WorldWideScience

Sample records for monodisperse cds nanocrystals

  1. Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse CdS Nanocrystals via Microreaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xinggui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CdS-based nanocrystals (NCs have attracted extensive interest due to their potential application as key luminescent materials for blue and white LEDs. In this research, the continuous synthesis of monodisperse CdS NCs was demonstrated utilizing a capillary microreactor. The enhanced heat and mass transfer in the microreactor was useful to reduce the reaction temperature and residence time to synthesize monodisperse CdS NCs. The superior stability of the microreactor and its continuous operation allowed the investigation of synthesis parameters with high efficiency. Reaction temperature was found to be a key parameter for balancing the reactivity of CdS precursors, while residence time was shown to be an important factor that governs the size and size distribution of the CdS NCs. Furthermore, variation of OA concentration was demonstrated to be a facile tuning mechanism for controlling the size of the CdS NCs. The variation of the volume percentage of OA from 10.5 to 51.2% and the variation of the residence time from 17 to 136 s facilitated the synthesis of monodisperse CdS NCs in the size range of 3.0–5.4 nm, and the NCs produced photoluminescent emissions in the range of 391–463 nm.

  2. PREPARATION OF MONODISPERSE CdS NANOCRYSTALS/PNIPAM HYDROGEL AND ITS THERMOSENSITIVE FLUORESCENCE%单分散CdS纳米晶/PNIPAM复合水凝胶的制备及其温敏荧光特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋秋生; 朱小飞; 杨洋

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of polymer aggregate state and chemical environment on the fluorescent performance of nanocrystal, monodisperse CdS nanocrystal is prepared via liquid-solid-solution synthesis ( LSS ) strategy, and monodisperse CdS nanocrystals/poly(iV-isopropylacrylamide) ( PNIPAM ) complex hydrogel are prepared by radical polymerization. The microstructure and performance of the monodisperse CdS nanocrystal and the complexes hydrogel are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) ,X-ray diffraction (XRD) ,Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) , differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and photoluminescence (PL). As evidenced from the HRTEM photos and XRD patterns, CdS nanocrystals show well monodispersity, and their size is about 2. 8 nm. PL spectrum shows that CdS nanocrystal has a strong emitting peak around 533 nm and a weak emitting peak around 469 nm. DSC curves suggest that the complex hydrogel is thermosensitive,and LCST of which is higher than that ofPNIPAM hydrogel. The results of PL spectra and DSC curves indicate that the complex hydrogel shows well thermosensitive-fluorescent performance, the variation of the fluorescent intensity of the complex hydrogel is in good agreement with its phase transformation. With variation of environmental temperature from 20℃ to 45℃ , the complex hydrogel changes from swollen state to collapse state, and the chemical environment around CdS nanocrystal changes from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, quantum yield of CdS nanocrystal changes respectively. The lower the environmental temperature is kept, the lower fluorescent intensity of the complex hydrogel is observed,and the fluorescent intensity changes sharply around its LCST. Testing on PL intensity change of CdS/PNIPAM hydrogel as a function of cooling-heating cycles between 20t and 40t demonstrates that the thermosensitive-fluorescent performance of the CdS/PNIPAM hydrogel is reversible.%采用液体-固

  3. Biomaterials supported CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balu, Alina M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' Ilie Murgulescu' , Spl. Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Campelo, Juan M. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Luque, Rafael, E-mail: q62alsor@uco.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Rajabi, Fatemeh [Department of Science, Payame Noor University, PO Box 878, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Romero, Antonio A. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    CdS quantum dot materials were prepared through a simple room temperature deposition of CdS nanocrystals on biomaterials including starch and chitosan. Materials obtained were found to contain differently distributed CdS nanocrystals on the surface of the biopolymers, making them potentially interesting for biomedical applications as contrast agents and/or in photocatalysis.

  4. Multicolored luminescent CdS nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The observation of efficient blue, green, orange and red luminescence from CdS nanocrystals made by using a reverse micelle method was reported. The blue luminescence about 480 nm is attributed to the radiative recombination of electron-hole pairs.The red luminescence around 650 nm is due to the radiative recombination of the exciton trapped in the nanocrystal surface defect states. The combination of different portion of band-edge emission and surface trap state emission results in green and orange luminescence for the nanocrystals. The CdS nanocrystals with efficient multicolored luminescence may find potential application in full color displays and biolabelings.

  5. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal{nanocrystal separation in CdS nanocrystal assembly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sameer Sapra; D D Sarma

    2005-10-01

    We report an easy, one pot synthesis to prepare ordered CdS nanocrystals with varying inter-particle separation and characterize the particle separation using x-ray diffraction at low and wide angles.

  6. Understanding and Controlling the Growth of Monodisperse CdS Nanowires in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xi, Lifei; Tan, Winnie Xiu Wen; Boothroyd, Chris;

    2008-01-01

    diffusion rate of the precursor and hence low reactivity. Therefore, ODPA is good for generating nearly monodisperse and high aspect ratio US nanowires. Our nanowires have a high degree of dispersibility and thus can be easily processed for potential applications as solar cells and transistors. Finally......Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires with a monodisperse diameter of 3.5 nm and length of about 600 nm were successfully synthesized using a simple and reproducible hot coordination solvents method. Structural characterization showed that the one-dimensional nanowires grow along the [001] direction......, we propose that the ODPA-to-Cd mole ratio is the key factor affecting the morphology of the nanowires because it affects both the cleavage rate of the P=S double bond and the nucleation/growth rate of the anisotropic nanocrystals. In addition, it was found that Cd-ODPA complexes give rise to a low...

  7. Shape and phase control of CdS nanocrystals using cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monodispersed CdS nanocrystals with controllable shape and phase have been successfully synthesized in this study by adding cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis system. With the increase of the amount of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC added, the shape of the CdS nanocrystals changed from spherical to multi-armed, and the phase changed from zinc-blende to wurtzite. It was found that halide ion Cl- plays a key role in the transformation, and other halide ions such as Br- can also induce similar transformation. We proposed that the strong binding between Cd2+ and halide ions reduced the reactivity of the precursors, decreased the nuclei formed in the nucleation stage, and led to the high concentration of precursor in the growth stage, resulting in the increase of size and phase transformation of CdS nanocrystals. In addition, it was found that the multi-armed CdS nanocrystals lost quantum confinement effect because of the increase of the size with the increase of the concentration of CTAC.

  8. Growth Mechanisms of CdS Nanocrystals in Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Latterini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CdS nanocrystals were prepared in water-in-oil microemulsions. The nanocrystal properties, absorption and luminescence spectra and size distributions, were monitored at different times after mixing the microemulsions of the two precursors to obtain information on their growth mechanism. In particular, CdS nanocrystals were prepared using water-in-heptane or water-in-nonane microemulsions. The results obtained from the investigation of nanocrystals prepared using heptane as the organic phase, confirmed that nanocrystal nucleation is fast while their growth is determined by droplet exchange content rate. Size distribution histograms obtained from the sample at early time points after mixing presented a bimodal population having average sizes of 3.0 ± 0.1 and 5.8 ± 0.1 nm, thus indicating that surface process controls the nanocrystal growth. With longer reaction times the occurrence of water droplet coalescence is likely responsible for the formation of nanocrystal agglomerates. Using a water-in-nonane microemulsion, the droplet exchange rate can be modified, thus leading to smaller CdS nanocrystals. However, the development of structural defects cannot be excluded, as evidenced by the luminescence spectra of the suspension. In general, aging of the nanocrystal in the pristine microemulsion resulted in the development of cubic semiconductor nanostructures.

  9. Facile microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis of CdS nanocrystals with their photocatalytic activities under visible lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Chonghai, E-mail: chdeng@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Hefei University, Hefei 230022 (China); Tian, Xiaobo [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three kinds of CdS nanostructures have been controllably synthesized. • Ethanediamine acts as a phase and morphology controlling reagent. • Three CdS nanostructures display high visible light photocatalytic activities. • Cubic CdS-3 shows superior photocatalytic activity to the other hexagonal CdS. • The growth processes for fabrication of CdS nanocrystals are also discussed. - Abstract: Three kinds of CdS nanostructures, that is, hexagonal nanospheres (CdS-1), hierarchical caterpillar-fungus-like hexagonal nanorods (CdS-2) and hierarchical cubic microspheres (CdS-3), were controllably synthesized by a facile and one-pot microwave-assisted aqueous chemical method using ethanediamine as a phase and morphology controlling reagent. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The results show that CdS-1 is mainly composed of monodispersed hexagonal nanospheres with average diameters of about 100 nm; hexagonal CdS-2 has lengths in the range of 600–800 nm and diameters of 40–60 nm, assembled by nanoparticles about 20 nm in diameter; and CdS-3 is pure cubic microspheres with diameters in the range of 0.8–1.3 μm, aggregated by tiny nanograins with size of 5.8 nm. The band gap energies of CdS products were calculated to be 2.30, 2.31 and 2.24 eV observed from UV–vis DRS for CdS-1, CdS-2 and CdS-3, respectively. PL spectra of CdS samples showed that sphalerite CdS-3 possesses a very weak fluorescence, while wurtzite CdS-2 has a strongest green near-band edge emission (NBE) at 550 nm. The visible light photodegradation of methylene blue and rhodamine B in the presence of CdS photocatalysts illustrates that all of them display high photocatalytic activities. Significantly, the cubic CdS-3 exhibits more excellent photocatalytic

  10. An alternative route towards monodisperse CdS quantum dots for hybrid solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Fengfeng; Wang, Hao [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Xia, Zhouhui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Dai, Xiao; Cong, Shan [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Dong, Chao [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of New Mexico, ABQ 87120 (United States); Sun, Baoquan [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Lou, Yanhui, E-mail: yhlou@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Sun, Yinghui; Zhao, Jie [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Zou, Guifu, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Monodisperse CdS quantum dots (QDs) are synthesized by thermal decomposition of organic complexes in the system of the cost-effective commercial 0{sup #} diesel at 200 °C. The prepared CdS QDs have a good dispersion and high crystallization. When the CdS QDs are doped into the blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl-(6, 6)C61 (PCBM) for hybrid solar cells (HSCs), the HSCs achieve about 25% increase of power conversion efficiency in comparison to the reference device without the CdS QDs. The improvement of the cell performance mainly attributes to the increased short-circuit current density arising from the absorption enhancement in the wavelength range of 350–550 nm by introducing the synthesized CdS QDs into the P3HT: PCBM active layer. - Highlights: • Monodisperse CdS quantum dots. • A cost-effective route to synthesize crystalline CdS quantum dots. • CdS quantum dots based hybrid solar cells with power conversion efficiency enhancement.

  11. Aqueous dispersion of monodisperse magnetic iron oxide nanocrystals through phase transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, William W [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Chang, Emmanuel [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Sayes, Christie M [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Drezek, Rebekah [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Colvin, Vicki L [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2006-09-14

    A facile method was developed for completely transferring high quality monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals from organic solvents to water. The as-prepared aqueous dispersions of iron oxide nanocrystals were extremely stable and could be functionalized for bioconjugation with biomolecules. These iron oxide nanocrystals showed negligible cytotoxicity to human breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and human dermal fibroblast cells. This method is general and versatile for many organic solvent-synthesized nanoparticles, including fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals.

  12. Efficient thermolysis route to monodisperse Cu₂ZnSnS₄ nanocrystals with controlled shape and structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Guobiao; Ji, Cheng; Huang, Kai; Zha, Chenyang; Wang, Yifeng; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2014-01-01

    Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals with tunable shape, crystalline phase, and composition are synthesized by efficient thermolysis of a single source precursor of mixed metal-oleate complexes in hot organic solvents...

  13. Microwave Synthesized Monodisperse CdS Spheres of Different Size and Color for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Rodríguez-Castañeda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse CdS spheres of size of 40 to 140 nm were obtained by microwave heating from basic solutions. It is observed that larger CdS spheres were formed at lower solution pH (8.4–8.8 and smaller ones at higher solution pH (10.8–11.3. The color of CdS products changed with solution pH and reaction temperature; those synthesized at lower pH and temperature were of green-yellow color, whereas those formed at higher pH and temperature were of orange-yellow color. A good photovoltage was observed in CdS:poly(3-hexylthiophene solar cells with spherical CdS particles. This is due to the good dispersion of CdS nanoparticles in P3HT solution that led to a large interface area between the organic and inorganic semiconductors. Higher photocurrent density was obtained in green-yellow CdS particles of lower defect density. The efficient microwave chemistry accelerated the hydrolysis of thiourea in pH lower than 9 and produced monodisperse spherical CdS nanoparticles suitable for solar cell applications.

  14. Luminescence in Mn-doped CdS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angshuman Nag; Sameer Sapra; Subhra Sen Gupta; Ankita Prakash; Ajit Ghangrekar; N Periasamy; D D Sarma

    2008-06-01

    We have synthesized Mn-doped CdS nanocrystals (NCs) with size ranging from 1.8–3 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the doped NCs differ from that of the undoped NCs with an additional peak due to Mn – transitions. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra along with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and PL spectra confirm the incorporation of Mn in the CdS lattice. The fact that emissions from surface states and the Mn levels occur at two different energies, allowed us to study the PL lifetime decay behaviour of both kinds of emissions.

  15. A steady blue-emitting CdS nanocrystals-polystyrene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, H.T. [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing (China); Zhao, P.Q. [Nanjing University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing (China); Nanjing University, Department of Physics, Nanjing (China)

    2013-02-15

    CdS nanocrystals with narrow size distribution were synthesized in an organic solution and transparent CdS nanocrystals/polystyrene composite films were fabricated. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, photoluminescence and Raman spectra were adopted to investigate these samples. The result of photoluminescence measurement shows that the composite films exhibit distinct luminescence properties of more stable emission and a narrower full-width at half-maximum than that of CdS nanocrystals in solution. Detailed analysis of the Raman spectra has enabled us to identify the origin of the optimized optoelectronic properties of the CdS nanocrystals-polystyrene composites films. (orig.)

  16. Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse Gold Nanocrystals Using Virola oleifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milaneze, Bárbara A.; Oliveira, Jairo P.; Augusto, Ingrid; Keijok, Wanderson J.; Côrrea, Andressa S.; Ferreira, Débora M.; Nunes, Otalíbio C.; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R.; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R.; Celante, Vinícius G.; da Silva, André Romero; Pereira, Ana Claudia H.; Endringer, Denise C.; Schuenck, Ricardo P.; Guimarães, Marco C. C.

    2016-10-01

    The development of new routes and strategies for nanotechnology applications that only employ green synthesis has inspired investigators to devise natural systems. Among these systems, the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts has been actively developed as an alternative, efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe method for producing nanoparticles, and this approach is also suitable for large-scale synthesis. This study reports reproducible and completely natural gold nanocrystals that were synthesized using Virola oleifera extract. V. oleifera resin is rich in epicatechin, ferulic acid, gallic acid, and flavonoids (i.e., quercetin and eriodictyol). These gold nanoparticles play three roles. First, these nanoparticles exhibit remarkable stability based on their zeta potential. Second, these nanoparticles are functionalized with flavonoids, and third, an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly mechanism can be employed to produce green nanoparticles with organic compounds on the surface. Our model is capable of reducing the resin of V. oleifera, which creates stability and opens a new avenue for biological applications. This method does not require painstaking conditions or hazardous agents and is a rapid, efficient, and green approach for the fabrication of monodisperse gold nanoparticles.

  17. DMSO as a solvent/ligand to monodisperse CdS spherical nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kaijun [China Pharmaceutical University, Physical Chemistry Lab, School of Science (China); Han, Qiaofeng, E-mail: hanqiaofeng@njust.edu.cn [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for Soft Chemistry and Functional Materials, Ministry of Education (China)

    2016-01-15

    Monodisperse CdS nanospheres assembled by small nanoparticles were prepared using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent through several routes including thermolysis of xanthate, the reaction of cadmium acetate (Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}) with thiourea, and interfacial reaction of CS{sub 2} and Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}/DMSO. The corresponding products possessed the particle sizes ranging from around 35 to 45 nm, 63 to 73 nm, and 240 to 280 nm, respectively. These products presented uniform spherical morphology, which provide insights into the effect of DMSO on CdS morphology. DMSO, as an aprotic and polar solvent, possesses unique properties. The oxygen and sulfur atoms in DMSO can coordinate to metal ions on nanoparticles surface, and the high polarity of DMSO is favorable to fast reaction, nucleation, growth, and Ostwald ripening, forming monodisperse nanospheres with narrow size distribution. The influence of CdS size on its photocatalytic activity was evaluated using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model compound under visible light irradiation.

  18. Shape-dependent electrocatalytic activity of monodispersed palladium nanocrystals toward formic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuwei; Yin, Huajie; Wang, Jinfeng; Chang, Lin; Gao, Yan; Liu, Wei; Tang, Zhiyong

    2013-09-21

    The catalytic activity of different-shaped and monodispersed palladium nanocrystals, including cubes, octahedra and rhombic dodecahedra, toward the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid has been systematically evaluated in both HClO4 and H2SO4 solutions. Notably, the cubic palladium nanocrystals wholly exposed with {100} facets exhibit the highest activity, while the rhombic dodecahedra with {110} facets show the lowest electrocatalytic performance. Furthermore, compared with HClO4 electrolyte, the catalytic activity is found to be obviously lower in H2SO4 solution likely due to the competitive adsorption of SO4(2-) ions and formic acid on the surface of Pd nanocrystals.

  19. One-Step Synthesis of Monodisperse In-Doped ZnO Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang QingLing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A method for the synthesis of high quality indium-doped zinc oxide (In-doped ZnO nanocrystals was developed using a one-step ester elimination reaction based on alcoholysis of metal carboxylate salts. The resulting nearly monodisperse nanocrystals are well-crystallized with typically crystal structure identical to that of wurtzite type of ZnO. Structural, optical, and elemental analyses on the products indicate the incorporation of indium into the host ZnO lattices. The individual nanocrystals with cubic structures were observed in the 5% In–ZnO reaction, due to the relatively high reactivity of indium precursors. Our study would provide further insights for the growth of doped oxide nanocrystals, and deepen the understanding of doping process in colloidal nanocrystal syntheses.

  20. Shape-dependent electrocatalytic activity of monodispersed palladium nanocrystals toward formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuwei; Yin, Huajie; Wang, Jinfeng; Chang, Lin; Gao, Yan; Liu, Wei; Tang, Zhiyong

    2013-08-01

    The catalytic activity of different-shaped and monodispersed palladium nanocrystals, including cubes, octahedra and rhombic dodecahedra, toward the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid has been systematically evaluated in both HClO4 and H2SO4 solutions. Notably, the cubic palladium nanocrystals wholly exposed with {100} facets exhibit the highest activity, while the rhombic dodecahedra with {110} facets show the lowest electrocatalytic performance. Furthermore, compared with HClO4 electrolyte, the catalytic activity is found to be obviously lower in H2SO4 solution likely due to the competitive adsorption of SO42- ions and formic acid on the surface of Pd nanocrystals.The catalytic activity of different-shaped and monodispersed palladium nanocrystals, including cubes, octahedra and rhombic dodecahedra, toward the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid has been systematically evaluated in both HClO4 and H2SO4 solutions. Notably, the cubic palladium nanocrystals wholly exposed with {100} facets exhibit the highest activity, while the rhombic dodecahedra with {110} facets show the lowest electrocatalytic performance. Furthermore, compared with HClO4 electrolyte, the catalytic activity is found to be obviously lower in H2SO4 solution likely due to the competitive adsorption of SO42- ions and formic acid on the surface of Pd nanocrystals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03100d

  1. Efficient thermolysis route to monodisperse Cu₂ZnSnS₄ nanocrystals with controlled shape and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Guobiao; Ji, Cheng; Huang, Kai; Zha, Chenyang; Wang, Yifeng; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2014-05-28

    Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals with tunable shape, crystalline phase, and composition are synthesized by efficient thermolysis of a single source precursor of mixed metal-oleate complexes in hot organic solvents with dissolved sulfur sources. Suitable tuning of the synthetic conditions and the Cu/(Zn + Sn) ratio of the precursor has enabled precise control of the crystalline phase in the form of kesterite, or a newly observed wurtzite structure. Nanocrystals with morphology in the form of spherical, rice-like, or rod-like shapes are obtained over a wide range of compositions (0.5 ≤ Cu/(Zn + Sn) ≤ 1.2). Both the final products and intermediates for each shape exhibit consistent composition and structure, indicating homogenous nucleation and growth of single-phase nanocrystals. Thin films prepared from colloidal nanocrystal suspensions display interesting shape-dependent photoresponse behavior under white light illumination from a solar simulator.

  2. Formation and spectroscopic characterization of mono-dispersed CdSe nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Yan-Ming; Li Chao-Rong; Cao Li; Liu Rui-Bin; He Yu-Ping; Xie Si-Shen; Zou Bing-Suo

    2005-01-01

    In this article, mono-dispersed hexagonal structure CdSe nanocrystals with polyhedron shape were prepared by an open solvent thermal reaction. They show a discrete excitonic transition structure in the absorption spectra and the minimal photoluminescence (PL) peak full-width at half-maximum of 19nm. The PL quantum yield is about 60%. Transmission electron micrographs, high-resolution transmission electron micrographs, x-ray powder diffraction patterns, UV-vis absorption spectra and PL spectra were obtained for the as-prepared CdSe nanocrystals. The size of the CdSe nanocrystals can be tuned by changing the reaction temperature or time. Due to the improved synthesis method, a different growth mechanism of the CdSe nanocrystals is discussed.

  3. Structural disorder versus spin canting in monodisperse maghemite nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubickova, S.; Vejpravova, J., E-mail: vejpravo@fzu.cz [Department of Magnetic Nanosystems, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Niznansky, D. [Faculty of Science, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 2030, 128 40 Prague (Czech Republic); Morales Herrero, M. P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Salas, G. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, Campus Universitario de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-02

    Monodisperse maghemite nanoparticles with diameter ranging from 7 to 20 nm were examined by the In-field Mössbauer Spectroscopy (IFMS) in varying external magnetic field up to 6 T. Surprisingly, the small-sized particles (7 nm) exhibit nearly no spin canting in contrast to the larger particles with lower surface-to-volume ratio. We demonstrate that the observed phenomenon is originated by lower relative crystallinity of the larger particles with different internal structure. Hence, the persistence of the 2nd and 5th absorption lines in the IFMS cannot be unambiguously assigned to the surface spins.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of CdSe Nanocrystals Capped by CdS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xing-guang; LIN Zhang-bi; HU Hai; ZHANG Jia-hua; JIN Qin-han

    2003-01-01

    CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals capped by CdS were synthesized in the aqueous solution with 2-mercaptoethanol as the stabilizer. The CdS capping with a higher band-gap than that of the core crystallite has successfully eliminated the surface traps. Optical absorption and fluorescence emission spectra were used to probe the effect of CdS passivation on the electronic structure of the nanocrystals. The composite CdSe/CdS nanocrystals exhibit strong, narrow(FWHM≤40 nm) and stable band-edge photoluminescence. X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to analyze the composite nanocrystals and determine their average size, size distribution, shape, internal structure and elemental composition.

  5. Effect of Sulfur Precursor on Dimensions of One-dimensional CdS Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Maleki; Sh. Mirdamadi; R.Ghasemzadeh; M.Sasani Ghamsari

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional CdS nanocrystals have been prepared by solvothermal method using cadmium acetate as a cadmium precursor, elemental sulfur and Na2S, as a sulfur precursor, and ethylenediamine as a solvent at 150℃ for 5 h. The nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. XRD patterns indicate that both Na2S and elemental sulfur as the sulfur precursor result in CdS nanorods with wurtzite phase (hexagonal structure). SEM and TEM images show that diameter of CdS nanorods can be decreased using Na2S instead of elemental sulfur. For the growth of CdS nanorods, a mechanism has been proposed. Uv-Vis absorption of CdS nanorods (sulfur precursor: Na2S) was shown blue shift to 485 nm due to the quantum size effect.

  6. A ceramic microreactor for the synthesis of water soluble CdS and CdS/ZnS nanocrystals with on-line optical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Sara Gómez-De; Puyol, Mar; Izquierdo, David; Salinas, Iñigo; de La Fuente, J. M.; Alonso-Chamarro, Julián

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a computer controlled microreactor to synthesize water soluble CdS and CdS/ZnS nanocrystals with in situ monitoring of the reaction progress is developed. It is based on ceramic tapes and the Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramics technology (LTCC). As well the microsystem set-up, the microreactor fluidic design has also been thoroughly optimized. The final device is based on a hydrodynamic focusing of the reagents followed by a three-dimensional micromixer. This generates monodispersed and stable CdS and core-shell CdS/ZnS nanocrystals of 4.5 and 4.2 nm, respectively, with reproducible optical properties in terms of fluorescence emission wavelengths, bandwidth, and quantum yields, which is a key requirement for their future analytical applications. The synthetic process is also controlled in real time with the integration of an optical detection system for absorbance and fluorescence measurements based on commercial miniaturized optical components. This makes possible the efficient managing of the hydrodynamic variables to obtain the desired colloidal suspension. As a result, a simple, economic, robust and portable microsystem for the well controlled synthesis of CdS and CdS/ZnS nanocrystals is presented. Moreover, the reaction takes place in aqueous medium, thus allowing the direct modular integration of this microreactor in specific analytical microsystems, which require the use of such quantum dots as labels.

  7. Noninjection Synthesis of CdS and Alloyed CdSxSe1−xNanocrystals Without Nucleation Initiators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CdS and alloyed CdSxSe1−x nanocrystals were prepared by a simple noninjection method without nucleation initiators. Oleic acid (OA was used to stabilize the growth of the CdS nanocrystals. The size of the CdS nanocrystals can be tuned by changing the OA/Cd molar ratios. On the basis of the successful synthesis of CdS nanocrystals, alloyed CdSxSe1−x nanocrystals can also be prepared by simply replacing certain amount of S precursor with equal amount of Se precursor, verified by TEM, XRD, EDX as well as UV–Vis absorption analysis. The optical properties of the alloyed CdSxSe1−x nanocrystals can be tuned by adjusting the S/Se feed molar ratios. This synthetic approach developed is highly reproducible and can be readily scaled up for potential industrial production.

  8. Enzyme mediated synthesis of phytochelatin-capped CdS nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Kang, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young-In; Choa, Yong-ho; Mulchandani, Ashok; Myung, Nosang V.; Chen, Wilfred

    2010-09-01

    We reported the enzyme mediated synthesis of CdS nanocrystals by immobilized phytochelatin synthase, which converts glutathione into the metal-binding peptide phytochelatin (PC). Formation of CdS nanocrystals were observed upon the addition of CdCl2 and Na2S with PC as the capping agent. By varying the reaction times, different compositions of PCs (form PC2 to PC3) can be synthesized, resulting in the formation of highly stable nanocrystals with tunable sizes (from 2.0 to 1.6 nm diameter). This approach may be generalized to guide the in vitro self assembly of a wide range of nanocrystals with different compositions and sizes.

  9. Small silicon, big opportunities: the development and future of colloidally-stable monodisperse silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, Melanie L; Henderson, Eric J; Puzzo, Daniel P; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2012-11-14

    Nanomaterials are becoming increasingly widespread in consumer technologies, but there is global concern about the toxicity of nanomaterials to humans and the environment as they move rapidly from the research laboratory to the market place. With this in mind, it makes sense to intensify the nanochemistry community's global research effort on the synthesis and study of nanoparticles that are purportedly "green". One potentially green nanoparticle that seems to be a most promising candidate in this context is silicon, whose appealing optical, optoelectronic, photonic, and biomedical attributes are recently gaining much attention. In this paper, we outline some of our recent contributions to the development of the growing field of silicon nanocrystals (ncSi) in order to stress the importance of continued study of ncSi as a green alternative to the archetypal semiconductor nanocrystals like CdSe, InAs, and PbS. While a variety of developments in synthetic methods, characterization techniques, and applications have been reported in recent years, the ability to prepare colloidally-stable monodisperse ncSi samples may prove to have the largest impact on the field, as it opens the door to study and access the tunable size-dependent properties of ncSi. Here, we summarize our recent contributions in size-separation methods to achieve monodisperse samples, the characterization of size-dependant property trends, the development of ncSi applications, and their potential impact on the promising future of ncSi.

  10. Solvothermal synthesis and controlled self-assembly of monodisperse titanium-based perovskite colloidal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruntu, Daniela; Rostamzadeh, Taha; Costanzo, Tommaso; Salemizadeh Parizi, Saman; Caruntu, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    The rational design of monodisperse ferroelectric nanocrystals with controlled size and shape and their organization into hierarchical structures has been a critical step for understanding the polar ordering in nanoscale ferroelectrics, as well as the design of nanocrystal-based functional materials which harness the properties of individual nanoparticles and the collective interactions between them. We report here on the synthesis and self-assembly of aggregate-free, single-crystalline titanium-based perovskite nanoparticles with controlled morphology and surface composition by using a simple, easily scalable and highly versatile colloidal route. Single-crystalline, non-aggregated BaTiO3 colloidal nanocrystals, used as a model system, have been prepared under solvothermal conditions at temperatures as low as 180 °C. The shape of the nanocrystals was tuned from spheroidal to cubic upon changing the polarity of the solvent, whereas their size was varied from 16 to 30 nm for spheres and 5 to 78 nm for cubes by changing the concentration of the precursors and the reaction time, respectively. The hydrophobic, oleic acid-passivated nanoparticles exhibit very good solubility in non-polar solvents and can be rendered dispersible in polar solvents by a simple process involving the oxidative cleavage of the double bond upon treating the nanopowders with the Lemieux-von Rudloff reagent. Lattice dynamic analysis indicated that regardless of their size, BaTiO3 nanocrystals present local disorder within the perovskite unit cell, associated with the existence of polar ordering. We also demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to being used for fabricating large area, crack-free, highly uniform films, BaTiO3 nanocubes can serve as building blocks for the design of 2D and 3D mesoscale structures, such as superlattices and superparticles. Interestingly, the type of superlattice structure (simple cubic or face centered cubic) appears to be determined by the type of solvent

  11. Near-Monodisperse Ni-Cu Bimetallic Nanocrystals of Variable Composition: Controlled Synthesis and Catalytic Activity for H2 Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yawen; Huang, Wenyu; Habas, Susan E.; Kuhn, John N.; Grass, Michael E.; Yamada, Yusuke; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-22

    Near-monodisperse Ni{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} (x = 0.2-0.8) bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized by a one-pot thermolysis approach in oleylamine/1-octadecene, using metal acetylacetonates as precursors. The nanocrystals form large-area 2D superlattices, and display a catalytic synergistic effect in the hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} to generate H{sub 2} at x = 0.5 in a strongly basic medium. The Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5} nanocrystals show the lowest activation energy, and also exhibit the highest H{sub 2} generation rate at 298 K.

  12. Efficient one-pot synthesis of monodisperse alkyl-terminated colloidal germanium nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carolan, Darragh, E-mail: darragh.carolan@tyndall.ie; Doyle, Hugh, E-mail: hugh.doyle@tyndall.ie [University College Cork, Tyndall National Institute (Ireland)

    2014-12-15

    An efficient one-pot method for fabricating alkyl-capped germanium nanocrystals (Ge NCs) is reported. Ge NCs with a size of 3.9 ± 0.5 nm, are formed by co-reduction of germanium tetrachloride in the presence of n-butyltrichlorogermane, producing NCs with butyl-terminated surfaces. The advantage of this method is that it allows rapid synthesis and functionalisation of NCs with minimal post-synthetic purification requirements. TEM imaging showed that the Ge NCs are monodisperse and highly crystalline, while EDX and SAED confirmed the chemical identity and crystal phase of the NCs. FTIR and XPS confirmed that the Ge NCs were well passivated, with some oxidation of the nanocrystal surface. Optical spectroscopy of the NCs showed a strong absorbance in the UV region and an excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence in the UV/violet. Time resolved photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of two nanosecond lifetime components, consistent with recombination of photogenerated excitons at low lying energy states present at the nanocrystal surface. Photoluminescence quantum yields were determined to be 37 %, one of the highest values reported for organically terminated Ge NCs.

  13. Ionic liquid-assisted synthesis, structural characterization, and photocatalytic performance of CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Kaisheng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, Henan 471003 (China); Lu Weiwei [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, Henan 471003 (China); Wang Jianji, E-mail: jwang@henannu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} Short nanorods, quasi-nanospheres and faceted CdS NPs were prepared with the assistance of an IL. {yields} The CdS samples show hexagonal phase structures. {yields} Shape, size and crystallinity of the products could be controllably synthesized. {yields} The samples demonstrated a highly photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methyl orange. - Abstract: With the assistance of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentylphosphinate), we have successfully synthesized short nanorods, quasi-nanospheres and faceted CdS nanoparticles via thermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complexes. It was shown that the shape, size and crystallinity of the products could be controlled through delicate regulation of the reaction temperature, monomer concentration, reaction time, and ionic liquid ratio. We found that higher temperature was beneficial to the good crystallinity, while the lower temperature and higher monomer concentration were in favor of anisotropic structures. The used ionic liquid contributed to the formation of hexagonal phase CdS nanocrystals, and its ratio played an important role in determining the ultimate morphology of products. The possible mechanism for the formation CdS nanocrystals was proposed. Furthermore, the as-prepared CdS samples demonstrated a highly photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methyl orange under visible light irradiation.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of monodisperse Ni, Zn-ferrite nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevkumar.dubey2@gmail.com [University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun, Uttarakhand (India); Kumar, Pankaj [University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun, Uttarakhand (India); Singh, Vaishali [University School of Basic and Applied Science (India); Kumar Mandal, Uttam [University of Chemical Technology, GGS Indraprastha University, Sector 16, Dwarka, Delhi 110403 (India); Kumar Kotnala, Ravinder [National Physical laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2015-04-01

    Synthesization of monodisperse Ni, Zn-ferrite (Ni{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, x=1, 0.8, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4, 0.2, 0.0) nanocrystals has been achieved by the inverse microemulsion method using CTAB as surfactant and kerosene as an oil phase. The detailed characterization of the synthesized nanocrystals and measurement of the magnetic properties has been done by techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FITR) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) respectively. The relationship between the structure and composition of the nanocrystals with magnetic properties has been investigated. The nanocrystals size is found to be in the range 1–5 nm. The effect of Zn substitution on size and magnetic properties has been studied. It has been observed that magnetism changed from ferromagnetic at X= 0 to super paramagnetic to paramagnetic at X=1 as Zn concentration increased. The Curie temperature is found to decrease with an increase in Zn concentration. - Highlights: • Reverse microemulsion route is very facile route for synthesis of Ni{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite. • Presence of Zn changes the structural and magnetic properties of the Zn substituted NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4.} • The lattice constant increases with the increase in Zn substitution. • The curie temperature decreases with Zn concentration appreciably. • Magnetic behavior varies from ferromagnetic at x=0 to superparamagnetic to paramagnetic at x=1.

  15. Microstructure analysis of chemically synthesized wurtzite-type CdS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEKA KULDEEP; KALITA M P C

    2016-05-01

    Microstructure of chemically synthesized wurtzite-type CdS nanocrystals have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak profile analysis by applying different forms of Williamson–Hall (WH) method viz., uniform deformation model (UDM), uniform stress deformation model (USDM) and uniform deformation energy density model (UDEDM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. The WH methods show the average crystallite size to beabout 10 nm. Strain, stress and energy density of the nanocrystals are found to be $1.18 \\times 10^{−2}, 0.43$ GPa and $2.27$ kJ m$^{−3}$, respectively. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) results show the nanocrystals to be in spherical shape with an average crystallite size of 10 nm, thereby complementing the size estimation by WH methods. Further, HRTEM observations reveal the presence of edge dislocations and twin boundaries within the nanocrystals.

  16. Efficient Thermolysis Route to Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystals with Controlled Shape and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Guobiao; Ji, Cheng; Huang, Kai; Zha, Chenyang; Wang, Yifeng; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2014-05-01

    Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals with tunable shape, crystalline phase, and composition are synthesized by efficient thermolysis of a single source precursor of mixed metal-oleate complexes in hot organic solvents with dissolved sulfur sources. Suitable tuning of the synthetic conditions and the Cu/(Zn + Sn) ratio of the precursor has enabled precise control of the crystalline phase in the form of kesterite, or a newly observed wurtzite structure. Nanocrystals with morphology in the form of spherical, rice-like, or rod-like shapes are obtained over a wide range of compositions (0.5 <= Cu/(Zn + Sn) <= 1.2). Both the final products and intermediates for each shape exhibit consistent composition and structure, indicating homogenous nucleation and growth of single-phase nanocrystals. Thin films prepared from colloidal nanocrystal suspensions display interesting shape-dependent photoresponse behavior under white light illumination from a solar simulator.

  17. Phase transfer of CdS nanocrystals mediated by heptamine β-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depalo, Nicoletta; Comparelli, Roberto; Huskens, Jurriaan; Ludden, Manon J W; Perl, Andras; Agostiano, Angela; Striccoli, Marinella; Curri, M Lucia

    2012-06-12

    A fundamental and systematic study on the fabrication of a supramolecularly assembled nanostructure of an organic ligand-capped CdS nanocrystal (NC) and multiple heptamine β-cyclodextrin ((NH(2))(7)βCD) molecules in aqueous solution has been here reported. The functionalization process of presynthesized hydrophobic CdS NCs by means of (NH(2))(7)βCD has been extensively investigated by using different spectroscopic and structural techniques, as a function of different experimental parameters, such as the composition and the concentration of CD, the concentration of CdS NCs, the nature of the NC surface capping ligand (oleic acid and octylamine), and the organic solvent. The formation of a complex based on the direct coordination of the (NH(2))(7)βCD amine groups at the NC surface has been demonstrated and found responsible for the CdS NC phase transfer process. The amine functional group in (NH(2))(7)βCD and the appropriate combination of pristine capping agent coordinating the NC surface and a suitable solvent have been found decisive for the success of the CdS NC phase transfer process. Furthermore, a layer-by-layer assembly experiment has indicated that the obtained (NH(2))(7)βCD functionalized CdS NCs are still able to perform the host-guest chemistry. Thus, they offer a model of a nanoparticle-based material with molecular receptors, useful for bio applications.

  18. White light emitting Ho{sup 3+}-doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained glass nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Goswami, Madhumita [Glass and Advanced Materials Division, Bhaba Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-02-23

    We report the generation of white light from Ho{sup 3+} ion doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained borosilicate glass nanocomposites prepared by the conventional melt-quench method. Near visible 405 nm diode laser excited white light emission is produced by tuning the blue emission from the Ho{sup 3+} ions, green band edge, and orange-red surface-state emissions of the nanocrystalline CdS, which are further controlled by the size of the nanocrystals. The absorption and emission spectra evidenced the excitation of Ho{sup 3+} ions by absorption of photons emitted by the CdS nanocrystals. The high color rendering index (CRI = 84–89) and befitting chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.308–0.309, y = 0.326–0.338) of white light emission, near visible harmless excitation wavelength (405 nm), and high absorbance values at excitation wavelength point out that these glass nanocomposites may serve as a prominent candidate for resin free high power white light emitting diodes.

  19. Patterned structures of in situ size controlled CdS nanocrystals in a polymer matrix under UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragouli, D; Pompa, P P; Caputo, G; Cingolani, R; Athanassiou, A [NNL-National Nanotechnology Laboratory, INFM, CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Resta, V; Laera, A M; Tapfer, L [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Brindisi, SS7 Appia Km 706, I-72100 Brindisi (Italy)], E-mail: despina.fragouli@unile.it

    2009-04-15

    A method of in situ formation of patterns of size controlled CdS nanocrystals in a polymer matrix by pulsed UV irradiation is presented. The films consist of Cd thiolate precursors with different carbon chain lengths embedded in TOPAS polymer matrices. Under UV irradiation the precursors are photolyzed, driving to the formation of CdS nanocrystals in the quantum size regime, with size and concentration defined by the number of incident UV pulses, while the host polymer remains macroscopically/microscopically unaffected. The emission of the formed nanocomposite materials strongly depends on the dimensions of the CdS nanocrystals, thus, their growth at the different phases of the irradiation is monitored using spatially resolved photoluminescence by means of a confocal microscope. X-ray diffraction measurements verified the existence of the CdS nanocrystals, and defined their crystal structure for all the studied cases. The results are reinforced by transmission electron microscopy. It is proved that the selection of the precursor determines the efficiency of the procedure, and the quality of the formed nanocrystals. Moreover it is demonstrated that there is the possibility of laser induced formation of well-defined patterns of CdS nanocrystals, opening up new perspectives in the development of nanodevices.

  20. Facile Droplet-based Microfluidic Synthesis of Monodisperse IV-VI Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Coupled In-Line NIR Fluorescence Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lignos, Ioannis; Protesescu, Loredana; Stavrakis, Stavros; Piveteau, Laura; Speirs, Mark J.; Loi, Maria A.; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; deMello, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the realization of a droplet-based microfluidic platform for the controlled and reproducible synthesis of lead chalcogenide (PbS, PbSe) nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs). Monodisperse nanocrystals were synthesized over a wide range of experimental conditions, with real-time assessment and f

  1. Unusual Blueshifting of Optical Band Gap of CdS Nanocrystals through a Chemical Bath Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Qing Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CdS nanocrystals are synthesized through a chemical bath deposition method. After annealing, these nanocrystals are enlarged according to Scherrer’s formula. Small nanocrystals display wide band gaps as a result of the quantum effect experienced by nanocrystals of a certain size. However, the absorption edge and green and red emissions of annealed CdS nanocrystals show obvious blueshift compared with the as-grown ones. After annealing, the intensity ratio of these green and red emissions increases, which indicated that the defect states are reduced. Therefore, the improvement in crystalline quality and the reduced strain contribute to the unusual blueshifting of the optical band gap and of the green and red emissions.

  2. Synthesis of Monodisperse Nanocrystals via Microreaction: Open-to-Air Synthesis with Oleylamine as a Coligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microreaction provides a controllable tool to synthesize CdSe nanocrystals (NCs in an accelerated fashion. However, the surface traps created during the fast growth usually result in low photoluminescence (PL efficiency for the formed products. Herein, the reproducible synthesis of highly luminescent CdSe NCs directly in open air was reported, with a microreactor as the controllable reaction tool. Spectra investigation elucidated that applying OLA both in Se and Cd stock solutions could advantageously promote the diffusion between the two precursors, resulting in narrow full-width-at-half maximum (FWHM of PL (26 nm. Meanwhile, the addition of OLA in the source solution was demonstrated helpful to improve the reactivity of Cd monomer. In this case, the focus of size distribution was accomplished during the early reaction stage. Furthermore, if the volume percentage (vol.% of OLA in the precursors exceeded a threshold of 37.5%, the resulted CdSe NCs demonstrated long-term fixing of size distribution up to 300 s. The observed phenomena facilitated the preparation of a size series of monodisperse CdSe NCs merely by the variation of residence time. With the volume percentage of OLA as 37.5% in the source solution, a 78 nm tuning of PL spectra (from 507 to 585 was obtained through the variation of residence time from 2 s to 160 s, while maintaining narrow FMWH of PL (26–31 nm and high QY of PL (35–55%.

  3. Structural and optical properties of solvothermal synthesized nearly monodispersed CdSe nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, A. K.; Pandey, B. K.; Singh, B. P.; Gopal, R.

    2016-09-01

    Water soluble nearly monodisperse CdSe nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized via aqueous phase solvothermal route in non ionic surfactant glycolic acid ethoxylate 4-non phenyl ether (GAEPE). X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to determine the phase, structural parameters such as lattice constants, strain, x-ray density and specific surface area, morphology, shape and size distribution, respectively, whereas optical properties are studied by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. All the diffraction peaks of XRD pattern indexed to wurtzite phase of hexagonal system of CdSe and crystallite sizes estimated to be 13-29 nm along some stronger and narrower peaks which is also consistent with TEM measurement while crystallinity and defects have been analyzed with selective area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern. Optical absorption spectrum shows that the as prepared sample exhibits primary and secondary absorption band centered at 2.15 eV and 1.82 eV, respectively, which is blue shifted as compared to bulk value (1.74 eV) of band gap due to quantum confinement effect. Photoluminescence spectrum shows sharp excitonic emission band centered at 583 nm which is nearer to primary band gap energy.

  4. Synthesis and Characterizations of Bare CdS Nanocrystals Using Chemical Precipitation Method for Photoluminescence Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bare cadmium sulfide (CdS nanocrystals were successfully synthesized by the thermolysis of a single-source organometallic precursor, cadmium chloride hemipentahydrate (CdCl2⋅2.5H2O with thiourea in ethanol. The microstructure of the CdS samples was characterized using XRD, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The XRD's results showed that there was a transformation from cubic to hexagonal crystalline phase when higher mass of CdCl2⋅2.5H2O was used. Further experimental with different Cd2+ source showed ion Cl− originated from CdCl2⋅2.5H2O attributed to this crystalline phase transformation. The UV-Visible analysis indicated that quantum confinement effect took place when compared to the bulk CdS. However, the photoluminescence experiments revealed that the red-light emission was observed in all samples. This finding could be ascribed to deep trap defects that were due to sulfur vacancies as suggested by XPS and also the fact that the bare CdS nanoparticles are in contact with each other as shown in the TEM images.

  5. Synthesis and white-light emission character of CdS magic-sized nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Dong Wang; Shu Min Han; Dan Dan Ke

    2012-01-01

    Family 373 and 406 of CdS magic-sized nanocrystals (MSNCs) were synthesized by a one-pot non-injection approach and white-light emission was generated from the coexistence of them.This light had excellent color characteristics,as defined by their pure white CIE (Commission Intemational de l'Eclairage) color coordinates (0.328,0.343),and it correlated with a color temperature of 5696 K.A probable thermodynamic equilibrium was proposed to explain the white-light emission behavior in this letter.

  6. Swift heavy ion irradiation effect on Cu-doped CdS nanocrystals embedded in PMMA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shweta Agrawal; Subodh Srivastava; Sumit Kumar; S S Sharma; B Tripathi; M Singh; Y K Vijay

    2009-12-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) have received much interest for their optical and electronic properties. When these NCs dispersed in polymer matrix, brightness of the light emission is enhanced due to their quantum dot size. The CdCuS NCs have been synthesized by chemical route method and then dispersed in PMMA matrix. These nanocomposite polymer films were irradiated by swift heavy ion (SHI) (100 MeV, Si+7 ions beam) at different fluences of 1 × 1010 and 1 × 1012 ions/cm2 and then compared their structural and optical properties by XRD, atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and UV-Vis spectroscopy before and after irradiation. The XRD spectra showed a broad hump around 2 ≈ 11.83° due to amorphous PMMA and other peaks corresponding to hexagonal structure of CdS nanocrystals in PMMA matrix. The photoluminescence spectra shows a broad peak at 530 nm corresponding to green emission due to Cu impurities in CdS. The UV-Vis measurement showed red shift in optical absorption and bandgap changed from 4.38–3.60 eV as the irradiation fluency increased with respect to pristine CdCuS nanocomposite polymer film.

  7. Highly fluorescent semiconductor core shell CdTe CdS nanocrystals for monitoring living yeast cells activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; Menezes, F. D.; Brasil, A. G., Jr.; Ferreira, R.; Motta, M. A.; Castro-Neto, A. G.; Vieira, A. A. S.; Silva, D. C. N.; Fontes, A.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals in quantum confinement regime (quantum dots) present several well-known features which make them very useful tools for biological labeling purposes. Low photobleaching rates, high chemical stability and active surface allowing conjugation to living cells explain the success of this labeling procedure over the commonly used fluorescent dyes. In this paper we report the results obtained with highly fluorescent core shell CdTe CdS (diameter=3 7 nm) colloidal nanocrystals synthesized in aqueous medium and conjugated to glucose molecules. The conjugated nanocrystals were incubated with living yeast cells, in order to investigate their glucose up-take activity in real time, by confocal microscopy analysis.

  8. Effect of CdS nanocrystals on charge transport mechanism in poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Taukeer; Almohammedi, Abdullah

    2017-08-01

    The present manuscript demonstrates the optical and electrical characteristics of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and cadmium sulphide (CdS) hybrid nanocomposites. Optical results suggest that there is a formation of charge transfer complex (CTC) between host P3HT and guest CdS nanocrystals (NCs). Electrical properties of P3HT and P3HT-CdS thin films have been studied in hole only device configurations at different temperatures (290 K-150 K), and results were analysed by the space charge limited conduction mechanism. Density of traps and characteristic trap energy increase on incorporation of inorganic NCs in the polymer matrix, which might be due to the additional favourable energy states created by CdS NCs in the band gap of P3HT. These additional trap states assist charge carriers to move quicker which results in enhancement of hole mobility from 7 × 10-6 to 5.5 × 10-5 cm2/V s in nanocomposites. These results suggest that the P3HT-CdS hybrid system has desirable optical and electrical properties for its applications to photovoltaics devices.

  9. Synthesis of CdS nanocrystals in polymeric films studied by in-situ GID and GISAXS

    KAUST Repository

    Di Luccio, Tiziana

    2015-07-07

    In this work, we describe the synthesis of CdS nanocrystals in thin polymeric films by in-situ Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) and Grazing Incidence Small Angle Scattering (GISAXS). The 2D GISAXS patterns indicate how the precursor structure is altered as the temperature is varied from 25°C to 300°C. At 150°C, the CdS nanocrystals start to arrange themselves in a hexagonal lattice with a lattice parameter of 27 A. The diffraction intensity from the hexagonal lattice reaches a maximum at 170"C and decreases steadily upon further heating above 220°C indicating loss of symmetry. Correspondingly, the GID scans at 170°C show strong crystalline peaks from cubic CdS nanocrystals that are about 2 nm size. The results indicate that a temperature of 170°C is sufficient to synthesize CdS nanocrystals without degradation of the polymer matrix (Topas) in thin films (about 30nm). © 2015 Materials Research Society.

  10. Shape-controlled synthesis of protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) and study on the binding of Cd2+/CdS to trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Dezhi; Wang, Li; Wang, Yabo; Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Qiuxia; He, Bingyu

    2017-07-01

    Protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) with different morphology have been synthesized under biomimetic condition using trypsin as capping agent in aqueous medium. The reaction parameters including concentration of trypsin, pH value, reaction time, and temperature have a major influence on the morphology and optical property of CdS NCs. XRD, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), TEM, HRTEM, and EDS characterizations were used to investigate the structure, composition, morphology, and size of as-prepared products. The binding reaction between Cd2+/CdS and trypsin was investigated systematically through various spectroscopic methods. UV-vis, FT-IR, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and conductivity analysis of Cd2+-trypsin suggest that Cd2+ ions could coordinate with the functional groups of trypsin and induce the formation of unfolding and loosening structure in protein molecules, and the change of protein conformation was also verified by circular dichroism (CD) spectra. This interaction increased local supersaturation of Cd2+ ions around the groups of trypsin and reduced the nucleation activation energy of CdS nuclei, which favored heterogeneous nucleation in trypsin matrix and resulted in the formation of inorganic-organic hybrid materials. The functional integrity of the enzyme conjugated to CdS NCs was studied by monitoring the enzymatic activity of CdS-trypsin conjugates. The fluorescence of CdS NCs is dependent strongly on trypsin which passivates the surface of NCs.

