in the literature. In this article I draw on a clinical narrative to elucidate my interpretation of engagement, which entails practices of attentiveness, respectful dialogue and commitment. I propose that practising engagement may help medical students and doctors to infuse their clinical encounters with empathy and compassion, with the aim of providing care that is experienced as being more humane. This practice has the potential to contribute to innovative pedagogical approaches to clinical communication.

  9. What is the relevance of women's sexual and reproductive rights to the practising obstetrician/gynaecologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dorothy; Faúndes, Anibal

    2006-06-01

    Women's sexual and reproductive rights are an integral part of daily practice for obstetricians/gynaecologists and the key to the survival and health of women around the world. Women's sexual and reproductive health is often compromised because of infringements of their basic human rights, not the lack of medical knowledge. Understanding the relevance of respecting and promoting sexual and reproductive rights is critical for providing current standards of care, and includes access to information and care, confidentiality, informed consent and evidence-based practice. The violation of women's rights in their daily lives through common problems such as gender-based violence and discrimination results in serious consequences for their health. Obstetricians/gynaecologists are natural advocates for women's health, yet may be lacking in their understanding of relevant laws or the limits of conscientious objection. This chapter outlines the framework for sexual and reproductive rights, and explores its relevance to the practising clinician.

  10. Inappropriate attitudes, fitness to practise and the challenges facing medical educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Demian

    2007-01-01

    The author outlines a number of reasons why morally inappropriate attitudes may give rise to concerns about fitness to practise. He argues that inappropriate attitudes may raise such concerns because they can lead to harmful behaviours (such as a failure to give proper care or treatment), and because they are often themselves harmful (both because of the offence that they can cause and because of the unhealthy pall that they may cast over relations between healthcare practitioners and patients). He also outlines some of the challenges that the cultivation and assessment of attitudes in students raise for medical educators and some of the ways in which those challenges may be approached and possibly overcome. PMID:17971472

  11. PRACTISE – Photo Rectification And ClassificaTIon SoftwarE (V.2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Härer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial photography combined with the recently presented Photo Rectification And ClassificaTIon SoftwarE (PRACTISE V.1.0 has proven to be a valuable source to derive snow cover maps in a high temporal and spatial resolution. The areal coverage of the used digital photographs is however strongly limited. Satellite images on the other hand can cover larger areas but do show uncertainties with respect to the accurate detection of the snow covered area. This is especially the fact if user defined thresholds are needed e.g. in case of the frequently used Normalised-Difference Snow Index (NDSI. The definition of this value is often not adequately defined by either a general value from literature or over the impression of the user but not by reproducible independent information. PRACTISE V.2.0 addresses this important aspect and does show additional improvements. The Matlab based software is now able to automatically process and detect snow cover in satellite images. A simultaneously captured camera-derived snow cover map is in this case utilised as in-situ information for calibrating the NDSI threshold value. Moreover, an additional automatic snow cover classification, specifically developed to classify shadow-affected photographs was included. The improved software was tested for photographs and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+ as well as Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI scenes in the Zugspitze massif (Germany. The results have shown that using terrestrial photography in combination with satellite imagery can lead to an objective, reproducible and user-independent derivation of the NDSI threshold and the resulting snow cover map. The presented method is not limited to the sensor system or the threshold used in here but offers manifold application options for other scientific branches.

  12. Collateral Intimate Partner Homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Meyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Collateral intimate partner homicide (CIPH is an underinvestigated genre of intimate partner violence (IPV where an individual(s connected to the IPV victim is murdered. We conducted a content analysis of a statewide database of CIPH newspaper articles (1990-2007. Out of 111 collateral murder victims, there were 84 IPV female focal victims and 84 male perpetrators. The most frequently reported CIPH decedent was the focal victim’s new partner (30%; 45% of focal victims were themselves killed. News reports framed CIPH as the unexpected result of interpersonal conflict, despite evidence of a systematic pattern of coercion and violence that capitulated in murder.

  13. A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Patients About ACOG A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs A Partner's Guide ... May 2016 PDF Format A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy Pregnancy Why is it important to be supportive ...

  14. CHP Partnership Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partners of EPA's Combined Heat and Power Partnership include federal, state, and local government agencies and private organizations such as energy users, energy service companies, CHP project developers and consultants, and equipment manufacturers.

  15. The Constitution of Partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    promoveret af branchen og af staten som et væsentligt led i udviklingen af byggeriets arbejdsformer. Med et udgangspunkt i en Foucauldiansk analyse af dispositiver, rum og orden bidrager afhandlingen med en ny differentieret forståelse af mulighederne for at håndtere branchens modsætningsfyldte fornyelse...... om, hvordan partnering som koncept er fremkommet og har udviklet sig og hvilke konstitutive effekter partnering har på byggeriets praksis. Det teoretiske udgangspunkt i Foucault begrundes i behovet for at fastholde en mangefacetteret og historisk analyse af partnering i modsætning til de...... fremherskende endimensionelle og rationelle forståelser, som ikke svarer til den oplevede og observerede praksis i byggebranchen. I afhandlingens første del diskuteres den analytiske anvendelse af et teoretisk nøglebegreb fra Foucault i analysen af partnering; dispositivet. Hermed forstås de bagvedliggende...

  16. Pacific Partners Wargame Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    such as medical qualifications and malpractice considerations, can be explored as part of interoperability. Partner nations are motivated to...specialized problems. Intellectual exchanges and fora involving experts from government, industry, academic and other institutions could be employed in

  17. Green Power Partner List

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. There are thousands of Green Power Partners, all listed on this page.

  18. Collateral Intimate Partner Homicide

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Meyer; Lori Post

    2013-01-01

    Collateral intimate partner homicide (CIPH) is an underinvestigated genre of intimate partner violence (IPV) where an individual(s) connected to the IPV victim is murdered. We conducted a content analysis of a statewide database of CIPH newspaper articles (1990-2007). Out of 111 collateral murder victims, there were 84 IPV female focal victims and 84 male perpetrators. The most frequently reported CIPH decedent was the...

  19. Dyadic dynamics of HIV risk among transgender women and their primary male sexual partners: the role of sexual agreement types and motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarel, Kristi E; Reisner, Sari L; Darbes, Lynae A; Hoff, Colleen C; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Nemoto, Toru; Operario, Don

    2016-01-01

    Transgender women - individuals assigned a male sex at birth who identify as women, female, or on the male-to-female trans feminine spectrum - are at high-risk of HIV worldwide. Prior research has suggested that transgender women more frequently engage in condomless sex with primary cisgender (i.e., non-transgender) male partners compared with casual or paying partners, and that condomless sex in this context might be motivated by relationship dynamics such as trust and intimacy. The current study examined sexual agreement types and motivations as factors that shape HIV risk behaviors in a community sample of 191 transgender women and their cisgender primary male partners who completed a cross-sectional survey. Overall, 40% of couples had monogamous, 15% open, and 45% discrepant sexual agreements (i.e., partners disagreed on their type of agreement). Actor-partner interdependence models were fit to examine the influence of sexual agreement type and motivations on extra-dyadic HIV risk (i.e., condomless sex with outside partners) and intra-dyadic HIV serodiscordant risk (i.e., condomless sex with serodiscordant primary partners). For male partners, extra-dyadic risk was associated with their own and their partners' sexual agreement motives, and male partners who engaged in extra-dyadic HIV risk had an increased odds of engaging in HIV serodiscordant intra-dyadic risk. Study findings support inclusion of the male partners of transgender women into HIV prevention efforts. Future research is warranted to explore the interpersonal and social contexts of sexual agreement types and motivations in relationships between transgender women and their male partners to develop interventions that meet their unique HIV prevention needs.

  20. Professional Feedback Loop: How Can Practising Teachers’ Reflection Inform English Language Teacher Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Evelyn Flognfeldt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Denne artikkelen presenterer en studie av den type læring praktiserende engelsklærere i norsk grunnskole selv rapporterer etter et års videreutdanningsstudium i engelsk. Et pedagogisk utviklingsprosjekt på egen skole inngikk som en sentral del av studiet. Studien gir et innblikk i hvilke aspekter ved skolefaget engelsk som erfarne lærere definerer som hoved­utfordringer i undervisningen og utbyttet de har hatt av prosjektene sine. Artikkelen bygger på data fra den kritiske refleksjonen som lærerne gir uttrykk for mot slutten av prosjektene sine. På bakgrunn av kvalitativ innholdsanalyse av prosjektrapportene identifiseres vesentlige felles språkdidaktiske elementer i lærernes konseptualisering av sin egen rolle og egne prioriteringer overfor elevenes læring. Denne typen lærerforskning kan få viktige følger for opplæringen i studiefaget engelsk i lærerutdanningen. Relevante forestillinger blant praktiserende lærere kan kanaliseres tilbake til lærerutdanningen for på den måten å mediere studentenes profesjonsforberedelse og deres framtidige arbeid som engelsklærere. Sentrale språkdidaktiske tema blir trukket fram, som i sin tur kan fungere som analytiske begreper og verktøy for engelskstudentene i forberedelsen til de komplekse praktiske utfordringer i klasse­rommet. Kontakt med denne typen forskning på egen undervisning som erfarne lærere har gjennomført med fokus på det de opplever som engelskfaglige utfordringer, kan hjelpe lærerstudentene til å knytte sammen teori og praksis og bidra til å senke deres affektive filter når de starter som lærere. Denne artikkelen munner ut i en diskusjon om hvilke former denne tilbakemeldingen fra praksisfeltet kan ta.Nøkkelord: utdanning av engelsklærere, profesjonsutvikling, læreres forskning, læreres læring, språkdidaktikkAbstractThis article presents a study of the learning reported by practising teachers of English in Norwegian primary and lower secondary schools

  1. More ornamented females produce higher-quality offspring in a socially monogamous bird: an experimental study in the great tit (Parus major).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remeš, Vladimír; Matysioková, Beata

    2013-03-25

    Animals are often conspicuously colored and explanations range from aposematism and mimicry to sexual selection. Although sexual selection explains vivid coloration in males, functional significance of vivid coloration in females of socially monogamous species remains unclear. The hypothesis of mutual mate choice predicts that more ornamented females produce offspring of higher quality. We tested this prediction in the great tit (Parus major), a small, insectivorous, socially monogamous passerine. In both females and males we quantified three ornaments that have been hypothesized to have signaling role in this species (size of black breast stripe, carotenoid chroma of yellow breast feathers, immaculateness of the white cheek). We swapped broods between nests soon after hatching, thus separating genetic plus pre-hatching vs. post-hatching effects on offspring performance. Body mass of offspring at 14 days of age was positively related to the area of black breast stripe of genetic mothers. Immune response to a novel antigen (phytohaemagglutinin) at 14 days of age was positively related to the immaculateness of the white cheek patch of both genetic and foster mothers. We showed that females with more elaborate ornaments produced higher-quality offspring and we discuss potential proximate mechanisms of these relationships. We conclude that as more elaborate ornaments were reliable signals of offspring quality, direct selection by male mate choice might have been responsible for the evolution and/or maintenance of these signaling traits in females.

  2. Predictability of conversation partners

    CERN Document Server

    Takaguchi, Taro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, Song et al. (2010) found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one's conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one's next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between close sensor nodes. We find t...

  3. Practising chaordic beauty: On embracing strangers in one inner city faith community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan de Beer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article I read one inner city faith community – the Tshwane Leadership Foundation (TLF – through the lenses of literature that reflects on chaordic organisations and chaordic leadership. I explore whether an emphasis on the management of diversity, which is widespread in organisational and ecclesial practices and languages, should not be replaced with a spirituality of vulnerable embrace, as I discover it in this specific faith community. It is a spirituality that combines an invitation and radical embrace of diversity, and a dance with chaos, with a posture of vulnerability and a vision of justice. I bring the reflections of community members in TLF on difference and diversity in their organisation, in conversation with scholars contemplating chaordic organisations and chaordic leadership. I then wonder whether their emphasis on embrace instead of management does not open up the possibility of retrieving and affirming the hidden beauties and potentialities mediated by diversity, which is, I suggest, to practise ‘chaordic beauty’.

  4. LEGAL MEDICINE ASPECTS OF PRACTISING MEDICINE IN THE AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE FORCE (ADF – A personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas McKenzie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The practice of medicine in the ADF is becoming increasingly complicated by administrative requirements, Health Directives and Instructions, with better informed patients and by an increasing doctor liability for medical outcomes. Patients and lawyers perceive modern medicine to be an exact science and, consequently, expect positive outcomes and have reduced tolerance for adverse events. Mother Nature can be cruel but she is not often held accountable for a poor outcome if a suitable human can be implicated. It is also considered disrespectful to blame the dead and injured for their misfortune, even if they were contributory to the outcome. Finding a ‘guilty party’ will appease complainants and their relatives and enable closure of the episode with resultant compensation. This outcome is often more preferable to finding systemic deficiencies or management failings. The long duration and exorbitant cost of Inquiries (often over $1m necessitates a definite, if expedient, outcome. In 32 years as an ADF medical officer I have observed increasing risks in practising ADF medicine. Having been a defendant in a military medical matter before a civilian medical board and an observer of several military Inquiries, I have observed a pattern of behaviour by lawyers appointed to such Inquiries. Natural justice with an equitable finding, from a common sense appraisal of the facts, does not always appear to be the main priority of a Commission of Inquiry into an adverse medical outcome.

  5. The influence of teams, supervisors and organizations on healthcare practitioners' abilities to practise ethically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah; Austin, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare practitioners make many important ethical decisions in their day-to-day practices. Questions arising in daily practice require practitioners to make prudent, balanced and good decisions, which are most effectively made interpersonally and reflectively. It is commonly assumed that the team-based structure of healthcare delivery can provide practitioners with the support needed to address ethical questions in their practice, especially if the team involves multidisciplinary collaboration. A phenomenological study was conducted in which the impact of the team and the larger organization on practitioners' experiences of dealing with moral challenges was uncovered. Various mental healthcare professionals shared their experiences of ethically challenging situations in their practices and described the ways in which their teammates and supervisors affected how they faced these troubling situations. These findings allow us to see that there is considerable room for healthcare managers, many of whom are nurses, to facilitate supportive, ethical environments for healthcare professionals. An understanding of the essential experience of practising ethically allows for an appreciation of the significance of the team's role in supporting it and enables healthcare managers to target support for ethical healthcare work.

  6. The practise and practice of Bourdieu: the application of social theory to youth alcohol research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunnay, Belinda; Ward, Paul; Borlagdan, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Some years ago Australian anthropologist David Moore criticised the predominant form of understanding youth alcohol consumption for residing with biomedical approaches that individualise and ultimately stigmatise drinking behaviour and 'ignore' the social context of consumption. Of interest here is the ongoing insufficient integration of alternative approaches to understanding young people's drinking. This paper presents theoretically informed qualitative research that investigates why young Australian females (aged 14-17) drink and how social and cultural context form the basis, rather than the periphery, of their drinking experience. We demonstrate the utility of Pierre Bourdieu's sociological framework for delving beyond the dichotomy of young people's drinking decisions as either a determination of their cultural environment or the singular result of a rational individual's independent decision-making. The paper is presented in two parts. First, we provide the interpretation, or 'practise', of Bourdieu's concepts through an outline and application of his complex theoretical constructs. Specifically, the concept of symbolic capital (or social power) is applied. Second, our explication of Bourdieu's 'practice', or epistemological contributions, offers a methodologically grounded example to other researchers seeking to attain more complete understandings of the social processes underpinning youth alcohol consumption. A sociological approach to exploring the complex relationship between drinking and contextual social factors amongst young Australian females is an unchartered area of enquiry. We contribute new theoretically supported insights to create a more complete picture of young females' drinking behaviours. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Do nursing students know and practise the Universal Precautions to prevent transmission of infectious agents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindy S. van der Berg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing students, like other healthcare students, are at high risk of occupational exposure to blood and bodily fluids. Studies have shown that use of the Universal Precautions(UPs lowers this risk, but do students know and practise these precautions?Objectives: This study investigated the knowledge and practice of undergraduate nursing students regarding the UPs, and whether there was a correlation between knowledge of the UPs and their practice.Method: This was a descriptive quantitative study amongst undergraduate nursing students in years 2–4 (n = 253, who were selected by means of stratified random sampling. A questionnaire was administered to the participants by the researcher. The data collected were analysed through use of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 16.0 and content analysis.Results: It was established that there was indeed a lack of knowledge regarding the UPs,and that the students’ self-reported practice of the UPs was poor. There was no statistically significant correlation between knowledge and practice of the UPs.Conclusion: More structured educational programmes are needed to improve both knowledge and practice of the UPs. These programmes should be offered across all nursing student study years as continuous professional development.

  8. Partners in Accomplished Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Arlington, VA.

    This report describes Partners in Accomplished Teaching, a project of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) designed to help increase the number of teachers achieving National Board Certification. It focuses on efforts in St. Paul, Minnesota; Mississippi; North Carolina; and San Antonio, Texas. The St. Paul program is a…

  9. Content for Conversation Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that a good strategy for helping English language learners to develop communicative competence in English is by pairing them with native English speakers. In such conversation programs, conversation partners should be provided with topics and activities that incorporate the goals, interests, and experiences of the learners. Recommends…

  10. Partners and Competitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The United States and China are entering an entirely new and complex era in their economic relationship. In a nutshell, China is both partner and competitor, and simplistic efforts to cast the complexity of U.S.-China economic relations as either one of partnership or competition are unhelpful to the development of effective policy.

  11. Partnering i praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer; Bang, Henrik L.; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    Publikationen sammenfatter resultater og erfaringer vedrørende brug af partnering i realiseringen af LO's hovedsæde i Havnestaden, København. Forløbet i byggesagen adskiller sig fra traditionelle byggesager på en række områder. Vigtigst af disse er anvendelsen af en række partneringstiltag, der u...

  12. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  13. What is it to practise good medical ethics? A Muslim's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serour, G I

    2015-01-01

    Good medical ethics should aim at ensuring that all human beings enjoy the highest attainable standard of health. With the development of medical technology and health services, it became necessary to expand the four basic principles of medical ethics and link them to human rights. Despite the claim of the universality of those ethical principles, their perception and application in healthcare services are inevitably influenced by the religious background of the societies in which those services are provided. This paper highlights the methodology and principles employed by Muslim jurists in deriving rulings in the field of medical ethics, and it explains how ethical principles are interpreted through the lens of Islamic theory. The author explains how, as a Muslim obstetrician-gynaecologist with a special interest in medical ethics, including international consideration of reproductive ethics issues, he attempts to 'practise good medical ethics' by applying internationally accepted ethical principles in various healthcare contexts, in ways that are consistent with Islamic principles, and he identifies the evidence supporting his approach. He argues that healthcare providers have a right to respect for their conscientious convictions regarding both undertaking and not undertaking the delivery of lawful procedures. However, he also argues that withholding evidence-based medical services based on the conscientious objection of the healthcare provider is unethical as patients have the right to be referred to services providing such treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Modern pentathlon and the First World War: when athletes and soldiers met to practise martial manliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    In the nationalistic atmosphere of the early twentieth century, a nurturing medium for sports practising martial manliness abounded throughout Europe. This framework supported the invention of a new multi-disciplinary sport, aided by Baron Pierre de Coubertin himself: modern pentathlon. Though the idea of a new form of pentathlon was already born in 1894, it took 30 years, until Paris 1924, to establish modern pentathlon within the Olympic Games. This study is concerned with the reasons for that delay. It will be assessed whether the active military preparations around the First World War and the contemporary image of masculinity had a decisive influence on the early history of modern pentathlon. By including historical documents from the IOC archives in Lausanne, Switzerland, the research office for military history in Potsdam, Germany, and the LA84 Foundation in Los Angeles, USA, as well as literature on gender, military sport and Olympic history, this study offers an entirely new view on the early history of a sport that was born in an atmosphere of glorifying manliness and apparent militarism. The history of modern pentathlon thereby provides a particularly appropriate area for the analysis of connections between sport, militarism and masculinity. It was not by chance that the implementation of a combined sport, which included besides swimming and running the three military disciplines of shooting, fencing and horse riding, arose in a pre-war context. Though in 1912 the Great War had not yet begun, the awareness of an upcoming battle was rising and led to a higher attention to Coubertin's almost forgotten assumption of a new sport. In 1924 the advantages were finally admitted on two sides: the army recruited modern pentathletes as future military officers; the sports community appointed skilled officers as successful competitors. Thus the lobby for an Olympic recognition of modern pentathlon was found.

  15. Determining the Practise and Knowledge of Medicine Usage in a Group of Elderly People in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Cakir Dolu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Determining the practise and knowledge of medicine usage in older people is the aim of this descriptive study. METHOD: The study sample was comprised of 300 people chosen from 960 old people over 65 years of age living in Eryaman Health Centre No. 3 neighbourhood by random sampling. Data which had been gathered with questionnaire survey were analyzed with the SPSS 11.5 and frequency, percent and chi-square tests. RESULTS: In this study, 44.1% of persons have more than one chronic disease and 84.3% of them use more than one medicine. The most common seen disease in the persons who participated in this research is hypertension and the most common used medicine group is cardiovascular system medicine. According to the older persons expressions, 17.0% of the persons abandoned using doctor’s prescription and 16.7% of them have been using overthe- counter medicine. As a result of the this study, adverse medicine reactions occurred in the 19.3% of persons. Replies to the questions concerning medicine knowledge shows that 51.3% of the persons know the right answers. 88.7% of the survey group stated that physicians informed them about the usage of the medicines and 2.2% of them were informed by nurses. CONCLUSION: Taking into consideration, these findings suggest that the nurses should be aware of the education level, habits of the older persons who use medicines, and they should observe them closely and inform and support them with the appropriate usage of the medicines. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(1.000: 37-44

  16. Fertility intentions and use of contraception among monogamous couples in northern Malawi in the context of HIV testing: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert L N Dube

    Full Text Available Knowledge of HIV status may influence fertility desires of married men and women. There is little knowledge about the importance of this influence among monogamously married couples and how knowledge of HIV status influences use of contraception among these couples.We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of interview data collected between October 2008 and September 2009 on men aged 15-59 years and women aged 15-49 years who formed 1766 monogamously married couples within the Karonga Prevention Study demographic surveillance study in northern Malawi.5% of men and 4% of women knew that they were HIV positive at the time of interview and 81% of men and 89% of women knew that they were HIV negative. 73% of men and 83% of women who knew that they were HIV positive stated that they did not want more children, compared to 35% of men and 38% of women who knew they were HIV negative. Concordant HIV positive couples were more likely than concordant negative couples to desire to stop child bearing (odds ratio 11.5, 95%CI 4.3-30.7, after adjusting for other factors but only slightly more likely to use contraceptives (adjusted odds ratio 1.5 (95%CI 0.8-3.3.Knowledge of HIV positive status is associated with an increase in the reported desire to cease childbearing but there was limited evidence that this desire led to higher use of contraception. More efforts directed towards assisting HIV positive couples to access and use reproductive health services and limit HIV transmission among couples are recommended.

  17. Parents as Writing Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenworth, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Parents know that writing is essential to their children's success, and they're eager to help their children become good writers. But often, they're at a loss about how to help. Instead of leaving them in the dark, schools can make parents into valuable writing partners by giving them a toolkit of guidelines for coaching writers.…

  18. Constrained mate choice in social monogamy and the stress of having an unattractive partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Simon C; Pryke, Sarah R; Buttemer, William A

    2011-09-22

    In socially monogamous animals, mate choice is constrained by the availability of unpaired individuals in the local population. Here, we experimentally investigate the physiological stress endured by a female (the choosy sex) when pairing with a non-preferred social partner. In two experimental contexts, female Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) socially paired with poor-quality mates had levels of circulating corticosterone that were three to four times higher than those observed in females that were paired with preferred mates. The elevated level of this stress hormone in response to partner quality was observed within 12 h of the experimental introduction and maintained over a period of several weeks. Our findings demonstrate the extent of intra-individual conflict that occurs when individuals are forced to make mate-choice decisions that are not perfectly aligned with mate-choice preferences. The elevated level of corticosterone also suggests a mechanistic route through which females might adaptively manage their responses to intersexual conflict over reproductive investment.

  19. Determinants of Practising Selected Forms of Physical Activity in a Group of Administrative and Office Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years, a decline in the level of physical activity has been observed all over the world. The number of professions where work is performed in a sitting position has increased. This has had many consequences for our health, the society, and the economy. The aim of this work was to determine which forms of physical activity are the most popular in administrative and office workers, depending on the motives which encourage them to be active. Material and methods. In 2014, a diagnostic survey was carried out among 937 persons in administrative and office positions using a questionnaire form designed by the authors. The study involved persons aged 18 to 65 years, and most of the respondents were female (n = 669. A qualitative analysis of the data was carried out using logistic regression, and the findings were considered statistically significant at p < 0.05. Results. Changing the shape of one’s body was found to be the main determinant of using the gym among the respondents. Persons who jogged regularly, on the other hand, did so in order to increase physical fitness, and those who practised Nordic walking were motivated by the need to care for their health. As far as swimming is concerned, persons who had friends that engaged in this form of activity undertook it almost ten times more often than those who did not have such support from their family and friends (OR = 9.58. Respondents who desired to meet new people were over five times more likely to choose team games as an active form of spending their leisure time (OR = 5.21 than other respondents. Finally, those who engaged in physical activity in order to strengthen family bonds preferred playing and playing games with children in the open air. Conclusions. The predominant forms of physical activity which were regularly performed by the respondents were walking, cycling, and doing gymnastic exercise at home. The respondents were mainly motivated to pursue these

  20. Factors influencing medical students' motivation to practise in rural areas in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Budhathoki, Shyam Sundar; Zwanikken, Prisca A. C.; Pokharel, Paras K.; Scherpbier, Albert J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives There is a shortage of doctors working in rural areas all over the world, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. The choice to practise medicine in a rural area is influenced by many factors. Motivation developed as a medical student is one key determinant of this choice. This study explores influences on medical students' motivation to practise in rural areas of low-income and middle-income countries following graduation. Design A systematic review was conducted to ...

  1. Sexual risk behavior and venues for meeting sex partners: an intercept survey of gay and bisexual men in LA and NYC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Bimbi, David S

    2007-11-01

    Understanding the link between venues for meeting sex partners and sexual risk behavior is critical to developing and placing effective sexual health education and HIV prevention services. Non-monogamous gay and bisexual men (n = 886) were surveyed in New York and Los Angeles about the venues that they met recent sex partners: bathhouses, private sex parties, gay bars/clubs, the gym, via public cruising, and the Internet. Bars/clubs, bathhouses, and the Internet were the most endorsed venues for meeting partners. Men having met a majority of their partners (i.e., "preference") via these three venues were compared/contrasted. Those having preference for bars/clubs were dissimilar from men with preference for bathhouses or the Internet on multiple levels (e.g. age, number of sex partners, temptation for unsafe sex). However, these men were proportionally similar in whether they had engaged in a recent episode of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). Logistic regressions predicting UAI suggested venues might not play a role in differentiating men who had preference for bars/clubs, bathhouses or the Internet. Additional regression analyses utilizing all six venues to predict UAI suggested other person-factors such as identity as a barebacker and temptation for unsafe sex better explain UAI. This research suggests HIV prevention and educational campaigns targeted within venues need also address socio-psychological person-factors in addition to environmental/venue contexts.

  2. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien Ac; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-04-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling.

  3. Engaging as Equal Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    TRADE volume between China and Africa hit a record last year, sending out positive signals about economic and trade cooperation. China’s robust economic activities,and enhanced cooperation between the two sides,have dragged bilateral trade out of the shadows of the global economic crisis,and helped China emerge as Africa’s largest trading partner in 2009.Professor Mthuli Ncube,Chief Economist and Vice President of the African Development Bank,spoke with ChinAfrica reporter Yu Nan to share his views about the role China has had in Africa’s economic development in recent years. Edited excerpts follow:

  4. New partner - Forestland

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      New partner   Do you need a moment of relaxation and adventure?  Come to Divonne-les-bains and benefit of an immediate discount of 20% on all ropes courses of Forestland http://www.forestland.fr/ upon presentation of your Staff Association membership card. The park is open from 10h00 to 19h00 on Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday during the school period and public holidays (France and Switzerland) or every day during school holidays (France and Switzerland). Different levels of difficulty are available: children, juniors, adults, athletes.

  5. From Neighbors To Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China and Central Asian nations are both benefiting from closer economic,political and social ties This year marks the 15th anniversary of China’s establishment of diplomatic relations with five Central Asian countries—Uzbekistan,Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan. After becoming independent upon the breakup of the Soviet Union, they established and developed stable and sustainable ties with China on a brand new basis. Now, with close cooperation in various fields, China and Central Asian countries have become friendly and cooperative partners.

  6. Close partner relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović-Stanojević Tatjana Z.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of emotional attachment, specific emotional relationships are being established at an early age between a child and its parents. On the basis of the quality of these relationships the child creates the so-called internal working model ie the image of itself as well as others. The working model persists throughout one's lifetime, shaping in part the quality of adult relationships. Thus, a dominant adult relationship is a close, partner or love one. Within the indicated theoretical context, we were interested in finding out whether there is a statistically significant link between the emotional ties of parents and their children formed in early childhood. The investigation included 180 grown-ups of the same sex and age. For investigating close partner relationships the test Experience in Close Relationship by the American authors (Brenan K.A., Clark C.L., & Shaver P.R. 1998. was used, while the early emotional relationships were investigated using a test which has been the only one so far to measure this quality in adults - Adult Attachment Interview, (Main M., Casidy J., & Kaplan N., 1985. The results show there is a statistically significant link between the observed variables.

  7. Neural Regulation of Pair Bond Formation in a Monogamous Rodent Species%单配制啮齿动物Pair Bond形成的神经调节机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brandon J.Aragona; J.Thomas Curtis; 刘彦; 汪作新

    2004-01-01

    单配制啮齿动物社会结构的神经生物学原理可以通过实验室研究Social bonding而获得.在本文中,我们探讨了如何利用单配制的草原田鼠(Microtus ochrogaster)作为研究模型揭示pair bond形成的神经调控机制.我们进而探讨了单配制与多配制田鼠之间神经解剖学的差异以及神经化学物质的调节是怎样影响pair bond的.本篇综述还讨论了与pair bond形成有关的神经化学系统之间的相互影响以及pair bond形成过程中的两性差异.最后,我们预测了这一研究领域的未来研究方向以及研究social bonding的神经调控对人类健康的重要性.%The neurobiology of monogamous social organization can be studied by laboratory examination of social bonding. In this review, we discuss how the monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) has been used as a model system to provide tremendous insight into the neural regulation of pair bond formation. Neuroanatomical differences between monogamous and non-monogamous voles, as well as how neurochemical manipulations affect pair bond formation are reviewed. In addition, interactions among neurochemical systems that regulate pair bond formation and the extent of sexual dimorphism associated with pair bonding are discussed. Finally, we propose future directions for this line of research and explain why understanding the neural regulation of social bonding is important for human health.

  8. Partnering with NASA: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Partnerships is an important part of doing business at NASA. NASA partners with external organizations to access capabilities under collaborative agreements; enters into agreements for partner access to NASA capabilities; expand overall landscape of space activity; and spurring innovation. NASA partnerships consist of Reimbursable and Non-Reimbursable Space Act Agreements. Partnerships at Ames aligns with Ames' core competencies, and Partners often office in the NASA Research Park, which is an established regional innovation cluster that facilitates commercialization and services as a technology accelerator via onsite collaborations between NASA and its partners.

  9. [The level of physical abilities of pupils practising sport in pupils sport club and their attitude to health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królicki, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    For centuries health has been a value and today is still making an influence on better functioning societies. Health is a subject of research in many scientific disciplines, and has a great influence on theory of physical education taking into consideration researches which are targeting at holding and increasing health, which has become today a thing that is not "given" once in a life-time. Those problems are a subject of health pedagogy researches. Health education is an activity aiming at creating pro-health attitudes. It is generally acknowledged that sport activity of children and teenagers improves their health condition, as well as better understanding and acceptance of fair play idea. The test of pro-health attitude as well as fair play attitude that occurs among young players practising handball in UKS (Pupils Sport Clubs) confirms research presumptions. It is worrying though that there are bad habits and attitudes to health and worse achievements in trials of physical ability among older pupils practising sport for a long time. The good thing is that pupils of a first class of secondary school (gymnasium) training for a long time have better attitude to fair play.

  10. Practise what you preach: health behaviours and stress among non-consultant hospital doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Sinéad

    2016-02-01

    High rates of psychological distress, depression and suicide have been reported among doctors. Furthermore, many doctors do not access healthcare by conventional means. This study aimed to increase understanding regarding non-consultant hospital doctors\\' (NCHDs\\') response to stress and barriers to accessing supports, and identify possible solutions. Medical manpower departments in 58 hospitals distributed a 25-item questionnaire to 4,074 NCHDs; we received 707 responses (response rate, 17.4%). 60% of NCHDs were unable to take time off work when unwell; \\'letting teammates down\\' (90.8%) and \\'difficulty covering call\\' (85.9%) were the leading reasons. \\'Being too busy\\' (85%), \\'self-prescription\\' (66.6%) and \\'self-management\\' (53.1%) were ranked highest in deterring NCHDs from visiting a general practitioner (GP). 22.9% of NCHDs would not attend a GP with anxiety or depression until they began to feel hopeless, helpless or suicidal. 12.2% would not seek help at all. 55% of respondents (n = 330) had to move away from partners or dependants due to work, negatively affecting the social supports of 82.9%. Possible practical solutions were explored. NCHDS are a vulnerable population and have a particularly challenging lifestyle. Key recommendations include improved GP and counselling access for NCHDs, and addressing the culture of self-treatment and poor health behaviours through undergraduate and postgraduate education.

  11. A comparison of scent marking between a monogamous and promiscuous species of peromyscus: pair bonded males do not advertise to novel females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Becker

    Full Text Available Scent marking can provide behavioral and physiological information including territory ownership and mate advertisement. It is unknown how mating status and pair cohabitation influence marking by males from different social systems. We compared the highly territorial and monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus to the less territorial and promiscuous white-footed mouse (P. leucopus. Single and mated males of both species were assigned to one of the following arenas lined with filter paper: control (unscented arena, male scented (previously scent-marked by a male conspecific, or females present (containing females in small cages. As expected, the territorial P. californicus scent marked and overmarked an unfamiliar male conspecific's scent marks more frequently than P. leucopus. Species differences in responses to novel females were also found based on mating status. The presence of unfamiliar females failed to induce changes in scent marking in pair bonded P. californicus even though virgin males increased marking behavior. Pair bonding appears to reduce male advertisement for novel females. This is in contrast to P. leucopus males that continue to advertise regardless of mating status. Our data suggest that communication through scent-marking can diverge significantly between species based on mating system and that there are physiological mechanisms that can inhibit responsiveness of males to female cues.

  12. A comparison of scent marking between a monogamous and promiscuous species of peromyscus: pair bonded males do not advertise to novel females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Elizabeth A; Petruno, Sarah; Marler, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Scent marking can provide behavioral and physiological information including territory ownership and mate advertisement. It is unknown how mating status and pair cohabitation influence marking by males from different social systems. We compared the highly territorial and monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) to the less territorial and promiscuous white-footed mouse (P. leucopus). Single and mated males of both species were assigned to one of the following arenas lined with filter paper: control (unscented arena), male scented (previously scent-marked by a male conspecific), or females present (containing females in small cages). As expected, the territorial P. californicus scent marked and overmarked an unfamiliar male conspecific's scent marks more frequently than P. leucopus. Species differences in responses to novel females were also found based on mating status. The presence of unfamiliar females failed to induce changes in scent marking in pair bonded P. californicus even though virgin males increased marking behavior. Pair bonding appears to reduce male advertisement for novel females. This is in contrast to P. leucopus males that continue to advertise regardless of mating status. Our data suggest that communication through scent-marking can diverge significantly between species based on mating system and that there are physiological mechanisms that can inhibit responsiveness of males to female cues.

  13. When One Partner Is HIV+

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translate Text Size Print When One Partner Is HIV+ What is a “mixed-status” Relationship? A " ... but you can minimize it. Tips for the HIV-negative Partner If you are the HIV-negative ...

  14. Intimate Partner Violence. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as violence between two people in a close relationship, including current and former spouses and dating partners. IPV occurs on a continuum from a single episode to ongoing battering and can include physical violence, sexual violence, threats, emotional…

  15. Partner selection and Hollywood Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh; Kramer, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Based on cognitive, neurological and evolutionary based film theory the article describes the representation of partner selection in Hollywood films. It analyses paradigm scenarios of partner selection and love, It further describes some of those mechanisms that regulate the relation between auto...

  16. Partnering with the NCPV (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    Brochure that explains the basic partnering opportunities that exist within the National Center for Photovoltaics for industry and university groups: non-proprietary partnering opportunities, competitive solicitations, Technology Partnership Agreements, seed fund to develop Technology Partnership Agreements, Hands-On PV Experience Workshop, and NCPV Fellowship Program.

  17. Characterization of mathematics instructional practises for prospective elementary teachers with varying levels of self-efficacy in classroom management and mathematics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carrie W.; Walkowiak, Temple A.; Nietfeld, John L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between prospective teachers' (PTs) instructional practises and their efficacy beliefs in classroom management and mathematics teaching. A sequential, explanatory mixed-methods design was employed. Results from efficacy surveys, implemented with 54 PTs were linked to a sample of teachers' instructional practises during the qualitative phase. In this phase, video-recorded lessons were analysed based on tasks, representations, discourse, and classroom management. Findings indicate that PTs with higher levels of mathematics teaching efficacy taught lessons characterised by tasks of higher cognitive demand, extended student explanations, student-to-student discourse, and explicit connections between representations. Classroom management efficacy seems to bear influence on the utilised grouping structures. These findings support explicit attention to PTs' mathematics teaching and classroom management efficacy throughout teacher preparation and a need for formative feedback to inform development of beliefs about teaching practises.

  18. Characterization of mathematics instructional practises for prospective elementary teachers with varying levels of self-efficacy in classroom management and mathematics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carrie W.; Walkowiak, Temple A.; Nietfeld, John L.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between prospective teachers' (PTs) instructional practises and their efficacy beliefs in classroom management and mathematics teaching. A sequential, explanatory mixed-methods design was employed. Results from efficacy surveys, implemented with 54 PTs were linked to a sample of teachers' instructional practises during the qualitative phase. In this phase, video-recorded lessons were analysed based on tasks, representations, discourse, and classroom management. Findings indicate that PTs with higher levels of mathematics teaching efficacy taught lessons characterised by tasks of higher cognitive demand, extended student explanations, student-to-student discourse, and explicit connections between representations. Classroom management efficacy seems to bear influence on the utilised grouping structures. These findings support explicit attention to PTs' mathematics teaching and classroom management efficacy throughout teacher preparation and a need for formative feedback to inform development of beliefs about teaching practises.

  19. Evaluation of Knowledge, Attitude, Practise and Adoption Among Health Care Professionals for Informatics/Computerised Technology Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Kavitha; Munuswamy, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    This proposed study will be conducted in Telangana and Tamil Nadu states in India. Mapping of Health care Professionals by a web-based Delphi technique followed by Focus Group Discussion and Evaluation of Knowledge, Attitude, Practise and Adoption among Health Care Professionals for informatics/computerised technology systems by using structured questionnaire for knowledge and practice and for Attitudes toward Computers in Healthcare (P.A.T.C.H.) Scale will be used to collect the data. This study results will create evidence on present and relevant informatics/computerized technology systems needs and help the research team to develop informatics competencies list and design an online or offline skill up gradation programs for health professionals in India according to their diverse roles in the health care system. The researcher team believes these results will have National relevance to the current focus areas of Government of India and to strengthen the Health Informatics Program offered in IIPH, Hyderabad.

  20. Emerging issues and current trends in assistive technology use 2007-2010: practising, assisting and enabling learning for all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Chris; Brown, David; Evett, Lindsay; Standen, Penny

    2014-11-01

    Following an earlier review in 2007, a further review of the academic literature relating to the uses of assistive technology (AT) by children and young people was completed, covering the period 2007-2011. As in the earlier review, a tripartite taxonomy: technology uses to train or practise, technology uses to assist learning and technology uses to enable learning, was used in order to structure the findings. The key markers for research in this field and during these three years were user involvement, AT on mobile mainstream devices, the visibility of AT, technology for interaction and collaboration, new and developing interfaces and inclusive design principles. The paper concludes by locating these developments within the broader framework of the Digital Divide.

  1. Partnering in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev Bohnstedt, Kristian; Bejder, Erik; Haugbølle, Kim

    2013-01-01

    publications change across this period. It is concluded that trends such as research on developing trust among construction partners to facilitate project success, feasibility of and the barriers to adopting a partnering approach and strategic propositions for overcoming barriers are highly emerging. Finally...... gaps in existing body of knowledge. The objective of this literature-based paper is to explore the current literature by systematically reviewing and summarizing research trends in leading top-tier construction management journals between 2002 and 2012, addressing how the themes in partnering related...

  2. Partnering in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev Bohnstedt, Kristian; Haugbølle, Kim; Bejder, Erik

    2013-01-01

    gaps in existing body of knowledge. The objective of this literature-based paper is to explore the current literature by systematically reviewing and summarizing research trends in leading top-tier construction management journals between 2002 and 2012, addressing how the themes in partnering related...... publications change across this period. It is concluded that trends such as research on developing trust among construction partners to facilitate project success, feasibility of and the barriers to adopting a partnering approach and strategic propositions for overcoming barriers are highly emerging. Finally...

  3. Same-Sex Partner Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlamazoglou, Lefteris; Simmonds, Janette G; Snell, Tristan L

    2017-01-01

    The experience of same-sex-attracted people who have lost a partner is neglected in the existing literature on bereavement. Previous research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer and questioning (LGBTIQ) populations tends to focus on the loss of a partner to HIV-related causes, and there is scant research concerning non-HIV-related bereavement. The purpose of this article is to investigate the non-HIV-related bereavement experiences of same-sex partners and to address the potential complications of disenfranchised grief. Coping with the loss of a same-sex partner and the impact of bereavement on subsequent relationships are also discussed. Implications for counseling of bereaved same-sex-attracted individuals are drawn, and recommendations for future psychological research on the experience of bereavement are made.

  4. 2015 NAIP Partner Availability Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Shows the available NAIP imagery which NAIP Partners can access. Either Quarter Quads (QQs), Compressed County Mosaics (CCMs) or data that has been physically mailed...

  5. A Partner's Guide to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth problems. Women who are well supported during pregnancy may be less anxious and have less stress in the weeks after childbirth. You can be supportive by educating yourself about pregnancy, going with your partner to prenatal care appointments, ...

  6. Partners Against Crime (PAC) Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The Partners Against Crime (PAC) program promotes collaboration among police officers, Durham residents, and city and county government officials to find...

  7. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Having critical management tools gives foreign investors the chance to maximize their investment, minimize their risk and develop a mutually profitable business with a Chinese partner. This concludes our series on this topic.

  8. Managing Your China JV Partner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHRIS; DEVONSHIRE-ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    Joint ventures (JVs) are a marriage between businesses, and as in any marriage,both partners need to put time and effort intoit. Having conducted your due diligence,negotiated your investments, and agreed to

  9. Partner Ballroom Dance Robot -PBDR-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Takahiro; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Nomura, Minoru; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Koizumi, Mizuo; Oconogi, Tatsuya

    In this research, we have developed a dance partner robot, which has been developed as a platform for realizing the effective human-robot coordination with physical interaction. The robot could estimate the next dance step intended by a human and dance the step with the human. This paper introduce the robot referred to as PBDR (Partner Ballroom Dance Robot), which has performed graceful dancing with the human in EXPO 2005, Aichi, Japan.

  10. An investigation of sexual dysfunction in female partners of men with erectile dysfunction: how interviews expand on questionnaire responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaglen, H M; O'Connor, E J; McCabe, M P; Conaglen, J V

    2010-01-01

    Using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) for investigating female sexual function has become widespread. A score of 26.5 has been suggested as delineating 'functional' from 'dysfunctional' women. This study aimed to understand in greater detail what contributes to changes in women's FSFI scores while their partners are taking oral erectile medications for erection problems. Couples randomized to receive two erectile medications for two 3-month phases, completed questionnaires. FSFI scores were augmented by individual interviews at baseline, 3 and 6 months, in order to better understand what the scores meant in the context of ED medication use. In all, 50% of the women scored dysfunctional' women recorded low FSFI scores solely as a result of their partner's ED. Overall, 22% were still 'dysfunctional' at 6 months, but one third of these appeared 'functional' at 3 months. A further group of women continued to record low scores despite reporting much improved sexual satisfaction. The women's interviews elaborate on their FSFI results, with five themes emerging to provide more clarity about the relative changes seen in a prospective study situation, and potentially in clinical practise contexts. The increasing use of questionnaires to determine sexual function should be supplemented with good clinical interviewing. The interview details explain how FSFI fluctuations occurred and contain clinical implications for research and practise in the area of couple's sexuality.

  11. Characterization of Mathematics Instructional Practises for Prospective Elementary Teachers with Varying Levels of Self-Efficacy in Classroom Management and Mathematics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carrie W.; Walkowiak, Temple A.; Nietfeld, John L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between prospective teachers' (PTs) instructional practises and their efficacy beliefs in classroom management and mathematics teaching. A sequential, explanatory mixed-methods design was employed. Results from efficacy surveys, implemented with 54 PTs were linked to a sample of…

  12. Pharma partnering: other people's science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Partnering is an ideal field if someone is seeking to move from a scientific to a more business-oriented discipline. Partnering's goal is to identify and acquire external innovation. These discoveries are then included in a company's pipeline and help bring novel treatments to patients. Advanced scientific training is essential in the identification and evaluation of these external assets. Here I describe how partnering works in a pharmaceutical company and offer advice on how to make a successful transition from a PhD program to a business career. © 2017 Hofmann. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Partnering and integrated supply management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnø, Ole-Christian; Olsen, Anders; Thyssen, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    are common among the actors in the building industry. Partnering is still in its early stages, and a strategic development of the concept to include long-term collaborative relationships appears to be able to offer considerable potential, while there is a pressing need for the development of methods...... for strategic management of collaborative relationships on a line with the purchasing perspectives offered by Supply Chain Management. Based on a study of the literature and an in-depth case study carried out within a large Scandinavian contractor, this article gives a proposal for how Partnering can...... be supported by strategic purchasing, with the aim of achieving strategic Partnering. The contribution of this article is thus the development of a new purchasing perspective within Construction Supply Chain Management....

  14. Validation of Fear of Partner Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, K Daniel; Foran, Heather; Cohen, Shiri

    2013-10-01

    Therapists have a responsibility to ascertain if psychological aggression, physical aggression, sexual aggression exist, and if there is fear of the partner. A fear of partner measure was evaluated in 100 couples who sought relationship feedback. Fear of partner's psychological, physical, and sexual aggression was related to actual reports of such behavior. For both men and women, fear of speaking in front of partner and fear of being in therapy with partner were related to reports of psychological aggression perpetrated by the partner, dominance, and isolation by the partner, and one's own marital dissatisfaction. Among respondents who were aggressed against, more men than women reported fear of participating in therapy with their partner. The measure herein can be used to determine the extent of fear of aggression by partners and to assist in the decision-making about the appropriateness of marital therapy and divorce mediation.

  15. The Symmetry of Partner Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenbourg, Pierre; Lemaignan, Séverin; Sangin, Mirweis; Nova, Nicolas; Molinari, Gaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative learning has often been associated with the construction of a shared understanding of the situation at hand. The psycholinguistics mechanisms at work while establishing common grounds are the object of scientific controversy. We postulate that collaborative tasks require some level of mutual modelling, i.e. that each partner needs…

  16. Top couplings and top partners

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We review the model-independent description of the couplings of the top quark to the Higgs and gauge bosons in theories beyond the Standard Model. Then we examine these couplings in the case of arbitrary heavy vector-like quarks mixing with the third family. We also discuss the couplings of these top partners, and comment on implications for LHC searches.

  17. CHINA-JANAICA'S VALUABLE PARTNER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan; Yang Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Jamaica is China's largest trading partner in the English-speaking Caribbean and bilateral trade has developed rapidly,although last year bilateral trade has been greatly affected because of the economic crisis.However,with continuous development of the two economies,bilateral economic development and trade has great potential.

  18. Beijing 2008 Olympic Games Partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ At Olympic times, many business giants try to expand their influence by sponsoring the Games. The Games is an opportunity for them to turn from a national to an international brand. Here are brief introductions to some of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games partners.

  19. Partnering into the New Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sharon; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Suggests the need to develop partnerships in this time of rapidly changing technology. Describes the successful partnership between the John Deere Company and Madison (WI) Area Technical College (MATC) that arose because of needs of both partners: John Deere needed well-trained technicians, and MATC was having difficulty attracting students to its…

  20. Holographic Mutual Information is Monogamous

    CERN Document Server

    Hayden, Patrick; Maloney, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We identify a special information-theoretic property of quantum field theories with holographic duals: the mutual informations among arbitrary disjoint spatial regions A,B,C obey the inequality I(A:BC) >= I(A:B)+I(A:C), provided entanglement entropies are given by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. Inequalities of this type are known as monogamy relations and are characteristic of measures of quantum entanglement. This suggests that correlations in holographic theories arise primarily from entanglement rather than classical correlations. We also show that the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is consistent with all known general inequalities obeyed by the entanglement entropy, including an infinite set recently discovered by Cadney, Linden, and Winter; this constitutes strong evidence in favour of its validity.

  1. Holographic mutual information is monogamous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Patrick; Headrick, Matthew; Maloney, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    We identify a special information-theoretic property of quantum field theories with holographic duals: the mutual informations among arbitrary disjoint spatial regions A, B, C obey the inequality I(A∶B∪C)≥I(A∶B)+I(A∶C), provided entanglement entropies are given by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. Inequalities of this type are known as monogamy relations and are characteristic of measures of quantum entanglement. This suggests that correlations in holographic theories arise primarily from entanglement rather than classical correlations. We also show that the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is consistent with all known general inequalities obeyed by the entanglement entropy, including an infinite set recently discovered by Cadney et al.; this constitutes strong evidence in favor of its validity.

  2. Practising Silence in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The concept "silence" has diametrically opposed meanings; it connotes peace and contemplation as well as death and oblivion. Silence can also be considered a practice. There is keeping the rule of silence to still the mind and find inner truth, as well as forcibly silencing in the sense of subjugating another to one's own purposes.…

  3. Writing Through: Practising Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Scott

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay exists as a segment in a line of study and writing practice that moves between a critical theory analysis of translation studies conceptions of language, and the practical questions of what those ideas might mean for contemporary translation and writing practice. Although the underlying preoccupation of this essay, and my more general line of inquiry, is translation studies and practice, in many ways translation is merely a way into a discussion on language. For this essay, translation is the threshold of language. But the two trails of the discussion never manage to elude each other, and these concatenations have informed two experimental translation methods, referred to here as Live Translations and Series Translations. Following the essay are a number of poems in translation, all of which come from Blanco Nuclear by the contemporary Spanish poet, Esteban Pujals Gesalí. The first group, the Live Translations consist of transcriptions I made from audio recordings read in a public setting, in which the texts were translated in situ, either off the page of original Spanish-language poems, or through a process very much like that carried out by simultaneous translators, for which readings of the poems were played back to me through headphones at varying speeds to be translated before the audience. The translations collected are imperfect renderings, attesting to a moment in language practice rather than language objects. The second method involves an iterative translation process, by which three versions of any one poem are rendered, with varying levels of fluency, fidelity and servility. All three translations are presented one after the other as a series, with no version asserting itself as the primary translation. These examples, as well as the translation methods themselves, are intended as preliminary experiments within an endlessly divergent continuum of potential methods and translations, and not as a complete representation of a methodology.

  4. 新疆阿魏种苗繁育技术%The Seedling Breeding Practise of Ferula sinkiangensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱军; 李晓瑾; 樊丛照; 祖勒胡玛尔; 王果平

    2015-01-01

    在对新疆阿魏种苗繁育技术多年试验研究的基础上,总结了新疆阿魏种子特性和种苗繁育技术。新疆阿魏种子具有种胚生理后熟现象,种子置于相对湿度50%~60%沙子中,4℃条件处理40~50 d,种子萌发率达60%以上。大田育苗,入冬前播种较利于种子萌发,种苗第二年移栽成活率较高,移栽后高温季节适当浇灌有利于提高保苗率。通过此技术可实现新疆阿魏种苗的规范化生产,为新疆阿魏的产业化栽培和发展提供技术支撑。%This paper summarizes the seed characteristics and seedling breeding practise of Ferula sinki-angensis, based on several years research. The physiological dormancy of Ferula sinkiangensis seeds was proved and it can be broken down by using 4 ℃ and relative humidity 50% ~60% treatment over 40 or 50 days in the sand, the germination rate over 60%. Late fall nitrogen sowing was beneficial to seed ger-mination of Field Seedling-Raising, the higher seedling survival rate can be obtained in the next year transplanting and appropriate pour in the dry hot season was favorable to improving seedling ration after transplanting. It offers a technological support for industrialization cultivation and development of Ferula sinkiangensis and realizes standardization production of Ferula sinkiangensis seedling.

  5. 77 FR 76380 - Partner's Distributive Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... the type of partner (for example, if the partner is a nonresident alien) and the type of income the partnership earns (for example, if the partnership earns effectively connected income). d. Deemed...

  6. Light 't Hooft Top Partners

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Vector-like quarks, usually dubbed top partners, are a common presence in composite Higgs models. Being composite objects, their mass is expected to be of the order of their inverse size, that is the condensation scale of the new strong interactions. Light top partners, while not being a generic prediction, are however often considered in phenomenological models. We suggest that their lightness may be due to the matching of global 't Hooft anomalies of the underlying theory. We check this mechanism in explicit models showing that, in one case, composite fermions with the quantum numbers of the top quark obtain a mass which is controlled by a soft breaking term and can be made parametrically small.

  7. Actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of sarcasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, P

    2000-10-01

    This study compared actors', partners', and observers' perceptions of the amount of sarcasm used by participants (n = 80) in videotaped conversations. Significant differences were found among perceptions of actors, partners, and observers. Of the three perspectives, actors perceived themselves as using the greatest amount of sarcasm, followed by partners' perceptions of actors. Observers perceived actors as using the least amount of sarcasm. Correlations conducted to assess whether partners and observers recognized actors' individual attempts at sarcasm during the conversations were generally low.

  8. Privacy against the business partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Gruschka, Nils

    2009-01-01

    For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing...... business process data against partners. In this paper, we investigate the issues regarding the realization of process level confidentiality in WS-BPEL-based Web Service compositions....

  9. Positive illusions about one's partner's physical attractiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a

  10. Living with heart failure : Partner perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, Marie Louise; Blaauwbroek, Arnarins; Dijker, Anton; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2007-01-01

    To preserve the supportive capabilities of partners of heart failure (HF) patients, it is necessary to gain insight in the experiences and potential needs of these partners. Thirteen partners of HF patients participated in semistructured interviews specifically focused on their experiences as a

  11. Positive illusions about one's partner's physical attractiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a

  12. Positive illusions about one's partner's physical attractiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a

  13. Partner Knowledge Awareness in Knowledge Communication: Learning by Adapting to the Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehler Zufferey, Jessica; Bodemer, Daniel; Buder, Jurgen; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2011-01-01

    Awareness of the knowledge of learning partners is not always sufficiently available in collaborative learning scenarios. To compensate, the authors propose to provide collaborators with partner knowledge awareness by means of a visualization tool. Partner knowledge awareness can be used to adapt messages toward the partner. This study…

  14. Adult Attachment as a Risk Factor for Intimate Partner Violence : The "Mispairing" of Partners' Attachment Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Diana M.; Pearson, Christine L.; Elgin, Jenna E.; McKinley, Lisa L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between intimate partner violence and adult attachment in a sample of 70 couples. The attachment style of each partner and the interaction of the partners' attachment styles were examined as predictors of intimate partner violence. Additional analyses were conducted to examine violence reciprocity and to…

  15. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Martin

    Full Text Available When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice. Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice.

  16. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justin W; Cushman, Fiery

    2015-01-01

    When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control) or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice). Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice.

  17. Privacy against the business partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Gruschka, Nils

    2009-01-01

    For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing bu...... business process data against partners. In this paper, we investigate the issues regarding the realization of process level confidentiality in WS-BPEL-based Web Service compositions. © 2009 IEEE.......For service-oriented business processes, an important security requirement is confidentiality of transmitted data. Here, existing Web Services security standards provide suitable solutions for single invocations, but fail to cover service composition scenarios properly, especially for securing...

  18. Semiconductor foundry, lithography, and partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Burn J.

    2002-07-01

    The semiconductor foundry took off in 1990 with an annual capacity of less than 0.1M 8-inch-equivalent wafers at the 2-mm node. In 2000, the annual capacity rose to more than 10M. Initially, the technology practiced at foundries was 1 to 2 generations behind that at integrated device manufacturers (IDMs). Presently, the progress in 0.13-mm manufacturing goes hand-in-hand with any of the IDMs. There is a two-order of magnitude rise in output and the progress of technology development outpaces IDMs. What are the reasons of the success? Is it possible to sustain the pace? This paper shows the quick rise of foundries in capacity, sales, and market share. It discusses the their uniqueness which gives rise to advantages in conjunction with challenges. It also shows the role foundries take with their customer partners and supplier partners, their mutual dependencies, as well as expectations. What role then does lithography play in the foundries? What are the lithographic challenges to sustain the pace of technology? The experience of technology development and transfer, at one of the major foundries, is used to illustrate the difficulties and progresses made. Looking into the future, as semiconductor manufacturing will become even more expensive and capital investment more prohibitive, we will make an attempt to suggest possible solutions.

  19. Collaborative vaccine development: partnering pays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Rangappa

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development, supported by infusions of public and private venture capital, is re-entering a golden age as one of the fastest growing sectors in the life-sciences industry. Demand is driven by great unmet need in underdeveloped countries, increased resistance to current treatments, bioterrorism, and for prevention indications in travelers, pediatric, and adult diseases. Production systems are becoming less reliant on processes such as egg-based manufacturing, while new processes can help to optimize vaccines. Expeditious development hinges on efficient study conduct, which is greatly enhanced through research partnerships with specialized contract research organizations (CROs) that are licensed and knowledgeable in the intricacies of immunology and with the technologic and scientific foundation to support changing timelines and strategies inherent to vaccine development. The CRO often brings a more objective assessment for probability of success and may offer alternative development pathways. Vaccine developers are afforded more flexibility and are free to focus on innovation and internal core competencies. Functions readily outsourced to a competent partner include animal model development, safety and efficacy studies, immunotoxicity and immunogenicity, dose response studies, and stability and potency testing. These functions capitalize on the CRO partner's regulatory and scientific talent and expertise, and reduce infrastructure expenses for the vaccine developer. Successful partnerships result in development efficiencies, elimination or reduced redundancies, and improved time to market. Keys to success include honest communications, transparency, and flexibility.

  20. RISK FACTORS FOR INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ceren Atakay

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence has kept being one of the major societal issues in our country over the past year. It is absolutely necessary to intervene in this substantially psychological issue multi-directionally. In order to intervene in the problem from psychological aspect, it is important to estimate and interpret the risk factors for intimate partner violence. Therefore in the current study, ‘I-cube theory’ which is about the risk factors for intimate partner violence has been explained fi...

  1. Risk and vulnerability of key populations to HIV infection in Iran; knowledge, attitude and practises of female sex workers, prison inmates and people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehkazemi, Razieh; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Navadeh, Soodabeh; Setayesh, Hamidreza; Sajadi, Leily; Osooli, Mehdi; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    Background In this study data of three national surveys conducted among female sex workers (FSW), prison inmates and people who inject drugs (PWID) were presented and compared in relation to knowledge, attitude, and practises. The surveys were conducted in 2009 and 2010 and included 2546 PWID, 872 FSW and 5530 prison inmates. Knowledge, attitude and practises towards HIV were measured through similar questions for each category. Over 90% of all participants had ever heard of HIV/AIDS, although only approximately half of them perceived themselves at risk of contracting HIV. More than 80% were able to correctly identify the ways of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV; while more than two-thirds did not use condom in their last sexual contact. Approximately 20% of prisoners and FSW had a history of injecting drugs. Among all participants who have injected drugs, prisoners had the highest unsafe injecting behaviour at the last injection (61%), followed by FSW (11%) and PWID (3%). Despite major efforts to control the HIV epidemic in Iran, the level of risk and vulnerability among prisoners, FSW and PWID is still high. The level of comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS is relatively good; however, their risk perception of contracting HIV is low and high-risk behaviours are prevalent. Therefore, HIV prevention programs should be redesigned in a more comprehensive way to identify the best venues to reach the largest number of people at a higher risk of contracting HIV and decrease their risk overlaps and vulnerability factors.

  2. Telling Your Partner You Have an STD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... offer information about the STD and its symptoms. Give your partner time to take in the information. If you and your partner ... your doctor prescribes. You also might need to take medicine if you have an ... A doctor or a health clinic can give advice on how to lower the chance of ...

  3. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican

  4. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican R

  5. Intimate Partner Violence in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Amy E.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Reid, Robert J.; Carrell, David; Fishman, Paul A.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Thompson, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the prevalence, types, duration, frequency, and severity of intimate partner violence ("partner violence") in older women. Design and Methods: We randomly sampled a total of 370 English-speaking women (65 years of age and older) from a health care system to participate in a cross-sectional telephone interview. Using 5…

  6. Sexual Experiences of Men with Incontinent Partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Milou D.; Beck, Jacky J. H.; Putter, Hein; van Driel, Mels F.; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrordus; Nijeholt, Guus A. B. Lycklama A.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies show that urinary incontinence (UI) impairs women's sexual functioning and sexual satisfaction. However, there is no scientific knowledge about the effects of UI on sexual functioning of the male partners. Aim. To analyze sexual functioning of the male partners of femal

  7. Facing the partner influences exchanges in force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Atsushi; Bagnato, Carlo; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Many studies in psychology have documented how the behaviour of verbally communicating pairs is affected by social factors such as the partner’s gaze. However, few studies have examined whether physically interacting pairs are influenced by social factors. Here, we asked two partners to exchange forces with one another, where the goal was to accurately replicate the force back onto the other. We first measured an individual’s accuracy in reproducing a force from a robot. We then tested pairs who knowingly exchanged forces whilst separated by a curtain. These separated pairs exchanged forces as two independent individuals would, hence the force reproduction accuracy of partners is not affected by knowingly reproducing a force onto a nonvisible partner. On the other hand, pairs who exchanged forces whilst facing one another consistently under-reproduced the partner’s force in comparison to separated partners. Thus, the force reproduction accuracy of subjects is strongly biased by facing a partner. PMID:27739492

  8. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners.