  11. Direct anisotropic growth of CdS nanocrystals in thermotropic liquid crystal templates for heterojunction optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2014-09-01

    The direct growth of CdS nanocrystals in functional solid-state thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) small molecules and a conjugated LC polymer by in situ thermal decomposition of a single-source cadmium xanthate precursor to fabricate LC/CdS hybrid nanocomposites is described. The influence of thermal annealing temperature of the LC/CdS precursors upon the nanomorphology, photophysics, and optoelectronic properties of the LC/CdS nanocomposites is systematically studied. Steady-state PL and ultrafast emission dynamics studies show that the charge-transfer rates are strongly dependent on the thermal annealing temperature. Notably, annealing at liquid-crystal state temperature promotes a more organized nanomorphology of the LC/CdS nanocomposites with improved photophysics and optoelectronic properties. The results confirm that thermotropic LCs can be ideal candidates as organization templates for the control of organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposites at the nanoscale level. The results also demonstrate that in situ growth of semiconducting nanocrystals in thermotropic LCs is a versatile route to hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Microbe-Assisted Synthesis and Luminescence Properties of Monodispersed Tb3+-Doped ZnS Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanguo Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tb3+-doped zinc sulfide (ZnS:Tb3+ nanocrystals were synthesized by spray precipitation with sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB culture at room temperature. The morphology of the SRB and ZnS:Tb3+ nanocrystals was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and the ZnS:Tb3+ nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy. The PL mechanism of ZnS:Tb3+ nanocrystals was further analyzed, and the effects of Tb3+ ion concentration on the luminescence properties of ZnS:Tb3+ nanocrystals were studied. ZnS:Tb3+ nanocrystals showed a sphalerite phase, and the prepared ZnS:Tb3+ nanocrystals had high luminescence intensity under excitation at 369 nm. The main peak position of the absorption spectra positively blueshifted with increasing concentrations of Tb3+ dopant. Based on the strength of the peak of the excitation and emission spectra, we inferred that the optimum concentration of the Tb3+ dopant is 5 mol%. Four main emission peaks were obtained under excitation at 369 nm:489 nm (5D4→7F6, 545 nm (5D4→7F5, 594 nm (5D4→7F4, and 625 nm (5D4→7F3. Our findings suggest that nanocrystals have potential applications in photoelectronic devices and biomarkers.

  13. Rapid Fabrication of CdS Nanocrystals with Well Mesoporous Structure Under Ultrasound Irradiation at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Chang-lin; ZHOU Wan-qin; YU Jim-my; YANG Jian-gao; FAN Qi-zhe

    2012-01-01

    Sphere-like mesoporous CdS nanocrystals with high crystallinity and big surface area were successfully fabricated by ultrasound irradiation at room temperature.The as-synthesized CdS with and without ultrasound irradiation was investigated by the characterizations of X-ray diffraction(XRD),scanning electron microscopy(SEM),transmission electron microscopy(TEM),and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET) surface areas.The photocatalytic activity of the CdS was evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange under visible light(λ>420 nm) irradiation.A possible mechanism for the formation of the CdS nanocrystals with mesoporous structure under ultrasound irradiation was proposed.The results show that both the template role of the triblock copolymer of P123 and the effect of ultrasound-induced aggregation are mainly responsible for the formation of mesoporous structure.On the other hand,the energy generated from acoustic cavitation can effectively accelerate the crystallization process of the amorphous CdS.

  14. Ion beam synthesis of CdS, ZnS, and PbS compound semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, C.W.; Budai, J.D.; Meldrum, A.L. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Sequential ion implantation followed by thermal annealing has been used to form encapsulated CdS, ZnS, and PbS nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrices. In SiO{sub 2}, nanoparticles are nearly spherical and randomly oriented, and ZnS and PbS nanocrystals exhibit a bimodal size distribution. In Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, nanoparticles are faceted and coherent with the matrix. Initial photoluminescence (PL) results are presented.

  15. Bright CuInS2/CdS nanocrystal phosphors for high-gain full-spectrum luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Kilburn, Troy B; Alzate, Dane G; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-06-04

    The performance of colloidal CuInS2/CdS nanocrystals as phosphors for full-spectrum luminescent solar concentrators has been examined. Their combination of large solar absorption, high photoluminescence quantum yields, and only moderate reabsorption produces the highest projected flux gains of any nanocrystal luminophore to date.

  16. CDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The Centre de Donnees de Strasbourg (CDS) is a reference data centre for Astronomy. The CDS services; SIMBAD, Vizier, Aladin and X-Match, provide added value to scientific content in order to support the astronomy research community. Data and information are curated from refereed journals, major surveys, observatories and missions with a strong emphasis on maintaining a high level of quality. The current status and plans of the CDS will be presented, highlighting how the recent innovations of the HiPS (Hierarchical Progressive surveys) and MOC (Multi-Order Coverage map) systems enable the visualisation of hundreds of surveys and data sets, and brings new levels of interoperability between catalogues, surveys images and data cubes.

  17. Synthesis of Co-Doped CdS Nanocrystals by Direct Thermolysis of Cadmium and Cobalt Thiolate Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-doped CdS (Co:CdS nanocrystals with controllable morphology (quantum dots and nanorods were easily synthesized by direct thermolysis of (Me4N2[Co4(SC6H510] and (Me4N4[S4Cd10(SPh16] under different precursor concentration, in virtue of the ions exchange of molecular clusters. The Co:CdS quantum dots were produced under low precursor concentration, and the Co:CdS nanorods could be obtained under higher precursor concentration. The Co-doping effect on the structure, growth process, and property of CdS nanocrystals was also investigated. The results indicated that the Co-doping was favorable for the formation of the nanorod structures for a short reaction time. In addition, the Co-doping in the CdS lattice resulted in the ferromagnetic property of the Co:CdS quantum dots at room temperature. Moreover, compared with the CdS quantum dots, the Co:CdS quantum dots exhibited obvious quantum confinement effect and photoluminescence emission with slightly red-shift.

  18. Silica-modified monodisperse hexagonal lanthanide nanocrystals: synthesis and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiv, U; Janoušková, O; Šlouf, M; Kotov, N; Engstová, H; Smolková, K; Ježek, P; Horák, D

    2015-11-21

    Oleic acid-stabilized hexagonal NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocrystals, emitting green and red luminescence, were prepared by the high-temperature co-precipitation of lanthanide chlorides. By varying the reaction time and the Ln(3+)/Na(+) ratio, the nanocrystal size can be controlled within the range 16-270 nm. The maximum upconversion quantum yield is achieved under 970 nm excitation. The reverse microemulsion technique using hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane is a suitable method to coat the nanocrystal surface with a silica shell to make the particles dispersible and colloidally stable in aqueous media. During the subsequent functionalization, (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane introduced amino groups onto the silica to enable future bioconjugation with the target molecules. All specimens were characterized by TEM microscopy, electron and X-ray diffraction, ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, and upconversion luminescence. Finally, in vitro cytotoxicity and intracellular nanoparticle uptake (using confocal microscopy) were determined with human cervical carcinoma HeLa and mRoGFP HeLa cells, respectively. From the investigated particles, amino-functionalized NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanocrystals internalized into the cells most efficiently. The nanoparticles proved to be nontoxic at moderate concentrations, which is important when considering their prospective application in biolabeling and luminescence imaging of various cell types.

  19. Rational design of the gram-scale synthesis of nearly monodisperse semiconductor nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We address two aspects of general interest for the chemical synthesis of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals: (1 the rational design of the synthesis protocol aiming at the optimization of the reaction parameters in a minimum number of experiments; (2 the transfer of the procedure to the gram scale, while maintaining a low size distribution and maximizing the reaction yield. Concerning the first point, the design-of-experiment (DOE method has been applied to the synthesis of colloidal CdSe nanocrystals. We demonstrate that 16 experiments, analyzed by means of a Taguchi L16 table, are sufficient to optimize the reaction parameters for controlling the mean size of the nanocrystals in a large range while keeping the size distribution narrow (5-10%. The DOE method strongly reduces the number of experiments necessary for the optimization as compared to trial-and-error approaches. Furthermore, the Taguchi table analysis reveals the degree of influence of each reaction parameter investigated (e.g., the nature and concentration of reagents, the solvent, the reaction temperature and indicates the interactions between them. On the basis of these results, the synthesis has been scaled up by a factor of 20. Using a 2-L batch reactor combined with a high-throughput peristaltic pump, different-sized samples of CdSe nanocrystals with yields of 2-3 g per synthesis have been produced without sacrificing the narrow size distribution. In a similar setup, the gram-scale synthesis of CdSe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals exhibiting a fluorescence quantum yield of 81% and excellent resistance of the photoluminescence in presence of a fluorescent quencher (aromatic thiol has been achieved. PACS: 81.20.Ka, 81.07.Bc, 78.67.Bf

  20. Rational design of the gram-scale synthesis of nearly monodisperse semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protière, Myriam; Nerambourg, Nicolas; Renard, Olivier; Reiss, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We address two aspects of general interest for the chemical synthesis of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals: (1) the rational design of the synthesis protocol aiming at the optimization of the reaction parameters in a minimum number of experiments; (2) the transfer of the procedure to the gram scale, while maintaining a low size distribution and maximizing the reaction yield. Concerning the first point, the design-of-experiment (DOE) method has been applied to the synthesis of colloidal CdSe nanocrystals. We demonstrate that 16 experiments, analyzed by means of a Taguchi L16 table, are sufficient to optimize the reaction parameters for controlling the mean size of the nanocrystals in a large range while keeping the size distribution narrow (5-10%). The DOE method strongly reduces the number of experiments necessary for the optimization as compared to trial-and-error approaches. Furthermore, the Taguchi table analysis reveals the degree of influence of each reaction parameter investigated (e.g., the nature and concentration of reagents, the solvent, the reaction temperature) and indicates the interactions between them. On the basis of these results, the synthesis has been scaled up by a factor of 20. Using a 2-L batch reactor combined with a high-throughput peristaltic pump, different-sized samples of CdSe nanocrystals with yields of 2-3 g per synthesis have been produced without sacrificing the narrow size distribution. In a similar setup, the gram-scale synthesis of CdSe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals exhibiting a fluorescence quantum yield of 81% and excellent resistance of the photoluminescence in presence of a fluorescent quencher (aromatic thiol) has been achieved. PACS: 81.20.Ka, 81.07.Bc, 78.67.Bf

  1. Monodisperse and inorganically capped Sn and Sn/SnO2 nanocrystals for high-performance Li-ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchyk, Kostiantyn; Protesescu, Loredana; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Krumeich, Frank; Yarema, Maksym; Walter, Marc; Guntlin, Christoph; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2013-03-20

    We report a facile synthesis of highly monodisperse colloidal Sn and Sn/SnO2 nanocrystals with mean sizes tunable over the range 9-23 nm and size distributions below 10%. For testing the utility of Sn/SnO2 nanocrystals as an active anode material in Li-ion batteries, a simple ligand-exchange procedure using inorganic capping ligands was applied to facilitate electronic connectivity within the components of the nanocrystalline electrode. Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that 10 nm Sn/SnO2 nanocrystals enable high Li insertion/removal cycling stability, in striking contrast to commercial 100-150 nm powders of Sn and SnO2. In particular, reversible Li-storage capacities above 700 mA h g(-1) were obtained after 100 cycles of deep charging (0.005-2 V) at a relatively high current of 1000 mA h g(-1).

  2. Sub-6 nm monodisperse hexagonal core/shell NaGdF4 nanocrystals with enhanced upconversion photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Guanying; Hao, Shuwei; Yang, Chunhui

    2017-01-07

    The ability to fabricate lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs) with tailored size and emission profile has fuelled their uses in a broad spectrum of biological applications. Yet, limited success has been met in the preparation of sub-6 nm UCNCs with efficient upconversion photoluminescence (UCPL), which enable high contrast optical bioimaging with minimized adverse biological effects entailed by size-induced rapid clearance from the body. Here, we present a simple and reproducible approach to synthesize a set of monodispersed hexagonal-phase core NaGdF4:Yb/Ln (Ln = Er, Ho, Tm) of ∼3-4 nm and core/shell NaGdF4:Yb/Ln@NaGdF4 (Ln = Er, Ho, Tm) UCNCs of ∼5-6 nm. We show that the core/shell UCNCs can be up to ∼1000 times more efficient than the corresponding core UCNCs due to the effective suppression of surface-related quenching effects for the core. The observation of prolonged PL lifetime for the core/shell than that for the core UCNCs demonstrates the role of the inert shell layer for the protection of the core. The achievement of sub-6 nm NaGdF4 UCNCs with significantly improved luminescence efficiency constitutes a solid step towards high contrast UCPL optical imaging with secured biological safety.

  3. Electrocrystallization of Monodisperse Nanocrystal Copper on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄令; LEE,Eun-Sung; KIM,Kwang-Bum

    2005-01-01

    Mechanism of copper electrocrystallization on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode from a solution of 1 mmol/L CuSO4 and 1.0 mol/L H2SO4 has been studied using cyclic voltammogram and chronoamperometry. The results show that in copper electrodeposition the charge-transfer step is fast and the rate of growth is controlled by the rate of mass transfer of copper ions to the growing centers. Reduction of Cu(Ⅱ) ions did not undergo underpotential deposition. The initial deposition kinetics of Cu electrocrystallization corresponds to a model including progressive nucleation and diffusion controlled growth. Copper nanocrystals with size of 75.6 nm and relative standard deviation of 9% can be obtained by modulation potential electrodeposition.

  4. Monodisperse Co, Zn-Ferrite nanocrystals: Controlled synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevkumar.dubey2@gmail.com [University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007 (India); Singh, Vaishali; Aggarwal, Saroj [School of Basic and Applied Sciences (India); Mandal, Uttam Kumar [University School of Chemical Technology, GGS Indraprastha University, Kashmere Gate, Delhi 110403 (India); Kotnala, R.K. [National Physical laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2012-11-15

    Co{sub x}Zn{sub y}Fe{sub 3-x-y}O{sub 4} ferrite (x=1 to 0; y=0 to1) nanocrystals have been synthesized by reverse microemulsion method. The nanocrystals are then comprehensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM), and magnetic properties were measured by using Vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray analysis showed that all the crystals were cubic spinel. The lattice constant increased with the increase in Zn substitution. FETEM reveals that particle size varies in the range from 3 to 6 nm. As the concentration of Zn increases the magnetic behavior varies from ferromagnetic at y=0 and 0.2 to superparamagnetic to paramagnetic at y=1. The Curie temperature decreases with increasing concentration of Zn. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reverse microemulsion route is a very facile route for synthesis of Co{sub x}Zn{sub y}Fe{sub 3-x-y}O{sub 4} ferrite and all particles synthesized by reverse microemulsion is in the range of 3-6 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of Zn changes the structural and magnetic properties of the Zn substituted CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lattice constant increases with the increase in Zn substitution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The curie temperature decreases with Zn concentration appreciably. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic behavior varies from ferromagnetic at y=0, 0.2 to superparamagnetic to paramagnetic at y=1.

  5. Large-scale synthesis of nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals using air-stable reagents via successive ion layer adsorption and reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J Jack; Wang, Y Andrew; Guo, Wenzhuo; Keay, Joel C; Mishima, Tetsuya D; Johnson, Matthew B; Peng, Xiaogang

    2003-10-15

    Successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) originally developed for the deposition of thin films on solid substrates from solution baths is introduced as a technique for the growth of high-quality core/shell nanocrystals of compound semiconductors. The growth of the shell was designed to grow one monolayer at a time by alternating injections of air-stable and inexpensive cationic and anionic precursors into the reaction mixture with core nanocrystals. The principles of SILAR were demonstrated by the CdSe/CdS core/shell model system using its shell-thickness-dependent optical spectra as the probes with CdO and elemental S as the precursors. For this reaction system, a relatively high temperature, about 220-240 degrees C, was found to be essential for SILAR to fully occur. The synthesis can be readily performed on a multigram scale. The size distribution of the core/shell nanocrystals was maintained even after five monolayers of CdS shell (equivalent to about 10 times volume increase for a 3.5 nm CdSe nanocrystal) were grown onto the core nanocrystals. The epitaxial growth of the core/shell structures was verified by optical spectroscopy, TEM, XRD, and XPS. The photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY) of the as-prepared CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals ranged from 20% to 40%, and the PL full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) was maintained between 23 and 26 nm, even for those nanocrystals for which the UV-vis and PL peaks red-shifted by about 50 nm from that of the core nanocrystals. Several types of brightening phenomena were observed, some of which can further boost the PL QY of the core/shell nanocrystals. The CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals were found to be superior in comparison to the highly luminescent CdSe plain core nanocrystals. The SILAR technique reported here can also be used for the growth of complex colloidal semiconductor nanostructures, such as quantum shells and colloidal quantum wells.

  6. 有机硫源溶剂热法合成CdS纳米晶体%Solvothermal Synthesis of CdS Nanocrystals with Organic Sulphur Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓丹; 潘力嘉; 张海黔

    2009-01-01

    CdS nanocrystals were synthesized by a solvothermal method with tetramethyl thiuram disulfide(TMTD) as a sulphur source in benzene or water-benzene solvent at different temperatures for different periods of time. The structure and formation mechanism of CdS nanocrystals were investigated by field emission -scanning electron microscope(FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction(XRD) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FHR), respectively. The results indicated that the solvothermal temperature played a more important role than reaction time in formation of crystal morphology. CdS nanocrystals were found to be a mixed phase of cube and hexagon. Furthermore, the type of solvent was also an important influencing factor for the structure and formation of CdS nanocrystals. The cathodoluminescence(CL) of the obtained flower-like CdS nanocrystals was also studied.%以二硫化四甲基秋兰姆(TMTD)作为有机硫源,分别在苯、水-苯溶剂中于不同温度、不同时间溶剂热法合成了CdS纳米晶体.采用FE-SEM、XRD和FTIR对晶体的结构和成形机理进行了研究.结果表明,溶剂热温度比反应时间对晶体形貌的形成影响更大.CdS纳米晶体是立方与六角的混合晶型.此外,溶剂的种类也是影响CdS纳米晶体结构和成形的重要因素,并且对花形CdS纳米晶体进行了阴极发光(CL)光谱的研究.

  7. CdS nanocrystals/TiO{sub 2}/crosslinked chitosan composite: Facile preparation, characterization and adsorption-photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Huayue [Key Laboratory for Biomass-Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology of Hubei Province, Colledge of Resource and Environment Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, Hubei (China); Laboratory of Resource Utilization and Pollution Control, College of Life Science, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000, Zhejiang (China); Jiang, Ru [Laboratory of Resource Utilization and Pollution Control, College of Life Science, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000, Zhejiang (China); Xiao, Ling, E-mail: xiaoling9119@yahoo.cn [Key Laboratory for Biomass-Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology of Hubei Province, Colledge of Resource and Environment Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, Hubei (China); Liu, Li; Cao, Chunhua [Key Laboratory for Biomass-Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology of Hubei Province, Colledge of Resource and Environment Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, Hubei (China); Zeng, Guangming [Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)

    2013-05-15

    CdS nanocrystals deposited on TiO{sub 2}/crosslinked chitosan composite (CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC) were prepared in an attempt to photocatalyze decolorization of water soluble azo dye in aqueous solution under simulated solar light irradiation. CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The characterization results proved that CdS nanocrystals has successfully been deposited on/in TiO{sub 2}/crosslinked chitosan composite. The adsorption ability of CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC was approximately 2.66 mg methyl orange (a typical water soluble azo dye) per gram. The photocatalytic decolorization of methyl orange solution reached 99.1% by CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC after simulated solar light irradiation for 210 min. Kinetics analysis indicated that photocatalytic decolorization of methyl orange solution by CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC obeyed first-order kinetic Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism (R{sup 2} > 0.997). CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity under simulated solar light irradiation compared with photocatalysts reported before and the photocatalytic activity of CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC maintained at 89.0% of initial decolorization rate after five batch reactions. The presence of NO{sub 3}{sup −} accelerated the decolorization of methyl orange solution by CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC, while SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and Cl{sup −} had an inhibitory effect on the decolorization of methyl orange. Therefore, present experimental results indicated to assess the applicability of CdS/TiO{sub 2}/CSC as a suitable and promising photocatalyst for effective decolorization treatment of dye-containing effluents.

  8. The surface engineering of CdS nanocrystal for photocatalytic reaction: A strategy of modulating the trapping states and radicals generation towards RhB degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuo, E-mail: lishuochem@outlook.com; Meng, Dedong, E-mail: 1159594702@qq.com; Hou, Libo, E-mail: hlb2014332156@outlook.com; Wang, Dejun, E-mail: wangdj@jlu.edu.cn; Xie, Tengfeng, E-mail: xietf@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Surfactants were successfully used for the surface states engineering of CdS nanocrystal. • The existence and the location of surface hole traps and surface electron traps were investigated. • The surface states can modulate the generation of radicals. - Abstract: Cationic surfactant (CTAB) and anionic surfactant (sodium oleate) were used to modify CdS nanocrystals with different surface states. The surfactant CTAB led to surface states of hole traps, while sodium oleate induced surface states of electron traps on the surface of CdS. The photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) over these modified CdS nanocrystals was investigated under visible light irradiation. An efficient cycloreversion degradation of RhB occurred over the E-CdS nanocrystals. However, for H-CdS nanocrystals, an efficient N-deethylation reaction concomitant with a subsequent slow cycloreversion reaction of RhB was observed. The E-CdS sample showed a first-order kinetic rate for the cycloreversion degradation of RhB. By contrast, H-CdS sample shows a zero-order kinetic rate for the N-deethylation reaction of RhB followed by a first-order kinetic rate for the cycloreversion degradation. It is revealed that the different kinds of surface traps could significantly affect the dynamic properties of photogenerated charge carriers, which leads to different degradation mechanism of RhB. These findings demonstrate an alternative solution towards developing efficient photocatalysts with high selectivity by constructing different surface trap states.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass doped with Nd{sup 3+} and CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serqueira, E.O.; Dantas, N.O. [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG 38400-902 (Brazil); Anjos, V. [Grupo de Espectroscopia de Materiais, Departamento de Física, ICE – UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil); Bell, M.J.V., E-mail: mjvbell@yahoo.com.br [Grupo de Espectroscopia de Materiais, Departamento de Física, ICE – UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • The formation of CdS nanocrystals in the glassy host is shown by Raman measurements. • Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the growth of CdS nanocrystals in the SNAB glass. • Nd{sup 3+} ions are not incorporated inside the semiconductor nanocrystals. -- Abstract: We report the Raman spectroscopic characterization of a SNAB glass system doped with neodymium and CdS nanocrystals and fabricated by the fusion process. Raman spectra revealed CdS nanocrystals in the glass host and bands associated with Si–O vibrational modes with five structural configurations, boroxol modes of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al–O and Cd–S vibrational modes. Additionally, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the growth of CdS nanocrystals in the SNAB glass and Nd{sup 3+} ions are not incorporated inside the semiconductor nanocrystals.

  10. Preparation, morphology, size quantization effect and photocatalytic properties of CdS Q-nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Weiguang; (章伟光); ZHONG; Yun; (钟昀); FAN; Jun; (范军),; SUN; Siqiao; (孙姒巧); TANG; Ning; (唐宁); TAN; Minyu; (谭民裕); WU; Longmin; (吴隆民)

    2003-01-01

    CdS nanoclusters were synthesized by using n- octylthiol as a ligand and n- hexadecyl- trimethyl-ammonium bromide (or n-tetrabutylammonium bromide) as an organic cation. Size- selective precipitation techniques have enabled the preparation of different CdS Q-nanoparticles with narrow size distribution and mean diameters ranging from 2 to 5 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering were used to determine the mean cluster size. Their size quantization effect has been observed in UV-Vis spectra, fluorescence spectra and small-angle X-ray diffraction, but it became too weak to be observed for large particles (2r > 10 nm). Moreover, their photo-catalysis has been studied by ESR technique and the results revealed that the photo-catalytic reaction occurred in the solution system and some free radicals such as (CH2-OH in methanol, or CH3-CH-OH in ethanol were generated if some CdS Q-particles were added to methanol (or ethanol) and initiated by UV light at the same time, which may be very crucial in organic synthesis.

  11. Nanocrystal synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisdale, William; Prins, Ferry; Weidman, Mark; Beck, Megan

    2016-11-01

    A method of preparing monodisperse MX semiconductor nanocrystals can include contacting an M-containing precursor with an X donor to form a mixture, where the molar ratio between the M containing precursor and the X donor is large. Alternatively, if additional X donor is added during the reaction, a smaller ratio between the M containing precursor and the X donor can be used to prepare monodisperse MX semiconductor nanocrystals.

  12. Regulating Mid-infrared to Visible Fluorescence in Monodispersed Er3+-doped La2O2S (La2O2SO4) Nanocrystals by Phase Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiwen; Yang, Dandan; Kang, Shiliang; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2016-11-01

    Rare earth doped mid-infrared (MIR) fluorescent sources have been widely investigated due to their various potential applications in the fields of communication, chemical detecting, medical surgery and so forth. However, with emission wavelength extended to MIR, multiphonon relaxation process that strongly quenched the MIR emission is one of the greatest challenges for such practical applications. In our design, we have described a controllable gas-aided annealing strategy to modulate the phase, crystal size, morphology and fluorescent performance of a material simultaneously. Uniform and monodispersed Er3+-doped La2O2S and La2O2SO4 nanocrystals with a similar lattice structure, crystallinity, diameter and morphology have been introduced to investigate the impact of multiphonon relaxation on luminescence performance. Detailed spectroscopic evolutions in the region of MIR, near-infrared (NIR), visible upconversion (UC) and their corresponding decay times provide insight investigation into the fluorescent mechanism caused by multiphonon relaxation. A possible energy transfer model has also been established. Our results present direct observation and mechanistic investigation of fluorescent evolution in multiphonon relaxation process, which is conductive to design MIR fluorescent materials in the future. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first investigation on MIR fluorescent performance of La2O2S nanocrystals, which may find various applications in many photoelectronic fields.

  13. Monodisperse antimony nanocrystals for high-rate Li-ion and Na-ion battery anodes: nano versus bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meng; Kravchyk, Kostiantyn; Walter, Marc; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2014-03-12

    We report colloidal synthesis of antimony (Sb) nanocrystals with mean size tunable in the 10-20 nm range and with narrow size distributions of 7-11%. In comparison to microcrystalline Sb, 10 and 20 nm Sb nanocrystals exhibit enhanced rate-capability and higher cycling stability as anode materials in rechargeable Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. All three particle sizes of Sb possess high and similar Li-ion and Na-ion charge storage capacities of 580-640 mAh g(-1) at moderate charging/discharging current densities of 0.5-1C (1C-rate is 660 mA g(-1)). At all C-rates (0.5-20C, e.g. current densities of 0.33-13.2 Ag(1-)), capacities of 20 nm Sb particles are systematically better than for both 10 nm and bulk Sb. At 20C-rates, retention of charge storage capacities by 10 and 20 nm Sb nanocrystals can reach 78-85% of the low-rate value, indicating that rate capability of Sb nanostructures can be comparable to the best Li-ion intercalation anodes and is so far unprecedented for Na-ion storage.

  14. 微波水热法制备CdS纳米晶体的研究%Semiconductor Nanocrystals CdS Synthesized by Microwave-Hydrothermal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王悦虹; 刘岩

    2012-01-01

    利用微波水热技术合成CdS半导体纳米晶体,可以克服有机合成方法毒性大,成本高等问题,通过XRD、TEM表征,产物CdS半导体纳米晶体具有立方晶相,纯度较高。通过紫外吸收光谱和荧光光谱分析,发现该方法制备出的半导体CdS纳米晶体具有良好的光致发光性质,证明水相同样适合高质量CdS半导体纳米晶体的生长。%CdS semiconductor nanocrystals(NCs) were synthesized by microwave-hydrothermal method in water solution.In comparison,with the synthesis of NCs in organic solvents,the growth surroundings of aqueous NCs were more poisonous and costly.The XRD and TEM provided direct evidence for a cubic zinc blende structure of bulk CdS crystal.Moreover,the CdS NCs had excellent photoluminescence properties by the characterizations of absorption spectra and luminescence spectra.This method proved that CdS NCs suited to grow in aqueous condition.

  15. Modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by plasma treatment and further use as templates for growth of CdS nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chun-Hao; Wang, Cheng-Chien; Chen, Chuh-Yung

    2006-11-28

    In this study, we present a novel method for preparing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grafted with a poly(2-methacrylic acid 3-(bis-carboxymethylamino)-2-hydroxy-propyl ester) (GMA-IDA)-cadmium sulfide complex (CNTs-G-ICdS complex) through plasma-induced grafting polymerization. The characteristics of the MWCNTs after being grafted with the GMA-IDA polymer were monitored by a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscope. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) shows that the amount of GMA-IDA grafted onto the MWCNTs increases with the concentration of GMA-IDA monomer. The complex resulting from GMA-IDA polymer grafting onto the MWCNTs, CNTs-G-I (15%), shows excellent dispersion properties in aqueous solution and has high Zeta potential values over a wide range of pH values, from 2 to 12. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the successful chemical modification of MWCNTs through the plasma treatment. The chelating groups, -N(CH(2)COO(-))(2) in the GMA-IDA polymer grafted on the surface of the CNTs-G-I, are the coordination sites for chelating cadmium ions, and are further used as nano-templates for the growth of CdS nanocrystals (quantum dots). Moreover, TEM microscopy reveals that the size of the CdS nanocrystals on the CNT surfaces increases with increasing S(2-) concentration. In addition, high resolution x-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of the MWCNTs after chemical modification by the plasma treatment and grafting with GMA-IDA polymer.

  16. High-efficiency CdTe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals in water enabled by photo-induced colloidal hetero-epitaxy of CdS shelling at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hakimeh Zare[1; Maziar Marandi[2; Somayeh Fardindoost[1; Vijay Kumar Sharma[3,4; Aydan Yeltik[3; Omid Akhavan[1,5; Hilmi Volkan Demir[3,4; Nima Taghavinia[1,5

    2015-01-01

    We report high-efficiency CdTe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals synthesized in water by epitaxially growing CdS shells on aqueous CdTe cores at room temperature, enabled by the controlled release of S species under low-intensity ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The resulting photo-induced dissociation of S2O2- ions conveniently triggers the formation of critical two-dimensional CdS epitaxy on the CdTe surface at room temperature, as opposed to initiating the growth of individual CdS core-only nanocrystals. This controlled colloidal hetero-epitaxy leads to a substantial increase in the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of the shelled nanocrystals in water (reaching 64%). With a systematic set of studies, the maximum PL QY is found to be almost independent of the illuminating UV intensity, while the shell formation kinetics required for reaching the maximum QY linearly depends on the illuminating UV intensity. A stability study of the QD films in air at various temperatures shows highly improved thermal stability of the shelled QDs (up to 120 ℃ in ambient air). These results indicate that the proposed aqueous CdTe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals hold great promise for applications requiring efficiency and stability.

  17. Synthesis of CdS flower-like hierarchical microspheres as electrode material for electrochemical performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaviyarasu, K., E-mail: Kaviyarasuloyolacollege@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital, Bharath University, Chrompet, Chennai, 600044, Tamil Nadu (India); Maaza, M., E-mail: maaza@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-05

    We report in this paper, a facile hydrothermal route for the preparation of CdS nanocrystals at room temperature (RT). Composition, structure and morphology of the products were analyzed and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the hydrothermal treatment at 180 °C for periods ranging from 0 to 1440 min caused no significant modification of the long range order structure subjected to hydrothermal treatment. From the XRD analysis the diffraction peaks pertaining to 26.75°, 43.89° and 52.34° are attributed to the (111), (220) and (311) planes of cubic zinc blende structure. The Photoluminescence (PL) spectra are dominated by a strong narrow band edge emission tunable in the blue region of the visible spectra indicating the narrow size distribution of CdS nanocrystals. TEM observation shows that the CdS nanocrystals synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis are well dispersed and the average crystallite size was found to be ∼10 nm. The confocal microscopic studies reveal that each flower like spheres is due to Ostwald's ripening with numerous nanoparticles aggregating a surface. - Highlights: • The adjacent particle coalesces together forming spherical particles. • The average crystalline size of CdS nanoparticles was found to be ∼3 nm. • In the case of spherical crystallite, is given by L = 3/4 D. • The CdS nanocrystal exhibits a direct band gap of 2.4 eV. • The microspheres are dispersed with good monodispersity.

  18. «Green» Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanoparticles and CdS Semiconductor Nanocrystals Using Biological Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blume, Ya.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles of synthesis of metal nanoparticles and semiconductor nanocrystals and its application prospects are considered. The relevance of the exploiting living systems and their components for the development of «green » synthesis technology for nano-objects with the unique properties and a wide range of applications is analyzed. The biotechnological synthesis of nanoparticles of silver, gold and bimetallic silver-gold nanoparticles using plant extracts of Magnolia denudata, M. stellata, Camellia sinensis var. sinensis, C. sinensis var. assamica, Orthosiphon stamineus and Hypericum perforatum is described. The results of cadmium sulfide fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal synthesis using bacteria Escherichia coli, basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus and plant Linaria maroccana are reported. Morphological and optical characteristics of the synthesized nanoparticles are presented.

  19. Heterogeneous catalysts need not be so "heterogeneous": monodisperse Pt nanocrystals by combining shape-controlled synthesis and purification by colloidal recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yijin; Li, Meng; Cai, Yun; Cargnello, Matteo; Diaz, Rosa E; Gordon, Thomas R; Wieder, Noah L; Adzic, Radoslav R; Gorte, Raymond J; Stach, Eric A; Murray, Christopher B

    2013-02-20

    Well-defined surfaces of Pt have been extensively studied for various catalytic processes. However, industrial catalysts are mostly composed of fine particles (e.g., nanocrystals), due to the desire for a high surface to volume ratio. Therefore, it is very important to explore and understand the catalytic processes both at nanoscale and on extended surfaces. In this report, a general synthetic method is described to prepare Pt nanocrystals with various morphologies. The synthesized Pt nanocrystals are further purified by exploiting the "self-cleaning" effect which results from the "colloidal recrystallization" of Pt supercrystals. The resulting high-purity nanocrystals enable the direct comparison of the reactivity of the {111} and {100} facets for important catalytic reactions. With these high-purity Pt nanocrystals, we have made several observations: Pt octahedra show higher poisoning tolerance in the electrooxidation of formic acid than Pt cubes; the oxidation of CO on Pt nanocrystals is structure insensitive when the partial pressure ratio p(O2)/p(CO) is close to or less than 0.5, while it is structure sensitive in the O(2)-rich environment; Pt octahedra have a lower activation energy than Pt cubes when catalyzing the electron transfer reaction between hexacyanoferrate (III) and thiosulfate ions. Through electrocatalysis, gas-phase-catalysis of CO oxidation, and a liquid-phase-catalysis of electron transfer reaction, we demonstrate that high quality Pt nanocrystals which have {111} and {100} facets selectively expose are ideal model materials to study catalysis at nanoscale.

  20. Convenient synthesis of magnetically recyclable Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C@CdS photocatalysts by depositing CdS nanocrystals on carbonized ferrocene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Xie, Jianjian [Department of Materials Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Zhang, Yong; Qiao, Ru [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Li, Sheng [Department of Materials Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Li, Zhengquan, E-mail: zqli@zjnu.edu.cn [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Department of Materials Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Development of magnetic visible-light-driven photocatalysts is desirable to the practical application of photocatalyts for collection and recycling use. Here we present a facile approach to synthesize Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C@CdS magnetic photocatalysts which can avoid multi-step preparation process. Through one-step solvothermal carbonization of ferrocene, the produced carbon-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} clusters can serve as both magnetic cores and deposition substrates for in situ generating crystalline CdS nanocrystals on them by rapid microwave irradiation. The prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C@CdS nanoparticles exhibit a uniform core–shell structure and display good photocatalytic activity and recyclability in the degradation of organic dyes. These magnetic photocatalysts may find potential application in wastewater treatment for the future environment remedy. - Highlights: • A rapid strategy is presented to obtain multifunctional core–shell nanostructures. • Magnetic visible-light-driven Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C@CdS nanophotocatalysts are synthesized. • Carbonized ferrocene can provide both magnetic cores and good deposition substrate. • Photocatalytic and recyclable properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C@CdS nanoparticles are explored.

  1. Highly luminescent ZnO and CdS nanostructures prepared by ionic liquid precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The ionic liquids containing Cd and Zn,which served as the metal-chalcogenides precursors,were synthesized and reacted with Na2S to synthesize the ionic-liquid-capped semiconductors. The products were detected by XRD and TEM. The results demonstrated that the CdS was composed of 5―6 nm monodispersed nanocrystals. At the same time,the ZnO composed of 1 μm hexagonal-disk nanostructure was prepared under the same experimental condition. The difference of the morphology and structures between Zn and Cd systems was discussed by thermodynamics and crystallography. The fluorescence of as-prepared ZnO and CdS showed the excellent photoluminescence.

  2. General and Robust Strategies for Multifunctional Organic-Inorganic Nanocompositesvia Direct Growth of Monodisperse Nanocrystals Intimately and Permanently Connected with Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    amphiphilic copolymer brushes: Poly( ethylene oxide )-graft-polystyrene. J. Polym. Sci. Part A: Polym. Chem. 44, 4361-4371 (2006). 2. Mora-Pale, M., Meli, L...results are summarized as follows. Recent research has witnessed tremendous advances in isotropic nanomaterials synthesis , which has provided access...nanocrystals of both fundamental and practical interest.(12, 13) Current emerging synthesis approaches, including template-assisted synthesis ,(14-16

  3. Cadmium (II) pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex as single source precursor for the preparation of CdS nanocrystals by microwave irradiation and conventional heating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx Nirmal, R.; Pandian, K.; Sivakumar, K.

    2011-01-01

    The complex of cadmium with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate Cd(pdtc)2 has been used as single source precursor for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles. The formation of CdS nanostructures was achieved by thermal decomposition of the complex under microwave irradiation and conventional heating in presence of hexadecylamine. The CdS nanoparticles with disordered close-packed structure were obtained under microwave irradiation, whereas wurtzite hexagonal phase CdS nanorods were obtained by conventional heating method (up to 150 °C). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies also were carried out to study the structure and morphology of nanoparticles. The optical property of the CdS nanoparticles was studied by UV-visible and fluorescence emission spectral studies. Fluorescence measurements on the CdS nanoparticles show a strong emission spectrum with two sub bands that are attributed to band-edge and surface-defect emissions. The reduction of a suitable cadmium metal complex is considered to be one of the single pot methods to generate CdS semiconductor nanoparticles with different shapes and high yield.

  4. Cadmium (II) pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex as single source precursor for the preparation of CdS nanocrystals by microwave irradiation and conventional heating process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx Nirmal, R. [Department of Physics, Anna University Chennai, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600025 (India); Pandian, K. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India); Sivakumar, K., E-mail: ksivakumar@annauniv.edu [Department of Physics, Anna University Chennai, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600025 (India)

    2011-01-15

    The complex of cadmium with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate Cd(pdtc){sub 2} has been used as single source precursor for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles. The formation of CdS nanostructures was achieved by thermal decomposition of the complex under microwave irradiation and conventional heating in presence of hexadecylamine. The CdS nanoparticles with disordered close-packed structure were obtained under microwave irradiation, whereas wurtzite hexagonal phase CdS nanorods were obtained by conventional heating method (up to 150 deg. C). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies also were carried out to study the structure and morphology of nanoparticles. The optical property of the CdS nanoparticles was studied by UV-visible and fluorescence emission spectral studies. Fluorescence measurements on the CdS nanoparticles show a strong emission spectrum with two sub bands that are attributed to band-edge and surface-defect emissions. The reduction of a suitable cadmium metal complex is considered to be one of the single pot methods to generate CdS semiconductor nanoparticles with different shapes and high yield.

  5. Synthesis of Ultra-Small Palladium Nanoparticles Deposited on CdS Nanorods by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid: Role of Metal Nanocrystal Size in the Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanbit; Reddy, D Amaranatha; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Seunghee; Ma, Rory; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-09-21

    It is imperative to suppress the rate of recombination of photogenerated carriers to improve the semiconductor-catalyzed solar-driven production of hydrogen. To this end, photocatalysts comprising active sunlight-harvesting photo-absorbers and stable metal co-catalysts have attracted significant attention. However, the size, clean surface, and highly dispersed nature of the metal co-catalysts are crucial factors affecting catalyst performance and reaction rate. Nevertheless, most of the available metal nanocrystals have been synthesized by complex procedures using harmful organic templates and stabilizers, affording high-purity compounds with difficulty and high cost. To overcome these problems, in this study, the pulsed laser ablation in liquid approach was utilized to generate palladium and bimetallic palladium-platinum nanoparticles with an average size and distribution by adjusting the laser wavelength and fluence. A high rate of evolution of hydrogen of 130.33 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) was obtained by using the optimized CdS-PdPt catalyst under simulated sunlight irradiation. This value is 51.31 times greater than that observed for bare CdS nanostructures. Furthermore, the amount of hydrogen evolved was significantly better than that obtained by using several other noble-metal co-catalysts deposited on CdS. This proposed strategy is thought to open new avenues for the design of advanced photocatalytic materials for efficient solar-driven production of hydrogen. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-07-06

    Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

  7. Aqueous synthesis and characterization of bovine hemoglobin-conjugated cadmium sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guangrui [Institute of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, North China University of Water Conservancy and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Qin, Dezhi, E-mail: dezhiqin@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ganqing; Zhang, Qiuxia; Wu, Jiulin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • CdS nanocrystals were synthesized by biomimetic method in bovine hemoglobin (BHb) solution. • The study of the interaction between Cd{sup 2+}/CdS and BHb. • The optical properties of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals. • The synthesis process of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals is facile, effective and environment friendly. • The change of secondary structure of BHb after binding to CdS nanocrystals. - Abstract: Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals with average diameter about 5.5 nm were synthesized in aqueous solution of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) via simple biomimetic method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations were used to determine the structure and morphology of CdS nanocrystals. It was revealed that amount of BHb, chelating of Cd{sup 2+} to BHb and reaction temperature were key factors in controlling shape and dispersion of CdS nanocrystals. The binding sites of BHb to CdS nanocrystals and the change of secondary structure of protein have been identified by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It was found that conjugating of BHb with Cd{sup 2+} and CdS could protect nanocrystals from agglomerating. Moreover, the thermostability of BHb enhanced after conjugating with CdS nanocrystals. The interaction mechanism of BHb with Cd{sup 2+}/CdS was also proposed. The quantum-confined effect of CdS nanocrystals was confirmed by ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum. The nanocrystals exhibited a well-defined photoluminescence (PL) emission feature at about 510 nm with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM)

  8. Aging effect of quantum dots on solar cells sensitized with nano-crystals of CdS and PbS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Borhanifar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, solar cells sensitized with CdS and PbS Nanocrystalline metal sulfides, chemically grown by SILAR, were fabricated and characterized. PV experiments including I-V test in the presence of light and dark,Vocdecay, and Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed on the Cells made through this method in the presence of light and dark and in the time period of 2, 3, 6 and 10 days. From these experiments, the changes in indicators including fill factor, efficiency, open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, lifetime of electrons in nanostructured anode electrode, recombination resistance and capacitance of the anode electrode-electrolyte interface were observed. Also, mechanisms for some existing evidences within photovoltaic experiments such as the increase and decrease of recombination resistance were proposed.

  9. Engineered monodisperse mesoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, R.S.; Small, J.H.; Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.; Jamison, G.M.

    1997-08-01

    Porous materials technology has developed products with a wide variety of pore sizes ranging from 1 angstrom to 100`s of microns and beyond. Beyond 15{angstrom} it becomes difficult to obtain well ordered, monodisperse pores. In this report the authors describe efforts in making novel porous material having monodisperse, controllable pore sizes spanning the mesoporous range (20--500 {angstrom}). They set forth to achieve this by using unique properties associated with block copolymers--two linear homopolymers attached at their ends. Block copolymers phase separate into monodisperse mesophases. They desired to selectively remove one of the phases and leave the other behind, giving the uniform monodisperse pores. To try to achieve this the authors used ring-opening metathesis polymerization to make the block copolymers. They synthesized a wide variety of monomers and surveyed their polymers by TGA, with the idea that one phase could be made thermally labile while the other phase would be thermally stable. In the precipitated and sol-gel processed materials, they determined by porosimetry measurements that micropores, mesopores, and macropores were created. In the film processed sample there was not much porosity present. They moved to a new system that required much lower thermal treatments to thermally remove over 90% of the labile phase. Film casting followed by thermal treatment and solvent extraction produced the desired monodisperse materials (based solely on SEM results). Modeling using Density Functional Theory was also incorporated into this project. The modeling was able to predict accurately the domain size and spacing vs. molecular weight for a model system, as well as accurate interfacial thicknesses.

  10. Preparation of CdS Nanocrystals Doped TiO2 Supported on Bamboo Charcoal and Photocatalytic Properties%竹炭负载纳米CdS掺杂TiO2光催化剂制备及光催化性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军

    2012-01-01

    A photocatalyst of CdS nanocrystals doped with TiO2 supported bamboo charcoal was prepared by a hydrothermal method in the different temperature. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption in low temperature and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra. The XRD and SEM results showed that the as -synthesized TiO2 was anatase phase and its size was about 20-40nm. The UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra indicated that in the visible region, the absorption edges of the CdS nanonrystals doping TiO2 supported on bamboo charcoal shifted to visible light region, thus largely enhancing the TiO2 absorption of visible light. A xenon lamp ( λ >420nm) was used as an illuminant in the degeneration experiment and Rhodamine B (Rh B) was chosen as the model substance to evaluate photocatalytic activity of the CdS nanocrystals doped with TiO2 supported bamboo charcoal. The results showed that the photocatalytic activity of the CdS nanocrystals doping TiO2 supported bamboo charcoal synthesized at 240℃ when the doping amount of CdS nanocrystals is 4% ( mol fraction) is best, the colour removal of Rh B is 98.2% in 200 minutes.%采用水热法在不同温度下制备了竹炭(BC)负载纳米CdS掺杂TiO2光催化剂;采用X-射线粉末衍射(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、氮气低温吸附和紫外-可见漫反射图谱等对竹炭(BC)负载纳米CdS掺杂TiO2光催化剂进行了表征,XRD和SEM结果表明,TiO2为锐钛矿相.粒径为20nm~ 40nm.紫外-可见漫反射图谱显示,竹炭负载纳米CdS掺杂的TiO2的样品吸收边发生了明显的红移,大大提高了TiO2对可见光吸收.以氙灯为光源(λ> 420nm)、罗丹明B(Rh B)为模型污染物进行降解实验,探索了不同条件下合成竹炭负载纳米CdS掺杂TiO2的可见光催化性能.结果表明,纳米CdS掺杂量为4%(摩尔分数)240℃时,制备的竹炭负载纳米CdS掺杂TiO2对RhB的降解效果最好,

  11. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Sadtler, Bryce F

    2010-01-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions of a nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size an...

  12. CERN Document Server (CDS): Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Costa, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    A short online tutorial introducing the CERN Document Server (CDS). Basic functionality description, the notion of Revisions and the CDS test environment. Links: CDS Production environment CDS Test environment  

  13. Narrowing the size distribution of CdTe nanocrystals using digestive ripening

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mona Mittal; Sameer Sapra

    2015-06-01

    Digestive ripening of polydispersed colloidal CdTe nanocrystals is performed which results in monodispersed nanocrystals (NCs) as studied by optical spectroscopy. Optimization of ligand and refluxing time is carried out. Monodispersed NCs are obtained using mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a digestive ripening agent at a refluxing time of 1–2 h. Digestive ripening of CdTe NCs, which are less polydispersed, is also executed and it leads to more monodispersed NCs. In all the cases, there is a shift of maximum emission wavelength of CdTe NCs after digestive ripening that may be due to Ostwald ripening along with digestive ripening.

  14. Time and Temperature Dependence of CdS Nanoparticles Grown in a Polystyrene Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Antolini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent CdS nanocrystals embedded in a polystyrene matrix were successfully prepared. The in situ growth of CdS QDs was realized by thermal treatment of Cd bis(thiolate/polymer foil at different times and temperatures (240°C and 300°C of annealing, in order to evaluate their influence on the quantum dots growth process. As a general trend, the increasing of time and temperature of annealing induces a rise of the CdS nanocrystals size into the polymeric matrix. The size distribution, morphology, and structure of the CdS nanoparticles were analysed with HRTEM and XRD experiments. UV-Vis and PL data are strongly size-dependent and were used to investigate the particles' growth process, too. The CdS nanoparticles behavior in solution indicated a general trend of QDs to aggregation. This predisposition was clearly displayed by DLS measurements.

  15. Observation of Single Colloidal Platinum Nanocrystal Growth Trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Haimei; Smith, Rachel; Jun, Young-wook; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-02-09

    It is conventionally assumed that the growth of monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals requires a temporally discrete nucleation followed by monomer attachment onto the existing nuclei. However, recent studies have reported violations of this classical growth model, and have suggested that inter-particle interactions are also involved during the growth. Mechanisms of nanocrystal growth still remain controversial. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we show that platinum nanocrystals can grow either by monomer attachment from solution onto the existing particles or by coalescence between the particles. Surprisingly, an initially broad size distribution of the nanocrystals can spontaneously narrow. We suggest that nanocrystals take different pathways of growth based on their size- and morphology-dependent internal energies. These observations are expected to be highly relevant for other nanocrystal systems.

  16. Photovoltaic Devices Employing Ternary PbSxSe1-x Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Wanli; Luther, Joseph; Zheng, Haimei; Wu, Yue; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-02-05

    We report solar cells based on highly confined nanocrystals of the ternary compound PbSxSe1-x. Crystalline, monodisperse alloyed nanocrystals are obtained using a one-pot, hot injection reaction. Rutherford back scattering and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy suggest that the S and Se anions are uniformly distributed in the alloy nanoparticles. Photovoltaic devices made using ternary nanoparticles are more efficient than either pure PbS or pure PbSe based nanocrystal devices.

  17. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  18. Simple and green synthesis of protein-conjugated CdS nanoparticles and spectroscopic study on the interaction between CdS and zein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Dezhi; Zhang, Li; Du, Xian; Wang, Yabo; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2016-09-01

    The present study demonstrates the role of zein molecules in synthesizing CdS nanoassemblies through protein-directed, green synthetic approach. Zein molecules can as capping ligand and stabilizing agent to regulate the nucleation and growth of CdS nanocrystals, and the obtained products are organic-inorganic nanocomposites. The analysis of surface charge and conductivity indicates that strong electrostatic force restricts mobility of ions, which creates a local supersaturation surrounding the binding sites of zein and reduces the activated energy of nucleation. The interaction between Cd2+/CdS and zein molecules was systematically investigated through spectroscopy techniques. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra were used to envisage the binding of the functional groups of zein with the surface of CdS nanoparticles. Ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra results show that Cd2+/CdS might interact with the aromatic amino acids of protein molecules and change its chemical microenvironment. The quantum-confined effect of nanocrystals is confirmed by optical absorption spectrum due to the small size (3-5 nm) of CdS particles. The data of circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicate that the formation of CdS nanocrystals could lead to the conformational change of zein molecules. Moreover, the possible mechanism of CdS nanocrystals growth in zein solution was also discussed. The weak interactions such as Van der Waals, hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds in zein molecules should play a crucial factor in the self-assembly of small nanoparticles.

  19. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce F [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or

  20. Information in CDS Spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Norden (Lars)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate how public and private information drives corporate CDS spreads before rating announcements. We find that CDS spreads of firms with higher news intensity move significantly earlier and stronger before rating announcements, which can be explained with public information fro

  1. Studies on II-VI and III-V semiconductor nanostructures. Introduction of the core/shell/shell structure and development of CdSe nanocrystals in an automatized procedure; Untersuchungen an II-VI und III-V Halbleiternanostrukturen. Einfuehrung der Core/shell/shell-Struktur und Darstellung von CdSe-Nanokristallen in einem automatisierten Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekis, I.