  9. Catastrophizing and perceived partner responses to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Jennifer L; Thorn, Beverly E; Overduin, Lorraine Y; Ward, L Charles

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between catastrophizing and patient-perceived partner responses to pain behaviors. The Catastrophizing subscale of the Cognitive Coping Strategy Inventory and the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory were completed by 62 adult chronic pain patients. Consistent with past research, catastrophizing and patient-perceived solicitous partner behaviors were positively correlated with negative pain outcomes. The communal coping theory of catastrophizing suggests that catastrophizing might be undertaken to solicit support and empathy from others. However, catastrophizing was not related to perceived solicitous partner behavior in this study. Rather, catastrophizing was associated with perceived punishing partner responses. Implications are that catastrophizing and perceived solicitous partner behaviors are independently associated with pain and that catastrophizing may not be reinforced by empathy from significant others.

  10. HMO partnering: the provider dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, J; Benson, L; Bonhag, R

    1996-10-01

    While the growth of HMOs has slowed patient visits to doctors, it also has created a deluge of press clippings. On July 16, 1996, three articles on the subject appeared in the Wall Street Journal, front section. The headlines painted a vivid picture of the forces acting on HMOs and providers alike (Figure 1). The articles portended more change for healthcare. The "shake-out," a term applied to industries in serious transformation, brings shedding of excess capacity and loss of jobs and income. Providers, in particular, find themselves in a difficult dilemma. They must not only cut costs as reimbursement drops, but also retain patients with good outcomes and high quality service. Patient retention means keeping the individual patient from switching to another provider and keeping the insurer's group of patients as an authorized provider for that insurer. The relationship between provider and HMO lies at the heart of the provider dilemma. The HMO structure, which shifts financial risk for care, is quickly setting the standard, for healthcare pricing, medical standards, and management practices. Understanding and responding to HMO needs are vital to competitive advantage and survival. The article discusses the inherent dilemma of HMO and provider partnering and suggests provider responses.

  11. Husband/Partner Intoxication and Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Tran, Phu

    2016-09-01

    This study examined husband/partner intoxication and experience with physical, sexual, and emotional intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW) using data derived from a nationally representative survey conducted in the Philippines in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between intoxication and 3 different types of intimate partner violence against women. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine intoxication and severity of violence. In this sample, 28.8% of women reported experiencing any form of intimate partner violence and 92.9% of women reported their partner being intoxicated at least sometimes. Intoxication was significantly associated with all 3 types of intimate partner violence, while the odds of experiencing one form of IPVAW versus no form of IPVAW and 2 forms of IPVAW versus 1 form of IPVAW was greater among women reporting frequency of husband/partner intoxication as often.

  12. Partners in Leadership for Pearl River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Members of the 2007 class of Partners in Leadership toured NASA Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on Jan. 11. They visited the center's B Test Stand, part of the center's rocket engine test complex. The Partners in Leadership training program is designed to teach Pearl River County leaders about their county's government, economic development, health and human services, history and arts, environment and education during a 10-month period. The program, sponsored by the Partners for Pearl River County, helps fulfill the mission of the economic and community development agency.

  13. 浅议大学生公民意识的践行——以安康学院学生为背景%Practising of College Students' Civic Awareness:Taking Ankang University as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴亚娥

    2011-01-01

    The survey revealed that most of the students in our university lack the habit of practising civic consciousness. To improve awareness of our citizens, we should begin with our neighbor, the key is to develop the practising habits.%调查反映我院大部分学生欠缺公民意识自觉践行的习惯.完善其公民意识应从身边小事做起,培养身边责任意识践行习惯是关键.

  14. Factors influencing medical students' motivation to practise in rural areas in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanikken, Prisca A C; Pokharel, Paras K; Scherpbier, Albert J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives There is a shortage of doctors working in rural areas all over the world, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. The choice to practise medicine in a rural area is influenced by many factors. Motivation developed as a medical student is one key determinant of this choice. This study explores influences on medical students' motivation to practise in rural areas of low-income and middle-income countries following graduation. Design A systematic review was conducted to identify influences on medical students' motivation to work in rural areas in low-income and middle-income countries. Papers reporting influences on motivation were included, and content analysis was conducted to select the articles. Articles not published in English were excluded from this review. Results A rural background (ie, being brought up in a rural area), training in rural areas with a community-based curriculum, early exposure to the community during medical training and rural location of medical school motivate medical students to work in rural areas. Perceived lack of infrastructure, high workload, poor hospital management and isolation are among the health facility factors that demotivate medical students for medical practice in rural areas. Conclusions Medical school selection criteria focusing on a rural background factor and medical education curriculum focusing on rural area are more relevant factors in low-income and middle-income countries. The factors identified in this review may assist the planners, medical educators and policymakers in low-income and middle-income countries in designing relevant interventions to positively influence rural choices where the shortage of rural physicians is an ongoing and increasing concern. PMID:28232465

  15. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Colwell, Lucy J; Wingreen, Ned S

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multi-protein complexes, and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners. Hence, the sequences of interacting partners are correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify which proteins are specific interaction partners from sequence data alone. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer direct couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the three-dimensional structures of proteins from sequences. Building on this approach, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from among the members of two protein families. We assess the algorithm's performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. The algorithm proves successful without any a pri...

  16. Gender symmetry, sexism, and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher T; Swan, Suzanne C; Raghavan, Chitra

    2009-11-01

    This study of a predominantly Hispanic sample of 92 male and 140 female college students examines both gender symmetry in intimate partner violence (IPV) and inconsistent relationships found in previous studies between sexist attitudes and IPV. Results indicate that although comparable numbers of men and women perpetrate and are victimized in their relationships with intimate partners, the path models suggest that women's violence tends to be in reaction to male violence, whereas men tend to initiate violence and then their partners respond with violence. Benevolent sexism was shown to have a protective effect against men's violence toward partners. Findings highlight the importance of studying women's violence not only in the context of men's violence but also within a broader sociocultural context.

  17. Whom to Choose as License Partner?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke; Trombini, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    between technology and market forces: if partners are market distant, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnership decreases with partners’ technological distance. Using data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994...

  18. Featured Partner: Saddle Creek Logistics Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA fact sheet spotlights Saddle Creek Logistics as a SmartWay partner committed to sustainability in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by freight transportation, partly by growing its compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles for

  19. MPS/CAS Partner Group on Cosmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yipeng; Gerhard B(o)rner

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Partner Group does research in cosmology, focussing on the quantitative modeling of the structure and evolution of galaxies and galaxy clusters, the pattern of galaxies and of larger structures.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Intimate partner violence, health behaviours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    country study on IPV and women's physical and mental health found a significant association ... heart attack and high blood pressure reached near-significance. Conclusions. Partner ..... These activities were supported by the. United States ...

  1. Inter-ethnic Marriage and Partner Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sinning, Mathias; Worner, Shane

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates immigrant assortative mating and relationship satisfaction. Using a modified random effects ordered probit model, the paper demonstrates that spouses of mixed couples are significantly less satisfied with their partner than nativeonly and foreign-only couples. Dieses Papier untersucht die Wahl des Ehepartners und die Zufriedenheit mit dem Partner. Unter Verwendung eines modifizierten Random Effects Ordered Probit-Modells zeigt das Papier, dass Ehepartner gemischter ...

  2. Perceptions of the physical attractiveness of the self, current romantic partners, and former partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Allum, Lucy

    2012-02-01

    This study examined ratings of physical attractiveness of the self and former and current partners. A total of 304 participants completed measures of attractiveness, relationship satisfaction, love dimensions, self-esteem and sociosexual orientation. Consistent with previous work, results showed that participants rated their current partners as more attractive than themselves and their former partners. However, results also showed that former partners were rated as more attractive than the self on a number of bodily characteristics. Finally, results showed that ratings of former partner physical attractiveness were associated with passion for the former partner, self-esteem, sociosexual orientation, and attributions of relationship termination. These results are discussed in relation to the available literature on positive illusions in intimate relationships.

  3. Partner choice creates fairness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debove, Stéphane; André, Jean-Baptiste; Baumard, Nicolas

    2015-06-07

    Many studies demonstrate that partner choice has played an important role in the evolution of human cooperation, but little work has tested its impact on the evolution of human fairness. In experiments involving divisions of money, people become either over-generous or over-selfish when they are in competition to be chosen as cooperative partners. Hence, it is difficult to see how partner choice could result in the evolution of fair, equal divisions. Here, we show that this puzzle can be solved if we consider the outside options on which partner choice operates. We conduct a behavioural experiment, run agent-based simulations and analyse a game-theoretic model to understand how outside options affect partner choice and fairness. All support the conclusion that partner choice leads to fairness only when individuals have equal outside options. We discuss how this condition has been met in our evolutionary history, and the implications of these findings for our understanding of other aspects of fairness less specific than preferences for equal divisions of resources. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Partner preferences among survivors of betrayal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Robyn L

    2012-01-01

    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that social and cognitive development may be affected by early trauma such that individuals develop survival strategies, particularly dissociation and lack of betrayal awareness, that may place them at risk for further victimization. Several experiences of victimization in the context of relationships predicated on trust and dependence may contribute to the development of relational schema whereby abuse is perceived as normal. The current exploratory study investigates interpersonal trauma as an early experience that might impact the traits that are desired in potential romantic partners. Participants in the current study were asked to rate the desirability of several characteristics in potential romantic partners. Although loyalty was desirable to most participants regardless of their trauma history, those who reported experiences of high betrayal trauma rated loyalty less desirable than those who reported experiences of traumas that were low and medium in betrayal. Participants who reported experiences of revictimization (defined as the experience of trauma perpetrated by a close other during 2 different developmental periods) differed from participants who only reported 1 experience of high betrayal trauma in their self-reported desire for a romantic partner who possessed the traits of sincerity and trustworthiness. Preference for a partner who uses the tactic of verbal aggression was also associated with revictimization status. These preliminary findings suggest that victimization perpetrated by close others may affect partner preferences.

  5. Partner Market Opportunities and Relationship Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Rapp

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although partner market opportunities are generally considered to be important for relationship stability, they have never been measured accurately. In order to be able to test the anticipated effects of partner market opportunities, this study conceptualises them as individual opportunities for contact and interaction in concrete social contexts, like the neighbourhood, the workplace, leisure activities, etc. Using data from the German Marriage Market Survey, we first examine the impact of individual partner market opportunities on the risk of separation. Second, we examine to what extend the most frequently studied determinants of divorce and separation depend on partner market opportunities. Our results show that the number of opposite sex contacts increases the probability of separation. Sharing the same contacts with one’s partner decreases the risk of separation. Our results indicate further that reducing opposite sex contacts in the course of the relationship is partly responsible for the higher stability of longer-lasting relationships. Having a migration background is associated with fewer opposite sex contacts. This means that having a migration background would be more destabilising if these individuals did not have less opposite sex contacts than individuals without a migration background. In contrast, joint home ownership, church attendance, higher education and residing in western Germany would generally be more stabilising if these factors were not connected with more opposite sex contacts.

  6. A Community-Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keyonna M; Pardo, Yvette-Janine; Norris, Keith C; Diaz-Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D; Brown, Arleen F

    2015-10-01

    Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two-part community-academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half-day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community-academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12-week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self-efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1-year follow-up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community-academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community-academic teams successfully compete for funding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Community–Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Yvette‐Janine; Norris, Keith C.; Diaz‐Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D.; Brown, Arleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two‐part community–academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half‐day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community–academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12‐week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self‐efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1‐year follow‐up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community–academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community–academic teams successfully compete for funding. PMID:26365589

  8. Welcoming spouses and partners to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The questions related to Diversity were examined in the framework of the Five-yearly Review, which was approved in December 2015. The first themes implemented this year concern helping spouses or partners integrate into the working world, and improving the balance between professional and private life.   To this end, the Social Affairs Service and the CERN Diversity Office organised together on Tuesday, 15 November, a “Welcome Drink” for the spouses and partners of employed members of the personnel of CERN who have recently arrived in the region. This event was an occasion for the spouses and partners to meet and greet with various internal services at CERN, including the Staff Association, as well as local networks that can provide assistance in integrating into the region, in terms of job search for instance. Therefore, several service providers were present, including: the Geneva Welcome Center (CAGI), a welcoming network for newly arrived employees of international organi...

  9. Partner manipulation stabilises a horizontally transmitted mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Martin; Barajas-Barron, Alejandro; Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Svatos, Ales

    2014-02-01

    Mutualisms require protection from non-reciprocating exploiters. Pseudomyrmex workers that engage in an obligate defensive mutualism with Acacia hosts feed exclusively on the sucrose-free extrafloral nectar (EFN) that is secreted by their hosts, a behaviour linking ant energy supply directly to host performance and thus favouring reciprocating behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that Acacia hosts manipulate this digestive specialisation of their ant mutualists. Invertase (sucrose hydrolytic) activity in the ant midguts was inhibited by chitinase, a dominant EFN protein. The inhibition occurred quickly in cell-free gut liquids and in native gels and thus likely results from an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Once a freshly eclosed worker ingests EFN as the first diet available, her invertase becomes inhibited and she, thus, continues feeding on host-derived EFN. Partner manipulation acts at the phenotypic level and means that one partner actively controls the phenotype of the other partner to enhance its dependency on host-derived rewards.

  10. Evaluating self and partner physical attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian; Georgiades, Chrissa; Pang, Lily

    2007-03-01

    This study used a novel questionnaire to examine ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. Seventy-two men and 83 women estimated their own and their opposite-sex partner's overall physical attractiveness and the attractiveness of various body parts and measures. They also answered six simple questions concerning physical attractiveness. Results showed significant gender differences in self-estimates of overall facial attractiveness and upper body features. In general, and regardless of gender, participants rated their opposite-sex partners as being significantly more attractive than themselves. In addition, the results showed that body weight and facial attractiveness were the best predictors of overall physical attractiveness. Implications of these results in terms of social biases are considered.

  11. AIDS, partner notification and gender issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheimer, Galya M

    2002-01-01

    The interplay between public health, human rights, legal obligations and physicians' ethical concerns was revealed dramatically in Israel in recent cases involving reporting of the HIV positive status of patients. This paper reviews and critically analyses the decision-making process of Israeli Ethics Committees regarding HIV partner notification. One aim of this analysis is to suggest principles that may guide the decision in such cases. It is argued that the resolution concerning disclosure to partners be based on the Principle of Proportionality, taking into account the type of relationship between partner and patient, their cultural background and gender issues. The paper demonstrates the advantages of addressing such issues by professional multidisciplinary Ethics Committees, whose decisions can bring to bear the scope of relevant considerations.

  12. Whom to Choose as License Partner?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke; Trombini, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the matching of firms on the market for technology. The paper forwards two dimensions along which license formation occurs: technology and product-market. Both sides of the market search for a partner representing potential for high technology synergies to maximize licensing...... benefits and obviate issues related to technology transfer and knowledge recombination. At the same time, firms wish to select a partner operating in a different product market to minimize competitive downside issues and to access other product markets, skills and resources. We contend interdependence...... between technology and market forces: if partners are market distant, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnership decreases with partners’ technological distance. Using data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994...

  13. Partner Selection in Technological Licensing Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Trombini, Giulia

    as attractors, and market competition and potential involuntary spillovers act as repellants. Firms seek potential licensing partners by trying to maximize technological synergies while attempting to minimize the competitive downsides. We hypothesize that when licensees engage in matches involving a partner...... that is technologically unrelated, ex ante familiarity with the licensors’ technology is required. We contend also that there is interdependence between technological learning and market competition: if partners are in the same product markets, the likelihood of technology license contractual partnerships decreases...... with partners’ technological relatedness. We use data on the formation of license partnerships in the global biopharmaceutical industry over the period 1994-2004 and find that, on the whole, there is empirical support for our theoretical predictions....

  14. Research on Partner-fly Infrared Decoys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Yang; LI Yan-jun; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of new generation of infrared-guided missiles, it is very difficult for the traditional point-source infrared decoys to confront them. Therefore it is important to research the jamming mechanism and tactical application of infrared decoys. Through the research on rocket-propelled infrared decoys, a movement model and a radiation pattern of partner-fly infrared decoy are established based on the jamming mechanism of infrared centroid effect, the aerodynamics principle as well as the aeronautical dynamics principle. A dynamic simulation seeking superiority is conducted for its firing range and direction, a tactical application method of partner-fly infrared decoy against infrared-guided missile is explored, and the technical conditions of partner-fly infrared decoys are determined.

  15. Are human resource professionals strategic business partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Randy; Selmer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    place has been less pervasive. Based on a sample of CEOs, line managers and HR executives, this study applies both a quantitative and a qualitative approach to examine the research question whether HR professionals are strategic business partners. Although the overall quantitative results provided...... a weak support for an affirmative answer to the research question, quantitative analyses and the qualitative findings revealed that while HR executives regarded themselves as strategic business partners, CEOs and line managers were not sure that they played this strategic business role. Plausible...

  16. 心理辅导员社工化可行性研究%Psychological Counselor Practise Social Work Feasibility Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢丽仪

    2012-01-01

      面对青少年复杂的内心世界以及纷繁的人际关系,心理辅导员仅靠具备一定的心理学、教育学理论素养以及掌握心理辅导等方法是远不足以满足青少年的需求。心理辅导员推行社工化,有助于建设一支符合新时代要求的心理辅导员队伍,使心理辅导更全面、更人性化,从而更好地为广大师生及家长服务,积极推动和谐社会的全面构建。%  Teenagers have complex psychological and complicat-ed interpersonal relationships. The psychological counselors cannot satisfy teenagers' requirements only on certain psychology, educational theoretical attainment and master psychological service technology. Psychological counselors practise social-work can help building of a contingent of psychological counselors which meet the requirements in the new period, make the psychological service more comprehensive, more humane, serve the majority of teachers, students and parents better, vigorously promote the comprehensive construction of harmo-nious society.

  17. Assessment of arsenic in Australian grown and imported rice varieties on sale in Australia and potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransisca, Yunnita; Small, Darryl M; Morrison, Paul D; Spencer, Michelle J S; Ball, Andrew S; Jones, Oliver A H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic dietary exposure to arsenic, particularly the inorganic forms (defined as elemental arsenic, predominantly As(3+) and As(5+), and all its inorganic compounds except arsine), is a matter of concern for human health. Ingestion of arsenic usually occurs via contaminated water but recent studies show there is also a risk of exposure from food, particularly Asian rice (Oryza sativa). Australia is a rice growing country, contributing around 2% of the world rice trade, and a large proportion of the population consumes rice regularly. In the present study we investigated concentrations of arsenic in both Australian grown and imported rice on sale in Australia and examined the potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry. The results indicated a wide spread of arsenic levels of 0.09-0.33 mg kg(-1), with Australian grown Arborio and sushi varieties of O. sativa containing the highest mean value of ∼0.22 mg kg(-1). Arsenic levels in all samples were below the 1 mg kg(-1) limit set by Food Standards Australia New Zealand.

  18. Practise of clinical pharmacists at hematology department%临床药师在血液科的工作实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宇; 龚汉明; 段鹏程

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨临床药师在血液科的药学服务模式,为临床药师工作提供参考。方法总结临床药师在血液科的工作经验及成效。结果临床药师发挥自身专业优势,协助解决临床用药问题,为医生、护士和患者提供药学服务。结论加强临床实践,找准切入点,协助临床解决用药中存在的问题,提高医疗质量。%Objective To explore the service mode at hematology department and set an example for clinical pharmacists in the respect of working mode .Methods To summarize the experience and achievements of clinical pharmacists in offering pharmaceutical service to doctors , nurses and patients at hematology depart-ment.Results The clinical pharmacists use their specialty to assist doctors and nurses in solving the dilemma of clinical prescription and guide patients in taking medicine .Conclusion A clinical pharmacists need to prac-tise more and find a breakthrough to serve doctors , nurses and patients better with their specialty .

  19. Social media and professionalism: a retrospective content analysis of Fitness to Practise cases heard by the GDC concerning social media complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, P

    2017-09-08

    Introduction Since 2013, all General Dental Council (GDC) registrants' online activities have been regulated by the GDC's social media guidelines. Failure to comply with these guidelines results in a Fitness to Practise (FtP) complaint being investigated.Aims This study explores the prevalence of social media related FtP cases investigated by the GDC from 1 September 2013 to 21 June 2016.Method Documentary analysis of social media related FtP cases published on the GDC's website was undertaken. All cases that met the study's inclusion criteria were analysed using a quantitative content analysis framework.Findings It was found that 2.4% of FtP cases published on the GDC website during that period were related to breaches of the social media guidelines. All of the cases investigated were proven and upheld. Most of those named in the complaints were dental nurses and the most common type of complaint was inappropriate Facebook comments.Conclusions The low incidence rate should be interpreted with caution, being illustrative of the types of issues that might arise rather than the volume. The GDC will need to remain vigilant in this area and ensure that social media awareness training is an active part of CPD for all the dental team.

  20. Violence and substance use among female partners of men in treatment for intimate-partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wupperman, Peggilee; Amble, Paul; Devine, Susan; Zonana, Howard; Fals-Stewart, William; Easton, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    To improve understanding of the complex dynamics in intimate partner violence (IPV) in heterosexual relationships, we explored violence and substance use among the female partners of men entering treatment for both IPV and substance-related problems. All male participants (n = 75) were alcohol dependent and had at least one domestic-violence arrest. Results showed that female partners were as likely as men to engage in substance use the week before treatment; however, according to reports by the men, the female partners were more likely than men to use substances during the last week of treatment, due to a reported increase in use during the men's treatment. Regarding violence, 59 percent of female IPV victims reported engaging in some form of mild violence against their male partners, and 55 percent reported engaging in some form of severe violence. By contrast, only 23 percent of male batterers reported that their female partners had engaged in mild violence, and only 19 percent reported that their partners had engaged in severe violence. Regardless of whether the violence was defensive in nature, the data suggest that women in relationships involving substance abuse and IPV are in need of treatment. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: Conduct Problems, Interventions, and Partner Contact With the Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee; Vu, Nicole L; Rancher, Caitlin; Mueller, Victoria

    2016-06-30

    Children's contact with their mother's violent partner is a potentially important variable for understanding conduct problems among children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Within the context of a treatment study evaluating a parenting intervention (Project Support) for families exiting a domestic violence shelter, this study tested four hypotheses regarding children's postshelter contact with their mother's violent partner: (1) participation in Project Support decreases the frequency of children's contact with their mother's violent partner; (2) postshelter contact is positively associated with children's conduct problems and is associated more strongly for girls than boys; (3) frequency of contact mediates Project Support's effects on children's conduct problems; and (4) frequency of contact is positively associated with IPV and partner-child aggression, and these latter associations help explain effects of contact on children's conduct problems. Participants were 66 women (26 White) with a child (32 girls) between 4 and 9 years. Families were assessed every 4 months for 20 months after departure from a domestic violence shelter. Project Support reduced the extent of partner-child contact. In addition, within-subject changes in contact over time were associated with girls', but not boys', conduct problems, and it partially mediated effects of Project Support on girls' conduct problems. Higher average levels of contact over time were also positively associated with further incidents of IPV and partner-child aggression, and partner-child aggression helped explain effects of contact on children's conduct problems. Children's postshelter contact with the mother's violent partner relates positively to several negative family outcomes.

  2. Making the Most of a Teaching Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Boni

    2009-01-01

    Teachers often miss opportunities to use their classroom computers as teaching partners because of a lack of knowledge or confidence about how the computers can support learning. Internet-connected computers can enable teachers to access well-designed websites that support literacy instruction and involve students in interactive responses to…

  3. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  4. Risk Recognition and Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Tricia H.; Kendra, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether female victims of physical forms of intimate partner violence (IPV) displayed deficits in risk recognition, or the ability to detect danger, in physically violent dating encounters. A total of 182 women watched a video depicting a psychologically and physically aggressive encounter between…

  5. Self and partner personality in intimate relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, D.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the relations between both partners' personality and marital quality in married or cohabiting heterosexual couples. In Study 1 (N = 1380, or 690 couples), personality was assessed by means of the Dutch Personality Questionnaire, whereas in Study 2 (N = 564, or 2

  6. Auditory Training with Frequent Communication Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Sommers, Mitchell; Barcroft, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with hearing loss engage in auditory training to improve their speech recognition. They typically practice listening to utterances spoken by unfamiliar talkers but never to utterances spoken by their most frequent communication partner (FCP)--speech they most likely desire to recognize--under the assumption that familiarity…

  7. Yorkie and Scalloped: partners in growth activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Edgar, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway limits organ growth in organisms from Drosophila to mammals by suppressing the activity of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki)/YAP. The TEAD/TEF factor Scalloped (Sd) has been identified as the first known transcription factor to partner with Yki as a downstream target of Hpo signaling.

  8. Physical Health Effects of Intimate Partner Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillito, Carrie LeFevre

    2012-01-01

    Although intimate partner violence has been recognized as both a social problem and health issue, the extent to which it is a health issue for both males and females in the general population is largely unknown. This longitudinal research uses data from the National Survey of Family and Households (1987-2003). Random effects logistic regression…

  9. Intimate Partner Violence Victimization and Associated Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Protective factors. Self-rated health status was assessed by a single ... Life satisfaction was elicited with one question,. “All things ... 95% confidence interval (CI) to determine the associations .... severe depression and 21.1% for PTSD. Regarding .... Table 3: Associations with Intimate Partner Violence among Men. Variables.

  10. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  11. Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Carol, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Including 66 focused snapshots of outreach in action, this resource reflects the creative solutions of librarians searching for new and innovative ways to build programs that meet customer needs while expanding the library's scope into the community. This contributed volume includes: (1) A huge array of program options for partnering with other…

  12. Gender Symmetry, Sexism, and Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher T.; Swan, Suzanne C.; Raghavan, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    This study of a predominantly Hispanic sample of 92 male and 140 female college students examines both gender symmetry in intimate partner violence (IPV) and inconsistent relationships found in previous studies between sexist attitudes and IPV. Results indicate that although comparable numbers of men and women perpetrate and are victimized in…

  13. Intimate partner violence in orthopaedic trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprague, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) or domestic violence is a common and serious public health problem around the globe. Victims of IPV frequently present to health care practitioners including orthopaedic surgeons. Substantial research has been conducted on IPV over the past few decades, but very

  14. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dwyer, Robert S.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein−protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multiprotein complexes and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners, causing their sequences to be correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify, from sequence data alone, which proteins are specific interaction partners. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the 3D structures of proteins from sequences. Thus inspired, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from two protein families whose members are known to interact. We first assess the algorithm’s performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. We obtain a striking 0.93 true positive fraction on our complete dataset without any a priori knowledge of interaction partners, and we uncover the origin of this success. We then apply the algorithm to proteins from ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter complexes, and obtain accurate predictions in these systems as well. Finally, we present two metrics that accurately distinguish interacting protein families from noninteracting ones, using only sequence data. PMID:27663738

  15. Self and partner personality in intimate relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, D.P.H.

    Two studies were conducted to examine the relations between both partners' personality and marital quality in married or cohabiting heterosexual couples. In Study 1 (N = 1380, or 690 couples), personality was assessed by means of the Dutch Personality Questionnaire, whereas in Study 2 (N = 564, or

  16. Intimate Partner Violence within Law Enforcement Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Anita S.; Lo, Celia C.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Baltimore Police Stress and Domestic Violence study, the authors examined how exposure to stressful events on the job affects law enforcement employees' physical aggression toward domestic partners, evaluating the role of negative emotions and authoritarian spillover in mediating the impact of such task-related stress. The…

  17. Perceived neighborhood partner availability, partner selection, and risk for sexually transmitted infections within a cohort of adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Pamela A; Chung, Shang-En; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2014-07-01

    This research examined the association between a novel measure of perceived partner availability and discordance between ideal and actual partner characteristics as well as trajectories of ideal partner preferences and perceptions of partner availability over time. A clinic-recruited cohort of adolescent females (N = 92), aged 1619 years, were interviewed quarterly for 12 months using audio computer-assisted self-interview. Participants ranked the importance of characteristics for their ideal main sex partner and then reported on these characteristics for their current main partner. Participants reported on perceptions of availability of ideal sex partners in their neighborhood. Paired t-tests examined discordance between ideal and actual partner characteristics. Random-intercept regression models examined repeated measures. Actual partner ratings were lower than ideal partner preferences for fidelity, equaled ideal preferences for emotional support and exceeded ideal preferences for social/economic status and physical attractiveness. Discordance on emotional support and social/economic status was associated with sex partner concurrency. Participants perceived low availability of ideal sex partners. Those who perceived more availability were less likely to be ideal/actual discordant on fidelity [OR = .88, 95% CI: .78, 1.0]. Neither ideal partner preferences nor perceptions of partner availability changed over 12 months. Current main sex partners met or exceeded ideal partner preferences in all domains except fidelity. If emotional needs are met, adolescents may tolerate partner concurrency in areas of limited partner pools. Urban adolescent females who perceive low availability may be at increased risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI) because they may be more likely to have nonmonogamous partners. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol Misuse and Multiple Sexual Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi, PhD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We examine the association between self-reported alcohol misuse and alcohol usewithin 2 hours of having sex and the number of sexual partners among a sample of African-Americanand Latino emergency department (ED patients.Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected prospectively from a randomized sample of all EDpatients during a 5-week period. In face-to-face interviews, subjects were asked to report their alcoholuse and number of sexual partners in the past 12 months. Data were analyzed using multiple variablenegative binomial regression models, and effect modification was assessed through inclusion ofinteraction terms.Results: The 395 study participants reported an average of 1.4 (standard error¼0.11 sexual partnersin the past 12 months, 23% reported misusing alcohol, and 28% reported consuming alcohol beforesex. There was no statistically significant association between alcohol misuse and the number ofsexual partners; however, alcohol before sex was associated with a larger number of sexual partners inthe past year. Moreover, among those who misused alcohol, participants who reported alcohol beforesex were 3 times more likely to report a higher number of sexual partners (risk ratio¼3.2; confidenceinterval [CI]¼1.9–5.6. The association between alcohol use before sex and number of sexual partnersis dependent upon whether a person has attributes of harmful drinking over the past 12 months.Overall, alcohol use before sex increases the number of sexual partners, but the magnitude of thiseffect is significantly increased among alcohol misusers.Conclusion: Alcohol misusers and those who reported having more than 1 sexual partner were morelikely to cluster in the same group, ie, those who used alcohol before sex. Efforts to reduce the burdenof sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and other consequences ofrisky sexual behavior in the ED population should be cognizant of the interplay of alcohol and

  19. Number of sexual partners and sexual assertiveness predict sexual victimization: do more partners equal more risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dave P; Messman-Moore, Terri L; Ward, Rose Marie

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies, number of sexual partners and sexual assertiveness were examined as independent risk factors for sexual victimization among college women. Using a sample of 335 college women, this study examined the interaction of number of sexual partners and sexual assertiveness on verbal sexual coercion and rape. Approximately 32% of the sample reported unwanted sexual intercourse, 6.9% (n = 23) experienced verbal sexual coercion, 17.9% (n = 60) experienced rape, and 7.2% (n = 24) experienced both. As number of sexual partners increased, instances of verbal sexual coercion increased for women low in relational sexual assertiveness but not for women high in relational sexual assertiveness. A similar relationship was not found for rape. Among women who experienced both verbal sexual coercion and rape, increases in number of partners in the context of low refusal and relational assertiveness were associated with increases in verbal sexual coercion and rape. Findings suggest sexual assertiveness is related to fewer experiences of sexual coercion.

  20. Partner dependency and intimate partner abuse: A sociocultural grounding of spousal abuse in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Stephen Baffour

    2015-01-01

    While sociocultural scholarship has attempted an ecological explanation of intimate partner violence, it has largely been criticized for ignoring dispositional factors of both perpetrators and victims. Dependent personality and attachment-related emotional problems have been implicated in the ext......While sociocultural scholarship has attempted an ecological explanation of intimate partner violence, it has largely been criticized for ignoring dispositional factors of both perpetrators and victims. Dependent personality and attachment-related emotional problems have been implicated...... of dependency and attachment-related spousal violence as a form of a psychopathology. This article discusses partner dependency and jealousy-motivated spousal violence as socioculturally situated, dependent on contextual and relational conditions of meaning embedded in the communal society of Ghana....... It highlights Ghanaian communal personality, gendered socialization and meaning systems of marriage as salient sociocultural features for conceptualizing partner dependency and emotional-related spousal violence....

  1. Ants use partner specific odors to learn to recognize a mutualistic partner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru K Hojo

    Full Text Available Regulation via interspecific communication is an important for the maintenance of many mutualisms. However, mechanisms underlying the evolution of partner communication are poorly understood for many mutualisms. Here we show, in an ant-lycaenid butterfly mutualism, that attendant ants selectively learn to recognize and interact cooperatively with a partner. Workers of the ant Pristomyrmex punctatus learn to associate cuticular hydrocarbons of mutualistic Narathura japonica caterpillars with food rewards and, as a result, are more likely to tend the caterpillars. However, the workers do not learn to associate the cuticular hydrocarbons of caterpillars of a non-ant-associated lycaenid, Lycaena phlaeas, with artificial food rewards. Chemical analysis revealed cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the mutualistic caterpillars were complex compared with those of non-ant-associated caterpillars. Our results suggest that partner-recognition based on partner-specific chemical signals and cognitive abilities of workers are important mechanisms underlying the evolution and maintenance of mutualism with ants.

  2. Practising virtue: inside international arbitration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron, D.D.; Schill, S.W.; Smutny, A.C.; Triantafilou, E.E.

    2015-01-01

    International arbitration has developed into a global system of adjudication, dealing with disputes arising from a variety of legal relationships: between states, between private commercial actors, and between private and public entities. It operates to a large extent according to its own rules and

  3. Practising virtue: inside international arbitration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Caron; S.W. Schill; A.C. Smutny; E.E. Triantafilou

    2015-01-01

    International arbitration has developed into a global system of adjudication, dealing with disputes arising from a variety of legal relationships: between states, between private commercial actors, and between private and public entities. It operates to a large extent according to its own rules and

  4. Paradoxes unbounded: Practising community making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Maginess

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The first section of this paper is a discussion of the paradoxes contained in definitionsof the word 'community' and deliberately foregrounds and makes problematicconflicting meanings before arguing for a third definition and practice of community.This third definition and practice celebrates and even transcends contradictions withinan active learning model of education in the community, aimed at tackling inequalityand prejudice. The second section offers an autocritical narrative account of aneducation in the community project that illustrates how such a practice of communitymaking can be achieved within an educational framework in which pupil is teacher andteacher is pupil and in which an imaginative, creative approach is deployed toconstruct a community making practice. The paper draws on understandings fromcommunity development, inclusive and creative education, emancipatory actionresearch, postcolonial and post-structuralist theory.

  5. New theoretical discourses in the discussion of the Neolithisation process in South Scandinavia during the late 5th and early 4th millennium BC – an identification of learning processes, communities of practise and migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Sørensen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is argued that agriculture is a very complex technology, which takes a long time to learn, thus making it very difficult for agrarian practises to spread as ideas. Instead, based on a detailed survey of primary agrarian evidence (direct 14C dates of cereals and domesticated animals and secondary evidence of material culture (polished axes and pottery, it is claimed that the expansions of agrarian practises in South Scandinavia are associated with the migration of farmers who were related to the Michelsberg Culture. These incoming farmers had the appropriate skills and the ability to teach the indigenous hunter-gatherer populations about agriculture by establishing communities of practice, a fact which supports the theory of integrationism. The engagement in these communities of practise changed the identity and material culture of the immigrating farmers, as well as the indigenous hunter-gatherers, thus creating new agrarian societies in South Scandinavia which were interconnected in a regional as well as larger European network.

  6. Pengetahuan, Sikap, dan Praktik Pemilik Breeding Kennel terhadap Pencegahan dan Pengendalian Bruselosis pada Anjing Impor (KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTISES OF BREEDING KENNEL OWNER REGARDING CANINE BRUCELLOSIS PREVENTION AND CONTROLLING ON IMPORTED DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citra Noviana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of Brucella canis of imported dog for breederthrough Soekarno Hatta International Airport, Cengkareng Tanggerang, Indonesia. A total of 64 serumsamples were obtained from breeder dogs imported to Indonesia between Mei–September 2014. Theserums were examined by Immunochromatographic Assay. None of the serum samples in this studytested positive. Result of this study indicated that antibodies of B. canis were not detected in 64 dogsimported to Indonesia during the research period. A Knowledge, Attitude and Practises (KAP Survey wasalso performed. This study used 32 respondents and data were analyzed by using path analysis. Therespondents were breeding kennel owners (breeder who imported dogs through Soekarno HattaInternational Airport during the research period. The study concluded that the knowledge significantlyinfluenced the attitude of the breeder, and also the attitude significantly influenced the practises ofpreventing and controlling brucellosis. The annually income was also identified as a variable thatsignificantly influenced the practises. Practice prevention and control of canine brucellosis can be improvedby increasing the knowledge of the breeding kennel owner.

  7. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally representative survey to assess experiences of intimate partner violence,...

  8. Intimate partner violence and mental health in Bolivia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meekers, Dominique; Pallin, Sarah C; Hutchinson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Latin America has among the highest rates of intimate partner violence. While there is increasing evidence that intimate partner violence is associated with mental health problems, there is little such research for developing countries...

  9. Positive illusions about a partner's personality and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown individuals to hold positive biases about their relationships. The present study examined positive illusions about a partner's specific personality characteristics in relation to relationship quality and personality. Both partners of 120 heterosexual couples participated

  10. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally-representative telephone survey that collects detailed ...

  11. HIV Treatment Protects Uninfected Partner from The Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html HIV Treatment Protects Uninfected Partner From the Virus Study of gay couples duplicates findings of earlier ... HealthDay News) -- HIV treatment prevented transmission of the virus in gay couples when only one partner had ...

  12. Positive illusions about a partner's personality and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    Previous studies have shown individuals to hold positive biases about their relationships. The present study examined positive illusions about a partner's specific personality characteristics in relation to relationship quality and personality. Both partners of 120 heterosexual couples participated

  13. HPV genotypes concordance between sex partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, M; Mottolese, M; Marandino, F; Carosi, M; Diodoro, M G; Sentinelli, S; Visca, P; Rollo, F; Mariani, L; Vocaturo, G; Sindico, R; Di Giannuario, D; Perrone Donnorso, R; Pellicciotta, M; Vocaturo, A

    2007-12-01

    The HPV genotype concordance in the sexual couples could support the sexual viral transmission of HPV infection. The present study contains a case-report of a stable Italian sex couple harbouring the same five HPV genotypes in their genital samples. The female partner, affected by vulvar condilomatosis, evidenced positivity in her cervicovaginal scraping with high risk HPV DNA Hybrid Capture 2 test and was negative at liquid-based performed Pap Test and at colposcopic examination. The male partner was clinically healthy regarding his external genitalia. In both male and female genital scrapings, the following HPV genotypes were detected by means of a PCR-based assay: 6, 16, 53, 73 and 84. This considerably high genotype concordance does not appear to be casual and supports, in our opinion, the hypothesis that genital HPV types are sexually transmitted agents

  14. Are human resource professionals strategic business partners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Randy; Selmer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical speculations and prescriptive discussions abound in the literature regarding the strategic importance of human resource management. However, evidence based on rigorous empirical studies that the transformation from an administrative service function to strategic partnership has taken...... place has been less pervasive. Based on a sample of CEOs, line managers and HR executives, this study applies both a quantitative and a qualitative approach to examine the research question whether HR professionals are strategic business partners. Although the overall quantitative results provided...... a weak support for an affirmative answer to the research question, quantitative analyses and the qualitative findings revealed that while HR executives regarded themselves as strategic business partners, CEOs and line managers were not sure that they played this strategic business role. Plausible...

  15. Partners' session spurs progress for Latin women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-18

    A workshop sponsored by Partners of the Americas with support from the US Agency for International Development's Women in Development Office held in Christiana, Jamaica, October 1981 was designed to expand the involvement of women in the development process by strengthening leadership capabilities of women in the Caribbean. Sessions were held on project planning, goal identification, and resource evaluation. By the end of the workshop women representing 11 US states and their partners in 17 Latin American and Caribbean countries had initiated several projects. Some projects are: 1) Colombia-Florida: developing literacy training aids about nutrition information, 2) Guatemala-Alabama: home gardening and nutrition education, and 3) Jamaica-western New York: skills training programs for young mothers.

  16. Performance improvement with patient service partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J P

    1998-01-01

    Once the decision is made to use a patient-focused care delivery system, a variety of methods can be used to successfully design the model. The author describes the process used by a multilevel, multidisciplinary team at a community hospital to design and implement a Service Partner role that would meet and exceed customer expectations. Demonstrated performance improvements included increased patient satisfaction, productive labor dollar savings, and improvements in the work environment for staff members.

  17. Unperceived intimate partner violence and women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Michela; Gandarillas, Ana; Zorrilla, Belén; Lasheras, Luisa; Pires, Marisa; Anes, Ana; Ordobás, María

    2013-01-01

    Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) often do not perceive themselves as abused. This study sought to estimate the health effects of unperceived IPV (uIPV), taking violence-free women as the reference, and to compare the effects of uIPV with those of perceived IPV (pIPV). We performed a cross-sectional population study through telephone interviews of 2835 women aged 18 to 70 years living in the region of Madrid and having an ongoing intimate partner relationship or contact with a former partner in the preceding year. Based on 26 questions from the Conflict Tactics Scale-1 and the Enquête Nacional sur les Violences envers les Femmes en France and the question "Do you feel abused by your partner?" a variable was constructed in three categories, namely, the absence of IPV, uIPV and pIPV. Using logistic regression, we analyzed the association between health problems, medication use, health-service utilization and IPV (perceived and unperceived) vis-à-vis the absence of IPV. There were 247 cases of uIPV and 96 of pIPV (prevalences of 8.8% and 3.4%, respectively). The multivariate analysis showed that a substantial number of the outcomes explored were associated with uIPV, pIPV, or both. The highest odds ratios (ORs) were obtained for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9≥10) (uIPV: OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-3.8; and pIPV: 4.1, 95%CI 2.5-6.8). In most problems, the ORs did not significantly differ between the two types of IPV. uIPV is 2.6 times more frequent than pIPV and is associated with at least as many health problems as pIPV. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Patterns in PARTNERing across Public Health Collaboratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A. Bevc

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inter-organizational networks represent one of the most promising practice-based approaches in public health as a way to attain resources, share knowledge, and, in turn, improve population health outcomes. However, the interdependencies and effectiveness related to the structure, management, and costs of these networks represents a critical item to be addressed. The objective of this research is to identify and determine the extent to which potential partnering patterns influence the structure of collaborative networks. This study examines data collected by PARTNER, specifically public health networks (n = 162, to better understand the structured relationships and interactions among public health organizations and their partners, in relation to collaborative activities. Combined with descriptive analysis, we focus on the composition of public health collaboratives in a series of Exponential Random Graph (ERG models to examine the partnerships between different organization types to identify the attribute-based effects promoting the formation of network ties within and across collaboratives. We found high variation within and between these collaboratives including composition, diversity, and interactions. The findings of this research suggest common and frequent types of partnerships, as well as opportunities to develop new collaborations. The result of this analysis offer additional evidence to inform and strengthen public health practice partnerships.

  19. Intimate partner violence is everyone's problem, but how should we ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    feel fortunate to have a partner, that they would never cope with- out their partner or are ... pelvic pain). • Vague ... Has your partner ever threatened you or forced you to do some- thing you didn't want ... My patient is being abused – now what?

  20. Logistics in Security Force Assistance: Sustainable Partner Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    original hypothesis of this paper was that efforts to build partner capacity historically only included sustainment training in a limited fashion . The...LOGISTICS IN SECURITY FORCE ASSISTANCE: SUSTAINABLE PARTNER DEVELOPMENT A Monograph by MAJ J. Troy Fisher United...Logistics in Security Force Assistance: Sustainable Partner Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  1. Trends in Intimate Partner Violence: 1980-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Rachael A.; Kaukinen, Catherine Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Research on trends in partner violence has primarily relied on official measures of victimization focusing primarily on women's risk for intimate partner homicide. The current study uses 28 years of data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to examine the trends of intimate partner violence against female victims and identify…

  2. Positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined the existence of positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and its relations to relationship quality. Positive illusions were assumed to exist when individuals rated their partner as more attractive than their partner rated him or herself. In two Dutc

  3. Positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and relationship quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    The present research examined the existence of positive illusions about a partner's physical attractiveness and its relations to relationship quality. Positive illusions were assumed to exist when individuals rated their partner as more attractive than their partner rated him or herself. In two

  4. Partner's Stake in Conformity and Abused Wives' Psychological Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaris, Alfred; Kaukinen, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the potential buffering effect of help-seeking in the association between intimate partner assault and women's psychological trauma, and how this, in turn, may depend on the partner's stake in conformity. The sample consists of 374 women reporting the experience of domestic violence from a current intimate partner, drawn…

  5. Innovation durch Partnering im deutschen Schlüsselfertigbau

    OpenAIRE

    Schmolke, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In der angloamerikanischen Baubranche werden bereits seit Jahren innovative Managementkonzepte zur Steuerung partnerschaftlicher Kooperationen nach dem Leitgedanken des Partnering zwischen Haupt- und Nachunternehmern im Schlüsselfertigbau erfolgreich umgesetzt. Hierzulande bleibt der Einsatz derartiger Partnering-Modelle bislang jedoch weitgehend unbeachtet. Das Ziel der Arbeit besteht daher darin, wesentliche Elemente und Erfahrungen des angloamerikanischen Partnering-Konzeptes im Hinb...

  6. Partner Status, Social Support, and Psychological Adjustment during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Lawrence H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied partner status, social support, and psychological adjustment of pregnant women. Administered Brief Symptom Inventory to predominantly minority and lower-income pregnant women (N=157) categorized as married, single/partnered, or single/unpartnered. Found single/partnered women were at least risk for emotional disequilibrium and suggested…

  7. 45 CFR 162.915 - Trading partner agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trading partner agreements. 162.915 Section 162... REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS General Provisions for Transactions § 162.915 Trading partner agreements. A covered entity must not enter into a trading partner agreement that would do any of...

  8. Sigma: A computer RPG using Monogame framework

    OpenAIRE

    Arauz Morales, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This Final Degree Project (”Trabajo Fin de Grado”) involves the creation of a multiplatform prototype of a videogame from the very beginning, from the perspective of game and character designer and programmer. Videogames are complex, multidisciplinary software products involving a well defined and balanced team, where programming is the means of expressing emotions through the plot, characters, art and/or music. Being like this, a programmer could be considered as the conductor...

  9. Partner notification for sexually transmitted infections and perception of notified partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elani Graça Ferreira Cavalcante

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Learn the perceptions of patients with sexually transmitted infections and sexual partners who are notified of the infection. METHOD A descriptive and qualitative study, based on the collective subject discourse technique, was conducted in four healthcare centers of reference in Fortaleza, Ceará, from March to July 2014. The sample comprised 21 subjects (11 index patients and 10 notified partners. RESULTS The index patients reported complicity, concern about the partner's health and revelation of diagnosis aiming to preserve the relationship. The partners showed antagonistic perceptions: tranquility-betrayal, fear of death, of incurability and the diagnosis, especially of HIV. The reasons for coming to a healthcare center were: fear of being sick, attenuation of guilt of infection transmission, need for diagnosis, early start of treatment. CONCLUSION Fear of losing trust, insecurities when dealing with a sexual infection and being responsible or co-responsible for the transmission were the predominant feelings. Various types of partner notification were reported (verbal, telephone, notification card, according to individual convenience. This study suggests the use of alternative methods of notification and an integrated system of notification.

  10. The influences of partner accuracy and partner memory ability on social false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numbers, Katya T; Meade, Michelle L; Perga, Vladimir A

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined whether increasing the proportion of false information suggested by a confederate would influence the magnitude of socially introduced false memories in the social contagion paradigm Roediger, Meade, & Bergman (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 8:365-371, 2001). One participant and one confederate collaboratively recalled items from previously studied household scenes. During collaboration, the confederate interjected 0 %, 33 %, 66 %, or 100 % false items. On subsequent individual-recall tests across three experiments, participants were just as likely to incorporate misleading suggestions from a partner who was mostly accurate (33 % incorrect) as they were from a partner who was not at all accurate (100 % incorrect). Even when participants witnessed firsthand that their partner had a very poor memory on a related memory task, they were still as likely to incorporate the confederate's entirely misleading suggestions on subsequent recall and recognition tests (Exp. 2). Only when participants witnessed firsthand that their partner had a very poor memory on a practice test of the experimental task itself were they able to reduce false memory, and this reduction occurred selectively on a subsequent individual recognition test (Exp. 3). These data demonstrate that participants do not always consider their partners' memory ability when working on collaborative memory tasks.

  11. Romantic Partners, Friends, Friends with Benefits, and Casual Acquaintances As Sexual Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Wyndol; Shaffer, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to provide a detailed examination of sexual behavior with different types of partners. A sample of 163 young adults reported on their light nongenital, heavy nongenital, and genital sexual activity with romantic partners, friends, and casual acquaintances. They described their sexual activity with “friends with benefits” as well as with friends in general. Young adults were most likely to engage in sexual behavior with romantic partners, but sexual behavior also often occurred with some type of nonromantic partner. More young adults engaged in some form of sexual behavior with casual acquaintances than with friends with benefits. The frequencies of sexual behavior, however, were greater with friends with benefits than with friends or casual acquaintances. Interview and questionnaire data revealed that friends with benefits were typically friends, but not necessarily. Nonsexual activities were also less common with friends with benefits than other friends. Taken together, the findings illustrate the value of differentiating among different types of nonromantic partners and different levels of sexual behavior. PMID:21128155

  12. Intimate Partner Violence: The Lived Experience of Single Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laura; Scott-Tilley, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Research in intimate partner violence has focused on married, cohabiting, adolescents, or college aged women. The experience of intimate partner violence by single women has not been studied separately from other groups of women. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used with feminist inquiry to gain insight into the experience of intimate partner violence by single women. The overarching theme was control and manipulation by the abuser. Subthemes included not feeling safe, poor communication skills, and caretaking. Nurses need to be aware of the occurrence of intimate partner violence in male and female partnered relationships to provide comprehensive and nonjudgmental care.

  13. Partner switching can favour cooperation in a biological market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwagmeyer, P L

    2014-09-01

    Intraspecific cooperation and interspecific mutualisms can be promoted by mechanisms that reduce the frequency with which cooperative organisms are exploited by unhelpful partners. One such mechanism consists of changing partners after interacting with an uncooperative individual. I used McNamara et al.'s (Nature, 451, 2008, 189) partner switching model as a framework to examine whether this mechanism can select for increased cooperative investment by house sparrows (Passer domesticus) collaborating to rear offspring; previous research on this species has shown that substantial cooperative investments by both pair members are required to achieve high pay-offs from collaborating. I found that the poorer the outcome of a breeding attempt relative to the number of eggs the female invested, the greater the likelihood of partner switching. The incidence of partner switching changed seasonally, with peak switching coinciding with an increase in the number of alternative partners available to females. After females switched partners, their breeding outcomes rose to match those of females that remained with the same partner; this was not the case for males that switched partners. Consistent with the model's prediction, males in stable partnerships achieved over 25% higher than average reproductive success, which was attributable to both persistently good breeding outcomes and their older partners' high fecundity. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that partner switching favours increased cooperative investment levels, and they demonstrate that variation in the relative value of by-product benefits can enhance that process.

  14. Associations of Partner Age Gap at Sexual Debut with Teenage Parenthood and Lifetime Number of Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masho, Saba W; Chambers, Gregory J; Wallenborn, Jordyn T; Ferrance, Jacquelyn L

    2017-06-01

    Age at sexual debut and age gap between partners at debut are modifiable characteristics that may be related to risky sexual behaviors. Understanding any such relationships is a necessary first step toward strengthening risk interventions. Age at sexual debut and partner age gap were examined for 3,154 female and 2,713 male respondents to the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth who first had intercourse before age 18. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess associations between these measures and teenage parenthood and reporting a high lifetime number of partners (i.e., a number above the sample median). Females' odds of teenage parenthood were elevated if sexual debut occurred at ages 15-17 and involved a partner age gap of 3-4 years (odds ratio, 1.8) or more (2.0); they were reduced if debut occurred before age 15 and the gap was 3-4 years (0.8). Females' likelihood of reporting a high lifetime number of partners was negatively associated with age gap (0.4-0.7, depending on age at debut and length of age gap). Males' likelihood of reporting a large number of partners was positively associated with age gap if sexual debut was before age 15 and the gap was five or more years (1.7) or if debut was at ages 15-17 and involved a 3-4-year gap (2.0). Identifying the mechanisms underlying these associations could inform program design and implementation. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  15. Community Partners for Healthy Farming Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, J; Palermo, T

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the Community Partners for Healthy Farming Intervention Research (CPHF-IR) program is to implement and evaluate existing or new interventions for reduction of agriculture-related injuries, hazards, and illnesses. Objectives include the development of active partnerships between experienced researchers, communities, workers, managers, agricultural organizations, agribusinesses, and other stakeholders. Specific intervention projects were selected by the competitive review process in response to a request for proposals. The second series of projects (funded 2000-2003) targeted: improved ergonomics for handling grapes (CA) and for small-scale berry growers (WI, IA, MI, MN), engineering controls (KY, VA, SC) and training (IN) related to tractors, private-sector financial incentives for safety (IA, NE), and reducing eye injuries in Latino farmworkers (IL, MI, FL). Partners have provided their unique resources for accessing the target population, planning, implementation, dissemination, and evaluation. They have produced useful engineering controls, educational and motivational tools, and helped build infrastructure for promoting agricultural health as essential to sustainable agriculture. Additional outcomes have included: increased interest among participants in collaborating in further research, the feasibility of Latino lay health advisors as active partners in research, and the value of process evaluation of a partnership to enhance intervention sustainability. NIOSH is utilizing the model created for Simple Solutions: Ergonomics for Farm Workers, a document related to earlier CPHF-IR projects, for a comparable document for construction in both English and Spanish. This program has confirmed that such partnerships can produce not only sustainable interventions but also products and models with the potential to expand farther geographically than originally anticipated and even into other sectors, e.g., for primary prevention among healthcare workers and

  16. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-06

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013; 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered; 797 new participants installed a HAN; Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components; Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program; On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly; and An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  17. Coordinating the United States Interagency Partnering Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    stage over the last 6 years.7 The DoD is on the cutting edge of partnering and there have been valuable lessons learned at the tactical and...global stage . “3D are the three pillars that provide the foundation for promoting and protecting U.S. national security interests abroad.”33 DoD, DoS...operations now will mean throwing 18 away hard-fought gains, and expose the United States to new risks from across the globalising

  18. Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidan, Ahmet; Bui, Hoan N

    2016-08-01

    The present study examines intimate partner violence (IPV) reported by a sample of women in Zimbabwe to explore factors associated with the problem. Findings from the study indicate an important role of gender relationships in violence against women. The effects of gender inequalities on the likelihood of IPV vary with types of violence, but husband's patriarchal behaviors increase the likelihood of all forms of violence. The study suggests the importance of improving gender equality through public education on gender relationships, increasing women's education and economic opportunities, and eliminating customary laws that sustain gender inequality as necessary steps to combat IPV against women in Zimbabwe. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Jacobi photonic lattices and their SUSY partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Segundo, A; Rodríguez-Lara, B M; Fernández C, David J; Moya-Cessa, H M

    2014-01-13

    We present a classical analog of quantum optical deformed oscillators in arrays of waveguides. The normal modes of these one-dimensional photonic crystals are given in terms of Jacobi polynomials. We show that it is possible to attack the problem via factorization by exploiting the corresponding quantum optical model. This allows us to provide an unbroken supersymmetric partner of the proposed Jacobi lattices. Thanks to the underlying SU(1, 1) group symmetry of the lattices, we present the analytic propagators and impulse functions for these one-dimensional photonic crystals.

  20. Hiring your next partner: AOA critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasier, R Dale; Gagnon, Michael R; Iannotti, Joseph P; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Hiring a new partner into an orthopaedic department or group can be a daunting task. A recent American Orthopedic Association symposium sought to address three major aspects of hiring that affect orthopaedic leaders: (1) when to hire-the chairperson's role; (2) generational issues that affect hiring; and (3) the development of an initial compensation package.How does the chairperson recruit new physicians? Hiring a new partner into the academic setting requires a good deal of foresight. There must be an established game plan. Advertising and interviews need to be orchestrated. Chairpersons can find information about candidates from many unique sources. Fit within the department and community is important and must be cultivated. Spouses and families need special attention. Research candidates have individual needs. Perhaps the most important aspect of recruitment is the development of a realistic business plan. This paper provides an overview of factors to consider in managing a new hire.Generational issues are intriguing. Should they affect our hiring practices? It seems clear to established physicians that the new generation of graduates is different from their predecessors. Is this really true? Most everyone is familiar with the terms "Silent Generation," "Baby Boomers," "Generation X," and "Generation Y." Is there anything to be gained by categorizing an applicant? Is it important to hire a replica of one's self? This paper provides a thoughtful overview of generational issues as they apply to hiring new partners.Most department chairpersons are not trained as negotiators. Some preparation and experience are helpful in guiding the process of making an initial offer to a candidate. It is not all about pay. The package includes the guarantee period, expectations for the new hire, mentorship, and resources. How much should new orthopaedic academic hires be paid? Recent benchmark data from the Academic Orthopaedic Consortium suggest a mean income of $282,667 for

  1. Touch increases autonomic coupling between romantic partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eChatel-Goldman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal touch is of paramount importance in human social bonding and close relationships, allowing a unique channel for affect communication. So far the effect of touch on human physiology has been studied at an individual level. The present study aims at extending the study of affective touch from isolated individuals to truly interacting dyads. We have designed an ecological paradigm where romantic partners interact only via touch and we manipulate their empathic states. Simultaneously, we collected their autonomic activity (skin conductance, pulse, respiration. 14 couples participated to the experiment. We found that interpersonal touch increased coupling of electrodermal activity between the interacting partners, regardless the intensity and valence of the emotion felt. In addition, physical touch induced strong and reliable changes in physiological states within individuals. These results support an instrumental role of interpersonal touch for affective support in close relationships. Furthermore, they suggest that touch alone allows the emergence of a somatovisceral resonance between interacting individuals, which in turn is likely to form the prerequisites for emotional contagion and empathy.

  2. An approach to non-traditional partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ornela Fabani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the evolution of the political-diplomatic and the economic and trade links between Argentina and the Gulf monarchies, as well as the factors that explain this evolution, during the administrations of Cristina Fernandez (2007-2015. Meanwhile, the premise that informs it is that that during Fernandez's governments the political and diplomatic relations between Argentina and the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar became more dynamic as a result of the Argentine interest in strengthening economic and trade ties with those States. The deepening of these ties is explained in terms of some of the main areas of Argentina's foreign trade policy, which focus on the following: to diversify trade partners, attract investment and increase the volume of trade. Moreover, the aforementioned actors are perceived as potential partners in that the Gulf monarchies need to ensure food security and advance technological cooperation, in a context marked by the international financial crisis.

  3. Designing Comprehensive Partnering Agreements : An Introduction to the Partnering Agreement Scorecard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Pfisterer (Stella); N. Payandeh (Nasim); S. Reid

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAgreements are a key mechanism of partnerships because their role is to govern interactions. They help partnerships become more effective by allowing partners to cope with relational, performance and situational risks that characterise inter-organisational relationships. The Partnerships

  4. Actor and Partner Effects of Adolescents' Romantic Working Models and Styles on Interactions with Romantic Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Wyndol; Simon, Valerie A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined how adolescents' and their romantic partners' romantic working models and relational styles were related to their interactions with each other. Sixty-five couples (M age=18.1 years) were observed interacting. Romantic working models were assessed in interviews about their romantic experiences; romantic styles were…

  5. Violence in childhood, attitudes about partner violence, and partner violence perpetration among men in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yount, K.M.; Huyen, T.P.; Tran, H.M.; Krause, K.H.; Schuler, S.R.; Hoang, T.A.; VanderEnde, K.; Kramer, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We assess the association of men’s exposure to violence in childhood—witnessing physical violence against one’s mother and being hit or beaten by a parent or adult relative—with their attitudes about intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. We explore whether men’s perpetration of IPV

  6. Enlightenment from construction of field practising base on Luofu Mountain%罗浮山野外实践教学基地的建设与启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱霓; 郑芷青

    2012-01-01

    实践教学基地是培养学生创新精神、实践能力和综合素质的重要阵地.20多年来,罗浮山一直是我院地理学专业野外实践教学基地.结合多年野外实践教学的经验,探讨在高等教育大众化阶段基地建设的重要性,提出以规范性、探究性、开放性为原则指导野外实践教学基地建设.实践教学基地建设的重点在于转变实践教学观、创新实践教学模式,以提高实践教学质量,培养高素质创新人才.%The practising base is an important place for training the innovative spirit and practical ability and comprehensive ability of students. Luofu Mountain has been the field practical and teaching base for geography specialty of the School of Geography Sciences for twenty years. This paper discusses the importance to base construction with the experience of field practical teaching in the higher education popularization stage, and puts forward the principles of rule, research and opening direction to construct the field practising base. Changing the idea, creating the mode and improving quality in practical teaching are important in construction of practising base.