    2005-11-15

    The work in this dissertation is focused on the development and characterization of fluorescent II-VI and III-V-Nanomaterials. Highly luminescent and photostable Nanocrystals with narrow size distributions were prepared. It was shown that nearly monodisperse CdSe-Nanocrystals could be prepared from Cd(Ac){sub 2} and TOPSe in a mixture of TOPO/TOP/HDA/TDPA. Nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS-Core/shell-Nanocrystals have been prepared in a one-pot-synthesis by injection of H{sub 2}S-Gas into a freshly prepared crude solution of CdSe. The passivation of the CdSe-core with an inorganic shell of CdS resulted in the drastic improvement of the photoluminescence-efficiency of the colloidal solution. Reproducible room-temperature quantum yields reached up to a value of 85%. Photostability investigations have proved the enhanced stability of CdSe/CdS-Nanocrystals compared to CdSe-Nanocrystals under illumination with UV-Light. A novel type of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal structure has been developed, consisting of a CdSe core and two anorganic shells. Highly fluorescent and nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS/ZnS- and CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS-Core/shell/shell-nanocrystals have been prepared via organometallic- and acetate-precursors. The Core/she ll/shell particles reached reproducible room-temperature quantum yields up to 85%. Photostability investigations among CdSe-core, CdSe/CdS-Core/shell- and CdSe/CdS/ZnS- Core/shell/-shell-nanocrystals under illumination with UV-light have proved the highest photostability of the Core/shell/shell-particles. The photostabilities of CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS-and CdSe/ZnS-nanocrystals were compared under illumination with intense laser-beam in air. Another part of this work focused on the development of an automated synthesis procedure of CdSe-nanocrystals by constructing and implementing a flow-reactor system. The size and structure of prepared nanocrystals depended considerably on the Cd:Se-precursorratio and the flow-rate. The preparation of CdSe using Cd(Ac)2

  2. Aerosol printing of colloidal nanocrystals by aerodynamic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lejun

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, have shown promise as the active material in electronic and optoelectronic applications, because of their high quantum yield, narrow spectral emission band, size-tunable bandgap, chemical stability, and easy processibility. Meanwhile, it is still challenging to print patterns of nanocrystal films with desired linewidth and thickness, which is a critical step in fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices. In this thesis, a direct-write method of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has been developed. Like other direct-write techniques, this aerosol based method simplifies printing process and reduces the manufacturing cost, as it avoids mask screening, lithography, and pre-patterning of the substrate. Moreover, the aerosol printing with aerodynamic lenses needs neither microscale nozzles nor sheath gases, and is able to incorporate into the vacuum systems currently used in microelectronic fabrication. This thesis research presents systematic efforts to develop an aerosol-based method to directly write patterns of semiconductor nanocrystals from colloidal dispersions by aerodynamic focusing. First, the synthesized colloidal nanocrystals in hexane were nebulized into compact and spherical agglomerates suspending in the carrier gas. The details about the impact dynamics of individual aerosolized nanocrystal agglomerates were investigated. As building blocks of printed nanocrystal films, the agglomerate exhibited cohesive and granular behaviors during impact deformation on the substrate. The strength of cohesion between nanocrystals in the agglomerates could be adjusted by tuning the number concentration of colloidal nanocrystal dispersion. Second, ultrathin films of nanocrystals were obtained by printing monodisperse nanocrystal agglomerates. As the result of the granular property of nanocrystal agglomerates, it was found that the thickness of deposited agglomerates strongly depended on the size of agglomerates. A

  3. Literate Programming System CDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾云峰

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a broad outline and some implementation techniques of the literate programming system CDS.Compared with the previous ones (e.g.WEB,Cweb),CDS has two main characteristics:1) A Chinese-English typesetting system was developed to produce the documentation.This makes the Chinese documentation possible.2) A suitable method for automatic formatting was introduced to generate the software documentation automatically.This frees the programmer from typesetting details while still allowing programmer's interference.

  4. Formation of nearly monodisperse In2O3 nanodots and oriented-attached nanoflowers: hydrolysis and alcoholysis vs pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Arun; Xu, Huifang; Pradhan, Narayan; Kim, Myeongseob; Peng, Xiaogang

    2006-08-01

    Single crystalline and nearly monodisperse In2O3 nanocrystals with both dot and flower shapes were synthesized in a simple reaction system. This system used indium carboxylates as the precursors with or without alcohol as the activating reagents in a hydrocarbon solvent under elevated temperatures. Limited ligand protection (LLP) led to three-dimensional (3D) oriented attachment of nanodots, resulting in 3D nanoflowers. When the system had sufficient ligand protection for the nanocrystals, nanodots were found to be the stable products. The diameters of nearly monodisperse nanodots and nanoflowers were varied in a range from approximately 5 to approximately 15 nm and approximately 15 to approximately 60 nm, respectively. The simple reaction system made it possible to have a systematic study of the reaction mechanisms along with the growth kinetics of nanocrystals. Hydrolysis and alcoholysis were identified as the major paths for this system, as opposed to pyrolysis. Both nearly monodispersed nanodots and nanoflowers can be made through either of the reaction pathways. Hydrolysis was found as a reversible pathway, and alcoholysis was confirmed to be irreversible. Consequently, a sufficient amount of alcohol was able to force the yield of nanocrystals, both dots and flowers, to unity.

  5. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  6. Synthesis and applications of heterostructured semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khon, Elena

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) have been of great interest to researchers for several decades due to their unique optoelectronic properties. These nanoparticles are widely used for a variety of different applications. However, there are many unresolved issues that lower the efficiency and/or stability of devices which incorporate these NCs. Our research is dedicated to addressing these issues by identifying potential problems and resolving them, improving existing systems, generating new synthetic strategies, and/or building new devices. The general strategies for the synthesis of different nanocrystals were established in this work, one of which is the colloidal growth of gold domains onto CdS semiconductor nanocrystals. Control of shape and size was achieved simply by adjusting the temperature and the time of the reaction. Depending on the exact morphology of Au and CdS domains, fabricated nano-composites can undergo evaporation-induced self-assembly onto a substrate, which is very useful for building devices. CdS/Au heterostructures can assemble in two different ways: through end-to-end coupling of Au domains, resulting in the formation of one-dimensional chains; and via side-by-side packing of CdS nanorods, leading to the onset of two-dimensional superlattices. We investigated the nature of exciton-plasmon interactions in Au-tipped CdS nanorods using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The study demonstrated that the key optoelectronic properties of electrically coupled metal and semiconductor domains are significantly different from those observed in systems with weak inter-domain coupling. In particular, strongly-coupled nanocomposites promote mixing of electronic states at semiconductor-metal domain interfaces, which causes a significant suppression of both plasmon and exciton carrier excitations. Colloidal QDs are starting to replace organic molecules in many different applications, such as organic light emmiting diods (OLEDs), due to their

  7. Controlled crystalline structure and surface stability of cobalt nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Beerman, Michael; Pakhomov, Alexandre B; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2005-04-21

    The synthesis of monodispersed 10 nm cobalt nanocrystals with controlled crystal morphology and investigation of the surface stability of these nanocrystals are described. Depending on the surfactants used, single crystalline or multiple grain nanocrystals can be reproducibly produced. The relative surface stability of these nanocrystals is analyzed using the temperature dependences of the dc magnetic susceptibility. The novel method, which allows sensitive monitoring of the surface stability, is based on the observation that, with particle oxidation, an anomalous peak appears at 8 K in zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements. It is found that the surfactant protective layer is more important for long-term stability at room temperature, while the high-temperature oxidation rate is controlled by the crystal morphology of the nanoparticles.

  8. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  9. Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory contains descriptions of past and present CDS projects across the Federal Government. It includes Federal projects,...

  10. Face-Centred-Cubic Artificial Opal Embedded with CdS Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岭; 李明海; 张宇; 马懿; 徐骏; 黄信凡; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    Highly monodispersed colloidal silica spheres in sub-micrometre size with distribution standard deviation less than 5% were synthesized by a chemical method. Using the self-crystallization of the silica spheres, we successfully obtained the three-dimensional close-packed face-centred-cubic silica matrices and artificial opals. Then,a colloidal photonic crystal embedded with CdS quantum dots (QDs) was also chemically prepared by using artificial opals as a template. A reflection spectra study reveals that both artificial opals with and without CdS QDs possess (111) directional photonic bandgap features.

  11. Synthesis of highly monodisperse Ge crystals in a capacitively coupled flow through reactor for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresback, Ryan; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2006-10-01

    Germanium nanocrystals are interesting candidates for quantum dot-based solar cells. While the band gap of bulk Ge is ˜0.7 eV, the energy gap can be increased due to quantum confinement to ˜ 2eV for Ge particles of ˜3 nm in size. With a single material, Ge nanocrystals of sizes from 3 -15 nm would thus allow to span the entire range of band gaps that is of interest for photovoltaic devices. Moreover, compared to many other quantum dot materials that are currently studied for photovoltaic applications, Ge is perceived as non-toxic and environmentally benign. Ge nanocrystals are synthesized in a tubular, capacitively coupled flow through reactor. Germanium tetrachloride is used as a precursor. It is introduced into the plasma by a flow of argon and hydrogen. At typical pressures of 2 Torr and 40 W of RF power at 13.56 MHz, Ge crystals are generated and reside in the plasma for several tens of milliseconds. The size of the nanocrystals can be controlled in a range from 3-20 nm through the residence time. Particles are highly monodisperse. Organically passivated Ge nanocrystals self-assemble into monolayers when cast from colloidal solutions.

  12. Organization of 'nanocrystal molecules' using DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Johnsson, Kai P.; Peng, Xiaogang; Wilson, Troy E.; Loweth, Colin J.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Schultz, Peter G.

    1996-08-01

    PATTERNING matter on the nanometre scale is an important objective of current materials chemistry and physics. It is driven by both the need to further miniaturize electronic components and the fact that at the nanometre scale, materials properties are strongly size-dependent and thus can be tuned sensitively1. In nanoscale crystals, quantum size effects and the large number of surface atoms influence the, chemical, electronic, magnetic and optical behaviour2-4. 'Top-down' (for example, lithographic) methods for nanoscale manipulation reach only to the upper end of the nanometre regime5; but whereas 'bottom-up' wet chemical techniques allow for the preparation of mono-disperse, defect-free crystallites just 1-10 nm in size6-10, ways to control the structure of nanocrystal assemblies are scarce. Here we describe a strategy for the synthesis of'nanocrystal molecules', in which discrete numbers of gold nanocrystals are organized into spatially defined structures based on Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. We attach single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides of defined length and sequence to individual nanocrystals, and these assemble into dimers and trimers on addition of a complementary single-stranded DNA template. We anticipate that this approach should allow the construction of more complex two-and three-dimensional assemblies.

  13. Photovoltaic Devices from Multi-Armed CdS Nanorods and Conjugated Polyme, Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-Shan; WANG Li; QIN Dong-Huan; CAO Yong

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the preparation of composite photovoltaic devices by using the blends of multi-armed CdS nanorods with conjugated polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-l,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV). Multi-armed CdS nanorods are prepared by thermolysing single precursor cadmium ethylxanthate [Cd(exan)2] in pure hexadecylamine solution under ambient conditions. The photoluminescence of MEH-PPV can be ef fectively quenched in the composites at high CdS nanocrystal (nc-CdS)/MEH-PPV ratios. Post-treatment of the multi-armed CdS nanorods by refluxing in pyridine significantly increases the performance of the composite photovoltaic devices. Power conversion efficiency is obtained to be 0.17% under AM 1.5 illumination for this composite device.

  14. Biomolecularly capped uniformly sized nanocrystalline materials: glutathione-capped ZnS nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Martínez, Claudia L.; Nguyen, Liem; Kho, Richard; Bae, Weon; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Klimov, Victor; Mehra, Rajesh K.

    1999-09-01

    Micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeasts form CdS to detoxify toxic cadmium ions. Frequently, CdS particles formed in yeasts and bacteria were found to be associated with specific biomolecules. It was later determined that these biomolecules were present at the surface of CdS. This coating caused a restriction in the growth of CdS particles and resulted in the formation of nanometre-sized semiconductors (NCs) that exhibited typical quantum confinement properties. Glutathione and related phytochelatin peptides were shown to be the biomolecules that capped CdS nanocrystallites synthesized by yeasts Candida glabrata and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Although early studies showed the existence of specific biochemical pathways for the synthesis of biomolecularly capped CdS NCs, these NCs could be formed in vitro under appropriate conditions. We have recently shown that cysteine and cysteine-containing peptides such as glutathione and phytochelatins can be used in vitro to dictate the formation of discrete sizes of CdS and ZnS nanocrystals. We have evolved protocols for the synthesis of ZnS or CdS nanocrystals within a narrow size distribution range. These procedures involve three steps: (1) formation of metallo-complexes of cysteine or cysteine-containing peptides, (2) introduction of stoichiometric amounts of inorganic sulfide into the metallo-complexes to initiate the formation of nanocrystallites and finally (3) size-selective precipitation of NCs with ethanol in the presence of Na+. The resulting NCs were characterized by optical spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction. HRTEM showed that the diameter of the ZnS-glutathione nanocrystals was 3.45+/-0.5 nm. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction analyses indicated ZnS-glutathione to be hexagonal. Photocatalytic studies suggest that glutathione-capped ZnS nanocrystals prepared by our procedure are highly efficient in degrading a test model

  15. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse CdSe quantum dots in different organic solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Rong; You Xiaogang; Tian Hongye; Gao Feng; Cui Daxiang; Gu Hongchen

    2006-01-01

    Nearly monodisperse CdSe quantum dots (QDs)have been prepared by a soft solution approach using air-stable reagents in different organic solvents.This scheme is a supplement to the conventional thermal decomposition of organometailic compounds at higher temperatures.CdSe nanocrystals of different sizes could be obtained by simply changing the solvent.This method is reproducible and simple and thus can be readily scaled up for industrial production.The reaction process was monitored by the temporal evolution of the UV-Vis absorption and room temperature photoluminensce spectra.The structures of the CdSe quantum dots were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The phase-transfer of oleic acid-stabilized CdSe nanocrystals into PBS buffer solutions was also studied for their potentials in biological applications.

  16. Facile synthesis of Pd-based bimetallic nanocrystals and their application as catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Pinxian; Cao, Yang; Yang, Fengchun; Ma, Cai; Chen, Fengjuan; Yu, Sha; Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Zhengzhi; Zhang, Xin

    2013-06-01

    We employed an efficient and facile route to synthesise monodisperse Pd-based bimetallic nanocrystals (MPd: M = Cu, Co and Ni) via a controlled co-reduction of Pd(ii) chloride and M(ii) nitrate at 200-230 °C in the presence of oleylamine (OAm). These monodisperse Pd-based nanocrystals have small dimensions, unique structures and homogeneous morphology, thus exhibit efficient catalytic activities for methanol oxidation in alkaline solution, which is much better than commercial Pd/C with same amount of palladium. The catalytic activities of these nanocrystals followed the order of NiPd/C > CoPd/C > CuPd/C > commercial Pd/C, due to the different synergistic effects. Our results show that these Pd-based bimetallic nanocrystals can be promising as practical catalysts for methanol oxidation reactions and other catalytic reactions in further investigations.We employed an efficient and facile route to synthesise monodisperse Pd-based bimetallic nanocrystals (MPd: M = Cu, Co and Ni) via a controlled co-reduction of Pd(ii) chloride and M(ii) nitrate at 200-230 °C in the presence of oleylamine (OAm). These monodisperse Pd-based nanocrystals have small dimensions, unique structures and homogeneous morphology, thus exhibit efficient catalytic activities for methanol oxidation in alkaline solution, which is much better than commercial Pd/C with same amount of palladium. The catalytic activities of these nanocrystals followed the order of NiPd/C > CoPd/C > CuPd/C > commercial Pd/C, due to the different synergistic effects. Our results show that these Pd-based bimetallic nanocrystals can be promising as practical catalysts for methanol oxidation reactions and other catalytic reactions in further investigations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00912b

  17. Monodispersed Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle-Dye Dyads and Triads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladfelter, Wayne L. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Blank, David A. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mann, Kent R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-06-22

    The overall energy conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells depends on the combined efficiencies of light absorption, charge separation and charge transport. Dye-sensitized solar cells are photovoltaic devices in which a molecular dye absorbs light and uses this energy to initiate charge separation. The most efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) use nanocrystal titanium dioxide films to which are attached ruthenium complexes. Numerous studies have provided valuable insight into the dynamics of these and analogous photosystems, but the lack of site homogeneity in binding dye molecules to metal oxide films and nanocrystals (NCs) is a significant impediment to extracting fundamental details about the electron transfer across the interface. Although zinc oxide is emerging as a potential semiconducting component in DSSCs, there is less known about the factors controlling charge separation across the dye/ZnO interface. Zinc oxide crystallizes in the wurtzite lattice and has a band gap of 3.37 eV. One of the features that makes ZnO especially attractive is the remarkable ability to control the morphology of the films. Using solution deposition processes, one can prepare NCs, nanorods and nanowires having a variety of shapes and dimensions. This project solved problems associated with film heterogeneity through the use of dispersible sensitizer/ZnO NC ensembles. The overarching goal of this research was to study the relationship between structure, energetics and dynamics in a set of synthetically controlled donor-acceptor dyads and triads. These studies provided access to unprecedented understanding of the light absorption and charge transfer steps that lie at the heart of DSSCs, thus enabling significant future advances in cell efficiencies. The approach began with the construction of well-defined dye-NC dyads that were sufficiently dispersible to allow the use of state of the art pulsed laser spectroscopic and kinetic methods to understand the charge transfer

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal Metal and Photovoltaic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-11-05

    method was used for the in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles as a model system. Relatively monodisperse gold nanoparticles were produced. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by the gold precursor and surfactant concentration in the ‘ink.’ This approach can be extended to the synthesis of other nanocrystals and is thus a truly impactful process for the low-cost synthesis of materials and devices incorporating nanocrystals.

  19. CDS User survey

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Document Service

    2011-01-01

      The CERN Document Server is launching a user survey in order to collect information relative to its search engine, submission interfaces, collaborative features and content organisation. With the view of re-shaping its collections and interfaces and to better integrate with the new INSPIRE platform that serves all HEP literature, CERN Document Server team invites you to take part in the survey. Your input is essential to provide us with useful information before setting up the new service and improve your interactions with CDS. Thanks for participating !  

  20. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  1. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  2. Safe-haven CDS Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingler, Sven; Lando, David

    We argue that Credit Default Swap (CDS) premia for safe-haven sovereigns, like Germany and the United States, are driven to a large extent by regulatory requirements under which derivatives dealing banks have an incentive to buy CDS to hedge counterparty credit risk of their counterparties. We...

  3. Safe-haven CDS Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingler, Sven; Lando, David

    We argue that Credit Default Swap (CDS) premia for safe-haven sovereigns, like Germany and the United States, are driven to a large extent by regulatory requirements under which derivatives dealing banks have an incentive to buy CDS to hedge counterparty credit risk of their counterparties. We...

  4. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  5. Novel Nanocrystal Floating Gate Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Huimei

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigating the feasibility of engineering nanocrystals and tunnel oxide layer with a novel structure. Several novel devices are demonstrated to improve the performance of the novel nanocrystal memories.A novel TiSi2 nanocrystal memory was demonstrated. TiSi2 nanocrystals were synthesized on SiO2 by annealing Ti covered Si nanocrystals. Compared to the reference Si nanocrystal memory, both experiment and simulation results show that TiSi2 nanocrystal memory exhibits ...

  6. Seed mediated synthesis of highly mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the presence of hydroquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Sykes, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being studied for several biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biomedical imaging, contrast agents and tumor targeting. The synthesis of nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution is critical for these applications. We report the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed AuNPs by a seed mediated approach, in the presence of tri-sodium citrate and hydroquinone (HQ). AuNPs with an average size of 18 nm were used for the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed nanocrystals of an average size 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ˜100 nm; but the protocol is not limited to these sizes. The colloidal gold was subjected to UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, showing a red shift in lambda max wavelength, peaks at 518.47 nm, 526.37 nm, 535.73 nm, 546.03 nm and 556.50 nm for AuNPs seed (18 nm), 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ˜100 nm respectively. The analysis was consistent with dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Hydrodynamic diameters measured were 17.6 nm, 40.8 nm, 59.8 nm, 74.1 nm, and 91.4 nm (size by dynamic light scattering—volume %); with an average poly dispersity index value of 0.088, suggesting mono-dispersity in the size distribution, which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The advantage of a seed mediated approach is a multi-step growth of nanoparticle size that enables us to control the number of nanoparticles in the suspension, for size ranging from 24.5 nm to 95.8 nm. In addition, the HQ-based synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals allowed control of the particle size and size distribution by tailoring either the number of seeds, amount of gold precursor or reducing agent (HQ) in the final reaction mixture.

  7. Seed mediated synthesis of highly mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the presence of hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Sykes, Peter

    2016-09-02

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being studied for several biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biomedical imaging, contrast agents and tumor targeting. The synthesis of nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution is critical for these applications. We report the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed AuNPs by a seed mediated approach, in the presence of tri-sodium citrate and hydroquinone (HQ). AuNPs with an average size of 18 nm were used for the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed nanocrystals of an average size 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ∼100 nm; but the protocol is not limited to these sizes. The colloidal gold was subjected to UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, showing a red shift in lambda max wavelength, peaks at 518.47 nm, 526.37 nm, 535.73 nm, 546.03 nm and 556.50 nm for AuNPs seed (18 nm), 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ∼100 nm respectively. The analysis was consistent with dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Hydrodynamic diameters measured were 17.6 nm, 40.8 nm, 59.8 nm, 74.1 nm, and 91.4 nm (size by dynamic light scattering-volume %); with an average poly dispersity index value of 0.088, suggesting mono-dispersity in the size distribution, which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The advantage of a seed mediated approach is a multi-step growth of nanoparticle size that enables us to control the number of nanoparticles in the suspension, for size ranging from 24.5 nm to 95.8 nm. In addition, the HQ-based synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals allowed control of the particle size and size distribution by tailoring either the number of seeds, amount of gold precursor or reducing agent (HQ) in the final reaction mixture.

  8. Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Genova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Centre de Donnees astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS, created in 1972, has been a pioneer in the dissemination of digital scientific data. Ensuring sustainability for several decades has been a major issue because science and technology evolve continuously and the data flow increases endlessly. The paper briefly describes CDS activities, major services, and its R&D strategy to take advantage of new technologies. The next frontiers for CDS are the new Web 2.0/3.0 paradigm and, at a more general level, global interoperability of astronomical on-line resources in the Virtual Observatory framework.

  9. Surface chemical modification of nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helms, Brett Anthony; Milliron, Delia Jane; Rosen, Evelyn Louise; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Llordes, Anna

    2017-03-14

    Nanocrystals comprising organic ligands at surfaces of the plurality of nanocrystals are provided. The organic ligands are removed from the surfaces of the nanocrystals using a solution comprising a trialkyloxonium salt in a polar aprotic solvent. The removal of the organic ligands causes the nanocrystals to become naked nanocrystals with cationic surfaces.

  10. Controlled synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Gouder, Thomas; Courtois, Eglantine; Kübel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2013-04-22

    Very little is known about the size and shape effects on the properties of actinide compounds. As a consequence, the controlled synthesis of well-defined actinide-based nanocrystals constitutes a fundamental step before studying their corresponding properties. In this paper, we report on the non-aqueous surfactant-assisted synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nanocrystals. The final characteristics of thorium and uranium oxide nanocrystals can be easily tuned by controlling a few experimental parameters such as the nature of the actinide precursor and the composition of the organic system (e.g., the chemical nature of the surfactants and their relative concentrations). Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the outcome of the synthesis is highly dependent on the nature of the actinide element (thorium versus uranium). By using optimised experimental conditions, monodisperse isotropic uranium oxide nanocrystals with different sizes (4.5 and 10.7 nm) as well as branched nanocrystals (overall size ca. 5 nm), nanodots (ca. 4 nm) and nanorods (with ultra-small diameters of 1 nm) of thorium oxide were synthesised.

  11. Large-Scale Production of CdSe Nanocrystal by a Continuous Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawa, Manabu, E-mail: 508532@cc.m-kagaku.co.jp; Morii, Hidekazu; Ioku, Atau; Saita, Soichiro [MCC-Group Science and Technology Research Center, Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation (Japan); Okuyama, Kikuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2003-04-15

    Organically capped CdSe nanocrystals were successfully produced by a continuous flow reactor in 13 g/h rate as isolated CdSe nanocrystal, using trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) both as the capping organic reagent and the high-temperature reaction solvent. Relatively high reaction temperature (e.g. 350 deg. C) was necessary for matured crystal growth. The quality of TOPO (i.e. impurity composition such like phosphonic acids) was also influential on the quality of the resulting CdSe nanocrystal. The continuous flow reactor was able to produce highly-luminescence, monodispersed CdSe nanocrystals, confirmed by transmission electron microscope observation. The production rate was stable at least 1 h to allow over 10 g production.

  12. Synthesis of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, Focusing on Nontoxic and Earth-Abundant Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Peter; Carrière, Marie; Lincheneau, Christophe; Vaure, Louis; Tamang, Sudarsan

    2016-09-28

    We review the synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals/colloidal quantum dots in organic solvents with special emphasis on earth-abundant and toxic heavy metal free compounds. Following the Introduction, section 2 defines the terms related to the toxicity of nanocrystals and gives a comprehensive overview on toxicity studies concerning all types of quantum dots. Section 3 aims at providing the reader with the basic concepts of nanocrystal synthesis. It starts with the concepts currently used to describe the nucleation and growth of monodisperse particles and next takes a closer look at the chemistry of the inorganic core and its interactions with surface ligands. Section 4 reviews in more detail the synthesis of different families of semiconductor nanocrystals, namely elemental group IV compounds (carbon nanodots, Si, Ge), III-V compounds (e.g., InP, InAs), and binary and multinary metal chalcogenides. Finally, the authors' view on the perspectives in this field is given.

  13. Synthesis of new nanocrystal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Yasser Hassan Abd El-Fattah

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) have sparked great excitement in the scientific community in last two decades. NCs are useful for both fundamental research and technical applications in various fields owing to their size and shape-dependent properties and their potentially inexpensive and excellent chemical processability. These NCs are versatile fluorescence probes with unique optical properties, including tunable luminescence, high extinction coefficient, broad absorption with narrow photoluminescence, and photobleaching resistance. In the past few years, a lot of attention has been given to nanotechnology based on using these materials as building blocks to design light harvesting assemblies. For instant, the pioneering applications of NCs are light-emitting diodes, lasers, and photovoltaic devices. Synthesis of the colloidal stable semiconductor NCs using the wet method of the pyrolysis of organometallic and chalcogenide precursors, known as hot-injection approach, is the chart-topping preparation method in term of high quality and monodisperse sized NCs. The advancement in the synthesis of these artificial materials is the core step toward their applications in a broad range of technologies. This dissertation focuses on exploring various innovative and novel synthetic methods of different types of colloidal nanocrystals, both inorganic semiconductors NCs, also known as quantum dots (QDs), and organic-inorganic metal halide-perovskite materials, known as perovskites. The work presented in this thesis focuses on pursuing fundamental understanding of the synthesis, material properties, photophysics, and spectroscopy of these nanostructured semiconductor materials. This thesis contains 6 chapters and conclusions. Chapters 1?3 focus on introducing theories and background of the materials being synthesized in the thesis. Chapter 4 demonstrates our synthesis of colloidal linker--free TiO2/CdSe NRs heterostructures with CdSe QDs grown in the presence of Ti

  14. Spontaneous Breakup of Extended Monodisperse Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Yu, Kaijia

    2011-01-01

    We apply continuum mechanical based, numerical modeling to study the dynamics of extended monodisperse polymer melts during the relaxation. The computations are within the ideas of the microstructural ‘‘interchain pressure’’ theory. The computations show a delayed necking resulting in a rupture...

  15. Preparation and characterization of ZnS:Fe/MX (M = Cd, Zn; X = S, Se) core-shell nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Xie, Ruishi; Gu, Yongjun; Huang, Jinliang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2012-06-01

    ZnS:Fe/MX (M = Cd, Zn; X = S, Se) nanocrystals were synthesized by chemical precipitation method. Compared to ZnS:Fe nanocrystals, the diffraction peaks intensity of ZnS:Fe/ZnS nanocrystals reduced and the diffraction peaks of ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals moved to lower angles. TEM photos show that ZnS:Fe and ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals are spheroidal and the average particles size is about 2-4 nm. The selected-area electron diffraction pattern of ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals shows the diffraction rings, indicating the ZnS:Fe/ZnSe nanocrystals have a polycrystalline structure. XPS shows that the divalent and trivalent of Fe ion are coexisted in ZnS:Fe nanocrystals. The emission peaks of ZnS:Fe nanocrystals were from S and Zn ions vacancy defects and surface defects for the range of 200-900 nm. The use of ZnS (CdS, ZnSe) as surface modifying reagent inhibited the luminescent intensity of ZnS:Fe nanocrystallines at 420 nm. The PL spectra of ZnS:Fe/CdS nanocrystals show a new peak at 554 nm.

  16. High-refractive Index Nanocomposite Films Of Polyvinyl-pyrolidone And CdS Nanoparticles By In-Situ Thermolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Tapas K.; Patel, Mitesh G.

    2010-12-01

    A simple and rapid process for deposition of high refractive index films of CdS/PVP nanocomposite is described. CdS/PVP films are prepared on glass substrate by dip coating a precursor film from methanolic solution of thio-organic complex of cadmium and PVP and subsequent heating at 180° C in air for 10 min. The transmission spectra of the films (thickness ˜700 nm) in the wavelength range 300 to 1000 nm showed an absorption edge near 500 nm due to CdS and high transmission of 85% beyond 500 nm. The refractive index is found to be 1.74 by Swanepoel method, which is between that of PVP (1.48) and CdS (2.5). Transmission Electron Microscopy showed that PVP matrix contains 5 to 10 nm CdS nanocrystals. X-ray and electron diffraction revealed the formation of cubic CdS nanoparticles in PVP. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy of the composite showed that there is a strong interaction between CdS nanocrystals and PVP.

  17. MD SIMULATION FOR NANOCRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马新玲; 杨卫

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) provided an ab initio simulation for nano-scale mechanical behavior of materials, provided that the inter-atomic potential is accurately prescribed. MD is particularly suitable in simulating the formation, the deformation, and the evolution of nanocrystals under a fast strain rate. To tackle large scale system and nano-seconds time duration, parallel algorithm is desired. The present paper reviews the recent advances in MD simulation for nanocrystals with attention focused on the applications toward nanomechanics. The examined issues are: formation of nanocrystalline metals, nanoindentation on nanocrystals, fast deformation of nanocrystals, orderdisorder transition, and nano-particle impact.

  18. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, J. R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  19. Visible light induced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and rhodamine B from the catalyst of CdS nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, R. Sankar; Durgadevi, E.; Navaneethan, M.; Sharma, Sanjeev K.; Binitha, H. S.; Ponnusamy, S.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2017-09-01

    CdS nanowires and nanorods were successfully synthesized by the simple solvothermal method and tested their photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (RhB). The monodispersed CdS nanowire and nanorods were confirmed from the field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis. The prepared photocatalyst demonstrated the superior visible light photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (RhB). The highest degradation (97%) of MB was achieved within 180 min and 90% towards RhB. Therefore, CdS nanowire has a remarkable towards organic pollutants under the visible light irradiation.

  20. Surface modification-a novel way of attaching cocatalysts on CdS semiconductors for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2014-08-22

    Noble metals as cocatalysts for hydrogen evolution are widely investigated for semiconductor photocatalytic water splitting. In this paper, we present a novel way to attach not only noble metals, but also transitional metals onto CdS nanocrystals as cocatalysts for hydrogen evolution. The hydrogen evolution performances for each metal were compared and result shows that Pd attached CdS gives the highest hydrogen evolution rate of 250 μmol/h. The amounts of metal ions attached on the surface were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). This work confirms that surface modification is a promising way of attaching cocatalysts onto semiconductor photocatalysts.

  1. General shape control of colloidal CdS, CdSe, CdTe quantum rods and quantum rod heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Felice; Saunders, Aaron E; Korgel, Brian A

    2005-05-12

    We report a general synthetic method for the formation of shape-controlled CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals and mixed-semiconductor heterostructures. The crystal growth kinetics can be manipulated by changing the injection rate of the chalcogen precursor, allowing the particle shape-spherical or rodlike-to be tuned without changing the underlying chemistry. A single injection of precursor leads to isotropic spherical growth, whereas multiple injections promote epitaxial growth along the length of the c-axis. This method was extended to produce linear type I and type II semiconductor nanocrystal heterostructures.

  2. Inorganic cluster syntheses of TM2+-doped quantum dots (CdSe, CdS, CdSe/CdS): physical property dependence on dopant locale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Paul I; Santangelo, Steven A; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2007-08-08

    A series of colloidal transition-metal-doped chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (TM2+:CdSe, TM2+:CdS, etc.) has been prepared by thermal decomposition of inorganic cluster precursors. It is shown through extensive spectroscopic and structural characterization that the nanocrystals prepared following literature procedures for synthesis of TM2+:CdSe nanocrystals actually possess an unintended CdSe/TM2+:CdS core/shell morphology. The conditions required for successful formation of TM2+:CdSe and TM2+:CdS by cluster decomposition have been determined. Magneto-optical and photoluminescence spectroscopic results for this series of doped nanocrystals reveal major physical consequences of dopant localization within the shell and demonstrate the capacity to engineer dopant-carrier exchange interactions via core/shell doping strategies. The results presented here illustrate some of the remarkable and unexpected complexities that can arise in nanocrystal doping chemistries and emphasize the need for meticulous characterization to avoid false positives.

  3. Facile thermolysis synthesis of CuInS2 nanocrystals with tunable anisotropic shape and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ningzhong; Qiu, Xinmin; Wang, Yu-Hsiang A; Zhou, Ziyou; Lu, Xiaohua; Grimes, Craig A; Gupta, Arunava

    2011-09-07

    Monodisperse CuInS(2) nanocrystals are produced by injecting mixed metal-oleate precursors into hot organic solvents containing the dissolved sulphur sources. A better understanding of the formation mechanism of CuInS(2) has enabled us to tailor anisotropic shapes in the form of triangular-pyramid, circular cone, and bullet-like rods with tunable crystal phases by varying the synthetic conditions. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  4. Enriching The Metadata On CDS

    CERN Document Server

    Chhibber, Nalin

    2014-01-01

    The project report revolves around the open source software package called Invenio. It provides the tools for management of digital assets in a repository and drives CERN Document Server. Primary objective is to enhance the existing metadata in CDS with data from other libraries. An implicit part of this task is to manage disambiguation (within incoming data), removal of multiple entries and handle replications between new and existing records. All such elements and their corresponding changes are integrated within Invenio to make the upgraded metadata available on the CDS. Latter part of the report discuss some changes related to the Invenio code-base itself.

  5. Template synthesis of monodisperse carbon nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyukov, D. A.; Eurov, D. A.; Stovpiaga, E. Yu.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Konyakhin, S. V.; Shvidchenko, A. V.; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Monodisperse carbon nanodots in pores of mesoporous silica particles are obtained by template synthesis. This method is based on introducing a precursor (organosilane) into pores, its thermal decomposition with formation of carbon nanodots, and the template removal. Structural analysis of the nanomaterial has been performed, which showed that carbon nanodots have an approximately spherical form and a graphite-like structure. According to dynamic light scattering data, the size of carbon nanodots is 3.3 ± 0.9 nm.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of monodispersed inorganic/organic core/shell microspheres with fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kai; HAN Kun; ZHANG Xuehai; YANG Bai

    2005-01-01

    @@ In recent years, the semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) have attracted great interest due to their potentials in photonics, electronics, magnetics and catalysis, and the monodispersed organic or inorganic microspheres doped NCs display predominant characteristics in the fabrication and study for photonic crystals[1,2], and considerable effort has been devoted to the design and synthesis of CdTe NCs doped colloid with well fluorescence[3-8]. For example, CdTe NCs were fabricated on the surfaces of silica or polymer microspheres by the methods of layer-by-layer assembly, and CdTe NCs were also doped into inorganic or organic microspheres through sol-gel process or swell- ing.

  7. Direct Dry-Grinding Synthesis of Monodisperse Lipophilic CuS Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajuan; Scott, Julie; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Guo, Liangran; Zhao, Mingyang; Wang, Xiaodong; Lu, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Copper sulfide nanoparticles, effective absorbers of near-infrared light, are recently attracting broad interest as a photothermal coupling agent for cancer therapy. Lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles are preferred for high performance biomedical applications due to high tissue affinity. Synthesis of lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles requires complicated multi-step processes under severe conditions. Here, we describe a new synthetic process, developed by direct dry-grinding of copper(II) acetylacetonate with sulfur under ambient environment at low temperature. The formed CuS nanoparticles are of uniform size, ~10 nm in diameter, and are monodispersed in chloroform. Each covellite CuS nanocrystal surface is modified with oleylamine through hydrogen bonding between sulfur atoms and amine groups of oleylamine. The nanoparticles demonstrate near-infrared light absorption for photothermal applications. The synthetic methodology described here is more convenient and less extreme than previous methods, and should thus greatly facilitate the preparation of photothermal lipophilic copper sulfide nanomaterials for cancer therapy.

  8. Microwave Synthesis of Nearly Monodisperse Core/Multishell Quantum Dots with Cell Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hengyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report in this article the microwave synthesis of relatively monodisperse, highly crystalline CdSe quantum dots (QDs overcoated with Cd0.5Zn0.5S/ZnS multishells. The as-prepared QDs exhibited narrow photoluminescence bandwidth as the consequence of homogeneous size distribution and uniform crystallinity, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. A high photoluminescence quantum yield up to 80% was measured for the core/multishell nanocrystals. Finally, the resulting CdSe/Cd0.5Zn0.5S/ZnS core/multishell QDs have been successfully applied to the labeling and imaging of breast cancer cells (SK-BR3.

  9. Diorganyl dichalcogenides as useful synthons for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutchey, Richard L

    2015-11-17

    The ability to synthesize colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in a well-controlled manner (i.e., with fine control over size, shape, size dispersion, and composition) has been mastered over the past 15 years. Much of this success stems from careful studies of precursor conversion and nanocrystal growth with respect to phosphine chalcogenide precursors for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. Despite the high level of success that has been achieved with phosphine chalcogenides, there has been a longstanding interest in exploring alternate chalcogenide precursors because of issues associated with phosphine chalcogenide cost, purity, toxicity, etc. This has resulted in a large body of literature on the use of sulfur and selenium dissolved in octadecene or amines, thio- and selenoureas, and silyl chalcogenides as alternate chalcogenide precursors for metal chalcogenide nanocrystal synthesis. In this Account, emerging work on the use of diorganyl dichalcogenides (R-E-E-R, where E = S, Se, or Te and R = alkyl, allyl, benzyl, or aryl) as alternate chalcogenide precursors for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is summarized. Among the benefits of these dichalcogenide synthons are the following: (i) they represent the first and only common precursor type that can function as chalcogen transfer reagents for each of the group VI elements (i.e., to make metal oxide, metal sulfide, metal selenide, and metal telluride nanocrystals); (ii) they possess relatively weak E-E bonds that can be readily cleaved under mild thermolytic or photolytic conditions; and (iii) the organic substituents can be tuned to affect the reactivity. These combined attributes have allowed dichalcogenide precursors to be employed for a wide range of metal chalcogenide nanocrystal syntheses, including those for In2S3, SnxGe1-xSe, SnTe, Cu2-xSySe1-y, ZnSe, CdS, CdSe, MoSe2, WSe2, BiSe, and CuFeS2. Interestingly, a number of metastable phases of compositionally complex

  10. Optimal Financing with CDS Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Matta

    2013-01-01

    One could argue that CDSs improve risk sharing, hence credit supply and financing terms for firms. Accordingly, one would expect risky borrowers to benefit the most from CDS insurance. This is in contrast, however, with recent empirical evidence (Ashcraft and Santos (2009) and Hirtle (2009)). This p

  11. A novel approach for the fabrication of all-inorganic nanocrystal solids: Semiconductor matrix encapsulated nanocrystal arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Pavel

    matrix-encapsulated PbS nanocrystal films containing a tunable fraction of insulating ZnS domains, we uniquely distinguish the dynamics of charge scattering on defects from other processes of exciton dissociation. The measured times are subsequently used to estimate the diffusion length and the carrier mobility for each film type within hopping transport regime. It is demonstrated that nanocrystal films encapsulated into semiconductor matrices exhibit a lower probability of charge scattering than nanocrystal solids cross-linked with either 3-mercaptopropionic acid or 1,2-ethanedithiol molecular linkers. The suppression of carrier scattering in matrix-encapsulated nanocrystal films is attributed to a relatively low density of surface defects at nanocrystal/matrix interfaces. High stability and low density of defects made it possible to fabricate infrared-emitting nanocrystal solids. Presently, an important challenge facing the development of nanocrystal infrared emitters concerns the fact that both the emission quantum yield and the stability of colloidal nanoparticles become compromised when nanoparticle solutions are processed into solids. Here, we address this issue by developing an assembly technique that encapsulates infrared-emitting PbS NCs into crystalline CdS matrices, designed to preserve NC emission characteristics upon film processing. Here, the morphology of these matrices was designed to suppress the nonradiative carrier decay, whereby increasing the exciton lifetime up to 1 mus, and boosting the emission quantum yield to an unprecedented 3.7% for inorganically encapsulated PbS NC solids.

  12. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  13. Optimizing the synthesis of CdS/ZnS core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals for bioimaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-wei Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report on CdS/ZnS nanocrystals as a luminescence probe for bioimaging applications. CdS nanocrystals capped with a ZnS shell had enhanced luminescence intensity, stronger stability and exhibited a longer lifetime compared to uncapped CdS. The CdS/ZnS nanocrystals were stabilized in Pluronic F127 block copolymer micelles, offering an optically and colloidally stable contrast agents for in vitro and in vivo imaging. Photostability test exhibited that the ZnS protective shell not only enhances the brightness of the QDs but also improves their stability in a biological environment. An in-vivo imaging study showed that F127-CdS/ZnS micelles had strong luminescence. These results suggest that these nanoparticles have significant advantages for bioimaging applications and may offer a new direction for the early detection of cancer in humans.

  14. Shape and size controlled synthesis of uniform iron oxide nanocrystals through new non-hydrolytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Lee, Seung Soo; Wu, Jiewei; Hinton, Carl H.; Fortner, John D.

    2016-08-01

    New, non-hydrolytic routes to synthesize highly crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (8-40 nm, magnetite) are described in this report whereby particle size and morphology were precisely controlled through reactant (precursor, e.g. (FeO(OH)) ratios, co-surfactant and organic additive, and/or reaction time. Particle size, with high monodispersivity (oxide nanocrystals can be reproducibly synthesized through simple one-pot thermal decomposition methods. High resolution transmission electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device were used to characterize the size, structure and magnetic properties of the resulting nanocrystals. For aqueous applications, materials synthesized/purified in organic solvents are broadly water dispersible through a variety of phase (aqueous) transfer method(s).

  15. Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals prepared by a colloidal route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjun Liu

    Full Text Available Nearly monodispersed Ag3PO4 nanocrystals with size of 10 nm were prepared through a colloidal chemical route. It was proven that the synthesized Ag3PO4 nanoparticles have intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity. They can quickly catalyze oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3, 3, 5, 5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB in the presence of H2O2, producing a blue color. The catalysis reaction follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The calculated kinetic parameters indicate a high catalytic activity and the strong affinity of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals to the substrate (TMB. These results suggest the potential applications of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals in fields such as biotechnology, environmental chemistry, and medicine.

  16. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yongfen [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  17. Nanocrystals for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthani, Matthew G; Korgel, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are promising materials for low-cost large-area electronic device fabrication. They can be synthesized with a wide variety of chemical compositions and size-tunable optical and electronic properties as well as dispersed in solvents for room-temperature deposition using various types of printing processes. This review addresses research progress in large-area electronic device applications using nanocrystal-based electrically active thin films, including thin-film transistors, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics.

  18. Gold electrodes from recordable CDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angnes; Richter; Augelli; Kume

    2000-11-01

    Gold electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry. The notable performance when used in stripping analysis of many ionic species and the extraordinary affinity of thio compounds for its surface make these electrodes very suitable for many applications. This paper reports a simple and novel way to construct gold electrodes (CDtrodes) using recordable CDs as the gold source. The nanometer thickness of the gold layer of recordable disks (50-100 nm) favors the construction of band nanoelectrodes with areas as small as 10(-6) cm2. The plane surface can be easily used for the construction of conventional-sized gold electrodes for batch or flow injection analysis or even to obtain electrodes as large as 100 cm2. The low price of commercial recordable CDs allows a "one way use". The evaluation and applicability of these electrodes in the form of nanoelectrodes, in batch and associated with flow cells, are illustrated in this paper.

  19. Photoluminescent nanocomposite materials based on SBMA copolymer and CdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovu, M.; Enachescu, M.; Culeac, I.; Verlan, V.; Robu, S.; Bojin, D.; Nistor, Iu.; Cojocaru, I.

    2015-02-01

    We present experimental results on copolymer-based nanocomposite made of styrene with butyl methacrylate (SBMA) (1:1) and inorganic semiconductor CdS. Thin film composite samples have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption and photoluminescent spectroscopy, as well as by transmission electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination confirms a relatively narrow distribution of CdS nanoclusters in the SBMA matrix, which covers the range 2-10 nm. On the other side, the average CdS particles size estimated from the position of first excitonic peak in the UV-Vis absorption spectrum was found to be 2.8 nm and 4.4 nm for two samples with different duration of thermal treatment, which is in good agreement with photoluminescence (PL) experimental data. The PL spectrum for CdS nanocrystals is dominated by near-band-edge emission. The relatively narrow line width (40-45 nm) of the main PL band suggests the nanoparticles having narrow size distribution. On the other side, relatively low PL emission from surface trap states at longer wavelengths were observed in the region 500-750 nm indicating on recombination on defects. Key words: nanocomposite, polymer matrix, photoluminescence,

  20. Fabrication of 2D and 3D dendritic nanoarchitectures of CdS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Li

    2008-01-01

    The controlled preparation of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) dendritic nanostructures of CdS was reported. 2D dendritic patterns are obtained through the self-assembly of nanoparticles under the entropy-driven force. 3D dendritic needle-like nanocrystals are prepared through an aqueous solution synthesis regulated by oleic acid molecules. Their growth mechanism is presumed to be the selective binding of OA molecules onto growing crystal planes. Techniques such as SEM, TEM, XRD, and FT-IR were employed to characterize the morphologies and structures of the obtained products.

  1. Microfluidic Production of Monodisperse Perfluorocarbon Microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Schalte, Kevin; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is process in which liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets are vaporized using focused ultrasound to form gas bubbles that are approximately 125 times larger in volume. Gas embolotherapy is a novel cancer treatment that uses ADV in vivo to strategically form gas emoboli, which can lodge in the microcirculation and starve tumors. Current methods to produce PFC microdroplets, such has high speed shaking or sonication, result in polydisperse droplet distributions where a fraction of droplets fall within the 2-10 microns range. In the clinical application with such a droplet distribution, large droplets are filtered by the lungs and small droplets result in bubbles that are too small to lodge in the tumor vasculature. Consequently, there is a need for a monodisperse droplet distribution. A microfluidic based device has been developed in order to produce such monodisperse PFC microdroplets. The device used hydrodynamic flow focusing to create droplets with a mean diameter less than 10 microns in diameter. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  2. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongation...

  3. Faradaurate-940: Synthesis, Mass Spectrometry, STEM, PDF, and SAXS Study of Au~940(SR)~160 Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumara, Chanaka [University of Mississippi, The; Zuo, Xiaobing [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Cullen, David A [ORNL; Dass, Amala [University of Mississippi, The

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining monodisperse nanocrystals, and determining its composition to the atomic level and its atomic structure is highly desirable, but is generally lacking. Here, we report the discovery and comprehensive characterization of a 3-nm plasmonic nanocrystal with a composition of Au940 20(SCH2CH2Ph)160 4, which is, the largest mass spectrometrically characterized gold thiolate nanoparticle produced to date. The compositional assignment has been made using electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The MS results show an unprecedented size monodispersity, where the number of Au atoms vary by only 40 atoms (940 20). The mass spectrometrically-determined size and composition are supported by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and synchrotron-based methods such as atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Lower resolution STEM images show an ensemble of particles 1000 s per frame visually demonstrating monodispersity. Modelling of SAXS on statistically significant nanoparticle population approximately 1012 individual nanoparticles - shows that the diameter is 3.0 0.2nm, supporting mass spectrometry and electron microscopy results on monodispersity. Atomic PDF based on high energy X-ray diffraction experiments show decent match with either a Marks decahedral or truncated octrahedral structure. Atomic resolution STEM images of single particles and its FFT suggest face-centered cubic (fcc) arrangement. UV-visible spectroscopy data shows that the 940-atom size supports a surface plasmon resonance peak at 505 nm. These monodisperse plasmonic nanoparticles minimize averaging effects and has potential application in solar cells, nano-optical devices, catalysis and drug delivery.

  4. A configurable CDS for the production laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Meek, Irish

    2003-01-01

    Various aspects of a configurable chromatography data system (CDS) for the production laboratory are discussed. The Atlas CDS can be configured extensively to fit the production laboratory work flow and meet the needs of analysts. The CDS can also be configured to automatically create a sample sequence with the required number of injections and download methods to the dedicated instrument. The Atlas Quick Start wizard offers uses quick way of generating a sequence from a predefined template and starting a run. (Edited abstract).

  5. Solvothermal synthesis and characterization of monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shichuan; Zhang, Tonglai; Tang, Runze; Qiu, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Caiqin [Shandong Special Industry Group Co., Ltd, Shandong 255201 (China); Zhou, Zunning [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-04-01

    A series of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters with different structure guide agents were synthesized by a modified solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analyses (TG), a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It is found that the superparamagnetic nanoparticles guided by NaCit (sodium citrate) have high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 69.641 emu/g and low retentivity (M{sub r}) of 0.8 emu/g. Guiding to form superparamagnetic clusters with size range of 80–110 nm, the adherent small-molecule citrate groups on the surface prevent the prefabricated ferrite crystals growing further. In contrast, the primary small crystal guided and stabilized by the PVP long-chain molecules assemble freely to larger ones and stop growing in size range of 100–150 nm, which has saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 97.979 emu/g and retentivity (M{sub r}) of 46.323 emu/g. The relevant formation mechanisms of the two types of samples are proposed at the end. The superparamagnetic ferrite clusters guided by sodium citrate are expected to be used for movement controlling of passive interference particles to avoid aggregation and the sample guided by PVP will be a candidate of nanometer wave absorbing material. - Highlights: • A facile synthesis of two kinds of monodisperse iron oxide nano-particle clusters was performed via a modified one-step solvothermal method in this work. • The NaCit and PVP as different guiding agents are used to control the formation and aggregation of nano-crystals during reacting and the ripening processes. • The superparamagnetic NaCit–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples have high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 69.641 emu/g and low retentivity (M{sub r}) of 0.8 emu/g. • The relevant formation mechanisms of the two types of samples are proposed.

  6. Synthesis and optical proper ties of nanosized CdS prepared in a quaternary CTAB/ n-hexanol/n-heptane/waterreverse micelle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Quaternary water-in-oil reverse micelles consisting of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), nhexanol, n-heptane and water were prepared and characterized. The optimized reaction conditions were determined,and monodispersed droplets of the reverse micelles were used as microreactors to synthesize CdS nanoparticles. By using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-Vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, the influences of the reverse micelle components on the size, size distribution,morphology, stability and optical properties of CdS nanoparticles were investigated. CdS nanoparticles with narrow size distribution were obtained and the size range is 6-8 nm when W=24 (W=[water]/[CTAB]), P=5.27 (P=[n-hexanol]/ [CTAB]), [CTAB]=0.2 mol/L, [Cd2+] and [S2] are 8.45×10-4 mol/L.