  7. Nothing is more important than my partner's health: Turkish men's perspectives on partner's appearance after mastectomy and alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Ayla; Koçan, Sema; Aktuğ, Cemile

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to acquire a deeper understanding of male experiences on the emotional and social impact of their partners' mastectomy and chemotherapy-induced alopecia. A purposive sample of 16 males whose partners had undergone mastectomy and alopecia due to chemotherapy was chosen. The data were collected through a semi-structured interview method. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of tape-recorded interviews was employed. Two main themes emerged from the data: facing the changes and my wife and I at present. Male partners were affected differently by the change in the physical appearance of their female partners. Our study participants said it was a difficult experience to see their partners for the first time after the surgery, but they emphasized that it was more important that their partners were healthy than the fact that they did not have a breast and hair. They also said they did not know how to behave towards their partners after surgery and/or chemotherapy. Nevertheless, they felt that the disease process of their partners had strengthened their bond and had not negatively influenced their relationship with others. The changes in the partners' physical appearance after mastectomy and chemotherapy affected males differently in psychological, emotional and social terms. Since nurses working in this field are in contact with patients during all phases of treatment and care, it would be positive and beneficial to plan nursing interventions that give emotional support for male partners of patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intimate partner violence and maternal educational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Josianne Maria Mattos da; Lima, Marília de Carvalho; Ludermir, Ana Bernarda

    2017-04-10

    The objective of this study is to analyze the association between intimate partner violence against women and maternal educational practice directed to children at the beginning of formal education. This is a cross-sectional study, carried out between 2013 and 2014, with 631 mother/child pairs, registered in the Family Health Strategy of the Health District II of the city of Recife, State of Pernambuco, Brazil. It integrates a prospective cohort study designed to investigate the consequences of exposure to intimate partner violence in relation to the child who was born between 2005 and 2006. The maternal educational practice has been assessed by the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scale and the intimate partner violence by a questionnaire adapted from the Multi-Country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence of the World Health Organization. Intimate partner violence referred to the last 12 months and was defined by specific acts of psychological, physical, and sexual violence inflicted to women by the partner. The crude and adjusted prevalence ratios were estimated for the association studied, using log-binomial regression. The prevalence of intimate partner violence was 24.4%, and violent maternal educational practice was 93.8%. The use of non-violent discipline was mentioned by 97.6% of the women, coexisting with violent strategies of discipline. Children whose mothers reported intimate partner violence presented a higher chance of suffering psychological aggression (PR = 2.2; 95%CI 1.0-4.7). The violence suffered by the mother interferes in the parental education. The findings show high prevalence of violent maternal educational practice, pointing to the need for interventions that minimize the damage of violence in women and children. Analisar a associação entre a violência pelo parceiro íntimo contra a mulher e a prática educativa materna direcionada às crianças no início da escolaridade formal. Estudo transversal, realizado entre 2013 e 2014, com

  9. Preferential partner selection in an evolutionary study of prisoner's dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Ashlock, D; Stanley, E A; Tesfatsion, L; Ashlock, Dan; Smucker, Mark D; Stanley, E Ann; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1994-01-01

    Partner selection is an important process in many social interactions, permitting individuals to decrease the risks associated with cooperation. In large populations, defectors may escape punishment by roving from partner to partner, but defectors in smaller populations risk social isolation. We investigate these possibilities for an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma in which agents use expected payoffs to choose and refuse partners. In comparison to random or round-robin partner matching, we find that the average payoffs attained with preferential partner selection tend to be more narrowly confined to a few isolated payoff regions. Most ecologies evolve to essentially full cooperative behavior, but when agents are intolerant of defections, or when the costs of refusal and social isolation are small, we also see the emergence of wallflower ecologies in which all agents are socially isolated. In between these two extremes, we see the emergence of ecologies whose agents tend to engage in a small number of defecti...

  10. Infrastructure for Personalized Medicine at Partners HealthCare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott T. Weiss

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center within the Partners HealthCare system (founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital whose mission is to utilize genetics and genomics to improve the care of patients in a cost effective manner. PPM consists of five interconnected components: (1 Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM, a CLIA laboratory performing genetic testing for patients world-wide; (2 Translational Genomics Core (TGC, a core laboratory providing genomic platforms for Partners investigators; (3 Partners Biobank, a biobank of samples (DNA, plasma and serum for 50,000 Consented Partners patients; (4 Biobank Portal, an IT infrastructure and viewer to bring together genotypes, samples, phenotypes (validated diagnoses, radiology, and clinical chemistry from the electronic medical record to Partners investigators. These components are united by (5 a common IT system that brings researchers, clinicians, and patients together for optimal research and patient care.

  11. Partner Selection Optimization Model of Agricultural Enterprises in Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feipeng Guo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With more and more importance of correctly selecting partners in supply chain of agricultural enterprises, a large number of partner evaluation techniques are widely used in the field of agricultural science research. This study established a partner selection model to optimize the issue of agricultural supply chain partner selection. Firstly, it constructed a comprehensive evaluation index system after analyzing the real characteristics of agricultural supply chain. Secondly, a heuristic method for attributes reduction based on rough set theory and principal component analysis was proposed which can reduce multiple attributes into some principal components, yet retaining effective evaluation information. Finally, it used improved BP neural network which has self-learning function to select partners. The empirical analysis on an agricultural enterprise shows that this model is effective and feasible for practical partner selection.

  12. Partner Power: A study of two distance education consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Banks Pidduck

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This research reports findings from a study which explored the process and criteria of partner selection – how and why partners are chosen – for two distance education consortia. The researchers reviewed recent literature on partnerships and partner selection. Two Canada-wide distance education consortia were identified as large-scale case studies for investigation of the research theory. A total of 34 informants were contacted. Written business plans, contracts, documents, partner network diagrams, and 231 archival emails from 36 correspondents were collected and analyzed for the two consortia. The research identified four criteria that influence why specific partners are chosen: requirements, resource availability, social network, and reputation. These findings suggest that the formation of partnerships and the process of partner selection are both very complex.

  13. The psychopathic intimate partner batterer: a non-psychopathological profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Pozueco-Romero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical study reviews two of the most cited profiles of intimate partner batterers in the scientific literature, paying special attention to the most notable differences between them, as well as to their common criteria. The study also discusses one of the longest standing controversies in various research studies, including the particular overview with respect to Spain: it being the constant yet erroneous reference to the equivalence of psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder. Similarly, special attention is paid to the implications of considering intimate partner batterers as having either a psychopathological or psychopathic profile, while also stressing the specific role played by psychopathy in the intimate partner batterer and, concerning psychopathic intimate partner batterers, such aspects as their specific motives for perpetrating intimate partner violence and the evaluation instruments of this particular profile. Finally, a series of future directives for research concerning psychopathic intimate partner batterers are also pointed out.

  14. Perpetration and Victimization of Intimate Partner Aggression Among Rural Mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab Reese, Laura M.; Harland, Karisa; Smithart, Kelsey; Ramirez, Marizen

    2015-01-01

    Intimate partner aggression is a leading cause of injury among women of child-bearing age. Research suggests that pregnancy and the postpartum period are times of increased vulnerability to aggression. Since rural women are at an increased risk of intimate partner aggression, research is needed to examine the role of pregnancy and the presence of children on intimate partner aggression among this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between young chil...

  15. Ovulatory shifts in women's attractions to primary partners and other men: further evidence of the importance of primary partner sexual attractiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larson, Christina M; Pillsworth, Elizabeth G; Haselton, Martie G

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has documented shifts in women's attractions to their romantic partner and to men other than their partner across the ovulation cycle, contingent on the degree to which her partner...

  16. High Rate of Partner Treatment Among Chlamydia trachomatis-Infected Pregnant Women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh; Cabeza, Jeanne; Segura, Eddy; García, Patricia J; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    This was a substudy of 60 Chlamydia trachomatis-infected women from a larger study of pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Participants were encouraged to bring their partners in for concurrent patient-partner treatment. The alternative partner treatment was expedited partner therapy. Partner treatment uptake was 91.7%. Twenty-one partners (38.2%) received treatment through concurrent patient-partner treatment, and 34 (61.8%) through expedited partner therapy. Living with the partner was significantly associated with having the partner treated (P=0.0028).

  17. Current evidence on perinatal home visiting and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Phyllis W; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Baty, Marguerite L; Walker, Keisha S; Bair-Merritt, Megan H

    2008-01-01

    To describe current evidence on home visiting interventions for pregnant or postpartum women with specific intimate partner violence assessment and content. Online bibliographic databases including PubMed, CINAHL Plus, and Web of Science and a hand search of bibliographies of relevant articles. Original research and intervention studies were included that contained (a) a well-described prenatal and/or postpartum home visitation; (b) an assessment of perinatal intimate partner violence; and (c) quantitative data describing health outcomes for the women and their infants. The search yielded 128 articles, and 8 relevant articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Nonresearch, nonintervention, and international articles were excluded. No perinatal home visiting interventions were designed to address intimate partner violence. Programs that screened for intimate partner violence found high rates, and the presence of intimate partner violence limited the ability of the intervention to improve maternal and child outcomes. Perinatal home visitation programs likely improve pregnancy and infant outcomes. Home visiting interventions addressing intimate partner violence in nonperinatal population groups have been effective in minimizing intimate partner violence and improving outcomes. This suggests that perinatal home visiting programs adding specific intimate partner violence interventions may reduce intimate partner violence and improve maternal and infant health. Continued rigorous research is needed.

  18. Partner Selection for Interfirm Collaboration: The Context of Ship Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solesvik, Marina Z.; Encheva, Sylvia

    There is a growing body of research devoted to the issues of cooperative design. However, there are still gaps in the existing knowledge on partner selection for cooperation. This paper intends to explore partner selection issues in the context of collaborative ship design. The study aims to fill a gap in the partner selection literature by proposing a quantitative technique based on formal concept analysis. An illustrative example of the selection of a partner for a project-based alliance in a naval architect firm is presented. The study has implications for practitioners and researchers.

  19. Partner change among Norwegian teenage girls attending youth health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egil Skjeldestad, Finn; Nilsen, Stine

    2008-01-01

    To examine incidence and risk factors of partner change among Norwegian teenage girls attending youth health clinics. Prospective cohort study. Setting. Study subjects were 691 girls, aged 16 to 19 years, who participated in a study on prescription of oral contraceptives at three youth health clinics in the city of Trondheim, Norway. Eligible for analysis were participants who were sexually active, and who returned for at least one follow-up visit more than 120 days after study start. All demographic and behavior data were collected through interview by public health nurses. All analyses were performed with SPSS for Windows (version 15.0) using chi-square test, survival analyses and logistic regression. New sexual male partners. Four out of five girls (80%) did not have any new partner during the study period of 12 months. From survival analyses the 12-month incidence rate were 29.8 (95% CI: 25.3-34.1) and 10.6 per 100-women months (95% CI: 7.3-13.9) for one or two or more partners, respectively. Predictors of partner change were partner change during the last six month prior study start, being single and sexual debut within three years after menarche. CONCLUSION. Being in a regular relationship with a boyfriend reduce considerably the risk of having a new sexual partner. Recent history of partner change is the strongest predictor of future partner change.

  20. Uncertainty in Partner Selection for Virtual Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispim, José; de Sousa, Jorge Pinho

    A virtual enterprise (VE) is a temporary organization that pools the core competencies of its member enterprises and exploits fast changing market opportunities. The success of such an organization is strongly dependent on its composition, and the selection of partners becomes therefore a crucial issue. This problem is particularly difficult because of the uncertainties related to information, market dynamics, customer expectations and technology speed up. In this paper we propose an integrated approach to rank alternative VE configurations in business environments with uncertainty, using an extension of the TOPSIS method for fuzzy data, improved through the use of a stochastic multiobjective tabu search meta-heuristic. Preliminary computational results clearly demonstrate the potential of this approach for practical application.

  1. Physical intimate partner violence in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragavan, Maya I; Iyengar, Kirti; Wurtz, Rebecca M

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we examine perceptions about the definition of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) in northern India utilizing feminist perspectives as a framework. We interviewed 56 women and 52 men affiliated with a health services nongovernmental organization in the Udaipur district of Rajasthan. We transcribed, coded, and analyzed the interviews utilizing grounded theory. We found that perceptions regarding physical IPV were associated with both structural and ideological patriarchal beliefs and microlevel constructs such as alcohol use. We discovered multiple types of physical IPV in the study region, including rationalized violence (socially condoned violence perpetrated by a husband against his wife), unjustified violence (socially prohibited violence perpetrated by a husband against his wife), and majboori violence (violence perpetrated by a wife against her husband). Our results add to the breadth of research available about IPV in India and create a framework for future research and IPV prevention initiatives.

  2. Top Partners Searches and Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Wulzer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  3. Top partners searches and composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  4. The clinical studies to developing BV Partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Gi-Rok

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was performed to examine the Herbal Acupuncture decrease the side effect of Bee Venom. Methods: We treated Bee Venom and various Herbal Acupuncture mixed Bee Venom using double blind test to 70th health youth, and checked pain, edema size, CBC, Serum biochemistry and Thermography. Results:1. Herbal Acupuncture made by Morus bombycis Koidzumi showed good results to decrease the side effect of Bee Venom than any other Herbal Acupuncture. 2. We examined CBC, ESR and Serum biochemistry before and after treated. Special change was not showed. 3. We observed the pain and edema after treated Bee Venom and Morus bombycis Koidzumi Herbal Acupuncture mixed Bee Venom. We knew that Morus bombycis Koidzumi Herbal Acupuncture was decrease the pain and edema due to Bee Venom. 4. According to these clinical studies, Morus bombycis Koidzumi Herbal Acupuncture has a possibility to be a good partner of Bee Venom.

  5. New partners of TKS4 scaffold protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropyvko S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available TKS4 scaffold protein is involved in the formation of invadopodia, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by tumor cells and other cellular processes. Aim. To identify new TKS4 partners involved in the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and endo-/exocytosis. Methods. The GST pull-down assay was used to identify the interaction. Results. We revealed that TKS4 SH3 domains interact with the actin cytoskeleton reorganization proteins N-WASP and CR16, as well as with DNM2, SYNJ1 and OPHN1 which are involved in endo-/exocytosis. We also tested the WIP, WIRE, SHIP2, RhoU, RhoV and NUMB proteins, but their interaction with the SH3 domains of TKS4 was not found. Conclusions. The SH3 domains of TKS4 interact with N-WASP, DNM2, SYNJ1, OPHN1 and weakly with CR16 in vitro.

  6. Strategy Guideline. Partnering for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, Duncan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. This guide is intended for use by all parties associated in the design and construction of high performance homes. It serves as a starting point and features initial tools and resources for teams to collaborate to continually improve the energy efficiency and durability of new houses.

  7. Effects of partner violence in migrant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Guadalupe Delgadillo Guzmán

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the relationship between partner violence, depression and maternal self-efficacy in migrant women. It is thought that this type of violence brings about sinking morale and a hindrance for their development as mothers. It is a quantitative study of an explanatory correlational type, worked with 40 immigrant women with a residence of two to 25 years, with at least one reported episode of violation and at least one son in preschool. Three instruments were employed: “The Parental Involvement and Efficacy”, “The Survey-Depression Scale” and“The Revised Conflict Tactic Scale”. The results showed important relationships between the variables, namely, the more violence women suffer, the greater the depression is, and the greater the depression is, the lesser the maternal self-efficacy becomes.

  8. Top partner searches and Composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Panico, Giuliano [Barcelona Univ. Autonoma (Spain). IFAE; Wulyer, Andrea [Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomia; INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  9. With or without you: does partner satisfaction and partner-directed violence influence the presence of a partner on women's Facebook cover profile photographs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Prokop

    Full Text Available Social network sites (SNSs provide new opportunities for online self-presentation of millions of users. The cover profile photograph (CPP along with written information regarding relationship status is a central component of online self-presentation, although their associations with actual romantic relationships are not clear. We investigated relationships between the presence of a current romantic partner on the CPP and the displayed relationship status and partner satisfaction, partner-directed violence and women's intrasexual competition with peers. A total of 28 % of the 158 women with a Facebook profile and being involved in a romantic relationship had their romantic partners on their CPP. As predicted, women with their partners on the CPP were more satisfied with their romantic relationship than others. Furthermore, women who did not have their partner on the CPP tended to conceal or lie in their displayed mating status suggesting that this may be a strategy how to attract another potential mate. The partner-directed violence and intrasexual competition hypotheses were not supported. Overall, the CPP and an honestly displayed relationship status is an expression of relationship satisfaction amongst women.

  10. Virtual conversation partner for adults with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepagnier, Cheryl Y; Olsen, Dale E; Boteler, Laura; Bell, Corinne A

    2011-01-01

    Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is notable for severely impaired reciprocal social interaction skills relative to language and intellectual abilities, presenting a major barrier to social integration and vocational success. Evidence-based interventions to address these needs are lacking. We report on the development of a small, prototype conversation simulation to teach conversational skills to adolescents and adults with ASD and average to superior intellectual abilities. We also report on a test of the feasibility and acceptability of the simulation approach with a sample of the target population. The simulation engages the user in a virtual conversation with an on-screen partner whose reactions provide naturalistic feedback geared to the appropriateness of the learner's response choices. The prototype simulation, which provides for up to 12 potentially unique multi-turn conversations, was used over a period of 2 weeks by 16 adolescents and adults who then rated statements about the system on a linear scale of 1 (disagreement) to 5 (high agreement). The participants highly endorsed the majority of positive statements about the quality and credibility of the interaction and the virtual conversation partner. In contrast, agreement with positive statements about instructional features external to the conversation was moderate. Unexpectedly, most participants strongly agreed that using the simulation had been helpful to them. Further development and testing in the context of a controlled study with randomized assignment to control and experimental groups are needed to determine whether this approach is effective in improving real-world pragmatic language behavior of high-functioning adults with ASD.

  11. Psychosocial adjustment and marital intimacy among partners of patients with breast cancer: a comparison study with partners of healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the psychosocial adjustment of 70 partners of patients with breast cancer by comparing their emotional adjustment and quality of life (QoL) with 70 partners of women without cancer. The role of marital intimacy in their adjustment and the moderating effect of group type were analyzed. The partners of patients with breast cancer presented higher levels of anxious and depressive symptomatology; poor social, psychological, general and physical QoL; and higher levels of intimacy. The moderation analysis showed that higher levels of intimacy predicted lower levels of depression and anxiety and greater QoL only among the partners of cancer patients.

  12. Romantic partners in a market perspective: expectations about what ensures a highly desirable partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe N; Hattori, Wallisen T; Yamamoto, Maria Emília; Lopes, Fívia A

    2013-10-01

    This study used the biological market perspective and influential statistical models from the marketing field to investigate males' and females' expectations regarding which combination of characteristics are most relevant in ensuring desirable partnerships for same-sex individuals. Thus, 358 Brazilian undergraduates assessed eight descriptions of same-gender stimulus targets (formulated with different levels of physical attractiveness, social skills, and current or prospective social status) and evaluated the overall desirability of the targets' expected or probable partners. From the possible combinations, three groups emerged: for one group, mainly composed of men, status characteristics were the most important attributes; for the others, mostly composed of women, social skills or physical characteristics were identified as most important in appealing to a desirable partner. This work expands the understanding of variability in male and female romantic expectations, and its implications are discussed from an evolutionary perspective.

  13. Between rigidity and chaos: worldviews of partners experiencing intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enosh, Guy; Eisikovits, Zvi; Gross, Chen

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this article was to examine the worldviews of cohabiting or married men and women who experienced domestic violence in their relationships. The study was based on content analysis of in-depth interviews with 48 men and women (24 couples), who were living together after experiencing at least one violent event in their relationships over the previous 12 months. Using constructivist grounded theory, the authors examined the deep structure of the ways by which partners living with intimate partner violence constructed their world. The men and women under study constructed heuristic models in two major life domains-psychological processes and how the world works overall. The analysis has revealed two axes resulting in four worldviews. The two axes were the construction of the world and the construction of the mind. Constructions of the mind ranged from chaotic to deterministic. Constructions of external reality ranged from static to fluid and uncontrollable. The theoretical model developed suggested four different types of basic worldviews. The suggested typology was examined in relation to existing typologies in the field of intimate partner violence and in relation to future research and interventions.

  14. Discussing partner abuse: Does doctor's gender really matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, S.H.; Jonge, A. de; Wester, F.P.J.; Mol, S.S.L.; Römkens, R.R.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are conflicting findings on the influence of gender on responding to partner abuse. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore gender differences in family doctors' views, attitudes, experiences and practices regarding intimate partner abuse against women. METHODS: We used the focus-group

  15. Discussing partner abuse : Does doctor's gender really matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo Fo Wong, S.; de Jonge, A.; Wester, F.; Mol, S.; Römkens, R.; Lagro-Janssen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Background. There are conflicting findings on the influence of gender on responding to partner abuse. Objectives. We aimed to explore gender differences in family doctors' views, attitudes, experiences and practices regarding intimate partner abuse against women. Methods. We used the focus-group

  16. 76 FR 68745 - Seneca Power Partners, L.P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ...] Seneca Power Partners, L.P. v. New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Complaint Take... and Procedures, 18 CFR 385.206, Seneca Power Partners, L.P. (Complainant) filed a complaint against... TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on November 28, 2011. Dated: October...

  17. The crossover of burnout and its relation to partner health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Bakker (Arnold)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTwo studies among medical residents and teachers in the Netherlands and Greece tested the hypothesis that burnout may transfer from employees to their intimate partners at home and indirectly influence the partner's health. Study 1 included a general index of self-rated health, whereas,

  18. Female Intimate Partner Violence Survivors' Experiences with Accessing Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Amy L.; Hays, Danica G.; Chang, Catherine Y.

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigates the types of personal and community resources that female intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors used when leaving an abusive male partner. Three African American and 2 European American IPV survivors, ages 24 to 38 years, described positive and negative experiences with social support, personal…

  19. Intimate Partner Violence and Belief Systems in Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary; Devitt, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is endemic in parts of the African continent. A small scale survey (n = 229) was conducted in 2009 in Northern Liberia, West Africa, to determine the prevalence and nature of intimate partner violence, and the cultural beliefs and gender norms that underpin respondent experiences and views towards intimate partner…

  20. Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence in Dating Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, Frank D.; Cui, Ming; Braithwaite, Scott; Pasley, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Prevention of intimate partner violence on college campuses includes programs designed to change attitudes, and hence, a scale that assesses such attitudes is needed. Study 1 (N = 859) cross validates the factor structure of the Intimate Partner Violence Attitude Scale-Revised using exploratory factor analysis and presents initial validity data on…

  1. Trauma Symptoms among Infants Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogat, G. Anne; DeJonghe, Erika; Levendosky, Alytia A.; Davidson, William S.; von Eye, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether infants have a traumatic response to intimate partner violence (male violence toward their female partner; IPV) experienced by their mothers, two questions were explored: (1) Is the number of infant trauma symptoms related to the infant's temperament and the mother's mental health? (2) Does severity of violence…

  2. 76 FR 50715 - Briefing on Partner Vetting System Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Agency for International Development Briefing on Partner Vetting System Pilot Program... briefing. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a briefing on the Partner Vetting System (PVS) pilot program. The objective of the briefing is to provide information about the PVS pilot program. Members of the...

  3. Interaction Design Patterns for ePartners : Method and Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulissen, R.T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cremers, A.H.M.; Kranenborg, K.

    2013-01-01

    An ePartner is a personal computer application that helps its user to achieve personal goals such as managing his or her health related behaviors concerning nutrition, exercise and medication. The aim of the first phase of the ‘ePartners that Care’ project is to achieve a general method and framewor

  4. Betriebliche Bildungsmanager als Business Partner: Professionalisierung und Kompetenzen

    OpenAIRE

    Breßler, Julia; Gehde, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Das Paper ist motiviert durch die Arbeiten von Hasanbegovic, die Bildungsmanagement einbetten in Beratungsforschung und in Managementkonzepte sowie die Arbeit von Diesner, die den Typ 3 Bildungsmanagement als Business Partner einführt. Aufgrund dieser Vorarbeiten analysieren wir betriebliche Bildungsmanager als Business Partner und erarbeiten ein spezifisches Kompetenzprofil. Darauf aufbauend synthetisieren wir die Ergebnisse im Hinblick auf die Professionalisierungstheorie nach Freidson. ...

  5. Parenting and Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Dia, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between parenting and women's use of violence the current study surveyed 106 mothers arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) related crimes on parenting styles and attitudes toward when using violence against their partner is justified. Findings indicate parenting styles indicative of low belief in using physical…

  6. Intimate Partner Violence: Building Resilience with Families and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Thomasine T.

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence includes physical, emotional, or sexual maltreatment from an intimate partner that may include name-calling, hitting, controlling behaviors, use of weapons, rape, intimidation, and a plethora of other physical and emotional tactics (Kress, Protivnak, & Sadlak, 2008; United States Department of Justice, 2013). Such…

  7. Self and partner personality and responses to relationship threats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies examined the relations between three different types of jealousy and personality characteristics of self and partner in two large heterogeneous community samples of heterosexual couples (459 and 230 couples, respectively). It was expected that partners would resemble each other to some e

  8. Associating Pregnancy with Partner Violence against Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ko Ling; Brownridge, Douglas A.; Tiwari, Agnes; Fong, Daniel Y. T.; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ho, Pak Chung

    2011-01-01

    The present study discusses if pregnancy is a risk factor for intimate partner violence using a large, representative sample containing detailed information on partner violence including physical and sexual abuse as well as perpetrator-related risk factors. Data from a representative sample of 2,225 men were analyzed. The self-reported prevalence…

  9. Differences between Partners from Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-01

    Partners from four types of couples without children (gay unmarried, lesbian unmarried, heterosexual unmarried, and heterosexual married, Ns=1,412, 1,310, 1,036, and 1,728, respectively) were compared to partners from heterosexual married couples with children ("N"= 3,116) on mean levels of variables from a model of relationship adjustment as well…

  10. Sex Partner with No Zika Symptoms Transmits Virus: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160643.html Sex Partner With No Zika Symptoms Transmits Virus: CDC New report also highlights ties between Zika ... HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials report that the Zika virus can be spread sexually even when a partner ...

  11. Colorful Twisted Top Partners and Partnerium at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Yevgeny; McCullough, Matthew; Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam; Thaler, Jesse

    2017-06-01

    In scenarios that stabilize the electroweak scale, the top quark is typically accompanied by partner particles. In this work, we demonstrate how extended stabilizing symmetries can yield scalar or fermionic top partners that transform as ordinary color triplets but carry exotic electric charges. We refer to these scenarios as "hypertwisted" since they involve modifications to hypercharge in the top sector. As proofs of principle, we construct two hypertwisted scenarios: a supersymmetric construction with spin-0 top partners, and a composite Higgs construction with spin-1/2 top partners. In both cases, the top partners are still phenomenologically compatible with the mass range motivated by weak-scale naturalness. The phenomenology of hypertwisted scenarios is diverse, since the lifetimes and decay modes of the top partners are model dependent. The novel coupling structure opens up search channels that do not typically arise in top-partner scenarios, such as pair production of top-plus-jet resonances. Furthermore, hypertwisted top partners are typically sufficiently long lived to form "top-partnerium" bound states that decay predominantly via annihilation, motivating searches for rare narrow resonances with diboson decay modes.

  12. Gender Differences in Expectations of Self and Future Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1992-01-01

    Investigated expectations that 131 single female and 103 male college students had for themselves and their future marital partners. Genders did not differ on expectations for personal success but did differ on expectations for success of future marital partner. Women expected more success for future husbands than men expected for wives.…

  13. Examining the Interface Between Substance Misuse and Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Monti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable theoretical and empirical support for a link between substance misuse and perpetration and victimization of intimate partner violence. This review briefly summarizes this literature and highlights current research that addresses the interface between treatment for substance abuse and intimate partner violence. Suggestions for future research and clinical implications are provided.

  14. Interaction Design Patterns for ePartners : Method and Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulissen, R.T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cremers, A.H.M.; Kranenborg, K.

    2013-01-01

    An ePartner is a personal computer application that helps its user to achieve personal goals such as managing his or her health related behaviors concerning nutrition, exercise and medication. The aim of the first phase of the ‘ePartners that Care’ project is to achieve a general method and framewor

  15. Institutional Distance and Partner Selection in International Technological Alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krammer, Marius

    2013-01-01

    This study posits that institutional distance has a negative influence on partner selection in international technological alliances. Empirical results based on a dataset of firms in the global tire industry confirm that firms prefer technological partners from closer cognitive, normative and regula

  16. Partner's stake in conformity and abused wives' psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaris, Alfred; Kaukinen, Catherine

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates the potential buffering effect of help-seeking in the association between intimate partner assault and women's psychological trauma, and how this, in turn, may depend on the partner's stake in conformity. The sample consists of 374 women reporting the experience of domestic violence from a current intimate partner, drawn from the larger survey Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996. Help-seeking did not appear to buffer the impact of assault severity, contrary to expectation. However, the partner's stake in conformity did condition the effect of his or her having been arrested. Victims had higher levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) when police arrested partners of average or below-average stake in conformity. But victims of partners characterized by higher than average stake in conformity did not show elevated PTSD due to their partners having been arrested. On the other hand, PTSD was higher among women experiencing more emotional abuse from the partner.

  17. Care Partner Responses to the Onset of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Roberto, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined characteristics, responses, and psychological well-being of care partners who support and assist older adults recently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Design and Methods: Based on a sample of 106 care partners of community residents diagnosed with MCI at memory clinics, we conducted face-to-face interviews…

  18. Differences between Partners from Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Cohabiting Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-01

    Partners from four types of couples without children (gay unmarried, lesbian unmarried, heterosexual unmarried, and heterosexual married, Ns=1,412, 1,310, 1,036, and 1,728, respectively) were compared to partners from heterosexual married couples with children ("N"= 3,116) on mean levels of variables from a model of relationship adjustment as well…

  19. Partnering with Big Pharma-What Academics Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Stuart A; Nordstedt, Christer

    2016-04-21

    Knowledge of the parameters of drug development can greatly aid academic scientists hoping to partner with pharmaceutical companies. Here, we discuss the three major pillars of drug development-pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity studies-which, in addition to pre-clinical efficacy, are critical for partnering with Big Pharma to produce novel therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gender Differences in Expectations of Self and Future Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1992-01-01

    Investigated expectations that 131 single female and 103 male college students had for themselves and their future marital partners. Genders did not differ on expectations for personal success but did differ on expectations for success of future marital partner. Women expected more success for future husbands than men expected for wives.…

  1. The crossover of burnout and its relation to partner health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Bakker (Arnold)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTwo studies among medical residents and teachers in the Netherlands and Greece tested the hypothesis that burnout may transfer from employees to their intimate partners at home and indirectly influence the partner's health. Study 1 included a general index of self-rated health, whereas,

  2. PARTNER: A Marie Curie Initial Training Network for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    CERN BULLETIN; Nathalie Hospital; Manuela Cirilli

    2011-01-01

    PARTNER is a 4-year Marie Curie Training project funded by the European Commission with 5.6 million Euros aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies are participating in PARTNER, that is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network.

  3. Self and partner personality and responses to relationship threats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies examined the relations between three different types of jealousy and personality characteristics of self and partner in two large heterogeneous community samples of heterosexual couples (459 and 230 couples, respectively). It was expected that partners would resemble each other to some

  4. Alignment of Partnering with Construction IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Papadonikolaki

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Supply Chain Management (SCM and Building Information Modelling (BIM are seen as innovations that can manage complexities in construction by focusing on integrating processes and products respectively. Whereas these two innovations have been considered compatible, their practical combination has been mainly anecdotal. The Netherlands was the locale of this study, where both SCM and BIM have been popular approaches. The research objective is to explore their real-world combination and propose strategies for the alignment of SCM and BIM, by viewing Supply Chain (SC partnering as the inter-organisational proxy of SCM. The main question is: “How to align the SCM philosophy with BIM technologies to achieve integration in the construction industry? What aspects contribute to this alignment?”. The methodology was mixed and both qualitative and quantitative data were analysed. The overarching method was case study research and the unit of analysis was the firm, also referred to as ‘actor’.After a semi-chronological review of the relevant literature, the two constructs of SCM and BIM were found interdependent in product-, process-, and actor-related (P/P/A dimensions. The study consisted of four other consecutive studies. First, empirical insights into the practical implementation of SC partnering and BIM were obtained via the exploration of five cases. Second, a conceptual model for the quantitative analysis of the product-, process-, and actor-related dimensions was designed. Third, this model and mixed methods were applied to two polar (extreme cases to analyse the contractual (typically SC-related, digital (typically BIM-related, and informal interactions among the involved actors. Fourth, an additional theoretical exploration of the BIM-enabled SC partnerships took place with focusing also on intra-organisational relations within the involved firms. After the four studies, the findings were systematically combined to create the theoretical

  5. The impact of partner coping in couples experiencing infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, B D; Pirritano, M; Christensen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    as the unit of analysis. RESULTS: A partner's use of active-avoidance coping was related to the increased personal, marital and social distress for men and women. A woman's use of active-confronting coping was related to increased male marital distress. And a partner's use of meaning-based coping...... is particularly relevant. METHODS: Data were based on a questionnaire in a consecutive sample of 1169 women and 1081 Danish men prior to beginning assisted reproduction treatment. Multilevel modeling using the Actor Partner Interdependence Model and follow-up analysis of variance were used to examine the couple...... was associated with decreased marital distress in men and increased social distress in women. CONCLUSIONS: Although understudied, partner coping patterns play a key role in a partner's ability to cope with the infertility experience. Physicians and mental health providers can help couples to understand...