  7. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  8. Tuning light emission of PbS nanocrystals from infrared to visible range by cation exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Binetti, Enrico

    2015-10-27

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, with intense and sharp-line emission between red and near-infrared spectral regions, are of great interest for optoelectronic and bio-imaging applications. The growth of an inorganic passivation layer on nanocrystal surfaces is a common strategy to improve their chemical and optical stability and their photoluminescence quantum yield. In particular, cation exchange is a suitable approach for shell growth at the expense of the nanocrystal core size. Here, the cation exchange process is used to promote the formation of a CdS passivation layer on the surface of very small PbS nanocrystals (2.3 nm in diameter), blue shifting their optical spectra and yielding luminescent and stable nanostructures emitting in the range of 700–850 nm. Structural, morphological and compositional investigation confirms the nanocrystal size contraction after the cation-exchange process, while the PbS rock-salt crystalline phase is retained. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate the growth of a passivation layer with a decrease of the PbS core size, as inferred by the blue-shift of the excitonic peaks. The surface passivation strongly increases the photoluminescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In addition, the nanocrystals reveal increased stability against oxidation over time. Thanks to their absorption and emission spectral range and the slow recombination dynamics, such highly luminescent nano-objects can find interesting applications in sensitized photovoltaic cells and light-emitting devices.

  9. Synthesis of monodisperse crosslinked polystyrene microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Kai; Chen Sheng-Li; Dong Peng; Liu Renxiao

    2008-01-01

    Monodisperse crosslinked polystyrene (CPS) particles were prepared through the normal emulsion polymerization method by adding crosslinker-divinylbenzene (DVB) into the reaction system after polystyrene (PS) particles grew to ~80% of the final size. When the amount of crosslinker DVB added was less than 6.17 wt% based on styrene, the prepared CPS particles were spherical and uniform and the size of the CPS particles could be predicted through the normal emulsion method. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the prepared CPS particles was higher than that of un-crosslinked PS particles and, the more crosslinker that was added, the higher the Tg of CPS Particles. The prepared CPS particles had strong resistance to organic solvents.

  10. Monodisperse microdroplet generation and stopping without coalescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-02-23

    A system for monodispersed microdroplet generation and trapping including providing a flow channel in a microchip; producing microdroplets in the flow channel, the microdroplets movable in the flow channel; providing carrier fluid in the flow channel using a pump or pressure source; controlling movement of the microdroplets in the flow channel and trapping the microdroplets in a desired location in the flow channel. The system includes a microchip; a flow channel in the microchip; a droplet maker that generates microdroplets, the droplet maker connected to the flow channel; a carrier fluid in the flow channel, the carrier fluid introduced to the flow channel by a source of carrier fluid, the source of carrier fluid including a pump or pressure source; a valve connected to the carrier fluid that controls flow of the carrier fluid and enables trapping of the microdroplets.

  11. Eco-friendly intracellular biosynthesis of CdS quantum dots without changing Escherichia coli's antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng-Yu; Du, Qing-Qing; Qian, Jing; Wan, Dong-Yu; Wu, Sheng-Mei

    2017-01-01

    In the paper, a green and efficient biosynthetical technique was reported for preparing cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots, in which Escherichia coli (E. coli) was chosen as a biomatrix. Fluorescence emission spectra and fluorescent microscopic photographs revealed that as-produced CdS quantum dots had an optimum fluorescence emission peak located at 470nm and emitted a blue-green fluorescence under ultraviolet excitation. After extracted from bacterial cells and located the nanocrystals' foci in vivo, the CdS quantum dots showed a uniform size distribution by transmission electron microscope. Through the systematical investigation of the biosynthetic conditions, including culture medium replacement, input time point of cadmium source, working concentrations of raw inorganic ions, and co-cultured time spans of bacteria and metal ions in the bio-manufacture, the results revealed that CdS quantum dots with the strongest fluorescence emission were successfully prepared when E. coli cells were in stationary phase, with the replacement of culture medium and following the incubation with 1.0×10(-3)mol/L cadmium source for 2 days. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing indicated that the sensitivities to eight types of antibiotics of E. coli were barely changed before and after CdS quantum dots were prepared in the mild temperature environment, though a slight fall of antibiotic resistance could be observed, suggesting hinted the proposed technique of producing quantum dots is a promising environmentally low-risk protocol.

  12. Mutual Excitation in Eurozone Sovereign CDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Pelizzon, L.

    2013-01-01

    We study self- and cross-excitation of shocks in the sovereign CDS market, on the basis of a large database of Eurozone sovereign CDS spreads. We adopt a multivariate setting with credit default intensities driven by mutually exciting jump processes, to capture the salient features observed in the d

  13. Nanocrystal grain growth and device architectures for high-efficiency CdTe ink-based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Ryan W; Panthani, Matthew G; Rance, William L; Duenow, Joel N; Parilla, Philip A; Callahan, Rebecca; Dabney, Matthew S; Berry, Joseph J; Talapin, Dmitri V; Luther, Joseph M

    2014-09-23

    We study the use of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanocrystal colloids as a solution-processable "ink" for large-grain CdTe absorber layers in solar cells. The resulting grain structure and solar cell performance depend on the initial nanocrystal size, shape, and crystal structure. We find that inks of predominantly wurtzite tetrapod-shaped nanocrystals with arms ∼5.6 nm in diameter exhibit better device performance compared to inks composed of smaller tetrapods, irregular faceted nanocrystals, or spherical zincblende nanocrystals despite the fact that the final sintered film has a zincblende crystal structure. Five different working device architectures were investigated. The indium tin oxide (ITO)/CdTe/zinc oxide structure leads to our best performing device architecture (with efficiency >11%) compared to others including two structures with a cadmium sulfide (CdS) n-type layer typically used in high efficiency sublimation-grown CdTe solar cells. Moreover, devices without CdS have improved response at short wavelengths.

  14. Size-driven magnetic transitions in monodisperse MnO nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yi-Cheng; Pakhomov, Alexandre B.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2010-01-01

    We report the observation of weak ferromagnetism up to TC≈250 K and a spin-glass-like behavior at temperatures below TSG≈30 K in nanoscale MnO particles. TSG is considerably lower and TC is much higher than the Néel temperature (TN=122 K) of bulk MnO. While the dominant low temperature behavior (below 30 K) may be attributed to the effects studied in this system before, such as uncompensated surface spins in antiferromagnetic particles, no manganese oxides have been observed with the Curie te...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse Eu3+doped gadolinium oxysulfide nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J Cichos; M Karbowiak; D Hreniak; W Strk

    2016-01-01

    Gd2O2S:Eu3+nanoparticles were synthesized using two step process consisting of sulfuration of basic carbonates obtained by homogenous precipitation. Annealing of lanthanide nitrates at total concentration of 5×10–3 mol/L in a water solution containing relatively high, three molar concentration of urea ensured the optimal conditions for the reproducible preparation of uniform and small spherical particles. During sulfuration step elemental sulfur was mixed with precursor which eliminated necessity of using an auxiliary furnace and provided sulfur-reach reaction atmosphere. Such optimized protocol afforded synthesis of spherical and non-agglomerated nanoparticles with diameter smaller than 100 nm. The precursors morphology was maintained, but particles size was reduced by 15%–20%during sulfuration. The results indicated that higher emission intensity was observed for Gd2O2S:Eu3+(8%) oxysulfide sample synthesized using crystalline Gd(CO3)OH precursor, than for that obtained from amorphous Gd2(OH)2(CO3)2⋅H2O precursor, although some further efforts to improve morphology of the former are still required.

  16. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoen, Bruno; Chahadih, Abdallah; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Cristini, Odile; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  17. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  18. Facile Method for Preparation of Silica Coated Monodisperse Superparamagnetic Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Hung Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a facile method for preparation of silica coated monodisperse superparamagnetic microsphere. Herein, monodisperse porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene microbeads were prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization and subsequently sulfonated with acetic acid/H2SO4. The as-prepared sulfonated macroporous beads were magnetized in presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ under alkaline condition and were subjected to silica coating by sol-gel process, providing water compatibility, easily modifiable surface form, and chemical stability. FE-SEM, TEM, FT-IR, and TGA were employed to characterize the silica coated monodisperse magnetic beads (~7.5 μm. The proposed monodisperse magnetic beads can be used as mobile solid phase particles candidate for protein and DNA separation.

  19. Great improvement of photoelectric property from co-sensitization of TiO{sub 2} electrodes with CdS quantum dots and dye N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing [Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan 430062 (China); Zhao, Li, E-mail: zhaoli7376@163.com [Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang, Shimin, E-mail: shiminwang@126.com [Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hu, Jinghua [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Dong, Binghai; Lu, Hongbing; Wan, Li [Ministry-of-Education, Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang, Ping [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} film electrodes have been successfully sensitized with CdS QDs. • DSSC based on CdS QDs-sensitized TiO{sub 2} film with 4 min has the highest efficiency. • CdS QDs can improve the electron transport and reduce the electron recombination. • Our work open up a new avenue for the development of DSSCs. - Abstract: The TiO{sub 2} film electrodes sensitized with CdS quantum dots (QDs) via chemical bath deposition method were successfully prepared as the photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Microstructural characterizations by XRD, SEM, TEM and EDX show that the CdS nanocrystals with the cubic structure have intimate contact to the TiO{sub 2} films. The amount of CdS QDs can be controlled by varying the dipping time. The experiment results demonstrate that the CdS QDs-sensitized solar cells show a wider absorption in the solar spectrum and an enhanced surface photovoltage response. The maximal photoelectric conversion efficiency of 5.57% was achieved by the DSSC based on CdS QDs-sensitized TiO{sub 2} film with 4 min. The performance improvement is ascribed to the enhancement of electron transport, the reduction of electron recombination and the long electron lifetime.

  20. Alternate current magnetic property characterization of nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals for inductor fabrication via a solution based process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hongseok [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kim, Jungkwun; Allen, Mark G. [Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Paik, Taejong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of); Meng, Lingyao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Jo, Pil Sung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Complex Assemblies of Soft Matter, CNRS-SOLVAY-PENN UMI 3254, Bristol, Pennsylvania 19007-3624 (United States); Kikkawa, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kagan, Cherie R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Murray, Christopher B., E-mail: cbmurray@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    We investigate the ac magnetic behavior of solution processable, non-stoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals with a series of sizes and zinc concentrations. Nearly monodisperse Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanocrystals (x = 0–0.25) with an average size ranging from 7.4 nm to 13.8 nm are synthesized by using a solvothermal method. All the nanocrystals are in a superparamagnetic state at 300 K, which is confirmed by Superconductive Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. Due to the doping of non-magnetic Zn{sup 2+} into A site of ferrite, the saturation magnetization of nanocrystals increases as the size and Zn concentration increases. The ac magnetic permeability measurements at radio frequencies reveal that the real part of the magnetic permeability of similarly sized ferrite nanocrystals can be enhanced by almost twofold as the Zn{sup 2+} doping level increases from 0 to 0.25. The integration of 12.3 nm Zn{sub 0.25}Fe{sub 2.75}O{sub 4} nanocrystals into a toroidal inductor and a solenoid inductor prepared via a simple solution cast process yields a higher quality factors than air core inductors with the same geometries up to 5 MHz and 9 MHz, respectively, which is in the regime of the switching frequencies for the advanced integrated power converters.

  1. One-pot synthesis of graphene-supported monodisperse Pd nanoparticles as catalyst for formic acid electro-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sudong; Dong, Jing; Yao, Zhaohui; Shen, Chengmin; Shi, Xuezhao; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Shaoxiong; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2014-03-28

    To synthesize monodisperse palladium nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets, we have developed an easy and scalable solvothermal reduction method from an organic solution system. The RGO-supported palladium nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.8 nm are synthesized in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and in the presence of oleylamine and trioctylphosphine, which facilitates simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide and formation of Pd nanocrystals. So-produced Pd/RGO was tested for potential use as electrocatalyst for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. Pd/RGO catalyzes formic acid oxidation very well compared to Pd/Vulcan XC-72 catalyst. This synthesis method is a new way to prepare excellent electrocatalysts, which is of great significance in energy-related catalysis.

  2. One-Pot Synthesis of Graphene-Supported Monodisperse Pd Nanoparticles as Catalyst for Formic Acid Electro-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sudong; Dong, Jing; Yao, Zhaohui; Shen, Chengmin; Shi, Xuezhao; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Shaoxiong; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2014-03-01

    To synthesize monodisperse palladium nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets, we have developed an easy and scalable solvothermal reduction method from an organic solution system. The RGO-supported palladium nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.8 nm are synthesized in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and in the presence of oleylamine and trioctylphosphine, which facilitates simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide and formation of Pd nanocrystals. So-produced Pd/RGO was tested for potential use as electrocatalyst for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. Pd/RGO catalyzes formic acid oxidation very well compared to Pd/Vulcan XC-72 catalyst. This synthesis method is a new way to prepare excellent electrocatalysts, which is of great significance in energy-related catalysis.

  3. Controllable 5-sulfosalicylic acid assisted solvothermal synthesis of monodispersed superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoclusters with tunable size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Tang, Bingtao; Wu, Suli; Gao, Zhanming; Ju, Benzhi; Teng, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Shufen

    2017-02-01

    Monodispersed Fe3O4 nanoclusters were synthesized in a one-pot solvothermal route with 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) as the functional ligand in a mixed-solvent system of diethylene glycol/ethylene glycol (DEG/EG). Nucleation and aggregation growth model was responsible for the formation of secondary structure of the clusters. In the process, the size of the clusters can be effectively controlled by varying the amounts of SSA and the volume ratio of DEG/EG. The nanoclusters exhibited superparamagnetic properties with high saturation magnetization value of about 68.7 emu g-1 at room temperature. The water-soluble small-molecule SSA grafted on the surface of Fe3O4 nanocrystals rendered the superparamagnetic clusters dispersible in water, which is crucial for potential applications in biomedical fields.

  4. Monodisperse mesoporous anatase beads as high performance and safer anodes for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erwin F.; Chen, Dehong; Hollenkamp, Anthony F.; Cao, Lu; Caruso, Rachel A.

    2015-10-01

    To achieve high efficiency lithium ion batteries (LIBs), an effective active material is important. In this regard, monodisperse mesoporous titania beads (MMTBs) featuring well interconnected nanoparticles were synthesised, and their mesoporous properties were tuned to study how these affect the electrochemical performance in LIBs. Two pore diameters of 15 and 25 nm, three bead diameters of 360, 800 and 2100 nm, and various annealing temperatures (from 300 to 650 °C) were investigated. The electrochemical results showed that while the pore size does not significantly influence the electrochemical behaviour, the specific surface area and the nanocrystal size affect the performance. Also, there is an optimum annealing temperature that enhances electron transfer across the titania bead structure. The carbon content employed in the electrode was varied, showing that the bead diameter strongly influences the minimal content of the conductive carbon required to fabricate the electrode. As a general rule, the smaller the bead diameter, the more carbon was required in the electrode. A large energy capacity and high current rate performance were achieved on the MMTBs featuring high surface area, nano-sized anatase crystals and well-sintered connections between the nanocrystals. The high stability of these mesoporous structures was demonstrated by charge/discharge cycling up to 500 cycles. Devices constructed with the MMTBs retained more than 80% of the initial capacity, indicating an excellent performance.To achieve high efficiency lithium ion batteries (LIBs), an effective active material is important. In this regard, monodisperse mesoporous titania beads (MMTBs) featuring well interconnected nanoparticles were synthesised, and their mesoporous properties were tuned to study how these affect the electrochemical performance in LIBs. Two pore diameters of 15 and 25 nm, three bead diameters of 360, 800 and 2100 nm, and various annealing temperatures (from 300 to 650

  5. Interactions and Assemblies of Polymeric Materials and Colloidal Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Teresa Elaine

    Our need to reduce global energy use is well known and without question, not just from an economic standpoint but also to decrease human impact on climate change. Emerging advances in this area result from the ability to tailor-make materials and energy-saving devices using solution-phase chemistry and deposition techniques. Colloidally synthesized nanocrystals, with their tunable size, shape, and composition, and unusual optical and electronic properties, are leading candidates in these efforts. Because of recent advances in colloidal chemistries, the inventory of monodisperse nanocrystals has expanded to now include metals, semiconductors, magnetic materials, and dielectric materials. For a variety of applications, an active layer composed of a thin film of randomly close-packed nanocrystals is not ideal for optimized device performance; here, the ability to arrange these nano building units into mesoporous (2 nm devices such as electrochromic windows. Understanding the local environment of nanocrystal surfaces and their interaction with surrounding media is vital to their controlled assembly into higher-order structures. Though work has continued in this field for over a decade, researchers have yet to provide a simple and straightforward procedure to scale across nanoscale material systems and applications allowing for synthetic and structural tunability and quantitative characterization. In this dissertation, I have synthesized a new class of amphiphilic block copolymer architecture-directing agents based upon poly(dimethylacrylamide)-b-poly( styrene) (PDMA-b-PS), which are strategically designed to enhance the interaction between the hydrophilic PDMA block and ligand-stripped nanocrystals. As a result, stable assemblies are produced which, following solution deposition and removal of the block copolymer template, renders a mesoporous framework. Leveraging the use of this sacrificial block copolymer allows for the formation of highly tunable structures, where

  6. A method to synthesize CdSe nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chuang; CHEN Wei; WANG Jingkang

    2007-01-01

    CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) have great application prospects in various fields due to their novel properties.Some high-cost and toxic materials such as tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) are used in the popular method to synthesize CdSe NCs.Based on this,a new low-cost,environment-friendly and safe solvent was introduced in the synthesis of CdSe NCs in this paper.The prepared CdSe NCs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-Vis),photoluminescence (PL),transmission electron micrograph (TEM),energy disperse X-ray spectra (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The CdSe NCs obtained which show a good PL properry are monodisperse,size-tunable and of high crystallinity.It indicates that the new solvent A is a good substitute for the solvent used in the classic route and achieves a greener synthesis of CdSe NCs.

  7. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  8. Biotemplated preparation of CdS nanoparticles/bacterial cellulose hybrid nanofibers for photocatalysis application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiazhi; Yu, Junwei; Fan, Jun; Sun, Dongping; Tang, Weihua; Yang, Xuejie

    2011-05-15

    In this work, we describe a novel facile and effective strategy to prepare micrometer-long hybrid nanofibers by deposition of CdS nanoparticles onto the substrate of hydrated bacterial cellulose nanofibers (BCF). Hexagonal phase CdS nanocrystals were achieved via a simple hydrothermal reaction between CdCl(2) and thiourea at relatively low temperature. The prepared pristine BCF and the CdS/BCF hybrid nanofibers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results reveal that the CdS nanoparticles were homogeneously deposited on the BCF surface and stabilized via coordination effect. The CdS/BCF hybrid nanofibers demonstrated high-efficiency photocatalysis with 82% methyl orange (MO) degradation after 90 min irradiation and good recyclability. The results indicate that the CdS/BCF hybrid nanofibers are promising candidate as robust visible light responsive photocatalysts.

  9. Structural and optical characterization of mechanochemically synthesized copper doped CdS nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, P., E-mail: pireyes@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica-SEES, CINVESTAV-IPN, Zacatenco, D.F., C.P.07360, Mexico (Mexico); Velumani, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica-SEES, CINVESTAV-IPN, Zacatenco, D.F., C.P.07360, Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    Incorporation of copper into CdS crystals has been successfully prepared by mechanical alloying using a planetary ball mill. The powders are prepared with different milling times at 300 rpm with various Cu/Cd ratios from 0.1 to 25 at%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of milled powders showed peaks corresponding to hexagonal structure with a detection of phase transition to a cubic structure with increasing milling time. Grain sizes varied from 21 to 30 nm corresponding to different Cu/Cd ratios. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images reveal agglomerated materials with particle size of approximately 28 nm (5 Cu at%) and layered structures caused due to the milling process. Powder composition by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) reveals the incorporation of copper into the CdS. Micro Raman spectroscopy showed peaks approximately at 301 and 585 cm{sup -1} corresponding to first and second order scatterings of longitudinal optical phonon mode. The LO mode at 301 cm{sup -1} shifted towards lower wave number due to decrease of grain size by increase in milling time. From high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), the dominant phase of individual CdS nanocrystals was found to be hexagonal structure along with cubic structure.

  10. What do we know about speculation in the CDS market?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Norden (Lars); K. Radoeva (Kristina)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe measure speculation in the CDS market and investigate its determinants. The CDS volume on a firm that exceeds its outstanding debt (= naked CDS) indicates speculation since hedging can be ruled out. Using weekly CDS trading volume data for actively traded U.S. firms during 2008-2012,

  11. Nanocrystal synthesis and thin film formation for earth abundant photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Nathaniel J.

    Providing access to on-demand energy at the global scale is a grand challenge of our time. The fabrication of solar cells from nanocrystal inks comprising earth abundant elements represents a scalable and sustainable photovoltaic technology with the potential to meet the global demand for electricity. Solar cells with Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) absorber layers are of particular interest due to the high absorption coefficient of CZTSSe, its band gap in the ideal range for efficient photovoltaic power conversion, and the relative abundance of its constituent elements in the earth's crust. Despite the promise of this material system, CZTSSe solar cell efficiencies reported throughout literature have failed to exceed 12.6%, principally due to the low open-circuit voltage (VOC) achieved in these devices compared to the absorber band gap. The work presented herein primarily aims to address the low VOC problem. First, the fundamental cause for such low VOC's is investigated. Interparticle compositional inhomogeneities identified in the synthesized CZTS nanocrystals and their effect on the absorber layer formation and device performance are characterized. Real-time energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) elucidates the role of these inhomogeneities in the mechanism by which a film of CZTS nanocrystals converts into a dense absorber layer comprising micron-sized CZTSSe grains upon annealing in a selenium atmosphere (selenization). Additionally, a direct correlation between the nanocrystal inhomogeneities and the VOC in completed devices is observed. Detailed characterization of CZTSSe solar cells identifies electrical potential fluctuations in the CZTSSe absorber - due to spatial composition variations not unlike those observed in the nanocrystals - as a primary V OC inhibitor. Additional causes for low VOC's in CZTSSe solar cells proposed in the literature involve recombination at the interface between the CZTSSe absorber and: (1) the n-type, CdS buffer layer, or (2) the

  12. Improving the Formatting Tools of CDS Invenio

    CERN Document Server

    Caffaro, J; Pu Faltings, Pearl

    2006-01-01

    CDS Invenio is the web-based integrated digital library system developed at CERN. It is a strategical tool that supports the archival and open dissemination of documents produced by CERN researchers. This paper reports on my Master’s thesis work done on BibFormat, a module in CDS Invenio, which formats documents metadata. The goal of this project was to implement a completely new formatting module for CDS Invenio. In this report a strong emphasis is put on the user-centered design of the new BibFormat. The bibliographic formatting process and its requirements are discussed. The task analysis and its resulting interaction model are detailed. The document also shows the implemented user interface of BibFormat and gives the results of the user evaluation of this interface. Finally the results of a small usability study of the formats included in CDS Invenio are discussed.

  13. Managing an Institutional Repository with CDS Invenio

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, N; Simko, T

    2007-01-01

    CERN has long been committed to the free dissemination of scientific research results and theories. Towards this end, CERN's own institutional repository, the CERN Document Server (CDS) offers access to CERN works and to all related scholarly literature in the HEP domain. Hosting over 500 document collections containing more than 900,000 records, CDS provides access to anything from preprints and articles, to multimedia information such as photographs, movies, posters and brochures. The software that powers this service, CDS Invenio, is distributed freely under the GNU GPL and is currently used in approximately 15 institutions worldwide. In this paper, we discuss the use of CDS Invenio to manage a repository of scientific literature. We outline some of the issues faced during the lifecycle of a document from acquisition, processing and indexing to dissemination. In particular, we focus on the features and technology developed to meet the complexities of managing scientific information in the LHC era of large ...

  14. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  15. The concept of delayed nucleation in nanocrystal growthdemonstrated for the case of iron oxide nanodisks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casula, Maria F.; Jun, Young-wook; Zaziski, David J.; Chan, EmoryM.; Corrias, Anna; Alivisatos, Paul A.

    2005-09-09

    A comprehensive study of iron oxide nanocrystal growth through non-hydrolitic, surfactant-mediated thermal reaction of iron pentacarbonyl and an oxidizer has been conducted, which includes size control, anisotropic shape evolution, and crystallographic phase transition of monodisperse iron oxide colloidal nanocrystals. The reaction was monitored by in situ UV-Vis spectroscopy taking advantage of the color change accompanying the iron oxide colloid formation allowing measurement of the induction time for nucleation. Features of the synthesis such as the size control and reproducibility are related to the occurrence of the observed delayed nucleation process. As a separate source of iron and oxygen is adopted, phase control could also be achieved by sequential injections of oxidizer.

  16. The Einstein nanocrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bertoldi, D S; Miranda, E N

    2016-01-01

    We study the simplest possible model of nanocrystal consisting in a simple cubic lattice with a small number of atoms (NA ~ 10-10^3), where each atom is linked to its nearest neighbor by a quantum harmonic potential. Some properties (entropy, temperature, specific heat) of the nanocrystal are calculated numerically but exactly within the framework of the microcanonical ensemble. We find that the presence of a surface in the nanocrystal modifies the thermostatistic properties to a greater extent than the small number of atoms in the system. The specific heat Cv behaves similarly to the Einstein solid, with an asymptotic value for high temperatures that differs from that of the Dulong-Petit law by a term of the order of NA^(-1/3) and that can be explained easily in terms of the surface. The entropy is non-additive, but this is due to the presence of the surface and we show that the additivity is recovered in the thermodynamic limit. Finally, we find that, when calculations follow the canonical ensemble, results...

  17. Synthesis and Doping of Silicon Nanocrystals for Versatile Nanocrystal Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas Johannes

    The impact of nanotechnology on our society is getting larger every year. Electronics are becoming smaller and more powerful, the "Internet of Things" is all around us, and data generation is increasing exponentially. None of this would have been possible without the developments in nanotechnology. Crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles (nanocrystals) are one of the latest developments in the field of nanotechnology. This thesis addresses three important challenges for the transition of silicon nanocrystals from the lab bench to the marketplace: A better understanding of the nanocrystal synthesis was obtained, the electronic properties of the nanocrystals were characterized and tuned, and novel silicon nanocrystal inks were formed and applied using simple coating technologies. Plasma synthesis of nanocrystals has numerous advantages over traditional solution-based synthesis methods. While the formation of nanoparticles in low pressure nonthermal plasmas is well known, the heating mechanism leading to their crystallization is poorly understood. A combination of comprehensive plasma characterization with a nanoparticle heating model presented here reveals the underlying plasma physics leading to crystallization. The model predicts that the nanoparticles reach temperatures as high as 900 K in the plasma as a result of heating reactions on the nanoparticle surface. These temperatures are well above the gas temperature and sufficient for complete nanoparticle crystallization. Moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for industrial applications. The heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles was adapted in Chapter 3 to study plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 -- 105 Pa). The model considers three collisionality regimes and determines the dominant contribution of each regime under various plasma conditions. Strong nanoparticle cooling at

  18. Direct dry-grinding synthesis of monodisperse lipophilic CuS nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yajuan; Scott, Julie; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Guo, Liangran; Zhao, Mingyang; Wang, Xiaodong [Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (United States); Lu, Wei, E-mail: weilu@uri.edu [Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (United States); School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Copper sulfide nanoparticles, effective absorbers of near-infrared light, are recently attracting broad interest as a photothermal coupling agent for cancer therapy. Lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles are preferred for high performance biomedical applications due to high tissue affinity. Synthesis of lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles requires complicated multi-step processes under severe conditions. Here, we describe a new synthetic process, developed by direct dry-grinding of copper(II) acetylacetonate with sulfur under ambient environment at low temperature. The formed CuS nanoparticles are of uniform size, ∼10 nm in diameter, and are monodispersed in chloroform. Each covellite CuS nanocrystal surface is modified with oleylamine through hydrogen bonding between sulfur atoms and amine groups of oleylamine. The nanoparticles demonstrate near-infrared light absorption for photothermal applications. The synthetic methodology described here is more convenient and less extreme than previous methods, and should thus greatly facilitate the preparation of photothermal lipophilic copper sulfide nanomaterials for cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We make lipophilic CuS nanoparticles by mechanical grinding method in large scale. • The reaction condition is studied to obtain high yield and uniform size. • The synthesis does not need nitrogen protection or high temperature. • Lipophilic CuS nanoparticles show significant near-infrared absorbance.

  19. Heterogeneous core/shell fluoride nanocrystals with enhanced upconversion photoluminescence for in vivo bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuwei; Yang, Liming; Qiu, Hailong; Fan, Rongwei; Yang, Chunhui; Chen, Guanying

    2015-06-01

    We report on heterogeneous core/shell CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+@NaGdF4 nanocrystals of 17 nm with efficient upconversion (UC) photoluminescence (PL) for in vivo bioimaging. Monodisperse core/shell nanostructures were synthesized using a seed-mediated growth process involving two quite different approaches of liquid-solid-solution and thermal decomposition. They exhibit green emission with a sharp band around 540 nm when excited at ~980 nm, which is about 39 times brighter than the core CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+ nanoparticles. PL decays at 540 nm revealed that such an enhancement arises from efficient suppression of surface-related deactivation from the core nanocrystals. In vivo bioimaging employing water-dispersed core/shell nanoparticles displayed high contrast against the background.We report on heterogeneous core/shell CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+@NaGdF4 nanocrystals of 17 nm with efficient upconversion (UC) photoluminescence (PL) for in vivo bioimaging. Monodisperse core/shell nanostructures were synthesized using a seed-mediated growth process involving two quite different approaches of liquid-solid-solution and thermal decomposition. They exhibit green emission with a sharp band around 540 nm when excited at ~980 nm, which is about 39 times brighter than the core CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+ nanoparticles. PL decays at 540 nm revealed that such an enhancement arises from efficient suppression of surface-related deactivation from the core nanocrystals. In vivo bioimaging employing water-dispersed core/shell nanoparticles displayed high contrast against the background. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02287h

  20. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  1. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyley, Samuel; Thielemans, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Chemical modification of cellulose nanocrystals is an increasingly popular topic in the literature. This review analyses the type of cellulose nanocrystal modification reactions that have been published in the literature thus far and looks at the steps that have been taken towards analysing the products of the nanocrystal modifications. The main categories of reactions carried out on cellulose nanocrystals are oxidations, esterifications, amidations, carbamations and etherifications. More recently nucleophilic substitutions have been used to introduce more complex functionality to cellulose nanocrystals. Multi-step modifications are also considered. This review emphasizes quantification of modification at the nanocrystal surface in terms of degree of substitution and the validity of conclusions drawn from different analysis techniques in this area. The mechanisms of the modification reactions are presented and considered with respect to the effect on the outcome of the reactions. While great strides have been made in the quality of analytical data published in the field of cellulose nanocrystal modification, there is still vast scope for improvement, both in data quality and the quality of analysis of data. Given the difficulty of surface analysis, cross-checking of results from different analysis techniques is fundamental for the development of reliable cellulose nanocrystal modification techniques.

  2. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  3. Doping of CdSe Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, John

    2003-10-01

    What happens to a nanocrystal when it is doped with electrons? We doped CdSe nanocrystals with potassium metal and sodium biphenyl, potassium and sodium acting as the charge carriers. In order to monitor the properties of the doped nanocrystals we used Electron Spin Resonance and luminescence techniques. In this poster we present findings and problems encountered in doping CdSe nanocrystals.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lin; Zhu, Jianguo, E-mail: yanglin_1028@163.com; Xiao, Dingquan

    2014-04-15

    High-quality ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals were prepared via a hydrothermal microemulsion technique. Effective surface passivation of monodisperse ZnSe:Fe nanocrystals is achieved by overcoating them with a ZnSe shell. The samples were characterized by means of XRD, EDX, TEM, PSD, XPS, photoluminescence, and Raman spectrum. The results show that the as-synthesized nanocrystals are cubic zinc blende ZnSe structure with high purity and the average particle size of ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystal is larger than that of ZnSe:Fe core. The growth of ZnSe shell causes a small red shift in PL spectra, and then the PL quantum yield (QY) increases from 16% before shell growth to the maximum of 37% after increasing shell thickness up to 1.2 monolayers (ML). Moreover, both transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) phonon modes of ZnSe are shifted toward lower frequency as compared with the reported ones. -- Highlights: • ZnSe:Fe/ZnSe core/shell QDs were prepared by a hydrothermal microemulsion method. • ZnSe shell efficiently passivates surface defects by serving as a physical barrier. • The particle size and PL properties can be turned with the growth of ZnSe shell. • The luminescence efficiency and stability of QDs could be improved in this manner.

  5. Low-threshold amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from colloidal nanocrystals of caesium lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakunin, Sergii; Protesescu, Loredana; Krieg, Franziska; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Nedelcu, Georgian; Humer, Markus; de Luca, Gabriele; Fiebig, Manfred; Heiss, Wolfgang; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-08-01

    Metal halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structures have recently emerged as highly promising optoelectronic materials. Despite the recent surge of reports on microcrystalline, thin-film and bulk single-crystalline metal halides, very little is known about the photophysics of metal halides in the form of uniform, size-tunable nanocrystals. Here we report low-threshold amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from ~10 nm monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals of caesium lead halide perovskites CsPbX3 (X=Cl, Br or I, or mixed Cl/Br and Br/I systems). We find that room-temperature optical amplification can be obtained in the entire visible spectral range (440-700 nm) with low pump thresholds down to 5+/-1 μJ cm-2 and high values of modal net gain of at least 450+/-30 cm-1. Two kinds of lasing modes are successfully observed: whispering-gallery-mode lasing using silica microspheres as high-finesse resonators, conformally coated with CsPbX3 nanocrystals and random lasing in films of CsPbX3 nanocrystals.

  6. Terbium-Aspartic Acid Nanocrystals with Chirality-Dependent Tunable Fluorescent Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baojin; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Shicai; Qiu, Jichuan; Zhao, Lili; Guo, Daidong; Duan, Jiazhi; Sang, Yuanhua; Li, Linlin; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2017-02-28

    Terbium-aspartic acid (Tb-Asp) nanocrystals with chirality-dependent tunable fluorescent properties can be synthesized through a facile synthesis method through the coordination between Tb and Asp. Asp with different chirality (dextrorotation/d and levogyration/l) changes the stability of the coordination center following fluorescent absorption/emission ability differences. Compared with l-Asp, d-Asp can coordinate Tb to form a more stable center, following the higher quantum yield and longer fluorescence life. Fluorescence intensity of Tb-Asp linearly increases with increase ratio of d-Asp in the mixed chirality Tb-Asp system, and the fluorescent properties of Tb-Asp nanocrystals can be tuned by adjusting the chirality ratio. Tb-Asp nanocrystals possess many advantage, such as high biocompatibility, without any color in visible light irradiation, monodispersion with very small size, and long fluorescent life. Those characteristics will give them great potential in many application fields, such as low-cost antifake markers and advertisements using inkjet printers or for molds when dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane. In addition, europium can also be used to synthesize Eu-Asp nanoparticles. Importantly, the facile, low-cost, high-yield, mass-productive "green" process provides enormous advantages for synthesis and application of fluorescent nanocrystals, which will have great impact in nanomaterial technology.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Enrico; Podsiadlo, Paul; Shevchenko, Elena; Ogletree, D. Frank; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Ashby, Paul D.

    2009-12-30

    Colloidal nanocrystals attract significant interest due to their potential applications in electronic, magnetic, and optical devices. Nanocrystal supercrystals (NCSCs) are particularly appealing for their well ordered structure and homogeneity. The interactions between organic ligands that passivate the inorganic nanocrystal cores critically influence their self-organization into supercrystals, By investigating the mechanical properties of supercrystals, we can directly characterize the particle-particle interactions in a well-defined geometry, and gain insight into both the self-assembly process and the potential applications of nanocrystal supercrystals. Here we report nanoindentation studies of well ordered lead-sulfide (Pbs) nanocrystal supercrystals. Their modulus and hardness were found to be similar to soft polymers at 1.7 GPa and 70 MPa respectively and the fractures toughness was 39 KPa/m1/2, revealing the extremely brittle nature of these materials.

  8. Photoacoustic Study on a Photonic System CdS and Doped CdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, N.; Ramachandran, K.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2002-12-01

    Using Photoacoustic spectroscopy thermal diffusion, thermal conductivity and energy band gap are studied on crystals of photonic system CdS and doped CdS grown by Physical Vapour transport. Optical band gap measured here agrees well with Photo current measurements. It is also found that the thermal diffusivity, effusivity, and optical band gap increases with increase of carrier concentration.

  9. Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukovic, Gordana; Merkle, Maxwell G.; Nelson, James H.; Hughes, Steven M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-08-06

    colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals. Among the II-VI semiconductors, CdS is of particular interest because it has the correct band alignment for water photolysis[2] and has been demonstrated to be photocatalytically active.[11-16] We have found that the photoexcitation of CdS and CdSe/CdS in the presence of an organometallic Pt precursor leads to deposition of Pt nanoparticles on the semiconductor surface. Stark differences are observed in the Pt nanoparticle location on the two substrates, and the photodeposition can be completely inhibited by the modification of the semiconductor surface. Our results suggest that tuning of the semiconductor band structure, spatial organization and surface chemistry should be crucial in the design of photocatalytic nanostructures.

  10. Growth Kinetics of Monodisperse Polystyrene Microspheres Prepared by Dispersion Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion polymerization has been widely applied to the synthesis of monodisperse micron-sized polymer colloidal spheres. Many efforts have been devoted to studying the influence of initial conditions on the size and uniformity of the resultant microspheres, aiming to synthesize micron-size monodisperse colloidal spheres. However, the inner contradiction between the size and the size distribution of colloidal spheres hinders the realization of this goal. In this work, we drew our attention from the initial conditions to the growth stage of dispersion polymerization. We tracked the size evolution of colloidal sphere during the dispersion polymerization, through which we established a kinetic model that described the relationship between the monomer concentration and the reaction time. The model may provide a guideline to prepare large polymer colloidal spheres with good monodispersity by continuous monomer feeding during the growth stage to maintain the concentration of monomer at a constant value in a dispersion polymerization process.

  11. A comparative study on CdS: PEO and CdS: PMMA nanocomposite solid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmaja, S. [Thin film centre, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Jayakumar, S., E-mail: s_jayakumar_99@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, PSG Institute of Technology and Applied Research, Coimbatore (India); Balaji, R.; Vaideki, K. [Thin film centre, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India)

    2016-08-15

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles were reinforced in Poly(ethylene Oxide) (PEO) and Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrices by in situ technique. The presence of CdS in PEO and PMMA matrix was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis disclosed the co-ordination of CdS in the matrices. Thermal analysis of the nanocomposites was carried out using Differential Scanning calorimetric studies (DSC). The optical studies using UV–vis spectroscopy were carried out to find the band gap of the materials and the absorption onset. The CdS particle size in the matrices was found by Effective Mass Approximation (EMA) model using the band gap values and was confirmed by TEM studies. The surface trapped emissions of the nanocomposites were observed from the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The distribution of CdS particles in the polymer matrices were presented by Atomic force microscopic studies (AFM).

  12. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  13. Highly crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) microbeads with uniformly dispersed quantum dot nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab; Morris, Jeffrey F; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles

    2011-11-01

    This study demonstrates how luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots or QDs) can be dispersed uniformly in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix by polymerizing a mixture of the prepolymer oligomers and the nanocrystals with a relatively large concentration of crosslinking molecules. A microfluidic device is used to fabricate PDMS microbeads embedded with the QDs by using flow focusing to first form monodisperse droplets of the prepolymer/crosslinker/nanocrystal mixture in a continuous aqueous phase. The droplets are subsequently collected, and heated to polymerize them into solid microbead composites. The degree of aggregation of the nanocrystals in the matrix is studied by measuring the nonradiative resonance energy transfer (RET) between the nanocrystals. For this purpose, two quantum dots are used with maxima in their luminescence emission spectrum at 560 nm and 620 nm. When the nanocrystals are within the Förster radius (approximately 10 nm) of each other, exciton energy cascades from the QDs which emit at the shorter wavelength to the QDs which emit at the longer wavelength. This energy transfer is quantified, for two concentration ratios of the prepolmer to the crosslinker, by measuring the deviation of the microbead luminescence spectrum from a reference spectrum obtained by dispersing the QD mixture in a solvent (toluene) in which the nanocrystals do not aggregate. For a low concentration of crosslinking molecules relative to the prepolymer (5:1 by weight prepolymer to crosslinker), strong RET is observed as the emission of the 620 nm QDs is increased and the 560 nm QDs is decreased relative to the reference. In the emission spectrum for a higher concentration of crosslinkers (2:1 by weight prepolymer to crosslinker), the resonance energy transfer is less relative to the case of the low concentration of crosslinkers, and the spectrum more closely resembles the reference. This result indicates that the increase in the crosslinker concentration

  14. Spontaneous droplet formation techniques for monodisperse emulsions preparation – Perspectives for food applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, A.A.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous droplet formation through Laplace pressure differences is a simple method for making monodisperse emulsions and is claimed to be suited for shear and temperature sensitive products, and those requiring high monodispersity. Techniques belonging to this category include (grooved) microchan

  15. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  16. Silicon nanocrystals as handy biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Tilley, Richard; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2007-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have brighter and longer fluorescence than organic dyes. Therefore, QDs can be applied to biotechnology, and have capability to be applied to medical technology. Currently, among the several types of QDs, CdSe with a ZnS shell is one of the most popular QDs to be used in biological experiments. However, when the CdSe QDs were applied to clinical technology, potential toxicological problems due to CdSe core should be considered. To eliminate the problem, silicon nanocrystals, which have the potential of biocompatibility, could be a candidate of alternate probes. Silicon nanocrystals have been synthesized using several techniques such as aerosol, electrochemical etching, laser pyrolysis, plasma deposition, and colloids. Recently, the silicon nanocrystals were reported to be synthesized in inverse micelles and also stabilized with 1-heptene or allylamine capping. Blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was observed when excited with a UV light. The nanocrystals covered with 1-heptene are hydrophobic, whereas the ones covered with allylamine are hydrophilic. To test the stability in cytosol, the water-soluble nanocrystals covered with allylamine were examined with a Hela cell incorporation experiment. Bright blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was detected in the cytosol when excited with a UV light, implying that the nanocrystals were able to be applied to biological imaging. In order to expand the application range, we synthesized and compared a series of silicon nanocrystals, which have variable surface modification, such as alkyl group, alcohol group, and odorant molecules. This study will provide a wider range of optoelectronic applications and bioimaging technology.

  17. Phosphine-free synthesis of high quality ZnSe, ZnSe/ZnS, and Cu-, Mn-doped ZnSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huaibin; Wang, Hongzhe; Li, Xiaomin; Niu, Jin Zhong; Wang, Hua; Chen, Xia; Li, Lin Song

    2009-12-21

    High quality zinc blende ZnSe and ZnSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals have been synthesized by two converse injection methods (i.e. zinc precursor injection or selenium precursor injection) when Se-ODE complex was chosen as the phosphine-free selenium precursor. Absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the as-synthesized ZnSe and ZnSe/ZnS nanocrystals. The quality of the as-prepared ZnSe nanocrystals reached the same high level compared with the method using phosphine selenium precursors since the quantum yields were between 40 and 60% and photoluminescence (PL) full width at half-maximum (FWHM) was well controlled between 14 and 17 nm. The parameter window for the growth of high quality ZnSe nanocrystals was found to be much broader and monodisperse ZnSe nanocrystals were synthesized successfully even when the reaction temperature was set as low as 240 degrees C. As cores, such zinc blende ZnSe nanocrystals were also used to synthesize ZnSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals with high fluorescence quantum yields of 70%. Cu(2+) or Mn(2+) doped ZnSe nanocrystals were also synthesized by simply modifying this phosphine-free method. The emission range has been extended to 500 and 600 nm with the use of Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) dopants compared with the emission coverage of ZnSe at around 400 nm. This is the first totally "green approach" (i.e. phosphine-free synthesis) for the synthesis of high quality ZnSe, ZnSe/ZnS, and Cu(2+) or Mn(2+) doped ZnSe nanocrystals.

  18. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  19. Photoresponsive Cellulose Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris S Argyropoulos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this communication a method for the creation of fluorescent cellulose nanoparticles using click chemistry and subsequent photodimerization of the installed side‐ chains is demonstrated. In the first step, the primary hydroxyl groups on the surface of the CNCs were converted to carboxylic acids by using TEMPO‐mediated hypohalite oxidation. The alkyne groups, essential for the click reaction, were introduced into the surface of TEMPO‐ oxidized CNCs via carbodiimide‐mediated formation of an amide linkage between monomers carrying an amine functionality and carboxylic acid groups on the surface of the TEMPO‐oxidized CNCs. Finally, the reaction of surface‐modified TEMPO‐oxidized cellulose nanocrystals and azido‐bearing coumarin and anthracene monomers were carried out by means of a click chemistry, i.e., Copper(I‐catalyzed Azide‐Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC to produce highly photo‐responsive and fluorescent cellulose nanoparticles. Most significantly, the installed coumarin and/or anthracene side‐chains were shown to undergo UV‐induced [2+2] and [4+4] cycloaddition reactions, bringing and locking the cellulose nanocrystals together. This effort paves the way towards creating, cellulosic photo responsive nano‐arrays with the potential of photo reversibility since these reactions are known to be reversible at varying wavelengths.

  20. Thermoplastic polyurethanes with TDI-based monodisperse hard segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De, D.; Araichimani, A.; ten Hoopen, Hermina W.M.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethanes with PTMO soft segments and toluene diisocyanate diamide as urethane segment were studied. The toluene diisocyanate diamide urethane segment was monodisperse in length. The soft segment length was changed by extending PTMO with TDI units to a soft segment length varying from 2 250 to

  1. Highly monodisperse bismuth nanoparticles and their three-dimensional superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarema, Maksym; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Hesser, Günter; Talapin, Dmitri V; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    A simple and reproducible synthesis of highly monodisperse and ligand-protected bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) is reported. The size of the single-crystalline and spherically shaped NPs is controlled between 11 and 22 nm mainly by the reaction temperature. The high uniformity of the NPs allows their self-assembly into long-range-ordered two- and three-dimensional superstructures.

  2. A general approach for monodisperse colloidal perovskites, Chemistry of Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.; Imhof, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel general method for synthesizing monodisperse colloidal perovskite particles at room temperature by postsynthesis addition of metal hydroxides to amorphous titania colloids. In previous work, we used titania particles to synthesize homogenously mixed silica-titania composite parti

  3. Cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers by spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontturi, Eero; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Kontturi, Katri S; Ahonen, Päivi; Thüne, Peter C; Laine, Janne

    2007-09-11

    Dilute concentrations of cellulose nanocrystal solutions were spin coated onto different substrates to investigate the effect of the substrate on the nanocrystal submonolayers. Three substrates were probed: silica, titania, and amorphous cellulose. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, anionic cellulose nanocrystals formed small aggregates on the anionic silica substrate, whereas a uniform two-dimensional distribution of nanocrystals was achieved on the cationic titania substrate. The uniform distribution of cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers on titania is an important factor when dimensional analysis of the nanocrystals is desired. Furthermore, the amount of nanocrystals deposited on titania was multifold in comparison to the amounts on silica, as revealed by AFM image analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Amorphous cellulose, the third substrate, resulted in a somewhat homogeneous distribution of the nanocrystal submonolayers, but the amounts were as low as those on the silica substrate. These differences in the cellulose nanocrystal deposition were attributed to electrostatic effects: anionic cellulose nanocrystals are adsorbed on cationic titania in addition to the normal spin coating deposition. The anionic silica surface, on the other hand, causes aggregation of the weakly anionic cellulose nanocrystals which are forced on the repulsive substrate by spin coating. The electrostatically driven adsorption also influences the film thickness of continuous ultrathin films of cellulose nanocrystals. The thicker films of charged nanocrystals on a substrate of opposite charge means that the film thickness is not independent of the substrate when spin coating cellulose nanocrystals in the ultrathin regime (<100 nm).

  4. Hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol at room temperature: Boosting palladium nanocrystals efficiency by coupling with copper via liquid phase pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanbit; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Seunghee; Ma, Rory; Lim, Manho; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-dispersed bimetallic nanomaterials have attracted much attention in the hydrogenation of highly toxic aromatic nitro compounds to aromatic amines owing to their high stability, superior activity, reusability, and unique optical and electronic properties, as compared to monometalic nanocrystals. However, the lack of facile and economically controllable strategies of producing highly pure ultra-dispersed bimetallic nanocatalysts limits their practical industrial applications. Considering the above obstacles, we present a simple and effective strategy for the formation of bimetallic (PdCu) nanocrystals by liquid phase pulsed laser ablation using a bulk Pd metal plate submerged in CuCl2 solutions with different concentrations, in contrast to the complex and costly experimental methods used previously. The microstructural and optical properties of the synthesized nanocrystals indicate that the obtained bimetallic nanostructures are highly pure and monodispersed. Moreover, bimetallic PdCu nanostructures show a higher catalytic activity than monometallic Pd nanocrystals for the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol at room temperature, also exhibiting high stability for up to four recycles. The mechanism of the enhanced catalytic activity and stability of bimetallic nanocrystals is discussed in detail. Finally, we believe that the presented design strategy and utilization of bimetallic nanocrystals for catalytic applications enables the development of novel bimetallic nanostructures by liquid phase pulsed laser ablation and their catalytic application for environmental remediation.

  5. Unique Challenges Accompany Thick-Shell CdSe/nCdS (n > 10) Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y; Marchuk, K; Abraham, R; Sampat, S; Abraham, R.; Fang, N; Malko, AV; Vela, J

    2011-12-23

    Thick-shell CdSe/nCdS (n {ge} 10) nanocrystals were recently reported that show remarkably suppressed fluorescence intermittency or 'blinking' at the single-particle level as well as slow rates of Auger decay. Unfortunately, whereas CdSe/nCdS nanocrystal synthesis is well-developed up to n {le} 6 CdS monolayers (MLs), reproducible syntheses for n {ge} 10 MLs are less understood. Known procedures sometimes result in homogeneous CdS nucleation instead of heterogeneous, epitaxial CdS nucleation on CdSe, leading to broad and multimodal particle size distributions. Critically, obtained core/shell sizes are often below those desired. This article describes synthetic conditions specific to thick-shell growth (n {ge} 10 and n {ge} 20 MLs) on both small (sub2 nm) and large (>4.5 nm) CdSe cores. We find added secondary amine and low concentration of CdSe cores and molecular precursors give desired core/shell sizes. Amine-induced, partial etching of CdSe cores results in apparent shell-thicknesses slightly beyond those desired, especially for very-thick shells (n {ge} 20 MLs). Thermal ripening and fast precursor injection lead to undesired homogeneous CdS nucleation and incomplete shell growth. Core/shells derived from small CdSe (1.9 nm) have longer PL lifetimes and more pronounced blinking at single-particle level compared with those derived from large CdSe (4.7 nm). We expect our new synthetic approach will lead to a larger throughput of these materials, increasing their availability for fundamental studies and applications.

  6. Improving the catalytic activity of semiconductor nanocrystals through selective domain etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khon, Elena; Lambright, Kelly; Khnayzer, Rony S; Moroz, Pavel; Perera, Dimuthu; Butaeva, Evgeniia; Lambright, Scott; Castellano, Felix N; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    Colloidal chemistry offers an assortment of synthetic tools for tuning the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals. While many nanocrystal architectures can be obtained directly via colloidal growth, other nanoparticle morphologies require alternative processing strategies. Here, we show that chemical etching of colloidal nanoparticles can facilitate the realization of nanocrystal shapes that are topologically inaccessible by hot-injection techniques alone. The present methodology is demonstrated by synthesizing a two-component CdSe/CdS nanoparticle dimer, constructed in a way that both CdSe and CdS semiconductor domains are exposed to the external environment. This structural morphology is highly desirable for catalytic applications as it enables both reductive and oxidative reactions to occur simultaneously on dissimilar nanoparticle surfaces. Hydrogen production tests confirmed the improved catalytic activity of CdSe/CdS dimers, which was enhanced 3-4 times upon etching treatment. We expect that the demonstrated application of etching to shaping of colloidal heteronanocrystals can become a common methodology in the synthesis of charge-separating nanocrystals, leading to advanced nanoparticles architectures for applications in areas of photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and light detection.