  6. Intimate partner violence: what do movies have to teach us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenahan, Patricia M

    2009-06-01

    Intimate partner violence is one of the most pervasive global public health problems affecting women. It results in untold costs to the healthcare system and is positively linked to eight out of ten leading indicators for Healthy People 2010. Intimate partner violence also is one of the factors associated with adverse childhood experiences that result in negative healthcare behaviours. Intimate partner violence has been the subject of film, made for television movies and music videos. The use of film as an innovative tool to teach about common health and mental health disorders is well-documented. Film also has been used as an adjunctive therapeutic tool in counselling. This paper will provide an overview of intimate partner violence, its portrayal in popular film and ways in which educators may use film to teach intimate partner violence-related topics.

  7. Telling partners about chlamydia: how acceptable are the new technologies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Rhian M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partner notification is accepted as a vital component in the control of chlamydia. However, in reality, many sexual partners of individuals diagnosed with chlamydia are never informed of their risk. The newer technologies of email and SMS have been used as a means of improving partner notification rates. This study explored the use and acceptability of different partner notification methods to help inform the development of strategies and resources to increase the number of partners notified. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 40 people who were recently diagnosed with chlamydia from three sexual health centres and two general practices across three Australian jurisdictions. Results Most participants chose to contact their partners either in person (56% or by phone (44%. Only 17% chose email or SMS. Participants viewed face-to-face as the "gold standard" in partner notification because it demonstrated caring, respect and courage. Telephone contact, while considered insensitive by some, was often valued because it was quick, convenient and less confronting. Email was often seen as less personal while SMS was generally considered the least acceptable method for telling partners. There was also concern that emails and SMS could be misunderstood, not taken seriously or shown to others. Despite these, email and SMS were seen to be appropriate and useful in some circumstances. Letters, both from the patients or from their doctor, were viewed more favourably but were seldom used. Conclusion These findings suggest that many people diagnosed with chlamydia are reluctant to use the new technologies for partner notification, except in specific circumstances, and our efforts in developing partner notification resources may best be focused on giving patients the skills and confidence for personal interaction.

  8. PARTNER INVOLVEMENT: NEGOTIATING THE PRESENCE OF PARTNERS IN PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AS CONDUCTED BY MIDWIVES AND CHILD AND FAMILY HEALTH NURSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollans, Mellanie; Kohlhoff, Jane; Meade, Tanya; Kemp, Lynn; Schmied, Virginia

    2016-05-01

    Universal screening for maternal depression and assessment of psychosocial risks has been integrated into the routine perinatal care provided in many Australian hospitals, but to date, partners/fathers have been largely excluded from the process. This study explored the ways in which clinicians in health service settings include partners who attend antenatal and postnatal visits with women. Qualitative data were collected using observations (n = 54), interviews (n = 60), and discussion groups (n = 7) with midwives and child and family health nurses who conducted the appointments. Transcripts from observations, interviews, and discussion groups underwent qualitative analysis, and key themes were identified. Results showed partners to have little or no involvement in psychosocial assessment and depression screening. Thematic analysis revealed four key themes: negotiating partner exclusion, partial inclusion, women's business or a couple concern? and they know anyway. Partner involvement appeared to be challenged particularly by mandatory interpersonal violence screening, which, according to health service policy, is to be conducted confidentially. Overall, results highlighted partner involvement in perinatal depression screening and psychosocial assessment processes and identified some of the benefits such as partner disclosure, but also the challenges and complexities of inclusion of partners. Clinical implications and directions for further education and research are discussed. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  9. 26 CFR 1.736-1 - Payments to a retiring partner or a deceased partner's successor in interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... time of his death or retirement of the withdrawing partner's interest in all the assets of the... shall not be considered to have terminated upon the death of the partner but shall terminate as to both... interest in partnership property in an arm's length agreement will be regarded as correct. If...

  10. An Initial Test of Inconsistent Nurturing as Control Theory: How Partners of Drug Abusers Assist Their Partners' Sobriety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Poire, Beth A.; Hallett, Jennifer S.; Erlandson, Karen T.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how inconsistent nurturing as control theory asserts that because of competing goals of nurturing and controlling, partners of drug-dependent individuals will unintentionally encourage the very behavior they are trying to extinguish through inconsistent manifestations of reinforcement and punishment. Finds that partners of substance…

  11. Trajectories of Intimate Partner Violence Victimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Swartout

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purposes of this study were to assess the extent to which latent trajectories of female intimate partner violence (IPV victimization exist; and, if so, use negative childhood experiences to predict trajectory membership.Methods: We collected data from 1,575 women at 5 time-points regarding experiences during adolescence and their 4 years of college. We used latent class growth analysis to fit a series of personcentered, longitudinal models ranging from 1 to 5 trajectories. Once the best-fitting model was selected, we used negative childhood experience variables—sexual abuse, physical abuse, and witnessing domestic violence—to predict most-likely trajectory membership via multinomial logistic regression.Results: A 5-trajectory model best fit the data both statistically and in terms of interpretability. The trajectories across time were interpreted as low or no IPV, low to moderate IPV, moderate to low IPV, high to moderate IPV, and high and increasing IPV, respectively. Negative childhood experiences differentiated trajectory membership, somewhat, with childhood sexual abuse as a consistent predictor of membership in elevated IPV trajectories.Conclusion: Our analyses show how IPV risk changes over time and in different ways. These differential patterns of IPV suggest the need for prevention strategies tailored for women that consider victimization experiences in childhood and early adulthood. [West J Emerg Med. 2012;13(3:272–277.

  12. Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Tracy A; Finley, Erin; Liebschutz, Jane M

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify characteristics that facilitate trust in the patient-provider relationship among survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). DESIGN Semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted to elicit participants' beliefs and attitudes about trust in interactions with health care providers. Using grounded theory methods, the transcripts were analyzed for common themes. A community advisory group, composed of advocates, counselors and IPV survivors, helped interpret themes and interview exerpts. Together, key components of trust were identified. SETTING Eastern Massachusetts. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-seven female survivors of IPV recruited from community-based IPV organizations. MAIN RESULTS Participants' ages ranged from 18 to 56 years, 36% were African American, 32% Hispanic, and 18% white. We identified 5 dimensions of provider behavior that were uniquely important to the development of trust for these IPV survivors: 1) communication about abuse: provider was willing to openly discuss abuse; 2) professional competency: provider asked about abuse when appropriate and was familiar with medical and social histories; 3) practice style: provider was consistently accessible, respected confidentiality, and shared decision making; 4) caring: provider demonstrated personal concern beyond biomedical role through nonjudgmental and compassionate gestures, empowering statements, and persistent, committed behaviors; 5) emotional equality: provider shared personal information and feelings and was perceived by the participant as a friend. CONCLUSIONS These IPV survivors identified dimensions of provider behavior that facilitate trust in their clinical relationship. Strengthening these provider behaviors may increase trust with patients and thus improve disclosure of and referral for IPV. PMID:12911643

  13. Marital dysfunction and personality characteristics of partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draganić-Gajić Saveta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A number of studies indicate that an early trauma is of extreme importance (most often experienced in the family of origin in developing personality disorders. Researches on correlations between family dysfunction and individual psychopathology have been rare and controversial. The reason for this stems from an attempt to establish links between traditional medical models and systemic family therapy. The aim of this research was to explore specific personality structures of married couples and the way they relate to the type of dysfunction within the partner relationship. Material and methods The sample consisted of 25 families in the middle of divorce. The examinees were aged 25-45. Specific interactional behavioral patterns were examined by Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS, while personality profile data were obtained using Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI. Results and conclusions In both groups dependency and obsessivness were marked, while males also presented with marked narcissism. Related to structural personality disorders, we have found only a group of men with significantly increased paranoid dimension. Concerning clinical syndromes, the obtained results revealed anxiety and depressive disorder in both genders and a tendency towards alcohol abuse among men. Results indicated to correlation of communication-interactive family patterns on one hand, and certain personality traits on the other. .

  14. Partners in quality: managing your suppliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B A

    1991-05-01

    Just expecting more from your supplier is not what partnership is about. We have had the experience where the quality improvement and partnership banner has been waved but the tone and spirit of the meeting did not encourage or support a joint quality improvement effort. Benefits will not be achieved until the wall truly begins to come apart and the relationship is built on mutual respect and trust. Data collection and open answers to questions often reveal embarrassing errors and obvious needs for improvements. As stated before, blame and finger-pointing must be replaced with a mutual commitment to asking and answering the question, "How can we improve?" As Dr. W. Edwards Deming has stated, "End the practice of awarding business on the basis of price tag. Instead, minimize total cost. Move toward a single supplier for any one item on a long-term relationship of loyalty and trust." The structured approach of a quality improvement process and the application of quality methods and techniques has proven useful in removing emotion and helping the team focus on the process rather than the people and the issues involved. Quality improvement methods are focused on achieving both customer and supplier goals--customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and operational efficiency and effectiveness. Our experience with Partners in Quality as well as our experience with the quality leadership process supports a recent quote in the Harvard Business Review: "Quality is not just a slogan...(it is) the most profitable way to run a business."

  15. Problem gambling and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Lorne M; Collins, Jane; Dutton, Don; Dhayananthan, Bramilee; Littman-Sharp, Nina; Skinner, Wayne

    2008-03-01

    This study examined the prevalence and severity of intimate partner violence (IPV) among 248 problem gamblers (43 women, 205 men) recruited from newspaper advertisements. The main outcome measures used were the Canadian Problem Gambling Index, the Conflicts Tactics Scale-2, the State Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the drug and alcohol section of the Addiction Severity Index and the substance use section of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV. In this sample, 62.9% of participants reported perpetrating and/or being the victims of IPV in the past year, with 25.4% reporting perpetrating severe IPV. The majority of the sample (64.5%) also had clinically significant anger problems, which was associated with an increased risk of being both the perpetrator and victim of IPV. The presence of a lifetime substance use disorder among participants who had clinically significant anger problems further increased the likelihood of both IPV perpetration and victimization. These findings underscore the importance of routinely screening gambling clients for anger and IPV, and the need to develop public policy, prevention and treatment programs to address IPV among problem gamblers. Future research to examine IPV among problem gamblers is recommended.

  16. 26 CFR 301.6223(h)-1 - Responsibilities of pass-thru partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibilities of pass-thru partner. 301.6223... Responsibilities of pass-thru partner. (a) In general. The pass-thru partner shall, within 30 days of receiving... tax matters partner, or another pass-thru partner, forward a copy of that notice or information to...

  17. Better than nothing? Patient-delivered partner therapy and partner notification for chlamydia: the views of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Francis J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genital chlamydia is the most commonly notified sexually transmissible infection (STI in Australia and worldwide and can have serious reproductive health outcomes. Partner notification, testing and treatment are important facets of chlamydia control. Traditional methods of partner notification are not reaching enough partners to effectively control transmission of chlamydia. Patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT has been shown to improve the treatment of sexual partners. In Australia, General Practitioners (GPs are responsible for the bulk of chlamydia testing, diagnosis, treatment and follow up. This study aimed to determine the views and practices of Australian general practitioners (GPs in relation to partner notification and PDPT for chlamydia and explored GPs' perceptions of their patients' barriers to notifying partners of a chlamydia diagnosis. Methods In-depth, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 40 general practitioners (GPs from rural, regional and urban Australia from November 2006 to March 2007. Topics covered: GPs' current practice and views about partner notification, perceived barriers and useful supports, previous use of and views regarding PDPT. Transcripts were imported into NVivo7 and subjected to thematic analysis. Data saturation was reached after 32 interviews had been completed. Results Perceived barriers to patients telling partners (patient referral included: stigma; age and cultural background; casual or long-term relationship, ongoing relationship or not. Barriers to GPs undertaking partner notification (provider referral included: lack of time and staff; lack of contact details; uncertainty about the legality of contacting partners and whether this constitutes breach of patient confidentiality; and feeling both personally uncomfortable and inadequately trained to contact someone who is not their patient. GPs were divided on the use of PDPT - many felt concerned that it is not

  18. Partner Services in STD Prevention Programs: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogben, Matthew; Collins, Dayne; Hoots, Brooke; O’Connor, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background Partner services have been a mainstay of public health sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention programs for decades. The principal goals are to interrupt transmission and reduce STD morbidity and sequelae. In this paper, we review current literature with the goal of informing STD prevention programs. Methods We searched the literature for systematic reviews. We found nine reviews published between 2005 and 2014 (covering 108 studies). The reviews varied by study inclusion criteria (e.g., study methods, geographic location, infections). We abstracted major conclusions and recommendations from the reviews. Results Conclusions and recommendations were divided into patient referral interventions and provider referral interventions. For patient referral, there was evidence supporting the use of expedited partner therapy and interactive counseling, but not purely didactic instruction. Provider referral through Disease Intervention Specialists was efficacious and particularly well-supported for HIV. For other studies, modeling data and testing outcomes showed that partner notification in general reached high-prevalence populations. Reviews also suggested more focus on using technology and population-level implementation strategies. However, partner services may not be the most efficient means to reach infected persons. Conclusions Partner services programs constitute a large proportion of program STD prevention activities. Value is maximized by balancing a portfolio of patient and provider referral interventions and by blending partner notification interventions with other STD prevention interventions in overall partner services program structure. STD prevention needs program-level research and development to generate this portfolio. PMID:26779688

  19. Heteronormativity and sexual partnering among bisexual Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Garcia, Jonathan; Wilson, Patrick A; Parker, Richard G; Severson, Nicolette

    2015-05-01

    Our analyses address the question of how bisexual Latino men organize their sexual partnerships. Heteronormativity can be understood as the set of social norms and normative structures that guide sexual partnering among men and women. We provide descriptive statistics to describe bisexual Latino men's sexual partnerships. Logistic and linear regression modeling were used to explore bivariate and multivariate relationships. Of our total sample (N = 142), 41.6 % had unprotected vaginal intercourse 2 months prior to the interview; 21.8 % had unprotected anal intercourse with female partners; 37.5 % had unprotected insertive anal intercourse with male partners; and 22.5 % had unprotected receptive anal intercourse with male partners. In our multivariate model, machismo was directly associated with meeting female partners through formal spaces (workplace, school, and/or church), but inversely associated with meeting male partners in formal spaces. Machismo was positively associated with meeting male sex partners through social networks (i.e., friendship and kinship networks). The more comfortable men were with homosexuality the less likely they were to meet men online and the more likely they were to meet men through social networks of friends and kinship. Interventions to reduce sexually transmitted diseases that target bisexual behavior as an epidemiological "bridge" of transmission from homosexual to heterosexual networks might very well benefit from a more complex understanding of how Latino bisexuality is patterned. Thus, this exploratory analysis might lead to a rethinking of how to address risk and vulnerability among Latino bisexual men and their sexual networks.

  20. The moderating role of partner support among smokers and abstainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the moderating effect of partner support in the relationship between psychological morbidity and quality of life among smokers and abstainers. Methods: This observational cross-sectional study assessed “partner support”, “psychological morbidity” (depression, anxiety and stress and “quality of life” in a convenience sample of 224 smokers and 169 abstainers through questionnaires that were validated and analyzed using regression and simple slopes. Results: Partner support (positive and negative among smokers appeared as a moderator in the relationship between psychological morbidity and physical quality of life. As for mental quality of life, the partner support did not have a moderating effect. The results among abstainers are similar to those found among smokers. When positive partner support is strong, there is an opposite relationship between psychological morbidity and quality of life. However, this relationship is stronger when negative partner support is strong and, in this case, the relationship between psychological morbidity and quality of life is negative. Conclusion: Partner support, whether positive or negative, was an important moderator concerning quality of life and psychological morbidity of smokers and abstainers. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p349

  1. Women's experience of intimate partner violence in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Anastasia J

    2005-07-01

    This study examined individual, partner, and community characteristics associated with the occurrence of intimate partner violence among ever-married women of reproductive age, using data from the 2000 Haiti Demographic and Health Survey. Separate logistic regressions were analyzed to assess women's risks of experiencing emotional, physical and sexual violence and multiple forms of intimate partner violence in the past 12 months. Twenty-nine percent of women in the sample experienced some form of intimate partner violence in the past 12 months, with 13 percent having experienced at least two different forms of violence. Significant positive associations with all forms of violence were found for lack of completion of primary school, history of violence exposure in women's families of origin either through witnessing violence between parents while growing up or direct experience of physical violence perpetrated by family members, partner's jealousy, partner's need for control, partner's history of drunkenness, and female-dominated financial decision-making. Significant positive associations were found between men's physical abuse of children at the community level and women's risk of experiencing emotional and physical violence. Neighborhood poverty and male unemployment, number of children living at home, women's attitudinal acceptance of wife beating, and male-dominated financial decision-making were additional risk factors for sexual violence. Women's economic independence was a protective factor for emotional and physical violence, while relationship quality was protective for all forms of violence and multiple victimizations.

  2. Intimate partner violence and breastfeeding in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Emily S; Yount, Kathryn M

    2014-04-01

    We examined the associations of maternal intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization with early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding in eight African countries. For mothers 15-49 years with an infant aged less than 6 months from national Demographic and Health Surveys since 2007 for Ghana (n = 173), Kenya (n = 449), Liberia (n = 313), Malawi (n = 397), Nigeria (n = 2007), Tanzania (n = 549), Zambia (n = 454), and Zimbabwe (n = 480), logistic regression was used to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted associations of lifetime maternal emotional, physical, and sexual IPV victimization with early initiation (less than 1 hour of birth) and exclusive breastfeeding in the prior 24 hours. Maternal lifetime IPV victimization often was adversely associated with optimal breastfeeding practices. Physical IPV in Zimbabwe (aOR 0.40, p = 0.002), sexual IPV in Zambia (aOR 0.42, p = 0.017), and emotional IPV in Kenya (aOR 0.54, p = 0.050) and Tanzania (aOR 0.57, p = 0.088) were associated with lower adjusted odds of early initiation. Sexual IPV in Liberia (aOR 0.09, p = 0.026), Ghana (aOR 0.17, p = 0.033), and Kenya (aOR 0.34, p = 0.085) were associated with lower adjusted odds of exclusive breastfeeding. Atypically, physical IPV in Tanzania (aOR 2.11, p = 0.042) and sexual IPV in Zambia (aOR 2.49, p = 0.025) were associated with higher adjusted odds of early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding, respectively. Across several settings, maternal IPV victimization may adversely influence breastfeeding practices. Longitudinal research of these relationships is warranted. Screening for IPV victimization and breastfeeding counseling in prenatal and postpartum care may mitigate the potential intergenerational effects of IPV.

  3. Understanding intimate partner violence and its correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikumar Ramadugu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study assessed intimate partner violence (IPV and alcohol use in an urban population in Pune, India. The prevalence of IPV and alcohol use was assessed along with the correlation of IPV with alcohol and other variables. Materials and Methods: The study was cross-sectional, questionnaire-based. The materials used were the hurt insult threaten scream (HITS scale, the alcohol use disorders identification test, and a brief psychosocial questionnaire. Systematic random sampling was done on the target population. Regression analysis of various factors in relation to HITS score was done. Results: Sample size (n was 318 individuals. Prevalence of IPV was found to be 16% and the victims were mostly women. Prevalence of alcohol use was 44%, of which 8.9% were harmful users. No female subjects consumed alcohol, but 94% were aware of their husband's alcohol consumption. No significant correlation was found between IPV and education (P = 0.220 or income of women (P = 0.250. Alcohol consumption by males was a significant risk factor for women experiencing IPV (σ = +0.524; P< 0.001. Regression analysis also revealed that increasing marital age (P = 0.019 and financial support from in-laws (P = 0.040 were significantly protective. Conclusion: IPV prevalence was less than the national average for India, but the majority of victims was women. The most common type of IPV was verbal. Alcohol use prevalence was higher than the national average, but harmful use was lower. Alcohol use is a significant risk factor for IPV. Education and income of women were not significantly protective against IPV but increased age at marriage and support from in-laws were.

  4. Intimate partner violence and housing instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavao, Joanne; Alvarez, Jennifer; Baumrind, Nikki; Induni, Marta; Kimerling, Rachel

    2007-02-01

    The mental and physical health consequences of intimate partner violence (IPV) have been well established, yet little is known about the impact of violence on a woman's ability to obtain and maintain housing. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between recent IPV and housing instability among a representative sample of California women. It is expected that women who have experienced IPV will be at increased risk for housing instability as evidenced by: (1) late rent or mortgage, (2) frequent moves because of difficulty obtaining affordable housing, and/or (3) without their own housing. Data were taken from the 2003 California Women's Health Survey, a population-based, random-digit-dial, annual probability survey of adult California women (N=3619). Logistic regressions were used to predict housing instability in the past 12 months, adjusting for the following covariates; age, race/ethnicity, education, poverty status, marital status, children in the household, and past year IPV. In the multivariate model, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, poverty, and IPV were significant predictors of housing instability. After adjusting for all covariates, women who experienced IPV in the last year had almost four times the odds of reporting housing instability than women who did not experience IPV (adjusted odds ratio=3.98, 95% confidence interval: 2.94-5.39). This study found that IPV was associated with housing instability among California women. Future prospective studies are needed to learn more about the nature and direction of the relationship between IPV and housing instability and the possible associated negative health consequences.

  5. [Health status and intimate partner violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Rey, Lourdes; Otero-García, Laura

    2014-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Spain in the last year and at some point during the lifetime, to determine health status in women according to whether they had experienced IPV or not, and to analyze the individual variables associated with IPV in Spain. A cross-sectional study was performed of the database, Macrosurvey on Gender Violence in Spain 2011. This database includes data on 7,898 women older than 18 years old. The dependent variables were IPV-last year, IPV-ever in life. Covariates consisted of sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, maternal experience of IPV, social support, and self-care. The measure of association used was the OR with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI). A total of 3.6% of women had experienced IPV-last year and 12.2% ever in life. Female victims of IPV had poorer health than women who had not experienced IPV. Immigrant women living in Spain for 6 years or more were more likely to experience IPV-ever in life than Spanish women [OR (95% CI): 1.95 (1.50, 2.53)]. An interaction was found between nationality and the existence of children under 18 years old. Among women with children under 18 years old, immigrant women were more likely to experience IPV-last year than Spanish women [OR (95% CI): 1.99 (1.25, 3.17)]. Other variables associated with IPV were age, low socioeconomic status, low social support and having a mother who had experienced IPV. In Spain, some women have a higher probability of experiencing IPV. The variables associated with greater vulnerability to IPV should be taken into account when implementing measures to prevent or alleviate IPV. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Partner Selection for Strategic Alliance in Networked Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYou-ping; YINYong; ZHOUZu-de

    2004-01-01

    Networked Manufacturing is the trend evolution for manufacture enterprise to gain core competence in the networked economy environment. In this paper, the definition of the strategic alliance is introduced and its life cycle is described. As the selection of suitable partners is of vital importance to the success for strategic alliance in Networked Manufacturing environment, also in this paper, the definition, criteria and process for partner selection are introduced. Then the fuzzy-AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) method, as a fuzzy extension of analytic hierarchical approach for partner selection, is given. In the end, a case study is provided.

  7. Partners selection of VE based on the organizational field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chang-yu; SHOU Jian-min

    2007-01-01

    VE organizational field is a management meaning field formed by the mutual action of resources element. It studies leader and partners in VE as a system, and founds the affiliation among them by the relation of resources. It describes candidate partner enterprise's inner trait and exterior trait by quality parameter and exterior parameter, then analyzes and evaluates them. It combines the qualitative variable and quantitative variable to evaluate the candidate enterprises. It integrates static and dynamic method to help the VE leader to choose partner, which is good for the whole alliance.

  8. College students' perceptions of intimate partner cyber harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Lisa A

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about cyber harassment in general, and in order to understand more about online harassment among intimate partners, it is important to examine people's perceptions of this new form of aggression. Using Johnson's typology of relationship violence as a guiding framework, the role of technology in partner violence was explored using data from five focus group interviews. Six themes emerged from the analyses, four of which revealed that this partner violence typology accounted for the aggressive use of technology in dating relationships. The remaining themes centered on the ways in which online harassment differs from offline violence. These findings have important theoretical implications and may inform future prevention and intervention efforts.

  9. What were they thinking? Men who murder an intimate partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobash, R Emerson; Dobash, Russell P

    2011-01-01

    The focus is on cognitions of men who murder an intimate partner and includes thinking prior to and after the murder. Based on the Murder in Britain Study, the qualitative accounts of various professionals included in the case-files of 104 men convicted of murdering a woman partner are used to examine beliefs about intimate relationships, orientations toward violence and previous violence to the victim, as well as subsequent denials, rationalizations, and justifications. We conclude that these and other cognitions are important elements of intimate partner murder and must be challenged and changed in efforts to eliminate nonlethal abuse and murder.

  10. Spinal-Cord-Injured Individual's Experiences of Having a Partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Having a partner is a strong factor in adaptation to the new life situation with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Still, more knowledge in detail about the partner's influences according to the experiences of individuals with SCI could contribute to the understanding of the situation after an injury...... and allowed SCI individuals the ability to self-realize. This promoted feelings of profound gratitude but also dependency. Thus, the SCI individual benefitted from the partner's support mentally and physically, which enabled a life that would not otherwise be possible....

  11. Intimate partner violence among rural South African men: alcohol use, sexual decision-making, and partner communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Abigail M; Colvin, Christopher J; Ndlovu, Nkuli; Dworkin, Shari L

    2014-01-01

    Nearly one-third of South African men report enacting intimate partner violence. Beyond the direct health consequences for women, intimate partner violence is also linked to varied risk behaviours among men who enact it, including alcohol abuse, risky sex, and poor healthcare uptake. Little is known about how to reduce violence perpetration among men. We conducted retrospective, in-depth interviews with men (n = 53) who participated in a rural South African programme that targeted masculinities, HIV risk, and intimate partner violence. We conducted computer-assisted thematic qualitative coding alongside a simple rubric to understand how the programme may lead to changes in men's use of intimate partner violence. Many men described new patterns of reduced alcohol intake and improved partner communication, allowing them to respond in ways that did not lead to the escalation of violence. Sexual decision-making changed via reduced sexual entitlement and increased mutuality about whether to have sex. Men articulated the intertwined nature of each of these topics, suggesting that a syndemic lens may be useful for understanding intimate partner violence. These data suggest that alcohol and sexual relationship skills may be useful levers for future violence prevention efforts, and that intimate partner violence may be a tractable issue as men learn new skills for enacting masculinities in their household and in intimate relationships.

  12. Urban adolescent girls' perspectives on multiple partners in the context of the sexual double standard and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelman, Anne M; Tennille, Julie; Bohinski, Julia; Jemmott, Loretta S; Jemmott, John B

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the influence of abusive and nonabusive relationship dynamics on the number of sex partners among urban adolescent girls. Focus groups were conducted with 64 sexually active adolescent girls ages 14 to 17 years. General coding and content analyses identified patterns, themes, and salient beliefs. More than one third (37.5%) reported having experienced physical, intimate partner violence; 32.8% had two or more recent sex partners, and 37.5% had ever had a sexually transmitted infection (STI) or HIV. Although some girls in abusive relationships feared retribution if they had more than one partner, others sought additional partners for solace or as an act of resistance. Adolescent HIV/STI prevention programs need to address the influence of gender norms such as the sexual double standard, as well as partner pressure and partner abuse on adolescent decision-making about safer sex, and also promote healthy relationships as integral to advancing HIV/STI risk reduction. Copyright © 2013 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to investigate associations between ejaculatory latency and control in partnered and non-partnered sexual activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jern, Patrick; Gunst, Annika; Sandqvist, Felicia; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Santtila, Pekka

    2011-07-01

    Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) was used to investigate associations between, and variations in, ejaculatory control and ejaculation latency time (ELT) over repeated measurements of sexual activities. Differences between measures recorded in partnered or non-partnered settings were also investigated. The sample consisted of 21 male Finns aged 18 years or above, contributing a total of 158 reports of partnered and non-partnered sexual activities over a six-week period. In the context of non-partnered sexual activities, after controlling for within-subjects dependence, ELTs between events were predictive of one another, but ELT did not predict ejaculatory control when measured simultaneously, nor at subsequent events. Also, ejaculatory control could not predict simultaneously measured ELT or ejaculatory control at subsequent events. During partnered sexual activities, both ejaculatory control and ELT could be accurately predicted by observing ejaculatory control at prior events. In this context, ejaculatory control could also reliably predict simultaneously measured ELT. ELT or ejaculatory control during partnered sexual activity could not be predicted by observing ELT at prior events. Between-event correlations were generally low, indicating considerable variation in ejaculatory functioning over time. EMA is a thrifty assessment method for studying variations in ejaculatory function, and is likely suitable for studying sexual dysfunctions in general.

  14. Effects of potential partners' physical attractiveness and socioeconomic status on sexuality and partner selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J M; Levy, G D

    1990-04-01

    Male (n = 170) and female (n = 212) college students viewed photographs, which had been prerated for physical attractiveness, of three opposite-sex individuals. These photographs were paired with three levels of occupational status and income. Subjects indicated their willingness to engage in relationships of varying levels of sexual intimacy and marital potential with the portrayed individuals. Analyses of variance, correlations, and trend analyses supported the hypotheses. Compared to men, women are more likely to prefer or insist that sexual intercourse occur in relationships that involve affection and marital potential, and women place more emphasis than men do on partners' SES in such relationships. Consequently, men's SES and their willingness and ability to invest affection and resources in relationships may often outweigh the effects of their physical attractiveness in women's actual selection of partners. These results and the literature reviewed are more consistent with parental investment theory than with the view that these sex differences are solely the result of differential access to resources and differential socialization.

  15. Knowledge, Perception and Level of Male Partner Involvement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Choice of Delivery Site among Couples at Coast Level Five Hospital,. Mombasa County .... conditions of sexual relations, family size and whether their .... Meaning, awareness and importance of male partner involvement. (N=207). Women.

  16. When Loved One Has Breast Cancer, Partner Suffers, Too

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care professionals need to do a better job reaching out to partners early on and identifying ... to help them cope," added Markham, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Florida. "When ...