  7. Nonclassical radiation from diamond nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Beveratos, A; Gacoin, T; Poizat, J P; Grangier, P; Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    The quantum properties of the fluorescence light emitted by diamond nanocrystals containing a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colored center is investigated. We have observed photon antibunching with very low background light. This system is therefore a very good candidate for the production of single photon on demand. In addition, we have measured larger NV center lifetime in nanocrystals than in the bulk, in good agreement with a simple quantum electrodynamical model.

  8. Theoretical investigation of magnetic and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshchenko, Vitaly

    This thesis presents the theoretical investigation of physical properties of pure and transition metal doped semiconductor nanostructures. First we study optical and energy (the density of states) spectra for Cd mSem clusters of various sizes and shapes, such as spheres, cubes, nanorods, and nanotubes. This work requires a careful computational analysis where a proper exchange-correlation functional has to be chosen to fit the experimental data. The next part of the thesis deals with the magnetic properties of manganese doped CdSe, ZnSe, ZnS, and CdS quantum dots (QDs). We theoretically explain the effect of dual luminescence and show that in the case with CdSe quantum dots the luminescence becomes tunable by a QD size. We also study the concentration dependence of magnetic order and optical transitions in Mn doped CdSe nanocrystals. Room temperature d0 ferromagnetism is studied in ZnS quantum dots and nanowires in Chapter 4. To find the magnetization of the medium and large size nanocrystals we introduce the surface-bulk (SB) model. We show that the condensation of Zn vacancies into a single droplet takes place which leads to the week d0 ferromagnetism in ZnS nanocrystals. In the last Chapter we study electronic, optical, and charge transport properties of two new holey 2D materials, ELH-g-C2N-H and ELH-g-C2N-Br with hydrogen and bromine side-groups, respectively. Since the two 2D crystals under study have not been synthesized yet, we provide the stability analysis and prove that the calculated crystal structures correspond to the global energy minimum criterion.

  9. Mutual excitation in Eurozone sovereign CDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Pelizzon, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study self- and cross-excitation of shocks in the Eurozone sovereign CDS market. We adopt a multivariate setting with credit default intensities driven by mutually exciting jump processes, to capture the salient features observed in the data, in particular, the clustering of high default probabil

  10. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C.; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  11. Green synthesis and antimicrobial activity of monodisperse silver nanoparticles synthesized using Ginkgo Biloba leaf extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yan-yu [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi' an 710021 (China); Yang, Hui, E-mail: 549456369@qq.com [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi' an 710021 (China); Wang, Tao [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi' an 710021 (China); Wang, Chuang [Department of Highway & Bridge, Shaanxi Railway Institute, Weinan 714000 (China)

    2016-11-25

    Various parts of plants can be used as a raw material for the synthesis of nanoparticles, which is eco-friendly way and does not involve any harmful chemicals. In this project, Ginkgo biloba leaf, an abundantly available medicinal plant in China, was for the first time adopted as a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize smaller sized and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). To improve the quality of AgNPs, the reduction was accelerated by changing the concentrations of initial Ag{sup +} (0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08 mol/L) of the reaction mixture consisting of silver nitrate solution (AgNO{sub 3}) and Ginkgo biloba leaf extract. At pH = 8 and lower AgNO{sub 3} concentration (0.02 mol/L), a colloid consisting of well-dispersed spherical nanoparticles was obtained. The synthesized nanocrystals were successfully characterized by UV–vis and XRD. TEM images revealed the size of the spherical AgNPs ranged between 10–16 nm. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of −NH{sub 2}, −OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the nanoparticles. The biosynthesized AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activities against gram-negative bacteria and gram-positive bacteria. Compared to traditional chemical methods, Ginkgo biloba leaf extract provides an easy green synthetical way. It is anticipated that the biosynthesized AgNPs can be used in areas such as cosmetics, foods and medical applications. - Highlights: • Monodisperse silver nanoparticles were first prepared by a green synthetical way through Ginkgo Biloba leaf extract. • The synthesized AgNPs is of high crystallinity, stable and good dispersion with smaller sizes between 10–16 nm. • The achieved AgNPs exhibits good antibacterial activities. • The biosynthesis method is advantageous for its cost effectiveness, availability, portability, nontoxic and environmentally benign.

  12. Templated synthesis of monodisperse mesoporous maghemite/silica microspheres for magnetic separation of genomic DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Shi, Ruobing; Xue, Yun; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2010-08-01

    A novel method is described for the preparation of superparamagnetic mesoporous maghemite (γ-Fe 2O 3)/silica (SiO 2) composite microspheres to allow rapid magnetic separation of DNA from biological samples. With magnetite (Fe 3O 4) and silica nanoparticles as starting materials, such microspheres were synthesized by the following two consecutive steps: (1) formation of monodispersed organic/inorganic hybrid microspheres through urea-formaldedyde (UF) polymerization and (2) removal of the organic template and phase transformation of Fe 3O 4 to γ-Fe 2O 3 by calcination at elevated temperatures. The as-synthesized particles obtained by heating at temperature 300 °C feature spherical shape and uniform particle size ( dparticle=1.72 μm), high saturation magnetization ( Ms=17.22 emu/g), superparamagnetism ( Mr/ Ms=0.023), high surface area ( SBET=240 m 2/g), and mesoporosity ( dpore=6.62 nm). The composite microsphere consists of interlocked amorphous SiO 2 nanoparticles, in which cubic γ-Fe 2O 3 nanocrystals are homogeneously dispersed and thermally stable against γ- to α-phase transformation at temperatures up to 600 °C. With the exposed iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a thin layer of silica shell, the magnetic microspheres were used as a solid-phase adsorbent for rapid extraction of genomic DNA from plant samples. The results show that the DNA templates isolated from pea and green pepper displayed single bands with molecular weights greater than 8 kb and A260/ A280 values of 1.60-1.72. The PCR amplification of a fragment encoding the endogenous chloroplast ndhB gene confirmed that the DNA templates obtained were inhibitor-free and amenable to sensitive amplification-based DNA technologies.

  13. Semiconductor nanocrystal-based phagokinetic tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A; Parak, Wolfgang J; Le Gros, Mark; Boudreau, Rosanne

    2014-11-18

    Methods for determining metabolic properties of living cells through the uptake of semiconductor nanocrystals by cells. Generally the methods require a layer of neutral or hydrophilic semiconductor nanocrystals and a layer of cells seeded onto a culture surface and changes in the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals are detected. The observed changes made to the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals can be correlated to such metabolic properties as metastatic potential, cell motility or migration.

  14. Harvesting Solar Energy by Means of Charge-Separating Nanocrystals and Their Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Geoffrey; O'Connor, Timothy; Moroz, Pavel; Kinder, Erich; Kohn, Elena; Perera, Dimuthu; Lorek, Ryan; Lambright, Scott; Imboden, Martene; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Conjoining different semiconductor materials in a single nano-composite provides synthetic means for the development of novel optoelectronic materials offering a superior control over the spatial distribution of charge carriers across material interfaces. As this study demonstrates, a combination of donor-acceptor nanocrystal (NC) domains in a single nanoparticle can lead to the realization of efficient photocatalytic1-5 materials, while a layered assembly of donor- and acceptor-like nanocrystals films gives rise to photovoltaic materials. Initially the paper focuses on the synthesis of composite inorganic nanocrystals, comprising linearly stacked ZnSe, CdS, and Pt domains, which jointly promote photoinduced charge separation. These structures are used in aqueous solutions for the photocatalysis of water under solar radiation, resulting in the production of H2 gas. To enhance the photoinduced separation of charges, a nanorod morphology with a linear gradient originating from an intrinsic electric field is used5. The inter-domain energetics are then optimized to drive photogenerated electrons toward the Pt catalytic site while expelling the holes to the surface of ZnSe domains for sacrificial regeneration (via methanol). Here we show that the only efficient way to produce hydrogen is to use electron-donating ligands to passivate the surface states by tuning the energy level alignment at the semiconductor-ligand interface. Stable and efficient reduction of water is allowed by these ligands due to the fact that they fill vacancies in the valence band of the semiconductor domain, preventing energetic holes from degrading it. Specifically, we show that the energy of the hole is transferred to the ligand moiety, leaving the semiconductor domain functional. This enables us to return the entire nanocrystal-ligand system to a functional state, when the ligands are degraded, by simply adding fresh ligands to the system4. To promote a photovoltaic charge separation, we use a

  15. Harvesting solar energy by means of charge-separating nanocrystals and their solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Geoffrey; O'Connor, Timothy; Moroz, Pavel; Kinder, Erich; Kohn, Elena; Perera, Dimuthu; Lorek, Ryan; Lambright, Scott; Imboden, Martene; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2012-08-23

    Conjoining different semiconductor materials in a single nano-composite provides synthetic means for the development of novel optoelectronic materials offering a superior control over the spatial distribution of charge carriers across material interfaces. As this study demonstrates, a combination of donor-acceptor nanocrystal (NC) domains in a single nanoparticle can lead to the realization of efficient photocatalytic materials, while a layered assembly of donor- and acceptor-like nanocrystals films gives rise to photovoltaic materials. Initially the paper focuses on the synthesis of composite inorganic nanocrystals, comprising linearly stacked ZnSe, CdS, and Pt domains, which jointly promote photoinduced charge separation. These structures are used in aqueous solutions for the photocatalysis of water under solar radiation, resulting in the production of H2 gas. To enhance the photoinduced separation of charges, a nanorod morphology with a linear gradient originating from an intrinsic electric field is used. The inter-domain energetics are then optimized to drive photogenerated electrons toward the Pt catalytic site while expelling the holes to the surface of ZnSe domains for sacrificial regeneration (via methanol). Here we show that the only efficient way to produce hydrogen is to use electron-donating ligands to passivate the surface states by tuning the energy level alignment at the semiconductor-ligand interface. Stable and efficient reduction of water is allowed by these ligands due to the fact that they fill vacancies in the valence band of the semiconductor domain, preventing energetic holes from degrading it. Specifically, we show that the energy of the hole is transferred to the ligand moiety, leaving the semiconductor domain functional. This enables us to return the entire nanocrystal-ligand system to a functional state, when the ligands are degraded, by simply adding fresh ligands to the system. To promote a photovoltaic charge separation, we use a

  16. A co-flow-focusing monodisperse microbubble generator

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jiaming

    2014-02-14

    We use a simple and inexpensive microfluidic device, which is based on microscope glass slides and two tapered glass capillaries, to produce monodisperse microbubbles. The innermost capillary used for transporting the gas is inserted into the second capillary, with its 2 μm sharp tip aligned with the center of the converging-diverging throat of the second capillary. This configuration provides a small and smooth gas flow rate, and a high velocity gradient at the tube outlet. Highly monodisperse microbubbles with diameters ranging from 3.5 to 60 microns have been successfully produced at a rate of up to 40 kHz. A simple scaling law, which is based on the capillary number and liquid-to-gas flow rate ratio, successfully predicts the bubble size. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of monodisperse copper nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Tomasz; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Stefańska, Joanna; Socha, Robert P; Warszyński, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Metallic monodisperse copper nanoparticles at a relatively high concentration (300 ppm CuNPs) have been synthesized by the reduction of copper salt with hydrazine in the aqueous SDS solution. The average particles size and the distribution size were characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Nanosight-Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA). The morphology and structure of nanoparticles were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The chemical composition of the copper nanoparticles was determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Monodisperse copper nanoparticles with average diameter 50 nm were received. UV/vis absorption spectra confirmed the formation of the nanoparticles with the characteristic peak 550 nm. The antimicrobial studies showed that the copper nanoparticles had high activity against Gram-positive bacteria, standard and clinical strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, comparable to silver nanoparticles and some antibiotics. They also exhibited antifungal activity against Candida species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanoparticles without Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles could be successfully synthesized with two kinds of precipitants through a precipitation method. As-prepared nanoparticles in the size around 10 nm with regular spherical-like shape were achieved by adjusting pH values. NaOH and NH3·H2O were used as two precipitants for comparison. The average size of nanoparticles with NH3·H2O precipitant got smaller and represented better dispersibility, while nanoparticles with NaOH precipitant represented better magnetic property. This work provided a simple method without using any organic solvents, organic metal salts, or surfactants which could easily obtain monodisperse nanoparticles with tunable morphology.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Monodisperse Nickel Nanoparticles by Polyol Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peng; GUAN Jianguo; ZHANG Qingjie; ZHAO Wenyu

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-protected monodisperse nickel nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method in the presence of poly ( N-vinyl- 2-pyrrolidone ). These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X- ray diffraction ( XRD ), selected area electron diffraction ( SAED ), as well as vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The experimental results show that the addition of PVP and the concentration of NaOH have strong influences on the size, agglomeration and uniformity of nanoparticles. In the presence of PVP and NaOH with low concentrations, monodisperse nickel nanoparticles with average diameters about 42 nm were obtained and characterized to be pure nickel crystalline with fcc structure. Secondary structures such as clusters, loops, and strings resulted from magnetic interactions between particles were observed. The chemical interaction between the PVP and nickel nanoparticles was found by FTIR. The saturation magnetization ( Ms ), remanent magnetization (Mr) and coercivity ( Hc ) of these nickel nanoparticles are lower than those of bulk nickel.

  20. Production and characterization of carbamazepine nanocrystals by electrospraying for continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mao; Rutledge, Gregory C; Myerson, Allan S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, an electrospray technique followed by annealing at high temperatures was developed to produce nanocrystals of carbamazepine (CBZ), a poorly water-soluble drug, for continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Electrospraying solutions of CBZ in methanol obeys the expected scaling law of current, which is I ∼ Q(1/2) (I, electrical current; Q, flow rate), for liquids with sufficiently high conductivity and viscosity. Lower flow rates during electrospraying were preferred to produce smaller diameters of monodisperse, dense CBZ nanoparticles. CBZ nanoparticles were predominantly amorphous immediately after electrospraying. Crystallization of CBZ nanoparticles was accelerated by annealing at high temperatures. CBZ nanocrystals with the most stable polymorph, form III, were obtained by annealing at 90°C, which is above the transition temperature, 78°C, for the enantiotropic CBZ form III and form I. The solubility and dissolution rates of CBZ nanocrystals increased significantly as compared with those of CBZ bulk particles. Therefore, electrospray technology has the potential to produce pharmaceutical dosage forms with enhanced bioavailability and can readily be integrated in a continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Monodispersive CoPt Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Chemical Reduction Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Cheng-Min; HUI Chao; YANG Tian-Zhong; XIAO Cong-Wen; CHEN Shu-Tang; DING Hao; GAO Hong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Monodispersive CoPt nanoparticles in sizes of about 2.2 nm are synthesized by superhydride reduction of CoCl2 and PtCl2 in diphenyl ether. The as-prepared nanoparticles show a chemically disordered A1 structure and are superparamagnetic. Thermal annealing transforms the A1 structure into chemically ordered L1o structure and the particles are ferromagnetic at room temperature.

  2. Monodisperse magnesium hydride nanoparticles uniformly self-assembled on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guanglin; Tan, Yingbin; Chen, Xiaowei; Sun, Dalin; Guo, Zaiping; Liu, Huakun; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhu, Min; Yu, Xuebin

    2015-10-21

    Monodisperse MgH2 nanoparticles with homogeneous distribution and a high loading percent are developed through hydrogenation-induced self-assembly under the structure-directing role of graphene. Graphene acts not only as a structural support, but also as a space barrier to prevent the growth of MgH2 nanoparticles and as a thermally conductive pathway, leading to outstanding performance.

  3. Supercritical synthesis and in situ deposition of PbS nanocrystals with oleic acid passivation for quantum dot solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakoli, M.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aashuri, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Colloidal quantum dot solar cells have recently attracted significant attention due to their low-processing cost and surging photovoltaic performance. In this paper, a novel, reproducible, and simple solution-based process based on supercritical fluid toluene is presented for in situ growth and deposition PbS nanocrystals with oleic-acid passivation. A lead precursor containing sulfur was mixed with oleic acid in toluene and processed in a supercritical fluid condition at different temperatures of 140, 270 and 330 °C for 20 min. The quantum dots were deposited on a fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrate inside the supercritical reactor. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, absorption and dynamic light scattering showed that the nanocrystals processed at the supercritical condition (330 °C) are fully crystalline with a narrow size distribution of ∼3 nm with an absorption wavelength of 915 nm (bandgap of 1.3 eV). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that the PbS quantum dots are passivated by oleic acid molecules during the growth. Photovoltaic characteristics of Schottky junction solar cells showed an improvement over devices prepared by spin-coating. - Highlights: • Supercritical fluid processing and in situ deposition of PbS QDs are presented. • The prepared nanocrystals are mono-dispersed with an optical bandgap of 1.3 eV. • Photovoltaic performance of the in situ deposited nanocrystals is reported. • An improved PV performance compared to spin coated Schottky solar cells is shown.

  4. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  5. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  6. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological applications of colloidal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Wolfgang J.; Gerion, Daniele; Pellegrino, Teresa; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine; Williams, Shara C.; Boudreau, Rosanne; LeGros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2003-07-01

    Due to their interesting properties, research on colloidal nanocrystals has moved in the last few years from fundamental research to first applications in materials science and life sciences. In this review some recent biological applications of colloidal nanocrystals are discussed, without going into biological or chemical details. First, the properties of colloidal nanocrystals and how they can be synthesized are described. Second, the conjugation of nanocrystals with biological molecules is discussed. And third, three different biological applications are introduced: (i) the arrangement of nanocrystal-oligonucleotide conjugates using molecular scaffolds such as single-stranded DNA, (ii) the use of nanocrystal-protein conjugates as fluorescent probes for cellular imaging, and (iii) a motility assay based on the uptake of nanocrystals by living cells.

  8. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  9. Visible-light driven photoelectrochemical immunosensor for insulin detection based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yixin; Zhang, Yifeng; Wu, Dan; Fan, Dawei; Pang, Xuehui; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Hongmin; Sun, Xu; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, a label-free photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor was developed for ultrasensitive detection of insulin based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites. As graphene-like 2D nanomaterial, SnS2 nanosheets loaded on the conducting framework of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were adopted for the construction of immunosensor for the first time, providing a favorable substrate for in-situ growth of CdS nanocrystal that had suitable band structure matching well with SnS2. The well-matched band structure of these two metal sulfides effectively inhibited the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, thus improving the photo-to-current conversion efficiency. Besides, the introduction of MWCNTs facilitated electron transfer across the surface of electrodes, leading to a further increment of photocurrent. The as constructed label-free PEC immunosensor based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites exhibited excellent PEC performance for the detection of insulin. The concentrations of insulin could be directly detected based on the decrement of photocurrent that was brought by the increased steric hindrances due to the formation of antigen-antibody immunocomplexes. Under the optimal conditions, the PEC immunosensor had a sensitive response to insulin in a linear range of 0.1pgmL(-1) to 5ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.03pgmL(-1). Meanwhile, good stability and selectivity were achieved as well. The design and fabrication of this PEC immunosensor based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites not only provided an ideal platform for the detection of insulin, but also opened up a new avenue for the development of immunosensor for some other biomarkers analysis.

  10. A digital CDS technique and the performance testing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Yan-Ji; Lu, Bo; Wang, Yu-Sa; Xu, Yu-Peng; Cui, Wei-Wei; Li, Wei; Li, Mao-Shun; Wang, Juan; Han, Da-Wei; Chen, Tian-Xiang; Huo, Jia; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Zi-Liang; Yin, Guo-He; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Zhong-Yi; Fu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Ya; Ma, Ke-Yan; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Readout noise is a critical parameter for characterizing the performance of charge-coupled devices (CCDs), which can be greatly reduced by the correlated double sampling (CDS) circuit. However, conventional CDS circuit inevitably introduces new noises since it consists of several active analog components such as operational amplifiers. This paper proposes a digital CDS circuit technique, which transforms the pre-amplified CCD signal into a train of digital presentations by a high-speed data acquisition card directly without the noisy CDS circuit first, then implement the digital CDS algorithm through numerical method. The readout noise of 3.3 e$^{-}$ and the energy resolution of 121 eV@5.9keV can be achieved via the digital CDS technique.

  11. The genomic CDS sandbox: An assessment among domain experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ayesha; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Eilbeck, Karen; Williams, Marc S; Freimuth, Robert R; Hoffman, Mark A; Rasmussen, Luke V; Overby, Casey L; Shirts, Brian H; Hoffman, James M; Welch, Brandon M

    2016-04-01

    Genomics is a promising tool that is becoming more widely available to improve the care and treatment of individuals. While there is much assertion, genomics will most certainly require the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to be fully realized in the routine clinical setting. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health recently convened an in-person, multi-day meeting on this topic. It was widely recognized that there is a need to promote the innovation and development of resources for genomic CDS such as a CDS sandbox. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a proposed approach for such a genomic CDS sandbox among domain experts and potential users. Survey results indicate a significant interest and desire for a genomic CDS sandbox environment among domain experts. These results will be used to guide the development of a genomic CDS sandbox.

  12. General synthetic approach to heterostructured nanocrystals based on noble metals and I-VI, II-VI, and I-III-VI metal chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minghui; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2014-08-19

    Solid metal precursors (alloys or monometals) can serve both as a starting template and as a source material for chemical transformation to metal chalcogenides. Herein, we develop a simple solution-based strategy to obtain highly monodisperse noble-metal-based heterostructured nanocrystals from such precursor seeds. By utilizing chemical and structural inhomogeneity of these metal seeds, in this work, we have synthesized a total of five I-VI (Ag2S, Ag2Se, Ag3AuS2, Ag3AuSe2, and Cu9S5), three II-VI (CdS, CdSe, and CuSe), and four I-III-VI (AgInS2, AgInSe2, CuInS2, and CuInSe2) chalcogenides, together with their fifteen associated heterodimers (Au-Ag2S, Au-Ag2Se, Au-Ag3AuS2, Au-Ag3AuSe2, Au-AgInS2, Au-AgInSe2, Au-CdS, Au-CdSe, Ag-Ag2S, Ag-AgInS2, Au-Cu9S5, Au-CuInS2, Au-CuSe, Au-CuInSe2, and Pt-AgInS2) to affirm the process generality. Briefly, by adding elemental sulfur or selenium to AuAg alloy seeds and tuning the reaction conditions, we can readily obtain phase-pure Au-Ag2S, Au-Ag2Se, Au-Ag3AuS2, and Au-Ag3AuSe2 heterostructures. Similarly, we can also fabricate Au-AgInS2 and Au-AgInSe2 heterostructures from the AuAg seeds by adding sulfur/selenium and indium precursors. Furthermore, by partial or full conversion of Ag seeds, we can prepare both single-phase Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals and Ag-based heterostructures. To demonstrate wide applicability of this strategy, we have also synthesized Au-based binary and ternary Cu chalcogenide (Au-Cu9S5, Au-CuSe, Au-CuInS2, and Au-CuInSe2) heterostructures from alloy seeds of AuCu and Pt chalcogenides (e.g., Pt-AgInS2) from alloy seeds of PtAg. The structure and composition of the above products have been confirmed with X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods. A kinetic investigation of the formation mechanism of these heterostructures is brought forward using Au-AgInS2 and Ag-CuInS2 as model examples.

  13. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  14. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2017-09-12

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  15. Highly luminescent nanostructures of CdS and ZnS prepared by microwaves heating: effect of sulphide concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Samuel; Gomez, Idalia; Elizondo, Perla [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Universidad s/n, C.P. 66450 San Nicolas de los Garza (Mexico); Cavazos, Jose [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Universidad s/n, C.P. 66450 San Nicolas de los Garza (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    Nearly monodisperse and highly luminescent ZnS and CdS NPs were obtained by microwave irradiation. The ZnS and CdS NPs solutions were prepared by adding freshly prepared ZnSO{sub 4} or CdSO{sub 4} solution to a thioacetamide solution at pH 8 in the presence of sodium citrate in solution used as stabilizer. The precursors concentration were such that the sulphide ion concentrations were 3 x 10{sup -2} M, 6 x 10{sup -2} M and 8 x 10{sup -2} M, for each of these [S] concentrations the [Zn] or [Cd] content were fixed at 3 x 10{sup -2} M. NPs were prepared under microwave irradiation for 1 min at 905 W of power. The NPs samples were taken when the temperature descended to ambient temperature for further analysis. Effect of concentration of Cd and Zn ions were studied in the luminescence property. RXD, AFM, TEM and UV-Vis were used too as analytical equipment for characterization. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Surface oxidation and water desorption of CdS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈正石; 李庆霖; 金振声

    1996-01-01

    The surface oxidation and HP desorption of powder CdS were studied by means of X-ray photoetectron spectroscopy (XPS), quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and in-situ FTIR. The results show that with the changes of surface composition and the elongation of store time of CdS there are four types of H2O thermally desorbed at different temperatures. It has also been found that through high-temperature air treatment for a short time the oxidized surface layer of CdS can prevent O2 and H2O in air from further attacking the inner CdS molecules.

  17. Formation and Characterization of CdS Hollow Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Peng; YU Haihu; DENG Jinyang; JIANG Desheng

    2008-01-01

    CdS hollow structures were built up by using the one pot method and using carbon disulfide (CS2) and ethylenediamine as starting materials. CS2 is insoluble in water and could form metastable oil droplets in the water at a moderate temperature. The oil droplets formed chains in the circumvolving water. CdS crystals grew and mineralized on the surfaces of the CS2 droplet chains, forming CdS shells around the unreacted CS2 cores. After the surrounding temperature was raised above the boiling point of CS2, the unreacted CS2 cores vaporized, leaving the CdS shelled hollow structures. The CdS hollow structures were characterized by using a transmission electron microscope, an X-ray diffractometer, a UV-Visible spectrophotometer and a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The CdS hollow structures were mainly tubes with closed ends. The exterior diameter and the interior diameter of tubes were about 50nm and about 15nm, respectively. Compared with the absorption onset wavelength of the bulk CdS, the CdS hollow structures exhibited a blue shift of about 57nm. While excited at 213nm. the CdS hollow structures emitted greenish blue light centered at 470nm.

  18. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  19. Exciton polarizability in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Shan, Jie; Islam, Mohammad A; Herman, Irving P; Bonn, Mischa; Heinz, Tony F

    2006-11-01

    The response of charge to externally applied electric fields is an important basic property of any material system, as well as one critical for many applications. Here, we examine the behaviour and dynamics of charges fully confined on the nanometre length scale. This is accomplished using CdSe nanocrystals of controlled radius (1-2.5 nm) as prototype quantum systems. Individual electron-hole pairs are created at room temperature within these structures by photoexcitation and are probed by terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The electronic response is found to be instantaneous even for THz frequencies, in contrast to the behaviour reported in related measurements for larger nanocrystals and nanocrystal assemblies. The measured polarizability of an electron-hole pair (exciton) amounts to approximately 10(4) A(3) and scales approximately as the fourth power of the nanocrystal radius. This size dependence and the instantaneous response reflect the presence of well-separated electronic energy levels induced in the system by strong quantum-confinement effects.

  20. Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Somorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-05-01

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO(2)-Pt and Pt-SiO(2), can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO(2)-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H(2), which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO(2) interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts.

  1. Energy transfer with semiconductor nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogach, A.L.; Klar, T.A.; Lupton, J.M.; Meijerink, A.; Feldmann, J.

    2009-01-01

    Fo¨ rster (or fluorescence) resonant energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful spectroscopic technique to study interactions, conformational and distance changes, in hybrid nanosystems. Semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as colloidal quantum dots, are highly efficient fluorophores with a strong band-

  2. A Facile Solvothermal Synthesis of Monodisperse Ni Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Peng-fei; CUI Bin; ZHANG Yan; SHI Qi-zhen

    2008-01-01

    A simple solvothermal approach was developed to synthesize uniform spherical monodisperse Ni nanoparticles, which can easily disperse in nonpolar solvents to form homogenous colloidal solution. The as-prepared sample was characterized by XRD, TEM, and FTIR. The results indicate that Ni nanoparticles have the structure of face-centered cube and a narrow distribution with a diameter of (3.5±0.5) nm. The FTIR spectrum reveals that the as a surfactant. The probable formation mechanism of the spherical nanoparticles was also discussed.

  3. Monodisperse Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by a Microwave-Assisted Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shao-Peng; TANG Shao-Chun; MENG Xiang-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles with an average size of about 2Onto are synthesized in a colloidal solution with the aid of microwave irradiation. Neither additional reductant nor stabilizer is required in this microwave-assisted method.The color of the colloidal solution is found to be dark green, different from the characteristic yellow of silver colloidal solutions. The silver nanoparticles in the colloidal solution have a narrow size distribution and large yield quantity. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy analysis reveals that the as-synthesized monodisperse silver nanoparticles have exceptional optical properties. Raman spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that these silver nanoparticles exhibit a notable surface-enhanced Raman scattering ability.

  4. MONODISPERSE MICRON-SIZED POLYACRYLAMIDE PARTICLES SYNTHESIZED BY DISPERSION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Hou; Bo Gao; Zhe-guo Zhang; Kang-de Yao

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse micron-sized polyacrylamide (PAM) particles with a regular shape have been successfully prepared through dispersion polymerization of the monomer using a rotary reactor. FTIR and NMR spectroscopic results demonstrated the formation of PAM. POM and TEM observations revealed that PAM particles had a regular shape and good dispersity. A thick layer of surfactant (PVP) still existed on PAM particles after multiple centrifugation and ultrasonic re-dispersion in ethanol, which indicates a strong interaction between PVP and PAM. The effects of various polymerization factors on the average size of PAM particles have also been studied.

  5. Nanocrystals Research for Energy Efficient and Clean Energy Technologies:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2013-12-17

    Efforts centered on: nanocrystal photovoltaic fabrication, ultrafast dynamics and aberration-corrected STEM characterization of II-VI core, core/shell and alloyed nanocrystals, and fundamental investigation and applications of ultrasmall white light-emitting CdSe nanocrystal.

  6. Structural Investigations of Surfaces and Orientation-SpecificPhenomena in Nanocrystals and Their Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruguete, Deborah Michiko [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Studies of colloidal nanocrystals and their assemblies are presented. Two of these studies concern the atomic-level structural characterization of the surfaces, interfaces, and interiors present in II-VI semiconductor nanorods. The third study investigates the crystallographic arrangement of cobalt nanocrystals in self-assembled aggregates. Crystallographically-aligned assemblies of colloidal CdSe nanorods are examined with linearly-polarized Se-EXAFS spectroscopy, which probes bonding along different directions in the nanorod. This orientation-specific probe is used, because it is expected that the presence of specific surfaces in a nanorod might cause bond relaxations specific to different crystallographic directions. Se-Se distances are found to be contracted along the long axis of the nanorod, while Cd-Se distances display no angular dependence, which is different from the bulk. Ab-initio density functional theory calculations upon CdSe nanowires indicate that relaxations on the rod surfaces cause these changes. ZnS/CdS-CdSe core-shell nanorods are studied with Se, Zn, Cd, and S X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is hypothesized that there are two major factors influencing the core and shell structures of the nanorods: the large surface area-to-volume ratio, and epitaxial strain. The presence of the surface may induce bond rearrangements or relaxations to minimize surface energy; epitaxial strain might cause the core and shell lattices to contract or expand to minimize strain energy. A marked contraction of Zn-S bonds is observed in the core-shell nanorods, indicating that surface relaxations may dominate the structure of the nanorod (strain might otherwise drive the Zn-S lattice to accommodate the larger CdS or CdSe lattices via bond expansion). EXAFS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that Cd-Se bond relaxations might be anisotropic, an expected phenomenon for a rod-shaped nanocrystal. Ordered self-assembled aggregates of cobalt nanocrystals are

  7. Optimizing Photovoltaic Response by Tuning Light-Harvesting Nanocrystal Shape Synthesized Using a Quick Liquid-Gas Phase Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Sayantan; Tamilselvan, Muthusamy; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2015-12-30

    The electron recombination lifetime in a sensitized semiconductor assembly is greatly influenced by the crystal structure and geometric form of the light-harvesting semiconductor nanocrystal. When such light harvesters with varying structural characteristics are configured in a photoanode, its interface with the electrolyte becomes equally important and directly influences the photovoltaic efficiency. We have systematically probed here the influence of nanocrystal crystallographic structure and shape on the electron recombination lifetime and its eventual influence on the light to electricity conversion efficiency of a liquid junction semiconductor sensitized solar cell. The light-harvesting cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals of distinctly different and controlled shapes are obtained using a novel and simple liquid-gas phase synthesis method performed at different temperatures involving very short reaction times. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic studies respectively exhibit different crystallographic phase content and optical properties. When assembled on a mesoscopic TiO2 film by a linker molecule, they exhibit remarkable variation in electron recombination lifetime by 1 order of magnitude, as determined by ac-impedance spectroscopy. This also drastically affects the photovoltaic efficiency of the differently shaped nanocrystal sensitized solar cells.

  8. Efficient solution route to transparent ZnO semiconductor films using colloidal nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suehiro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanocrystals (NCs were synthesized by heating Zn (II acetylacetonate in oleic acid/oleylamine in the presence of 1,2-hexadecanediol at 220 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurements revealed the formation of monodispersed ZnO NCs of ca. 7 nm. ZnO NC assembled films were fabricated on a glass substrate by deposition with the colloidal ZnO NCs dispersed in toluene. The film composed of the NCs showed good optical transparency in the visible to near-infrared region. A device coupling the ZnO NC film with a p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS NC film exhibited an obvious diode-like current–voltage behavior. The results suggest that the transparent ZnO film has a potentiality to be used for an n-type window layer in some optoelectronic applications.

  9. A novel method for preparing monodispersed polystyrene nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kaiyi; WANG Zhaoqun

    2007-01-01

    A preparation manner for monodispersed polystyrene(PS)nanoparticles polymerized by using a novel addition procedure of a monomer is suggested.In systems containing a smaller amount of surfactant compared with conventional microemulsion polymerization,the polymerization processes consists of three stages:adding dropwise the first part of the monomer for a few minutes at 80℃ and polymerizing for 1 h;adding collectively the residual part of the monomer and polymerizing at the same temperature for another 1 h;and then polymerizing at 85℃ for another 1 h.Based on discussions on the nucleation mechanism of particles in the polymerization system,the influences of monomer weight added dropwise,and amounts of initiator and emulsifier on the size and distribution of PS particles were investigated.PS nanoparticles with smaller diameter such as a number-average diameter of 18.7 nm and better monodispersity were obtained since the dropped styrene amount was suitable under 20wt-% emulsifier amount and 3wt-% initiator amount based on the monomer.

  10. Water-Soluble CdTe/CdS Core/Shell Semiconductor Nanocrystals: How Their Optical Properties Depend on the Synthesis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brener R. C. Vale

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a comparative synthesis of water-soluble CdTe/CdS colloidal nanocrystalline semiconductors of the core/shell type. We prepared the CdS shell using two different methods: a one-pot approach and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR; in both cases, we used 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA as the surface ligand. In the one-pot approach, thiourea was added over the freshly formed CdTe dispersion, and served as the sulfur source. We achieved thicker CdS layers by altering the Cd:S stoichiometric ratio (1:1, 1:2, 1:4, and 1:8. The Cd:S ratios 1:1 and 1:2 furnished the best optical properties; these ratios also made the formation of surface defects less likely. For CdTe/CdS obtained using SILAR, we coated the surface of three differently sized CdTe cores (2.17, 3.10, and 3.45 nm with one to five CdS layers using successive injections of the Cd2+ and S2– ions. The results showed that the core size influenced the optical properties of the materials. The deposition of three to five layers over the surface of smaller CdTe colloidal nanocrystals generated strain effects on the core/shell structure.

  11. Interchain tube pressure effect in extensional flows of oligomer diluted nearly monodisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Huang, Qian

    2014-01-01

    We have derived a constitutive equation to explain the extensional dynamics of oligomer-diluted monodisperse polymers, if the length of the diluent has at least two Kuhn steps. These polymer systems have a flow dynamics which distinguish from pure monodisperse melts and solutions thereof, if the ...

  12. Monodisperse Femto- to Atto-liter Droplet Formation Using a Nano-Microchannel Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Kim, Tae Song; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Taek-Dong; Jeon, Noo Li; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Choo, Jaebum; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the production of sub-micrometer diameter monodisperse droplets by using a nano-micro channel interface. A perfectly steady nanoscopic liquid filament can be formed by a geometric confinement which eventually gives rise to a stable production of nearly perfectly monodisperse droplets.

  13. Surface properties of poly(ethylene oxide)-based segmented block copolymers with monodisperse hard segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husken, D.; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The surface properties of segmented block copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments and monodisperse crystallizable tetra-amide segments were studied. The monodisperse crystallizable segments (T6T6T) were based on terephthalate (T) and hexamethylenediamine (6). Due to the crystallinity

  14. Regime-dependent determinants of Euro area sovereign CDS spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blommestein, H.J.; Eijffinger, Sylvester; Qian, Zongxin

    2016-01-01

    We study the determinants of sovereign CDS spreads of five Euro area countries (Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, and Spain) after the collapse of Lehman Brothers. We find that global and/or European Monetary Union (EMU)-wide factors are the main drivers of changes in the sovereign CDS spreads in ou

  15. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  16. Anisotropic Gold Nanocrystals:. Synthesis and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiufiuc, R.; Toderas, F.; Iosin, M.; Stiufiuc, G.

    In this letter we report on successful preparation and characterization of anisotropic gold nanocrystals bio-synthesized by reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions in pelargonium plant extract. The nanocrystals have been characterized by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). Using these investigation techniques, the successful formation of anisotropic single nanocrystals with the preferential growth direction along the gold (111) plane has been confirmed. The high detail phase images could give us an explanation concerning the growth mechanism of the nanocrystals.

  17. Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-10-31

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  18. Optical characterization of CdS nanorods capped with starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, J. S.; Pal Majumder, T.; Schick, C.

    2015-05-01

    Well crystalline uniform CdS nanorods were grown by changing the concentration of maize starch. The highly polymeric (branched) structure of starch enhances the growth of CdS nanorods. The average diameter of the nanorods is 20-25 nm while length is of 500-600 nm as verified from SEM and XRD observations. The optical band gaps of the CdS nanorods are varying from 2.66 eV to 2.52 eV depending on concentration of maize starch. The photoluminescence (PL) emission bands are shifted from 526 nm to 529 nm with concentration of maize starch. We have also observed the enhanced PL intensity in CdS nanorods capped with starch. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows the significant effect of starch on CdS nanorods.

  19. Templated synthesis of monodisperse mesoporous maghemite/silica microspheres for magnetic separation of genomic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Feng; Shi Ruobing; Xue Yun; Chen Lei [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wan Qianhong, E-mail: qhwan@tju.edu.c [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-08-15

    A novel method is described for the preparation of superparamagnetic mesoporous maghemite (gamma-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3})/silica (SiO{sub 2}) composite microspheres to allow rapid magnetic separation of DNA from biological samples. With magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and silica nanoparticles as starting materials, such microspheres were synthesized by the following two consecutive steps: (1) formation of monodispersed organic/inorganic hybrid microspheres through urea-formaldedyde (UF) polymerization and (2) removal of the organic template and phase transformation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to gamma-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by calcination at elevated temperatures. The as-synthesized particles obtained by heating at temperature 300 deg. C feature spherical shape and uniform particle size (d{sub particle}=1.72 mum), high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}=17.22 emu/g), superparamagnetism (M{sub r}/M{sub s}=0.023), high surface area (S{sub BET}=240 m{sup 2}/g), and mesoporosity (d{sub pore}=6.62 nm). The composite microsphere consists of interlocked amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, in which cubic gamma-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystals are homogeneously dispersed and thermally stable against gamma- to alpha-phase transformation at temperatures up to 600 deg. C. With the exposed iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a thin layer of silica shell, the magnetic microspheres were used as a solid-phase adsorbent for rapid extraction of genomic DNA from plant samples. The results show that the DNA templates isolated from pea and green pepper displayed single bands with molecular weights greater than 8 kb and A{sub 260}/A{sub 280} values of 1.60-1.72. The PCR amplification of a fragment encoding the endogenous chloroplast ndhB gene confirmed that the DNA templates obtained were inhibitor-free and amenable to sensitive amplification-based DNA technologies.

  20. Synthesis of copper and zinc sulfide nanocrystals via thermolysis of the polymetallic thiolate cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Kuzuya, Yutaka Tai, Saeki Yamamuro and Kenji Sumiyama

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper report on the synthesis of copper and zinc sulfide nanocrystals (NCs via the formation of polymetallic thiolate cages. Cu2S NCs derived from Cu–dodecanethiol complex formed well-defined spherers, which were sufficiently monodisperse (with a size distribution of ~10% standard deviation of approximately 4.7 nm diameter on average to generate ordered self-assemblies. An electron diffraction pattern and UV–vis spectrum of Cu2S NCs indicate that this process can provide pure β-chalcocite (Cu2S. Nearly monodisperse ZnS NCs with a size ranging from 3 to 7 nm were obtained by thermolysis of the S–Zn–dodecanethiol precursor. The electron diffraction pattern indicates that zinc sulfide NCs are either wurtzite or a mixture of wurtzite and zincblende. TEM observation and UV–vis spectra revealed that the growth rate of ZnS NCs depends strongly on the annealing temperature. UV–vis spectra of 3 nm ZnS NCs show sharp excitonic features and a large blue shift from the bulk material. The photoluminescence spectra exhibit a large red shift from the absorption band edges. These shifts could be attributed to recombination from the surface traps. The narrow size distribution of Cu2S and ZnS NCs led to the formation of ordered self-assemblies with various well-defined but nonclosed-packing.

  1. Lead sulphide nanocrystal photodetector technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Rinku; Curry, Richard J.

    2016-02-01

    Light detection is the underlying principle of many optoelectronic systems. For decades, semiconductors including silicon carbide, silicon, indium gallium arsenide and germanium have dominated the photodetector industry. They can show excellent photosensitivity but are limited by one or more aspects, such as high production cost, high-temperature processing, flexible substrate incompatibility, limited spectral range or a requirement for cryogenic cooling for efficient operation. Recently lead sulphide (PbS) nanocrystals have emerged as one of the most promising new materials for photodetector fabrication. They offer several advantages including low-cost manufacturing, solution processability, size-tunable spectral sensitivity and flexible substrate compatibility, and they have achieved figures of merit outperforming conventional photodetectors. We review the underlying concepts, breakthroughs and remaining challenges in photodetector technologies based on PbS nanocrystals.

  2. Faradaurate-940: synthesis, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, high-energy X-ray diffraction, and X-ray scattering study of Au∼940±20(SR)∼160±4 nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cullen, David A; Dass, Amala

    2014-06-24

    Obtaining monodisperse nanocrystals and determining their composition to the atomic level and their atomic structure is highly desirable but is generally lacking. Here, we report the discovery and comprehensive characterization of a 2.9 nm plasmonic nanocrystal with a composition of Au940±20(SCH2CH2Ph)160±4, which is the largest mass spectrometrically characterized gold thiolate nanoparticle produced to date. The compositional assignment has been made using electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MS). The MS results show an unprecedented size monodispersity, where the number of Au atoms varies by only 40 atoms (940 ± 20). The mass spectrometrically determined composition and size are supported by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and synchrotron-based methods such as atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Lower-resolution STEM images show an ensemble of particles-1000s per frame-visually demonstrating monodispersity. Modeling of SAXS data on statistically significant nanoparticle population-approximately 10(12) individual nanoparticles-shows that the diameter is 3.0 ± 0.2 nm, supporting mass spectrometry and electron microscopy results on monodispersity. Atomic PDF based on high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments shows decent match with either a Marks decahedral or truncated octahedral structure. Atomic resolution STEM images of single particles and their fast Fourier transform suggest face-centered cubic arrangement. UV-visible spectroscopy data show that Faradaurate-940 supports a surface plasmon resonance peak at ̃505 nm. These monodisperse plasmonic nanoparticles minimize averaging effects and have potential application in solar cells, nano-optical devices, catalysis, and drug delivery.

  3. Flexible Photonic Cellulose Nanocrystal Films

    OpenAIRE

    Guidetti, G.; Atifi, S; Vignolini, S; Hamad, WY

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of self-assembled cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films of tunable photonic and mechanical properties using a facile, green approach is demonstrated. The combination of tunable flexibility and iridescence can dramatically expand CNC coating and film barrier capabilities for paints and coating applications, sustainable consumer packaging products, as well as effective templates for photonic and optoelectronic materials and structures. CelluForce Inc., Biotechnology and Biologica...

  4. Luminophores of tunable colors from ternary Ag-In-S and quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals covering the visible to near-infrared spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2017-01-04

    Ternary Ag-In-S or quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals were prepared from simple precursors (silver nitrate, indium(iii) chloride, zinc stearate in a mixture of DDT and ODE) by injecting a solution of elemental sulfur into OLA. Ternary nanocrystals were modified by depositing either a ZnS or a CdS shell, yielding type I and type II core/shell systems exhibiting photoluminescence QY in the range of 12-16%. Careful optimization of the reaction conditions allowed alloyed quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals exhibiting tunable photoluminescence in the spectral range of 520-720 nm with a QY of 48% and 59% for green and red radiations, respectively, to be obtained. (1)H NMR analysis of the nanocrystal organic shell, after dissolution of its inorganic core, indicated that surfacial sulfur atoms were covalently bonded to aliphatic chains whereas surfacial cations were coordinated by amines and carboxylate anions. No thiol-type ligands were detected. Transfer of the prepared nanocrystals to water could be achieved in one step by exchanging the initial ligands for 11-mercaptoundecanoic ones resulting in a QY value of 31%. A new Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystal preparation method was elaborated in which indium and zinc salts of fatty acids were used as cation precursors and DDT was replaced by thioacetamide. This original DDT-free method enabled similar tuning of the photoluminescence properties of the nanocrystals as in the previous method; however the measured photoluminescence QYs were three times lower. Hence, further optimization of the new method is required.

  5. Photophysical Properties of II-VI Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ke

    As it is well known, semiconductor nanocrystals (also called quantum dots, QDs) are being actively pursued for use in many different types of luminescent optical materials. These materials include the active media for luminescence downconversion in artificial lighting, lasers, luminescent solar concentrators and many other applications. Chapter 1 gives general introduction of QDs, which describe the basic physical properties and optical properties. Based on the experimental spectroscopic study, a semiquantitative method-effective mass model is employed to give theoretical prediction and guide. The following chapters will talks about several topics respectively. A predictive understanding of the radiative lifetimes is therefore a starting point for the understanding of the use of QDs for these applications. Absorption intensities and radiative lifetimes are fundamental properties of any luminescent material. Meantime, achievement of high efficiency with high working temperature and heterostructure fabrication with manipulation of lattice strain are not easy and need systematic investigation. To make accurate connections between extinction coefficients and radiative recombination rates, chapter 2 will consider three closely related aspects of the size dependent spectroscopy of II-VI QDs. First, it will consider the existing literature on cadmium selenide (CdSe) QD absorption spectra and extinction coefficients. From these results and fine structure considerations Boltzmann weighted radiative lifetimes are calculated. These lifetimes are compared to values measured on very high quality CdSe and CdSe coated with zinc selenide (ZnSe) shells. Second, analogous literature data are analyzed for cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanocrystals and compared to lifetimes measured for very high quality QDs. Furthermore, studies of the absorption and excitation spectra and measured radiative lifetimes for CdTe/CdSe Type-II core/shell QDs are reported. These results are also analyzed in

  6. Highly active Ag clusters stabilized on TiO2 nanocrystals for catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Zhe; Ou, Dingrong; Tu, Baofeng; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Cheng, Mojie

    2016-11-01

    Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites comprising of Ag clusters on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces are of great significance in catalysts and advanced functional materials. Herein a novel method to synthesize Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites with Ag clusters under 2 nm on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces have been developed. The success of this method relies on a silver mirror reaction in toluene, which refers to the reduction of silver-dodecylamine complexes by acetaldehyde in the presence of mono-dispersed TiO2 nanocrystals. The prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have been characterized by FT-IR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, ultra high resolution scanning electron microscope (Ultra-HRSEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). Catalytic activity of Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites is evaluated for the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) into p-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4. Results demonstrate that Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have shown an outstanding catalytic activity as well as a good stability in successive reduction of 4-NP. Noticeably, TOF of Ag/TiO2-0.75 nanocomposites obtained in this work is the highest among Ag based catalysts previously reported.

  7. MONODISPERSED AND NANOSIZED DENDRIMER/POLYSTYRENE LATEX PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changfeng Yi; Zushun Xu; Warren T. Ford

    2004-01-01

    Emulsion polymerization of styrene was carried out using dendrimer DAB-dendr-(NH2)64 as seed. The size and size distribution of the emulsion particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and the effects of emulsion polymerization conditions on the preparation of emulsion particle were investigated. It has been found that the nanosized dendrimer/polystyrene polymer emulsion particles obtained were in the range of 26~64 nm in diameter, and were monodisperse; the size and size distribution of emulsion particles were influenced by the contents of dendrimer DAB-dendr-(NH2)64, emulsifier and initiator, as well as the pH value.

  8. Selection of quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Michael; Pfeifer, Sascha; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Size-segregated quasi monodisperse particles are essential for e.g. fundamental research concerning cloud microphysical processes. Commonly a DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer) is used to produce quasi-monodisperse submicron particles. Thereto first, polydisperse aerosol particles are bipolarly charged by a neutralizer, and then selected according to their electrical mobility with the DMA [Knutson et al. 1975]. Selecting a certain electrical mobility with a DMA results in a particle size distribution, which contains singly charged particles as well as undesired multiply charged larger particles. Often these larger particles need to either be removed from the generated aerosol or their signals have to be corrected for in the data inversion and interpretation process. This problem becomes even more serious when considering super-micron particles. Here we will present two different techniques for generating quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles with no or only an insignificant number of larger sized particles being present. First, we use a combination of a cyclone with adjustable aerodynamic cut-off diameter and our custom-built Maxi-DMA [Raddatz et al. 2013]. The cyclone removes particles larger than the desired ones prior to mobility selection with the DMA. This results in a reduction of the number of multiply charged particles of up to 99.8%. Second, we utilize a new combination of cyclone and PCVI (Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor), which is based on purely inertial separation and avoids particle charging. The PCVI instrument was previously described by Boulter et al. (2006) and Kulkarni et al. (2011). With our two setups we are able to produce quasi-monodisperse aerosol particles in the diameter range from 0.5 to 4.4 µm without a significant number of larger undesired particles being present. Acknowledgements: This work was done within the framework of the DFG funded Ice Nucleation research UnIT (INUIT, FOR 1525) under WE 4722/1-1. References

  9. Monodisperse Clusters in Charged Attractive Colloids: Linear Renormalization of Repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Štěpán; Allen, Michael P

    2015-08-11

    Experiments done on polydisperse particles of cadmium selenide have recently shown that the particles form spherical isolated clusters with low polydispersity of cluster size. The computer simulation model of Xia et al. ( Nat. Nanotechnol. 2011 , 6 , 580 ) explaining this behavior used a short-range van der Waals attraction combined with a variable long-range screened electrostatic repulsion, depending linearly on the volume of the clusters. In this work, we term this dependence "linear renormalization" of the repulsive term, and we use advanced Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the kinetically slowed down phase separation in a similar but simpler model. We show that amorphous drops do not dissolve and crystallinity evolves very slowly under linear renormalization, and we confirm that low polydispersity of cluster size can also be achieved using this model. The results indicate that the linear renormalization generally leads to monodisperse clusters.