  17. Isovector and hidden-beauty partners of the X(3872)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Høgaasen, Hallstein, E-mail: hallstein.hogasen@fys.uio.no [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Box 1048, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Kou, Emi, E-mail: kou@lal.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Université Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Richard, Jean-Marc, E-mail: j-m.richard@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, UCBL–IN2P3-CNRS, 4, rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sorba, Paul, E-mail: paul.sorba@lapth.cnrs.fr [LAPTh, Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Théorique, CNRS, Université de Savoie, BP 110, 74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France)

    2014-05-01

    The isovector partners of the X(3872), recently found at BES III, Belle and CLEO-c were predicted in a simple model based on the chromomagnetic interaction among quarks. The extension to the hidden-beauty sector is discussed.

  18. Parents as partners: building collaborations to support the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents as partners: building collaborations to support the development of school ... South African Journal of Education ... children to develop the abilities underlying vital school-readiness skills during whole-class, therapeutic group sessions.

  19. PARTNER project: Trained to battle cancer with particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The four CERN students participating in the PARTNER project. From left to right: Daniel Abler (Germany), Faustin Laurentiu Roman (Romania), Vassiliki Kanellopoulos (Greece/Germany) and Till Tobias Boehlen (Germany).

  20. Sexual partners and condom use of migrant workers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kathleen; Chamrathrithirong, Aphichat

    2007-11-01

    The objectives of this paper were to identify the types of sexual partners and condom use of migrant workers. Data for the study were drawn from a survey of 3,426 migrant workers in southern coastal and northern areas of Thailand conducted in 2004. Among sexually active men, 25% reported visiting a sex worker, 57% reported a regular partner, and 6% reported another non-regular partner in the last year. Reported condom use was high with sex workers (79% reported always use), but low with regular partners (4% ever use). Factors related to visiting sex workers included marital status (more visits if not married), longer residence in Thailand, occupation of seafarer or seafood production worker, Cambodian origin, and perceived AIDS risk. Condom use with sex workers was higher for younger men, married men, men who had been in Thailand longer, men with lower perceived AIDS risk, and men who drank alcohol less frequently.

  1. Residence in Switzerland of partners of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    1. Definitions a) CERN Staff Rules and Regulations Article S IV 1.02 of the Staff Rules defines a "partner", irrespective of gender, as "any person linked to an employed member of the personnel by a partnership officially registered in a Member State". Partners are regarded as family members for the purposes of protection against the financial consequences of illness and accidents. b) Swiss Federal Law Under Swiss federal law, to which the text below essentially refers, the following definitions apply: "partners": a couple of the same sex (linked by a registered partnership), "common-law spouses": a couple of the opposite sex (unmarried). Provided that they are aged 18 or more and are not blood relatives, two people of the same sex ("partners") may officially register their partnership with the competent registry office in order to give it a legal framework (a civil partnership commonly known as the Federal PACS...

  2. The Process of Partnering; Gluing Contracts, Organising and Financing together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian; Gottlieb, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses management of partnering projects where construction companies and clients cooperate in developing buildings and services. Taking a practice based theory and political process approach, partnering is seen as an example of a complex project operation, characterised by processual...... interactions between an emergent conceptual frame and the project's operational activities. Drawing on two case studies, it is analyzed how the governance frame of partnering projects is constituted by a combination of partnering elements, traditional contracts and financial arrangements. On the operational...... level these elements is continuously mobilized, negotiated and stabilized in their intersection with the practices and skill basis for the project. It is thus shown how incentives becomes especially problematic for the architects due to tensions between new and old contractual forms, and that project...

  3. socio-economic status and preferences in marriage partner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Engr E. Egbochukwu

    evolve preferences for males who had good financial prospects, were older than themselves, had ... of love and sex find that women value more than men, marriage partners who possess status ..... Marriage Choices and Social Reproduction:.

  4. Public-Private Partnerships: NASA as Your Business Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Partnerships is an important part of doing business at NASA. NASA partners with external organizations to access capabilities under collaborative agreements; enters into agreements for partner access to NASA capabilities; expand overall landscape of space activity; and spurring innovation. The U.S. national policy on commercial space is to develop a robust and competitive U.S. commercial space sector and to energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets. Commercial space must be competitive, while the government has other priorities such as safety, jobs, etc. NASA partnerships consist of Reimbursable and Non-Reimbursable Space Act Agreements. Partnerships at Ames aligns with Ames' core competencies, and Partners often office in the NASA Research Park, which is an established regional innovation cluster that facilitates commercialization and services as a technology accelerator via onsite collaborations between NASA and its partners.

  5. Pamplin College of Business partners with CFA Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business has been named a CFA Program Partner of CFA Institute, the global, non-profit professional association that administers the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) curriculum and examination program.

  6. Particle swarm optimization algorithm for partner selection in virtual enterprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Zhao; Xinhui Zhang; Renbin Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Partner selection is a fundamental problem in the formation and success of a virtual enterprise. The partner selection problem with precedence and due date constraint is the basis of the various extensions and is studied in this paper. A nonlinear integer program model for the partner selection problem is established. The problem is shown to be NP-complete by reduction to the knapsack problem, and therefore no polynomial time algorithm exists. To solve it efficiently, a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is adopted, and several mechanisms that include initialization expansion mechanism, variance mechanism and local searching mechanism have been developed to improve the performance of the proposed PSO algorithm. A set of experiments have been conducted using real examples and numerical simulation, and have shown that the PSO algorithm is an effective and efficient way to solve the partner selection problems with precedence and due date constraints.

  7. Trust and partner-enhancing attributions in close relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul J E; Rempel, John K

    2004-06-01

    A cross-lagged panel design was used to examine the links between trust and attributional processes in a sample of 75 married couples throughout a period of 2 years. During the first phase of the study, participants completed a measure of marital trust, engaged in a laboratory problem-solving discussion of a recurrent conflict-related issue, and then rated their partner's behavior and motives. Approximately 2 years later, 54 couples were again contacted and measures of trust were obtained. Forty of these couples also viewed a videotape of their laboratory problem-solving discussion from 2 years previously and rated their partner's behavior and motives. Results suggested a reciprocal causal pattern by which partner-enhancing attributions predict changes in trust and trust predicts changes in partner-enhancing attributions.

  8. The neural correlates of intimate partner violence in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Psychiatry • September 2011. 310. Introduction ... volume in women with IPV and PTSD compared to women with. The neural correlates of intimate ..... intimate partner violence-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychiatry ...

  9. Servitization in China via an External Service Partner Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Jawwad; Frandsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has predominately focused on the servitization strategies of Western manufacturers in advanced economies, neglecting the potential in those which are emerging, such as China. This paper explores the role of the external service partner network of a European manufacturer providing...... services in China in order to develop a better understanding of the challenges. An in-depth multiple case study approach was taken to examine the parent company, its subsidiary in China and the related service partner network. Data collection involved all three actors and took place in Denmark and China....... The findings suggest that motivation, opportunity and ability (MOA) need not only be mutually reinforcing for the organization attempting to move towards services but also congruent within the external service partner network. Furthermore, the findings suggest that an external service partner may not be able...

  10. China's Investments in Malaysia: Choosing the "Right" Partners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guanie Lim

    2015-01-01

      This paper examines China's outward foreign direct investment into Malaysia by analysing the major coalition partners of mainland Chinese firms that have invested into the country, a relatively underexplored topic...

  11. The Extended Role of the Communication Partner in AAC interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilesjö, Maja Sigurd

    , apart from being the ordinary communication partner, he also does other things as, for instance, ’voicing’ (Sigurd Pilesjö, 2012) the utterance of the individual with severe speech and physical impairment (SSPI). This knowledge is important in the training of communication partners.AimBased on micro...... understanding.Extracts from everyday interaction as they occured naturally will be shown and analyzed. Due to cerebral palsy, the two children both have a severe speech and physical impairment. In addition, the girl has a moderate intellectual disability. In the interaction with the boy, he uses a lightpointer...... by the speaking communication partner. The speaking communication partner also ascribes that the pointings go together, elaborates the pointed-at linguistic elements into correct Swedish and adds prosody.Thus, the social surroundings adapt to the challenges caused by the impairment and shape an individual...

  12. Preparing Scientists to be Community Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Many students, especially students from historically under-represented communities, leave science majors or avoid choosing them because scientific careers do not offer enough opportunity to contribute to their communities. Citizen science, or public participation in scientific research, may address these challenges. At its most collaborative, it means inviting communities to partner in every step of the scientific process from defining the research question to applying the results to community priorities. In addition to attracting and retaining students, this level of community engagement will help diversify science, ensure the use and usability of our science, help buttress public support of science, and encourage the application of scientific results to policy. It also offers opportunities to tackle scientific questions that can't be accomplished in other way and it is demonstrably effective at helping people learn scientific concepts and methods. In order to learn how to prepare scientists for this kind of intensive community collaboration, we examined several case studies, including a project on disease and public health in Africa and the professionally evaluated experience of two summer interns in Southern Louisiana. In these and other cases, we learned that scientific expertise in a discipline has to be accompanied by a reservoir of humility and respect for other ways of knowing, the ability to work collaboratively with a broad range of disciplines and people, patience and enough career stability to allow that patience, and a willingness to adapt research to a broader set of scientific and non-scientific priorities. To help students achieve this, we found that direct instruction in participatory methods, mentoring by community members and scientists with participatory experience, in-depth training on scientific ethics and communication, explicit articulation of the goal of working with communities, and ample opportunity for personal reflection were essential

  13. Communication Partner Training in Aphasia: An Updated Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Raymer, Anastasia; Cherney, Leora R

    2016-12-01

    To update a previous systematic review describing the effect of communication partner training on individuals with aphasia and their communication partners, with clinical questions addressing effects of partner training on language, communication activity/participation, psychosocial adjustment, and quality of life. Twelve electronic databases were searched using 23 search terms. References from relevant articles were hand searched. Three reviewers independently reviewed abstracts, excluding those that failed to meet inclusion criteria. Thirty-two full text articles were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. Articles not meeting inclusion criteria were eliminated, resulting in a corpus of 25 articles for full review. For the 25 articles, 1 reviewer extracted descriptive data regarding participants, intervention, outcome measures, and results. A second reviewer verified the accuracy of the extracted data. The 3-member review team classified studies using the American Academy of Neurology levels of evidence. Two independent reviewers evaluated each article using design-specific tools to assess research quality. All 25 of the current review articles reported positive changes from partner training. Therefore, to date, 56 studies across 2 systematic reviews have reported positive outcomes from communication partner training in aphasia. The results of the current review are consistent with the previous review and necessitate no change to the earlier recommendations, suggesting that communication partner training should be conducted to improve partner skill in facilitating the communication of people with chronic aphasia. Additional high-quality research is needed to strengthen the original 2010 recommendations and expand recommendations to individuals with acute aphasia. High-quality clinical trials are also needed to demonstrate implementation of communication partner training in complex environments (eg, health care). Copyright © 2016 American Congress of

  14. Using Smartphone Apps in STD Interviews to Find Sexual Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennise, Melissa; Herpin, Kate; Owens, John; Bedard, Brenden A.; Weimer, Anita C.; Kennedy, Byron S.; Younge, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Smartphone applications (apps) are increasingly used to facilitate casual sexual relationships, increasing the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). In STD investigations, traditional contact elicitation methods can be enhanced with smartphone technology during field interviews. Methods In 2013, the Monroe County Department of Public Health conducted a large, multi-infection STD investigation among men who have sex with men (MSM) using both index case and cluster interviews. When patients indicated meeting sexual partners online, disease intervention specialists (DISs) had access to smartphone apps and were able to elicit partners through access to inboxes and profiles where traditional contact information was lacking. Social network mapping was used to display the extent of the investigation and the impact of access to smartphones on the investigation. Results A total of 14 index patient interviews and two cluster interviews were conducted; 97 individuals were identified among 117 sexual dyads. On average, eight partners were elicited per interview (range: 1–31). The seven individuals who used apps to find partners had an average of three Internet partners (range: 1–5). Thirty-six individuals either had a new STD (n=7) or were previously known to be HIV-positive (n=29). Of the 117 sexual dyads, 21 (18%) originated either online (n=8) or with a smartphone app (n=13). Of those originating online or with a smartphone app, six (29%) partners were located using the smartphone and two (10%) were notified of their exposure via a website. Three of the new STD/HIV cases were among partners who met online. Conclusion Smartphone technology used by DISs in the field improved contact elicitation and resulted in successful partner notification and case finding. PMID:25931628

  15. Social partners slam government plans to counter crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Grünell, M.

    2009-01-01

    The social partners have criticized the plans put forward by the Dutch government to ease the impact of the economic crisis. Trade unions are against the plans to keep older employees working for longer and to raise the retirement age. Employers, meanwhile, have argued against the scrapping of the mortgage interest rate deduction. All of the social partners are calling on the government to react more decisively to the economic crisis, as it did in the autumn of 2008.

  16. PARTNERING WITH PRACTICE FOR ACCOUNTING EDUCATION: EVIDENCE FROM THE PACIFIC

    OpenAIRE

    Shiro Shivani Devi; Rashika Saroshma Kumar; Sherlin Krishna Raju

    2012-01-01

    The Partnering with Practice (PWP) approach to teaching accounting is a relatively new and an underresearched phenomenon. This approach requires partners from chartered accounting (CA) firms to work in collaboration with academics in the delivery of accounting courses or a designated module in a course at tertiary institutions. This paper seeks to discuss the viability of the PWP approach to teaching accounting in the School of Accounting and Finance (SOAF) at the University of the South Paci...

  17. Civil Conflict, Sex Ratio and Intimate Partner Violence in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Giulia La Mattina

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the long-term impact of civil conflict on intimate partner violence and women’s decision-making power using post-genocide data from Rwanda. Household survey data collected 11 years after the genocide indicate that women who became married after the genocide experienced significantly increased intimate partner violence and decreased decision-making power relative to women who became married before. The effect was greater for women in localities with high genocide intensity....

  18. Consistency and Inconsistency Among Romantic Partners Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwick, Paul W; Harden, K Paige; Shukusky, Jennifer A; Morgan, Taylor Anne; Joel, Samantha

    2017-03-02

    Theoretical perspectives on mating differentially emphasize whether (and why) romantic partner selection and maintenance processes derive from stable features of individuals (e.g., mate value, mate preferences, relationship aptitude) and their environments (e.g., social homogamy) rather than adventitious, dyad-specific, or unpredictable factors. The current article advances our understanding of this issue by assessing how people's actual romantic partners vary on constructs commonly assessed in evolutionary psychology (Study 1), sociology (Study 2), and close relationships (Study 3). Specifically, we calculated the extent to which the past and present partners of a focal person (i.e., the person who dated all of the partners) cluster on various measures. Study 1 investigated consistency in the observable qualities of the romantic partners, revealing substantial evidence for clustering on coder-rated attributes like attractiveness and masculinity. Study 2 examined qualities self-reported by romantic partners themselves in a demographically diverse sample and found modest evidence for clustering on attributes such as IQ and educational aspirations; however, clustering in this study was largely due to demographic stratification. Study 3 explored target-specific ratings by partners about the focal person and found little evidence for clustering: The ability to elicit high romantic desirability/sexual satisfaction ratings from partners was not a stable individual difference. The variables that affect mating may differ considerably in the extent to which they serve as stable versus unpredictable factors; thus, the fields of evolutionary psychology, sociology, and close relationships may reveal distinct depictions of mating because the constructs and assessment strategies in each differ along this underappreciated dimension. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Preventing violence by intimate partners in adolescence: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Rebeca Nunes Guedes de Oliveira; Rafaela Gessner; Bianca de Cássia Alvarez Brancaglioni; Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa da Fonseca; Emiko Yoshikawa Egry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze the scientific literature on preventing intimate partner violence among adolescents in the field of health based on gender and generational categories. METHOD This was an integrative review. We searched for articles using LILACS, PubMed/MEDLINE, and SciELO databases. RESULTS Thirty articles were selected. The results indicate that most studies assessed interventions conducted by programs for intimate partner violence prevention. These studies adopted quantitat...

  20. Should sexual partners of women with bacterial vaginosis receive treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Potter, J

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is the most prevalent infectious cause of vaginitis. It is associated with significant morbidity, particularly in pregnant women and following gynaecological operations. Cure is difficult. There is some controversy over whether treating sexual partners of affected women can improve cure rates. This paper provides a critical appraisal of the evidence for simultaneously treating the male partner of women affected by bacterial vaginosis. Unfortunately, no evidence was found s...

  1. RESEARCH ON NEGOTIATION-BASED PARTNER SELECTION APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The key problem in the construction of virtual enterprises (VEs) is how to select appropriate partners. The negotiation-based approach is proposed to support partner selection in the construction of VEs . The negotiation model is discussed from three main aspects respectively, i.e., negotiation protocol, negotiation goal and negotiation decision-making model. And the generic mathematical description of the negotiation model is formally presented. Finally, a simple example is used to validate the approach's availability.

  2. The EU funded PARTNER project for ICTR-PHE 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    Greco, V

    2012-01-01

    PARTNER is a 4-­‐‑year Marie Curie Training project funded by the European Commission that aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts in hadron-­‐‑therapy. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies (Siemens and IBA) are participating in PARTNER, which is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network.

  3. Intimate partner violence - identification and response in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Kelsey; O'Doherty, Lorna

    2011-11-01

    Intimate partner violence is a common problem among women attending general practice, with around one in 10 women currently experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse by a partner. Abused women frequently present with physical and psychosocial issues. Yet intimate partner violence often remains concealed and addressing it poses challenges for the clinician and patient alike. Although some of the general recommendations in this review may also apply to same-sex relationships and to women who abuse men, this article discusses identifying intimate partner violence in women who present to general practice. Identifying intimate partner violence is important in clinical practice as it underlies many common physical and mental health presentations. Facilitating disclosure and responding effectively requires good communication skills. Safety assessment of women and their families, pinpointing level of readiness to contemplate action, and providing appropriate referral options and ongoing nonjudgmental support are elements of an effective response. General practitioners have the potential to identify women and support them safely on a pathway to recovery, thereby avoiding the long term impacts of intimate partner violence.

  4. Social partners cooperation for reduction of musculoskeletal disorders in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Veerle; O'Neill, David; Motmans, Roeland; Lundqvist, Peter; Roman-Liu, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    The European social partners in agriculture recognize the considerable frequency of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) in the sector which has negative consequences for workers, employers, social security systems and hence for the whole society. They made an agreement in 2005 to tackle this problem and their main interest was finding good practices 'on the floor', with the involvement of the farmers and farming industries. A partnership with researchers from 4 different organisations across Europe, was created, taking into account both academic partners and/or partners experienced with the agricultural sector. GEOPA-COPA acted as a network partner with all the EU agriculture organisations. The project partners proposed a methodology how to collect the good practices. In total, 103 company visits were organised and 55 additional reports were collected. More than 140 good practices were defined going from easy, low-cost solutions to highly technological, more expensive solutions. All this information is disseminated via the project website (www.agri-ergonomics.eu) and summarised in 6 brochures. This paper focuses on the methodology to set up the ergonomic project with social partners.

  5. Intimate partner violence and unintended pregnancy: prevalence and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina da C. Azevêdo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the association between unintended pregnancy and intimate partner violence before pregnancy. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 1,054 women, aged 18 to 49, in Recife, Northeastern Brazil, from July 2005 to March 2006. Non-conditional logistic regression analysis was performed with a hierarchical strategy for entering variables into the model, according to the conceptual framework defined. Unintended pregnancy was reported by 60.3% (636 women. Intimate partner violence prior to the pregnancy was associated with unintended pregnancy (ORadj = 1.57; 95%CI: 1.17-2.11, even when adjusted for the women's sociodemographic characteristics, the partner's behaviour, and the relationship dynamic. When the association was adjusted for the use of contraception and the partner's refusal to use contraception, the association was no longer significant, suggesting that the effect of partner violence on unintended pregnancy may be mediated by these variables. The findings point to the need of screening for intimate partner violence in reproductive health services.

  6. Early maladaptive schemas of substance abusers and their intimate partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    The influence of intimate partners in the recovery of substance abuse has been increasingly recognized in the professional literature. Couples-based substance abuse treatment has demonstrated effectiveness in reducing substance abuse and increasing healthy couple functioning. Recently, research has begun to investigate enduring cognitive beliefs that may impact substance abusers and their intimate partners, which could advance our understanding of factors that may impact couple's functioning. The current study examined the early maladaptive schemas and substance use of a sample of adult substance abusers who have sought residential substance abuse treatment and their intimate partners (N = 102). Results demonstrated that the early maladaptive schemas of patients and their intimate partners may be interrelated and that patients scored significantly higher than their partners on 13 of the 18 early maladaptive schemas. Substance use was only associated with a few early maladaptive schemas. These findings highlight the potential importance of assessing early maladaptive schemas in couples where one partner has a substance abuse problem. Implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  7. THE INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE RESPONSIBILITY ATTRIBUTION SCALE (IPVRAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Lila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present a psychometrically sound instrument to assess intimate partner violence offenders’ responsibility attributions: the Intimate Partner Violence Responsibility Attribution Scale. The scale was administrated to 423 adult male intimate partner violence offenders court-mandated to a community-based intervention program. A three factor structure (responsibility attribution to the legal system, responsibility attribution to the victim, and responsibility attribution to the offender personal context was supported using confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability of the scales in this study was estimated using Cronbach’s alpha, ρ and greatest lower bound. The Intimate Partner Violence Responsibility Attribution Scale correlated in theoretically expected ways with variables used to assess construct validity (system blaming, problems with partner, and responsibility assumption and with variables used to assess criterion-related validity (satisfaction with legal system, victim-blaming attitudes, alcohol consumption, hostile sexism, stressful life events, social desirability, impulsivity and household income. Results support the validity and reliability of the Intimate Partner Violence Responsibility Attribution Scale

  8. The impact of adolescent risk behavior on partner relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberry, Terence P.; Krohn, Marvin D.; Augustyn, Megan Bears; Buchanan, Molly; Greenman, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Prior literature suggests that involvement in adolescent risk behaviors will have short- and long-term consequences that disrupt the orderly flow of later development, including impacts on patterns of partner relationships. In this study, we explore how adolescent involvement in delinquency, drug use, and sexual behavior at an early age affects the likelihood and timing of both marriage and cohabitation using a sample from the Rochester Youth Development Study. We also examine the direct effects of dropping out of high school, teenage parenthood, and financial stress during emerging adulthood as well as their potential role as mediators of the relationships between adolescent risk behaviors and partnering for both males and females. Overall, there is not very strong support for a direct relationship between adolescent delinquency, drug use, or early sexual behavior and patterns of partner formation. In contrast, the more proximal relationships, indicated by precocious transitions to adulthood and financial instability, are more consistently related to partner formation. These findings support models of cumulative disadvantage: early adolescent problem behaviors are weakly related to partner formation, but appear to set in motion cascading consequences that influence the transition to adulthood and, in turn, these more proximal variables are more consistently related to partner formation. PMID:27429604

  9. Venues for Meeting Sex Partners and Partner HIV Risk Characteristics: HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN064) Women's HIV Seroincidence Study (ISIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golin, C.; Wang, J.; Hughes, J.; Justman, J.; Haley, D.; Kuo, I.; Adimora, A.; Chege, W.; Hodder, S.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying venues where women meet sexual partners, particular partners who increase women's risk of acquiring HIV, could inform prevention efforts. We categorized venues where women enrolled in HPTN 064 reported meeting their last three sex partners as: (1) Formal, (2) Public, (3) Private, and (4) Virtual spaces. We used multinomial logistic regression to assess the association between these venues and women's individual characteristics and reports of their partners' HIV risk characteristics. The 2099 women reported meeting 3991 partners, 51 % at Public, 30 % Private, 17 % Formal and 3 % at Virtual venues. Women meeting partners at Formal venues reported more education and condom use than women meeting partners at other venues. Fewer partners met through Formal venues had “high” risk characteristics for HIV than through other venues and hence may pose less risk of HIV transmission. HIV prevention interventions can help women choose partners with fewer risk characteristics across all venue types. PMID:25863466

  10. Perceived partner serostatus, attribution of responsibility for prevention of HIV transmission, and sexual risk behavior with "MAIN" partner among adults living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Daniel S; Goldstein, Risë B; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Wong, F Lennie; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2006-04-01

    Persons living with HIV (PLH) often attribute HIV status to sexual partners based on observable partner characteristics. The present study investigated the relationship of sexual behavior with most recent "main" partner to that partner's perceived serostatus among 1,232 PLH interviewed in clinics and community agencies in Los Angeles, California. PLH who believed their most recent main partner to be HIV-negative more often identified partner appearance as a basis for their perceptions than those who believed their most recent main partner to be HIV-positive. PLH who perceived their most recent main partner as HIV-negative were more likely to assume responsibility for partner protection and always to use condoms, and less likely to report recent unprotected vaginal or anal sex with that partner. Unprotected receptive anal intercourse with their most recent main partner was less common among African American, Latino, and White participants who believed that partner to be HIV-negative. Although PLH appear protective toward HIV-negative main partners, interventions to encourage valid methods of identifying partner serostatus are needed.

  11. Distal and proximal factors associated with aggression towards partners and non-partners among patients in substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein-Ngo, Quyen M; Walton, Maureen A; Sanborn, Michelle; Kraus, Shane; Blow, Fred; Cunningham, Rebecca; Chermack, Stephen T

    2014-10-01

    Studies of violence in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment settings typically focus on partner aggression (PA) although non-partner aggression (NPA) is also a common problem. This study examines potentially distinct paths of distal and proximal risk factors related to aggression towards non-partners (NPA) and partners (PA) among a SUD treatment sample. The sample included 176 adults reporting past-year violence. Bivariate analyses indicated several distal and proximal factors were associated with NPA and PA. According to multivariate, multiple mediation analyses youth aggression history was a factor for both NPA and PA. Alcohol and cocaine use and psychological distress were associated with NPA; marijuana use was associated with PA. There also was evidence of indirect effects of distal factors on NPA and PA. The results suggest that there may be substantially different dynamics associated with NPA and PA, and have implications for developing screening, assessment and treatment protocols targeting violence among individuals in SUD treatment.

  12. Low-income mothers as "othermothers" to their romantic partners' children: women's coparenting in multiple partner fertility relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Linda M; Hardaway, Cecily R

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we investigated low-income mothers' involvement in multiple partner fertility (MPF) relationships and their experiences as "othermothers" to their romantic partners' children from previous and concurrent intimate unions. Othermothering, as somewhat distinct from stepmothering, involves culturally-scripted practices of sharing parenting responsibilities with children's biological parents. We framed this investigation using this concept because previous research suggests that many low-income women practice this form of coparenting in their friend and kin networks. What is not apparent in this literature, however, is whether women unilaterally othermother their romantic partners' children from different women. How often and under what circumstances do women in nonmarital MPF intimate unions with men coparent their partners' children from other relationships? We explored this question using a modified grounded theory approach and secondary longitudinal ethnographic data on 256 low-income mostly unmarried mothers from the Three-City Study. Results indicated that 78% of the mothers had been or were involved in MPF unions and while most had othermothered the children of their friends and relatives, 89% indicated that they did not coparent their partners' children from any MPF relationship. Mothers' reasons for not doing so were embedded in: (a) gendered scripts around second families, or "casa chicas"; (b) the tenuous nature of pass-through MPF relationships; and (c) mothers' own desires for their romantic partners to child-swap. Implications of this research for family science and practice are discussed.

  13. Intimate partner violence after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Roumayne Fernandes Vieira; Araújo, Maria Alix Leite; Vieira, Luiza Jane Eyre de Souza; Reis, Cláudia Bastos Silveira; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence and factors associated with intimate partner violence after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, CE, Northeastern Brazil, in 2012 and involved 221 individuals (40.3% male and 59.7% female) attended to at reference health care units for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Data were collected using a questionnaire applied during interviews with each participant. A multivariate analysis with a logistic regression model was conducted using the stepwise technique. Only the variables with a p value sexually transmitted diseases, the following variables remained statistically significant: extramarital relations (OR = 3.72; 95%CI 1.91;7.26; p = 0.000), alcohol consumption by the partner (OR = 2.16; 95%CI 1.08;4.33; p = 0.026), history of violence prior to diagnosis (OR = 2.87; 95%CI 1.44;5.69; p = 0.003), and fear of disclosing the diagnosis to the partner (OR = 2.66; 95%CI 1.32;5.32; p = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS Individuals who had extramarital relations, experienced violence prior to the diagnosis of sexually transmitted disease, feared disclosing the diagnosis to the partner, and those whose partner consumed alcohol had an increased likelihood of suffering violence. The high prevalence of intimate partner violence suggests that this population is vulnerable and therefore intervention efforts should be directed to them. Referral health care services for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases can be strategic places to identify and prevent intimate partner violence.

  14. Integrated treatment options for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Cory A; Easton, Caroline J

    2017-01-01

    Male-to-female intimate partner violence remains a worldwide public health issue with adverse physical and psychological consequences for victims, perpetrators and children. Personality disorders, addiction, trauma and mood symptoms are established risk factors for intimate partner violence perpetration and factor prominently into a recovery-oriented treatment approach. We reviewed the partner violence literature for detailed reports of traditional as well as innovative, integrated treatment approaches. Empirically based recommendations for intervention programs and the policies that guide intervention efforts are offered. Nascent research suggests that integrated treatment models utilising a holistic approach to account for psychological comorbidity and interventions that involve a motivational interviewing component appear promising in terms of significantly improving intimate partner violence treatment compliance and reducing subsequent acts of physical partner violence. Further, methodologically rigorous research is required to fully assess the benefits of traditional and integrated treatment options. We have advanced several recommendations, including the development of and exclusive reliance upon empirically supported treatments, conducting a thorough risk and needs assessment of the offender and the immediate family to facilitate appropriate treatment referrals, integrating content to foster the offender's internal motivation to change maladaptive behaviours, and attempting to minimise offender treatment burdens through the strategic use of integrated treatment models. Intimate partner violence is a complicated and nuanced problem that is perpetrated by a heterogeneous population and requires greater variability in integrated treatment options. [Crane CA, Easton CJ. Integrated treatment options for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:24-33]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  15. 26 CFR 1.706-1 - Taxable years of partner and partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.706-1 Taxable years of partner and... where the partners engage in a transaction that has as its principal purpose the avoidance of the... year of a partnership with tax-exempt partners—(i) Certain tax-exempt partners disregarded. In...

  16. The mechanism of building competitiveness through strategic partnering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamik Anna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper assumes that strategic partnering, as one of the more mature forms of inter-organisational cooperation, is also an effective method of support for strategic activities of enterprises. In the light of the above, the use of strategic partnering in processes aimed at enhancing their competitiveness was proposed. The aim of the analyses is to identify and systematise the key actions in the mechanism of building competitiveness through strategic partnering of enterprises. For its implementation, a review of literature in the field of theory of organisation, theory of cooperation and partnering as well as theory of competitiveness was carried out. Empirical research to verify the initial theoretical assumptions was also conducted. Quantitative research (surveys and qualitative research (extended case studies was carried out. The study was based on the research procedure modelled on forecasting methods of searching for solutions to organisational problems, i.e. on creative (lateral thinking. As a result, the algorithm of building competitiveness through mature strategic partnering was formulated and recommendations were made as to the possibility of its practical use.