  10. Solvent: A Key in Digestive Ripening for Monodisperse Au Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Qi, Xuan; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Tieqiang; Li, Yunong; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Shuang; Zhou, Jun; Fu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    This work has mainly investigated the influence of the solvent on the nanoparticles distribution in digestive ripening. The experiments suggested that the solvents played a key role in digestive ripening of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). For the benzol solvents, the resulting size distribution of Au NPs was inversely related to the solvent polarity. It may be interpreted by the low Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles in the high polarity medium, which was supposedly in favor of reducing the nanoparticles distribution. Through digestive ripening in the highly polar benzol solvent of p-chlorotoluene, monodisperse Au NPs with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.8% were achieved. This indicated that digestive ripening was an effective and practical way to prepare high-quality nanoparticles, which holds great promise for the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  11. Structure and Hydration of Highly Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Nickels, Jonathan; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane; Katsaras, John; Dutcher, John

    Monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles are a promising, new soft colloidal nanomaterial with many applications in the personal care, food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. These applications rely on exceptional properties that emerge from the highly branched structure of phytoglycogen and its interaction with water, such as extraordinarily high water retention, and low viscosity and exceptional stability in water. The structure and hydration of the nanoparticles was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). SANS allowed us to determine the size of the nanoparticles, evaluate their radial density profile, quantify the particle-to-particle spacing, and determine their water content. The results show clearly that the nanoparticles are highly hydrated, with each nanoparticle containing 250% of its mass in water, and that aqueous dispersions approach a jamming transition at ~ 25% (w/w). QENS experiments provided an independent and consistent measure of the high level of hydration of the particles.

  12. Technical training: CERN Document Server (CDS), Inspire and Library Services

    CERN Multimedia

    IT & GS Departments

    2012-01-01

    A new training course, “CERN Document Server (CDS), Inspire and Library Services”, is available since the beginning of the year. The training course is given by members of CERN’s CDS Team (IT-CIS group) and the Library Services (GIS SIS group) and is intended for all members of personnel of CERN. This course will present CDS and inspirehep.net and the content, scope and scientific information available in or with CDS, as much as the classification and organization of the documents. It is intended to give you the training needed to know how to use CDS most efficiently and in particular covers: the main characteristics and advanced features for the search of documents (scientific, multimedia, etc). the collaborative tools : baskets, alerts, comments, evaluation, etc. the submission of documents in CDS and examples of workflows. An important part of the training is composed of various exercises, designed to acquire practical ability to work with CDS in cases similar to re...

  13. Aqueous foams stabilized by chitin nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzoumaki, M.; Karefyllakis, D.; Moschakis, T.; Biliaderis, C.G.; Scholten, E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the potential use of chitin nanocrystals, as colloidal rod-like particles, to stabilize aqueous foams. Chitin nanocrystals (ChN) were prepared by acid hydrolysis of crude chitin and foams were generated mainly by sonicating the respective dispersions. The

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from dope

  16. Emission efficiency limit of Si nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, R.; Luxembourg, S.L.; Weeber, A.W.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2016-01-01

    One of the important obstacles on the way to application of Si nanocrystals for development of practical devices is their typically low emissivity. In this study we explore the limits of external quantum yield of photoluminescence of solid-state dispersions of Si nanocrystals in SiO2. By making use

  17. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    George J.; Sabapathi SN

    2015-01-01

    Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers...

  18. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  19. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlam, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-03-25

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit tight of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  20. Plasma synthesis and liquid-phase surface passivation of brightly luminescent Si nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangolini, L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Jurbergs, D. [InnovaLight, Inc., 3303 Octavius Dr., Suite 104, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Rogojina, E. [InnovaLight, Inc., 3303 Octavius Dr., Suite 104, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Kortshagen, U. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)]. E-mail: uk@me.umn.edu

    2006-12-15

    While silicon's optical properties are improved at the nanoscale, they also become highly sensitive to the properties of the surfaces and interfaces of silicon nanostructures. For instance, while reported quantum yields for photoluminescence of silicon quantum dots covered by a native oxide are often in the few percent range, quantum yields as high as 30% have been found in quantum dots whose surfaces were passivated by covalently bonded organic molecules. In this paper, we describe an approach that is based on the gas phase synthesis of silicon quantum dots in a nonthermal plasma, and the subsequent organic surface passivation in the liquid phase. Nanocrystals are formed within a few milliseconds with a high mass yield in a nonthermal plasma. Various organic ligands such as octadecene, dodecence, and styrene are grafted onto the nanocrystal surfaces in a reaction known as hydrosilylation. Materials are characterized through transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence measurements. The particle size distributions are found to be relatively monodisperse and are well controllable through the plasma process parameters. Photoluminescence quantum yields as high as 60-70% have been achieved for particles luminescing in the red range of the visible spectrum.

  1. Low-temperature synthesis of LiFePO4 nanocrystals by solvothermal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jinsub; Kang, Sung-Won; Moon, Jieh; Kim, Sungjin; Park, Hyosun; Baboo, Joseph Paul; Kim, Jaekook

    2012-01-05

    LiFePO4 nanocrystals were synthesized at a very low temperature of 170°C using carbon nanoparticles by a solvothermal process in a polyol medium, namely diethylene glycol without any heat treatment as a post procedure. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the LiFePO4 was indexed well to a pure orthorhombic system of olivine structure (space group: Pnma) with no undesirable impurities. The LiFePO4 nanocrystals synthesized at low temperature exhibited mono-dispersed and carbon-mixed plate-type LiFePO4 nanoparticles with average length, width, and thickness of approximately 100 to 300 nm, 100 to 200 nm, and 50 nm, respectively. It also appeared to reveal considerably enhanced electrochemical properties when compared to those of pristine LiFePO4. These observed results clearly indicate the effect of carbon in improving the reactivity and synthesis of LiFePO4 nanoparticles at a significantly lower temperature.

  2. Solution synthesis, optical properties, and bioimaging applications of silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Benjamin F P; Tilley, Richard D

    2014-10-21

    Understanding and unlocking the potential of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is important for future applications ranging from biomedical imaging contrast agents to the next generation of solar cells and LEDs. Silicon NCs (Si NCs) have key advantages compared with other semiconductor NCs due to silicon's high natural abundance, low toxicity and strong biocompatibility, and unique size, and surface dependent optical properties. In this Account, we review and discuss the synthesis, surface modification, purification, optical properties, and applications of Si NCs. The synthetic methods used to make Si NCs have improved considerably in the last 5-10 years; highly monodisperse Si NCs can now be produced on the near gram scale. Scaled-up syntheses have allowed scientists to drive further toward the commercial utilization of Si NCs. The synthesis of doped Si NCs, through addition of a simple elemental precursor to a reaction mixture or by the production of a single source precursor, has shown great promise. Doped Si NCs have demonstrated unique or enhanced properties compared with pure Si NCs, for example, magnetism due to the presence of magnetic metals like Fe and Mn. Surface reactions have reached a new level of sophistication where organic (epoxidation and diol formation) and click (thiol based) chemical reactions can be carried out on attached surface molecules. This has led to a wide range of biocompatible functional groups as well as a degree of emission tuneability. The purification of Si NCs has been improved through the use of size separation columns and size selective precipitation. These purification approaches have yielded highly monodisperse and pure Si NCs previously unachieved. This has allowed scientists to study the size and surface dependent properties and toxicity and enabled the use of Si NCs in biomedical applications. The optical properties of Si NCs are complex. Using a combination of characterization techniques, researchers have explored the

  3. ZnO nanorod/CdS nanocrystal core/shell-type heterostructures for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerguerian, Gariné; Elhordoy, Fernando; Pereyra, Carlos J.; Marotti, Ricardo E.; Martín, Francisco; Leinen, Dietmar; Ramos-Barrado, José R.; Dalchiele, Enrique A.

    2011-12-01

    ZnO/CdS core/shell nanorod arrays were fabricated by a two-step method. Single-crystalline ZnO nanorod arrays were first electrochemically grown on SnO2:F (FTO) glass substrates. Then, CdS nanocrystals were deposited onto the ZnO nanorods, using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique, to form core/shell nanocable architectures. Structural, morphological and optical properties of the nanorod heterojunctions were investigated. The results indicate that CdS single-crystalline domains with a mean diameter of about 7 nm are uniformly and conformally covered on the surface of the single-crystalline ZnO nanorods. ZnO absorption with a bandgap energy value of 3.30 ± 0.02 eV is present in all optical transmittance spectra. Another absorption edge close to 500 nm corresponding to CdS with bandgap energy values between 2.43 and 2.59 eV is observed. The dispersion in this value may originate in quantum confinement inside the nanocrystalline material. The appearance of both edges corresponds with the separation of ZnO and CdS phases and reveals the absorption increase due to CdS sensitizer. The photovoltaic performance of the resulting ZnO/CdS core/shell nanorod arrays has been investigated as solar cell photoanodes in a photoelectrochemical cell under white illumination. In comparison with bare ZnO nanorod arrays, a 13-fold enhancement in photoactivity was observed using the ZnO/CdS coaxial heterostructures.

  4. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystal coating on biodegradable microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Masahiro [Department of Bioengineering, Advanced Medical Engineering Center, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Furuzono, Tsutomu, E-mail: furuzono@ri.ncvc.go.jp [Department of Bioengineering, Advanced Medical Engineering Center, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Nano-sized single crystals of calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) were uniformly coated on poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) microspheres through the ionic interaction between calcium ions on the HAp nanocrystal and carboxyl groups on the PLLA microsphere. In order to coat the substrate with HAp nanocrystals through ionic interaction, the surfaces of the PLLA microspheres were hydrolyzed in an alkaline aqueous solution at pH 11.0 for 1 h at room temperature. The interaction between the HAp nanocrystals and the carboxyl groups originating from PLLA end groups was estimated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The alkali-treated PLLA microspheres were coated with HAp nanocrystals by immersing the microspheres in an ethanol dispersion of HAp nanocrystals followed by washing in an ultrasonic bath.

  5. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  6. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high-dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second.

  7. TiO2-CdS Nanocomposites: Effect of CdS Oxidation on the Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites TiO2-CdS with different relative contents of CdS (molar ratios Cd/Ti = 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.5 were studied. The structural, photophysical, and chemical properties were investigated using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, GSDR, and LIL. XRD and Raman results confirmed the presence of TiO2 and CdS with intensities dependent on the ratio Cd/Ti. The presence of CdSO4 was detected by XPS at the surface of all TiO2-CdS composites. The relative amount of sulphate was dependent on the CdS loading. Luminescence time-resolved spectra clearly proved the existence of an excitation transfer process from CdS to TiO2 through the luminescence emission from TiO2 after excitation of CdS at λexc=410 nm, where no direct excitation of TiO2 occurs. Photodegradation of a series of aromatic carboxylic acids—benzoic, salicylic, 4-bromobenzoic, 3-phenylpropionic, and veratric acids—showed a great enhancement in the photocatalytic efficiency of the TiO2-CdS composites, which is due, mainly, to the effect of the charge carriers’ increased lifetime. In addition, it was shown that the oxidation of CdS to CdSO4 did not result in the deactivation of the photocatalytic properties and even contributed to enhance the degradation efficiency.

  8. Noncovalent functionalization of graphene by CdS nanohybrids for electrochemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qi, Wei, E-mail: qiwei@tju.edu.cn [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Su, Rongxin [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Zhimin [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Graphene–CdS (GR–CdS) nanocomposites were synthesized via a noncovalent functionalization process. To retain the intrinsic electronic and mechanical properties of graphene, the pristine graphene was firstly modified with 1-aminopyrene based on a strong π–π bond between the pyrenyl groups and the carbon rings of the graphene. Then the CdS nanocrystals were uniformly grown on the amino-graphene. The GR–CdS nanocomposites were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A glucose biosensor was then fabricated based on the as-prepared GR–CdS nanocomposite by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) in a chitosan thin film on a glassy carbon electrode. Direct electron transfer between GOD and the electrode was achieved and the biosensor showed good electrocatalytic activity with glucose ranging from 0.5 to 7.5 mM and a sensitivity of 45.4 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. This work provided a simple and nondestructive functionalization strategy to fabricate graphene-based hybrid nanomaterials and it is expected that this composite film may find more potential applications in biosensors and biocatalysis. - Highlights: • A simple noncovalent approach to synthesize graphene–CdS (GR–CdS) nanocomposites • Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase based on synergistic effect of GR–CdS • A sensitive glucose biosensor was fabricated based on the GR–CdS hybrids.

  9. Strain-dependent photoluminescence behavior in three geometries of CdSe/CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina L; Koski, Kristie J; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2009-05-26

    In recent years, a new generation of quantum confined colloidal semiconductor structures has emerged, with more complex shapes than simple quantum dots1, 2. These include nanorods3 and tetrapods4. Beyond shape, it is also now possible to spatially vary the electron and hole potentials within these nanoparticles by varying the composition. Examples of these new structures include seeded dots, rods, and tetrapods, which contain a CdSe core embedded within a CdS shell5, 6. These structures may have many uses beyond those envisioned for simple quantum dots, which are frequently employed in luminescent applications7. This paper is concerned with changes in the optoelectronic properties of tetrapods when the arms are bent. We demonstrate that seeded tetrapods can serve as an optical strain gauge, capable of measuring forces on the order of nanonewtons. We anticipate that a nanocrystal strain gauge with optical readout will be useful for applications ranging from sensitive optomechanical devices to biological force investigations.

  10. Radiative and nonradiative pathways in multiexciton recombination in giant nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malko, Anton; Sampat, Siddharth; Htoon, Han; Vela-Becerra, Javier; Chen, Yongfen; Hollingsworth, Jennifer; Klimov, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Recently,footnotetextY. Chen et al., JACS 130, 5026 (2008) we developed ``giant'' nanocrystal quantum dots (g-NQDs), in which a small emitting core of CdSe is overcoated with a thick shell of a wider-gap CdS. We conduct room-temp measurements of photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes in such g-NQDs as a function of excitation power and a number of shell monolayers. At low pump levels, corresponding to excitation of less than 1 exciton per dot on average (>1, fast (˜1ns) PL component appeared, accompanied by a transition to a sub-linear scaling of PL intensity with . Our findings indicate that while g-NQDs indeed produce suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination,footnotetextF. Garcia-Santamaria et al., Nanoletters 9, 3482 (2009) this suppression is incomplete. We conduct systematic studies of relative efficiencies of nonradiative and radiative processes in these nanostructures.

  11. Photocatalytic efficiency analysis of CdS nanoparticles with modified electronic states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weon-Sik Chae

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available For the photooxidative reaction of olefin, colloidal CdS nanoparticles (NPs show enhanced efficiency of photocatalytic activity compared to bulk CdS. We find that the enhanced activity is due to the enlarged surface area of the colloidal CdS NPs as well as enhanced energetic coupling between the colloidal CdS NPs and the olefin molecules. Photocatalytic activity is reduced in the case that CdS NPs are encapsulated in mesoporous silica nanopores.

  12. Hot electron induced NIR detection in CdS films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-03-11

    We report the use of random Au nanoislands to enhance the absorption of CdS photodetectors at wavelengths beyond its intrinsic absorption properties from visible to NIR spectrum enabling a high performance visible-NIR photodetector. The temperature dependent annealing method was employed to form random sized Au nanoparticles on CdS films. The hot electron induced NIR photo-detection shows high responsivity of ~780 mA/W for an area of ~57 μm(2). The simulated optical response (absorption and responsivity) of Au nanoislands integrated in CdS films confirms the strong dependence of NIR sensitivity on the size and shape of Au nanoislands. The demonstration of plasmon enhanced IR sensitivity along with the cost-effective device fabrication method using CdS film enables the possibility of economical light harvesting applications which can be implemented in future technological applications.

  13. Photoelectrochemical glucose biosensor incorporating CdS nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinjie Sun; Yihua Zhu; Xiaoling Yang; Chunzhong Li

    2009-01-01

    A novel photoelectrochemical biosensor incorporating nanosized CdS semiconductor crystals with enzyme to enhance photochemical reaction has been investigated. CdS nanoparticles were synthesized by using dendrimer PAMAM as inner templates. The CdS nanoparticles and glucose oxidase (GOD) were immobilized on Pt electrode via layer-by-layer (LbL) technique to fabricate a biological-inorganic hybrid system. Under ultraviolet light, the photo-effect of the CdS nanoparticles showed enhancement of the biosensor to detect glucose. Pt nanoparticles were mixed into the Nation film to immobilize the CdS/enzyme composites and to improve the charge transfer of the hybrid, Experimental results demonstrate the desirable characteristics of this biosensing system, e.g. a sensitivity of 1.83 μA/(mM cm~2), lower detection limit (1 μM), and acceptable reproducibility and stability.

  14. Ordered Mesostructured CdS Nanowire Arrays with Rectifying Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Na

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Highly ordered mesoporous CdS nanowire arrays were synthesized by using mesoporous silica as hard template and cadmium xanthate (CdR2 as a single precursor. Upon etching silica, mesoporous CdS nanowire arrays were produced with a yield as high as 93 wt%. The nanowire arrays were characterized by XRD, N2adsorption, TEM, and SEM. The results show that the CdS products replicated from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 hard template possess highly ordered hexagonal mesostructure and fiber-like morphology, analogous to the mother template. The current–voltage characteristics of CdS nanoarrays are strongly nonlinear and asymmetrical, showing rectifying diode-like behavior.

  15. ZnO tetrapod nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus C. Newton

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ZnO has received considerable attention because of its unique optical, piezoelectric, and magnetic properties. It also readily self-assembles into a family of nanocrystalline structures. We review the current status of research into ZnO tetrapod nanocrystals. These crystals consist of a ZnO core in the zinc blende structure from which four ZnO arms in the wurtzite structure radiate. The arms are cylinders of hexagonal cross section, with each arm of equal length and diameter. Possible applications in optoelectronics, photovoltaics, spintronics, and piezoelectricity are discussed.

  16. LAMDA at TREC CDS track 2015: Clinical Decision Support Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-20

    biomedical literature retrieval for clinical cases: a survey of the TREC 2014 CDS track," Information Retrieval Journal , pp. 1-36. [2] M. S. Simpson and...LAMDA at TREC CDS track 2015 Clinical Decision Support Track Moon Soo Cha, Woo-Jin Han, Garam Lee, Minsung Kim, Kyung-Ah Sohn* Department of...Information and Computer Engineering Ajou University Suwon, Republic of Korea (ckanstnzja; data; piratekl; kimmsql; kasohn)@ajou.ac.kr Abstract

  17. Intraday dynamics of euro area sovereign CDS and bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob Gyntelberg; Peter Hördahl; Kristyna Ters; Jörg Urban

    2013-01-01

    The recent sovereign debt crisis in the euro area has seen credit spreads on sovereign bonds and credit default swaps (CDS) surge for a number of member states. While these events have increased interest in understanding the dynamics of sovereign spreads in bond and CDS markets, there is little agreement in the literature as to whether one of the two markets is more important than the other in terms of price discovery of sovereign credit risk.

  18. Summer Student Project: Collecting and disseminating CDS KPIs

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez Perez, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    CDS (CERN Document Server) stores over 900,000 bibliographic records, including 360,000 fulltext documents, of interest to people working in particle physics and related areas. My project consisted on extracting KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) from it and feeding them to a central IT KPI system. To achieve this, I learned the CDS-Invenio open source digital library software, and worked with its statistic module.

  19. Cr/alpha-Cr2O3 monodispersed spherical core-shell particles based solar absorbers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khamlich, S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Monodispersed spherical core-shell particles of Cr/alpha-Cr2O3 cermet ACG coatings investigated within this contribution could be successfully employed in thermal converters. Their selectivity depends on their chemical, physical and structural...

  20. Facile and Scalable Synthesis of Monodispersed Spherical Capsules with a Mesoporous Shell

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2010-05-11

    Monodispersed HMSs with tunable particle size and shell thickness were successfully synthesized using relatively concentrated polystyrene latex templates and a silica precursor in a weakly basic ethanol/water mixture. The particle size of the capsules can vary from 100 nm to micrometers. These highly engineered monodispersed capsules synthesized by a facile and scalable process may find applications in drug delivery, catalysis, separationm or as biological and chemical microreactors. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Preparation of Monodisperse Nanoparticle of Layered Double Hydroxides and Polyoxyethylene Sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huizhong; QIN Lianjie; ZHANG Hong; YANG Qinzheng; YANG Jing

    2005-01-01

    In order to obtain the bio-molecule/ LDHs nanocomposites having regular crystal structure,three nanocomposites of layered double hydroxides and polyoxyethylene sulfates were prepared by ion-exchange method. TEM analysis reveals that the monodisperse rigid .sphere of approximately 200 nm in diameter could be gotten when the intergallery anion was PEGS-400. Such monodisperse nanoparticle could be used as a promising precursor for preparing bio-molecule/LDHs nanocomposites.

  2. Quantum theory of electroabsorption in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepliakov, Nikita V; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2016-01-25

    We develop a simple quantum-mechanical theory of interband absorption by semiconductor nanocrystals exposed to a dc electric field. The theory is based on the model of noninteracting electrons and holes in an infinitely deep quantum well and describes all the major features of electroabsorption, including the Stark effect, the Franz-Keldysh effect, and the field-induced spectral broadening. It is applicable to nanocrystals of different shapes and dimensions (quantum dots, nanorods, and nanoplatelets), and will prove useful in modeling and design of electrooptical devices based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  3. Size quantization in Cu2Se nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindraju, S.; Kalenga, M. P.; Airo, M.; Moloto, M. J.; Sikhwivhilu, L. M.; Moloto, N.

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report on the synthesis of size quantized copper selenide nanocrystals via the colloidal method. Different colours of the sample were obtained at different time intervals indicative of the sizes of the nanocrystals. The absorption band edges were blue-shifted from bulk indicative of quantum confinement. This was corroborated by the TEM results that showed very small particles ranging from 2 nm to 7 nm. This work therefore shows a phenomenon readily observed in cadmium chalcogenide nanocrystals but has never been reported for copper based chalcogenides.

  4. Sigmoidal diagnostics with SOHO/CDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zanna, G.; Gibson, S. E.; Mason, H. E.; Pike, C. D.; Mandrini, C. H.

    During the third Whole Sun Month Campaign (August 18 - September 14, 1999), the evolution of the active region NOAA 8668 was followed during its meridian passage and at the limb (Sigmoid JOP 106), with simultaneous observations with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and with other instruments, both satellite and ground-based. On August 21st, a small flare, associated with a brightening of the sigmoidal structure, occurred. SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) observations of this small flare are presented. Coronal temperatures and densities of the sigmoid are estimated. High transition region densities (in the range 2.5-7 × 10 11 cm -3), obtained using O IV, are present in the brightenings associated with the flare. At coronal level, high temperatures of at least 8 MK were reached, as shown by strong Fe XIX emission. After this small flare, relatively strong blue-shifts (⋍ 30 km/s) are observed in coronal lines, located at the two ends of a small loop system associated with the sigmoid.

  5. One-pot synthesis of Size-Controllable core-shell CdS and derivative CdS@ZnxCd1-xS structures for dramatic Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Shuangshuang; Xi, Baojuan; Wang, Yifeng; Xiong, Shenglin

    2017-09-18

    Chalcogenide micro/nano composite structures have been attracting world-wide attention due to the enormous prospect of applications in photocatalytic hydrogen production. Well-defined micro/nanostructures, featured with predominant properties, are of extraordinary importance. Herein, we reported a facile one-pot method on synthesis of monodispersed size-controllable CdS and CdS@ZnxCd1-xS core-shell submicrospheres, which were engineered with respect to the structural conformation and size. CdS core-shell submicrospheres with different size were selectively prepared for the first time. The growth mechanism was investigated in detail by monitoring the time-dependent morphology of intermediates via TEM technique. By introduction of zinc precursor in the synthetic system, CdS@ZnxCd1-xS core-double shell submicrospheres had been obtained by cation exchange of CdS with zinc ions, experiencing the process of diffusion of CdS towards outside and transformation of ZnxCd1-xS crystallites. The H2 evolution rate over CdS@CdxZn1-xS (5.17 mmol h-1 g -1) is 12.3 times that of CdS core-shell (0.42 mmol h- 1 g -1) under visible light, owing to the efficient charge separation demonstrated by the electrochemical impedance and transient-state time-resolved photoluminescence spectra. Furthermore, CdS@ZnxCd1-xS core-double shell structures exhibited excellent stability over 20 h hydrogen production. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Periodic jetting and monodisperse jet drops from oblique gas injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Oliver; Gaillard, Antoine; Bird, James C.

    2017-07-01

    When air is blown in a straw or tube near an air-liquid interface, typically one of two behaviors is observed: a dimple in the liquid's surface, or a frenzy of sputtering bubbles, waves, and spray. Here we report and characterize an intermediate regime that can develop when a confined air jet enters the interface at an angle. This regime is oscillatory with a distinct characteristic frequency and can develop periodic angled jets that can break up into monodisperse aerosols. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this highly periodic regime are not well understood. Here we flow a continuous stream of gas through a tube near a liquid surface, observing both optically and acoustically the deformation of the liquid-air interface as various parameters are systematically adjusted. We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is responsible for the inception of waves within a cavity formed by the gas. Inertia, gravity, and capillary forces both shape the cavity and govern the frequency and amplitude of these gas-induced cavity waves. The flapping cavity focuses the waves into a series of periodic jets that can break up into droplets following the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. We present scaling arguments to rationalize the fundamental frequencies driving this system, as well as the conditions that bound the periodic regime. These frequencies and conditions compare well with our experimental results.

  7. Jamming of Monodisperse Cylindrical Grains in Featureless Vertical Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Nicholas; Baxter, G. William

    2014-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains falling through a featureless vertical channel under the influence of gravity. These grains have an aspect-ratio less than two (H/D aspirin tablets, 35mm film canisters, poker chips, or coins. Monodisperse grains are allowed to fall under the influence of gravity through a uniform channel of square cross-section where the channel width is greater than the grain size and constant along the length of the channel. No combination of grain heights and diameters is equal to the channel width. Collections of grains sometimes form jams, stable structures in which the grains are supported by the channel walls and not by grains or walls beneath them. The probability of a jam occurring and the jam's strength are influenced by the grain dimensions and channel width. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  8. Biotemplate synthesis of monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Li, Dongxu

    2010-03-01

    Monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres with a high degree of crystallization were prepared through a facile in situ deposition method using rape pollen grains as a biotemplate. The functional group on the surface of the pollen grains could adsorb Fe(3+), which provided the nucleation sites for growth of iron phosphate nanoparticles. After being sintered at 600 degrees C for 10 h, the pollen grains were removed and iron phosphate hollow microspheres were obtained. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction were applied to characterize the morphology and crystalline structure of the pollen grains, iron phosphate-coated pollen grains and iron phosphate hollow microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravity analyses were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the iron phosphate-coated pollen grains during the calcinations. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the interaction between the pollen grains and iron phosphate. The effect of the pollen wall on the surface morphology of these iron phosphate hollow microspheres was also proven in this work.

  9. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael Edward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  10. Ultrasonically Aided Electrospray source for monodisperse, charged nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weidong

    This dissertation presents a new method of producing nearly monodisperse electrospray using charged capillary standing waves. This method, based on the Ultrasonically Aided Electrospraying (UAE) technology concept invented by the author, includes the steps of dispensing a liquid on the top surface of a diaphragm so as to form a liquid film on the surface of the diaphragm, setting the diaphragm into vibration using piezoelectric transducers so as to induce capillary standing waves in the liquid film, applying electric charge to the capillary standing waves so that electrospray is extracted from the crests of the capillary standing waves. Theoretical analysis on the formation of charged particles from charged capillary standing waves at critically stable condition is performed. An experimental UAE system is designed, built, and tested and the performance of this new technology concept is assessed. Experimental results validate the capabilities of the UAE concept. The method has several applications including electric space propulsion, nano particulate technologies, nanoparticle spray coating and painting techniques, semiconductor fabrication and biomedical processes. Two example applications in electric space propulsion and nanoparticle spray coating are introduced.

  11. Spark Ignition of Monodisperse Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Allen M.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Namer, Izak

    1987-01-01

    A study of spark ignition energy requirements was conducted with a monodisperse spray system allowing independent control of droplet size, equivalent ratio, and fuel type. Minimum ignition energies were measured for n-heptane and methanol sprays characterized at the spark gap in terms of droplet diameter, equivalence ratio (number density) and extent of prevaporization. In addition to sprays, minimum ignition energies were measured for completely prevaporized mixtures of the same fuels over a range of equivalence ratios to provide data at the lower limit of droplet size. Results showed that spray ignition was enhanced with decreasing droplet size and increasing equivalence ratio over the ranges of the parameters studied. By comparing spray and prevaporized ignition results, the existence of an optimum droplet size for ignition was indicated for both fuels. Fuel volatility was seen to be a critical factor in spray ignition. The spray ignition results were analyzed using two different empirical ignition models for quiescent mixtures. Both models accurately predicted the experimental ignition energies for the majority of the spray conditions. Spray ignition was observed to be probabilistic in nature, and ignition was quantified in terms of an ignition frequency for a given spark energy. A model was developed to predict ignition frequencies based on the variation in spark energy and equivalence ratio in the spark gap. The resulting ignition frequency simulations were nearly identical to the experimentally observed values.

  12. Biotemplate synthesis of monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Feng; Li Dongxu, E-mail: dongxuli@njut.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Jiangsu Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres with a high degree of crystallization were prepared through a facile in situ deposition method using rape pollen grains as a biotemplate. The functional group on the surface of the pollen grains could adsorb Fe{sup 3+}, which provided the nucleation sites for growth of iron phosphate nanoparticles. After being sintered at 600 deg. C for 10 h, the pollen grains were removed and iron phosphate hollow microspheres were obtained. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction were applied to characterize the morphology and crystalline structure of the pollen grains, iron phosphate-coated pollen grains and iron phosphate hollow microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravity analyses were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the iron phosphate-coated pollen grains during the calcinations. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the interaction between the pollen grains and iron phosphate. The effect of the pollen wall on the surface morphology of these iron phosphate hollow microspheres was also proven in this work.

  13. Formation of monodisperse mesoporous silica microparticles via spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Kathryn; Wu, Winston Duo; Wu, Zhangxiong; Liu, Wenjie; Selomulya, Cordelia; Zhao, Dongyuan; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2014-03-15

    In this work, a protocol to synthesize monodisperse mesoporous silica microparticles via a unique microfluidic jet spray-drying route is reported for the first time. The microparticles demonstrated highly ordered hexagonal mesostructures with surface areas ranging from ~900 up to 1500 m(2)/g and pore volumes from ~0.6 to 0.8 cm(3)/g. The particle size could be easily controlled from ~50 to 100 μm from the same diameter nozzle via changing the initial solute content, or changing the drying temperature. The ratio of the surfactant (CTAB) and silica (TEOS), and the amount of water in the precursor were found to affect the degree of ordering of mesopores by promoting either the self-assembly of the surfactant-silica micelles or the condensation of the silica as two competing processes in evaporation induced self-assembly. The drying rate and the curvature of particles also affected the self-assembly of the mesostructure. The particle mesostructure is not influenced by the inlet drying temperature in the range of 92-160 °C, with even a relatively low temperature of 92 °C producing highly ordered mesoporous microparticles. The spray-drying derived mesoporous silica microparticles, while of larger sizes and more rapidly synthesized, showed a comparable performance with the conventional mesoporous silica MCM-41 in controlled release of a dye, Rhodamine B, indicating that these spray dried microparticles could be used for the immobilisation and controlled release of small molecules.

  14. Monodisperse droplet generation for microscale mass transfer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine; Rao, Rekha; Grillet, Anne; Jove-Colon, Carlos; Brooks, Carlton; Nemer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Understanding interfacial mass transport on a droplet scale is essential for modeling liquid-liquid extraction processes. A thin flow-focusing microfluidic channel is evaluated for generating monodisperse liquid droplets for microscale mass transport studies. Surface treatment of the microfluidic device allows creation of both oil in water and water in oil emulsions, facilitating a large parameter study of viscosity and flow rate ratios. The unusually thin channel height promotes a flow regime where no droplets form. Through confocal microscopy, this regime is shown to be highly influenced by the contact angle of the liquids with the channel. Drop sizes are found to scale with a modified capillary number. Liquid streamlines within the droplets are inferred by high speed imagery of microparticles dispersed in the droplet phase. Finally, species mass transfer to the droplet fluid is quantitatively measured using high speed imaging. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  15. Storage of optical excitations in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals; Speicherung optischer Anregungen in kolloidalen Halbleiter-Nanokristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Robert

    2009-07-22

    In the present theis it is described, how colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals can be used under influence of an electric field to store optical excitation energy at room temperature, to alter, and to supply controlledly. For this the photoluminescence emission of an ensemble of heterogeneous nanocrystals was manipulated and spectroscopically studied. The applied od-shaped particles consist of a spherical core of CdSe, on which an elongated shell of CdS is monocrystallinely be grown. The electron is in such an asymmetric geometry delocalized over the hole nanorod, whereas the hole because of the high potential barrier remains bound in the CdSe core. The wave-function overlap of the charge carriers can therefore be influenced both by the length of the nanorod and by an external electric field. In the regime of prompt fluorescence the manipulation of the charge-carrier separation by an electric field led to a suppression of the radiative recombination. As consequence a fluorescence suppression of about 40% could be observed. After the removal of the electric field the separation was reduced and the stored energy is in an fluorescence increasement directedly liberated again. The strength of the storage efficiency lies with the strength of the electric field in a linear connection. Furthermore in this time range a quantum-confined Stark effect of upt o 14 meV could be detected at room temperature, although the effect is complicated by the different orientations and sizes of the nanorods in the ensemble. Hereby it is of advance to can adress with the applied detection technique a subensemble of nanocrystals. Furthermore a significant storage of the ensmble emission by up to 100 {mu}s conditioned by the electric electric fieldcould be demonstrated, which exceeds the fluorescence lifetime of these particles by the 10{sup 5} fold. As also could be shown by experiments on CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals surface states play a relevent role for the emission dynamics of nanocrystals

  16. Chemical bath deposition of CdS thin films doped with Zn and Cu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A I Oliva; J E Corona; R Patiño; A I Oliva-Avilés

    2014-04-01

    Zn- and Cu-doped CdS thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by the chemical bath technique. ZnCl2 and CuCl2 were incorporated as dopant agents into the conventional CdS chemical bath in order to promote the CdS doping process. The effect of the deposition time and the doping concentration on the physical properties of CdS films were investigated. The morphology, thickness, bandgap energy, crystalline structure and elemental composition of Zn- and Cu-doped CdS films were investigated and compared to the undoped CdS films properties. Both Zn- and Cu-doped CdS films presented a cubic crystalline structure with (1 1 1) as the preferential orientation. Lower values of the bandgap energy were observed for the doped CdS films as compared to those of the undoped CdS films. Zn-doped CdS films presented higher thickness and roughness values than those of Cu-doped CdS films. From the photoluminescence results, it is suggested that the inclusion of Zn and Cu into CdS crystalline structure promotes the formation of acceptor levels above the CdS valence band, resulting in lower bandgap energy values for the doped CdS films.

  17. Doped Colloidal ZnO Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal ZnO nanocrystals are promising for a wide range of applications due to the combination of unique multifunctional nature and remarkable solution processability. Doping is an effective approach of enhancing the properties of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals in well-controlled manners. In this paper, we analyzed two synthetic strategies for the doped colloidal ZnO nanocrystals, emphasizing our understanding on the critical factors associated with the high temperature and nonaqueous approach. Latest advances of three topics, bandgap engineering, n-type doping, and dilute magnetic semiconductors related to doped ZnO nanocrystals were discussed to reveal the effects of dopants on the properties of the nanocrystalline materials.

  18. Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals in Silicon Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ferraioli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results on the photoluminescence properties of silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide are reviewed and discussed. The attention is focused on Si nanocrystals produced by high-temperature annealing of silicon rich oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of deposition parameters and layer thickness is analyzed in detail. The nanocrystal size can be roughly controlled by means of Si content and annealing temperature and time. Unfortunately, a technique for independently fine tuning the emission efficiency and the size is still lacking; thus, only middle size nanocrystals have high emission efficiency. Interestingly, the layer thickness affects the nucleation and growth kinetics so changing the luminescence efficiency.

  19. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  20. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size.

  1. Giant Raman gain in silicon nanocrystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirleto, Luigi; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Nikitin, Timur; Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    ... of next generation nonlinear photonic devices. Here we report the first observation of stimulated Raman scattering in silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silica matrix under non-resonant excitation at infrared wavelengths (~1.5 μm...

  2. Gas phase grown silicon germanium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, A.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Kaiser, M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the gas phase synthesis of highly crystalline and homogeneously alloyed Si1-xGex nanocrystals in continuous and pulsed plasmas. Agglomerated nanocrystals have been produced with remarkable control over their composition by altering the precursor GeH4 gas flow in a continuous plasma. We specially highlight that in the pulsed plasma mode, we obtain quantum-sized free standing alloy nanocrystals with a mean size of 7.3 nm. The presence of Si1-xGex alloy particles is confirmed with multiple techniques, i.e. Raman spectroscopy, XRD (Xray diffraction) and HRTEM (high resolution transmission electron microscopy) studies, with each of these methods consistently yielding the same composition. The nanocrystals synthesized here have potential applications in band-gap engineering for multijunction solar cells.

  3. Heavily Doped Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Mocatta; Guy Cohen; Jonathan Schattner; Oded Millo; Eran Rabani; Uri Banin

    2011-01-01

    ... of fundamental understanding of this heavily doped limit under strong quantum confinement. We developed a method to dope semiconductor nanocrystals with metal impurities, enabling control of the band gap and Fermi energy...

  4. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, K.; Liepins, J.; Gavare, M.; Patmalnieks, A.; Gruduls, A.; Jankovica, D.

    2012-08-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  5. Charge transport in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzel, Tamar Shoshana

    In this thesis, we study charge transport in arrays of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots. Nanocrystals are synthesized in solution, and an organic ligand on the surface of the nanocrystal creates a potential barrier that confines charges in the nanocrystal. Optical absorption measurements reveal discrete electronic energy levels in the nanocrystals resulting from quantum confinement. When nanocrystals are deposited on a surface, they self-assemble into a close-packed array forming a nanocrystal solid. We report electrical transport measurements of a PbSe nanocrystal solid that serves as the channel of an inverted field-effect transistor. We measure the conductance as a function of temperature, source-drain bias and. gate voltage. The data indicates that holes are the majority carriers; the Fermi energy lies in impurity states in the bandgap of the nanocrystal; and charges hop between the highest occupied valence state in the nanocrystals (the 1S h states). At low source-drain voltages, the activation energy for hopping is given by the energy required to generate holes in the 1Sh state plus activation over barriers resulting from site disorder. The barriers from site disorder are eliminated with a sufficiently high source-drain bias. From the gate effect, we extract the Thomas-Fermi screening length and a density of states that is consistent with the estimated value. We consider variable-range hopping as an alternative model, and find no self-consistent evidence for it. Next, we employ charge sensing as an alternative to current measurements for studying transport in materials with localized sites. A narrow-channel MOSFET serves as a charge sensor because its conductance is sensitive to potential fluctuations in the nearby environment caused by the motion of charge. In particular, it is sensitive to the fluctuation of single electrons at the silicon-oxide interface within the MOSFET. We pattern a strip of amorphous germanium within 100 nm of the transistor. The

  6. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. Keywords: sources of cellulose, mechanical properties, liquid crystalline nature, surface modification, nanocomposites 

  7. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  8. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  9. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Neng; DING Enyong; CHENG Rongshi

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the dispersibility of cellulose nanocrystal(CNC) particles,three difierent grafted reactions of acetylation,hydroxyethylation and hydroxypropylation were introduced to modify the CNC surface.The main advantages of these methods were the simple and easily controlled reaction conditions,and the dispersibility of the resulting products was distinctly improved.The properties of the modified CNC were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR),13 C nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR),transmission electron microscopy(TEM)and thermogravimetric analyses(TGA).The results indicated mat after desiccation,the modification products could be dispersed again in the proper solvents by ultrasonic treatments,and the diameter of their particles had no obvious changes.However,their thermal degradation behaviors were quite different.The initial decomposition temperature of the modified products via hydroxyethylation or hydroxypropylation was lower than that of modified products via acetylation.

  10. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, monodispersed CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs of size 8.5 ± 1.0, 11.4 ± 1.0 and 15.4 ± 1.0 nm were synthesized using the sol-gel method. Size-dependent structural, optical and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, ultra-violet visible (UV-VIS spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM measurements. The value of optical band gap is calculated for each particle size. The decrease in the value of optical band gap with increase of particle size may be attributed to the quantum confinement, which causes to produce localized states created by the oxygen vacancies due to the conversion of Ce4+ into Ce3+ at higher calcination temperature. The Raman spectra showed a peak at ∼461 cm-1 for the particle size 8.5 nm, which is attributed to the 1LO phonon mode. The shift in the Raman peak could be due to lattice strain developed due to variation in particle size. Weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is observed for each particle size. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms, coercivity (Hc and retentivity (Mr are increased with increase of particle size. The increase of Ms and Mr for larger particle size may be explained by increase of density of oxygen vacancies at higher calcination temperature. The latter causes high concentrations of Ce3+ ions activate more coupling between the individual magnetic moments of the Ce ions, leading to an increase of Ms value with the particle size. Moreover, the oxygen vacancies may also produce magnetic moment by polarizing spins of f electrons of cerium (Ce ions located around oxygen vacancies, which causes ferromagnetism in pure CeO2 samples.

  11. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Ojha, Animesh K. [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad-211004 (India); Srivastava, Manish, E-mail: 84.srivastava@gmail.com, E-mail: manish-mani84@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Singh, Jay [Department of Applied Chemistry and Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Layek, Samar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Yashpal, Madhu [Electron Microscope Facility, Department of Anatomy Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Materny, Arnulf [Center for Functional Materials and Nanomolecular Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In the present study, monodispersed CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) of size 8.5 ± 1.0, 11.4 ± 1.0 and 15.4 ± 1.0 nm were synthesized using the sol-gel method. Size-dependent structural, optical and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), ultra-violet visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements. The value of optical band gap is calculated for each particle size. The decrease in the value of optical band gap with increase of particle size may be attributed to the quantum confinement, which causes to produce localized states created by the oxygen vacancies due to the conversion of Ce{sup 4+} into Ce{sup 3+} at higher calcination temperature. The Raman spectra showed a peak at ∼461 cm{sup -1} for the particle size 8.5 nm, which is attributed to the 1LO phonon mode. The shift in the Raman peak could be due to lattice strain developed due to variation in particle size. Weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is observed for each particle size. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms), coercivity (Hc) and retentivity (Mr) are increased with increase of particle size. The increase of Ms and Mr for larger particle size may be explained by increase of density of oxygen vacancies at higher calcination temperature. The latter causes high concentrations of Ce{sup 3+} ions activate more coupling between the individual magnetic moments of the Ce ions, leading to an increase of Ms value with the particle size. Moreover, the oxygen vacancies may also produce magnetic moment by polarizing spins of f electrons of cerium (Ce) ions located around oxygen vacancies, which causes ferromagnetism in pure CeO{sub 2} samples.

  12. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  13. Solvothermal growth of single-crystal CdS nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Mahdi; J J Hassan; S J Kasim; S S Ng; Z Hassan

    2014-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires (NWs) were prepared by the solvothermal method using ethylenedi-amine as a solvent. Two sets of CdS NWs were synthesized at 160 and 200° C for various reaction durations (3.5, 7 and 24 h). Scanning/tunneling electron microscopy was used to examine the surface morphology of the grown NWs. Their dimensions are found to depend on the reaction temperature and duration. The CdS NWs grown at 200° C for all durations are longer than those prepared at 160° C, with diameters ranging from 15 to 40 nm. A three-armed structure is exhibited by all the samples. The grown CdS NWs display a hexagonal wurtzite phase and grows along the 001 direction. The optical absorption of the grown NWs shows a sharp absorption edge with a blueshift, which indicates an expansion of the optical band gap. All prepared samples show two emission peaks in their photoluminescence spectra. The emission peak location depends on the reaction temperature and duration. The CdS NWs prepared at 160° C show a sharp band–band emission compared with those prepared at 200° C. Raman analysis indicates that the optical properties of the grown NWs are enhanced with increased temperature and reaction duration.

  14. Optical switches based on CdS single nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Yi [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, 174 Shapingba Street, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Hu, Chenguo, E-mail: hucg@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, 174 Shapingba Street, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zheng, Chunhua; Zhang, Hulin [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, 174 Shapingba Street, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Rusen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Tian, Yongshu [Chongqing Communication College, Chongqing 400035 (China)

    2010-10-15

    CdS nanowires have been synthesized by a composite-hydroxide-mediated approach. The characterization of the nanowire with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy indicated a single-crystalline hexagonal structure growing along [21-bar 1-bar 0] direction with length up to 100 {mu}m. The UV-visible reflection spectrum demonstrated a band gap of 2.36 eV. A strong light emission centered at 543 nm was observed under different excitation wavelengths of 300, 320, 360 and 400 nm, which was further confirmed by a bright fluorescent imaging of a single CdS nanowire. The photocurrent response based on a single CdS nanowire showed distinct optical switch under the intermittent illumination of white light. The rise and decay time were less than 1.0 and 0.2 s, respectively, indicating high crystallization with fewer trap centers in the CdS nanowires. It is possible that the undesirable trapping effects on grain-boundaries for photoconductors could be avoided thanks to the single-crystalline nature of the CdS nanowires.

  15. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (properties. We observe the BaTiO3 nanocrystals crystallize with evidence of tetragonality. Electric field dependent polarization measurements show spontaneous polarization and hysteresis, indicating ferroelectric behavior for the BaTiO 3 nanocrystalline films with grain sizes in the range of 10--30 nm. Dielectric measurements of the films show dielectic constants in the range of 85--90 over the 1 kHz--100 kHz, with low loss. We present nanocrystals as initial building blocks for the preparation of thin films which exhibit uniform nanostructured morphologies and grain sizes. In the second part of this chapter, a nonhydrolytic alcoholysis route to study the preparation of well-crystallized size-tunable BaTiO3 nanocrystals is presented. Different surfactants of amines, carboxylic acids, and alcohols were used to study the effect of size and morphological control over the nanocrystals. Techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission

  16. Cross-linked branching nanohybrid polymer electrolyte with monodispersed TiO2 nanoparticles for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Jinfang; Xu, Mingquan; Xia, Qingbing; Liu, Jiatu; Zhao, Shuai; Chen, Libao; Pan, Anqiang; Ivey, Douglas G.; Wei, Weifeng

    2016-06-01

    Nanohybrid polymer electrolytes (NHPE) with ceramic particles have attracted significant attention owing to their improvement in electrochemical performance. However, particle aggregation and weak nanoparticle/polymer matrix interaction restrict their further application in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We demonstrate a facile in-situ polymerization/crystallization method to synthesize a homogeneous TiO2-grafted NHPE with a cross-linked branching structure, comprised of ion-conducting poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) and non-polar stearyl methacrylate (SMA). This technique is different from existing methods of blending functionalized ceramic particles into the polymer matrix. Highly monodispersed TiO2 nanocrystals enhance the effective interfacial interactions between particles and polymer matrix, which suppress the crystallization of ethylene oxide (EO) groups and facilitate forming continuously interconnected ion-conducting channels. Moreover, an increased dissociation degree of Li salt can also be achieved. The TiO2-grafted NHPE exhibits superior electrochemical properties with an ionic conductivity of 1.1 × 10-4 S cm-1 at 30 °C, a high lithium ion transference number and excellent interfacial compatibility with the lithium electrode. In particular, a lithium-ion battery based on TiO2-grafted NHPE demonstrates good C-rate performance, as well as excellent cycling stability with an initial discharge capacity of 153.5 mAh g-1 and a capacity retention of 96% after 300 cycles at 1 C (80 °C).

  17. PENERAPAN MICRO CDS/ISIS UNTUK PENGELOLAAN INFORMASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukasih Dardjat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Penggunaan komputer untuk penyimpanan dan pencarian kembali informasi sudah banyak dilakukan oleh beberapa perpustakaan, pusat informasi, pusat dokumentasi, dan lain-lain.CDS/ISIS (Computerized Documentation Systems/Integrated Set of Information Systems, adalah suatu sistem penyimpanan dan pencarian kembali informasi pada umumnya, yang dirancang secara khusus untuk pengelolaan pangkalan data yang bukan numerik (non-numerical data base dengan menggunakan komputer.Micro CDS/ISIS Software Package merupakan paket piranti lunak yang dikembangkan oleh Unesco (Copyright Unesco, 1985, yang sistem pengelolaannya dapat dioperasikan dengan menggunakan komputer mikro (IBM PC XT/AT, IBM Compatible, Olivetti PC, dan lain-lain.Paket perangkat lunak Nicro CDS/ISIS terdiri dari satu set program-program komputer yang setiap program mempunyai fungsi khusus untuk mengolah serta memproses elemen-elemen data yang berbeda sama sekali untuk menjadi suatu informasi tertentu yang sesuai dengan keinginan para pengguna.

  18. Photoluminescence studies of CdS layers for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemain, Frederique; Robin, Ivan-Christophe; Renet, Sebastien; Bernardi, Sergio [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-08-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on polycrystalline CdS films grown by close space sublimation (CSS) or by chemical bath deposition (CBD) in order to observe the evolution of emission features according to the deposition technique and post-deposition treatments. CdS is naturally n-type because of the presence of sulphur vacancies and in most of the observed samples, a donor-acceptor pair involving the sulfur vacancies could be identified at 1.65 eV. Different complexes emissions could be identified depending on the deposition technique and post-growth treatment. The best efficiencies were measured on CdTe/CdS based solar cells for which the CdS layer presents an excitonic donor bound PL peak as well as an emission corresponding to interstitial cadmium (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Optical sensor based on a single CdS nanobelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Shuming; Han, Feng; Wang, Liangjun; Zhang, Xiaotong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Pan, Anlian

    2014-04-23

    In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT) method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL) technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 10⁴, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  20. Optical Sensor Based on a Single CdS Nanobelt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 104, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  1. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claridge, Shelley A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  2. The CDS and the Government Bonds Markets During the Last Financial Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Križanič France

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Financial market had developed a special instrument to insure the buyers of bonds. This instrument is so called Credit Default Swap (CDS. The CDS price is a kind of insurance premium that the buyer of CDS pays to the seller of CDS in exchange for compensation of possible loss in operation. Paper analyses causality between CDS price and dynamics of bond yields and influence of macroeconomic factors on it in four selected countries during the last financial crisis. Analysis results show that there is no important macroeconomic variable included in the analysis that preceded the CDS prices connected with German government bonds. Sellers of CDS were apparently aware of the systemic nature of the financial crisis in the euro area. In the case of the United Kingdom, Russia and Slovenia we can observe the unemployment rate as the most important macroeconomic variable that preceded the CDS prices for government bonds.

  3. Growth and characterization of CdS crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    A growth method for the physical vapor transport of compound semiconductors in closed ampoules is described. With the unique techniques applied in the heat treatment of the starting materials and the temperature profiles provided by the three-zone translational furnace, large crystals of CdS have been grown successfully by the method at lower temperatures than previously used. Both unseeded and seeded growth have been investigated. The CdS crystals were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) to study the microstructure and the dislocation etch-pits. The crystals were further characterized by infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) transmission measurements.

  4. A CDO option market model on standardized CDS index tranches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    We provide a market model which implies a dynamic for standardized CDS index tranche spreads. This model is useful for pricing options on tranches with future Issue Dates as well as for modeling emerging options on struc- tured credit derivatives. With the upcoming regulation of the CDS market...... in perspective, the model presented here is also an attempt to face the e ects on pricing approaches provoked by an eventual Clearing Chamber . It becomes also possible to calibrate Index Tranche Options with bespoke tenors/tranche subordination to market data obtained by more liquid Index Tranche Options...

  5. Tuning of copper nanocrystals optical properties with their shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzemann, C; Brioude, A; Pileni, M-P

    2006-04-13

    Copper nanocrystals are obtained by chemical reduction of copper ions in mixed reverse micelles. A large excess of reducing agent favors producing a new generation of shaped copper nanocrystals as nanodisks, elongated nanocrystals, and cubes. By using UV-Visible spectroscopy and numerical optical simulations we demonstrate that the optical properties are tuned by the relative proportions of spheres and nanodisks.

  6. Metal halide solid-state surface treatment for nanocrystal materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Joseph M.; Crisp, Ryan; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-04-26

    Methods of treating nanocrystal and/or quantum dot devices are described. The methods include contacting the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots with a solution including metal ions and halogen ions, such that the solution displaces native ligands present on the surface of the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots via ligand exchange.

  7. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ujjal K Gautam; Bratindranath Mukherjee

    2006-02-01

    Water-soluble CuS nanocrystals and nanorods were prepared by reacting copper acetate with thioacetamide in the presence of different surfactants and capping agents. The size of the nanocrystals varied from 3–20 nm depending on the reaction parameters such as concentration, temperature, solvent and the capping agents. The formation of nanocrystals was studied by using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy.

  8. Microwave synthesis of high-quality and uniform 4 nm ZnFe2O4 nanocrystals for application in energy storage and nanomagnetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Suchomski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals with a narrow size distribution hold promise for many applications in different areas ranging from biomedicine to electronics and energy storage. Herein, the microwave-assisted sol–gel synthesis and thorough characterization of size-monodisperse zinc ferrite nanoparticles of spherical shape is reported. X-ray diffraction, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy all show that the material is both chemically and phase-pure and adopts a partially inverted spinel structure with Fe3+ ions residing on tetrahedral and octahedral sites according to (Zn0.32Fe0.68tet[Zn0.68Fe1.32]octO4±δ. Electron microscopy and direct-current magnetometry confirm the size uniformity of the nanocrystals, while frequency-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate the presence of a superspin glass state with a freezing temperature of about 22 K. Furthermore, as demonstrated by galvanostatic charge–discharge tests and ex situ X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy, the as-prepared zinc ferrite nanocrystals can be used as a high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, showing little capacity fade – after activation – over hundreds of cycles. Overall, in addition to the good material characteristics, it is remarkable that the microwave-based synthetic route is simple, easily reproducible and scalable.

  9. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m, which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  10. Titanium nitride: A new Ohmic contact material for n-type CdS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, A.; Battjes, H.; Machunze, R.; Dam, B.; Van de Krol, R.

    2011-01-01

    In devices based on CdS, indium is often used to make Ohmic contacts. Since indium is scarce and expensive, suitable replacement materials need to be found. In this work, we show that sputtered titanium nitride forms an Ohmic contact with n-type CdS. The CdS films, deposited with chemical bath depos

  11. Monodisperse, submicrometer droplets via condensation of microfluidic-generated gas bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minseok; Matsuura, Naomi

    2012-09-10

    Microfluidics (MFs) can produce monodisperse droplets with precise size control. However, the synthesis of monodisperse droplets much smaller than the minimum feature size of the microfluidic device (MFD) remains challenging, thus limiting the production of submicrometer droplets. To overcome the minimum micrometer-scale droplet sizes that can be generated using typical MFDs, the droplet material is heated above its boiling point (bp), and then MFs is used to produce monodisperse micrometer-scale bubbles (MBs) that are easily formed in the size regime where standard MFDs have excellent size control. After MBs are formed, they are cooled, condensing into dramatically smaller droplets that are beyond the size limit achievable using the original MFD, with a size decrease corresponding to the density difference between the gas and liquid phases of the droplet material. Herein, it is shown experimentally that monodisperse, submicrometer droplets of predictable sizes can be condensed from a monodisperse population of MBs as generated by MFs. Using perfluoropentane (PFP) as a representative solvent due to its low bp (29.2 °C), it is demonstrated that monodisperse PFP MBs can be produced at MFD temperatures >3.6 °C above the bp of PFP over a wide range of sizes (i.e., diameters from 2 to 200 μm). Independent of initial size, the generated MBs shrink rapidly in size from about 3 to 0 °C above the bp of PFP, corresponding to a phase change from gas to liquid, after which they shrink more slowly to form fully condensed droplets with diameters 5.0 ± 0.1 times smaller than the initial size of the MBs, even in the submicrometer size regime. This new method is versatile and flexible, and may be applied to any type of low-bp solvent for the manufacture of different submicrometer droplets for which precisely controlled dimensions are required.

  12. PREPARATION OF MONODISPERSE CROSSLINKED POLYMER MICROSPHERES HAVING CHLOROMETHYL GROUP BY DISTILLATION-PRECIPITATION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Feng Li; Xin-Lin Yang; Wen-Qiang Huang

    2005-01-01

    Monodisperse crosslinked poly(chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene) (poly(CMSt-co-DVB)) microspheres were prepared by distillation-precipitation copolymerization of chloromethylstyrene (CMSt) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in neat acetonitrile. The polymer particles had clean surfaces due to the absence of any added stabilizer. The size of the particles ranges from 2.59 μm to 3.19 μm and with mono-dispersity around 1.002-1.014. The effects of monomer feed in copolymerization on the microsphere formation were described. The polymer microspheres were characterized by SEM and chlorinity elemental analysis.

  13. A facile method to produce highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongliang; Wang, Chungang; Ma, Zhanfang; Su, Zhongmin

    2006-10-01

    Multiple shapes of nano- and micro-structured cystine aggregates, including spheres, rods, spindles, dendrites, and multipods, were easily synthesized just by adjusting the concentrations and pH values of L-Cysteine solutions under ultrasonic irritation. Importantly, highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates 225 nm in diameter without any other shapes were easily obtained for the system of 0.1 M L-Cysteine with pH 8. This will provide a very simple and effective approach to produce monodispersed cystine microspheres, which could promote new possibilities for future applications in biosensor, drug delivery, medicine, and the production of nanomaterials.

  14. A facile method to produce highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Hongliang; Wang Chungang; Ma Zhanfang; Su Zhongmin [Chemistry Department, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2006-10-28

    Multiple shapes of nano- and micro-structured cystine aggregates, including spheres, rods, spindles, dendrites, and multipods, were easily synthesized just by adjusting the concentrations and pH values of L-Cysteine solutions under ultrasonic irritation. Importantly, highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates 225 nm in diameter without any other shapes were easily obtained for the system of 0.1 M L-Cysteine with pH 8. This will provide a very simple and effective approach to produce monodispersed cystine microspheres, which could promote new possibilities for future applications in biosensor, drug delivery, medicine, and the production of nanomaterials.

  15. Designer Nanocrystal Materials for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Cherie

    Advances in synthetic methods allow a wide range of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to be tailored in size and shape and to be used as building blocks in the design of NC solids. However, the long, insulating ligands commonly employed in the synthesis of colloidal NCs inhibit strong interparticle coupling and charge transport once NCs are assembled into the solids state as NC arrays. We will describe the range of short, compact ligand chemistries we employ to exchange the long, insulating ligands used in synthesis and to increase interparticle coupling. These ligand exchange processes can have a dramatic influence on NC surface chemistry as well as NC organization in the solids, showing examples of short-range order. Synergistically, we use 1) thermal evaporation and diffusion and 2) wet-chemical methods to introduce extrinsic impurities and non-stoichiometry to passivate surface traps and dope NC solids. NC coupling and doping provide control over the density of states and the carrier type, concentration, mobility, and lifetime, which we characterize by a range of electronic and spectroscopic techniques. We will describe the importance of engineering device interfaces to design NC materials for solar photovoltaics.

  16. Prospects of nanoscience with nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V; Manna, Liberato; Cabot, Andreu; Hens, Zeger; Talapin, Dmitri V; Kagan, Cherie R; Klimov, Victor I; Rogach, Andrey L; Reiss, Peter; Milliron, Delia J; Guyot-Sionnnest, Philippe; Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Parak, Wolfgang J; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Korgel, Brian A; Murray, Christopher B; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs, i.e., crystalline nanoparticles) have become an important class of materials with great potential for applications ranging from medicine to electronic and optoelectronic devices. Today's strong research focus on NCs has been prompted by the tremendous progress in their synthesis. Impressively narrow size distributions of just a few percent, rational shape-engineering, compositional modulation, electronic doping, and tailored surface chemistries are now feasible for a broad range of inorganic compounds. The performance of inorganic NC-based photovoltaic and light-emitting devices has become competitive to other state-of-the-art materials. Semiconductor NCs hold unique promise for near- and mid-infrared technologies, where very few semiconductor materials are available. On a purely fundamental side, new insights into NC growth, chemical transformations, and self-organization can be gained from rapidly progressing in situ characterization and direct imaging techniques. New phenomena are constantly being discovered in the photophysics of NCs and in the electronic properties of NC solids. In this Nano Focus, we review the state of the art in research on colloidal NCs focusing on the most recent works published in the last 2 years.

  17. CdS films deposited by chemical bath under rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva-Aviles, A.I., E-mail: aoliva@mda.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Patino, R.; Oliva, A.I. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. A.P. 73-Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on rotating substrates by the chemical bath technique. The effects of the rotation speed on the morphological, optical, and structural properties of the films were discussed. A rotating substrate-holder was fabricated such that substrates can be taken out from the bath during the deposition. CdS films were deposited at different deposition times (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 min) onto Corning glass substrates at different rotation velocities (150, 300, 450, and 600 rpm) during chemical deposition. The chemical bath was composed by CdCl{sub 2}, KOH, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} and CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} as chemical reagents and heated at 75 deg. C. The results show no critical effects on the band gap energy and the surface roughness of the CdS films when the rotation speed changes. However, a linear increase on the deposition rate with the rotation energy was observed, meanwhile the stoichiometry was strongly affected by the rotation speed, resulting a better 1:1 Cd/S ratio as speed increases. Rotation effects may be of interest in industrial production of CdTe/CdS solar cells.

  18. SOHO/CDS observations of waves above the network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gömöry, P.; Rybák, J.; Kucera, A.; Curdt, W.; Wöhl, H.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze temporal variations in the intensities and the Doppler shifts of He i 584.33 Å (chromosphere), Ov 629.73 Å (transition region), and Mg ix 368.07 Å (corona) measured in and above chromospheric network near disk center with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the Solar and Hel

  19. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  20. Ag nanoparticle mediated growth of CdS nanobelts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreejith, K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)]. E-mail: ksreeju@rediffmail.com; Nuwad, J. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Thinaharan, C. [Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Pillai, C.G.S. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2007-06-30

    Catalytic growth of CdS have been carried out on large scale by evaporation of bulk CdS on Ag deposited Si (1 1 1) at atmospheric pressure. The as prepared CdS had wurtzite structure as evidenced by X-ray diffraction. The nanostructures were beltlike with several tens of micrometers length, several micrometers width and few nanometers to tens of nanometers thick as seen by scanning electron microscope and confirmed by TEM studies. The nanobelts were single crystalline in nature and showed reflection corresponding to (1 1 2) and (0 0 2) planes in SAED. The PL studies revealed the green band due to band gap emission and red band due to emission from the surface states. The higher intensity of the defect emission indicated the presence of considerable concentration of surface defects in the as prepared sample. The deposition of CdS could be explained on the basis of catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-solid mechanism.

  1. Ag nanoparticle mediated growth of CdS nanobelts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K.; Nuwad, J.; Thinaharan, C.; Dey, G. K.; Pillai, C. G. S.

    2007-06-01

    Catalytic growth of CdS have been carried out on large scale by evaporation of bulk CdS on Ag deposited Si (1 1 1) at atmospheric pressure. The as prepared CdS had wurtzite structure as evidenced by X-ray diffraction. The nanostructures were beltlike with several tens of micrometers length, several micrometers width and few nanometers to tens of nanometers thick as seen by scanning electron microscope and confirmed by TEM studies. The nanobelts were single crystalline in nature and showed reflection corresponding to (1 1 2) and (0 0 2) planes in SAED. The PL studies revealed the green band due to band gap emission and red band due to emission from the surface states. The higher intensity of the defect emission indicated the presence of considerable concentration of surface defects in the as prepared sample. The deposition of CdS could be explained on the basis of catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-solid mechanism.

  2. Gold nanocrystals with DNA-directed morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingyi; Huh, June; Park, Wounjhang; Lee, Luke P.; Kwon, Young Jik; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-09-01

    Precise control over the structure of metal nanomaterials is important for developing advanced nanobiotechnology. Assembly methods of nanoparticles into structured blocks have been widely demonstrated recently. However, synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures remains challenging. Here we show a directed crystallization of gold by a single DNA molecular regulator in a sequence-independent manner and its applications in three-dimensional topological controls of crystalline nanostructures. We anchor DNA onto gold nanoseed with various alignments to form gold nanocrystals with defined topologies. Some topologies are asymmetric including pushpin-, star- and biconcave disk-like structures, as well as more complex jellyfish- and flower-like structures. The approach of employing DNA enables the solution-based synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures in a desired direction, and expands the current tools available for designing and synthesizing feature-rich nanomaterials for future translational biotechnology.

  3. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  4. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadavanich, Andreas V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  5. Crystallization and Growth of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, Edson Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Since the size, shape, and microstructure of nanocrystalline materials strongly impact physical and chemical properties, the development of new synthetic routes to  nanocrystals with controlled composition and morphology is a key objective of the nanomaterials community. This objective is dependent on control of the nucleation and growth mechanisms that occur during the synthetic process, which in turn requires a fundamental understanding of both classical nucleation and growth and non-classical growth processes in nanostructured materials.  Recently, a novel growth process called Oriented Attachment (OA) was identified which appears to be a fundamental mechanism during the development of nanoscale  materials. OA is a special case of aggregation that provides an important route by which nanocrystals grow, defects are formed, and unique—often symmetry-defying—crystal morphologies can be produced. This growth mechanism involves reversible self-assembly of primary nanocrystals followed by reorientati...

  6. Developing New Nanoprobes from Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots havegarnered the spotlight as an important new class of biological labelingtool. Withoptical properties superior to conventional organicfluorophores from many aspects, such as high photostability andmultiplexing capability, quantum dots have been applied in a variety ofadvanced imaging applications. This dissertation research goes along withlarge amount of research efforts in this field, while focusing on thedesign and development of new nanoprobes from semiconductor nanocrystalsthat are aimed for useful imaging or sensing applications not possiblewith quantum dots alone. Specifically speaking, two strategies have beenapplied. In one, we have taken advantage of the increasing capability ofmanipulating the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals by developingsemiconductor quantum rods as fluorescent biological labels. In theother, we have assembled quantum dots and gold nanocrystals into discretenanostructures using DNA. The background information and synthesis,surface manipulation, property characterization and applications of thesenew nanoprobes in a few biological experiments are detailed in thedissertation.

  7. The Intercalibration of SOHO EIT, CDS-NIS, and TRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.

    2006-05-01

    Using coordinated observations of a quiet coronal region, we study the intercalibration of the CDS and EIT instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). We derive the differential emission measure (DEM) distribution from CDS spectral line intensities and convolve it with EIT and TRACE temperature response functions, calculated with the latest atomic data from the CHIANTI database, to predict count rates in their observing channels. We examine different analysis methods and briefly discuss some more advanced aspects of atomic modeling such as the density dependence of the ionization fractions. We investigate the implications for our study using data from the ADAS database. We find that our CDS DEM can predict the TRACE and EIT 171 and 195 Å channel count rates to within 25%. However, the accuracy of the predictions depends on the ionization fractions and elemental abundances used. The TRACE 284 Å and EIT 284 and 304 Å filter predictions do not agree well with the observations, even after taking the contribution from the optically thick He II 304 Å line to the TRACE 284 Å channel into account. The different CDS DEM solutions we derive using different ionization fractions produce fairly similar results: the majority of the CDS line intensities used are reproduced to within 20% with only around one-fifth reproduced to worse than 50%. However, the comparison provides us with further clues with which to explain the discrepancies found for some lines, and highlights the need for accurate equilibrium ionization balance calculations even at low density.

  8. Cloning nanocrystal morphology with soft templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Dev Kumar; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-08-01

    In most template directed preparative methods, while the template decides the nanostructure morphology, the structure of the template itself is a non-general outcome of its peculiar chemistry. Here we demonstrate a template mediated synthesis that overcomes this deficiency. This synthesis involves overgrowth of silica template onto a sacrificial nanocrystal. Such templates are used to copy the morphologies of gold nanorods. After template overgrowth, gold is removed and silver is regrown in the template cavity to produce a single crystal silver nanorod. This technique allows for duplicating existing nanocrystals, while also providing a quantifiable breakdown of the structure - shape interdependence.

  9. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of coumarin 120 with CdS nanoparticles in aqueous suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Murat; Bozkurt, Ebru; Meral, Kadem; Arık, Mustafa; Onganer, Yavuz, E-mail: yonganer@atauni.edu.tr

    2015-01-15

    The interaction of coumarin 120 (C120) with CdS nanoparticles (CdS NPs) in aqueous suspension was examined by using UV–vis absorption, steady-state, time-resolved fluorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence intensity of C120 was quenched with increasing the amount of CdS NPs in the aqueous suspension. The spectroscopic data revealed that the C120 molecules adsorbed on CdS NPs via electrostatic interactions. The apparent association constant (K{sub app}) and the degree of association (α) for C120/CdS NPs were determined as 130.3 M{sup −1} and 0.51 for 4 nm CdS NPs and 624.3 M{sup −1} and 0.71 for 8 nm CdS NPs, respectively. The photoinduced EPR studies exhibited that no electron transfers between CdS and C120 taking place. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of C120 with different CdS NPs is due to the formation of a non-fluorescent complex. - Highlights: • Interaction of C120 with CdS NPs in aqueous solution was spectroscopically examined. • Nonfluorescent C120–CdS NPs complexes in aqueous solution were formed. • In the system, CdS NPs in aqueous solution acted as a fluorescence quencher.

  10. An optimized multilayer structure of CdS layer for CdTe solar cells application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Junfeng, E-mail: pkuhjf@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Liao Cheng, E-mail: Cliao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang Tao [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Spanheimer, C.; Haindl, G.; Fu, Ganhua; Krishnakumar, V. [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Zhao Kui [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Klein, A.; Jaegermann, W. [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-04-28

    Research highlights: > Two different methods to prepare CdS films for CdTe solar cells. > A new multilayer structure of window layer for the CdTe solar cell. > Thinner CdS window layer for the solar cell than the standard CdS layer. > Higher performance of solar cells based on the new multilayer structure. - Abstract: CdS layers grown by 'dry' (close space sublimation) and 'wet' (chemical bath deposition) methods are deposited and analyzed. CdS prepared with close space sublimation (CSS) has better crystal quality, electrical and optical properties than that prepared with chemical bath deposition (CBD). The performance of CdTe solar cell based on the CSS CdS layer has higher efficiency than that based on CBD CdS layer. However, the CSS CdS suffers from the pinholes. And consequently it is necessary to prepare a 150 nm thin film for CdTe/CdS solar cell. To improve the performance of CdS/CdTe solar cells, a thin multilayer structure of CdS layer ({approx}80 nm) is applied, which is composed of a bottom layer (CSS CdS) and a top layer (CBD CdS). That bi-layer film can allow more photons to pass through it and significantly improve the short circuit current of the CdS/CdTe solar cells.

  11. Conventional and microwave hydrothermal synthesis of monodispersed metal oxide nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monodispersed nanoparticles of metal oxide including ferrites MFe2O4 (M=, Ni, Co, Mn) and γ-Fe2O3, Ta2O5 etc. have been synthesized using a water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure uses readily availab...

  12. Monodispersed water-in-oil emulsions prepared with semi-metal microfluidic EDGE systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, A.A.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Monodispersed water-in-oil emulsions were prepared with EDGE (Edge based Droplet GEneration) systems, which generate many droplets simultaneously from one junction. The devices (with plateau height of 1.0 µm) were coated with Cu and CuNi having the same hydrophobicity but different surface

  13. Lock and key colloids through polymerization-induced buckling of monodisperse silicon oil droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacanna, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311471676; Irvine, W.T.M.; Rossi, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410376; Pine, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a new simple method to fabricate bulk amounts of colloidal spheres with well defined cavities from monodisperse emulsions. Herein, we describe the formation mechanism of ‘‘reactive’’ silicon oil droplets that deform to reproducible shapes via a polymerization-induced buckling

  14. Encapsulation of novel fluorescent nanocrystals (quantum dots) with a nanocomposite polymer and their assessment by in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Arthur M.

    Advance in nanotechnology has led to the development of novel fluorescent probes called quantum dots which are being exploited for potential new methods of early cancer detection spread and therapeutic management. Concerns regarding the release of potentially toxic inorganic core atoms into their surrounding environment and possession of hydrophobic surfaces are hindering the development of quantum dots. In order to abrogate their toxicity and solubilise the nanocrystals in aqueous solution a novel polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) poly(carbonate-urea)urethane (PCU), a silica nanocomposite (NC) polymer has been used to coat them. Physical and chemical analysis of the coated quantum dots with UV-Visible spectrometry, Photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis and diffraction. Atomic force microscope and FTIR Spectrophotometry has enabled us ascertain the characteristics of these unique nanocrystals. The biocompatibility of the nanocomposite coated quantum dots (NCCQD) was assessed by using Alamar blue metabolic assay, Pico green assay and by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release on endothelial cell damage. Potential interference of NCCQD with a rat's normal physiology and systemic tissue distribution were assessed in an in-vivo animal model. Results demonstrated that the nanocrystals retained their unique optical properties, had a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 10.5 nm, excellent monodispersivity, large absorption spectrum with a narrow emission band at 790 nm and were highly photostable after polymer coating. NCCQD were compatible with endothelial cells as viable cells were demonstrated to be present after 14 days of growing cells in cell culture medium exposed to NCCQD at concentrations of 2.25 X 10"2 nM. There was no significant disturbance in the physiological parameters on injecting the NCCQD in an in-vivo rat model over a 2 hour period. NCCQD were seen to be deposited in the spleen and thymus as they are

  15. Comportamiento óptico no-lineal de nanocristales semiconductores de CdS en una matriz de gel de sílice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Rosa-Fox, N.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix can be obtained through sol-gel method, it permits the control of several kinetic parameters during the nanocrystal growth. The size and size distribution have been studied by means small-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS, that allow a spatial resolution from 1 to 50 nm. High intensity optical excitation from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns pulse at 10 Hz repetition rate was focused on the sample to study the photoluminescence yield at rigth angle. The spectrum shows radiative process from intrinsic transitions (2.76 eV and a broad band in the lower energy side (1.65 eV that correspond to crystal surface traps. The photoluminescence yield grows superlineary giving rise to amplified intensity (60 cm-1 due to biexciton species, this fact can be interpreted as a non-linear optical behaviour coming from the CdS nanocrystals.

    La inclusión de nanocristales en una matriz dieléctrica puede realizarse mediante el método sol-gel, permitiendo el control de parámetros cinéticos en el crecimiento de los cristales. El tamaño y distribución de dichos nanocristales se han estudiado por medio de difusión de neutrones a bajo ángulo (SANS, con una resolución espacial entre 1 y 50 nm. Bajo excitación óptica de alta intensidad, usando un láser (Nd:YAG con pulsos de 6 ns y una frecuencia de repetición de 10 Hz, se focalizó en la muestra para registrar la señal de fotoluminiscencia en la dirección perpendicular. El espectro indica procesos radiativos debidos a transiciones intrínsecas (2.76 eV y una banda ancha a más baja energía (1.65 eV correspondiente a recombinaciones en los defectos superficiales. La señal de fotoluminiscencia crece superlinealmente dando lugar a una amplificación (60 cm-1 debida principalmente a biexcitones que indican un comportamiento óptico no-lineal de los nanocristales de CdS.

  16. Epitaxial overgrowth of platinum on palladium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Majiong; Lim, Byungkwon; Tao, Jing; Camargo, Pedro H. C.; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Yimei; Xia, Younan

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes a systematic study on the epitaxial overgrowth of Pt on well-defined Pd nanocrystals with different shapes (and exposed facets), including regular octahedrons, truncated octahedrons, and cubes. Two different reducing agents, i.e., citric acid and L-ascorbic acid, were evaluated and compared for the reduction of K2PtCl4 in an aqueous solution in the presence of Pd nanocrystal seeds. When citric acid was used as a reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of octahedral Pt shells on regular and truncated octahedrons of Pd led to the formation of Pd-Pt core-shell octahedrons, while non-conformal overgrowth of Pt on cubic Pd seeds resulted in the formation of an incomplete octahedral Pt shell. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Pt branches was observed when L-ascorbic acid was used as a reducing agent regardless of the facets expressed on the surface of Pd nanocrystal seeds. This work shows that both the binding affinity of a reducing agent to the Pt surface and the reduction kinetics for a Pt precursor play important roles in determining the mode of Pt overgrowth on Pd nanocrystal surface.

  17. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  18. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roya R. Lahiji; Xin Xu; Ronald Reifenberger; Arvind Raman; Alan Rudie; Robert J. Moon

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a “green” nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs...

  19. Silicon nanocrystal films for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, Robert W.

    2009-02-06

    Whether nanoparticles of silicon are really suited for such applications, whether layers fabricated from this exhibit semiconducting properties, whether they can be doped, and whether for instance via the doping the conductivity can be tuned, was studied in the present thesis. Starting material for this were on the one hand spherical silicon nanocrystals with a sharp size distribution and mean diameters in the range from 4-50 nm. Furthermore silicon particle were available, which are with 50-500 nm distinctly larger and exhibit a broad distribution of the mean size and a polycrystalline fine structure with strongly bifurcated external morphology. The small conductivities and tje low mobility values of the charge carriers in the layers of silicon nanocrystals suggest to apply suited thermal after-treatment procedures. So was found that the aluminium-induced layer exchange (ALILE) also can be transferred to the porous layers of nanocrystals. With the deuteron passivation a method was available to change the charge-carrier concentration in the polycrystalline layers. Additionally to ALILE laser crystallization as alternative after-treatment procedure of the nanocrystal layers was studied.

  20. Seeded growth of metal-doped plasmonic oxide heterodimer nanocrystals and their chemical transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xingchen; Reifsnyder Hickey, Danielle; Fei, Jiayang; Diroll, Benjamin T; Paik, Taejong; Chen, Jun; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-04-02

    We have developed a generalized seeded-growth methodology for the synthesis of monodisperse metal-doped plasmonic oxide heterodimer nanocrystals (NCs) with a near-unity morphological yield. Using indium-doped cadmium oxide (ICO) as an example, we show that a wide variety of preformed metal NCs (Au, Pt, Pd, FePt, etc.) can serve as the seeds for the tailored synthesis of metal-ICO heterodimers with exquisite size, shape, and composition control, facilitated by the delayed nucleation mechanism of the CdO phase. The metal-ICO heterodimers exhibit broadly tunable near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonances, and dual plasmonic bands are observed for Au-ICO heterodimers. We further demonstrate that the oxide domain of the Au-ICO heterodimers can be selectively and controllably transformed into a series of partially and completely hollow cadmium chalcogenide nanoarchitectures with unprecedented structural complexity, leaving the metal domain intact. Our work not only represents an exciting addition to the rapidly expanding library of chemical reactions that produce colloidal hybrid NCs, but it also provides a general route for the bottom-up chemical design of multicomponent metal-oxide-semiconductor NCs in a rational and sequential manner.

  1. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of aluminium- and indium-doped ZnO nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarberg, Elin; Prodi-Schwab, Anna; Feldmann, Claus

    2009-06-01

    Microwave heating is applied to prepare suspensions of ZnO:In (IZO) and ZnO:Al (AZO) nanocrystals in diethylene glycol as a high-boiling multidentate alcohol (so-called polyol). Both n-doped zinc oxides are realized with high yields and in suspensions with solid contents up to 10 wt-%. These suspensions are colloidally stable for months. According to dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis as-prepared particles turn out to be single crystalline with an average diameter of 10-15 nm, a near monodisperse size distribution, and a low degree of agglomeration. As-prepared samples exhibit high resistivities due to the adhesion of DEG as a stabilizer on the particle surface. Subsequent to specific thermal post-treatment resistivities of 2.0 x 10(-1) and 5.7 x 10(-1) Omegacm are obtained for IZO and AZO powders, respectively. As a proof of the concept, thin layers are deposited on glass plates using a simple solvent evaporation technique. Post-treated layers exhibit a visible transmittance of about 80% and resistivities of 2.1 x 10(-1) Omegacm (IZO) and 2.6 x 10(-1) Omegacm (AZO). The bandgap of post-treated powders and thin layers is calculated to 3.2 and 3.3 eV, respectively.

  2. Silk fibroin/gold nanocrystals: a new example of biopolymer-based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noinville, S.; Garnier, A.; Courty, A.

    2017-05-01

    The dispersion of nanoparticles in ordered polymer nanostructures can provide control over particle location and orientation, and pave the way for tailored nanomaterials that have enhanced mechanical, electrical, or optical properties. Here we used silk fibroin, a natural biopolymer, to embed gold nanocrystals (NCs), so as to obtain well-ordered structures such as nanowires and self-assembled triangular nanocomposites. Monodisperse gold NCs synthesized in organic media are mixed to silk fibroin and the obtained nanocomposites are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Infrared spectroscopy. The optical properties study of gold NCs and silk-gold nanocomposites shows that the Surface Plasmon band is blue shifted compared to gold NCs. The size and shape of NCs gold superlattices can be well controlled by the presence of silk fibroin giving nanowires and also self-assembled triangular nanocomposites as characterized by TEM, FE-SEM and AFM. The strong interaction between gold NCs and silk fibroin is also revealed by the conformation change of silk protein in presence of gold NCs, as shown by FTIR analysis. The formation of such ordered nanocomposites (gold NCs/silk fibroin) will provide new nanoplasmonic devices.

  3. Direct-Indirect Nature of the Bandgap in Lead-Free Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhai; Yin, Jun; Parida, Manas R; Ahmed, Ghada H; Pan, Jun; Bakr, Osman M; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Mohammed, Omar F

    2017-07-20

    With record efficiencies achieved in lead halide perovskite-based photovoltaics, urgency has shifted toward finding alternative materials that are stable and less toxic. Bismuth-based perovskite materials are currently one of the most promising candidates among those alternatives. However, the band structures of these materials, including the nature of the bandgaps, remain elusive due to extremely low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) and scattering issues in their thin-film form. Here, we reveal the specific nature of the material's electronic transitions by realizing monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) of hexagonal-phase Cs3Bi2X9 perovskites, which afford well-resolved PL features. Interestingly, the PL profile exhibits a dual-spectral feature at room temperature with comparable intensities, based on which we propose an exciton recombination process involving both indirect and direct transitions simultaneously-an observation further supported by temperature-dependent and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings provide experimental and theoretical insights into the nature of the bandgaps in bismuth halide materials-essential information for assessing their viability in solar cells and optoelectronics.

  4. Bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on nanocrystal-polymer hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yunfei; Krueger, Michael [Freiburg Materials Research Centre (FMF), University of Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany); Urban, Gerald [Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Organic solar cells have the promising advantages of low-cost and large-area fabrication on flexible substrates. State-of-the-art organic solar cells based on blends of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives achieve efficiencies up to 5-6%. Inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) e.g. out of CdSe, with tunable bandgaps and high intrinsic carrier mobilities, can be incorporated into conjugated polymers e.g. poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to form bulk-heterojunction hybrid solar cells. In our group, a highly reproducible synthesis method for CdSe NCs has been developed, leading to monodisperse NCs with excellent photophysical properties. Current research is performed to control the shape and the lattice structure of the NCs within the same synthesis approach. Various solar cells based on bulk-heterojunction nanocomposite materials have been fabricated and characterized. We systematically checked how the solar cell device performance is affected by different NC ligands and by different thermal annealing treatments. Devices using spherical NCs capped with aromatic ligands and appropriate thermal annealing treatment exhibit so far power conversion efficiencies over 0.5% under standard measurement condition. Further investigations to improve the materials and device performance are currently in progress.

  5. Photovoltaic devices from CdSe nanocrystals and conjugated polymer composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yanshan; WANG Li; CAO Yong

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of CdSe nanospheres (ns-CdSe) and their application as electron acceptor in conjugated polymer photovoltaic devices are reported, ns-CdSe with diameters of 5 nm were prepared through an organometallic method. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM),ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and photolumines-cence (PL) spectra indicate that the CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) are monodispersed nanospheres with the first exciton absorption peak at around 625 nm and the emission peakat around 652 nm. The PL spectra of the ns-CdSe/polymer composite films show that the PL of the conjugated polymers is effectively quenched upon the addition of ns-CdSe.Photovoltaic devices were fabricated from the compositesof ns-CdSe and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) or poly(3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT). Under AM 1.5 illumination (100 mW/cm2), the short circuit current (ISC), open circuit voltage (V), fill factor (FF)and energy conversion efficiency (η) reached 1.56 mA/cm2,0.75 V, 34.5% and 0.40%, respectively for device from the ns-CdSe/MEH-PPV (15:1 by weight) and 1.93 mA/cm2,0.65 V, 38.4% and 0.48%, respectively for device from the ns-CdSe/P3HT (10 : 1 by weight).

  6. Colloidal stability of iron oxide nanocrystals coated with a PEG-based tetra-catechol surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondini, Sara; Drago, Carmelo; Ferretti, Anna M.; Puglisi, Alessandra; Ponti, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    Long-term colloidal stability of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is an important goal that has not yet been fully achieved. To make an advance in our understanding of the colloidal stability of iron oxide NPs in aqueous media, we prepared NPs comprising a monodisperse (13 nm) iron oxide core coated with a PEG-based (PEG: polyethyleneglycol) surfactant. This consists of a methoxy-terminated PEG chain (MW = 5000 Da) bearing four catechol groups via a diethylenetriamine linker. The surfactant was grafted onto the nanocrystals by ligand exchange monitored by infrared spectroscopy. The colloidal stability of these nanoparticles was probed by monitoring the time evolution of the Z-average intensity-weighted radius Rh and volume-weighted size distribution Pv obtained from analysis of dynamic light scattering data. The nanoparticles showed no sign of aggregation for four months in deionized water at room temperature and also when subjected to thermal cycling between 25 and 75 °C. In 0.01 M PBS (phosphate buffered saline), aggregation (if any) is slow and partial; after 66 h, about 50% of NPs have not aggregated. Aggregation is more effective in 0.15 M NH4AcO buffer, where isolated particles are not observed after 66 h, and especially in acidic NH4AcO/AcOH buffer, where aggregation is complete within 1 h and precipitation is observed. The differing stability of the NPs in the above aqueous media is closely related to their ζ potential.

  7. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Core/Shell Quantum Dots: Strained Ge/Si Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Katharine I; Held, Jacob T; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2017-03-08

    In this work, we present an all-gas-phase approach for the synthesis of quantum-confined core/shell nanocrystals (NCs) as a promising alternative to traditional solution-based methods. Spherical quantum dots (QDs) are grown using a single-stage flow-through nonthermal plasma, yielding monodisperse NCs, with a concentric core/shell structure confirmed by electron microscopy. The in-flight negative charging of the NCs by plasma electrons keeps the NC cores separated during shell growth. The success of this gas-phase approach is demonstrated here through the study of Ge/Si core/shell QDs. We find that the epitaxial growth of a Si shell on the Ge QD core compressively strains the Ge lattice and affords the ability to manipulate the Ge band structure by modulation of the core and shell dimensions. This all-gas-phase approach to core/shell QD synthesis offers an effective method to produce high-quality heterostructured NCs with control over the core and shell dimensions.

  8. Direct-Indirect Nature of the Bandgap in Lead-Free Perovskite Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuhai

    2017-06-23

    With record efficiencies achieved in lead halide perovskite-based photovoltaics, urgency has shifted toward finding alternative materials that are stable and less toxic. Bismuth-based perovskite materials are currently one of the most promising candidates among those alternatives. However, the band structures of these materials, including the nature of the bandgaps, remain elusive due to extremely low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) and scattering issues in their thin-film form. Here, we reveal the specific nature of the material\\'s electronic transitions by realizing monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) of hexagonal-phase Cs3Bi2X9 perovskites, which afford well-resolved PL features. Interestingly, the PL profile exhibits a dual-spectral feature at room temperature with comparable intensities, based on which we propose an exciton recombination process involving both indirect and direct transitions simultaneously-an observation further supported by temperature-dependent and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings provide experimental and theoretical insights into the nature of the bandgaps in bismuth halide materials-essential information for assessing their viability in solar cells and optoelectronics.

  9. Dielectric Properties of CDS Nanoparticles Synthesized by Soft Chemical Route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Tripathi; A Kumar; T P Sinha

    2009-06-01

    CdS nanoparticles have been synthesized by a chemical reaction route using thiophenol as a capping agent. The frequency-dependent dielectric dispersion of cadmium sulphide (CdS) is investigated in the temperature range of 303–413 K and in a frequency range of 50 Hz–1 MHz by impedance spectroscopy. An analysis of the complex per-mittivity ( and ) and loss tangent (tan ) with frequency is performed by assuming a distribution of relaxation times. The scaling behaviour of dielectric loss spectra sug- gests that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at various temperatures. The frequency-dependent electrical data are analysed in the framework of conductivity and modulus formalisms. The frequency-dependent conductivity spectra obey the power law.

  10. Studies of heat treated CSS CdS films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinskiy, D.; Marinskaya, S.; Viswanathan, V.; Morel, D. L.; Ferekides, C. S.

    1999-03-01

    Cadmium sulfide continues to be the most successful and widely used n-type heterojunction partner in thin film CdTe solar cells. In most cases solar cell performance is enhanced if the CdS films are heat treated prior to the deposition of the CdTe. This paper discusses the effect of H2 annealing on the resistivity of CSS-CdS films and the use of a mobility activation model to explain the observed changes in resistivity. Photoluminescence measurements of CSS CdS films heat-treated in He and in CdCl2 vapor have also been carried out. In all cases the heat treatments lead to an increase in the intensity of a photoluminescence band believed to be associated with sulfur vacancies.

  11. Novel applications of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pick Chung

    We have investigated ways of modifying a common water soluble CdTe NCs to become non-photobleaching. Such NCs are capable of responding reversibly to an inter-switching of the oxygen and argon environments over multiple hours of photoexcitation. They are found to quench upon exposure to oxygen, but when the system is purged with argon, their photoluminescence (PL) revives to the original intensity. Such discovery could potentially be used as oxygen nanosensors. These PL robust CdTe NCs immobilized on glass substrates also exhibit significant changes in their PL when certain organic/bio molecules are placed in their vicinity (nanoscale). This novel technique also known as NC-organic molecule close proximity imaging (NC-cp imaging) has found to provide contrast ratio greater by a factor of 2-3 compared to conventional fluorescence imaging technique. PL of NCs is recoverable upon removal of these organic molecules, therefore validating these NCs as potential all-optical organic molecular nanosensors and, upon optimization, ultimately serving as point detectors for purposes of super-resolution microscopy (with proper instrumentation). No solvents are required for this sensing mechanism since all solutions were dried under argon flow. Furthermore, core graded shell CdSe/CdSexS1-x/CdS giant nanocrystal (g-NCs) were found to have very robust PL temperature response. At a size of 10.2 nm in diameter, these g-NCs undergo PL drop of only 30% at 355K (normalized to PL intensity at 85K). In comparison, the core step shells CdSe/CdS g-NCs at the same diameter exhibit 80% PL drop at 355K. Spectral shifting and broadening were acquired and found to be 5-10 times and 2-4 times smaller respectively than the standard CdSe core and CdSe/CdS core shell NCs. It is also discovered that these core graded shell g-NCs are largely nonblinking and have insignificant photoluminescence decay even after exciting the samples at very high irradiance (44 kW/cm2) for over an hour. These types of g

  12. Re-dispersible Li+ and Eu3+ co-doped CdS nanoparticles: Luminescence studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N S Gajbhiye; Raghumani Singh Ninghoujam; Asar Ahmed; D K Panda; S S Umare; S J Sharma

    2008-02-01

    Re-dispersible CdS, 5 at.% Eu3+-doped CdS, 2 at.% Li+ and 5 at.% Eu3+ co-doped CdS nanoparticles in organic solvent are prepared by urea hydrolysis in ethylene glycol medium at a low temperature of 170°C. CdS nanoparticles have spherical shape with a diameter of ∼ 80 nm. The asymmetric ratio (21) of the integrated intensities of the electrical dipole transition to the magnetic dipole transition for 5 at.% Eu3+-doped CdS is found to be 3.8 and this ratio is significantly decreased for 2 at.% Li+ and 5 at.% Eu3+ co-doped CdS (21 = 2.6). It establishes that the symmetry environment of Eu3+ ion is more favored by Li-doping. Extra peak at 550 nm (green emission) could be seen for 2 and 5 at.% Eu3+ co-doped CdS. Also, the significant energy transfer from host CdS to Eu3+ is found for 5 at.% Eu3+-doped CdS compared to that for 2 at.% Li+ and 5 at.% Eu3+ co-doped CdS.

  13. CDS/ISIS系统的输出

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯汇波

    1995-01-01

    介绍利用CDS/ISIS PASCAL语言开发的一个显示打印模块,它具有随意浏览、联机打印功能,并对ISIS PASCAL语言中一些资料中未说明而在程序设计中需要加以注意的问题作了阐述.

  14. The liquidity premium in CDS transaction prices: Do frictions matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Gehde-Trapp, Monika; Gündüz, Yalin; Nasev, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Based on individual CDS transactions cleared by the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation, we show that illiquidity strongly affects credit default swap premiums. We identify the following effects: First, transaction direction affects prices, as buy (sell) orders lead to premium increases (decreases). Second, larger transactions have a higher price impact. This finding stands in stark contrast to corporate bond markets. Third, traders charge higher premiums as a price for liquidity provisio...

  15. Nonradiative and Radiative Recombination in CdS Polycrystalline Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gaubas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of polycrystalline CdS layers, employed in formation of the CdS-Cu2S heterostructures, have been studied by combining contactless techniques of the time and spectrally resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL spectroscopy and microwave-probed photoconductivity (MW-PC transients. The confocal microscopy has been employed to correlate the homogeneity of photoluminescence and grain size in CdS layers. Three types of samples with crystallite grain size of <1 μm (the I-type and of 2–10 μm of homogeneous (II-type and inhomogeneous (III-type grain distribution have been separated. The simultaneous record of MW-PC and TR-PL responses ensures the same sampling area on the layer under investigation, as both (MW-PC and TR-PL signals are generated by the same UV laser excitation beam. Two PL bands peaked at 500 and 700 nm were revealed. It has been demonstrated that photoluminescence intensity strongly depends on the properties of the polycrystalline 15–26 μm thick CdS layers with equilibrium carrier density of about 1.5×1013 cm−3, which serve as the substrates to form CdS-Cu2S junctions. The different carrier decay components were ascribed to different microareas with characteristic MW-PC and PL decay lifetimes of 2–10 ns, ascribed to microcrystallites with PL instantaneous decay lifetimes of 40–200 ns, and MW-PC decay lifetimes in the range of 100–1000 μs attributed to the inter-crystallite areas of CdS polycrystalline material.

  16. Structure and transformation of tactoids in cellulose nanocrystal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Xi; Hamad, Wadood Y.; MacLachlan, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals obtained from natural sources are of great interest for many applications. In water, cellulose nanocrystals form a liquid crystalline phase whose hierarchical structure is retained in solid films after drying. Although tactoids, one of the most primitive components of liquid crystals, are thought to have a significant role in the evolution of this phase, they have evaded structural study of their internal organization. Here we report the capture of cellulose nanocrystal tactoids in a polymer matrix. This method allows us to visualize, for the first time, the arrangement of cellulose nanocrystals within individual tactoids by electron microscopy. Furthermore, we can follow the structural evolution of the liquid crystalline phase from tactoids to iridescent-layered films. Our insights into the early nucleation events of cellulose nanocrystals give important information about the growth of cholesteric liquid crystalline phases, especially for cellulose nanocrystals, and are crucial for preparing photonics-quality films.

  17. Performance and Reliability of Multilayer Silicon Nanocrystal Nonvolatile Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liudi; ZHANG Zhigang; ZHAO Yue; MAO Ping; PAN Liyang

    2009-01-01

    Nonvolatile memories (NVMs) with triple layers of silicon nanocrystals were fabricated with conventional CMOS technology.This paper explores the program/erase performance and reliability of NVMs with three layers of nanocrystals.The results indicate that the nanocrystals in the triple-layer nanocrystal NVM (NCNVM) are difficult to fully charge during the programming process.The programming speed of the triple-layer NCNVMs is quicker than that of single-layer NCNVMs,which means that the second and third layers of nanocrystals in the triple-layer NCNVM affect the charge of the first layer nanocrystals.Reliability tests show that the memory window has little degradation after 1×104 cycles.

  18. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals.

  19. Hydrophobic starch nanocrystals preparations through crosslinking modification using citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiang; Tong, Jin; Su, Xingguang; Ren, Lili

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradable starch nanocrystals prepared by an acid treatment process were modified through crosslinking modification using citric acid as reactant by a dry reaction method. The occurrence of crosslinking modification was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and swelling degree. X-ray diffraction, wettability tests and contact angle measurements were used to characterize the modified starch nanocrystals. It was found that the crosslinked starch nanocrystals displayed a higher affinity for low polar solvents such as dichloromethane. The surface of starch nanocrystals became more roughness after crosslinking modification with citric acid and the size decreased as revealed by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results. XRD analysis showed that the crystalline structure of starch nanocrystals was basically not changed after the crosslinking modification with shorter heating time. The resulting hydrophobic starch nanocrystals are versatile precursors to the development of nanocomposites.

  20. Synthesis and Surface Modification of CdTe Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals were prepared in aqueous solution via the reaction between Cd2+ and NaHTe in the presence of mercaptoacetic acid. Interactions between CdTe nanocrystals and phenylalanine were formed via electrostatic/coordinate self-assembly. The photoluminescence intensity of CdTe nanocrystals was improved obviously. The interaction mechanism was discussed and was considered to be surface passivation.

  1. Positron studies of surfaces, structure and electronic properties of nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Eijt, S. W. H.; Barbiellini, B.; Houtepen, A.J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Bansil, A.

    2007-01-01

    A brief review is given of recent positron studies of metal and semiconductor nanocrystals. The prospects offered by positron annihilation as a sensitive method to access nanocrystal (NC) properties are described and compared with other experimental methods. The tunability of the electronic structure of nanocrystals underlies their great potential for application in many areas. Owing to their large surface-to-volume ratio, the surfaces and interfaces of NCs play a crucial role in determining ...

  2. Electroluminescence of Si Nanocrystal-Doped SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dan; XIE Zhi-Qiang; WU Qian; ZHAO You-Yuan; LU Ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ We perform a comparative study on the electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) of Si nanocrystaldoped SiO2 (nc-Si:SiO2) and SiO2, and clarify whether the contribution from Si nanocrystals in the EL of nc-Si:SiO2 truly exists. The results unambiguously indicate the presence of EL of Si nanocrystals. The difference of peak positions between the EL and PL spectra are discussed. It is found that the normal method of passivation to enhance the PL of Si nanocrystals is not equally effective for the EL, hence new methods need to be explored to promote the EL of Si nanocrystals.

  3. Spectroscopy of intraband optical transitions in anisotropic semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new type of optical spectroscopy of anisotropic semiconductor nanocrystals, which is based on the welldeveloped stationary pump-probe technique, where the pump and probe fields are absorbed upon, respectively, interband and intraband transitions of the nanocrystals' electronic subsystem. We develop a general theory of intraband absorption based on the density matrix formalism. This theory can be applied to study degenerate eigenstates of electrons in semiconductor nanocrystals of different shapes and dimentions. We demonstrate that the angular dependence of intraband absorption by nonspherical nanocrystals enables investigating their shape and orientation, as well as the symmetry of quantum states excited by the probe field and selection rules of electronic transitions.

  4. Continuous and rapid synthesis of nanoclusters and nanocrystals using scalable microstructured reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung Dae

    Recent advances in nanocrystalline materials production are expected to impact the development of next generation low-cost and/or high efficiency solar cells. For example, semiconductor nanocrystal inks are used to lower the fabrication cost of the absorber layers of the solar cells. In addition, some quantum confined nanocrystals display electron-hole pair generation phenomena with greater than 100% quantum yield, called multiple exciton generation (MEG). These quantum dots could potentially be used to fabricate solar cells that exceed the Schockley-Queisser limit. At present, continuous syntheses of nanoparticles using microreactors have been reported by several groups. Microreactors have several advantages over conventional batch synthesis. One advantage is their efficient heat transfer and mass transport. Another advantage is the drastic reduction in the reaction time, in many cases, down to minutes from hours. Shorter reaction time not only provides higher throughput but also provide better particle size control by avoiding aggregation and by reducing probability of oxidizing precursors. In this work, room temperature synthesis of Au11 nanoclusters and high temperature synthesis of chalcogenide nanocrystals were demonstrated using continuous flow microreactors with high throughputs. A high rate production of phosphine-stabilized Au11 nanoclusters was achieved using a layer-up strategy which involves the use of microlamination architectures; the patterning and bonding of thin layers of material (laminae) to create a multilayered micromixer in the range of 25-250 mum thick was used to step up the production of phosphine-stabilized Au11 nanoclusters. Continuous production of highly monodispersed phosphine-stabilized Au 11 nanoclusters at a rate of about 11.8 [mg/s] was achieved using a microreactor with a size of 1.687cm3. This result is about 30,000 times over conventional batch synthesis according to production rate/per reactor volume. We have elucidated the

  5. Ultrasound-assisted microwave preparation of Ag-doped CdS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Tai, Guo'an; Guo, Wanlin

    2010-03-01

    Ag-doped CdS nanoparticles were synthesized by an ultrasound-assisted microwave synthesis method. The X-ray diffraction patterns reveal a structural evolution from cubic to hexagonal with increasing molar ratios of Ag(+)/Cd(2+) from 0% to 5%. It shows that the Ag-doped hexagonal CdS nanoparticles are polycrystal. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the CdS nanoparticles doping with 5% Ag(+) shows that the doped Ag in CdS is metallic. Simultaneously, the characteristic Raman peaks of the CdS nanoparticles enhance with increasing Ag(+) concentrations. The photocatalytic activity of different Ag-doped samples show a reasonable change due to different ratios of Ag which doped into CdS. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extracellular Synthesis of Luminescent CdS Quantum Dots Using Plant Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovaya, Mariya N.; Burlaka, Olga M.; Naumenko, Antonina P.; Blume, Yaroslav B.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study describes a novel method for preparation of water-soluble CdS quantum dots, using bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cell suspension culture. Acting as a stabilizing and capping agent, the suspension cell culture mediates the formation of CdS nanoparticles. These semiconductor nanoparticles were determined by means of an UV-visible spectrophotometer, photoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and XRD. Followed by the electron diffraction analysis of a selected area, transmission electron microscopy indicated the formation of spherical, crystalline CdS ranging in diameter from 3 to 7 nm and showed wurtzite CdS quantum dots. In the present work, the toxic effect of synthesized CdS quantum dots on Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts as a very sensitive model was under study. The results of this research revealed that biologically synthesized CdS nanoparticles in low concentrations did not induce any toxic effects.

  7. Photo current generation in RGO - CdS nanorod thin film device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Chakrabarty, Sankalpita; Ibrahim, Sk.; Pal, Tanusri; Ghosh, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) - cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocomposite materials. The reduction of GO, formation of CdS and decoration of CdS onto RGO sheets were done in a one- pot solvothermal process. We have observed that the PL intensity for CdS nanorods remarkably quenched after the attachment of RGO, which established the photo induced charge transformation from the CdS nanorod to RGO sheets through the RGO-CdS interface. The optoelectronic transport properties of our fabricated large area thin film device exhibits excellent photo induced charge generation under simulated solar light illumination. The photo sensitivity of the device increases linearly with the increase of illuminated light intensity. The RGO-CdS composite exhibits enhance photocatalytic dye degradation efficiency in compare to control CdS under simulated solar light illumination.

  8. Modification of optical and electrical properties of chemical bath deposited CdS using plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G. Alan; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, C.P 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2011-08-31

    Cadmium sulphide (CdS) is a well known n-type semiconductor that is widely used in solar cells. Here we report preparation and characterization of chemical bath deposited CdS thin films and modification of their optical and electrical properties using plasma treatments. CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing Cadmium chloride, Triethanolamine and Thiourea under various deposition conditions. Good quality thin films were obtained during deposition times of 5, 10 and 15 min. CdS thin films prepared for 10 min. were treated using a glow discharge plasma having nitrogen and argon carrier gases. The changes in morphology, optical and electrical properties of these plasma treated CdS thin films were analyzed in detail. The results obtained show that plasma treatment is an effective technique in modification of the optical and electrical properties of chemical bath deposited CdS thin films.

  9. Highly active Ag clusters stabilized on TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals for catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Division of Fuel Cells, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Zhao, Zhe; Ou, Dingrong; Tu, Baofeng; Cui, Daan [Division of Fuel Cells, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); Wei, Xuming [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Cheng, Mojie, E-mail: mjcheng@dicp.ac.cn [Division of Fuel Cells, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Graphical abstract: Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites have been synthesized through the reduction of silver-dodecylamine complexes by CH{sub 3}CHO in the presence of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals and have shown excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-NP into 4-AP by NaBH{sub 4}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with Ag clusters under 2 nm are synthesized through a silver mirror reaction in toluene. • The silver mirror reaction refers to the reduction of silver-dodecylamine complexes by acetaldehyde in toluene. • The Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites show a good ability of resistant against poisoning by the product in reduction of 4-NP. • TOFs of Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites obtained in this work are the highest among Ag based catalysts previously reported. - Abstract: Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites comprising of Ag clusters on TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal surfaces are of great significance in catalysts and advanced functional materials. Herein a novel method to synthesize Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with Ag clusters under 2 nm on TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal surfaces have been developed. The success of this method relies on a silver mirror reaction in toluene, which refers to the reduction of silver-dodecylamine complexes by acetaldehyde in the presence of mono-dispersed TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals. The prepared Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites have been characterized by FT-IR spectra, UV–vis absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, ultra high resolution scanning electron microscope (Ultra-HRSEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). Catalytic activity of Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites is evaluated for the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) into p-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH{sub 4}. Results demonstrate that Ag/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites have shown an outstanding catalytic activity as well as a good stability in successive reduction of 4-NP. Noticeably, TOF of Ag/TiO{sub 2

  10. Effect of Mixed Solvent on Fabrication, Morphology and Monodispersity of Microspheres with Hydrophobic Poly(butyl methacrylate) Shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xincai; LU Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Monodisperse microspheres (mean diameter 200-300 nm) with polystyrene cores and poly(acrylamide-co-buty1 methacrylate) shells were prepared by using a free radical polymerization method.Moreover,the effect of mixed solvent on the preparation,morphology and monodispersity was investigated.The experimental results showed that solubility parameter of butyl methacrylate and solvent affected mainly the molding of monodisperse core-shell microspheres.When the microspheres were fabricated in a sequential synthesis process,addition of hydrophilic and organic solvent including butyl methacrylate led to spherical degree of the particles becoming worse,and the mean diameter of the microspheres decreased and the monodispersity became better with increasing the crosslinker methylenebisacrylamide dosage.

  11. Time-varying credit risk and liquidity premia in bond and CDS markets

    OpenAIRE

    Bühler, Wolfgang; Trapp, Monika

    2009-01-01

    We develop a reduced-form model that allows us to decompose bond spreads and CDS premia into a pure credit risk component, a pure liquidity component, and a component measuring the relation between credit risk and liquidity. CDS liquidity has important consequences for the bond credit risk and liquidity components. Besides the credit risk link, we document a liquidity link between the bond and the CDS market. Liquidity in both markets dries up as credit risk increases, and higher bond market ...

  12. Formation mechanism of monodisperse, low molecular weight chitosan nanoparticles by ionic gelation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen; Yan, Wei; Xu, Zushun; Ni, Hong

    2012-02-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles have been extensively studied for drug and gene delivery. In this paper, monodisperse, low molecular weight (LMW) chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by a novel method based on ionic gelation using sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) as cross-linking agent. The objective of this study was to solve the problem of preparation of chitosan/TPP nanoparticles with high degree of monodispersity and stability, and investigate the effect of various parameters on the formation of LMW chitosan/TPP nanoparticles. It was found that the particle size distribution of the nanoparticles could be significantly narrowed by a combination of decreasing the concentration of acetic acid and reducing the ambient temperature during cross-linking process. The optimized nanoparticles exhibited a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 138 nm with a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.026 and a zeta potential of +35 mV, the nanoparticles had good storage stability at room temperature up to at least 20 days.

  13. Controlled Synthesis and Characterization of Monodisperse Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI,Rongrong; GAO,Guanhua; YI,Ran; ZHOU,Kechao; QIU,Guanzhou; LIU,Xiaohe

    2009-01-01

    Monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through the thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate in octadecene solvent in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine.The influences of experimental parameters,such as reacting temperature,amounts and kinds of surfactants,solvents,oleic acid and oleylamine,on the size and shape of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles were discussed.The phase structures,morphology,and size of the as-prepared products were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).Magnetic property was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) at room temperature,which revealed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles were of ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 74.0 emu/g and coercivity (Hc) of 72.6 Oe.

  14. Simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices for the generation of monodisperse multiple emulsions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2013-12-16

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology. Polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. Here, we report the design and fabrication of simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices based on microscope glass slides and pulled glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. The advantages of our method lie in a simple manufacturing procedure, inexpensive processing equipment and flexibility in the surface modification of the designed microfluidic devices. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demonstrated their robustness for preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Micro-spherical cochleate composites: method development for monodispersed cochleate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsekar, Kalpa; Ashtikar, Mukul; Steiniger, Frank; Thamm, Jana; Schacher, Felix H; Fahr, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    Cochleates have been of increasing interest in pharmaceutical research due to their extraordinary stability. However the existing techniques used in the production of cochleates still need significant improvements to achieve sufficiently monodispersed formulations. In this study, we report a simple method for the production of spherical composite microparticles (3-5 μm in diameter) made up of nanocochleates from phosphatidylserine and calcium (as binding agent). Formulations obtained from the proposed method were evaluated using electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering and were compared with conventional cochleate preparation techniques. In this new method, an ethanolic lipid solution and aqueous solution of a binding agent is subjected to rapid and uniform mixing with a microfluidic device. The presence of high concentration of organic solvent promotes the formation of composite microparticles made of nanocochleates. This simple methodology eliminates elaborate preparation methods, while providing a monodisperse cochleate system with analogous quality.

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of monodispersed silver cluster arrays assembled on block copolymer scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, C H; Chen, X; Liu, Y J; Xie, B; Han, M [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Song, F Q; Wang, G H, E-mail: sjhanmin@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-05-14

    Triblock copolymer poly(styrene-b-butadiene-b-styrene) (SBS) films with long-range ordered self-assembled nanopatterns are used as templates to selectively adsorb soft-landing silver clusters. Closely spaced cluster arrays with high monodispersity are formed through the confinement of the block copolymer scaffolds, and show a much enhanced thermal stability as compared with the cluster assemblies on the surfaces of covalent amorphous solids, or even on the disordered SBS films. Their morphologies are barely influenced by long time thermal annealing at a temperature as high as 180 deg. C, while in the latter case intense aggregations and coalescences of silver clusters are commonly observed upon annealing. The different thermal stabilities of the cluster assemblies also induce different evolutions of their optical extinction spectra under annealing. This promises a simple way to control the monodispersity and thermal stability of metal cluster assembly via self-assembled block copolymer template.

  17. A granocentric model captures the statistical properties of monodisperse random packings

    CERN Document Server

    Newhall, Katherine A; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    We present a generalization of the granocentric model proposed in [Clusel et al., Nature, 2009, 460, 611615] that is capable of describing the local fluctuations inside not only polydisperse but also monodisperse packings of spheres. This minimal model does not take into account the relative particle positions, yet it captures positional disorder through local stochastic processes sampled by efficient Monte Carlo methods. The disorder is characterized by the distributions of local parameters, such as the number of neighbors and contacts, filled solid angle around a central particle and the cell volumes. The model predictions are in good agreement with our experimental data on monodisperse random close packings of PMMA particles. Moreover, the model can be used to predict the distributions of local fluctuations in any packing, as long as the average number of neighbors, contacts and the packing fraction are known. These distributions give a microscopic foundation to the statistical mechanics framework for jamm...

  18. Fabrication of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution using a block copolymer template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcrette, Mélissa; Ortiz, Guillermo; Tallegas, Salomé; Joisten, Hélène; Tiron, Raluca; Baron, Thierry; Hou, Yanxia; Lequien, Stéphane; Bsiesy, Ahmad; Dieny, Bernard

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes a fabrication process of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution, based on combined ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ approaches. The process involves the use of a self-assembled PS-PMMA block copolymer formed on a sacrificial layer. Such an approach was so far mostly explored for the preparation of patterned magnetic media for ultrahigh density magnetic storage. It is here extended to the preparation of released monodisperse nanoparticles for biomedical applications. A special sacrificial layer had to be developed compatible with the copolymer self-organization. The resulting nanoparticles exhibit very narrow size dispersion (≈7%) and can be good candidates as contrast agents for medical imaging i.e. magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic particle imaging. The approach provides a great freedom in the choice of the particles shapes and compositions. In particular, they can be made of biocompatible magnetic material.

  19. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.

  20. Active Optical Fibers Doped with Ceramic Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mrazek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erbium-doped active optical fiber was successfully prepared by incorporation of ceramic nanocrystals inside a core of optical fiber. Modified chemical vapor deposition was combined with solution-doping approach to preparing preform. Instead of inorganic salts erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium garnet nanocrystals were used in the solution-doping process. Prepared preform was drawn into single-mode optical fiber with a numerical aperture 0.167. Optical and luminescence properties of the fiber were analyzed. Lasing ability of prepared fiber was proofed in a fiber-ring set-up. Optimal laser properties were achieved for a fiber length of 20~m. The slope efficiency of the fiber-laser was about 15%. Presented method can be simply extended to the deposition of other ceramic nanomaterials.

  1. Towards Cluster-Assembled Materials of True Monodispersity in Size and Chemical Environment: Synthesis, Dynamics and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    pathway Status: not yet published Diverse technologies, from catalyst coking to graphene synthesis , entail hydrocarbon dehydrogena- tion and...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0037 Towards cluster-assembled materials of true monodispersity in size and chemical environment: Synthesis , Dynamics and...Towards cluster-assembled materials of true monodispersity in size and chemical environment: synthesis , dynamics and activity 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  2. Size reduction of cosolvent-infused microbubbles to form acoustically responsive monodisperse perfluorocarbon nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minseok; Williams, Ross; Matsuura, Naomi

    2015-09-07

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplet agents are exciting new biomaterials that can be remotely vapourized by ultrasound or light to change into micron-scale gas bubbles in situ. After PFC nanodroplet vapourization, the micron-scale gas bubble can interact strongly with ultrasound radiation, such that the bubbles can be used for cancer imaging and therapy. For these phase-change agents to be useful, however, PFC nanodroplets must be produced in the range of 100 to 400 nm in diameter with high size control and monodispersity, restrictions that remain a challenge. Here, we address this challenge by taking advantage of the size control offered by microfluidics, in combination with the size reduction provided by cosolvent-infused PFC bubbles through both condensation and cosolvent dissolution. In this approach, PFC bubbles with a high percentage of cosolvent (in this study, diethyl ether, DEE) are produced using microfluidics at a temperature above the boiling point. After synthesis, these bubbles become much smaller through both condensation of the gas into liquid droplets and from dissolution of the DEE into the continuous phase. This approach demonstrates that monodisperse, cosolvent-incorporated PFC bubbles can directly form monodisperse PFC nanodroplets a factor of 24 times smaller than the precursor bubbles. We also demonstrate that these nanoscale droplets can be converted to echogenic microbubbles after exposure to ultrasound, showing that these PFC nanodroplets are viable for the in situ production of ultrasound contrast agents. We show that this system can overcome the minimum droplet size limit of standard microfluidics, and is a powerful new tool for generating monodisperse, PFC phase-change ultrasound contrast agents for treating and imaging cancer.

  3. Aerosol-Assisted Synthesis of Monodisperse Single-Crystalline α-Cristobalite Nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xingmao; Bao, Lihong; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Dunphy, Darren R.; Li, Xiaodong; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse single-crystalline α-cristobalite nanospheres have been synthesized by hydrocarbon-pyrolysis-induced carbon deposition on amorphous silica aerosol nanoparticles, devitrification of the coated silica at high temperature, and subsequent carbon removal by oxidation. The nanosphere size can be well controlled by tuning the size of the colloidal silica precursor. Uniform, high-purity nanocrystalline α-cristobalite is important for catalysis, nanocomposites, advanced polishing, and und...

  4. On sufficient stability conditions of the Couette — Poiseuille flow of monodisperse mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, D. I.; Sagalakov, A. M.; Nikitenko, N. G.

    2011-06-01

    The stability of the Couette — Poiseuille flow of a monodisperse mixture is considered. Sufficient stability conditions are derived. Results of the computation of the spectrum are presented. A considerable stabilization of the flow with particles admixture to small disturbances is observed. It is found that the regions of instability generation may have complex geometry. The influence of the main velocity profile and admixture parameters on the stability conditions is considered.

  5. Enhancement of magnetic coercivity and macroscopic quantum tunneling in monodispersed Co/CoO cluster assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, D. L.; Sumiyama, Kenji; Hihara, Takehiko; Yamamuro, S.; ヒハラ, タケヒコ; スミヤマ, ケンジ; 日原, 岳彦; 隅山, 兼治; Hihara, T.; Sumiyama, K.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic properties have been measured for monodisperse-sized Co/CoO cluster assemblies prepared by a plasma-gas-condensation-type cluster beam deposition technique. The clear correlation obtained between exchange bias field and coercivity suggests the enhancement of uniaxial anisotropy owing to the exchange coupling between the ferromagnetic Co core and antiferromagnetic CoO shell, and magnetic disorder at the core-shell interface. A nonthermal magnetic relaxation observed below 8 K, being r...

  6. Monodisperse spherical meso-macroporous silica particles: Synthesis and adsorption of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovpiaga, E. Yu.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Kukushkina, Yu. A.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Sokolov, V. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    Monodispersed spherical silica particles, including large mesopores (over 10 nm) and macropores (up to 100 nm) were obtained by chemical etching in an autoclave. A method for introducing globular protein myoglobin molecules into the pores is developed. The method of filling is based on a high adsorption capacity of the developed internal pore structure of the particles. The structure and adsorption properties of the materials are studied.

  7. Monodispersed bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles with twinned structures: Formation and enhancement for the methanol oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Yin; Yining Zhang; Kai Chen; Jing Li; Wenjing Li; Pei Tang; Huabo Zhao; Qingjun Zhu; Xinhe Bao; Ding Ma

    2014-01-01

    Monodispersed bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles can be fabricated through the emulsion-assisted ethylene glycol (EG) ternary system. Different compositions of bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles, Pd80Ag20, Pd65Ag35 and Pd46Ag54 can be obtained via adjusting the reaction parameters. For the formation process of the bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles, there have two-stage growth processes: firstly, nucleation and growth of the primary nanoclusters; secondly, formation of the secondary nanoparticles with the s...

  8. In-site synthesis of monodisperse, oleylamine-capped Ag nanoparticles through microemulsion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Ju, Yanyun; Guo, Yi; Xiong, Chuanxi; Dong, Lijie

    2017-03-01

    Ag NPs were in-site synthesized through microemulsion method by reducing silver acetate with oleylamine-mediated at 70 °C with highly monodisperse and narrow size from 10 to 20 nm. The synthesis of Ag NPs was aided by oleylamine and the role of oleylamine was researched. This in-site synthesis approach to Ag NPs was reproducibility and high yield more than 80% with stable store about 6 months.

  9. One-pot polyol synthesis of highly monodisperse short green silver nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patarroyo, Javier; Genç, Aziz; Arbiol, Jordi; Bastús, Neus G; Puntes, Victor

    2016-09-21

    Green silver nanorods (Ag NRs) of a low aspect ratio (2.8) have been produced in high yields via an optimized, simple, and robust one-pot polyol method in the presence of tannic acid, which favors the nucleation of decahedral seeds needed for the production of monodisperse Ag NRs. These Ag NRs were further used as sacrificial templates to produce Au hollow nanostructures via galvanic replacement reaction with HAuCl4 at room temperature.

  10. Effects of PVP on the preparation and growth mechanism of monodispersed Ni nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Monodispersed Ni nanoparticles were successfully prepared by chemical reduction with hydrazine hydrate in ethylene glycol.The effect of the amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-K30) on the preparation of Ni nanoparticles was investigated.X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were employed to characterize the nickel particles are spherical in shape and are not agglomerated.A possible extensive mechanism of nickel nanoparticle formation has been suggested.

  11. Microwave assisted synthesis of CdS nanoparticles and their size evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, I. A.; Vazquez, A.; Gomez, I., E-mail: idaliagomezmx@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Laboratorio de Materiales I, Av. Universidad, Cd. Universitaria, 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2013-05-01

    The study of the size evolution of CdS nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion is presented in this paper. The sodium citrate was employed as stabilizer of CdS nanoparticles synthesized by microwave assisted synthesis. Analysis of this study was carried out by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, by comparison of the band gap energy using theoretical and empirical models. Results obtained show that the synthesis conditions produce CdS nanoparticles with diameters below of 6 nm, which remains stabilized by at least 14 days. These characteristics were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirms cubic phase of the CdS nanoparticles. (Author)

  12. Luminescence properties of Eu3+/CDs/PVA composite applied in light conversion film

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangling; He, Youling; Zhuang, Jianle; Zhang, Haoran; Lei, Bingfu; Liu, Yingliang

    2016-12-01

    In this work, blue-light-emitting carbon dots (CDs) were composited with red-light-emitting europium ions (Eu3+) solutions under the synergistic reaction of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to prepare the light conversion film. The formation mechanism of Eu3+/CDs/PVA film was detailedly discussed. It is the first report that this composite was synthesized through direct recombination of CDs and Eu3+ solutions instead of traditional methods based on Eu3+ coordination compound. Furthermore, tunable photoluminescence property can be successfully achieved by controlling the ratio of CDs to doped Eu3+, this property can meet the variable light component requirements for different species of plants.

  13. Digital Color in Cellulose Nanocrystal Films

    OpenAIRE

    Dumanli, Ahu Gümrah; van der Kooij, Hanne M.; Kamita, Gen; Reisner, Erwin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/am501995e. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) form chiral nematic phases in aqueous suspensions that can be preserved upon evaporation of water. The resulting films show an intense directional coloration determined by their microstructure. Here, microreflection experiments correlated with analysis of the helicoidal nanostructure of the films reveal that the iridescent colors and the ordering of the ind...

  14. Studies on Monodispersed Microspheres of Zinc Sulfide Doped with Mn2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, zinc acetate, manganese acetate and thiacetamide are used as raw materials to successfully synthesize monodispersed ZnS:Mn2+ microspheres by using hydrothermal method and taking P123 surfactant as a template. The products were characterized by XRD, STEM,FT-IR and N2 adsorption-desorption. And the results show that the diameter of this microsphere is 1.0 μm or so, which is larger than that of ZnS microsphere without Mn2+ doping, and it has monodispersion, smooth surface and uniform size. The doping of Mn2+ does not obviously change the structure of monodispersed ZnS microsphere. The photoluminescence peak lies in a wide band ranging from 450 to 650 nm, and the microspheres emit orange light;with the increase of Mn2+concentration, fluorescence intensity of ZnS:Mn2+ microsphere changes, and when the mole ratio of Mn2+:Zn2+is 0.3:1, the fluorescence intensity is the strongest.

  15. Monodispersity of recombinant Cre recombinase correlates with its effectiveness in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenhofer Frank

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cre recombinase is a common reagent used for the in vivo on/off switching of the expression of target genes flanked by loxP sites. In particular, recombinant TAT-Cre fusion constructs purified from bacteria have been used to promote the cell uptake of the enzyme. However, the recovery of active TAT-Cre remains a demanding process and its specific activity varies significantly among batches, making difficult data comparison. Results We noticed a strong correlation between recombinase activity and enzyme monodispersity. The existence of such correlation enabled us to indirectly monitor the TAT-Cre recombinase activity during the multi-step purification process by measuring its monodispersity, a parameter detectable by means of a spectrofluorimetric assay that allows the calculation of the Aggregation Index (AI in an easy and rapid way. AI values were recorded after each purification passage to identify the critical steps and to choose optimal alternatives for chromatographic conditions, desalting procedures, and protocols for bacterial endotoxin removal. Furthermore, the effect of metal ions and temperature on TAT-Cre aggregation and inactivation was characterized in vitro. Finally, we optimized the enzyme delivery protocol in vivo by following the accumulation tuning of the reporter protein β-catenin. Conclusion A rational purification protocol for TAT-Cre has been developed by choosing the options that minimize the enzyme aggregation. Our data suggest that AI measurement should support the optimization of any protocol aiming at the recovery of monodispersed protein.

  16. Existence of isostatic, maximally random jammed monodisperse hard-disk packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Steven; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-12-30

    We generate jammed packings of monodisperse circular hard-disks in two dimensions using the Torquato-Jiao sequential linear programming algorithm. The packings display a wide diversity of packing fractions, average coordination numbers, and order as measured by standard scalar order metrics. This geometric-structure approach enables us to show the existence of relatively large maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings with exactly isostatic jammed backbones and a packing fraction (including rattlers) of [Formula: see text]. By contrast, the concept of random close packing (RCP) that identifies the most probable packings as the most disordered misleadingly identifies highly ordered disk packings as RCP in 2D. Fundamental structural descriptors such as the pair correlation function, structure factor, and Voronoi statistics show a strong contrast between the MRJ state and the typical hyperstatic, polycrystalline packings with [Formula: see text] that are more commonly obtained using standard packing protocols. Establishing that the MRJ state for monodisperse hard disks is isostatic and qualitatively distinct from commonly observed polycrystalline packings contradicts conventional wisdom that such a disordered, isostatic packing does not exist due to a lack of geometrical frustration and sheds light on the nature of disorder. This prompts the question of whether an algorithm may be designed that is strongly biased toward generating the monodisperse disk MRJ state.

  17. Synthesis of monodisperse silver nanoparticles for ink-jet printed flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiliang; Zhang Xingye; Xin Zhiqing; Deng Mengmeng; Wen Yongqiang; Song Yanlin, E-mail: zhangxy@iccas.ac.cn, E-mail: ylsong@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Lab of Organic Solids, Laboratory of New Materials, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-10-21

    In this study, monodisperse silver nanoparticles were synthesized with a new reduction system consisting of adipoyl hydrazide and dextrose at ambient temperature. By this facile and rapid approach, high concentration monodisperse silver nanoparticles were obtained on a large scale at low protectant/AgNO{sub 3} mass ratio which was highly beneficial to low cost and high conductivity. Based on the synthesized monodisperse silver nanoparticles, conductive inks were prepared with water, ethanol and ethylene glycol as solvents, and were expected to be more environmentally friendly. A series of electrocircuits were fabricated by ink-jet printing silver nanoparticle ink on paper substrate with a commercial printer, and they had low resistivity in the range of 9.18 x 10{sup -8}-8.76 x 10{sup -8} {Omega} m after thermal treatment at 160 {sup 0}C for 30 min, which was about five times that of bulk silver (1.586 x 10{sup -8} {Omega} m). Moreover, a radio frequency identification (RFID) antenna was fabricated by ink-jet printing, and 6 m wireless identification was realized after an Alien higgs-3 chip was mounted on the printed antenna by the flip-chip method. These flexible electrocircuits produced by ink-jet printing would have enormous potential for low cost electrodes and sensor devices.

  18. Synthesis of monodisperse silver nanoparticles for ink-jet printed flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiliang; Zhang, Xingye; Xin, Zhiqing; Deng, Mengmeng; Wen, Yongqiang; Song, Yanlin

    2011-10-21

    In this study, monodisperse silver nanoparticles were synthesized with a new reduction system consisting of adipoyl hydrazide and dextrose at ambient temperature. By this facile and rapid approach, high concentration monodisperse silver nanoparticles were obtained on a large scale at low protectant/AgNO(3) mass ratio which was highly beneficial to low cost and high conductivity. Based on the synthesized monodisperse silver nanoparticles, conductive inks were prepared with water, ethanol and ethylene glycol as solvents, and were expected to be more environmentally friendly. A series of electrocircuits were fabricated by ink-jet printing silver nanoparticle ink on paper substrate with a commercial printer, and they had low resistivity in the range of 9.18 × 10( - 8)-8.76 × 10( - 8) Ω m after thermal treatment at 160 °C for 30 min, which was about five times that of bulk silver (1.586 × 10( - 8) Ω m). Moreover, a radio frequency identification (RFID) antenna was fabricated by ink-jet printing, and 6 m wireless identification was realized after an Alien higgs-3 chip was mounted on the printed antenna by the flip-chip method. These flexible electrocircuits produced by ink-jet printing would have enormous potential for low cost electrodes and sensor devices.

  19. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  20. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  1. CdS/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal photosensitizers for visible to UV upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Victor; Xia, Pan; Huang, Zhiyuan; Moses, Emily; Fast, Alexander; Fishman, Dmitry A; Vullev, Valentine I; Abrahamsson, Maria; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Lee Tang, Ming

    2017-08-01

    Herein we report the first example of nanocrystal (NC) sensitized triplet-triplet annihilation based photon upconversion from the visible to ultraviolet (vis-to-UV). Many photocatalyzed reactions, such as water splitting, require UV photons in order to function efficiently. Upconversion is one possible means of extending the usable range of photons into the visible. Vis-to-UV upconversion is achieved with CdS/ZnS core-shell NCs as the sensitizer and 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) as annihilator and emitter. The ZnS shell was crucial in order to achieve any appreciable upconversion. From time resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption measurements we conclude that the ZnS shell affects the NC and triplet energy transfer (TET) from NC to PPO in two distinct ways. Upon ZnS growth the surface traps are passivated thus increasing the TET. The shell, however, also acts as a tunneling barrier for TET, reducing the efficiency. This leads to an optimal shell thickness where the upconversion quantum yield (Φ'UC) is maximized. Here the maximum Φ'UC was determined to be 5.2 ± 0.5% for 4 monolayers of ZnS shell on CdS NCs.

  2. Synthesis of Copper-Antimony-Sulfide Nanocrystals for Solution-Processed Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Satoshi; Horita, Keisuke; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Tooru; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Ishiwata, Yoichi; Shimanoe, Kengo; Kida, Tetsuya

    2015-08-17

    The p-type nanocrystals (NCs) of copper-based chalcogenides, such as CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaic applications due to their potential to produce cheap solution-processed solar cells. Herein, we report the synthesis of copper-antimony-sulfide (CAS) NCs with different crystal phases including CuSbS2, Cu3SbS4, and Cu12Sb4S13. In addition, their morphology, crystal phase, and optical properties were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, UV-vis-near-IR spectroscopy, and photoemission yield spectroscopy. The morphology, crystal phase, and electronic structure were significantly dependent on the chemical composition in the CAS system. Devices were fabricated using particulate films consisting of CAS NCs prepared by spin coating without a high-temperature treatment. The CAS NC-based devices exhibited a diode-like current-voltage characteristic when coupled with an n-type CdS layer. In particular, the CuSbS2 NC devices exhibited photovoltaic responses under simulated sunlight, demonstrating its applicability for use in solution-processed solar cells.

  3. Morphological variations in cadmium sulfide nanocrystals without phase transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colorado Henry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A very novel phenomenon of morphological variations of cadmium sulfide (CdS nanorods under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM beam was observed without structural phase transformation. Environmentally stable and highly crystalline CdS nanorods have been obtained via a chemical bath method. The energy of the TEM beam is believed to have a significant influence on CdS nanorods and may melt and transform them into smaller nanowires. Morphological variations without structural phase transformation are confirmed by recording selected area electron diffraction at various stages. The prepared CdS nanorods have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The importance of this phenomenon is vital for the potential application for CdS such as smart materials.

  4. Hydrogen evolution from water using CdS as photosensitizer

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Oncescu; M. Contineanu; Lucia Meahcov

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal chemical approaches are increasingly utilised for the preparation and stabilization of semiconductor nanoparticles.We prepared a colloidal CdS in excess of Na2S using a method described in the literature and determined the particle size from its absorption spectrum by Brus equation. A diameter of about 50Å was calculated. For the stabilization of colloid we choosed from various tested polymers a 1% in weight copolymer (1/1), styrene/maleic anhydride. As redox catalyst we used colloi...

  5. Chemical effects of size quantization of CdS nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈德文; 王素华

    1996-01-01

    The behaviour of photoreaction occurring on the superfine duster interface of semiconductor CdS has been studied. The results indicated that the size quantization effect of semiconductor nanoparticles was obviously reflected not only in their physical properties, but also in the interfacial photocatalysis reactions initiated by superfine nanopartides. This means that the direction and mechanisms in photoreactions of the compounds adsorbed on the surface of nanopartides could vary with the alteration of particle size because the redox potential values of semiconductor particles could be changed with the variation of particle size. Doubtlessly, this effect could play an important role in controlling the interfacial reaction mechanisms and raising the selectivity to photoreaction paths.

  6. Tying loan interest rates to borrowers' CDS spreads

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Ivan T.; Santos, Joao A. C.; Vo, Thu

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how the introduction of market-based pricing, the practice of tying loan interest rates to credit default swaps, has affected borrowing costs. We find that CDS-based loans are associated with lower interest rates, both at origination and during the life of the loan. Our results also indicate that banks simplify the covenant structure of market-based pricing loans, suggesting that the decline in the cost of bank debt is explained, at least in part, by a reduction in monitoring c...

  7. Synthesis and Photovoltaic Application of Coper (I) Sulfide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-22

    Cu2S ( JCPDS 026-1116, Fig. 1a red lines). Low-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies (Fig. 1b) show nanocrystals with an average...a, XRD diffraction pattern of Cu2S nanocrystals, which can be indexed to hexagonal Cu2S ( JCPDS 026-1116, red lines). b, TEM image of Cu2S

  8. Characterization of Ge-nanocrystal films with photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bostedt, C; Willey, T M; Nelson, A J; Franco, N; Möller, T; Terminello, L J

    2003-01-01

    The Ge 3d core-levels of germanium nanocrystal films have been investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The experiments indicate bulk-like coordinated atoms in the nanocrystals and suggest structured disorder on the nanoparticle surface. The results underline the importance of the surface on the overall electronic structure of this class of nanostructured materials.

  9. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  10. Nanocrystals of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskites (CsPbX₃, X = Cl, Br, and I): Novel Optoelectronic Materials Showing Bright Emission with Wide Color Gamut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protesescu, Loredana; Yakunin, Sergii; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Krieg, Franziska; Caputo, Riccarda; Hendon, Christopher H; Yang, Ruo Xi; Walsh, Aron; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-06-10

    Metal halides perovskites, such as hybrid organic-inorganic CH3NH3PbI3, are newcomer optoelectronic materials that have attracted enormous attention as solution-deposited absorbing layers in solar cells with power conversion efficiencies reaching 20%. Herein we demonstrate a new avenue for halide perovskites by designing highly luminescent perovskite-based colloidal quantum dot materials. We have synthesized monodisperse colloidal nanocubes (4-15 nm edge lengths) of fully inorganic cesium lead halide perovskites (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, and I or mixed halide systems Cl/Br and Br/I) using inexpensive commercial precursors. Through compositional modulations and quantum size-effects, the bandgap energies and emission spectra are readily tunable over the entire visible spectral region of 410-700 nm. The photoluminescence of CsPbX3 nanocrystals is characterized by narrow emission line-widths of 12-42 nm, wide color gamut covering up to 140% of the NTSC color standard, high quantum yields of up to 90%, and radiative lifetimes in the range of 1-29 ns. The compelling combination of enhanced optical properties and chemical robustness makes CsPbX3 nanocrystals appealing for optoelectronic applications, particularly for blue and green spectral regions (410-530 nm), where typical metal chalcogenide-based quantum dots suffer from photodegradation.

  11. Structural Order in Ultrathin Films of the Monolayer Protected Clusters Based Upon 4-nm Gold Nanocrystals: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Khanal, Subarna; Bahena, Daniel; Olmos-Asar, Jimena A.; Ponce, Arturo; Whetten, Robert L.; Mariscal, Marcelo M.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The structural order in ultrathin films of monolayer protected clusters (MPCs) is important in a number of application areas but can be difficult to demonstrate by conventional methods, particularly when the metallic core dimension, d, is in the intermediate size-range, 1.5 < d < 5.0 nm. Here, improved techniques for the synthesis of monodisperse thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles have made possible the production of dodecane-thiolate saturated ~ 4 ± 0.5 nm Au clusters with single-crystal core structure and morphology. An ultrathin ordered film or superlattice of these nanocrystal-core MPCs is prepared and investigated using aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) which allowed imaging of long-range hexagonally ordered superlattices of the nanocrystals, separated by the thiolate groups. The lattice constants determined by direct imaging are in good agreement with those determined by small-angle electron diffraction. The STEM image revealed the characteristic grain boundary (GB) with sigma (Σ) 13 in the interface between two crystals. The formation and structures found are interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and coarse-grained (CG) approach. PMID:24875295

  12. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  13. Biocomposites reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals derived from potato peel waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D; Lawton, D; Thompson, M R; Liu, Q

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of cellulose nanocrystals derived from potato peel waste as a reinforcement and vapor barrier additive. The nanocrystals were derived from cellulosic material in the potato peel by alkali treatment and subsequently acid hydrolysis. TEM images revealed the average fiber length of the nanocrystals was 410 nm with an aspect ratio of 41; its aspect ratio being considerably larger than cotton-derived nanocrystals prepared using similar reaction conditions. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)-filled polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and thermoplastic starch (TPS) films were prepared by solution casting method to maintain uniform dispersion of the 1-2% (w/w) filler content. An increase of 19% and 33% (starch composite) and 38% and 49% (PVA composite) in tensile modulus was observed for the 1% and 2% CNC-reinforced composites, respectively. Water vapor transmission measurements showed a marginal reduction of water permeability for the PVA composite, whereas no effect was observed for the thermoplastic starch composite.

  14. Synthesis of tungsten carbide nanocrystals and their electrochemical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghua ZENG; Dingsheng YUAN; Yingliang LIU; Jingxing CHEN; Sanxiang TAN

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) nanocrystals have been prepared by a solvothermal method with Mg as the reductant and WO3 and anhydrous ethanol as the precursors. The effects of time and temperature on the synthesis of WC were investigated and a probable formation mechanism was discussed. The obtained WC nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spec-troscopy and electrochemical methods. Hexagonal close-packed WC was successfully synthesized when the temperature was as low as 500°C. The content of carbon was more than that of W, indicating that the composition of the treated sample was C and WC only. The diameters of WC nanocrystals were ranged from 40 nm to 70 nm and the nanocrystals were dispersed on carbon films. The electrochemical measurements reveal that WC nanocrystals obviously promote Pt/C electrocatalytic ability for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  15. Facile synthesis of water-soluble curcumin nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Zoran M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, facile synthesis of water soluble curcumin nanocrystals is reported. Solvent exchange method was applied to synthesize curcumin nanocrystals. Different techniques were used to characterize the structural and photophysical properties of curcumin nanocrystals. We found that nanocurcumin prepared by this method had good chemical and physical stability, could be stored in the powder form at room temperature, and was freely dispersible in water. It was established that the size of curcumin nanocrystals was varied in the range of 20-500 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis analyses showed the presence of tetrahydrofuran inside the curcumin nanocrystals. Also, it was found that nanocurcumin emitted photoluminescencewith yellow-green colour. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172003

  16. Synthesis, Growing Processes and Physical Properties of CdS Nanoclusters in Y-Zeolite Studied by Positron Annihilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Direct synthesis of CdS nanoclusters within the pore structure of Y zeolite was made. The location of CdS nanoclusters inside Y zeolite hosts was confirmed by the blue-shifted reflection absorption spectra with respected to that of bulk CdS materials. In this paper, we conducted Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectrum (PALS) measurements on a series of CdS/Y zeolite samples and concluded that CdS clusters were not located in supercages but in smaller sodalite cages; as the CdS loading concentration increases to 5 wt%, the discrete CdS cubes begin to form bigger superclusters through interaction. The stability of CdS clusters inside the so- dalite units is due to the coordination of Cd atoms with the framework oxygen atoms of the double six-ring windows. Moreover, PALS reveals some important information of surface states existing on the interfacial layers between CdS clusters and Y zeolite.

  17. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  18. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  19. Structural properties of dopping metallic impurities on CdS thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghasemzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available (Cu,Zn-dopped CdS thin layers were deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition technique. The effects of the doping on the structural properties of CdS thin layers were studied by SEM and EDAX analysis. Hetero junction layers were produced with different nano structures and different fraction of voids and metallic ions.

  20. Structural properties of dopping metallic impurities on CdS thin layers

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ghasemzadeh; H. kangarlou

    2016-01-01

    (Cu,Zn)-dopped CdS thin layers were deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition technique. The effects of the doping on the structural properties of CdS thin layers were studied by SEM and EDAX analysis. Hetero junction layers were produced with different nano structures and different fraction of voids and metallic ions.

  1. DEFECTS IN CDS - IN DETECTED BY PERTURBED ANGULAR-CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (PAC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAGERLE, R; DEICHER, M; DESNICA, U; KELLER, R; PFEIFFER, W; PLEITER, F; SKUDLIK, H; WICHERT, T

    1991-01-01

    The local lattice environment of the donor In in CdS is investigated measuring the electric-field gradient at the site of the radioactive probe atom In-111 by the perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation technique. It is shown that implantation of In into CdS with subsequent annealing drives 100% o

  2. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  3. A comparative study of CdS thin films deposited by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Hernández, G., E-mail: german.perez@ujat.mx [Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Avenida Universidad s/n, Col. Magisterial, Villahermosa, Tabasco 86040 (Mexico); Pantoja-Enríquez, J. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico en Energías Renovables, UNICACH, Libramiento Norte No 1150, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas 29039 (Mexico); Escobar-Morales, B. [Instituto Tecnológico de Cancún, Avenida Kábah Km 3, Cancún, Quintana Roo 77500 (Mexico); Martinez-Hernández, D.; Díaz-Flores, L.L.; Ricardez-Jiménez, C. [Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Avenida Universidad s/n, Col. Magisterial, Villahermosa, Tabasco 86040 (Mexico); Mathews, N.R.; Mathew, X. [Centro de Investigación en Energía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium sulfide thin-films were deposited on glass slides and SnO{sub 2}:F coated glass substrates by chemical bath deposition, sputtering and close-spaced sublimation techniques. The films were studied for the structural and opto-electronic properties after annealing in an ambient identical to that employed in the fabrication of CdTe/CdS devices. Quantum efficiency of the CdTe/CdS solar cells fabricated with CdS buffer films prepared by the three methods were investigated to understand the role of CdS film preparation method on the blue response of the devices. The higher blue response observed for the devices fabricated with chemical bath deposited CdS film is discussed. - Highlights: ► CdS films were prepared by different techniques. ► Role of CdS on the blue response of device was studied. ► Structural and optical properties of CdS were analyzed. ► Chemically deposited CdS has high blue transmittance. ► CdS deposition method influences diffusion of S and Te.

  4. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  5. Controlling the assembly of CdS nanorods via solvent and acidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, L. J. A.; Khodabakhsh, S.; Greenham, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report control over the phase behavior of CdS nanorods via the solvent and acidity. CdS nanorods were synthesized using alkane phosphonic acid ligands, which were replaced after synthesis by a series of aromatic ligands. Change of ligand enabled us to cast films from different solvents. By replac

  6. Effects of bacteria on CdS thin films used in technological devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpdoğan, S.; Adıgüzel, A. O.; Sahan, B.; Tunçer, M.; Metin Gubur, H.

    2017-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by the chemical bath deposition method at 70 {}^\\circ \\text{C} considering deposition times ranging from 2 h to 5 h. The optical band gaps of CdS thin films were found to be in the 2.42-2.37 eV range. CdS thin films had uniform spherical nano-size grains which had polycrystalline, hexagonal and cubic phases. The films had a characteristic electrical resistivity of the order of {{10}5} Ω \\text{cm} and n-type conductivity at room condition. CdS thin films were incubated in cultures of B.domonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which exist abundantly in the environment, and form biofilms. SEM images showed that S. aureus and K. pneumonia were detected significantly on the film surfaces with a few of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis cells attached. CdS thin film surface exhibits relatively good resistance to the colonization of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis. Optical results showed that the band gap of CdS thin films which interacted with the bacteria is 2.42 \\text{eV} . The crystal structure and electrical properties of CdS thin films were not affected by bacterial adhesion. The antimicrobial effect of CdS nanoparticles was different for different bacterial strains.

  7. Microstructural, optical and photocatalytic properties of CdS doped TiO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, S. H.; Shaaban, E. R.

    2011-11-01

    CdS doped TiO2 thin films (with CdS content=0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 at%) were grown on glass substrates. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the films are polycrystalline of monoclinic TiO2 structure. The microstructure parameters of the films such as crystallite size (Dν) and microstrain (e) are calculated. Both the crystallites size and the microstrain are decreased with increasing CdS content. The optical constants have been determined in terms of Murmann's exact equations. The refractive index and extinction coefficient are increased with increasing CdS content. The optical band gap is calculated in the strong absorption region. The possible optical transition in these films is found to be an allowed direct transition. The values of Egopt are found to decrease as the CdS content increased. The films with 3 at% CdS content have better decomposition efficiency than undoped TiO2. The films with 6 at% and 9 at% CdS content have decomposition efficiency comparable to that of undoped TiO2, although they have lower band gap. The CdS doped TiO2 could have a better impact on the decomposing of organic wastes.

  8. A new synthesis strategy for chiral CdS nanotubes based on a homochiral MOF template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xuan; Ma, Yu; Zhang, Caiyun; Su, Hao; Zhang, Jine; Tang, Bo

    2015-04-07

    We describe for the first time a convenient technique to prepare helical CdS nanotubes, with a MOF as the template. The prepared helical CdS nanotubes were remarkably sensitive to D/L-aspartic acid (Asp) and can be used as a potential sensor for enantioselective recognition of D/L-Asp.

  9. TRACE and CDS: JOP 146 Data Analysis Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2003-05-01

    Joint Observing Program 146 was designed to collect data on coronal loops using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on SoHO and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. These two instruments collectively provide high spatial, temporal and temperature resolution. Calibration of the 171 Å filter on TRACE to spectral line intensities collected by CDS combines these qualities to produce the most detailed data currently available for the solar corona. We have determined an absolute value for the wavelengths of ions in data collected on September 18, 2001. This wavelength was then used to determine the Doppler shifts for many points along a coronal loop. The resulting values for velocity and intensity of Mg IX were then compared to the flux measured by the TRACE 171 Å filter. We find a appreciable correlation between the 171 Å filter and Mg IX. We use this determination to develop method of Differential Emission Measure analysis that provides a DEM for any pixel along a loop at nearly the same instant in time. This is uncharacteristic of DEM curves typically created from CDS data, as these curves are highly time dependant.

  10. Spectral Dependent Photoelectrochemical Behaviors of CdS Sensitized ZnO Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, T; Hmar, J J L; Roy, J N; Mondal, S P

    2016-04-01

    CdS decorated ZnO nanorods have been grown by a combination of hydrothermal method and successive ion layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method. Optical absorption and emission properties of ZnO nanorods have been studied after sensitization with CdS nanoparticles. Current-voltage characteristics of ZnO nanorods and CdS sensitized ZnO nanorods have been studied in an electrochemical cell. The spectral dependent photocurrent and photopotential behaviors of ZnO nanorods and CdS sensitized ZnO nanorods have been investigated using monochromatic light of wavelength 300-700 nm. The photopotential recovery time have been estimated for CdS sensitized nanorods and pristine nanorods.

  11. Mesoporous structured MIPs@CDs fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive detection of TNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoufang; Lu, Hongzhi

    2016-11-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare mesoporous structured molecularly imprinted polymers capped carbon dots (M-MIPs@CDs) fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive and selective determination of TNT. The strategy using amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer" for imprinting simplify the imprinting process and provide well recognition sites accessibility. The as-prepared M-MIPs@CDs sensor, using periodic mesoporous silica as imprinting matrix, and amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer", exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward TNT with detection limit of 17nM. The recycling process was sustainable for 10 times without obvious efficiency decrease. The feasibility of the developed method in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of TNT in soil and water samples with satisfactory recoveries of 88.6-95.7%. The method proposed in this work was proved to be a convenient and practical way to prepare high sensitive and selective fluorescence MIPs@CDs sensors.

  12. Optical Properties of CdS Nanobelts and Nanosaws Synthesized by Thermal Evaporation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-wei Peng; Bing-suo Zou

    2012-01-01

    By a simple one-step H2-assisted thermal evaporation method,high quality CdS nanostructures have been successfully fabricated on Au coated Si substrates in large scale.The as-synthesized CdS nanostructures consisted of sword-like nanobelts and toothed nanosaws with a single-crystal hexagonal wurtzite structure.The deposition temperature played an important role in determining the size and morphology of the CdS nanostructures.A combination of vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-solid growth mechanisms were proposed to interpret the formation of CdS nanostructures.Photoluminescence measurement indicated that the nanobelts and nanosaws have a prominent green emission at about 512 nm,which is the band-to-band emission of CdS.The waveguide characteristics of both types of CdS nanostructures were observed and discussed.

  13. Preparation of CdS nanoparticles by hydrothermal method in microemulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZANG Jinxin; ZHAO Gaoling; HAN Gaorong

    2007-01-01

    CdS nanoparticles with good crystallinity were prepared by hydrothermal method in microemulsion composed of polyoxyethylene laurylether/water/cyclohexane/butanol.The structure and the size of the CdS nanoparticles were analyzed by TEM and XRD.The UV-Vis optical absorption of the samples was also investigated.The results show that hydrothermal treatment is an effective method to prepare CdS nanoparticles of hexagonal structure at lower temperature.The particles were in dimensional uniformity.The diameter of the CdS nanoparticles decreased with the increase of the molar ratio of water to surfactant.The minimum diameter of the CdS nanoparticles prepared in this work was about 10 nm.Obvious blue shift appeared in the UV-Vis absorption spectra.

  14. Structural and Optical Properties of CdS Thin Film Grown by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajpal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report synthesis and optical characterization of CdS thin films coated on glass substrate. The films were deposited using chemical bath deposition method. Scanning Electron microscopy shows a uniform film of CdS film at particular concentration and dipping time. The Energy Dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of Cd and S in the CdS film. X-Ray diffraction confirms the cubic structure of CdS deposited on glass and amorphous nature of glass. Optical and photoluminescence studies were done using UV-Visible spectroscopy and Photoluminescence spectroscopy respectively. We have determined bandgap by analyzing UV-Visible spectra results. Wettability studies were done using Optical Contact Angle, which confirms the hydrophobic nature of the CdS films.

  15. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  16. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar, E-mail: dr.samirmukherjee@gmail.com

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Toxic effect of CdS NPs on the growth and cell division in E. coli was studied. • CdS NPs affected cell surface topology and cell division. • Downregulation of both FtsZ and FtsQ was observed due to NPs exposure. • CdS NPs affected HeLa cell morphology with fragmented nuclei. • All such effects might be due to elevated oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC{sub 50} value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells.

  17. Galvanic displacement of metals on semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Melanie; Kelly, Joel A.; Henderson, Eric J.; Veinot, Jonathan G. C.

    2009-11-01

    We report the galvanic displacement (GD) of germanium from germanium nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) with silver. The Ge-NCs are synthesized by reductive thermal processing of germanium suboxide sol-gel prepolymers. Thermal processing yields size-controlled oxide-embedded Ge-NCs, which are liberated by dissolution of the germanium oxide matrix in water. Subsequent exposure of the freestanding Ge-NCs to aqueous solutions of AgNO3 leads to deposition of silver nanostructures by GD. The resulting metal structures were analyzed by XRD, XPS, TEM and EDX, confirming deposition of elemental silver in a variety of shapes and sizes.

  18. Galvanic displacement of metals on semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Melanie; Kelly, Joel A; Henderson, Eric J; Veinot, Jonathan G C, E-mail: jveinot@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Chemistry, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    We report the galvanic displacement (GD) of germanium from germanium nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) with silver. The Ge-NCs are synthesized by reductive thermal processing of germanium suboxide sol-gel prepolymers. Thermal processing yields size-controlled oxide-embedded Ge-NCs, which are liberated by dissolution of the germanium oxide matrix in water. Subsequent exposure of the freestanding Ge-NCs to aqueous solutions of AgNO{sub 3} leads to deposition of silver nanostructures by GD. The resulting metal structures were analyzed by XRD, XPS, TEM and EDX, confirming deposition of elemental silver in a variety of shapes and sizes.

  19. Photoassisted tuning of silicon nanocrystal photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Wang, Nam Sun; Reipa, Vytas

    2007-03-13

    Silicon is a rather inefficient light emitter due to the indirect band gap electronic structure, requiring a phonon to balance the electron momentum during the interband transition. Fortunately, momentum requirements are relaxed in the 1-5 nm diameter Si crystals as a result of quantum confinement effects, and bright photoluminescence (PL) in the UV-vis range is achieved. Photoluminescent Si nanocrystals along with the C- and SiC-based nanoparticles are considered bioinert and may lead to the development of biocompatible and smaller probes than the well-known metal chalcogenide-based quantum dots. Published Si nanocrystal production procedures typically do not allow for the fine control of the particle size. An accepted way to make the H-terminated Si nanocrystals consists of anodic Si wafer etching with the subsequent breakup of the porous film in an ultrasound bath. Resulting H-termination provides a useful platform for further chemical derivatization and conjugation to biomolecules. However, a rather polydisperse mixture is produced following the ultrasonic treatment, leading to the distributed band gap energies and the extent of surface passivation. From the technological point of view, a homogeneous nanoparticle size mixture is highly desirable. In this study, we offer an efficient way to reduce the H-terminated Si nanocrystal diameter and narrow size distribution through photocatalyzed dissolution in a HF/HNO3 acid mixture. Si particles were produced using the lateral etching of a Si wafer in a HF/EtOH/H2O bath followed by sonication in deaerated methanol. Initial suspensions exhibited broad photoluminescence in the red spectral region. Photoassisted etching was carried out by adding the HF/HNO3 acid mixture to the suspension and exposing it to a 340 nm light. Photoluminescence and absorbance spectra, measured during dissolution, show the gradual particle size decrease as confirmed by the photoluminescence blue shift. The simultaneous narrowing of the

  20. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Lanthanide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, James Henry [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We have had considerable success on this project, particularly in the understanding of the relationship between nanostructure and magnetic properties in lanthanide nanocrystals. We also have successfully facilitated the doctoral degrees of Dr. Suseela Somarajan, in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Dr. Melissa Harrison, in the Materials Science Program. The following passages summarize the various accomplishments that were featured in 9 publications that were generated based on support from this grant. We thank the Department of Energy for their generous support of our research efforts in this area of materials science, magnetism, and electron microscopy.