  17. Predictors of multiple sexual partners from adolescence through young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, Sara A; Lanza, Stephanie T

    2014-10-01

    To examine time-varying associations between predictors of recent multiple sexual partners from middle adolescence through young adulthood. We examined whether the odds of multiple partners in the past year were differentially predicted by substance use and depression over time, using data from a nationally representative longitudinal study (N = 11,963, 52.2% female, 18.3% African-American, 11.9% Hispanic, 3.5% Asian, 2.6% other race, M age at Wave I = 16.1 years, SD = 1.8). Data were analyzed using the time-varying effect model, which estimates associations between predictors and an outcome as a function of near-continuous time. The proportion of participants having multiple partners increased over time, leveling off at around 30% after age 20. Significant positive associations between substance use and multiple partners were strongest early in adolescence and decreased sharply by around age 18. The significant positive association between depression and sexual behavior weakened with age, remaining significant in young adulthood for women but not men. These findings suggest that factors associated with having multiple recent sexual partners change from middle adolescence through young adulthood. The time-varying effect model can be used to identify risk factors that are especially salient at different ages, thus identifying which age periods may hold the greatest promise for intervention. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Working on gender issues with partners and other actors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Discussions at the workshop centered around the Oxfam UK/1 program work on gender with its partners and other actors. Gender issues have been part of the program since 1985. Around 80% of the program involves mixed partners (men and women), while around 15% involves women-only groups. Strategies for working with partners include training, ongoing dialogue, involvement in planning, networking, lobbying, advocacy work, sectoral interventions, and research to highlight issues. Improving the gender work of existing counterparts and building new relationships are the goals of the Oxfam UK/1 program. Gender awareness should be used as a criterion in choosing those with whom work is done. Time-bound strategies are needed to persuade partners to respond to the gender-related needs of target groups. Resources are needed to enhance the capacity skills of willing partners. The workshop produced the following recommendations: 1) program managers must take conscious steps to invest time and resources in seeking out new relationships with new potential actors; 2) local culture should be analyzed to develop a locally appropriate approach to gender discrimination, and strategies have to synchronize policy directives with what is happening on the ground; 3) in seeking new relationships, centers of positive energy, which can create a domino effect and break down resistance, should be identified; and 4) networking should be broadened to outside the current universe of counterparts.

  19. Audit quality and the audit partner effect : Evidence from European listed companies

    OpenAIRE

    Buuren, van, R.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to provide evidence on the differences in audit quality amongst audit partners. I attribute these dissimilarities to (i) differences in the audit risk perception and the risk appetite of individual audit partners and (ii) to differences in the personal business case of audit partners. As a result, three audit partner archetypes have been identified: liberal, high quality and conservative. This paper will provide evidence that 50% of the audit partners (53% ...

  20. Making Sense of Partnering: Discourses, Governance and Institutional Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer; Jensen, Jens Stissing

    2012-01-01

    from an ethnographic case study of a public partnering project, it is shown that rather than providing a well-defined alternative to the traditional form of project governance, the institutional destabilization has cultivated an organization field offering a legitimate frame for local sense making....... Thus, as a project governance mechanism, partnering emerges as a collective sense-making process directed at (re-)creating a new form of rational behaviour under changing institutional conditions....... a perspective of institutional theory, however, the development of partnering can also be understood as a strategic intervention that has destabilized the established regulative context in which the traditional contractual mode of project governance takes place. Drawing on a historical document study and data...

  1. The Strategic Partners Network's Extraction: The XStrat.Net Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taifi, Nouha; Passiante, Giuseppina

    The firms in the business environment have to choose adequate partners in order to sustain their competitive advantage and their economic performance. Plus, the creation of special communities consisting of these partners is essential for the life-long development of these latter and the firms creating them. The research project XStrat.Net aims at the identification of factors and indicators about the organizations for the modelling of intelligent agents -XStrat intelligent agents- and the engineering of a software -XStrat- to process these backbones intelligent agents. Through the use of the software, the firms will be able to select the needed partners for the creation of special communities for the purpose of learning, interest or innovation. The XStrat.Net project also intends to provide guidelines for the creation of the special communities.

  2. Detecting the trustworthiness of novel partners in economic exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desteno, David; Breazeal, Cynthia; Frank, Robert H; Pizarro, David; Baumann, Jolie; Dickens, Leah; Lee, Jin Joo

    2012-12-01

    Because trusting strangers can entail high risk, an ability to infer a potential partner's trustworthiness would be highly advantageous. To date, however, little evidence indicates that humans are able to accurately assess the cooperative intentions of novel partners by using nonverbal signals. In two studies involving human-human and human-robot interactions, we found that accuracy in judging the trustworthiness of novel partners is heightened through exposure to nonverbal cues and identified a specific set of cues that are predictive of economic behavior. Employing the precision offered by robotics technology to model and control humanlike movements, we demonstrated not only that experimental manipulation of the identified cues directly affects perceptions of trustworthiness and subsequent exchange behavior, but also that the human mind will utilize such cues to ascribe social intentions to technological entities.

  3. Search Strategies for Top Partners in Composite Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben; Parker, M A; Sutherland, Dave

    2014-01-01

    We consider how best to search for top partners in generic composite Higgs models. We begin by classifying the possible group representations carried by top partners in models with and without a custodial $SU(2)\\times SU(2) \\rtimes \\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry protecting the rate for $Z \\rightarrow b\\overline{b}$ decays. We identify a number of minimal models whose top partners only have electric charges of $\\frac{1}{3}, \\frac{2}{3},$ or $\\frac{4}{3}$ and thus decay to top or bottom quarks via a single Higgs or electroweak gauge boson. We develop an inclusive search for these based on a top veto, which we find to be more effective than existing searches. Less minimal models feature light states that can be sought in final states with like-sign leptons and so we find that 2 straightforward LHC searches give a reasonable coverage of the gamut of composite Higgs models.

  4. Modes of strategic technology partnering Formy realizacji strategicznych partnerstw technologicznych

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Puślecki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to verify the organizational modes of strategic technological partnering. The author used a classification of modes of technology cooperation in terms of inter-organizational dependence to discuss major trends and characteristics of different forms of inter-firm partnering on the basis of the MERIT-CATI database. In the article the following forms of technological cooperation were presented: joint-ventures (JV, R&D pacts, technology exchange agreements and research contracts, customer-supplier relations, X-licensing as well as R&D contracts. The verification of such forms of technology partnering was made in years 1980-1996 on the basis of the empirical material taken from MERIT-CATI database.

  5. MPS/CAS Partner Group on Nanostructured Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Ke; Manfred Rühle

    2004-01-01

    @@ As one of the first Partner Groups which were initiated to foster scientific exchange and interaction between the Max Pianck Society (MPS) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the Partner Group led by Lu Ke was established on April 1, 1999.During the past five years, the group has received substantial support from the CAS for equipment and from the MPS for personnel and travel expenses. Extensive and productive collaborations between the research staff and students of the Partner Group with several professors (departments) in the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research (MPI-MF) have led to significant advances in synthesis,mechanical properties, melting and superheating of nanostructured metals. The research is well recognized internationally and a substantial number of publications in high quality, peer-reviewed journals (including Science and Physical Review Letters) have resulted.

  6. Protection of the weaker partner in the marital property agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaček-Stanić Gordana B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many jurisdictions, spouses/common-law partners can choose which matrimonial property regime they want to be applied on their property relations. Viewed comparatively, such freedom exists in Western European countries for some time, but recently, both Eastern and Central European countries introduced the possibility of concluding marital property agreement in their legal systems, which changes the default marital property regime. However, the spouses do not have an absolute freedom when concluding such a contract. Restriction of freedom is due to the fact that the contracting parties are specific subjects - married persons, between whom exists personal relationships, which requires caution and some sort of protection of the weaker partner. This paper analyzes the legal mechanisms to protect weaker partners in domestic family law and in a comparative European law.

  7. Men who batter intimate partners: a grounded theory study of the development of male violence in intimate partner relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Donna Scott; Brackley, Margaret

    2005-04-01

    Intimate partner violence is a serious and pervasive problem in U.S. society, with 25% of women and 7.6% of men reporting physical abuse by an intimate partner each year. Understanding the risk factors for development of violence is essential toward the development of interventions to reduce partner violence. Much of the understanding about the development of partner violence is based on research with victims rather than perpetrators. The study was conducted with men convicted of assault on an intimate female partner. Grounded theory was the method used to analyze data from interviews with 16 men participating in a batterers' intervention and prevention program. From the data, the Violent Couples Model was developed. The primary elements of the Violent Couples Model are justifying violence, minimizing violence, childhood exposure to violence, ineffective anger management, childhood experience of violence, and ineffective conflict resolution. Social and familial factors serve as moderating elements. Contextual elements of the model include power and control, social isolation, desensitization, insecure maternal relationships, the view of violence as a private problem, ambivalent intimate relationships, objectification of women, immaturity, lack of awareness about what constitutes violence, mistrust, traditional views of the roles of women, financial issues, and jealousy. Interventions indicated in the model are primary, or preventive, in nature. The model focuses on prevention efforts with the family as a whole, rather than on batterers alone.

  8. Perceptions of partners' problematic alcohol use affect relationship outcomes beyond partner self-reported drinking: alcohol use in committed romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lindsey M; Øverup, Camilla S; Overup, Camilla S; Neighbors, Clayton

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol use is prevalent among college students, including those who are in committed romantic relationships. Individuals' perceptions of their partner's alcohol use may have significant effects on how they view both their partner and their relationship. The current study examines the effect of one's perception of one's romantic partner's drinking as problematic on one's relationship satisfaction and commitment, and whether this varies as a function of one's partner's drinking. Both partners in romantic heterosexual relationships (N = 78 dyads) completed an online survey assessing alcohol use and problems, relationship satisfaction and commitment, and the perception that their partner's drinking was problematic. Analyses using Actor-Partner Interdependence Models (APIMs) revealed a partner-moderated actor interaction, such that partner self-reported drinking significantly moderated the association between the actor's perception of their partner's drinking as problematic and actor relationship outcomes. Results indicated that when partners drank at higher levels, perceiving their drinking as problematic did not have an effect. These individuals were less satisfied regardless of their perceptions. However, when partners drank at lower levels, perceiving their drinking as problematic was negatively associated with relationship outcomes. Furthermore, for alcohol consumption, three-way interactions with gender emerged, indicating that this effect was stronger for males. Results extend the literature on drinking in relationships and on interpersonal perception. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  9. Trade Relationship between Oman and Its Major Trading Asian Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdusalam F. Yahia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: No empirical research exists that examines the interdependence of trade between Oman and its five major trading Asian partners (Emirates, Japan, South-Korea, Thailand and Mainland China. This study attempted to fill this gap in the literature by examining the interaction of trade between Oman and its major trading Asian partner. Particularly, this study attempted to answer the very important question that is there any feedback effect of the trade relationship between Oman and its major trading Asian partners. Approach: A simultaneous-equations model with a double-log form was developed and tested in this study in order to achieve its objectives. Results: The model was estimated using the Two Stage Least Square (2SLS procedure of estimation and the main findings of the analysis revealed that the price of oil does not seem to be the major determinant of Omani exports to its major trading partners with exception of Japan. The short-term elasticity of Omani imports from its major trading partners with respect to its income seems to be higher (e.g., ranging from 0.55-2.0 in all cases. Conclusion: This study brought new empirical evidence on the trade interdependence and suggested that there is a significant impact (a feedback effect on the level of GDP of Omani's four major trading partners namely Emirates, Japan and South Korea. Therefore, policy maker in sultanate of Oman should be aware of such interdependence and consider the degree of feedback effect of trade in any economic programming that linked and related to these countries.

  10. Endocannabinoid influence on partner preference in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memos, Nicoletta K; Vela, Rebekah; Tabone, Courtney; Guarraci, Fay A

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the role of the endocannabinoid system on sexual motivation in the female rat. In Experiment 1, gonadally intact female rats were first tested for partner preference after a vehicle injection. Approximately 2 weeks later, all rats were tested again after an injection of the endocannabinoid antagonist, SR141716 (SR; also known as Rimonabant; 1.0mg/kg). During the first 10 min of each partner preference test, subjects could spend time near either a male or female stimulus animal that was placed behind a wire mesh (No-Contact). During the second 10 min of each partner preference test, subjects had unrestricted access to both stimulus animals (Contact). When the female subjects were treated with SR, they made fewer visits to either stimulus animal during the no-contact phase of the partner preference test compared to when they were treated with vehicle. In Experiment 2, ovariectomized (OVX) subjects primed with estrogen were administered SR or vehicle and tested for partner preference (Experiment 2A). Approximately 2 weeks later, the subjects from the control group were tested again after an injection of SR (Experiment 2B). In contrast to Experiment 1, treatment with SR reduced the number of visits specifically to the male stimulus during the contact phase of the test in Experiment 2. Experiment 3 tested the effects of SR on general locomotion and found no effect of SR on line crossings in an open field. Finally, in Experiment 4, OVX estrogen- and progesterone-primed subjects were administered the endocannabinoid agonist anandamide (AEA: 1.0mg/kg) or vehicle and tested for partner preference. AEA-treated subjects made more visits to the male stimulus than vehicle-treated subjects during the contact phase of the test. The results of the present study suggest that the endocannabinoid system may contribute to sexual motivation in female rats by specifically altering approach behavior.

  11. Lovestruck: women, romantic love and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Charmaine; Koch, Tina; Kralik, Debbie; Jackson, Debra

    2006-05-01

    Intimate Partner Violence remains a significant problem globally despite health promotion aimed at raising awareness. In particular, there is a current trend for many young women to view some abusive/violent behaviours as acceptable in their relationships. Intimate Partner Violence has serious implications for its short and long term impacts on the health of women and children. Health workers may find working with women a challenging and sometimes frustrating experience. A way forward is to develop clearer understandings of the complexities of Intimate Partner Violence and to better understand women's investments in romantic relationships. In this paper a secondary analysis of data from a narrative study of women's recovery from IPV relationships is presented in order to illustrate discourses that inform underpinnings of romantic relationships. Transcriptions of audio-taped interviews were analysed using a feminist post-structural approach in order to make visible the ways in which the women negotiated their identities in the discourses of femininity. A critical review of current literature was also undertaken to develop the construct of romantic love. Women revealed that cues for Intimate Partner Violence were present early in the relationship but were not recognised at the time. Two positions within the discourse of romantic love were identified that underpinned their desires to establish and invest in the relationship despite the presence of cues for Intimate Partner Violence. These were 'Desperate for a man' and interpreting jealousy as a sign of love. Romantic love may be desirable for the sharing of warmth, safety and protection, and yet can mask behaviours that are cues for domestic violence. Understanding the complex nature of the ways that women's desires are located in the discourse of romantic love has implications for all nurses working to prevent and reduce the incidence of Intimate Partner Violence.

  12. Intimate partner violence after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumayne Fernandes Vieira Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence and factors associated with intimate partner violence after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, CE, Northeastern Brazil, in 2012 and involved 221 individuals (40.3% male and 59.7% female attended to at reference health care units for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Data were collected using a questionnaire applied during interviews with each participant. A multivariate analysis with a logistic regression model was conducted using the stepwise technique. Only the variables with a p value < 0.05 were included in the adjusted analysis. The odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI was used as the measure of effect. RESULTS A total of 30.3% of the participants reported experiencing some type of violence (27.6%, psychological; 5.9%, physical; and 7.2%, sexual after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted disease. In the multivariate analysis adjusted to assess intimate partner violence after the revelation of the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases, the following variables remained statistically significant: extramarital relations (OR = 3.72; 95%CI 1.91;7.26; p = 0.000, alcohol consumption by the partner (OR = 2.16; 95%CI 1.08;4.33; p = 0.026, history of violence prior to diagnosis (OR = 2.87; 95%CI 1.44;5.69; p = 0.003, and fear of disclosing the diagnosis to the partner (OR = 2.66; 95%CI 1.32;5.32; p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS Individuals who had extramarital relations, experienced violence prior to the diagnosis of sexually transmitted disease, feared disclosing the diagnosis to the partner, and those whose partner consumed alcohol had an increased likelihood of suffering violence. The high prevalence of intimate partner violence suggests that this population is vulnerable and therefore intervention efforts should be directed to them. Referral health care services for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases can

  13. Intimate partner violence after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Roumayne Fernandes Vieira; Araújo, Maria Alix Leite; Vieira, Luiza Jane Eyre de Souza; Reis, Cláudia Bastos Silveira; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence and factors associated with intimate partner violence after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, CE, Northeastern Brazil, in 2012 and involved 221 individuals (40.3% male and 59.7% female) attended to at reference health care units for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Data were collected using a questionnaire applied during interviews with each participant. A multivariate analysis with a logistic regression model was conducted using the stepwise technique. Only the variables with a p value < 0.05 were included in the adjusted analysis. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used as the measure of effect. RESULTS A total of 30.3% of the participants reported experiencing some type of violence (27.6%, psychological; 5.9%, physical; and 7.2%, sexual) after the diagnosis of sexually transmitted disease. In the multivariate analysis adjusted to assess intimate partner violence after the revelation of the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases, the following variables remained statistically significant: extramarital relations (OR = 3.72; 95%CI 1.91;7.26; p = 0.000), alcohol consumption by the partner (OR = 2.16; 95%CI 1.08;4.33; p = 0.026), history of violence prior to diagnosis (OR = 2.87; 95%CI 1.44;5.69; p = 0.003), and fear of disclosing the diagnosis to the partner (OR = 2.66; 95%CI 1.32;5.32; p = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS Individuals who had extramarital relations, experienced violence prior to the diagnosis of sexually transmitted disease, feared disclosing the diagnosis to the partner, and those whose partner consumed alcohol had an increased likelihood of suffering violence. The high prevalence of intimate partner violence suggests that this population is vulnerable and therefore intervention efforts should be directed to them. Referral health care services for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases can be strategic

  14. Partners or rivals? Strategies for the iterated prisoner's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne; Sigmund, Karl

    2015-07-01

    Within the class of memory-one strategies for the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma, we characterize partner strategies, competitive strategies and zero-determinant strategies. If a player uses a partner strategy, both players can fairly share the social optimum; but a co-player preferring an unfair solution will be penalized by obtaining a reduced payoff. A player using a competitive strategy never obtains less than the co-player. A player using a zero-determinant strategy unilaterally enforces a linear relation between the two players' payoffs. These properties hold for every strategy used by the co-player, whether memory-one or not.

  15. HIV-positive people, HIV-negative partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, L; Volker, M

    1995-01-01

    More relationships exist today between HIV-positive and HIV-negative partners. This article explores the underlying dynamics that might account for this phenomenon. Codependency theories may explain these relationships for some couples. For other couples, it is suggested that positive-negative homosexual relationships may be influenced by both unhealthy and healthy gay developmental experiences as well as by a sense of compassion. The article addresses both HIV-positive people choosing HIV-negative partners and vice versa. Treatment issues for the various theories are discussed and recommendations are made.

  16. Isospectral partners for a complex PT-invariant potential

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, A K; Sinha, Anjana; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2002-01-01

    We construct isospectral partner potentials of a complex PT-invariant potential, viz., V(x) = V_1 sech ^2 x - i V_2 sech x tanh x using Darboux's method. Oneset of isospectral potentials are obatined which can be termed 'Satellite potentials', in the sense that they are pf the same form as the original potential. In a particular case, the supersymmetric partner potential has the same spectrum, including the zero energy ground state, a fact which cannot occur in conventional supersymmetric quantum mechanics with real potential. An explicit example of a non-trivial set of isospectral potential is also obtained.

  17. Making Sense of Partnering: Discourses, Governance and Institutional Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer; Jensen, Jens Stissing

    2012-01-01

    a perspective of institutional theory, however, the development of partnering can also be understood as a strategic intervention that has destabilized the established regulative context in which the traditional contractual mode of project governance takes place. Drawing on a historical document study and data...... from an ethnographic case study of a public partnering project, it is shown that rather than providing a well-defined alternative to the traditional form of project governance, the institutional destabilization has cultivated an organization field offering a legitimate frame for local sense making...

  18. Nonergodic Subdiffusion from Transient Interactions with Heterogeneous Partners

    CERN Document Server

    Charalambous, C; Celi, A; Garcia-Parajo, M F; Lewenstein, M; Manzo, C; García-March, M A

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal disorder has been recently associated to the occurrence of anomalous nonergodic diffusion of molecular components in biological systems, but the underlying microscopic mechanism is still unclear. We introduce a model in which a particle performs continuous Brownian motion with changes of diffusion coefficients induced by transient molecular interactions with diffusive binding partners. In spite of the exponential distribution of waiting times, the model shows subdiffusion and nonergodicity similar to the heavy-tailed continuous time random walk. The dependence of these properties on the density of binding partners is analyzed and discussed. Our work provide an experimentally-testable microscopic model to investigate the nature of nonergodicity in disordered media.

  19. Indigenous Partner Violence, Indigenous Sentencing Courts, and Pathways to Desistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Elena; Daly, Kathleen

    2016-09-13

    Mainstream sentencing courts do little to change the behavior of partner violence offenders, let alone members of more socially marginal groups. Indigenous offenders face a court system that has little relevance to the complexity of their relations and lived experiences. Assisted by respected Elders and Community Representatives, Australian Indigenous sentencing courts seek to create a more meaningful sentencing process that has a deeper impact on Indigenous offenders' attitudes and, ultimately, their behavior. Drawing from interviews with 30 Indigenous offenders, we explore the ways in which the courts can motivate Indigenous partner violence offenders on pathways to desistence.

  20. The Partners in Flight handbook on species assessment Version 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, Arvind O.; Blancher, Peter J.; Easton, Wendy E.; Stanton, Jessica C.; Demarest, Dean W.; Dettmers, Randy; Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; ,

    2017-01-01

    Partners in Flight (PIF) is a cooperative venture of federal, state, provincial, and territorial agencies, industry, non-governmental organizations, researchers, and many others whose common goal is the conservation of North American birds (www.partnersinflight.org). While PIF has focused primarily on landbirds, it works in conjunction with other bird partners to promote coordinated conservation of all birds. PIF follows an iterative, adaptive planning approach that develops a sound scientific basis for decision-making and a logical process for setting, implementing, and evaluating conservation objectives (Pashley et al. 2000, Rich et al. 2004, Berlanga et al. 2010). The steps include: 1. Assessing conservation vulnerability of all bird species;

  1. Partners of the $X(3872)$ and HQSS breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Entem, D.R.; Fernandez, F.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the $X(3872)$ the study of heavy meson molecules has been the subject of many investigations. On the experimental side different experiments have looked for its spin partners and the bottom analogs. On the theoretical side different approaches have been used to understand this state. Some of them are EFT that impose HQSS and so they make predictions for the partners of the $X(3872)$, suggesting the existence of a $J^{PC}=2^{++}$ partner in the charm sector or $J^{PC}=1^{++}$ or $2^{++}$ analogs in the bottom. In our work, in order to understand the $X(3872)$, we use a Chiral quark model in which, due to the proximity to the $DD^*$ threshold, we include $c\\bar c$ states coupled to $DD^*$ molecular components. In this coupled channel model the relative position of the bare $c\\bar c$ states with two meson thresholds are very important. We have looked for the $X(3872)$ partners and we don't find a bound state in the $D^*D^*$ $J^{PC}=2^{++}$. In the bottom sector we find the opposite situati...

  2. Women's perception of partner violence in a rural Igbo community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilika, Amobi Linus

    2005-12-01

    Partner violence is a serious public health problem affecting mostly women. This qualitative study assessed the perceptions of rural Igbo women of Nigeria of intimate partner violence. Information was elicited using in-depth interviews and focus group discussion. Women of childbearing age were selected from the various women age grades in Ozubulu, Anambra State, Nigeria. Findings revealed that the women generally condone and are complacent with intimate partner violence, perceiving it as cultural and religious norms. The women felt that reprimands, beating and forced sex affecting their physical, mental and reproductive wellbeing are normal in marriage. They did not support reporting such cases to the police or divorcing the man, they would rather prefer reporting to family members. They felt that exiting the marriage would not gain the support of family members. They also expressed fear for the uncertainty in re-marrying, means of livelihood after re-marriage, social stigmatisation, and concern for their children. Socio-cultural norms and structures favour partner violence in Anambra State of Nigeria. There is a need for advocacy and concerted action that will involve the educational, health, civil and religious sectors of the society to evolve sustainable structures that will empower women and provide support to enable victims to react appropriately to violence.

  3. Revisiting the Role of Communication in Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Adam M.; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Fry, Deborah A.; Lessel, Harriet; Davidson, Leslie L.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that communication strategies can promote or inhibit intimate partner violence (IPV). Research on communication is still needed on a group ripe for early IPV intervention: high school-aged adolescents. This article revisits our previous analyses of young female reproductive clinic patients (Messinger, Davidson, &…

  4. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  5. Patterns of caregiver experiences among partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Mulder, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    2000-01-01

    This study describes patterns of caregiving experiences in partners of patients with cancer (N=148) over a 6-month period. Caregiving experiences were assessed by means of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment Scale (CRA), which consists of four negative dimensions and one positive subscale: Disrupted S

  6. 26 CFR 7.704-1 - Partner's distributive share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....704-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1976 § 7.704-1 Partner's distributive share. (a)-(c) (d) Limitation on allowance of losses. (1)-(2) (3)(i) Section 213(e) of the Tax...

  7. Partner Choice Drives the Evolution of Cooperation via Indirect Reciprocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Roberts

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity potentially provides an important means for generating cooperation based on helping those who help others. However, the use of 'image scores' to summarize individuals' past behaviour presents a dilemma: individuals withholding help from those of low image score harm their own reputation, yet giving to defectors erodes cooperation. Explaining how indirect reciprocity could evolve has therefore remained problematic. In all previous treatments of indirect reciprocity, individuals are assigned potential recipients and decide whether to cooperate or defect based on their reputation. A second way of achieving discrimination is through partner choice, which should enable individuals to avoid defectors. Here, I develop a model in which individuals choose to donate to anyone within their group, or to none. Whereas image scoring with random pairing produces cycles of cooperation and defection, with partner choice there is almost maximal cooperation. In contrast to image scoring with random pairing, partner choice results in almost perfect contingency, producing the correlation between giving and receiving required for cooperation. In this way, partner choice facilitates much higher and more stable levels of cooperation through image scoring than previously reported and provides a simple mechanism through which systems of helping those who help others can work.

  8. Social partners slam government plans to counter crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünell, M.

    2009-01-01

    The social partners have criticized the plans put forward by the Dutch government to ease the impact of the economic crisis. Trade unions are against the plans to keep older employees working for longer and to raise the retirement age. Employers, meanwhile, have argued against the scrapping of the m

  9. Concordance of vitamin D peripheral levels in infertile couples' partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffoni, Alessio; Ferrari, Stefania; Mangiarini, Alice; Noli, Stefania; Bulfoni, Alessandro; Vigano, Paola; Parazzini, Fabio; Somigliana, Edgardo

    2017-08-01

    A large number of evidence supports the role of vitamin D insufficiency in both women and men infertility. However, no studies have evaluated the rate of concordance of vitamin D status between the partners. This finding might open new scenarios in the interpretation of the available data linking vitamin D insufficiency and infertility. In the present cross-sectional study, 103 consecutive infertile couples were recruited between April and May 2014. Both partners concomitantly provided a serum sample for the assessment of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25-(OH)-D]. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as serum 25-(OH)-D D insufficient, corresponding to a rate of 73%. Overall, concordance was observed in 73 couples (71%), thus higher than the expected 61% (0.732 + 0.272) based on chance (p = 0.007). The Pearson coefficient of correlation R2 between the partners of the couples was 0.52 (p D insufficiency according to the causes of infertility. Serum 25-(OH)-D correlates within the partners of infertile couples. Further evidence is warranted to determine the clinical relevance and possible clinical applications of this finding.

  10. intimate partner violence and post-traumatic stress disorder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    chronic pain, gastrointestinal and gynaecological problems, sexually transmitted diseases ... Has your partner ever hit you or threatened you in ... I want to make sure each of my patients is ... Does she ever feel numbed or that she can't feel?

  11. Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy and Mothers' Child Abuse Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanueva, Cecilia E.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2007-01-01

    This research examines whether women who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy have a higher child abuse potential than women who have not experienced IPV. Data were analyzed from a longitudinal investigation of IPV during pregnancy. This study recruited 88 pregnant women during prenatal care and followed them for 1 1/2…

  12. The Conversational Partner's Perspective Affects Spatial Memory and Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Alexia; Michael, Christina; Mello, Catherine; Greenauer, Nathan M.; Avraamides, Marios N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether people spontaneously represent the partner's viewpoint in spatial memory when it is available in advance and whether they adapt their spontaneous descriptions accordingly. In 18 pairs, Directors studied arrays of objects while: (1) not knowing about having to describe the array to a Matcher, (2) knowing about the subsequent…

  13. Perceptions of Help Resources for Victims of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Scott D.; Witting, Michael D.; Furuno, Jon P.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Limcangco, Rhona; Perisse, Andre R. S.; Rasch, Elizabeth K.

    2004-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) constitutes a major public health problem in the United States. This cross-sectional survey of 108 emergency department (ED) care providers and 146 ED visitors at three metropolitan EDs compared the beliefs of ED health care providers with those of community members about the relative benefits of the helpfulness of…

  14. Partner Schemas and Relationship Functioning: A States of Mind Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatav, Yael; Whisman, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitions such as relationship attributions and beliefs, measured by self-report, have been identified as robust correlates of relationship (e.g., marital) satisfaction. This study sought to build on the theory and assessment of cognitions in relationships by evaluating partner schemas, defined in terms of self-ratings and recall of positive and…

  15. Risky Business: An Ecological Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence Disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaggia, Ramona; Regehr, Cheryl; Jenney, Angelique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A multistage, mixed-methods study using grounded theory with descriptive data was conducted to examine factors in disclosure of intimate partner violence (IPV). Method: In-depth interviews with individuals and focus groups were undertaken to collect data from 98 IPV survivors and service providers to identify influential factors.…

  16. Intimate Partner Violence and Welfare Participation: A Longitudinal Causal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tyrone C.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the temporal-ordered causal relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV), five mental disorders (depression, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic attack, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]), alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/ dependence, treatment seeking (from physician, counselor, and…

  17. A Content Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Danica G.; Emelianchik, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    With approximately 30% of individuals of various cultural identities experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetimes, it is imperative that professional counselors engage in effective assessment practices and be aware of the limitations of available IPV assessments. A content analysis of 38 IPV assessments was conducted, yielding…

  18. Revisiting the Role of Communication in Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Adam M.; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Fry, Deborah A.; Lessel, Harriet; Davidson, Leslie L.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that communication strategies can promote or inhibit intimate partner violence (IPV). Research on communication is still needed on a group ripe for early IPV intervention: high school-aged adolescents. This article revisits our previous analyses of young female reproductive clinic patients (Messinger, Davidson, &…

  19. Intimate Partner Violence in Colombia: Who Is at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedemann-Sanchez, Greta; Lovaton, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    The role that domestic violence plays in perpetuating poverty is often overlooked as a development issue. Using data from the 2005 Demographic Health Survey, this paper examines the prevalence of intimate partner violence in Colombia. Employing an intrahousehold bargaining framework and a bivariate probit model, it assesses the prevalence of and…

  20. Intimate Partner Violence and Unintended Pregnancy among Bangladeshi Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mosfequr; Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Ryota; Tomizawa, Hideki; Makinoda, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and unintended pregnancy using data from women reporting IPV in the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey. The analysis included 4,695 married women, aged 15 to 40 years, who had at least one birth in the last 5 years. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression…