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Sample records for monocytogenes phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase

  1. Biochemical characterization of the tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family and its role in plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed; Vossen, J.H.; Zeijl, van Arjan; Dezhsetan, Sara; Testerink, Christa; Seidl, M.F.; Beck, Martina; Strutt, James; Robatzek, Silke; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Plants possess effective mechanisms to quickly respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. The rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes occurs early after the stimulation of plant immune-receptors. Genomes of different plant species encode multiple PLC homologs

  2. Biochemical characterization of the tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family and its role in plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd-el-Haliem, A.M.; Vossen, J.H.; van Zeijl, A.; Dezhsetan, S.; Testerink, C.; Seidl, M.F.; Beck, M.; Strutt, J.; Robatzek, S.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Plants possess effective mechanisms to quickly respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. The rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes occurs early after the stimulation of plant immune-receptors. Genomes of different plant species encode multiple PLC homologs

  3. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C: studies on synthetic substrates, inhibitors and a synthetic enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizitiu, D; Kriste, A G; Campbell, A S; Thatcher, G R

    1996-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition studies on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from B. Cereus were performed in order to gain an understanding of the mechanism of the PI-PLC family of enzymes and to aid inhibitor design. Inhibition studies on two synthetic cyclic phosphonate analogues (1,2) of inositol cyclic-1:2-monophosphate (cIP), glycerol-2-phosphate and vanadate were performed using natural phosphatidylinositol (PI) substrate in Triton X100 co-micelles and an NMR assay. Further inhibition studies on PI-PLC from B. Cereus were performed using a chromogenic, synthetic PI analogue (DPG-PI), an HPLC assay and Aerosol-OT (AOT), phytic acid and vanadate as inhibitors. For purposes of comparison, a model PI-PLC enzyme system was developed employing a synthetic Cu(II)-metallomicelle and a further synthetic PI analogue (IPP-PI). The studies employing natural PI substrate in Triton X100 co-micelles and synthetic DPG-PI in the absence of surfactant indicate three classes of PI-PLC inhibitors: (1) active-site directed inhibitors (e.g. 1,2); (2) water-soluble polyanions (e.g. tetravanadate, phytic acid); (3) surfactant anions (e.g. AOT). Three modes of molecular recognition are indicated to be important: (1) active site molecular recognition; (2) recognition at an anion-recognition site which may be the active site, and; (3) interfacial (or hydrophobic) recognition which may be exploited to increase affinity for the anion-recognition site in anionic surfactants such as AOT. The most potent inhibition of PI-PLC was observed by tetravanadate and AOT. The metallomicelle model system was observed to mimic PI-PLC in reproducing transesterification of the PI analogue substrate to yield cIP as product and in showing inhibition by phytic acid and AOT.

  4. Plant phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C at the center of plant innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed M.; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding plant resistance to pathogenic microbes requires detailed information on the molecular mechanisms controlling the execution of plant innate immune responses. A growing body of evidence places phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes immediately downstream of activated

  5. Isolation of cDNA encoding the catalytic site of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Coffea arabica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cach, Lucila A; Ortiz-García, Matilde M; Minero-García, Yereni; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando; Hernández-Sotomayor, SM Teresa; Suárez-Solís, Víctor M

    2008-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the catalytic site of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) was isolated from Coffea arabica suspension cells. The cDNA (designated CaPLC) encodes a polypeptide of 308 amino acids, containing the catalytic X and Y domains, and has 99% identity to the soybean gene. Recombinant CaPLC protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and used to produce a polyclonal antibody. The peptide has a molecular mass of 27 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analyses. Immunoblots revealed the presence of PLC-like proteins in the tissues of different plant species. PMID:19513191

  6. Modulation of Bacillus thuringiensis Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Phospholipase C Activity by Mutations in the Putative Dimerization Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, X.; Shao, C; Zhang, X; Zambonelli, C; Redfield, A; Head, J; Seaton, B; Roberts, M

    2009-01-01

    Cleavage of phosphatidylinositol (PI) to inositol 1,2-(cyclic)-phosphate (cIP) and cIP hydrolysis to inositol 1-phosphate by Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C are activated by the enzyme binding to phosphatidylcholine (PC) surfaces. Part of this reflects improved binding of the protein to interfaces. However, crystallographic analysis of an interfacially impaired phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase (W47A/W242A) suggested protein dimerization might occur on the membrane. In the W47A/W242A dimer, four tyrosine residues from one monomer interact with the same tyrosine cluster of the other, forming a tight dimer interface close to the membrane binding regions. We have constructed mutant proteins in which two or more of these tyrosine residues have been replaced with serine. Phospholipid binding and enzymatic activity of these mutants have been examined to assess the importance of these residues to enzyme function. Replacing two tyrosines had small effects on enzyme activity. However, removal of three or four tyrosine residues weakened PC binding and reduced PI cleavage by the enzyme as well as PC activation of cIP hydrolysis. Crystal structures of Y247S/Y251S in the absence and presence of myo-inositol as well as Y246S/Y247S/Y248S/Y251S indicate that both mutant proteins crystallized as monomers, were very similar to one another, and had no change in the active site region. Kinetic assays, lipid binding, and structural results indicate that either (i) a specific PC binding site, critical for vesicle activities and cIP activation, has been impaired, or (ii) the reduced dimerization potential for Y246S/Y247S/Y248S and Y246S/Y247S/Y248S/Y251S is responsible for their reduced catalytic activity in all assay systems.

  7. Identification of tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) family members and the role of PLC4 and PLC6 in HR and disease resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, J.H.; Abd-El-Haliem, A.; Fradin, E.F.; Berg, van den G.C.M.; Ekengren, S.K.; Meijer, H.J.G.; Seifi Abdolabad, A.R.; Bai, Y.; Have, ten A.; Munnik, T.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The perception of pathogen-derived elicitors by plants has been suggested to involve phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) signalling. Here we show that PLC isoforms are required for the hypersensitive response (HR) and disease resistance. We characterised the tomato [Solanum

  8. Plant phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C at the center of plant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed M; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2017-03-01

    Understanding plant resistance to pathogenic microbes requires detailed information on the molecular mechanisms controlling the execution of plant innate immune responses. A growing body of evidence places phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes immediately downstream of activated immune receptors, well upstream of the initiation of early defense responses. An increase of the cytoplasmic levels of free Ca(2+) , lowering of the intercellular pH and the oxidative burst are a few examples of such responses and these are regulated by PI-PLCs. Consequently, PI-PLC activation represents an early primary signaling switch between elicitation and response involving the controlled hydrolysis of essential signaling phospholipids, thereby simultaneously generating lipid and non-lipid second messenger molecules required for a swift cellular defense response. Here, we elaborate on the signals generated by PI-PLCs and their respective downstream effects, while providing an inventory of different types of evidence describing the involvement of PI-PLCs in various aspects of plant immunity. We project the discussed information into a model describing the cellular events occurring after the activation of plant immune receptors. With this review we aim to provide new insights supporting future research on plant PI-PLCs and the development of plants with improved resistance. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. Biochemical characterization of the tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family and its role in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed M; Vossen, Jack H; van Zeijl, Arjan; Dezhsetan, Sara; Testerink, Christa; Seidl, Michael F; Beck, Martina; Strutt, James; Robatzek, Silke; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2016-09-01

    Plants possess effective mechanisms to quickly respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. The rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes occurs early after the stimulation of plant immune-receptors. Genomes of different plant species encode multiple PLC homologs belonging to one class, PLCζ. Here we determined whether all tomato homologs encode active enzymes and whether they can generate signals that are distinct from one another. We searched the recently completed tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) genome sequence and identified a total of seven PLCs. Recombinant proteins were produced for all tomato PLCs, except for SlPLC7. The purified proteins showed typical PLC activity, as different PLC substrates were hydrolysed to produce diacylglycerol. We studied SlPLC2, SlPLC4 and SlPLC5 enzymes in more detail and observed distinct requirements for Ca(2+) ions and pH, for both their optimum activity and substrate preference. This indicates that each enzyme could be differentially and specifically regulated in vivo, leading to the generation of PLC homolog-specific signals in response to different stimuli. PLC overexpression and specific inhibition of PLC activity revealed that PLC is required for both specific effector- and more general "pattern"-triggered immunity. For the latter, we found that both the flagellin-triggered response and the internalization of the corresponding receptor, Flagellin Sensing 2 (FLS2) of Arabidopsis thaliana, are suppressed by inhibition of PLC activity. Altogether, our data support an important role for PLC enzymes in plant defence signalling downstream of immune receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  10. Cloning and expression of AtPLC6, a gene encoding a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaojing; CAO Zhixiang; LIU Guoqin; Madan K. Bhattacharrya; REN Dongtao

    2004-01-01

    A full-length eDNA clone corresponding to a putative phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PIPLC) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana by screening a cDNA library and using RT-PCR strategy. The cDNA, designated AtPLC6, encodes a putative polypeptide of 578 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 66251.84 D and a pI of 7.24. The sequence analysis indicates that the polypeptide contains X, Y, EF-hand and C2 domains. The overall structure of putative AtPLC6 protein, like other plant PI-PLCs, is most similar to that of mammalian PLC& The recombinant AtPLC6 protein expressed in E. coli was able to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biophosphate (PIP2) to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphate (IP3) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG). The protein hydrolyzes PIP2 in a Ca2+-dependent manner and the optimum concentration of Ca2+ is 10 μmol/L.These results suggested that AtPLC6 gene encodes a genuine PI-PLC. Northern blot analysis showed that the AtPLC6 gene is expressed at low level in all examined tissues, such as roots,stems, leaves, flowers, siliques and seedlings under normal growth conditions. The gene is strongly induced under low temperature and weakly induced under various stresses,such as ABA, high-salt stress and heat. These results suggested that AtPLC6 might be involved in the signal-transduction pathways of cold responses of the plants.

  11. Identification of tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) family members and the role of PLC4 and PLC6 in HR and disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Jack H; Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed; Fradin, Emilie F; van den Berg, Grardy C M; Ekengren, Sophia K; Meijer, Harold J G; Seifi, Alireza; Bai, Yuling; ten Have, Arjen; Munnik, Teun; Thomma, Bart P H J; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2010-04-01

    The perception of pathogen-derived elicitors by plants has been suggested to involve phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) signalling. Here we show that PLC isoforms are required for the hypersensitive response (HR) and disease resistance. We characterised the tomato [Solanum lycopersicum (Sl)] PLC gene family. Six Sl PLC-encoding cDNAs were isolated and their expression in response to infection with the pathogenic fungus Cladosporium fulvum was studied. We found significant regulation at the transcriptional level of the various SlPLCs, and SlPLC4 and SlPLC6 showed distinct expression patterns in C. fulvum-resistant Cf-4 tomato. We produced the encoded proteins in Escherichia coli and found that both genes encode catalytically active PI-PLCs. To test the requirement of these Sl PLCs for full Cf-4-mediated recognition of the effector Avr4, we knocked down the expression of the encoding genes by virus-induced gene silencing. Silencing of SlPLC4 impaired the Avr4/Cf-4-induced HR and resulted in increased colonisation of Cf-4 plants by C. fulvum expressing Avr4. Furthermore, expression of the gene in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced the Avr4/Cf-4-induced HR. Silencing of SlPLC6 did not affect HR, whereas it caused increased colonisation of Cf-4 plants by the fungus. Interestingly, Sl PLC6, but not Sl PLC4, was also required for resistance to Verticillium dahliae, mediated by the transmembrane Ve1 resistance protein, and to Pseudomonas syringae, mediated by the intracellular Pto/Prf resistance protein couple. We conclude that there is a differential requirement of PLC isoforms for the plant immune response and that Sl PLC4 is specifically required for Cf-4 function, while Sl PLC6 may be a more general component of resistance protein signalling.

  12. InlB-mediated Listeria monocytogenes internalization requires a balanced phospholipase D activity maintained through phospho-cofilin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Xuelin; Yu, Rentao; Ji, Lei; Zhen, Dongyu; Tao, Sha; Li, Shuai; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Feng, Zhe; Li, Xianping; Han, Gaige; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes into non-phagocytic cells is tightly controlled by host cell actin dynamics and cell membrane alterations. However, knowledge about the impact of phosphatidylcholine cleavage driven by host cell phospholipase D (PLD) on Listeria internalization into

  13. InlB-mediated Listeria monocytogenes internalization requires a balanced phospholipase D activity maintained through phospho-cofilin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Xuelin; Yu, Rentao; Ji, Lei; Zhen, Dongyu; Tao, Sha; Li, Shuai; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Feng, Zhe; Li, Xianping; Han, Gaige; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    2011-01-01

    Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes into non-phagocytic cells is tightly controlled by host cell actin dynamics and cell membrane alterations. However, knowledge about the impact of phosphatidylcholine cleavage driven by host cell phospholipase D (PLD) on Listeria internalization into epitheli

  14. Interleukin-22-Induced Antimicrobial Phospholipase A2 Group IIA Mediates Protective Innate Immunity of Nonhematopoietic Cells against Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Yamato; Shiono, Takeru; Yahagi, Ayano; Hamada, Satoru; Umemura, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-07

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen which establishes intracellular parasitism in various cells, including macrophages and nonhematopoietic cells, such as hepatocytes. It has been reported that several proinflammatory cytokines have pivotal roles in innate protection against L. monocytogenes infection. We found that a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin 22 (IL-22), was expressed by CD3(+) CD4(+) T cells at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection in mice. To assess the influence of IL-22 on L. monocytogenes infection in hepatocytes, cells of a human hepatocellular carcinoma line, HepG2, were treated with IL-22 before L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. Gene expression analysis of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells identified phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2G2A) as an upregulated antimicrobial molecule. Addition of recombinant PLA2G2A to the HepG2 culture significantly suppressed L. monocytogenes infection. Culture supernatant of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells contained bactericidal activity against L. monocytogenes, and the activity was abrogated by a specific PLA2G2A inhibitor, demonstrating that HepG2 cells secreted PLA2G2A, which killed extracellular L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, colocalization of PLA2G2A and L. monocytogenes was detected in the IL-22-treated infected HepG2 cells, which suggests involvement of PLA2G2A in the mechanism of intracellular killing of L. monocytogenes by HepG2 cells. These results suggest that IL-22 induced at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection enhances innate immunity against L. monocytogenes in the liver by stimulating hepatocytes to produce an antimicrobial molecule, PLA2G2A.

  15. Listeriolysin O suppresses phospholipase C-mediated activation of the microbicidal NADPH oxidase to promote Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Grace Y; Fattouh, Ramzi; Muise, Aleixo M; Grinstein, Sergio; Higgins, Darren E; Brumell, John H

    2011-12-15

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes produces phospholipases C (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) and the pore-forming cytolysin listeriolysin O (LLO) to escape the phagosome and replicate within the host cytosol. We found that PLCs can also activate the phagocyte NADPH oxidase during L. monocytogenes infection, a response that would adversely affect pathogen survival. However, secretion of LLO inhibits the NADPH oxidase by preventing its localization to phagosomes. LLO-deficient bacteria can be complemented by perfringolysin O, a related cytolysin, suggesting that other pathogens may also use pore-forming cytolysins to inhibit the NADPH oxidase. Our studies demonstrate that while the PLCs induce antimicrobial NADPH oxidase activity, this effect is alleviated by the pore-forming activity of LLO. Therefore, the combined activities of PLCs and LLO on membrane lysis and the inhibitory effects of LLO on NADPH oxidase activity allow L. monocytogenes to efficiently escape the phagosome while avoiding the microbicidal respiratory burst. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stalling autophagy: a new function for Listeria phospholipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Tattoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that induces its own uptake in non-phagocytic cells. Following invasion, Listeria escapes from the entry vacuole through the secretion of a pore-forming toxin, listeriolysin O (LLO that acts to damage and disrupt the vacuole membrane. Listeria then replicates in the cytosol and is able to spread from cell-to-cell using actin-based motility. In addition to LLO, Listeria produces two phospholipase toxins, a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC, encoded by plcB and a broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC, encoded by plcA, which contribute to bacterial virulence. It has long been recognized that secretion of PI- and PC-PLC enables the disruption of the double membrane vacuole during cell-to-cell spread, and those phospholipases have also been shown to augment LLO-dependent escape from the entry endosome. However, a specific role for Listeria phospholipases during the cytosolic stage of infection has not been previously reported. In a recent study, we demonstrated that Listeria PI-PLC and PC-PLC contribute to the bacterial escape from autophagy through a mechanism that involves direct inhibition of the autophagic flux in the infected cells [Tattoli et al. EMBO J (2013, 32, 3066-3078].

  17. Misregulation of the broad-range phospholipase C activity increases the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes to intracellular killing by neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Bryant S; Abi Abdallah, Delbert S; Park, Justin J; Nazarova, Evgeniya V; Pavinski Bitar, Alan; Maurer, Kirk J; Marquis, Hélène

    2014-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that tightly regulates the activities of various virulence factors during infection. A mutant strain (the plcBDpro mutant) that has lost the ability to control the activity of a phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is attenuated a hundred fold in mice. This attenuation is not due to a lack of bacterial fitness, but appears to result from a modified host response to infection. The transcriptomic pattern of immune-related genes indicated that PC-PLC did not enhance the innate immune response in infected macrophages. However, it partially protected the cells from bacteria-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation. In mice, the plcBDpro mutant transiently caused an increase in liver pathology, as judged by the size of neutrophil-filled micro-abscesses. Moreover, the plcBDpro mutant was more susceptible to intracellular killing by neutrophils than wild-type L. monocytogenes. Together, these data indicate that in vivo attenuation of the plcBDpro mutant results from its reduced ability to disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis and to resist intracellular killing by neutrophils.

  18. A single substitution in 5'-untranslated region of plcB is involved in enhanced broad-range phospholipase C activity in Listeria monocytogenes strain H4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Bai; Jianshun Chen; Qiaomiao Chen; Xiaokai Luo; Weihuan Fang; Lingli Jiang

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether the in vitro phospholipase activity in Listeria monocytogenes strain H4 was due to two nucleotide mutations (C to T at position -26 and A to G at position + 1) in plcB or resulted from regulatory activation, two mutants H4-plcB-ml (single mutation at position -26) and H4-plcB-m2 (substitution at both positions) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the two mutants had significantly lower transcription of plcB than their parent strain H4 and did not show phospho-Hpase activity on the egg yolk agar, implying that the apparent phospholipase activity of strain H4 could be related to single substitution at position -26 ofplcB, most probably by its 5t-untranslated region (5'-UTR) regulation mechanism. Tn917-based transposon mutagenesis generated eight L. monocytogenes mutants lacking phospholipase activity among 560 mutant candidates. Seven mutants had transposon insertion into prfA (encoding positive regulatory factor A) open reading frame, whereas only one mutant (WF-L127) was inserted into the P1 promoter region ofprfA (prfAP1). Transcription of major virulence genes was significantly lower in both types of mutants than in their parent strain H4. Disruption of prfAP1 in WFL127 abolished its phospholipase C activity but did not change its hemolytic phenotype, indicating that plcB was more dependent on prfA regulation than hly. Taken together, this study presents some evidence for the regulation ofplcB expression by its 5'-UTR mechanism.

  19. The ability of Listeria monocytogenes PI-PLC to facilitate escape from the macrophage phagosome is dependent on host PKCbeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussin, Mathilde A; Leitges, Michael; Goldfine, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes are facultative intracellular pathogenic bacteria that can infect macrophages as well as non-professional phagocytes. After entry in the host cell, the bacteria escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. In murine macrophages and in cell lines derived from these cells, escape of L. monocytogenes from the phagosome is absolutely dependent on listeriolysin O (LLO) and facilitated by a secreted phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Work in this laboratory has previously demonstrated a LLO and PI-PLC-dependent translocation of host PKCbeta isoforms. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCbeta resulted in a significant reduction in permeabilization of the phagosome, and in the number of bacteria reaching the cytosol. These findings led to the prediction that the bacterial PI-PLC promotes escape through the production of diacylglycerol leading to the activation of host PKCbeta. To test this hypothesis, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMf) obtained from PKCbeta knockout (PKCbetaKO) or C57Bl/6 mice were infected with L. monocytogenes. We observed that wild-type L. monocytogenes escapes from the phagosome of PKCbetaKO BMMf as well as from C57Bl/6 BMMf. However, in PKCbetaKO BMMf, L. monocytogenes uses a PI-PLC-independent, but phosphatidylcholine-preferring PLC (PC-PLC)-dependent pathway to facilitate escape. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that PI-PLC promotes escape through mobilization of host PKCbeta.

  20. Prevalence of Listeria species including L. monocytogenes from apparently healthy animals at Baroda Zoo, Gujarat State, India

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    M.M. Yadav

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeriosis is a infectious bacterial disease of domestic and wild animals and humans. A total of 56 faecal samples were collected from mammals and birds at Baroda Zoo, Vadodara, Gujarat State, India. Confirmation of the isolates was based on biochemical tests followed by phenotypic characterization by hemolysis on sheep blood agar, Christie Atkins Munch-Petersen (CAMP test, phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC assay and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC assay. The isolates were subjected to genotypic characterization with the help of polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay for five virulence-associated genes, plcA, prfA, hlyA, actA and iap. Listeria monocytogenes isolates were further subjected to multiplex-PCR based serotyping. From 56 samples three (5.36% were found positive for Listeria spp. of which one (1.79% was identified as L. monocytogenes and two (3.57% were identified as L. innocua. The isolate of L. monocytogenes was hemolytic, CAMP positive, PI-PLC positive, hlyA, pclA and prfA positive by PCR and turned out to be PC-PLC positive and was serotyped as 4b.

  1. Exclusion of the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C beta 3 (PLC beta 3) gene as candidate for the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M J; Landsvater, R M; Sinke, R J; Geurts van Kessel, A; Lips, C J; Höppener, J W

    1997-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by hyperplasia and neoplasia in several endocrine organs. The MEN 1 gene, which is most probably a tumor suppressor gene, has been localized to a 900-kb region on chromosome 11q13. The human pho

  2. Characteristics of the biologically active 35-kDa metalloprotease virulence factor from Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffey, A; van den Burg, B; Veltman, R; Abee, T

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen, synthesizes an extracellular protease which is responsible for the maturation of phosphatidylcholine phospholipase C (lecithinase), a virulence factor involved in cell-to-cell spread. This work describes the environmental parameters

  3. PROFILIN ACTIVATES BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS PHOSPHOINOSITIDE SPECIFIC PHOSPHOLIPASE C

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    Sandeepta Burgula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many extracellular signaling molecules including hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters andimmunoglobulins elicit intracellular responses by activating phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLCupon binding to their cell surface receptors. Activated PLC catalyses the hydrolysis of Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 to generate DAG and IP3 , which act as signaling molecules that control various cellular processes.Exploring the mechanism of regulation of PLC activity may lead to understanding various signaling events thatregulate cell growth and differentiation. One of the dramatic effects of profilin is inhibition of PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC-γ in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, the effect of profilin on Phosphotidylinositol specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC purified from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt was examined. Assay of PI-PLC activity indicated that Bovine profilinactivated the hydrolysis of phosphotidylinositol (PI by BtPI-PLC in a concentration dependent manner under in vitroconditions. A 250 % increase in activity was noted in the presence of profilin but not in presence of phosphoprofilin. Inthe presence of profilin more proteins are observed in the soluble fraction. In conclusion it can be stated that thatprofilin activates bacterial PLC activity towards PI hydrolysis

  4. Molecular Serotyping and Pathogenic Potential of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Raman; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, an important bacterial pathogen, is responsible for foodborne illnesses worldwide. Examination of food samples for the presence of L. monocytogenes and assessment of their pathogenicity is usually an effective strategy in the prevention of listeriosis. In the present study, we have tested 307 samples of milk and milk products from various places in Tamil Nadu, India for the presence of L. monocytogenes using ISO 11290 and U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual methods. 16S rDNA sequencing and duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for prs and iap genes were used to identify L. monocytogenes at the species level. Fifteen of the 307 samples screen tested positive for L. monocytogenes. Molecular serotyping of the L. monocytogenes isolates by multiplex PCR revealed the predominance of the serogroups 1/2a and 4b. Fourteen of the 15 isolates contained all the virulence genes (inlA, inlB, hlyA, and plcA) screened for using multiplex PCR. Only one isolate of L. monocytogenes was negative for the plcA gene and in vitro phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C activity. L. monocytogenes strains that belong to the serogroup 4b exhibited higher nematocidal activity against Caenorhabditis elegans than the serogroup 1/2a. Worms infected with L. monocytogenes were symptomatic with aberrant contraction of body muscles, loss of pharyngeal pumping, and decreased locomotion, which highlights the pathogenic potential of the L. monocytogenes isolates.

  5. Superantigen and HLA-DR ligation induce phospholipase-C gamma 1 activation in class II+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Odum, Niels; Grosmaire, L;

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial enterotoxin superantigens bind directly to HLA class II molecules (HLA-DR) expressed on both APC and activated human T cells, and simultaneously bind to certain V beta chains of the TCR. In this report, we compared early T cell signaling events in human alloantigen-stimulated T cells when...... activated by HLA-DR ligation through antibody cross-linking or by direct enterotoxin superantigen binding. Both types of stimuli induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and an increase in intracellular calcium concentration; however....... In addition, down-modulation of CD3 receptors with antibody demonstrated that superantigen-induced signaling events were CD3-dependent. Superantigen signaling was also class II-dependent, in that resting T cells were not responsive to direct enterotoxin stimulation. To address how early signal transducing...

  6. Superantigen and HLA-DR ligation induce phospholipase-C gamma 1 activation in class II+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Odum, Niels; Grosmaire, L

    1992-01-01

    activated by HLA-DR ligation through antibody cross-linking or by direct enterotoxin superantigen binding. Both types of stimuli induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and an increase in intracellular calcium concentration; however......, superantigen-induced signaling was stronger than class II ligation alone. Antibody-mediated ligation of HLA-DR with CD3 resulted in augmented PLC gamma 1 activation and increased calcium mobilization, consistent with a mechanism of superantigen activity through a combination of class II and CD3/Ti signals...... to the PLC gamma 1 signal transduction pathway, and that coligation of HLA-DR with CD3 augments T cell signaling comparable to that induced by enterotoxin superantigen. Thus, we suggest that superantigen-induced early signaling responses in activated T cells may be due in part to class II transmembrane...

  7. Phospholipase A2 Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, John E.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2008-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) superfamily consists of many different groups of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the sn-2 ester bond in a variety of different phospholipids. The products of this reaction, a free fatty acid, and lysophospholipid have many different important physiological roles. There are five main types of PLA2: the secreted sPLA2’s, the cytosolic cPLA2’s, the Ca2+ independent iPLA2’s, the PAF acetylhydrolases, and the lysosomal PLA2’s. This review focuses on the superfam...

  8. Listeria monocytogenes: diagnostic problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.; Hazeleger, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    The first isolation methods for the detection of Listeria spp. were generally based on the direct culture of samples on simple agar media, but isolation of the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes was difficult. In time, new techniques were developed, based on a variety of selective and elective agents

  9. Listeria monocytogenes endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, B D; Evans, T; Sage, R

    1985-01-01

    A fatal case of endocarditis due to Listeria monocytogenes is reported. Case reports of endocarditis due to this organism are rare but indicate a higher mortality than with many other causes of bacterial endocarditis. The size of the problem may be underestimated because the organism has a "diphtheroid' appearance and may be incorrectly dismissed as a contaminant.

  10. Mammalian phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol (DAG). DAG and IP(3) each control diverse cellular processes and are also substrates for synthesis of other important signaling molecules. PLC is thus central to many important interlocking regulatory networks. Mammals express six families of PLCs, each with both unique and overlapping controls over expression and subcellular distribution. Each PLC also responds acutely to its own spectrum of activators that includes heterotrimeric G protein subunits, protein tyrosine kinases, small G proteins, Ca(2+), and phospholipids. Mammalian PLCs are autoinhibited by a region in the catalytic TIM barrel domain that is the target of much of their acute regulation. In combination, the PLCs act as a signaling nexus that integrates numerous signaling inputs, critically governs PIP(2) levels, and regulates production of important second messengers to determine cell behavior over the millisecond to hour timescale.

  11. Phospholipases and their industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, L; Vind, J; Oxenbøll, K M; Svendsen, A; Patkar, S

    2007-02-01

    Phospholipids are present in all living organisms. They are a major component of all biological membranes, along with glycolipids and cholesterol. Enzymes aimed at modifying phospholipids, namely, phospholipases, are consequently widespread in nature, playing very diverse roles from aggression in snake venom to signal transduction and digestion in humans. In this review, we give a general overview of phospholipases A1, A2, C and D from a sequence and structural perspective and their industrial application. The use of phospholipases in industrial processes has grown hand-in-hand with our ability to clone and express the genes in microbial hosts with commercially attractive amounts. Further, the use in industrial processes is increasing by optimizing the enzymes by protein engineering. Here, we give a perspective on the work done to date to express phospholipases in heterologous hosts and the efforts to optimize them by protein engineering. We will draw attention to the industrial processes where phospholipases play a key role and show how the use of a phospholipase for oil degumming leads to substantial environmental benefits. This illustrates a very general trend: the use of enzymes as an alternative to chemical processes to make products often provides a cleaner solution for the industrial processes. In a world with great demands on non-polluting, energy saving technical solutions--white biotechnology is a strong alternative.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis and Expression Profiling of the Phospholipase C Gene Family in Soybean (Glycine max.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawei Wang

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC hydrolyses phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate to produce diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. It plays an important role in plant development and abiotic stress responses. However, systematic analysis and expression profiling of the phospholipase C (PLC gene family in soybean have not been reported. In this study, 12 putative PLC genes were identified in the soybean genome. Soybean PLCs were found on chromosomes 2, 11, 14 and 18 and encoded 58.8-70.06 kD proteins. Expression pattern analysis by RT-PCR demonstrated that expression of the GmPLCs was induced by PEG, NaCl and saline-alkali treatments in roots and leaves. GmPLC transcripts accumulated specifically in roots after ABA treatment. Furthermore, GmPLC transcripts were analyzed in various tissues. The results showed that GmPLC7 was highly expressed in most tissues, whereas GmPLC12 was expressed in early pods specifically. In addition, subcellular localization analysis was carried out and confirmed that GmPLC10 was localized in the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our genomic analysis of the soybean PLC family provides an insight into the regulation of abiotic stress responses and development. It also provides a solid foundation for the functional characterization of the soybean PLC gene family.

  13. [Listeria monocytogenes in food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mícková, V

    1992-12-01

    As in recent years laboratory diagnostics of listeria has become part of food microbiology, the frequency of occurrence of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes has been followed in various kinds of foods for a year. A total of 51 strains of L. monocytogenes (7.2%) was isolated from 700 kinds of samples (raw milk, pasteurized milk, meat surface, poultry, cheeses, thermally not treated meat products, food--industry machinery). As can be seen in Tab. I, the highest number of strains was isolated from meat surfaces (13.5%), followed by meat--industry machinery (12.72%), poultry (10%) and cheeses (5%). The lower numbers of strains were found out in thermally not treated meat products (3.8%) and in raw milk (3.3%). Pasteurized milk did not contain any strains. Our findings in raw milk (3.3%) and in pasteurized milk (0) are in agreement with the data cited e. g. by authors from the USA (Lovett et al., 1987), who mention the value of 4.2% in raw milk and the zero value in pasteurized milk. The percentage of strains monitored in cheeses (5%) can be evaluated as low as the assortment of investigated cheeses was small (all strains were isolated from soft ripening cheeses). German authors (Tham et al., 1988) speak about the 2.5% percentage of L. monocytogenes strains; this is in keeping with our findings. The findings in thermally not treated meat products (3.8%) can be evaluated as low although the number of strains found in raw meat was high.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Molecular characterization and antibiogram of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from chicken and mutton of retail markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar B. N., Nadeem Fairoze , Madhavaprasad C. B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate Listeria monocytogenes from chicken and mutton meat sold at retail outlets and to characterize isolates for virulence determinants. Methods: Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from chicken and mutton meat samples using ISO: 11290 method. Multiplex PCR was performed for the detection of virulence associated genes. Results: Out of 198 retail meat samples (72 chicken and 126 mutton analyzed, Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from 4.5% (8.3% chicken and 2.3% mutton samples. All the 9 isolates (6 from chicken and 3 from mutton belonged to 1/2a servar and carried virulence genes viz. haemolysin (hlyA, phosphatidylinositol phospholipase (plcA, actin polymerization protein (actA and invasive associative protein p60 (Iap. Conclusion: L. monocytogenes is an organism of food safety and public health significance, its recovery from the meat sold at retail outlets indicated breach in the quality assurance. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(2: 65-68

  15. [Hematometra & Listeria monocytogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Arzapalo, E; Pérez Mendizábal, A; Herrera Avalos, I; Gorozpe Calvillo, J I

    2001-05-01

    The hematometra is a nosological entity that may not always be attributed to an embryonic defect of the paramesonefros; cervical-vaginal infections such as etiological possibilities due to Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), cervix malignant neoplasias, iatrogenias due to endometrial ablation with Lasser, traumatic bloody uterine curetage and because of cervical cryocoagulation or electrocoagulation are also mentioned. The case to be reported is from a woman in reproductive stage, who is 32 years old, and had menarca at the age of 13, starting her sexual life at 31, not using any method to control her fertility. When having an eight-week amenorrhea after 8 months of marriage, she visited the doctor for assumed pregnancy, within the prenatal analysis a pelvic echographic study was requested, finding out images that we concluded as hematometra, having been drained and demonstrated the presence of LM by anti-Lm antibodies, being administered Azitromicina and Espiramicina.

  16. Evidence for the involvement of ActA in maturation of the Listeria monocytogenes phagosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mathilde A Poussin; Howard Goldfine

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), a Gram-positive facultative bacterium, is the causative agent of listeriosis, a food-borne disease affecting humans [1]. During infections, Lm enters phagosomes from which it escapes into the cytoplasm. Listeriolysin O (LLO) is essential, and two phospholipases play a role in this process [1]. Actin polymerization provides the propulsive force that moves the bacteria through the cytoplasm and into adjacent cells. It is initiated by the interaction of the N-terminal domain of ActA, a 639 amino acid membrane protein, with the host Arp2/3 complex.

  17. Fødevarebetinget listeria monocytogenes endokarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Bundgaard, Henning; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Listeria monocytogenes is rare and mainly seen in immunosuppressed patients. Infection with L. monocytogenes has a mortality rate of 30%. We present a case report of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and endocarditis in a 70-year-old man with several co-morbidities and following four...... major surgical procedures. This illustrates the findings and characteristics in one of the 16 patients who died in 2013 and 2014 this summer due to sausage-related L. monocytogenes infection....

  18. Neuroinfections due to Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streharova, A; Babjakova, A; Moravcikova, A; Harnicarova, A; Holeckova, K; Lesnakova, A; Sladeckova, V; Seckova, S; Kisac, P; Beno, P

    2007-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is not a rare pathogen causing meningitis, mainly in small children and in close contacts to livestock. The pathogen is naturally resistant to cephalosporins and some glycopeptides as well, therefore despite of syndromologic diagnosis of meningitis and initial therapy with 3rd generation cephalosporins according to the guidelines therapeutic failures with clinical consequences may occur.

  19. Listeria monocytogenes en alimentos: ¿son todos los aislamientos igual de virulentos? Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes: are all the isolates equally virulent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. López

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes es un patógeno humano que se transmite a través de los alimentos y que causa infecciones graves, con una alta tasa de mortalidad. A pesar de la ubicuidad del microorganismo, la tasa real de la enfermedad es bastante baja y se asocia casi siempre a condiciones predisponentes. Tradicionalmente se consideraba que los aislamientos presentes en los alimentos y en el ambiente tenían la misma capacidad patogénica que los aislamientos de origen clínico. Pero el análisis de mutaciones en los genes de determinados factores de virulencia (internalina, hemolisina, fosfolipasas, proteína de superficie ActA y proteína reguladora PrfA, los estudios cuantitativos realizados con cultivos celulares y la genética de poblaciones, están replanteando la discusión sobre la variabilidad de la virulencia de L. monocytogenes. A pesar de todos estos avances, no existe un único marcador que permita comprobar la virulencia de los aislamientos naturales de esta especie. Probablemente en el futuro, la combinación de diferentes marcadores moleculares permitirá detectar los alimentos contaminados sólo por los clones virulentos de L. monocytogenes, con lo que se mejorará la prevención de la listeriosis humana transmitida por alimentos.Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne human pathogen responsible for invasive infections presenting overall a high mortality. Despite the ubiquity of the microorganism, the actual disease rate is quite low and the disease is most often associated with an underlying predisposition. Foodborne and environmental isolates were traditionally considered of similar pathogenicity compared to clinical isolates. But the analysis of mutations in the genes encoding specific virulence factors (internalin, hemolysin, phospholipases, surface protein ActA and regulator protein PrfA, quantitative studies with cell cultures and population genetics have raised considerable concerns about virulence differences among L

  20. Posttranslocation Chaperone PrsA2 Regulates the Maturation and Secretion of Listeria monocytogenes Proprotein Virulence Factors ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Brian M.; Zemansky, Jason; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Marquis, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    PrsA2 is a conserved posttranslocation chaperone and a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that contributes to the virulence of the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. One of the phenotypes associated with a prsA2 mutant is decreased activity of the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). PC-PLC is made as a proenzyme whose maturation is mediated by a metalloprotease (Mpl). The proforms of PC-PLC and Mpl accumulate at the membrane-cell wall interface until a de...

  1. Posttranslocation Chaperone PrsA2 Regulates the Maturation and Secretion of Listeria monocytogenes Proprotein Virulence Factors ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Brian M.; Zemansky, Jason; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Marquis, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    PrsA2 is a conserved posttranslocation chaperone and a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that contributes to the virulence of the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. One of the phenotypes associated with a prsA2 mutant is decreased activity of the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). PC-PLC is made as a proenzyme whose maturation is mediated by a metalloprotease (Mpl). The proforms of PC-PLC and Mpl accumulate at the membrane-cell wall interface until a de...

  2. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas Darwin

    There are two ways in which bacteria survive killing by antibiotics. The most well-known, is antibiotic resistance, which results from the acquisition of a resistance gene or mutation that allows bacteria to grow and divide in the presence of antibiotic concentrations that would normally kill other...... that are completely refractory to antibiotics due to the inactivity of cellular processes. Persister cells have been linked to treatment failures in several bacterial infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Preceding the start of this Ph......D project, Listeria monocytogenes was observed to form these antibiotic tolerant persister cells. L. monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, a rare, but often lethal disease, even with antibiotic treatment. It typically affects pregnant women, neonates, the elderly...

  3. Virulence Phenotyping and Molecular Characterization of a Low-pathogenicity Isolate of Listeria monocytogenes from Cow's Milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Li JIANG; Jing-Jing XU; Ning CHEN; Jiang-Bing SHUAI; Wei-Huan FANG

    2006-01-01

    A low-pathogenicity isolate of Listeria monocytogenes from cow's milk, as screened in mouse and chicken embryonated egg models, was examined for virulence-related phenotypic traits. Corresponding virulence genes (iap, prfA, plcA, hly, mpl, actA, plcB, InlA and InlB) were compared with L. monocytogenes reference strains 10403S and EGD to elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms of low virulence. Although L. monocytogenes H4 exhibited similar patterns to strain 10403S in terms of hemolytic activity, in vitro growth and invasiveness and even had higher adhesiveness, faster intracellular growth and higher phospholipase activity in vitro, it was substantially less virulent than the strain 10403S in mouse and chicken embryo models (50% lethal dose: 108.14 vs. 105.49 and 106.73 VS. 101.9, respectively). The genes prfA, plcA and mpl were homologous among L. monocytogenes strains H4, 10403S and EGD (>98%). Genes iap, hly, plcB,InlA and InlB of L. monocytogenes 10403S had higher homology to those of strain EGD (>98%) than isolate H4. The homology of the gene hly between strain 10403S and isolate H4 was 96.9% at the nucleotide level,but 98.7% at the amino acid level. The actA gene of isolate H4 had deletions of 105 nucleotides corresponding to 35 amino acid deletions falling within the proline-rich region. Taken together, this study presents some clues as to reduced virulence to mice and chicken embryos of the isolate H4 probably as a result of deletion mutations of actA.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes en comidas preparadas

    OpenAIRE

    Vila Brugalla, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Tradicionalmente Listeria monocytogenes no era considerado como un importante patógeno transmitido a través de los alimentos y, en consecuencia, no había recibido mucha atención por parte de la industria alimentaria. Los índices de listeriosis en la población humana siempre habían estado enormemente ensombrecidos por otras enfermedades transmitidas por los alimentos como la salmonelosis o la campilobacterosis, y la confirmación de brotes era poco frecuente. Sin embargo, los brotes de listerio...

  5. Comprehensive genomic analysis and expression profiling of phospholipase C gene family during abiotic stresses and development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amarjeet; Kanwar, Poonam; Pandey, Amita; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Sopory, Sudhir K; Kapoor, Sanjay; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is one of the major lipid hydrolysing enzymes, implicated in lipid mediated signaling. PLCs have been found to play a significant role in abiotic stress triggered signaling and developmental processes in various plant species. Genome wide identification and expression analysis have been carried out for this gene family in Arabidopsis, yet not much has been accomplished in crop plant rice. An exhaustive in-silico exploration of rice genome using various online databases and tools resulted in the identification of nine PLC encoding genes. Based on sequence, motif and phylogenetic analysis rice PLC gene family could be divided into phosphatidylinositol-specific PLCs (PI-PLCs) and phosphatidylcholine- PLCs (PC-PLC or NPC) classes with four and five members, respectively. A comparative analysis revealed that PLCs are conserved in Arabidopsis (dicots) and rice (monocot) at gene structure and protein level but they might have evolved through a separate evolutionary path. Transcript profiling using gene chip microarray and quantitative RT-PCR showed that most of the PLC members expressed significantly and differentially under abiotic stresses (salt, cold and drought) and during various developmental stages with condition/stage specific and overlapping expression. This finding suggested an important role of different rice PLC members in abiotic stress triggered signaling and plant development, which was also supported by the presence of relevant cis-regulatory elements in their promoters. Sub-cellular localization of few selected PLC members in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells has provided a clue about their site of action and functional behaviour. The genome wide identification, structural and expression analysis and knowledge of sub-cellular localization of PLC gene family envisage the functional characterization of these genes in crop plants in near future.

  6. Comprehensive genomic analysis and expression profiling of phospholipase C gene family during abiotic stresses and development in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjeet Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phospholipase C (PLC is one of the major lipid hydrolysing enzymes, implicated in lipid mediated signaling. PLCs have been found to play a significant role in abiotic stress triggered signaling and developmental processes in various plant species. Genome wide identification and expression analysis have been carried out for this gene family in Arabidopsis, yet not much has been accomplished in crop plant rice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An exhaustive in-silico exploration of rice genome using various online databases and tools resulted in the identification of nine PLC encoding genes. Based on sequence, motif and phylogenetic analysis rice PLC gene family could be divided into phosphatidylinositol-specific PLCs (PI-PLCs and phosphatidylcholine- PLCs (PC-PLC or NPC classes with four and five members, respectively. A comparative analysis revealed that PLCs are conserved in Arabidopsis (dicots and rice (monocot at gene structure and protein level but they might have evolved through a separate evolutionary path. Transcript profiling using gene chip microarray and quantitative RT-PCR showed that most of the PLC members expressed significantly and differentially under abiotic stresses (salt, cold and drought and during various developmental stages with condition/stage specific and overlapping expression. This finding suggested an important role of different rice PLC members in abiotic stress triggered signaling and plant development, which was also supported by the presence of relevant cis-regulatory elements in their promoters. Sub-cellular localization of few selected PLC members in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells has provided a clue about their site of action and functional behaviour. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The genome wide identification, structural and expression analysis and knowledge of sub-cellular localization of PLC gene family envisage the functional characterization of these genes in crop plants in near

  7. Antibiotic therapy for Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C C; Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients, but it has been rarely reported in Taiwan. We reviewed 13 cases of L. monocytogenes bacteremia at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 12-year period. All of the patients had underlying diseases. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and neurologic signs were found in 6 patients. Most of the patients received penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin with an aminoglycoside. Corticosteroids were used in 9 of 13 patients. The overall mortality directly due to L. monocytogenes bacteremia was 31%. However, patients treated with cephalosporins or oxacillin had higher mortality than those treated with penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin (p = 0.05). Given the increasing number of immunosuppressed patients in Taiwan, it is likely that more cases will be encountered. Physicians in Taiwan should be aware of L. monocytogenes bacteremia and its treatment.

  8. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2003-01-01

    Activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) is an early event in brain injury, which leads to the formation and accumulation of bioactive lipids: platelet-activating factor (PAF), free arachidonic acid, and eicosanoids. A cross-talk between secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) and cPLA(2) in neura...

  9. Phospholipase Cδ regulates germination of Dictyostelium spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, Peter van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Background: Many eukaryotes, including plants and fungi make spores that resist severe environmental stress. The micro-organism Dictyostelium contains a single phospholipase C gene (PLC); deletion of the gene has no effect on growth, cell movement and differentiation. In this report we show that PLC

  10. Phospholipase Cδ regulates germination of Dictyostelium spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, Peter van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Background: Many eukaryotes, including plants and fungi make spores that resist severe environmental stress. The micro-organism Dictyostelium contains a single phospholipase C gene (PLC); deletion of the gene has no effect on growth, cell movement and differentiation. In this report we show that PLC

  11. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in European cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    2017-01-01

    Both in Europe and worldwide cheese has caused important outbreaks of listeriosis and can be a vehicle for transmission of Listeria monocytogenes to consumers. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using scientific literature and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports...... understanding of L. monocytogenes prevalence in different types of cheeses and provided results that can be useful as input for quantitative microbiological risk assessment modelling....

  12. Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes in Whole Avocado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Evans, Peter; Hammack, Thomas S; Brown, Eric W; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, tree fruits have emerged as a new concern for Listeria monocytogenes contamination. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the potential internalization of L. monocytogenes from the surface of avocados into the edible portions of the fruit during certain postharvest practices simulated in a laboratory setting. One set of intact avocados was spot inoculated with L. monocytogenes on the stem scar, and the second set was hydrocooled in water contaminated with L. monocytogenes. Under these experimental conditions, L. monocytogenes internalized into the avocado pulp through the stem or stem scar after both spot inoculation and hydrocooling. In avocados spot inoculated with 50, 130, 500, and 1,300 CFU per fruit, bacteria were detected in the edible portion adjacent to the stem scar within 15 days postinoculation during storage at 4°C. In avocados hydrocooled in water containing L. monocytogenes at 10(6) and 10(8) CFU/ml, bacteria reached the bottom end of the fruit, and the populations in the edible portion adjacent to the stem scar reached up to 5.90 to 7.19 log CFU/g within 10 to 15 days during storage at 4°C. Dye mixed with inoculum was useful for guiding subsequent sampling, but dye penetration patterns were not always consistent with bacterial penetration.

  13. Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnancy and neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pascale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors report a fatal neonatal sepsis caused by Listeria monocytogenes. While the diagnostic procedure aimed to identify the microrganism is described, it is emphasized the importance to recover Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS and L. monocytogenes by means of vaginal-rectal swab culture. The intrapartum screening for L. monocytogenes, by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR providing results in 75 minutes is also evaluated.

  14. The physiological roles of primary phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Follo, Matilde Y; Cocco, Lucio; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2013-09-01

    The roles of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) have been extensively investigated in diverse cell lines and pathological conditions. Among the PLC isozmes, primary PLCs, PLC-β and PLC-γ, are directly activated by receptor activation, unlike other secondary PLCs (PLC-ɛ, PLC-δ1, and PLC-η1). PLC-β isozymes are activated by G protein couple receptor and PLC-γ isozymes are activated by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Primary PLCs are differentially expressed in different tissues, suggesting their specific roles in diverse tissues and regulate a variety of physiological and pathophysiological functions. Thus, dysregulation of phospholipases contributes to a number of human diseases and primary PLCs have been identified as therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of diseases. Here we review the roles of primary PLCs in physiology and their impact in pathology. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Colourimetric Determination of Phospholipase Activities in Balamuthia mandrillaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Razi Haider

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Balamuthia mandrillaris is a recently identified protozoan pathogen that can cause fatal granulomatous encephalitis however the pathogenesis and pathophysiology associated with Balamuthia encephalitis remain unclear. We have recently isolated B. mandrillaris from a 33-years old male who died of encephalitis. Using this isolate, we demonstrated for the first time that B. mandrillaris exhibited phospholipase activities. More specifically, B. mandrillaris exhibited phospholipase A2 and phospholipase D activities. For the first time we used colourimetric technique based on spectrophotometer and designed phospholipases assays to determine these phospholipase activities. The functional role of phospholipases was determined in in vitro assays using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC. We observed that PLA2-specific inhibitor i.e., cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine significantly inhibited B. mandrillaris binding to HBMEC. Similarly PLD inhibitor i.e., compound 48/80 inhibited B. mandrillaris binding to HBMEC. Moreover, both inhibitors inhibited B. mandrillaris-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity. Overall these results clearly demonstrate that phospholipases are important virulence determinants in B. mandrillaris. Further studies will identify the precise role of phospholipases in the pathogenesis of B. mandrillaris, which may help develop therapeutic interventions. Using a novel spectrophotometric-based assay we demonstrated for the first time that B. mandrillaris exhibit phospholipase activities.

  16. Prevalence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes contamination of seafood varies with product category. The highest prevalence was found in cold- smoked fish (34-60%), while the lowest was found in heat- treated and cured seafood (4-12%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes differed greatly in cold-smoked salmon between...... production sites, ranging from monocytogenes. The organism showed moderate growth...... in naturally contaminated cold-smoked, and 'gravad', fish while the growth appeared faster in hot smoked fish. Thus L. monocytogenes is not under control in these products. Finally, the prevalence and growth of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon are discussed in relation...

  17. Prevalence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes contamination of seafood varies with product category. The highest prevalence was found in cold- smoked fish (34-60%), while the lowest was found in heat- treated and cured seafood (4-12%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes differed greatly in cold-smoked salmon between...... production sites, ranging from monocytogenes. The organism showed moderate growth...... in naturally contaminated cold-smoked, and 'gravad', fish while the growth appeared faster in hot smoked fish. Thus L. monocytogenes is not under control in these products. Finally, the prevalence and growth of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon are discussed in relation...

  18. Listeria monocytogenes survival in refrigerator dill pickles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyung; D'Sa, Elaine M; Harrison, Mark A; Harrison, Judy A; Andress, Elizabeth L

    2005-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can survive and grow in refrigerated foods with pH values of approximately 4.0 to 5.0 and salt concentrations of 3 to 4%. Home-fermented refrigerator dill pickles fit this description. Contamination of this product with L. monocytogenes could cause serious problems because these items are not heated prior to consumption. L. monocytogenes survival and growth patterns were investigated in refrigerator dill pickles at 1.3, 3.8, and 7.6% salt concentrations. Pickling cucumbers were dipped into an inoculum of L. monocytogenes, brine mixtures were added, and cucumbers were held at room temperature for 1 week and then refrigerated for up to 3 months. The pH, NaCl percentage, titratable acidity percentage, and total populations of Listeria and aerobic, psychrotrophic, and lactic acid bacteria were measured at the addition of brine, after 2, 4, and 7 days of storage at room temperature, and then weekly during refrigerated storage. The initial Listeria population was 5.4 to 5.6 log CFU/cm2 on cucumber surfaces and 3.9 to 4.6 log CFU/g internally. There was an approximate 0.3- to 1-log increase during room temperature fermentation followed by a population decline during refrigerator storage, with a greater decrease in the brines with the highest NaCl concentration. Up to 49 days, the internal tissue of pickles with 1.3, 3.8, or 7.6% salt concentrations were presumptively positive for L. monocytogenes by the enrichment method, and at 91 days the surfaces of such pickles were still positive for L. monocytogenes. Populations of total aerobes and lactic acid bacteria increased during room temperature storage and decreased gradually during refrigerated storage.

  19. Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Simon, Tabassome; Exeter, Holly J

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease.......This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease....

  20. 40 CFR 721.4585 - Lecithins, phospholipase A2-hydrolyzed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lecithins, phospholipase A2-hydrolyzed... Substances § 721.4585 Lecithins, phospholipase A2-hydrolyzed. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as lecithins...

  1. Diverse Functions of Secretory Phospholipases A2

    OpenAIRE

    Preetha Shridas; Webb, Nancy R

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 enzymes (PLA2s) catalyze the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids at their sn-2 position releasing free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Mammalian PLA2s are classified into several categories of which important groups include secreted PLA2s (sPLA2s) and cytosolic PLA2s (cPLA2s) that are calcium-dependent for their catalytic activity and calcium-independent cytosolic PLA2s (iPLA2s). Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs), lysosomal PLA2s, and adipose-specific ...

  2. Control options for Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik; Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech

    2000-01-01

    At least three outbreaks of listeriosis associated with seafood have been reported. Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the general environment including fresh water, coastal water and live fish from these areas. Contamination or recontamination of seafood may also take place during...

  3. Listeria monocytogenes : nog steeds een probleem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is net als vele andere bacteriële voedselpathogenen al tientallen jaren bekend. De meeste grondstoffen voor voedingsmiddelen komen uit de akker- en tuinbouw, de veehouderij en de visserij. Besmetting vindt daar plaats met micro-organismen afkomstig uit grond, fecaliën, water,

  4. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ELMALI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objectives of this study were i to isolate Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in broiler wing meat samples, ii to confirm the isolates by PCR, based on prs and hly A gene sequences, iii to determine the seasonal and monthly distribution of the isolates. A total of 120 broiler wing meat samples (60 packaged pieces wrapped using strech film in styrofoam plates and 60 unpackaged pieces bought from different markets in Hatay province were analysed. Listeria spp. was isolated from 57 (47.5% out of 120 samples. Fifty-four, out of 57 Listeria spp. isolates were identified as L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes was isolated from the samples collected during the spring, winter, summer, and autumn at the levels of 26.6%, 40%, 53.3%, 60%, respectively. In this study, the isolation rates were found to be the highest in autumn, while the isolation rates were found to be the lowest in spring. As a consequence, high prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in poultry wing meat samples may pose a risk for human health. We consider that with obeying the rules of good hygiene practices (GHP, good manufacturing practices (GMP and HACCP can minimize the contamination with Listeria spp.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes : nog steeds een probleem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is net als vele andere bacteriële voedselpathogenen al tientallen jaren bekend. De meeste grondstoffen voor voedingsmiddelen komen uit de akker- en tuinbouw, de veehouderij en de visserij. Besmetting vindt daar plaats met micro-organismen afkomstig uit grond, fecaliën, water,

  6. VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes II (LMO2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John

    2013-01-01

    This AOAC GovVal study compared the VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes II (LMO2) to the Health Products and Food Branch MFHPB-30 reference method for detection of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) meats. The VIDAS LMO2 test is an automated enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay for the detection of L. monocytogenes in foods. The LMO2 test, following the enrichment procedure from the MFLP-33 method, also included use of the chromogenic media, chromID Ottaviani Agosti Agar (OAA) and chromID Lmono for confirmation of LMO2 presumptive results. In previous AOAC validation studies comparing the VIDAS LMO2 method to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual and U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service reference methods, LMO2 was approved as AOAC Official Method 2004.02 for the detection of L. monocytogenes in dairy products, vegetables, seafood, raw meats and poultry, and processed meats and poultry. The GovVal comparative study included 20 replicate test portions, each at two contamination levels for each matrix, where fractionally positive results (5-15 positive results/20 replicate portions tested) were obtained by at least one method at one level. Five uncontaminated controls were included. Chi-square analysis of the comparative data in this study indicates no statistical differences between the VIDAS LMO2 and the MFHPB-30 standard methods at the 5% level of significance. Confirmation of presumptive LMO2 results with the chromogenic OAA and Lmono media was shown to be equivalent to the appropriate reference method agars. The data demonstrate that the VIDAS LMO2 method is an acceptable alternative method to the MFHPB-30 standard culture method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in RTE meats, including liver paté, hot dogs, raw fermented sausage, sliced deli turkey, and sliced deli ham.

  7. A naturally occurring prfA truncation in a Listeria monocytogenes field strain contributes to reduced replication and cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sebastian; Aguilar-Bultet, Lisandra; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Guldimann, Claudia; Drögemüller, Cord; Pfarrer, Christiane; Vidondo, Beatriz; Seuberlich, Torsten; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna

    2015-08-31

    Listeria (L.) monocytogenes is an environmental bacterium that may become an intracellular pathogen upon ingestion to cause gastroenteritis, septicaemia, abortions, and/or fatal infections of the central nervous system. We here describe a L. monocytogenes field strain (JF5171) isolated from a bovine placenta in the context of abortion, which exhibited attenuation in bovine brain-slice cultures. The whole genome of strain JF5171 was sequenced, and the invasion, replication, and intercellular spread of JF5171 were further analyzed by quantification of colony forming units and immunofluorescence studies. Phospholipase and hemolysis activity of JF5171 were also quantified along with transcription levels of actA, hly and prfA. The data obtained were compared to those of the widely used L. monocytogenes reference strain, EGD-e. JF5171 exhibited reduced replication and lower levels of phospholipase and hemolysis activity. Invasion and cell-to-cell spread was strongly decreased compared to EGD-e, and actin polymerization was absent. A frame shift deletion was identified in the JF5171 coding region of the major regulator for virulence, prfA. This resulted in a truncated C-terminus sequence (WEN* vs. WGKLN*). In addition, a point mutation resulted in a lysine to arginine substitution at amino acid position 197. Complementation with prfA from EGD-e and with (EGD-e) prfA-K197N increased the replication and spread efficiency of JF5171. In contrast, complementation with the truncated version of prfA had no effect. Taken together, these results suggest that the truncated C-terminus of prfA considerably contributes to the strongly attenuated phenotype observed in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CHALLENGE TESTS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN SALAMI: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mioni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Challenge tests are the preferable methodology to study the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes on ready to eat foods, according to Regulation (EC 2073/2005. Challenge testing using L. monocytogenes in seasoned salami from different food business operators showed, after seasoning of the product, a count reduction of the inoculated organisms without any further growth of the pathogen; however differences of L. monocytogenes behaviour could be observed according to different production protocols.

  9. The relationship between calcium and the metabolism of plasma membrane phospholipids in hemolysis induced by brown spider venom phospholipase-D toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Souza, Fernanda N; Fogaça, Rosalvo T H; Mangili, Oldemir C; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga M; Veiga, Silvio S

    2011-09-01

    Brown spider venom phospholipase-D belongs to a family of toxins characterized as potent bioactive agents. These toxins have been involved in numerous aspects of cell pathophysiology including inflammatory response, platelet aggregation, endothelial cell hyperactivation, renal disorders, and hemolysis. The molecular mechanism by which these toxins cause hemolysis is under investigation; literature data have suggested that enzyme catalysis is necessary for the biological activities triggered by the toxin. However, the way by which phospholipase-D activity is directly related with human hemolysis has not been determined. To evaluate how brown spider venom phospholipase-D activity causes hemolysis, we examined the impact of recombinant phospholipase-D on human red blood cells. Using six different purified recombinant phospholipase-D molecules obtained from a cDNA venom gland library, we demonstrated that there is a correlation of hemolytic effect and phospholipase-D activity. Studying recombinant phospholipase-D, a potent hemolytic and phospholipase-D recombinant toxin (LiRecDT1), we determined that the toxin degrades synthetic sphingomyelin (SM), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), and lyso-platelet-activating factor. Additionally, we determined that the toxin degrades phospholipids in a detergent extract of human erythrocytes, as well as phospholipids from ghosts of human red blood cells. The products of the degradation of synthetic SM and LPC following recombinant phospholipase-D treatments caused hemolysis of human erythrocytes. This hemolysis, dependent on products of metabolism of phospholipids, is also dependent on calcium ion concentration because the percentage of hemolysis increased with an increase in the dose of calcium in the medium. Recombinant phospholipase-D treatment of human erythrocytes stimulated an influx of calcium into the cells that was detected by a calcium-sensitive fluorescent probe (Fluo-4). This calcium influx was shown to be channel

  10. Determination of Listeria monocytogenes Growth during Mushroom Production and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Leong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the EU, food is considered safe with regard to Listeria monocytogenes if its numbers do not exceed 100 CFU/g throughout the shelf-life of the food. Therefore, it is important to determine if a food supports growth of L. monocytogenes. Challenge studies to determine the ability of a food to support growth of L. monocytogenes are essential as predictive modelling often overestimates the growth ability of L. monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to determine if growth of L. monocytogenes was supported during the production and distribution of mushrooms. A three-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated onto three independent batches of whole mushrooms, sliced mushrooms, mushroom casing and mushroom substrate at a concentration of about 100–1000 CFU/g. The batches were incubated at potential abuse temperatures, as a worst case scenario, and at intervals during storage L. monocytogenes numbers, % moisture and pH were determined. The results showed that the sliced and whole mushrooms had the ability to support growth, while mushroom casing allowed survival but did not support growth. Mushroom substrate showed a rich background microflora that grew on Listeria selective media and this hindered enumeration of L. monocytogenes. In the case of this study, Combase predictions were not always accurate, indicating that challenge studies may be a necessary part of growth determination of L. monocytogenes.

  11. Colovesical fistula presenting as Listeria monocytogenes bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Mark

    2015-03-31

    We present a case of colovesical fistula presenting with a clinical syndrome of urosepsis subsequently demonstrated to be due to Listeria monocytogenes bacteraemia. The patient had a history of previous rectal cancer with a low anterior resection and a covering ileostomy that had been reversed 6 months prior to this presentation. L. monocytogenes was also isolated among mixed enteric organisms on urine culture. There were no symptoms or signs of acute gastrointestinal listeriosis or meningoencephalitis. This unusual scenario prompted concern regarding the possibility of communication between bowel and bladder, which was subsequently confirmed with CT and a contrast enema. The patient recovered well with intravenous amoxicillin and to date has declined surgical management of his colovesical fistula. This case illustrates the importance of considering bowel pathology when enteric organisms such as Listeria are isolated from unusual sites.

  12. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    2013-01-01

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC...... class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular...... bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP...

  13. Phospholipase Cepsilon regulates ovulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Ken-Ichi; Bui, Yen Kim; Gao, Xianlong; Sternberg, Paul W; Kataoka, Tohru

    2004-10-01

    Phospholipase Cepsilon (PLCepsilon) is a novel class of phosphoinositide-specific PLC with unknown physiological functions. Here, we present the first genetic analysis of PLCepsilon in an intact organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Ovulation in C. elegans is dependent on an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) signaling pathway activated by the receptor tyrosine kinase LET-23. We generated deletion mutants of the gene, plc-1, encoding C. elegans PLCepsilon. We observed a novel ovulation phenotype whereby oocytes are trapped in the spermatheca due to delayed dilation of the spermatheca-uterine valve. The expression of plc-1 in the adult spermatheca is consistent with its involvement in regulation of ovulation. On the other hand, we failed to observe genetic interaction of plc-1 with let-23-mediated IP(3) signaling pathway genes, suggesting a complex mechanism for control of ovulation.

  14. The mechanism of phospholipase Cγ1 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Krawczyk

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipase C is an enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2 into second messengers inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (Ins(1,4,5P3 and diacylglycerol (DAG. These messengers then promote the activation of protein kinase C and release of Ca2 from intracellular stores, initiating numerous cellular events including proliferation, differentiation, signal transduction, endocytosis, cytoskeletal reorganization or activation of ion channels. There have been identified 14 isozymes of PLC among which PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 are of particular interest. PLC contains catalytic region XY and a few regulatory domains: PH, EF and C2. The most unique features of these two enzymes are the Src homology domains (SH2, SH3 and split PH domain within the catalytic barrel. PLC1 and PLCγ2 have an identical domain structure, but they differ in their function and occurrence. Phospholipase Cγ1 is expressed ubiquitously, especially in the brain, thymus and lungs.PLCγ1 can be activated by receptor tyrosine kinases (i.e.: PDGFR, EGFR, FGFR, Trk, as well as non-receptor protein kinases (Src, Syk, Tec or phosphatidic acid, tau protein and its analogue.The molecular mechanism of PLCγ1 activation includes membrane recruitment, phosphorylation, rearrangements and activation in the presence of growth factors.In reference to PLCγ1 regulation, a number of positive and negative modulators have been considered. The most important positive modulator is phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P2. Protein kinase A and C, tyrosine phosphatases (SHP-1, PTP-1B and Cbl, Grb2, Jak2/PTP-1B complex proteins have been described as negative regulators of PLCγ1 activation.

  15. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  16. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  17. Phospholipase D signaling : Orchestration by PIP2 and small GTPases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; de Jesus, Maider Lopez; Schmidt, Martina

    2007-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by phospholipase D (PLD) leads to the generation of the versatile lipid second messenger, phosphatidic acid (PA), which is involved in fundamental cellular processes, including membrane trafficking, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, cell proliferation and cell survival

  18. 78 FR 23901 - Interagency Risk Assessment-Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Interagency Risk Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail... risk assessment (QRA), ``Interagency Risk Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Delicatessens... and on the FSIS Web site at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Listeria-Transcript_062309.pdf ). II....

  19. Incidence and control of Listeria monocytogenes in foods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk; Schlundt, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The Danish regulatory policy on Listeria monocytogenes in foods is based on the principles of HACCP and was developed using a health risk assessment approach. The Danish policy focuses examinations and criteria for L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods and is based on a combination of inspection...

  20. Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms to sanitizing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is notorious for its capacity to colonize the environment and equipment of food processing facilities and to persist in the processing plant ecosystem, sometimes for decades. Such persistence is mediated by multiple attributes of L. monocytogenes, including the pathogen’s capa...

  1. Application Progress of Recombinant Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes in Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Xiaojiao; Bai Lin; Yang Xu

    2015-01-01

    Much progress of application of bacterial vaccine in treatment and prevention of tumor was acquired,which showed broad prospect in clinical study of animals and humans. Listeria monocytogenes( L. monocytogenes) was considered much important by virtue of its special characteristic of biology and immunology.L. monocytogenes was ingested by professional or part-time phagocytes,survived and proliferated in the phagocytes under synergism of toxic factor secreted by itself,meanwhile,the cellular and humoral immune response was induced. Antigenic gene of specific tumor was loaded in the attenuated L. monocytogenes,which can enhance immune response of host cells. Effective cell targeted to enter tumor tissue and acted on tumor cells to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Tumor degenerated not easy to reappear. Therefore,recombinant attenuated L. monocytogenes was a safe and effective anti-cancer vaccine vector. Now the work of researchers mainly focuses on solving practical problem in clinical application. Biological characteristics of L. monocytogenes,feasibility and superiority of L. monocytogenes as targeted vaccine vector,problem and prospect of L. monocytogenes in clinical application of anti-tumor were reviewed in this paper.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes growth limits and stress resistance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der S.

    2008-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic rod, which is the causative agent of listeriosis. Due to the severity of the disease and the fact that its incidence is increasing in numerous European countries, L. monocytogenes is of great public health concer

  3. Genome sequences of Listeria monocytogenes strains with resistance to arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes frequently exhibits resistance to arsenic. We report here the draft genome sequences of eight genetically diverse arsenic-resistant L. monocytogenes strains from human listeriosis and food-associated environments. Availability of these genomes would help to elucidate the role ...

  4. Listeria monocytogenes internalizes in Romaine Lettuce grown in greenhouse conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in a number of outbreaks involving fresh produce, including an outbreak in 2016 resulting from contaminated packaged salads. The persistence and internalization potential of L. monocytogenes in romaine lettuce was evaluated, and the persistence of two L. mo...

  5. Survival strategies of Listeria monocytogenes - roles of regulators and transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Outbreaks of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes are mainly associated with ready-to-eatfoods. Survival strategies of L. monocytogenes in relation to minimally processed foods were studied.

  6. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Idiazabal cheese Prevalencia de Listeria monocytogenes en queso Idiazabal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Arrese

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Raw-milk cheese has been identified in risk assessment as a food of greater concern to public health due to listeriosis. Objective: To determine the prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in semi-hard Idiazabal cheese manufactured by different producers in the Basque Country at consumer level. Methodology: A total of 51 Idiazabal cheese samples were obtained from 10 separate retail establishments, chosen by stratified random sampling. Samples were tested using the official standard ISO procedure 11290-1 for detection and enumeration methods. Results and conclusion: All cheese samples tested negative for L. monocytogenes. However, 9.8% tested positive for Listeria spp., different from L. monocytogenes. Positive samples came from two brands, two were natural and three were smoked. The presence of Listeria spss. suggests that the cheese making process and the hygiene whether at milking or during cheese making could be insufficient.Introducción: Listeria monocytogenes se ha asociado a quesos elaborados a partir de leche cruda, lo que supone un importante riesgo de salud pública debido a la listeriosis. Objetivo: Estudiar la prevalencia y los niveles de L. monocytogenes en quesos Idiazabal semi-curados de distintos productores del País Vasco, a nivel de consumidor. Metodología: Se analizaron 51 muestras de queso Idiazabal procedentes de 10 establecimientos de venta al público; el muestreo fue aleatorio y estratificado. Los análisis se hicieron según el método de detección y de enumeración del procedimiento estandarizado ISO 11290-1. Resultados y conclusión: Todas las muestras dieron negativo para L. monocytogenes. Sin embargo, el 9,8% dio positivo para Listeria spp., distinta de L. monocytogenes. Las muestras positivas procedían de dos marcas, dos eran quesos naturales y tres ahumados. La presencia de Listeria spss. sugiere que el procesado del queso y la higiene durante el ordeño o durante la fabricación podr

  7. Molecular diversity of phospholipase D in angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvrčková Fatima

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phospholipase D (PLD family has been identified in plants by recent molecular studies, fostered by the emerging importance of plant PLDs in stress physiology and signal transduction. However, the presence of multiple isoforms limits the power of conventional biochemical and pharmacological approaches, and calls for a wider application of genetic methodology. Results Taking advantage of sequence data available in public databases, we attempted to provide a prerequisite for such an approach. We made a complete inventory of the Arabidopsis thaliana PLD family, which was found to comprise 12 distinct genes. The current nomenclature of Arabidopsis PLDs was refined and expanded to include five newly described genes. To assess the degree of plant PLD diversity beyond Arabidopsis we explored data from rice (including the genome draft by Monsanto as well as cDNA and EST sequences from several other plants. Our analysis revealed two major PLD subfamilies in plants. The first, designated C2-PLD, is characterised by presence of the C2 domain and comprises previously known plant PLDs as well as new isoforms with possibly unusual features-catalytically inactive or independent on Ca2+. The second subfamily (denoted PXPH-PLD is novel in plants but is related to animal and fungal enzymes possessing the PX and PH domains. Conclusions The evolutionary dynamics, and inter-specific diversity, of plant PLDs inferred from our phylogenetic analysis, call for more plant species to be employed in PLD research. This will enable us to obtain generally valid conclusions.

  8. Phospholipase Cδ regulates germination of Dictyostelium spores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Haastert Peter JM

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many eukaryotes, including plants and fungi make spores that resist severe environmental stress. The micro-organism Dictyostelium contains a single phospholipase C gene (PLC; deletion of the gene has no effect on growth, cell movement and differentiation. In this report we show that PLC is essential to sense the environment of food-activated spores. Results Plc-null spores germinate at alkaline pH, reduced temperature or increased osmolarity, conditions at which the emerging amoebae can not grow. In contrast, food-activated wild-type spores return to dormancy till conditions in the environment allow growth. The analysis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 levels and the effect of added IP3 uncover an unexpected mechanism how PLC regulates spore germination: i deletion of PLC induces the enhanced activity of an IP5 phosphatase leading to high IP3 levels in plc-null cells; ii in wild-type spores unfavourable conditions inhibit PLC leading to a reduction of IP3 levels; addition of exogenous IP3 to wild-type spores induces germination at unfavourable conditions; iii in plc-null spores IP3 levels remain high, also at unfavourable environmental conditions. Conclusions The results imply that environmental conditions regulate PLC activity and that IP3 induces spore germination; the uncontrolled germination of plc-null spores is not due to a lack of PLC activity but to the constitutive activation of an alternative IP3-forming pathway.

  9. Enzymatic characterization of Chlamydophila pneumoniae phospholipase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Fabiola; Ciervo, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydophila pneumoniae, an aetiological agent of respiratory infection, is also thought to play an immuno-pathogenetic role in atherosclerosis by contributing to inflammation and plaque instability. Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism and may have a direct or indirect impact on virulence and the inflammatory response. Some aspects of the developmental cycle of C. pneumoniae suggest a direct implication of its PLD (CpPLD) in the pathogenesis, specifically by affecting the regulation of lipid metabolism and lipid exchange between C. pneumoniae and host cells. Our previous studies disclosed a specific anti-CpPLD antibody response in patients with acute coronary syndromes chronically infected with C. pneumoniae, and demonstrated that this antigen is a factor able to drive the inflammatory process in atherosclerosis. Due to the intriguing aspects of the CpPLD, the present study investigated CpPLD enzymatic activity of the protein and the two domains that include one HKD motif each polypeptide. Our results showed that CpPLD was able to synthesize the cardiolipin (CL) but unable to hydrolyze phospholipids. It was also observed that each single HKD motif has an independent CL synthetase activity. This enzymatic activity of CpPLD could be important in the inflammatory process within the atherothrombotic events.

  10. PATOGENESIS DE Listeria monocytogenes, MICROORGANISMO ZOONOTICO EMERGENTE.

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Kirvis; Sierra, Sara; Potou, Raul; Carrascal, Ana; Mercado, Marcela

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes además de ser un paradigma para la investigación inmunológica se ha convertido en sistema modelo apropiado para el análisis de los mecanismos moleculares del parasitismo intracelular de otras bacterias. Investigadores en el área de la inmunología se interesaron en este microorganismo cuando se reconoció el riesgo que representaba para la salud pública y la seguridad en la industria de alimentos. Desde mediados de los años 80’s se ha investigado la biología molecular de ...

  11. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by Enterococcus mundtii isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigwood, T; Hudson, J A; Cooney, J; McIntyre, L; Billington, C; Heinemann, J A; Wall, F

    2012-12-01

    Two bacterial isolates with inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes and Enterococcus faecalis were obtained from soil. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization identified them as Enterococcus mundtii, a species whose ability to compete with L. monocytogenes is relatively unexplored compared to other members of the genus. The thermal stability of the inhibitory factor and its sensitivity to proteolytic enzymes indicate that it is most likely a bacteriocin. Both isolates grew at comparable rates to L. monocytogenes at 5 °C and 10 °C in vitro. One isolate killed L. monocytogenes when it reached concentrations of 10(6)-10(8) CFU ml(-1). Minimum inocula of 10(6) and 10(5) CFU ml(-1) of E. mundtii were required to reduce and maintain L. monocytogenes concentrations beneath the level of detection at 5 °C and 10 °C, respectively. In situ experiments at 5 °C showed that E. mundtii inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes on vacuum-packed cold smoked salmon during its four week shelf life. E. mundtii could, therefore, control the growth of L. monocytogenes at low temperatures, indicating a potential application in controlling this pathogen in chilled foods. To control growth of Listeria, the concentration of E. mundtii needs to be high, but it is possible that a purified bacteriocin could be used to achieve the same effect.

  12. Incorporation of Listeria monocytogenes strains in raw milk biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Christiane; Ifland, Andrea; Naumann, Annette; Kleta, Sylvia; Noll, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms develop successively on devices of milk production without sufficient cleaning and originate from the microbial community of raw milk. The established biofilm matrices enable incorporation of pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause a continuous contamination of food processing plants. L. monocytogenes is frequently found in raw milk and non-pasteurized raw milk products and as part of a biofilm community in milk meters and bulk milk tanks. The aim of this study was to analyze whether different L. monocytogenes strains are interacting with the microbial community of raw milk in terms of biofilm formation in the same manner, and to identify at which stage of biofilm formation a selected L. monocytogenes strain settles best. Bacterial community structure and composition of biofilms were analyzed by a cloning and sequencing approach and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The chemical composition of biofilms was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while settled L. monocytogenes cells were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Addition of individual L. monocytogenes strains to raw milk caused significant shifts in the biofilm biomass, in the chemical as well as in the bacterial community composition. Biofilm formation and attachment of L. monocytogenes cells were not serotype but strain specific. However, the added L. monocytogenes strains were not abundant since mainly members of the genera Citrobacter and Lactococcus dominated the bacterial biofilm community. Overall, added L. monocytogenes strains led to a highly competitive interaction with the raw milk community and triggered alterations in biofilm formation.

  13. Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    The intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.

  14. LACTIC FLORA-LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Colombo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The EC Regulation 2073/2005 (1 requires that food processors evaluate the capability of ready-to-use (RTE products to support the development of Listeria monocytogenes when their pH and aW values are favourable to the growth of this microorganism. It is renown that the lactic flora plays an important role in many different foods, both from a technological and a food safety standpoint. This study was aimed to observe the behaviour and the potential anti-Listeria effect of some natural lactic flora present in Italian liver patè crostini (chicken heart and liver, anchovies, onions, capers, starch, no added preservatives through the Combase Predictor – Max Growth Rate predictive software. The natural lactic flora of the crostini demonstrated a variable capability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes which depends upon : the concentration of the lactic flora at the beginning of the shelf life period and the subsequent lag phase, the possible release of anti-Listeria substances, and the maximum growth rate.

  15. Silver as antibacterial towards Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eBelluco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a serious foodborne pathogen that can contaminate food during processing and can grow during food shelf-life. New types of safe and effective food contact materials embedding antimicrobial agents, like silver, can play an important role in the food industry. The present work aimed at evaluating the in vitro growth kinetics of different strains of L. monocytogenes in the presence of silver, both in its ionic and nano form. The antimicrobial effect was determined by assaying the number of culturable bacterial cells, which formed colonies after incubation in the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs or silver nitrate (AgNO3. Ionic release experiments were performed in parallel. A different reduction of bacterial viability between silver ionic and nano forms was observed, with a time delayed effect exerted by AgNPs. An association between antimicrobial activity and ions concentration was shown by both silver chemical forms, suggesting the major role of ions in the antimicrobial mode of action.

  16. Enhanced Activity and Altered Specificity of Phospholipase A2 by Deletion of a Surface Loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Thunnissen, Marjolein M.G.M.; Geus, Pieter de; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Drenth, Jan; Verheij, Hubertus M.; Haas, Gerard H. de

    1989-01-01

    Protein engineering and x-ray crystallography have been used to study the role of a surface loop that is present in pancreatic phospholipases but is absent in snake venom phospholipases. Removal of residues 62 to 66 from porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 does not change the binding constant for mi

  17. Enhanced Activity and Altered Specificity of Phospholipase A2 by Deletion of a Surface Loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Thunnissen, Marjolein M.G.M.; Geus, Pieter de; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Drenth, Jan; Verheij, Hubertus M.; Haas, Gerard H. de

    1989-01-01

    Protein engineering and x-ray crystallography have been used to study the role of a surface loop that is present in pancreatic phospholipases but is absent in snake venom phospholipases. Removal of residues 62 to 66 from porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 does not change the binding constant for mi

  18. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  19. FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 10, 2003: Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 10 describes procedures for analysis of food samples and may be adapted for assessment of solid, particulate, aerosol, liquid and water samples containing Listeria monocytogenes.

  20. Growth inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Bech Hansen, T.; Garrido, P.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: This study elucidates the mechanisms by which a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Methods and Results: Listeria monocytogenes was exposed to live cultures of a bacteriocin-negative variant of C. piscicola A9b in co-culture, in a diffusion...... chamber system, and to a cell-free supernatant. Suppression of maximum cell density (0-3.5 log units) of L. monocytogenes was proportional to initial levels of C. pisciola (10(3)-10(7) CFU ml(-1)). Cell-to-cell contact was not required to cause inhibition. The cell-free C. piscicola supernatant caused...... a decrease in L. monocytogenes maximum cell density, which was abolished by glucose addition but not by amino acid, vitamin or mineral addition. The fermentate also gave rise to a longer lag phase and a reduction in growth rate. These effects were independent of glucose and may have been caused by acetate...

  1. Pyelonephritis with bacteremia caused by Listeria monocytogenes: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Shunsuke; Hase, Ryota; Toguchi, Akihiro; Otsuka, Yoshihito; Hosokawa, Naoto

    2017-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a well-known cause of meningitis, colitis, and bacteremia; however, obstructive pyelonephritis caused by L. monocytogenes has never been reported. We herein report on a 90-year-old Japanese woman with obstructive pyelonephritis and bacteremia due to uterus carcinoma invading the ureter. She was admitted to our hospital complaining of fever and chills, and her physical examination revealed left costovertebral angle tenderness. Computed tomography showed hydronephrosis and complete ureteral obstruction due to tumor invasion. Blood and urine cultures upon nephrostomy revealed the growth of L. monocytogenes. We treated the patient with two weeks of intravenous ampicillin and an additional one-week treatment of oral sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. This case shows the importance to recognize L. monocytogenes as a potential causative agent of urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alopecia in a viable phospholipase C delta 1 and phospholipase C delta 3 double mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Runkel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inositol 1,4,5trisphosphate (IP(3 and diacylglycerol (DAG are important intracellular signalling molecules in various tissues. They are generated by the phospholipase C family of enzymes, of which phospholipase C delta (PLCD forms one class. Studies with functional inactivation of Plcd isozyme encoding genes in mice have revealed that loss of both Plcd1 and Plcd3 causes early embryonic death. Inactivation of Plcd1 alone causes loss of hair (alopecia, whereas inactivation of Plcd3 alone has no apparent phenotypic effect. To investigate a possible synergy of Plcd1 and Plcd3 in postnatal mice, novel mutations of these genes compatible with life after birth need to be found. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterise a novel mouse mutant with a spontaneously arisen mutation in Plcd3 (Plcd3(mNab that resulted from the insertion of an intracisternal A particle (IAP into intron 2 of the Plcd3 gene. This mutation leads to the predominant expression of a truncated PLCD3 protein lacking the N-terminal PH domain. C3H mice that carry one or two mutant Plcd3(mNab alleles are phenotypically normal. However, the presence of one Plcd3(mNab allele exacerbates the alopecia caused by the loss of functional Plcd1 in Del(9olt1Pas mutant mice with respect to the number of hair follicles affected and the body region involved. Mice double homozygous for both the Del(9olt1Pas and the Plcd3(mNab mutations survive for several weeks and exhibit total alopecia associated with fragile hair shafts showing altered expression of some structural genes and shortened phases of proliferation in hair follicle matrix cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Plcd3(mNab mutation is a novel hypomorphic mutation of Plcd3. Our investigations suggest that Plcd1 and Plcd3 have synergistic effects on the murine hair follicle in specific regions of the body surface.

  3. Caratterizzazione biomolecolare di listeria monocytogenes in suini regolarmente macellati

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes è un batterio patogeno responsabile di una malattia potenzialmente molto grave per l’uomo. L’infezione avviene soprattutto tramite l’ingestione di alimenti di origine animale contaminati, e può propagarsi per via transplacentare al feto. Il potenziale patogeno di L. monocytogenes è dovuto soprattutto a caratteristici fattori di virulenza con i quali alcuni ceppi sono in grado di attaccare la cellula dell’organismo ospite potendo aderire, invadere, moltiplicare e prop...

  4. LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES RISK EVALUATION IN READY TO EAT DELI PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Civera

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the major concerns for food safety. Its ability to survive and replicate at low temperature, pH and high salt concentration, makes the bacterium a threat, mostly for RTE products. For these reasons, the present research was aimed at detecting the ability of growth of L. monocytogenes in RTE products retrieved from one deli store. Samples were analysed for L. monocytogenes detection, then inoculated with the pathogen (105cell/ml and stored at refrigeration temperature for the duration of their shelf-life (15-60 days. In all the products L. monocytogenes was not detected before experimental contamination. The challenge test evidenced that experimentally inoculated L. monocytogenes was not able to multiply for the duration of the entire shelf-life. These results indicated that the tested products could be considered as foods which are not able to support the growth of L. monocytogenes, as indicated by E.C. Regulation 2073/05. However, in order to guarantee consumer’s safety, it needs to be emphasized the need of a correct application of the GMPs, required for lowering the risk of initial contamination.

  5. Isolation and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes from Retail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D.I. Alsheikh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria species are widely distributed in environment and L. monocytogenes are the causal agent of Listeriosis, the disease that can be serious and fatal to human and animals. The objectives of this study were to detect, isolate and identify Listeria monocytogenes from retail broiler chicken ready to eat meat products in restaurants-Khartoum state, Sudan. A total of 250 retail broiler chicken ready to eat meat products were collected from restaurants in Khartoum State, 50 sample from frozen chicken burger, 50 sample from frozen chicken sausages, 50 sample from frozen chicken meat balls (kofta, 50 sample from chicken shawerma and 50 sample from chicken mortedella, Listeria spp. were isolated by the conventional International Organization for Standardization method and L. monocytogenes identified by biochemical test. The results showed that out of total 250 samples, 95 (38% were found to be contaminated with Listeria spp. the isolation rate was as follows: L. monocytogenes (13.6%, L. ivanovi (20.8%, L. grayi (1.6%, L. seeligeri (0.8% and L. welshimeri (1.2%. The results presented in this study indicate the contamination of retail broiler chicken ready to eat meat products with L. monocytogenes. This study reported the occurrence and distribution of L. monocytogenes and other Listeria species in retail meat products (frozen chicken burger, frozen chicken sausages, frozen chicken meat balls (kofta, chicken shawerma and chicken mortedella, purchased from restaurants in Khartoum state Sudan.

  6. Listeria monocytogenes does not survive ingestion by Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akya, Alisha; Pointon, Andrew; Thomas, Connor

    2010-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium capable of infecting humans, particularly pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. Although the intracellular invasion and pathogenesis of listeriosis in mammalian tissues has been well studied, little is known about the ecology of L. monocytogenes , and in particular the environmental reservoir for this bacterium has not been identified. This study used short-term co-culture at 15, 22 and 37 degrees C to examine the interaction of L. monocytogenes strains with Acanthamoeba polyphaga ACO12. Survival of L. monocytogenes cells phagocytosed by monolayers of trophozoites was assessed by culture techniques and microscopy. A. polyphaga trophozoites eliminated bacterial cells within a few hours post-phagocytosis, irrespective of the incubation temperature used. Wild-type L. monocytogenes and a phenotypic listeriolysin O mutant were unable to either multiply or survive within trophozoites. By contrast, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium C5 cells used as controls were able to survive and multiply within A. polyphaga trophozoites. The data presented indicate that A. polyphaga ACO12 is unlikely to harbour L. monocytogenes, or act as an environmental reservoir for this bacterium.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes, a down-to-earth pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Piveteau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the food-borne life threatening disease listeriosis. This pathogenic bacterium received much attention in the endeavor of deciphering the cellular mechanisms that underlie the onset of infection and its ability to adapt to the food processing environment. Although information is available on the presence of L. monocytogenes in many environmental niches including soil, water, plants, foodstuff and animals, understanding the ecology of L. monocytogenes in outdoor environments has received less attention. Soil is an environmental niche of pivotal importance in the transmission of this bacterium to plants and animals. Soil composition, microbial communities and macrofauna are extrinsic edaphic factors that direct the fate of L. monocytogenes in the soil environment. Moreover, farming practices may further affect its incidence. The genome of L. monocytogenes presents an extensive repertoire of genes encoding transport proteins and regulators, a characteristic of the genome of ubiquitous bacteria. Postgenomic analyses bring new insights in the process of soil adaptation. In the present paper focussing on soil, we review these extrinsic and intrinsic factors that drive environmental adaptation of L. monocytogenes.

  8. Inhibition of sortase A by chalcone prevents Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongen; Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Bing; Niu, Xiaodi; Song, Meng; Luo, Zhaoqing; Lu, Gejin; Liu, Bowen; Zhao, Xiaoran; Wang, Jianfeng; Deng, Xuming

    2016-04-15

    The critical role of sortase A in gram-positive bacterial pathogenicity makes this protein a good potential target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we report for the first time the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes sortase A and identify the active sites that mediate its transpeptidase activity. We also used a sortase A (SrtA) enzyme activity inhibition assay, simulation, and isothermal titration calorimetry analysis to discover that chalcone, an agent with little anti-L. monocytogenes activity, could significantly inhibit sortase A activity with an IC50 of 28.41 ± 5.34 μM by occupying the active site of SrtA. The addition of chalcone to a co-culture of L. monocytogenes and Caco-2 cells significantly inhibited bacterial entry into the cells and L. monocytogenes-mediated cytotoxicity. Additionally, chalcone treatment decreased the mortality of infected mice, the bacterial burden in target organs, and the pathological damage to L. monocytogenes-infected mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that chalcone is a promising candidate for the development of treatment against L. monocytogenes infection.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of the accessory genome of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk C den Bakker

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne bacterial pathogen, is comprised of four phylogenetic lineages that vary with regard to their serotypes and distribution among sources. In order to characterize lineage-specific genomic diversity within L. monocytogenes, we sequenced the genomes of eight strains from several lineages and serotypes, and characterized the accessory genome, which was hypothesized to contribute to phenotypic differences across lineages. The eight L. monocytogenes genomes sequenced range in size from 2.85-3.14 Mb, encode 2,822-3,187 genes, and include the first publicly available sequenced representatives of serotypes 1/2c, 3a and 4c. Mapping of the distribution of accessory genes revealed two distinct regions of the L. monocytogenes chromosome: an accessory-rich region in the first 65° adjacent to the origin of replication and a more stable region in the remaining 295°. This pattern of genome organization is distinct from that of related bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. The accessory genome of all lineages is enriched for cell surface-related genes and phosphotransferase systems, and transcriptional regulators, highlighting the selective pressures faced by contemporary strains from their hosts, other microbes, and their environment. Phylogenetic analysis of O-antigen genes and gene clusters predicts that serotype 4 was ancestral in L. monocytogenes and serotype 1/2 associated gene clusters were putatively introduced through horizontal gene transfer in the ancestral population of L. monocytogenes lineage I and II.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes a pathogen down-to-earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure eVivant

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the food-borne life threatening disease listeriosis. This pathogenic bacterium received much attention in the endeavour of deciphering the cellular mechanisms that underlie the onset of infection and its ability to adapt to the food processing environment. Although information is available on the presence of L. monocytogenes in many environmental niches including soil, water, plants, foodstuff and animals, understanding the ecology of L. monocytogenes in outdoor environments has received less attention. Soil is an environmental niche of pivotal importance in the transmission of this bacterium to plants and animals. Soil composition, microbial communities and macrofauna are extrinsic edaphic factors that direct the fate of L. monocytogenes in the soil environment. Moreover, farming practices may further affect its incidence. The genome of L. monocytogenes presents an extensive repertoire of genes encoding transport proteins and regulators, a characteristic of the genome of ubiquitous bacteria. Postgenomic analyses bring new insights in the process of soil adaptation. In the present paper focussing on soil, we review these extrinsic and intrinsic factors that drive environmental adaptation of L. monocytogenes.

  11. Substrate-enzyme interactions and catalytic mechanism in phospholipase C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, J R; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Hansen, S;

    1992-01-01

    Based on the high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus, the orientation of the phosphatidylcholine substrate in the active site of the enzyme is proposed. The proposal is based on extensive calculations using the GRID program and molecular mechanics ...

  12. Phorbol ester and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study evidence is provided for the existence of phospholipase D (PLD) activity in rat Leydig cells. Leydig cells were cultured and labelled with [H]myristic acid. In the presence of ethanol, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated the formation of [H]phosphatidylethanol ([...

  13. Phospholipases A2 in ocular homeostasis and diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Kolko, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s) and its generation of second messengers play an important role in signal transduction, cell proliferation, cell survival and gene expression. At low concentrations mediators of PLA(2) activity have a variety of physiological effects whereas high levels of PLA(2) and ...

  14. Drug delivery by phospholipase A(2) degradable liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper; Vermehren, C.; Frøkjær, S.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipid (PE-PEG) lipopolymers on phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) hydrolysis of liposomes composed of stearoyl-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC) was investigated. The PLA(2) lag-time, which is inversely related to the enzymatic activity, was determined...

  15. Phospholipase C delta regulates germination of Dictyostelium spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijken, P.; Van Haastert, PJM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Many eukaryotes including plants and fungi make spores that resist severe environmental stress. The micro-organism Dictyostelium contains a single phospholipase C gene (PLC); deletion of the gene has no effect on growth cell movement and differentiation. In this report we show that PLC

  16. Phospholipase C delta regulates germination of Dictyostelium spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijken, P.; Van Haastert, PJM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Many eukaryotes including plants and fungi make spores that resist severe environmental stress. The micro-organism Dictyostelium contains a single phospholipase C gene (PLC); deletion of the gene has no effect on growth cell movement and differentiation. In this report we show that PLC i

  17. Secretory Phospholipase A(2)-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Simon, Tabassome; Exeter, Holly J.; Folkersen, Lasse; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guardiola, Montse; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Carruthers, Kathryn F.; Horne, Benjamin D.; Brunisholz, Kimberly D.; Mega, Jessica L.; Van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Li, Mingyao; Leusink, Maarten; Trompet, Stella; Verschuren, Jeffrey J. W.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Dehghan, Abbas; Nelson, Christopher P.; Kotti, Salma; Danchin, Nicolas; Scholz, Markus; Haase, Christiane L.; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Staines-Urias, Eleonora; Goel, Anuj; van 't Hooft, Ferdinand; Gertow, Karl; de Faire, Ulf; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Tremoli, Elena; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Holdt, Lesca M.; Beutner, Frank; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Breitling, Lutz P.; Brenner, Hermann; Thiery, Joachim; Dallmeier, Dhayana; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Hofker, Marten H.; Tedgui, Alain; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Adamkova, Vera; Pitha, Jan; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cramer, Maarten J.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Klungel, Olaf H.; Kumari, Meena; Whincup, Peter H.; Morrow, David A.; Braund, Peter S.; Hall, Alistair S.; Olsson, Anders G.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Trip, Mieke D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Koenig, Wolfgang; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Teupser, Daniel; Day, Ian N. M.; Carlquist, John F.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Morris, Richard W.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Poledne, Rudolf; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Keating, Brendan J.; van der Harst, Pim; Price, Jackie F.; Mehta, Shamir R.; Yusuf, Salim; Witteman, Jaqueline C. M.; Franco, Oscar H.; Jukema, J. Wouter; de Knijff, Peter; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Rader, Daniel J.; Farrall, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kivimaki, Mika; Fox, Keith A. A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Palmer, Tom M.; Eriksson, Per; Pare, Guillaume; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Mallat, Ziad; Casas, Juan P.; Talmud, Philippa J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2))-IIA in cardiovascular disease. Background Higher circulating levels of sPLA(2)-IIA mass or sPLA(2) enzyme activity have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, it is not clea

  18. Silica gel stimulates the hydrolysis of lecithin by phospholipase A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goerke, J.; Gier, J. de; Bonsen, P.P.M.

    1971-01-01

    1. 1. Silica gel stimulates the hydrolysis of aqueous lecithin suspensions by phospholipase A. The activation is slightly greater than that caused by ether and takes place equally well in bulk suspensions of silica gel or on thin-layer Chromatographic plates prepared with silica. 2. 2. The hydrolys

  19. Characterization and partial purification of phospholipase D from human placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1995-01-01

    We report the existence in the human placenta of a phosphatidylcholine- hydrolyzing phospholipase D (PLD) activity, which has been characterized and partially purified. Triton X-100 effectively solubilized PLD from the particulate fraction of human placenta in a dose-dependent manner. However....... The present results form the basis for further purification of a PLD from human tissue....

  20. Phorbol ester and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study evidence is provided for the existence of phospholipase D (PLD) activity in rat Leydig cells. Leydig cells were cultured and labelled with [H]myristic acid. In the presence of ethanol, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated the formation of [H]phosphatidylethanol ([...

  1. Thyroxine signal transduction in liver cells involves phospholipase C and phospholipase D activation. Genomic independent action of thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasilnikova Oksana A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous investigations demonstrate a novel role of thyroid hormone as a modulator of signal transduction. Protein kinase C (PKC is critical to the mechanism by which thyroid hormones potentiate both the antiviral and immunomodulatory actions of IFNγ in different cells and regulate the exchange of signalling phospholipids in hepatocytes. Because nothing is known about accumulation of PKC modulator - diacylglycerol in cells treated with T4, we examined the nongenomic effect of thyroid hormones on DAG formation and phospholipase activation in liver cells. Results The results obtained provide the first demonstration of phospholipase C, phospholipase D and protein kinase C nongenomic activation and diacylglycerol (DAG accumulation by L-T4 in liver cells. The experiments were performed in either the [14C]CH3COOH-labeled rat liver slices or isolated hepatocytes pre-labeled by [14C]oleic acid. L-T4 activates the DAG production in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. DAG formation in stimulated cells is biphasic and short-lived event: there is an initial, rapid rise in DAG concentration and then a slower accumulation that can be sustained for a few minutes. The early phase of L-T4 generated DAG only is accompanied by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate level decrease and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation while the second phase is abolished by PKC inhibitor l,(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl2methylpiperasine dihydrochloride (H7 and propranolol. The second phase of DAG production is accompanied by free choline release, phosphatidylcholine content drop and phosphatidylethanol (Peth formation. Inhibitor of phospholipase-C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis, neomycin sulfate, reduced the Peth as well as the DAG response to L-T4. Conclusions The present data have indicated the DAG signaling in thyroid hormone-stimulated liver cells. L-thyroxine activates a dual phospholipase pathway in a sequential and synchronized manner

  2. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis. However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water. Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce–associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Gooneratne, Ravi; Hussain, Malik Altaf

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis). However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water). Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce–associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges. PMID:28282938

  4. Listeria monocytogenes in renal transplant recipients Listeria monocytogenes em pacientes pós-transplante renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Barroso HOFER

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Five cases of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriemia were observed from April to December 1985, among renal transplant recipients from the same hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. The patients were adults (mean age: 40.6 years, and the basic complain was fever, with no report of meningeal syndrome. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of two serovars, 1/2a and 4b, which were classified into three lysotypes. The four strains of serovar 4b showed the same antibiotype, with resistance to cefoxitin, clindamycin, oxacillin and penicillin.No período de abril a dezembro de 1985, foram observados cinco casos de listeriose em transplantados renais num mesmo hospital de São Paulo, SP. Os pacientes eram adultos (média de 40,6 anos tendo como queixa básica a febre. Laboratorialmente, em todos foram reconhecidos Listeria monocytogenes, caracterizada por dois sorovares 1/2a e 4b e três lisotipos distintos. As amostras do sorovar 4b apresentaram o mesmo antibiotipo: resistentes à cefoxitina, clindamicina, oxacilina e penicilina.

  5. Antitumoral Potential of Tunisian Snake Venoms Secreted Phospholipases A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoudha Zouari-Kessentini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipases type A2 (PLA2s are the most abundant proteins found in Viperidae snake venom. They are quite fascinating from both a biological and structural point of view. Despite similarity in their structures and common catalytic properties, they exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities. Besides being hydrolases, secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 are an important group of toxins, whose action at the molecular level is still a matter of debate. These proteins can display toxic effects by different mechanisms. In addition to neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, hemolytic activity, antibacterial, anticoagulant, and antiplatelet effects, some venom PLA2s show antitumor and antiangiogenic activities by mechanisms independent of their enzymatic activity. This paper aims to discuss original finding against anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activities of sPLA2 isolated from Tunisian vipers: Cerastes cerastes and Macrovipera lebetina, representing new tools to target specific integrins, mainly, and integrins.

  6. Drug delivery by phospholipase A(2) degradable liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper; Vermehren, C.; Frøkjær, S.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipid (PE-PEG) lipopolymers on phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) hydrolysis of liposomes composed of stearoyl-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC) was investigated. The PLA(2) lag-time, which is inversely related to the enzymatic activity, was determined by fluore......The effect of poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipid (PE-PEG) lipopolymers on phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) hydrolysis of liposomes composed of stearoyl-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC) was investigated. The PLA(2) lag-time, which is inversely related to the enzymatic activity, was determined...... by fluorescence, and the zeta-potentials of the liposomes were measured as a function of PE-PEG lipopolymer concentration. A significant decrease in the lag-time, and hence an increase in enzymatic activity, was observed with increasing amounts of the negatively charged PE-PEG lipopolymers incorporated...

  7. Listeria spp., y L. monocytogenes EN LECHE CRUDA DE CABRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Albarracín C

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test non-pasteurized goat’s milk from the village of ‘la Garita’, Northern Santander, for Listeria monocytogenes. Material and methods. 90 samples of non-pasteurized goat’s milk were obtained over a 4 month period; pH and temperature of each sample were measured. The INVIMA technique was used to isolate L. monocytogenes; the species was confirmed by PCR. Results. The study showed that eight goat milk providers of the zone neither had refrigeration nor pasteurized the milk. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes was 3%; 15% of the samples had other species of Listeria. The milk obtained from this zone contained the pathogen that may cause listeriosis in children less than 5 years of age, pregnant women, adults and immunologically compromised patients. Conclusions. This study shows the occurrence of this pathogen in goat’s milk and identified areas of risk for those people who drink goat’s milk.

  8. Animal models for oral transmission of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E F D'Orazio

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as a food borne pathogen in humans since the 1980s, but we still understand very little about oral transmission of L. monocytogenes or the host factors that determine susceptibility to gastrointestinal infection, due to the lack of an appropriate small animal model of oral listeriosis. Early feeding trials suggested that many animals were highly resistant to oral infection, and the more reproducible intravenous or intraperitoneal routes of inoculation soon came to be favored. There are a fair number of previously published studies using an oral infection route, but the work varies widely in terms of bacterial strain choice, the methods used for oral transmission, and various manipulations used to enhance infectivity. This mini review will summarize the published literature using oral routes of L. monocytogenes infection and will highlight recent technological advances that have made oral infection a more attractive model system.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes response regulators important for stress tolerance and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, B H; Ingmer, H

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sensing by two-component signal transduction systems is likely to play a role for growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes both during transmission in food products and within a host organism. Two-component systems typically consist of a membrane-associated sensor histidine...... kinase and a gene regulatory protein, the response regulator (RR). We have identified seven putative RR genes in L. monocytogenes LO28 by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers. By insertional inactivation we obtained data suggesting that three of the putative RRs contribute to the pathogenicity...... of L. monocytogenes in mice. Strikingly, the mutants that were attenuated in virulence also had a decreased ability to grow in the presence of various stress conditions potentially encountered in an infection process. Thus, our data point to a connection between the ability of the putative two...

  10. Role of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Lappann, Martin; Knøchel, S

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that is capable of living in harsh environments. It is believed to do this by forming biofilms, which are surface-associated multicellular structures encased in a self-produced matrix. In this paper we show that in L. monocytogenes extracellular DNA...... (eDNA) may be the only central component of the biofilm matrix and that it is necessary for both initial attachment and early biofilm formation for 41 L. monocytogenes strains that were tested. DNase I treatment resulted in dispersal of biofilms, not only in microtiter tray assays but also in flow...... cell biofilm assays. However, it was also demonstrated that in a culture without eDNA, neither Listeria genomic DNA nor salmon sperm DNA by itself could restore the capacity to adhere. A search for additional necessary components revealed that peptidoglycan (PG), specifically N-acetylglucosamine (NAG...

  11. Case of Contamination by Listeria Monocytogenes in Mozzarella Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolli, Rita; Bossù, Teresa; Rodas, Eda Maria Flores; Di Giamberardino, Fabiola; Di Sirio, Alessandro; Vita, Silvia; De Angelis, Veronica; Bilei, Stefano; Sonnessa, Michele; Gattuso, Antonietta; Lanni, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Following a Listeria monocytogenes detection in a mozzarella cheese sampled at a dairy plant in Lazio Region, further investigations have been conducted both by the competent Authority and the food business operatordairy factory (as a part of dairy factory HACCP control). In total, 90 dairy products, 7 brine and 64 environmental samples have been tested. The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes was 24.4% in mozzarella cheese, and 9.4% in environmental samples, while brines were all negatives. Forty-seven strains of L. monocytogenes have been isolated, all belonging to 4b/4e serotype. In 12 of these, the macrorestriction profile has been determined by means of pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The profiles obtained with AscI enzyme showed a 100% similarity while those obtained with ApaI a 96.78% similarity. These characteristics of the isolated strains jointly with the production process of mozzarella cheese has allowed to hypothesise an environmental contamination. PMID:27800317

  12. Rhombencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a pastured bull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Carolina; Varela, Gustavo; Mota, María Inés; Gianneechini, Ruben; Rivero, Rodolfo

    2017-03-01

    A pastured 2-y-old cross-breed bull developed brainstem encephalitis (rhombencephalitis); Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from the brain. In the brainstem, there was perivascular cuffing, multiple microabscesses, and positive immunostaining for L. monocytogenes. Samples of bovine feces, water, feedstuffs, milking parlor soil, and bulk tank milk were collected from the dairy farm. Seven isolates of the genus Listeria were obtained, 6 of L. innocua and 1 of L. monocytogenes, which was found in the pasture where the bull grazed. Both isolates belonged to serotype 4b and were positive for internalins A, C, and J. According to the DNA fragment patterns of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the isolates were closely related. The source of infection was the pasture, implying that listeriosis should not be discounted in cases with compatible clinical signs but the absence of silage feeding.

  13. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in rat tissue cytosols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, A.J.; Nijssen, J.G.; Aarsman, A.J.; Bosch, H. van den

    1988-01-01

    Cytosols (105000 X g supernatant) from seven rat tissues were assayed for Ca²⁺-independent phospholipase A₂ activity with either 1-acyl-2-[1-¹⁴C]linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-acyl-2-[l-¹⁴C]linoleoyl-snglycero- 3-phosphoethanohunine or 1-0-hexadecyl-2-[9,10-³H₂]oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoc

  14. Effects of Estradiol and Progesterone on Rat Intestinal and Hepatic Phospholipase A Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Several workers have investigated the effects of hormones upon phospholipase A activity. Rillema and Wild (3) showed that prolactin treatment... cheese cloth, an aliquot of the homogenate was saved for phospholipase A assay and the remainder was further fractionated. The method of Berezney and...Wild, (1977). Prolactin activation of phospholipase A activity in membrane preparations from mammary glands. Endocrinology 100:1219-1222. 4. Enholm, C

  15. Keberadaan Bakteri Listeria monocytogenes pada Keju Gouda Produksi Lokal dan Impor (PRESENCE OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN LOCAL AND IMPORTED GOUDA CHEESES)

    OpenAIRE

    Debby Fadhilah Pazra; Trioso Purnawarman; Denny Widaya Lukman

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is included in the foodborne pathogen, which has been associated with severaloutbreaks of human listeriosis especially in high risk groups. Listeria monocytogenes could be found inGouda cheeses because of poor hygienic and sanitation practices. In addition, this bacteria could surviveduring the making of cheese and cheese ripening process. The purpose of this study was to identify thepresence of L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheeses and how the safety lev...

  16. Diversity and distribution of Listeria monocytogenes in meat processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Belén; Perich, Adriana; Gómez, Diego; Yangüela, Javier; Rodríguez, Alicia; Garriga, Margarita; Aymerich, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a major concern for the meat processing industry because many listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to meat product consumption. The aim of this study was to elucidate L. monocytogenes diversity and distribution across different Spanish meat processing plants. L. monocytogenes isolates (N = 106) collected from food contact surfaces of meat processing plants and meat products were serotyped and then characterised by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were serotyped as 1/2a (36.8%), 1/2c (34%), 1/2b (17.9%) and 4b (11.3%). MLST identified ST9 as the most predominant allelic profile (33% of isolates) followed by ST121 (16%), both of which were detected from several processing plants and meat products sampled in different years, suggesting that those STs are highly adapted to the meat processing environment. Food contact surfaces during processing were established as an important source of L. monocytogenes in meat products because the same STs were obtained in isolates recovered from surfaces and products. L. monocytogenes was recovered after cleaning and disinfection procedures in two processing plants, highlighting the importance of thorough cleaning and disinfection procedures. Epidemic clone (EC) marker ECI was identified in 8.5%, ECIII was identified in 2.8%, and ECV was identified in 7.5% of the 106 isolates. Furthermore, a selection of presumably unrelated ST9 isolates was analysed by multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST). Most ST9 isolates had the same virulence type (VT11), confirming the clonal origin of ST9 isolates; however, one ST9 isolate was assigned to a new VT (VT95). Consequently, MLST is a reliable tool for identification of contamination routes and niches in processing plants, and MVLST clearly differentiates EC strains, which both contribute to the improvement of L. monocytogenes control programs in the meat industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analytical bioconjugates, aptamers, enable specific quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Ah; Um, Hyun-Ju; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Sun Park, Tae; Min, Jiho; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2015-06-15

    As a major human pathogen in the Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes causes the bacterial disease listeriosis, which is a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacteria. We have developed an aptamer-based sandwich assay (ABSA) platform that demonstrates a promising potential for use in pathogen detection using aptamers as analytical bioconjugates. The whole-bacteria SELEX (WB-SELEX) strategy was adopted to generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity against live L. monocytogenes. Of the 35 aptamer candidates tested, LMCA2 and LMCA26 reacted to L. monocytogenes with high binding, and were consequently chosen as sensing probes. The ABSA platform can significantly enhance the sensitivity by employing a very specific aptamer pair for the sandwich complex. The ABSA platform exhibited a linear response over a wide concentration range of L. monocytogenes from 20 to 2×10(6) CFU per mL and was closely correlated with the following relationship: y=9533.3x+1542.3 (R(2)=0.99). Our proposed ABSA platform also provided excellent specificity for the tests to distinguish L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species and other bacterial genera (3 Listeria spp., 4 Salmonella spp., 2 Vibrio spp., 3 Escherichia coli and 3 Shigella spp.). Improvements in the sensitivity and specificity have not only facilitated the reliable detection of L. monocytogenes at extremely low concentrations, but also allowed for the development of a 96-well plate-based routine assay platform for multivalent diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Phospholipase C in Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Faramarzi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Phospholipase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in pathogenesis through breaking up phospholipids and production of diacylglycerol. In this study, we examined the Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from Iranian patients for the genes encoding this enzyme."nMaterials and Methods: DNA extraction was performed using CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide from positive culture specimens in tuberculosis patients. PCR was then used to amplify the plcA, plcB, plcC genes of Beijing strain, and non-Beijing strains were identified by spoligotyping."nResults: Of 200 specimens, 19 (9.5% were Beijing strain and 181 (90.5% were non-Beijing strains. The results of PCR for Beijing strains were as follows: 16 strains (84.2% were positive for plcA, 17 (89.4% were positive for plcB and 17 (89.4% were positive for plcC genes. The standard strain (H37RV was used as control."nConclusion: The majority of Beijing strains have phospholipase C genes which can contribute to their pathogenesis but we need complementary studies to confirm the role of phospholipase C in pathogenecity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  19. Signalling through phospholipase C interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvou, Nicolas; Norden, Anthony G W; Unwin, Robert J; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2007-01-01

    We investigated if phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) hydrolysis by phospholipase C activation through cell surface receptors would interfere with clathrin-mediated endocytosis as recruitment of clathrin assembly proteins is PtdIns(4,5)P2-dependent. In the WKPT renal epithelial cell line, endocytosed insulin and beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2gpI) were observed in separate compartments, although endocytosis of both ligands was clathrin-dependent as demonstrated by expression of the clathrin-binding C-terminal domain of AP180 (AP180-C). The two uptake mechanisms were different as only insulin uptake was reduced when the mu2-subunit of the adaptor complex AP-2 was silenced by RNA interference. ATP receptors are expressed at the apical surface of renal cells and, thus, we examined the effect of extracellular ATP on insulin and beta2gpI uptake. ATP stimulated phospholipase C activity, and also suppressed uptake of insulin, but not beta2gpI. This effect was reversed by the PLC inhibitor U-73122. In polarized cell cultures, insulin uptake was apical, whereas beta2gpI uptake was through the basolateral membrane, thus providing an explanation for selective inhibition of insulin endocytosis by ATP. Taken together, these results demonstrate that stimulation of apical G-protein-coupled P2Y receptors, which are coupled to phospholipase C activation diminishes clathrin-mediated endocytosis without interfering with basolateral endocytic mechanisms.

  20. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Lucio; Follo, Matilde Y; Manzoli, Lucia; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipases are widely occurring and can be found in several different organisms, including bacteria, yeast, plants, animals, and viruses. Phospholipase C (PLC) is a class of phospholipases that cleaves phospholipids on the diacylglycerol (DAG) side of the phosphodiester bond producing DAGs and phosphomonoesters. Among PLCs, phosphoinositide-specific PLC (PI-PLC) constitutes an important step in the inositide signaling pathways. The structures of PI-PLC isozymes show conserved domains as well as regulatory specific domains. This is important, as most PI-PLCs share a common mechanism, but each of them has a peculiar role and can have a specific cell distribution that is linked to a specific function. More importantly, the regulation of PLC isozymes is fundamental in health and disease, as there are several PLC-dependent molecular mechanisms that are associated with the activation or inhibition of important physiopathological processes. Moreover, PI-PLC alternative splicing variants can play important roles in complex signaling networks, not only in cancer but also in other diseases. That is why PI-PLC isozymes are now considered as important molecules that are essential for better understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying both physiology and pathogenesis, and are also potential molecular targets useful for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Restoration of responsiveness of phospholipase Cγ2-deficient platelets by enforced expression of phospholipase Cγ1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Zheng

    Full Text Available Receptor-mediated platelet activation requires phospholipase C (PLC activity to elevate intracellular calcium and induce actin cytoskeleton reorganization. PLCs are classified into structurally distinct β, γ, δ, ε, ζ, and η isoforms. There are two PLCγ isoforms (PLCγ1, PLCγ2, which are critical for activation by tyrosine kinase-dependent receptors. Platelets express both PLCγ1 and PLCγ2. Although PLCγ2 has been shown to play a dominant role in platelet activation, the extent to which PLCγ1 contributes has not been evaluated. To ascertain the relative contributions of PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 to platelet activation, we generated conditionally PLCγ1-deficient, wild-type (WT, PLCγ2-deficient, and PLCγ1/PLCγ2 double-deficient mice and measured the ability of platelets to respond to different agonists. We found that PLCγ2 deficiency abrogated αIIbβ3-dependent platelet spreading, GPVI-dependent platelet aggregation, and thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces under shear conditions, which is dependent on both GPVI and αIIbβ3. Addition of exogenous ADP overcame defective spreading of PLCγ2-deficient platelets on immobilized fibrinogen, suggesting that PLCγ2 is required for granule secretion in response to αIIbβ3 ligation. Consistently, αIIbβ3-mediated release of granule contents was impaired in the absence of PLCγ2. In contrast, PLCγ1-deficient platelets spread and released granule contents normally on fibrinogen, exhibited normal levels of GPVI-dependent aggregation, and formed thrombi normally on collagen-coated surfaces. Interestingly, enforced expression of PLCγ1 fully restored GPVI-dependent aggregation and αIIbβ3-dependent spreading of PLCγ2-deficient platelets. We conclude that platelet activation through GPVI and αIIbβ3 utilizes PLCγ2 because PLCγ1 levels are insufficient to support responsiveness, but that PLCγ1 can restore responsiveness if expressed at levels normally achieved by PLCγ2.

  2. Transferable tetracycline resistance in Listeria monocytogenes from food in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshaban, Manoocheher; Ferrini, Anna Maria; Mannoni, Veruscka; Oliva, Brunello; Aureli, Paolo

    2002-07-01

    Mechanisms of tetracycline resistance were investigated in two recent Listeria monocytogenes isolates from food, with L. innocua 52P tet(r) as a control. Tetracycline resistance was transferred conjugatively from all three strains to L. ivanovii and from one isolate and the control to Enterococcus faecalis. Molecular analysis demonstrated a chromosomal location for the tet determinant, which was identified as tetM in all cases. These studies are the first to show that L. monocytogenes from food could be a source of tetracycline resistance genes able to spread to other micro-organisms.

  3. Variations in virulence between different electrophoretic types of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk

    2000-01-01

    A total of 245 strains of Listeria monocytogenes, representing 33 different electrophoretic types (ETs), were examined quantitatively for haemolytic activity. No significant difference was observed in the mean haemolytic activity between different ETs. Eighty four out of 91 strains examined were...... compared with 3.64 among food isolates). The explanation for this may be that more virulent strains are more prone to cause human infection. It is, however, also possible that strains oft. monocytogenes may become more virulent while multiplying in a living organism compared with multiplying in foods....

  4. Nalaz bakterije Listeria monocytogenes u ribi i ribljim proizvodima

    OpenAIRE

    Rožman, Jelena; Njari, dr. sc. Bela; Kozačinski, dr. sc. Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Listerioza je bolest koja se prenosi hranom a bakterija Listeria monocytogenes je jedan od najznačajnijih javnozdravstvenih problema i uvjet prometa hrane u svijetu. Prije svega povezana je s konzumacijom gotovih proizvoda. U ovom radu je pretražena svježa riba (brancin) i riblji proizvodi (dimljena i marinirana riba, orada i brancin) na nalaz bakterije L. monocytogenes. Također, pretraženi su uzorci brisova uzeti s radnih površina i ruku djelatnika u pogonima prerade morske ribe. Bakterija L...

  5. Listeria monocytogenes response regulators important for stress tolerance and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, B H; Ingmer, H

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sensing by two-component signal transduction systems is likely to play a role for growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes both during transmission in food products and within a host organism. Two-component systems typically consist of a membrane-associated sensor histidine...... of L. monocytogenes in mice. Strikingly, the mutants that were attenuated in virulence also had a decreased ability to grow in the presence of various stress conditions potentially encountered in an infection process. Thus, our data point to a connection between the ability of the putative two-component...

  6. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  7. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Salmon Roe - a kinetic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in unsalted and salted (3%) salmon roe. Growth curves, developed using inoculated samples incubated at constant temperatures between 5 and 30 degrees C, were analyzed by curve-fitting to the Huang and Baran...

  8. LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NEW COMMUNITY REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bragagnolo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years in the countries of the European Union have occurred profound and radical changes regarding the safety and hygiene of foodstuffs. The aim of this work is to highlight the significant changes made by the recent legislation in the control of Listeria monocytogenes.

  9. Studies on the risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, S.; Dufrenne, J.; Teunis, P.; Chackraborty, T.

    1998-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to Listeria monocytogenes, and high numbers may be ingested during consumption of certain types of food. However, epidemiological investigations show that listeriosis is a rare disease. Risk assessment studies using an animal mouse model indicate that almost all L. mono

  10. Overlevingsstrategieën Listeria monocytogenes bij lage temperatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen that may cause severe infections in humans. Many outbreaks caused by this organism have been associated with ready-to-eat foods wich may have undergone some form of minimal processing, or have been contaminated after processing. Ready-to-eat

  11. Neonatal infection with Listeria monocytogenes: Rare, but serious

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Stuijvenberg, M.; Spanjaard, L.; Bergman, K.A.

    2006-01-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, three infants, two girls and a boy, were found to have an invasive infection with Listeria monocytogenes. They received intensive care including respiratory and circulatory support, antibiotics, and treatment of the neurological complications when possible. One of the girls

  12. Listeria monocytogenes and hemolytic Listeria innocua in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, S R; Stout, J C; Hanning, I B; Clement, A; Fortes, E D; den Bakker, H C; Wiedmann, M; Ricke, S C

    2012-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, saprophytic, Gram-positive bacterium and occasional food-borne pathogen, often associated with ready-to-eat meat products. Because of the increased consumer interest in organic, all natural, and free range poultry products, it is important to understand L. monocytogenes in the context of such systems. Pasture-reared poultry were surveyed over the course of two 8-wk rearing periods. Cecal, soil, and grass samples were collected for Listeria isolation and characterization. Seven of 399 cecal samples (or 1.75%) were Listeria-positive. All positive cecal samples were obtained from broilers sampled at 2 wk of age. Grass and soil samples were collected from the pasture both before and after introduction of the poultry. Environmental samples collected after introduction of poultry were significantly more likely to contain Listeria (P Listeria, sigB allelic typing, and hlyA PCR tests found that both L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, including hemolytic L. innocua, were recovered from the cecal and environmental (grass/soil) samples. The sigB allelic typing also revealed that (1) positive samples could be composed of 2 or more allelic types; (2) allelic types found in cecal samples could also be found in the environment; and (3) allelic types could persist through the 2 rearing periods. Our data indicate that both pasture-reared poultry and their environment can be contaminated with L. monocytogenes and hemolytic L. innocua.

  13. Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in silage products of Shahrekord city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sharifzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in the silage samples. Methods: Silage samples obtained from 150 different farms in Shahrekord city (Iran and after DNA extraction, all samples were analyzed by PCR technique using one pair of primers for presence of this pathogen. The amplified products were detected on 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis. Results: Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 4 (2% of the 150 samples. The detection of this bacterium from silage samples in Shahrekord city indicated that these products could create a serious risk in public health of animal and human. The findings showed that in positive silage samples for Listeria monocytogenes, the pH value was about five and it was due to bacterial activity in these products. Conclusions: The quality of silage and hygiene parameters and good herd health management play an important role in the microbiological quality of herd and farm. Considering the high specificity and sensitivity of the employed PCR technique, it is recommended to be useful technique for identification of Listeria monocytogenes.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes : the nature, public health aspects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal Production Research Advances ... New food borne infectious diseases have continued to emerge world over in the food industries. ... Its' public health importance cannot be over emphasized as L. monocytogenes causes huge economic ... It is therefore, suggested that proper control strategies, good quality control ...

  15. Quantifying strain variability in modeling growth of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aryani, D.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth kinetics can differ from the actual behavior of the target microorganisms. In the present study, the impact of strain variability on maximum specific growth rate (µmax) (h- 1) was quantified using twenty Listeria monocytogenes strains. The µmax was determined as functi

  16. Genome sequesnce of lineage III Listeria monocytogenes strain HCC23

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotypes within lineages I and II. Serotypes within lineage III (4a and 4c) are commonly isolated from environmental and food specimens. We report the first complete genome sequence of a lineage III isolate, HCC2...

  17. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by fatty acids and monoglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L L; Johnson, E A

    1992-02-01

    Fatty acids and monoglycerides were evaluated in brain heart infusion broth and in milk for antimicrobial activity against the Scott A strain of Listeria monocytogenes. C12:0, C18:3, and glyceryl monolaurate (monolaurin) had the strongest activity in brain heart infusion broth and were bactericidal at 10 to 20 micrograms/ml, whereas potassium (K)-conjugated linoleic acids and C18:2 were bactericidal at 50 to 200 micrograms/ml. C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, glyceryl monomyristate, and glyceryl monopalmitate were not inhibitory at 200 micrograms/ml. The bactericidal activity in brain heart infusion broth was higher at pH 5 than at pH 6. In whole milk and skim milk, K-conjugated linoleic acid was bacteriostatic and prolonged the lag phase especially at 4 degrees C. Monolaurin inactivated L. monocytogenes in skim milk at 4 degrees C, but was less inhibitory at 23 degrees C. Monolaurin did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in whole milk because of the higher fat content. Other fatty acids tested were not effective in whole or skim milk. Our results suggest that K-conjugated linoleic acids or monolaurin could be used as an inhibitory agent against L. monocytogenes in dairy foods.

  18. The Continuous Challenge of Characterizing the Foodborne Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Woodward, Joshua John; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen commonly isolated from food processing environments and food products. This organism can multiply at refrigeration temperatures, form biofilms on different materials and under various conditions, resist a range of environmental stresses, and contaminate food products by cross-contamination. L. monocytogenes is recognized as the causative agent of listeriosis, a serious disease that affects mainly individuals from high-risk groups, such as pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Listeriosis can be considered a disease that has emerged along with changing eating habits and large-scale industrial food processing. This disease causes losses of billions of dollars every year with recalls of contaminated foods and patient medical treatment expenses. In addition to the immune status of the host and the infecting dose, the virulence potential of each strain is crucial for the development of disease symptoms. While many isolates are naturally virulent, other isolates are avirulent and unable to cause disease; this may vary according to the presence of molecular determinants associated with virulence. In the last decade, the characterization of genetic profiles through the use of molecular methods has helped track and demonstrate the genetic diversity among L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from various sources. The purposes of this review were to summarize the main methods used for isolation, identification, and typing of L. monocytogenes and also describe its most relevant virulence characteristics.

  19. Overlevingsstrategieën Listeria monocytogenes bij lage temperatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen that may cause severe infections in humans. Many outbreaks caused by this organism have been associated with ready-to-eat foods wich may have undergone some form of minimal processing, or have been contaminated after processing. Ready-to-eat

  20. Whole genome sequence-based serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Lennkh, Anna; Murer, Andrea; Springer, Burkhard; Blaschitz, Marion; Indra, Alexander; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner; Sensen, Christoph W

    2016-10-10

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is currently becoming the method of choice for characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in national reference laboratories (NRLs). WGS is superior with regards to accuracy, resolution and analysis speed in comparison to several other methods including serotyping, PCR, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and multivirulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST), which have been used thus far for the characterization of bacterial isolates (and are still important tools in reference laboratories today) to control and prevent listeriosis, one of the major sources of foodborne diseases for humans. Backward compatibility of WGS to former methods can be maintained by extraction of the respective information from WGS data. Serotyping was the first subtyping method for L. monocytogenes capable of differentiating 12 serovars and national reference laboratories still perform serotyping and PCR-based serogrouping as a first level classification method for Listeria monocytogenes surveillance. Whole genome sequence based core genome MLST analysis of a L. monocytogenes collection comprising 172 isolates spanning all 12 serotypes was performed for serogroup determination. These isolates clustered according to their serotypes and it was possible to group them either into the IIa, IIc, IVb or IIb clusters, respectively, which were generated by minimum spanning tree (MST) and neighbor joining (NJ) tree data analysis, demonstrating the power of the new approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  2. Studies on the risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, S.; Dufrenne, J.; Teunis, P.; Chackraborty, T.

    1998-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to Listeria monocytogenes, and high numbers may be ingested during consumption of certain types of food. However, epidemiological investigations show that listeriosis is a rare disease. Risk assessment studies using an animal mouse model indicate that almost all L.

  3. Antimicrobial treatments to control Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, António; Kamnetz, Mary B; Gadotti, Camila; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2017-06-01

    Queso fresco, is a Hispanic non-fermented cheese highly susceptible to contamination with L. monocytogenes. This research was aimed to determine the effect of GRAS antimicrobial ingredients to control L. monocytogenes. Antimicrobials included caprylic acid (CA), Nisaplin(®) (N, 2.5% nisin), a mixture of sodium lactate and sodium diacetate (SL/SD), Lactococcus lactis sbp. lactis DPC 3147, monolaurin, and lactic acid (LA). Batches of queso fresco curds were inoculated with 10(4) CFU/g and stored at 4 °C for three weeks. During storage the count of L. monocytogenes reached 7 to 8 Log CFU/g in control samples. Most individual antimicrobial treatments resulted in less than 1 Log CFU/g reductions in final counts, with the exception of N (0.5 g/kg) and CA (2.9 g/kg) that caused more than 3 and 5 Log CFU/g differences with controls, respectively. Mixtures of ingredients were more effective in inhibiting L. monocytogenes growth, and treatments with N and CA consistently delivered 6 Log CFU/g less counts than controls. Supplementation of 12 g/kg LA to treatments with SL/SD (3%/0.22%) caused differences of more than 4 Log CFU/g in final Listeria populations. Samples treated with the binary mixtures of N and CA (0.5 and 0.7 g/kg, respectively) were evaluated in a consumer panel (n = 67). Panelists slightly preferred control and commercial over treated samples, but all samples were in average rated between "slightly liking" and "moderately liking." These experiments indicated that combined use of antimicrobial ingredients may be an effective way to control the population of Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco.

  4. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry production in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaly, Marianne; Toquin, Marie-Therese; Le Nôtre, Yolene; Fravalo, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    This study aimed to update and create a data set from laying hens and broilers regarding contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. Two hundred laying-hen flocks were sampled, with 88 flocks reared in cages and 112 reared on the floor. One hundred forty-five broiler flocks were sampled, with 85 conventional and 60 free-range flocks. A total of 774 and 725 samples were analyzed from laying hens and broilers, respectively. L. monocytogenes was detected in 31 of 200 flocks, yielding an estimated prevalence of 15.5% in laying-hen flocks. Among positive flocks, there appeared a significant (P = 0.004) difference between caged and floor-reared hens, with a higher detection in dust samples from floor-reared hens. In positive caged hen flocks, significant (P = 0.028) differences between dust and fecal samples appeared, with a higher detection in feces than in dust samples. In broiler flocks, L. monocytogenes was isolated in 46 of 145 flocks, yielding an estimated prevalence of 32% (28% in conventional flocks versus 37% in the free-range flocks). L. monocytogenes was isolated in samples taken from conventional flocks with a lower frequency than in free-range flocks (13 versus 18%, respectively). The serotyping of L. monocytogenes strains showed that the majority belonged to type 1/2a in laying-hen flocks (74.3%) and in broiler flocks (40.5%). A significant difference (P = 0.007) between laying hens and broilers was shown for serogroup 4 and for serovar 1/2b (P = 0.007); these serogroups were more prevalent in broilers (40%) than in laying hens (5.7%).

  5. Increased phospholipase a activity and formation of communicative contacts between Acanthamoeba castellanii cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hax, W.M.A.; Demel, R.A.; Spies, F.; Vossenberg, J.B.J.; Linnemans, W.A.M.

    1974-01-01

    1. 1. Exogenous 1-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine becomes incorporated into the membrane of A. castellanii within 2 min of incubation. 2. 2. Homogenates of A. castellanii are shown to contain phospholipase A activity. 3. 3. The phospholipase A activity is dependent on the population density

  6. Soybean phospholipase D activity determination. A comparison of two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ré, E.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to a discrepancy between previously published results, two methods to determine the soybean phospholipase D activity were evaluated. One method is based on the extraction of the enzyme from whole soybean flour, quantifying the enzyme activity on the extract. The other method quantifies the enzymatic activity on whole soybean flour without enzyme extraction. In the extraction-based-method, both the extraction time and the number of extractions were optimized. The highest phospholipase D activity values were obtained from the method without enzyme extraction. This method is less complex, requires less running-time and the conditions of the medium in which phospholipase D acts resemble the conditions found in the oil industrySe evaluaron dos métodos para determinar la actividad de la fosfolipasa D en soja debido a que existe discrepancia entre los resultados publicados. Un método se basa en la extracción de la enzima de la harina resultante de la molienda del grano de soja entero, cuantificando la actividad sobre el extracto. En el otro método, la cuantificación se realiza sobre la harina del grano entero molido, sin extraer la enzima. En el método de extracción se optimizaron tanto el tiempo como el número de extracciones. Los mayores valores de actividad de la fosfolipasa D se obtuvieron por el método sin extracción de la enzima. Este método es más simple, exige menos tiempo de ejecución y las condiciones del medio en que actúa la fosfolipasa D se asemejan a las condiciones encontradas en la industria aceitera.

  7. Gestational alterations in phospholipase c coupled muscarinic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varol, F.G.; Hadjiconstantinou, M.; Zuspan, F.P.; Neff, N.H. (Ohio State Univ. college of Medicine, Columbus (USA))

    1989-01-01

    In the pregnant rat, carbachol-induced phosphoinositol hydrolysis by myometrium at the placental attachment region progressively decreased toward term, whereas hydrolysis was relatively stable in the myometrium of the non-attachment region. Tritium-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding increased in the myometrium of non-attachment regions as pregnancy progressed. At placental attachment sites binding remained relatively stable until parturition when it increased. Apparently the myometrium associated with the placental attachment site is less sensitive to cholinergic influence during pregnancy compared with the non-attachment site when evaluated by muscarinic activation of phospholipase C or ligand binding.

  8. Secretory Phospholipase A(2) Activity toward Diverse Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Linderoth, Lars; Subramanian, Arun Kumar

    2011-01-01

    , and an inverted ester. The latter were included to study head group-enzyme interactions. Our simulation results show that the lipids are optimally placed into the binding cleft and that water molecules can freely reach the active site through a well-defined pathway; both are indicative that these substrates......We have studied secretory phospholipase A(2)-IIA (sPLA(2)) activity toward different phospholipid analogues by performing biophysical 1 characterizations and molecular dynamics simulations. The phospholipids were natural substrates, triple alkyl phospholipids, a prodrug anticancer etherlipid...... charged residues, but relatively large fluctuations are observed, suggesting that these interactions are not necessarily important for stabilizing substrate binding to the enzyme....

  9. Phospholipase A2 structure/function, mechanism, and signaling1

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, John E.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Tremendous advances in understanding the structure and function of the superfamily of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes has occurred in the twenty-first century. The superfamily includes 15 groups comprising four main types including the secreted sPLA2, cytosolic cPLA2, calcium-independent iPLA2, and platelet activating factor (PAF) acetyl hydrolase/oxidized lipid lipoprotein associated (Lp)PLA2. We review herein our current understanding of the structure and interaction with substrate phosphol...

  10. Validation of the ANSR(®) Listeria monocytogenes Method for Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Selected Food and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Oscar; Alles, Susan; Le, Quynh-Nhi; Gray, R Lucas; Hosking, Edan; Pinkava, Lisa; Norton, Paul; Tolan, Jerry; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer; Chen, Yi; Ryser, Elliot; Odumeru, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Work was conducted to validate performance of the ANSR(®) for Listeria monocytogenes method in selected food and environmental matrixes. This DNA-based assay involves amplification of nucleic acid via an isothermal reaction based on nicking enzyme amplification technology. Following single-step sample enrichment for 16-24 h for most matrixes, the assay is completed in 40 min using only simple instrumentation. When 50 distinct strains of L. monocytogenes were tested for inclusivity, 48 produced positive results, the exceptions being two strains confirmed by PCR to lack the assay target gene. Forty-seven nontarget strains (30 species), including multiple non-monocytogenes Listeria species as well as non-Listeria, Gram-positive bacteria, were tested, and all generated negative ANSR assay results. Performance of the ANSR method was compared with that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedure for detection of L. monocytogenes in hot dogs, pasteurized liquid egg, and sponge samples taken from an inoculated stainless steel surface. In addition, ANSR performance was measured against the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference method for detection of L. monocytogenes in Mexican-style cheese, cantaloupe, sprout irrigation water, and guacamole. With the single exception of pasteurized liquid egg at 16 h, ANSR method performance as quantified by the number of positives obtained was not statistically different from that of the reference methods. Robustness trials demonstrated that deliberate introduction of small deviations to the normal assay parameters did not affect ANSR method performance. Results of accelerated stability testing conducted using two manufactured lots of reagents predicts stability at the specified storage temperature of 4°C of more than 1 year.

  11. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from three countries and antibiotic resistance differences among countries and Listeria monocytogenes serogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, M M; Bani Salman, A E; Lafi, S Q; Al-Abboodi, A R

    2015-06-01

    A total of 104 Listeria monocytogenes isolates from 330 fish samples from three countries were characterized by multiplex PCR for serogrouping and virulence markers determination and tested for antibiotics resistance. A 53·8% of the isolates belonged to serogroup 1/2a, 3a; 32% belonged to 1/2b, 3b, 7; 14·4% belonged to 4b, 4d, 4e and 1% belonged to 1/2c, 3c. All isolates exhibited resistance to at least one antibiotic but the resistance rates varied among countries. The isolates exhibited high resistance to penicillin, rifampicin, clindamycin, erythromycin and tetracycline, but low resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, gentamicin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin. When comparing countries, the resistance rate for rifampicin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid varied among countries. When comparing serogroup, 1/2a, 3a exhibited the highest resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline and vancomycin while serogroup 4b, 4d, 4e exhibited the highest resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. All isolates carried inlA, inlC, inlJ and lmo2672. Listeriolysin S was carried by 42 and 30% of 4b and 1/2b isolates respectively. Significance and impact of the study: This is one of few studies to correlate antibiotic resistance with Listeria monocytogenes serogroups. The study also compared the antibiotic resistance and serogroups of L. monocytogenes isolates from three countries in one single study. The findings of this study will be helpful in improving data on the antibiotics resistance of L. monocytogenes in developing countries and enriches the epidemiological and public health studies of L. monocytogenes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  13. Effect of octenidine hydrochloride on planktonic cells and biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Norris, Carol E; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2009-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen capable of forming biofilms and persisting in food processing environments for extended periods of time, thereby potentially contaminating foods. The efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH) for inactivating planktonic cells and preformed biofilms of L. monocytogenes was investigated at 37, 21, 8, and 4 degrees C in the presence and absence of organic matter (rehydrated nonfat dry milk). OH rapidly killed planktonic cells and biofilms of L. monocytogenes at all four temperatures. Moreover, OH was equally effective in killing L. monocytogenes biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel matrices in the presence and absence of organic matter. The results underscore OH's ability to prevent establishment of L. monocytogenes biofilms by rapidly killing planktonic cells and to eliminate preformed biofilms, thus suggesting that it could be used as a disinfectant to prevent L. monocytogenes from persisting in food processing environments.

  14. Inhibition of listeriolysin O oligomerization by lutein prevents Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bowen; Teng, Zihao; Wang, Jianfeng; Lu, Gejin; Deng, Xuming; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    The foodborne pathogenic bacterial species Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) has caused incalculable damages to public health, and its successful infection requires various virulence factors, including Listeriolysin O (LLO). By forming pores in phagosomal membranes and even in some organelles, LLO plays an indispensable role in the ability of L. monocytogenes to escape from host immune attacks. Because of its critical role, LLO offers an appropriate therapeutic target against L. monocytogenes infection. Here, lutein, a natural small molecule existing widely in fruits and vegetables, is demonstrated as an effective inhibitor of LLO that works by blocking its oligomerization during invasion without showing significant bacteriostatic activity. Further assays applying lutein in cell culture models of invasion and in animal models showed that lutein could effectively inhibit L. monocytogenes infection. Overall, our results indicate that lutein may represent a promising and novel therapeutic agent against L. monocytogenes infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in CSF from Three Patients with Meningoencephalitis by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming; Zhou, Jiali; Zhu, Yicheng; Zhang, Yinxin; Lv, Xia; Sun, Ruixue; Shen, Ao; Ren, Haitao; Cui, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Encephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is rare but sometimes fatal. Early diagnosis is difficult using routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, while next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used for the detection and characterization of pathogens. Methods This study set up and applied unbiased NGS to detect L. monocytogenes in CSF collected from three cases of clinically suspected listeria meningoencephalitis. Results Three cases of patients with acute/subacute meningoencephalitis are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging and blood cultures led to a suspected diagnosis of L. monocytogenes, while the CSF cultures were negative. Unbiased NGS of CSF identified and sequenced reads corresponding to L. monocytogenes in all three cases. Conclusions This is the first report highlighting the feasibility of applying NGS of CSF as a diagnostic method for central nervous system (CNS) L. monocytogenes infection. Routine application of this technology in clinical microbiology will significantly improve diagnostic methods for CNS infectious diseases.

  16. L. monocytogenes in a cheese processing facility: Learning from contamination scenarios over three years of sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückerl, I; Muhterem-Uyar, M; Muri-Klinger, S; Wagner, K-H; Wagner, M; Stessl, B

    2014-10-17

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changing patterns of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in a cheese processing facility manufacturing a wide range of ready-to-eat products. Characterization of L. monocytogenes isolates included genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Disinfectant-susceptibility tests and the assessment of L. monocytogenes survival in fresh cheese were also conducted. During the sampling period between 2010 and 2013, a total of 1284 environmental samples were investigated. Overall occurrence rates of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes were 21.9% and 19.5%, respectively. Identical L. monocytogenes genotypes were found in the food processing environment (FPE), raw materials and in products. Interventions after the sampling events changed contamination scenarios substantially. The high diversity of globally, widely distributed L. monocytogenes genotypes was reduced by identifying the major sources of contamination. Although susceptible to a broad range of disinfectants and cleaners, one dominant L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 5 could not be eradicated from drains and floors. Significantly, intense humidity and steam could be observed in all rooms and water residues were visible on floors due to increased cleaning strategies. This could explain the high L. monocytogenes contamination of the FPE (drains, shoes and floors) throughout the study (15.8%). The outcome of a challenge experiment in fresh cheese showed that L. monocytogenes could survive after 14days of storage at insufficient cooling temperatures (8 and 16°C). All efforts to reduce L. monocytogenes environmental contamination eventually led to a transition from dynamic to stable contamination scenarios. Consequently, implementation of systematic environmental monitoring via in-house systems should either aim for total avoidance of FPE colonization, or emphasize a first reduction of L. monocytogenes to sites where

  17. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes Controls Virus Load after Vaginal Challenge with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E.; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and del...

  18. Lineage specific recombination rates and microevolution in Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nightingale Kendra K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a saprotroph as well as an opportunistic human foodborne pathogen, which has previously been shown to consist of at least two widespread lineages (termed lineages I and II and an uncommon lineage (lineage III. While some L. monocytogenes strains show evidence for considerable diversification by homologous recombination, our understanding of the contribution of recombination to L. monocytogenes evolution is still limited. We therefore used STRUCTURE and ClonalFrame, two programs that model the effect of recombination, to make inferences about the population structure and different aspects of the recombination process in L. monocytogenes. Analyses were performed using sequences for seven loci (including the house-keeping genes gap, prs, purM and ribC, the stress response gene sigB, and the virulence genes actA and inlA for 195 L. monocytogenes isolates. Results Sequence analyses with ClonalFrame and the Sawyer's test showed that recombination is more prevalent in lineage II than lineage I and is most frequent in two house-keeping genes (ribC and purM and the two virulence genes (actA and inlA. The relative occurrence of recombination versus point mutation is about six times higher in lineage II than in lineage I, which causes a higher genetic variability in lineage II. Unlike lineage I, lineage II represents a genetically heterogeneous population with a relatively high proportion (30% average of genetic material imported from external sources. Phylograms, constructed with correcting for recombination, as well as Tajima's D data suggest that both lineages I and II have suffered a population bottleneck. Conclusion Our study shows that evolutionary lineages within a single bacterial species can differ considerably in the relative contributions of recombination to genetic diversification. Accounting for recombination in phylogenetic studies is critical, and new evolutionary models that

  19. Ostrich pancreatic phospholipase A(2): purification and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane; Mosbah, Habib; Mejdoub, Hafedh

    2007-09-15

    Ostrich pancreatic phospholipase A(2) (OPLA(2)) was purified from delipidated pancreases. Pure protein was obtained after heat treatment (70 degrees C), precipitation by ammonium sulphate and ethanol, respectively followed by sequential column chromatography on MonoQ Sepharose and size exclusion HPLC column. Purified OPLA(2), which is not a glycosylated protein, was found to be monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 13773.93 Da. A specific activity of 840U/mg for purified OPLA(2) was measured at optimal conditions (pH 8.2 and 37 degrees C) in the presence of 4 mM NaTDC and 10 mM CaCl(2) using PC as substrate. This enzyme was also found to be able to hydrolyze, at low surface pressure, 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3 phosphocholine (di C(12)-PC) monolayers. Maximal activity was measured at 5-8 mNm(-1). The sequence of the first 22 amino-acid residues at the N-terminal extremity of purified bird PLA(2) was determined by automatic Edman degradation and showed a high sequence homology with known mammal pancreatic secreted phospholipases A(2).

  20. Inflammasome-Mediated Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes-Stimulated Immunity Is Independent of Myelomonocytic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cassandra R.; Dustin, Michael L.; Sauer, John-Demian

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the Nlrc4 inflammasome results in the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 through caspase-1 and induction of pyroptosis. L. monocytogenes engineered to activate Nlrc4 by expression of Legionella pneumophilia flagellin (L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA) are less immunogenic for CD8+ T cell responses than wt L. monocytogenes. It is also known that IL-1β orchestrates recruitment of myelomonocytic cells (MMC), which have been shown to interfere with T cell-dendritic cells (DC) interactions in splenic white pulp (WP), limiting T cell priming and protective immunity. We have further analyzed the role of MMCs in the immunogenicity of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA. We confirmed that MMCs infiltrate the WP between 24–48 hours in response to wt L. monocytogenes infection and that depletion of MMCs enhances CD8+ T cell priming and protective memory. L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA elicited accelerated recruitment of MMCs into the WP. While MMCs contribute to control of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA, MMC depletion did not increase immunogenicity of L.p.FlaA expressing strains. There was a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA in CD8α+ DCs independent of MMCs. These findings suggest that limiting inflammasome activation is important for bacterial accumulation in CD8α+ DCs, which are known to be critical for T cell response to L. monocytogenes. PMID:24349458

  1. Microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods under special consideration of risk assessment approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    This paper shortly summarizes data related to risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes. From available data on risk assessment, it is concluded that the levels of L. monocytogenes consumed is an important factor affecting the incidence of listeriosis. Foods that do not support the growth of L....... monocytogenes are unlikely to be a source of listeriosis, whereas foods that support the growth to high levels, should be the target of risk management efforts. Based on current epidemiological information from several countries, a concentration of L. monocytogenes not exceeding 100/g of food at the time...

  2. Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in Mediterranean-Style Dry Fermented Sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Meloni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphological, physiological and epidemiological features of L. monocytogenes, together with the severity of human listeriosis infections, make L. monocytogenes of particular concern for manufacturers of cold-stored “ready to eat” (RTE foods. L. monocytogenes has been isolated from a wide variety of RTE foods and is responsible for several outbreaks associated with the consumption of RTE meat, poultry, dairy, fish and vegetable products. Although L. monocytogenes is among the most frequently-detected pathogens in dry fermented sausages, these products could be included in the category of RTE products in which the growth of L. monocytogenes is not favored and have rarely been implicated in listeriosis outbreaks. However, L. monocytogenes is highly difficult to control in fermented sausage processing environments due to its high tolerance to low pH and high salt concentration. In many Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages, an empirical application of the hurdle technology often occurs and the frequent detection of L. monocytogenes in these products at the end of ripening highlights the need for food business operators to properly apply hurdle technology and to control the contamination routes of L. monocytogenes in the processing plants. In the following, through an up-to-date review of (personal and un- published data, the main aspects of the presence of L. monocytogenes in Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages will be discussed.

  3. Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in Mediterranean-Style Dry Fermented Sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Domenico

    2015-03-12

    The morphological, physiological and epidemiological features of L. monocytogenes, together with the severity of human listeriosis infections, make L. monocytogenes of particular concern for manufacturers of cold-stored "ready to eat" (RTE) foods. L. monocytogenes has been isolated from a wide variety of RTE foods and is responsible for several outbreaks associated with the consumption of RTE meat, poultry, dairy, fish and vegetable products. Although L. monocytogenes is among the most frequently-detected pathogens in dry fermented sausages, these products could be included in the category of RTE products in which the growth of L. monocytogenes is not favored and have rarely been implicated in listeriosis outbreaks. However, L. monocytogenes is highly difficult to control in fermented sausage processing environments due to its high tolerance to low pH and high salt concentration. In many Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages, an empirical application of the hurdle technology often occurs and the frequent detection of L. monocytogenes in these products at the end of ripening highlights the need for food business operators to properly apply hurdle technology and to control the contamination routes of L. monocytogenes in the processing plants. In the following, through an up-to-date review of (personal and un-) published data, the main aspects of the presence of L. monocytogenes in Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages will be discussed.

  4. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis due to Listeria monocytogenes: importance of enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Saroj; Connor, Martin; Donaldson, Shona; Austin, Hannah; Foster, Adele

    2010-09-01

    A case of Listeria monocytogenes induced spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is reported in a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis. It is an indolent illness and may not show a neutrophil reaction in peritoneal fluid. Enrichment broth was required to isolate L monocytogenes in the patient. This is not routinely used in the UK and therefore isolates may be missed. L monocytogenes remains sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin and gentamicin, but is resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics. The rising incidence of listeriosis in the population suggests that the incidence of SBP from L monocytogenes is likely to increase.

  5. Inflammasome-mediated inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes-stimulated immunity is independent of myelomonocytic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra R Williams

    Full Text Available Activation of the Nlrc4 inflammasome results in the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 through caspase-1 and induction of pyroptosis. L. monocytogenes engineered to activate Nlrc4 by expression of Legionella pneumophilia flagellin (L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA are less immunogenic for CD8(+ T cell responses than wt L. monocytogenes. It is also known that IL-1β orchestrates recruitment of myelomonocytic cells (MMC, which have been shown to interfere with T cell-dendritic cells (DC interactions in splenic white pulp (WP, limiting T cell priming and protective immunity. We have further analyzed the role of MMCs in the immunogenicity of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA. We confirmed that MMCs infiltrate the WP between 24-48 hours in response to wt L. monocytogenes infection and that depletion of MMCs enhances CD8(+ T cell priming and protective memory. L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA elicited accelerated recruitment of MMCs into the WP. While MMCs contribute to control of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA, MMC depletion did not increase immunogenicity of L.p.FlaA expressing strains. There was a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA in CD8α(+ DCs independent of MMCs. These findings suggest that limiting inflammasome activation is important for bacterial accumulation in CD8α(+ DCs, which are known to be critical for T cell response to L. monocytogenes.

  6. Development of a mariner-Based Transposon and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes Determinants, Including the Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase PrsA2, That Contribute to Its Hemolytic Phenotype▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, Jason; Kline, Benjamin C.; Woodward, Joshua J.; Leber, Jess H.; Marquis, Hélène; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a pore-forming toxin that mediates phagosomal escape and cell-to-cell spread of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to identify factors that control the production, activity, or secretion of this essential virulence factor, we constructed a Himar1 mariner transposon delivery system and screened 50,000 mutants for a hypohemolytic phenotype on blood agar plates. Approximately 200 hypohemolytic mutants were identified, and the 51 most prominent mutants were screened ex vivo for intracellular growth defects. Eight mutants with a phenotype were identified, and they contained insertions in the following genes: lmo0964 (similar to yjbH), lmo1268 (clpX), lmo1401 (similar to ymdB), lmo1575 (similar to ytqI), lmo1695 (mprF), lmo1821 (similar to prpC), lmo2219 (prsA2), and lmo2460 (similar to cggR). Some of these genes are involved in previously unexplored areas of research with L. monocytogenes: the genes yjbH and clpX regulate the disulfide stress response in Bacillus subtilis, and the prpC phosphatase has been implicated in virulence in other gram-positive pathogens. Here we demonstrate that prsA2, an extracytoplasmic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, is critical for virulence and contributes to the folding of LLO and to the activity of another virulence factor, the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). Furthermore, although it has been shown that prsA2 expression is linked to PrfA, the master virulence transcription factor in L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, we demonstrate that prsA2 is not directly controlled by PrfA. Finally, we show that PrsA2 is involved in flagellum-based motility, indicating that this factor likely serves a broad physiological role. PMID:19376879

  7. Development of a mariner-based transposon and identification of Listeria monocytogenes determinants, including the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase PrsA2, that contribute to its hemolytic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, Jason; Kline, Benjamin C; Woodward, Joshua J; Leber, Jess H; Marquis, Hélène; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2009-06-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a pore-forming toxin that mediates phagosomal escape and cell-to-cell spread of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to identify factors that control the production, activity, or secretion of this essential virulence factor, we constructed a Himar1 mariner transposon delivery system and screened 50,000 mutants for a hypohemolytic phenotype on blood agar plates. Approximately 200 hypohemolytic mutants were identified, and the 51 most prominent mutants were screened ex vivo for intracellular growth defects. Eight mutants with a phenotype were identified, and they contained insertions in the following genes: lmo0964 (similar to yjbH), lmo1268 (clpX), lmo1401 (similar to ymdB), lmo1575 (similar to ytqI), lmo1695 (mprF), lmo1821 (similar to prpC), lmo2219 (prsA2), and lmo2460 (similar to cggR). Some of these genes are involved in previously unexplored areas of research with L. monocytogenes: the genes yjbH and clpX regulate the disulfide stress response in Bacillus subtilis, and the prpC phosphatase has been implicated in virulence in other gram-positive pathogens. Here we demonstrate that prsA2, an extracytoplasmic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, is critical for virulence and contributes to the folding of LLO and to the activity of another virulence factor, the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). Furthermore, although it has been shown that prsA2 expression is linked to PrfA, the master virulence transcription factor in L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, we demonstrate that prsA2 is not directly controlled by PrfA. Finally, we show that PrsA2 is involved in flagellum-based motility, indicating that this factor likely serves a broad physiological role.

  8. Histamine H1 and endothelin ETB receptors mediate phospholipase D stimulation in rat brain hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, E; Picatoste, F; Claro, E

    1995-08-01

    Different neurotransmitter receptor agonists [carbachol, serotonin, noradrenaline, histamine, endothelin-1, and trans-(1S,3R)-aminocyclopentyl-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (trans-ACPD)], known as stimuli of phospholipase C in brain tissue, were tested for phospholipase D stimulation in [32P]Pi-prelabeled rat brain cortical and hippocampal slices. The accumulation of [32P]phosphatidylethanol was measured as an index of phospholipase D-catalyzed transphosphatidylation in the presence of ethanol. Among the six neurotransmitter receptor agonists tested, only noradrenaline, histamine, endothelin-1, and trans-ACPD stimulated phospholipase D in hippocampus and cortex, an effect that was strictly dependent of the presence of millimolar extracellular calcium concentrations. The effect of histamine (EC50 18 microM) was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine with a Ki constant of 0.7 nM and was resistant to H2 and H3 receptor antagonists (ranitidine and tioperamide, respectively). Endothelin-1-stimulated phospholipase D (EC50 44 nM) was not blocked by BQ-123, a specific antagonist of the ETA receptor. Endothelin-3 and the specific ETB receptor agonist safarotoxin 6c were also able to stimulate phospholipase D with efficacies similar to that of endothelin-1, and EC50 values of 16 and 3 nM, respectively. These results show that histamine and endothelin-1 stimulate phospholipase D in rat brain through H1 and ETB receptors, respectively.

  9. Disintegration of lysosomes mediated by GTPgammaS-treated cytosol: possible involvement of phospholipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Y; Matsuda, T; Arai, K; Ohkuma, S

    1998-04-01

    We showed previously that cytosol treated with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gammaS) disintegrated lysosomes in vitro [Sai, Y. et al. (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 198, 869-877] in time-, temperature-, and dose-dependent manners. This also requires ATP, however, the latter can be substituted with deoxy-ATP, ADP, or ATPgammaS, suggesting no requirement of ATP hydrolysis. The lysis was inhibited by several chemical modifiers, including N-ethylmaleimide, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, and by various phospholipase inhibitors (trifluoperazine, p-bromophenacyl bromide, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, W-7, primaquine, compound 48/80, neomycin, and gentamicin), but not by ONO-RS-082, an inhibitor of phospholipase A2. The reaction was also inhibited by phospholipids (phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine) and diacylglycerol. Among the phospholipase A2 hydrolysis products of phospholipids, unsaturated fatty acids (oleate, linoleate, and arachidonate) and lysophospholipid (lysophosphatidylcholine) by themselves broke lysosomes down directly, whereas saturated fatty acids (palmitate and stearate) had little effect. We found that GTPgammaS-stimulated cytosolic phospholipase A2 activity was highly sensitive to ONO-RS-082. These results suggest the participation of phospholipase(s), though not cytosolic phospholipase A2, in the GTPgammaS-dependent lysis of lysosomes.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac G.M. Gahan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive encounters with acidic environments (which include the glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase systems, and those which enable the organism to cope with bile acids (including bile salt hydrolase and competition with the resident microbiota. An increased understanding of how the pathogen survives in this environment is likely to inform the future design of novel prophylactic approaches that exploit specific pharmabiotics; including probiotics, prebiotics or phages.

  11. Keberadaan Bakteri Listeria monocytogenes pada Keju Gouda Produksi Lokal dan Impor (PRESENCE OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN LOCAL AND IMPORTED GOUDA CHEESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debby Fadhilah Pazra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is included in the foodborne pathogen, which has been associated with severaloutbreaks of human listeriosis especially in high risk groups. Listeria monocytogenes could be found inGouda cheeses because of poor hygienic and sanitation practices. In addition, this bacteria could surviveduring the making of cheese and cheese ripening process. The purpose of this study was to identify thepresence of L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheeses and how the safety level of the Goudacheese against contamination of L. monocytogenes. This study used the conventional method in accordancewith the Bacteriological Analytical Manual, US Food and Drug Administration and Bergey’s Manual ofDeterminative Bacteriology to detect the presence of L. monocytogenes at 15 samples of local Gouda cheeseand 15 samples of imported Gouda cheese sold in supermarkets in Jakarta and Bogor. The results of thisstudy showed that was not found L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheese. It could be concludedthat is Gouda cheese relatively safe from L. monocytogenes and meets Indonesian National Standard.

  12. [Phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolates obtained from clinical specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Bulut, Yunus; Tunçoglu, Ebru

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the phospholipase, proteinase and hemolytic activities of Candida albicans strains isolated from clinical specimens. A total of 147 C. albicans strains isolated from blood (n = 29), respiratory specimens (n = 44), urine (n = 52), pus (n = 17) and stool (n = 5) were included in the study. Proteinase and phospholipase activities were determined in 81% and 76% of C. albicans isolates, respectively. All C. albicans isolates revealed beta-hemolytic activity on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 7% fresh sheep blood and 3% glucose. Phospholipase and proteinase positivity were highest among the respiratory isolates. Proteinase activity of respiratory (93%) and blood (83%) isolates were statistically significantly higher than that of urine (77%; p = 0.032), pus (65%; p = 0.007) and stool isolates (60%; p = 0.026). While phospholipase activity showed statistically significant difference between respiratory (84%) and pus (53%) isolates (p = 0.014), no statistically significant difference was determined for blood (79%), urine (75%) and stool (80%) isolates (p > 0.05). Two blood isolates with 4+ proteinase activity and 3 urine isolates with 3+ proteinase activity were phospholipase negative. One urine isolate with 4+ phospholipase activity and 4 with 3+ phospholipase activity were proteinase negative. Phospholipase and proteinase negative 1 isolate from stool and 1 isolate from pus were found to have 4+ hemolytic activity. In conclusion, besides proteinase and phospholipase enzyme activities, hemolytic activity may play an important role for the C.albicans infections. The pathogenetic role of these virulence factors should be evaluated by further clinical studies.

  13. Transcriptional and phenotypic responses of Listeria monocytogenes to chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleitner, Aaron M; Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T; Linton, Richard L; Oliver, Haley F

    2014-05-01

    Significant food-borne disease outbreaks have occurred from consumption of ready-to-eat foods, including produce, contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Challenging food matrices (e.g., cantaloupe, sprouts) with limited processing steps postharvest to reduce pathogen loads have underscored a need for new mitigation strategies. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is increasingly being used in produce and other food systems to reduce food-borne pathogen levels. The goal of this study was to characterize the transcriptional response and survival of L. monocytogenes 10403S exposed to ClO2. The transcriptional profile of log-phase cells exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 for 15 min was defined by whole-genome microarray. A total of 340 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Among the differentially expressed genes, 223 were upregulated (fold change ≥ 1.5; adjusted P value < 0.05) in role categories responsible for protein fate, cellular processes, and energy metabolism. There were 113 and 16 genes differentially expressed belonging to regulatory networks of σ(B) and CtsR, respectively. We assessed L. monocytogenes 10403S survival after exposure to 100, 300, and 500 mg/liter aqueous ClO2 in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth; there was a significant difference between cells exposed to 500 mg/liter ClO2 and those exposed to all other conditions over time (P value < 0.05). Isogenic ΔsigB and ΔctsR mutants exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 were more sensitive to ClO2 than the wild type under the same conditions. These results provide an initial insight into the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to survive sublethal ClO2 and further our understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of this increasingly used sanitizer.

  14. How Listeria monocytogenes organizes its surface for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe eCarvalho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for the manifestation of human listeriosis, an opportunistic foodborne disease with an associated high mortality rate. The key to the pathogenesis of listeriosis is the capacity of this bacterium to trigger its internalization by non-phagocytic cells and to survive and even replicate within phagocytes. The arsenal of virulence proteins deployed by L. monocytogenes to successfully promote the invasion and infection of host cells has been progressively unveiled over the past decades. A large majority of them are located at the cell envelope, which provides an interface for the establishment of close interactions between these bacterial factors and their host targets. Along the multistep pathways carrying these virulence proteins from the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane to their cell envelope destination, a multiplicity of auxiliary proteins must act on the immature polypeptides to ensure that they not only maturate into fully functional effectors but also are placed or guided to their correct position in the bacterial surface. As the major scaffold for surface proteins, the cell wall and its metabolism are critical elements in listerial virulence. Conversely, the crucial physical support and protection provided by this structure make it an ideal target for the host immune system. Therefore, mechanisms involving fine modifications of cell envelope components are activated by L. monocytogenes to render it less recognizable by the innate immunity sensors or more resistant to the activity of antimicrobial effectors. This review provides a state-of-the-art compilation of the mechanisms used by L. monocytogenes to organize its surface for virulence, with special focus on those proteins that work behind the frontline, either supporting virulence effectors or ensuring the survival of the bacterium within its host.

  15. How Listeria monocytogenes organizes its surface for virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filipe; Sousa, Sandra; Cabanes, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for the manifestation of human listeriosis, an opportunistic foodborne disease with an associated high mortality rate. The key to the pathogenesis of listeriosis is the capacity of this bacterium to trigger its internalization by non-phagocytic cells and to survive and even replicate within phagocytes. The arsenal of virulence proteins deployed by L. monocytogenes to successfully promote the invasion and infection of host cells has been progressively unveiled over the past decades. A large majority of them is located at the cell envelope, which provides an interface for the establishment of close interactions between these bacterial factors and their host targets. Along the multistep pathways carrying these virulence proteins from the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane to their cell envelope destination, a multiplicity of auxiliary proteins must act on the immature polypeptides to ensure that they not only maturate into fully functional effectors but also are placed or guided to their correct position in the bacterial surface. As the major scaffold for surface proteins, the cell wall and its metabolism are critical elements in listerial virulence. Conversely, the crucial physical support and protection provided by this structure make it an ideal target for the host immune system. Therefore, mechanisms involving fine modifications of cell envelope components are activated by L. monocytogenes to render it less recognizable by the innate immunity sensors or more resistant to the activity of antimicrobial effectors. This review provides a state-of-the-art compilation of the mechanisms used by L. monocytogenes to organize its surface for virulence, with special focus on those proteins that work “behind the frontline”, either supporting virulence effectors or ensuring the survival of the bacterium within its host. PMID:24809022

  16. Targeting of the central nervous system by Listeria monocytogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Among bacteria that reach the central nervous system (CNS), Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is one of deadliest, in human and ruminant. This facultative intracellular bacterium has the particularity to induce meningitis, meningoencephalitis and rhombencephalitis. Mechanisms by which Lm accesses the CNS remain poorly understood, but two major routes of infection have been proposed, based on clinical, in vitro and in vivo observations. A retrograde neural route is likely to occur in ruminants upon ...

  17. Towards a systemic understanding of Listeria monocytogenes metabolism during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo M Fuchs

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne human pathogen that can cause invasive infection in susceptible animals and humans. For proliferation within hosts, this facultative intracellular pathogen uses a reservoir of specific metabolic pathways, transporter and enzymatic functions whose expression requires the coordinated activity of a complex regulatory network. The highly adapted metabolism of L. monocytogenes strongly depends on the nutrient composition of various milieus encountered during infection. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies revealed the spatial-temporal dynamic of gene expression of this pathogen during replication within cultured cells or in vivo. Metabolic clues are the utilization of unusual C2- and C3-bodies, the metabolism of pyruvate, thiamine availability, the uptake of peptides, the acquisition or biosynthesis of certain amino acids, and the degradation of glucose-phosphate via the pentose phosphate pathway. These examples illustrate the interference of in vivo conditions with energy, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, thus affecting listerial growth. The exploitation, analysis and modelling of the available data sets served as a first attempt to a systemic understanding of listerial metabolism during infection. L. monocytogenes might serve as a model organism for systems biology of a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium.

  18. Assessment of Listeria sp. Interference Using a Molecular Assay To Detect Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittermann, Sandra I; Stanghini, Brenda; See, Ryan Soo; Melano, Roberto G; Boleszczuk, Peter; Murphy, Allana; Maki, Anne; Mallo, Gustavo V

    2016-01-01

    Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food is currently based on enrichment methods. When L. monocytogenes is present with other Listeria species in food, the species compete during the enrichment process. Overgrowth competition of the nonpathogenic Listeria species might result in false-negative results obtained with the current reference methods. This potential issue was noted when 50 food samples artificially spiked with L. monocytogenes were tested with a real-time PCR assay and Canada's current reference method, MFHPB-30. Eleven of the samples studied were from foods naturally contaminated with Listeria species other than those used for spiking. The real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes in all 11 of these samples; however, only 6 of these samples were positive by the MFHPB-30 method. To determine whether L. monocytogenes detection can be affected by other species of the same genus due to competition, an L. monocytogenes strain and a Listeria innocua strain with a faster rate of growth in the enrichment broth were artificially coinoculated at different ratios into ground pork meat samples and cultured according to the MFHPB-30 method. L. monocytogenes was detected only by the MFHPB-30 method when L. monocytogenes/L. innocua ratios were 6.0 or higher. In contrast, using the same enrichments, the real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes at ratios as low as 0.6. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that L. monocytogenes can be outcompeted by L. innocua during the MFHPB-30 enrichment phase. However, more reliable detection of L. monocytogenes in this situation can be achieved by a PCR-based method mainly because of its sensitivity.

  19. Recombinant Probiotic Expressing Listeria Adhesion Protein Attenuates Listeria monocytogenes Virulence In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ok Kyung; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular foodborne pathogen, infects immunocompromised hosts. The primary route of transmission is through contaminated food. In the gastrointestinal tract, it traverses the epithelial barrier through intracellular or paracellular routes. Strategies to prevent L. monocytogenes entry can potentially minimize infection in high-risk populations. Listeria adhesion protein (LAP) aids L. monocytogenes in crossing epithelial barriers via the paracellular route. The use of recombinant probiotic bacteria expressing LAP would aid targeted clearance of Listeria from the gut and protect high-risk populations from infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The objective was to investigate the ability of probiotic bacteria or LAP-expressing recombinant probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei (LbpLAP) to prevent L. monocytogenes adhesion, invasion, and transwell-based transepithelial translocation in a Caco-2 cell culture model. Several wild type probiotic bacteria showed strong adhesion to Caco-2 cells but none effectively prevented L. monocytogenes infection. Pre-exposure to LbpLAP for 1, 4, 15, or 24 h significantly (Pmonocytogenes in Caco-2 cells, whereas pre-exposure to parental Lb. paracasei had no significant effect. Similarly, LbpLAP pre-exposure reduced L. monocytogenes translocation by as much as 46% after 24 h. LbpLAP also prevented L. monocytogenes-mediated cell damage and compromise of tight junction integrity. Furthermore, LbpLAP cells reduced L. monocytogenes-mediated cell cytotoxicity by 99.8% after 1 h and 79% after 24 h. Conclusions/Significance Wild type probiotic bacteria were unable to prevent L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. In contrast, LbpLAP blocked adhesion, invasion, and translocation of L. monocytogenes by interacting with host cell receptor Hsp60, thereby protecting cells from infection. These data show promise for the use of recombinant probiotics in preventing L. monocytogenes infection in high

  20. A rapid phospholipase A2 bioassay using 14C-oleate-labelled E. coli bacterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T; von Wichert, P; Weins, D

    1989-02-01

    Two methods of phospholipase A2 determination using 14C-labelled E. coli bacterias as substrate were compared. One method works with a filter membrane for separation of cleaved 14C-oleate from remaining phospholipids, the other uses the well-known thin-layer chromatography for lipid analysis. Some features of human serum phospholipase A2 regarding pH and Ca2+ dependency were investigated. Possible sources of errors were discussed. It was shown that either method can differentiate between normal and pathologically elevated phospholipase A2 levels, but that the filter method is superior in terms of sensitivity and workload.

  1. Posttranslocation chaperone PrsA2 regulates the maturation and secretion of Listeria monocytogenes proprotein virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Brian M; Zemansky, Jason; Portnoy, Daniel A; Marquis, Hélène

    2011-11-01

    PrsA2 is a conserved posttranslocation chaperone and a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that contributes to the virulence of the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. One of the phenotypes associated with a prsA2 mutant is decreased activity of the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). PC-PLC is made as a proenzyme whose maturation is mediated by a metalloprotease (Mpl). The proforms of PC-PLC and Mpl accumulate at the membrane-cell wall interface until a decrease in pH triggers their maturation and rapid secretion into the host cell. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which PrsA2 regulates the activity of PC-PLC. We observed that in the absence of PrsA2, the proenzymes are secreted at physiological pH and do not mature upon a decrease in pH. The sensitivity of the prsA2 mutant to cell wall hydrolases was modified. However, no apparent changes in cell wall porosity were detected. Interestingly, synthesis of PC-PLC in the absence of its propeptide lead to the secretion of a fully active enzyme in the cytosol of host cells independent of PrsA2, indicating that neither the propeptide of PC-PLC nor PrsA2 is required for native folding of the catalytic domain, although both influence secretion of the enzyme. Taken together, these results suggest that PrsA2 regulates compartmentalization of Mpl and PC-PLC, possibly by influencing cell wall properties and interacting with the PC-PLC propeptide. Moreover, the ability of these proproteins to respond to a decrease in pH during intracellular growth depends on their localization at the membrane-cell wall interface.

  2. Posttranslocation Chaperone PrsA2 Regulates the Maturation and Secretion of Listeria monocytogenes Proprotein Virulence Factors ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Brian M.; Zemansky, Jason; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Marquis, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    PrsA2 is a conserved posttranslocation chaperone and a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that contributes to the virulence of the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. One of the phenotypes associated with a prsA2 mutant is decreased activity of the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). PC-PLC is made as a proenzyme whose maturation is mediated by a metalloprotease (Mpl). The proforms of PC-PLC and Mpl accumulate at the membrane-cell wall interface until a decrease in pH triggers their maturation and rapid secretion into the host cell. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which PrsA2 regulates the activity of PC-PLC. We observed that in the absence of PrsA2, the proenzymes are secreted at physiological pH and do not mature upon a decrease in pH. The sensitivity of the prsA2 mutant to cell wall hydrolases was modified. However, no apparent changes in cell wall porosity were detected. Interestingly, synthesis of PC-PLC in the absence of its propeptide lead to the secretion of a fully active enzyme in the cytosol of host cells independent of PrsA2, indicating that neither the propeptide of PC-PLC nor PrsA2 is required for native folding of the catalytic domain, although both influence secretion of the enzyme. Taken together, these results suggest that PrsA2 regulates compartmentalization of Mpl and PC-PLC, possibly by influencing cell wall properties and interacting with the PC-PLC propeptide. Moreover, the ability of these proproteins to respond to a decrease in pH during intracellular growth depends on their localization at the membrane-cell wall interface. PMID:21908675

  3. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: phospholipase in nonsensitized and sensitized rats after challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottolenghi, A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Kocan, A.A.; Weatherly, N.F.; Larsh, J.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Rats given an initial infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis showed greatly elevated phospholipase B levels in the small intestines and lungs from 8 through 22 days after challenge. The rise in enzyme concentration occurred earlier (Days 8-11) in the proximal half of the intestine, but at Days 22, 29, and 36 the levels were much higher in the distal segments. This shift in activity correlates with the known elimination of worms and a diminishing inflammatory response in the proximal areas. The increase in enzyme activity in the intestine and lungs was associated with an increased production of eosinophils in the bone marrow 11-22 days after challenge. Rats sensitized with one stimulating infection before challenge showed an anamnestic type of response, as measured by enzyme levels in the small intestines and lungs and by the numbers of eosinophils in the bone marrow. The results are discussed in light of our similar data reported earlier from animals infected with Trichinella spiralis.

  4. Trichinella spiralis: phospholipase in sensitized mice after challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsh, J.E. Jr. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill); Ottolenghi, A.; Weatherly, N.F.

    1975-01-01

    Mice given three sensitizing infections with Trichinella spiralis and then challenged with 400 larvae showed greatly elevated phospholipase B levels in the small intestine from one through 20 days after challenge; by 25 days after challenge, the enzyme level approached that of the uninfected controls. The high enzyme levels were accompanied, after a lag in time, by greatly increased numbers of eosinophils in the bone marrow. Increases of eosinophils strikingly above those in uninfected controls were noted from 11 through 20 days after challenge. The enzyme and eosinophil increases were parallel to the time course of the intestinal inflammatory response described in a previous study of sensitized mice of about the same age challenged with the same number of larvae. The results are consistent with our hypothesis that inflammation, elevated enzyme levels, and increased production of eosinophils are causally related.

  5. The application of rational design on phospholipase A(2) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchlis, V D; Barbayianni, E; Mavromoustakos, T M; Kokotos, G

    2011-01-01

    The phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) superfamily consists of different groups of enzymes which are characterized by their ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of the sn-2 ester bond in a variety of phospholipid molecules. The products of PLA(2s) activity play divergent roles in a variety of physiological processes. There are four main types of PLA(2s): the secreted PLA(2s) (sPLA(2s)), the cytosolic PLA(2s) (cPLA(2s)), the calcium-independent PLA(2s) (iPLA(2)) and the lipoprotein-associated PLA(2s) (LpPLA(2s)). Various potent and selective PLA2 inhibitors have been reported up to date and have provided outstanding support in understanding the mechanism of action and elucidating the function of these enzymes. The current review focuses on the implementation of rational design through computer-aided drug design (CADD) on the discovery and development of new PLA(2) inhibitors.

  6. Presenilin dependence of phospholipase C and protein kinase C signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehvari, Nodi; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Isacsson, Ola

    2007-01-01

    -stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activity which was gamma-secretase dependent. To further evaluate the dependence of PLC on PSs we measured PLC activity and the activation of variant protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking either PS1, PS2, or both. PLC activity and PKCalpha...... and PKCgamma activations were significantly lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs after PLC stimulation. Protein levels of PKCalpha and PKCgamma were lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs. In contrast, PKCdelta levels were significantly elevated in PS1 and PS2 double knockout as well as in PS1 knockout......). These results show that PLC and PKC activations are modulated by PS and also that PSs differentially regulate the expression of PKC isoforms by both APP/AICD-dependent and independent mechanisms....

  7. Cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 deletion enhances colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilsley, Jillian N M; Nakanishi, Masako; Flynn, Christopher; Belinsky, Glenn S; De Guise, Sylvain; Adib, John N; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Bonventre, Joseph V; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2005-04-01

    Cellular pools of free arachidonic acid are tightly controlled through enzymatic release of the fatty acid and subsequent utilization by downstream enzymes including the cyclooxygenases. Arachidonic acid cleavage from membrane phospholipids is accomplished by the actions of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)). Upon release, free arachidonic acid provides substrate for the synthesis of eicosanoids. However, under certain conditions, arachidonic acid may participate in ceramide-mediated apoptosis. Disruption of arachidonic acid homeostasis can shift the balance of cell turnover in favor of tumorigenesis, via overproduction of tumor-promoting eicosanoids or alternatively by limiting proapoptotic signals. In the following study, we evaluated the influence of genetic deletion of a key intracellular phospholipase, cytoplasmic PLA(2) (cPLA(2)), on azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis. Heterozygous and null mice, upon treatment with the organotropic colon carcinogen, azoxymethane, developed a significant (P < 0.05) increase in colon tumor multiplicity (7.2-fold and 5.5-fold, respectively) relative to their wild-type littermates. This enhanced tumor sensitivity may be explained, in part, by the attenuated levels of apoptosis observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining within the colonic epithelium of heterozygous and null mice ( approximately 50% of wild type). The lower frequency of apoptotic cells corresponded with reduced ceramide levels (69% and 46% of wild-type littermates, respectively). Remarkably, increased tumorigenesis resulting from cPLA(2) deletion occurred despite a significant reduction in prostaglandin E(2) production, even in cyclooxygenase-2-overexpressing tumors. These data contribute new information that supports a fundamental role of cPLA(2) in the control of arachidonic acid homeostasis and cell turnover. Our findings indicate that the proapoptotic role of cPLA(2) in the colon may supercede its contribution to

  8. Listeria monocytogenes and the inflammasome: from cytosolic bacteriolysis to tumor immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Erin; Sauer, John-Demian

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic innate immune surveillance systems that recognize a variety of danger signals, including those from pathogens. Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium evolved to live within the harsh environment of the host cytosol. Further, L. monocytogenes can activate a robust cell-mediated immune response that is being harnessed as an immunotherapeutic platform. Access to the cytosol is critical for both causing disease and for inducing a protective immune response, and it is hypothesized that the cytosolic innate immune system, including the inflammasome, is critical for both host protection and induction of long term immunity. L. monocytogenes can activate a variety of inflammasomes via its pore-forming toxin Listeriolysin-O, flagellin, or DNA released through bacteriolysis; however, inflammasome activation attenuates L. monocytogenes, and as such, L. monocytogenes has evolved a variety of ways to limit inflammasome activation. Surprisingly, inflammasome activation also impairs the host cell-mediated immune response. Thus understanding how L. monocytogenes activates or avoids detection by the inflammasome is critical to understand the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes and improve the cell-mediated immune response generated to L. monocytogenes for more effective immunotherapies. PMID:27460808

  9. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptaion and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced...

  10. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  11. A dynamical systems approach to actin-based motility in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotton, S.

    2010-11-01

    A simple kinematic model for the trajectories of Listeria monocytogenes is generalized to a dynamical system rich enough to exhibit the resonant Hopf bifurcation structure of excitable media and simple enough to be studied geometrically. It is shown how L. monocytogenes trajectories and meandering spiral waves are organized by the same type of attracting set.

  12. Influence of temperature on acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several factors play critical roles in controlling the induction of acid-stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes. Our findings show that temperature plays a significant role in the induction of acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and two distinct patterns were observed: (I) Presence of su...

  13. Listeria monocytogenes detection and behaviour in food and in the environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterial pathogen was studied, with emphasis on the detection and behaviour in food and environment.Epidemics of foodborne listeriosis have raised concern about the incidence of L. monocytogenes in foods. In the past 10-15 years listeriosis has emerged as a

  14. Diversity assessment of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation: Impact of growth condition, serotype and strain origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, S.R.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Veen, van der S.; Zwietering, M.H.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the ability to produce biofilms in food-processing environments and then contaminate food products, which is a major concern for food safety. The biofilm forming behavior of 143 L. monocytogenes strains was determined in four different media that wer

  15. A novel suicide plasmid for efficient gene mutation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although several plasmids have been used in Listeria monocytogenes for generating mutants by allelic exchange, construction of L. monocytogenes mutants has been inefficient due to lack of effective selection markers for first and second recombination events. To address this problem, we have develope...

  16. Betaine and L-carnitine transport by Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in response to osmotic signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Annette; Glaasker, Erwin; Poolman, Bert; Abee, Tjakko

    1997-01-01

    The naturally occurring compatible solutes betaine and L-carnitine allow the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to adjust to environments of high osmotic strength. Previously, it was demonstrated that L. monocytogenes possesses an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter. The present study reve

  17. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described i...

  18. Determination of thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken meat by isothermal and dynamic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research is to determine the thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken breast meat using both isothermal and dynamic conditions. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes was inoculated to chicken breast meat. Isothermal studies were performed by sub...

  19. Performance of stress resistant variants of Listeria monocytogenes in mixed species biofilms with Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, K.I.; Saa Ibusquiza, P.; Ortiz Camargo, A.R.; Krieg, M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Abee, T.

    2015-01-01

    Population diversity and the ability to adapt to changing environments allow Listeria monocytogenes to grow and survive under a wide range of environmental conditions. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the performance of a set of acid resistant L. monocytogenes variants in mixed-species biofilms w

  20. Surface attachment of Listeria monocytogenes is induced by sublethal concentrations of alcohol at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Anne; Lekkas, Charidimos; Knøchel, Susanne

    2005-09-01

    Sublethal concentrations of ethanol or isopropanol increased attachment of Listeria monocytogenes at 10, 20, or 30 degrees C; no induction occurred at 37 degrees C. The alcohol induction phenotype was retained in sigB and cesRK mutants; however, the degree of induction was affected. These results suggest that alcohol may contribute to the persistence of L. monocytogenes.

  1. Physiology of Listeria monocytogenes in relation to food components and biopreservation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, A.

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen that has been responsible for severe infections in humans. The ubiquitous distribution of L. monocytogenes in the environment and its ability to grow at refrigeration temperature and at high osmolarity are of paramount importance for its haz

  2. A multiplex PCR for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and its lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawool, Deepak B; Doijad, Swapnil P; Poharkar, Krupali V; Negi, Mamta; Kale, Satyajit B; Malik, S V S; Kurkure, Nitin V; Chakraborty, Trinad; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo B

    2016-11-01

    A novel multiplex PCR assay was developed to identify genus Listeria, and discriminate Listeria monocytogenes and its major lineages (LI, LII, LIII). This assay is a rapid and inexpensive subtyping method for screening and characterization of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Betaine and L-carnitine transport by Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in response to osmotic signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Annette; Glaasker, Erwin; Poolman, Bert; Abee, Tjakko

    1997-01-01

    The naturally occurring compatible solutes betaine and L-carnitine allow the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to adjust to environments of high osmotic strength. Previously, it was demonstrated that L. monocytogenes possesses an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter. The present study

  4. The fate of Listeria monocytogenes in brine and on Gouda cheese following artificial contamination during brining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, E.; Beumer, R.R.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The fate of 3 different Listeria monocytogenes strains (Scott A, 2F and 6E) was studied independently in brine and on factory-scale Gouda cheeses that had been submerged in brine that was artificially contaminated with these individual strains. Viable numbers of L. monocytogenes in the brine

  5. Diversity assessment of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation: Impact of growth condition, serotype and strain origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, S.R.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Veen, van der S.; Zwietering, M.H.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the ability to produce biofilms in food-processing environments and then contaminate food products, which is a major concern for food safety. The biofilm forming behavior of 143 L. monocytogenes strains was determined in four different media that

  6. Microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods under special consideration of risk assessment approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    This paper shortly summarizes data related to risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes. From available data on risk assessment, it is concluded that the levels of L. monocytogenes consumed is an important factor affecting the incidence of listeriosis. Foods that do not support the growth of L. m...

  7. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on cut cantaloupe, honeydew and watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyluk, Michelle D; Friedrich, Loretta M; Schaffner, Donald W

    2014-04-01

    A recent outbreak linked to whole cantaloupes underscores the importance of understanding growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in cut melons at different temperatures. Whole cantaloupe, watermelon, and honeydew purchased from a local supermarket were cut into 10 ± 1 g cubes. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes from food related outbreaks was used to inoculate fruit, resulting in ~10(3) CFU/10 g. Samples were stored at 4, 10, 15, 20, or 25 °C and L. monocytogenes were enumerated at appropriate time intervals. The square root model was used to describe L. monocytogenes growth rate as a function of temperature. The model was compared to prior models for Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 growth on cut melon, as well as models for L. monocytogenes on cantaloupe and L. monocytogenes ComBase models. The current model predicts faster growth of L. monocytogenes vs. Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 at temperatures below 20 °C, and agrees with estimates from ComBase Predictor, and a corrected published model for L. monocytogenes on cut cantaloupe. The model predicts ~4 log CFU increase following 15 days at 5 °C, and ∼1 log CFU increase following 6 days at 4 °C. The model can also be used in subsequent quantitative microbial risk assessments.

  8. Disruption of the Phospholipase D Gene Attenuates the Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Xianping; Gao, Meihua; Han, Xuelin; Tao, Sha; Zheng, Dongyu; Cheng, Ying; Yu, Rentao; Han, Gaige; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen that induces serious infections in immunocompromised patients. Phospholipases are key enzymes in pathogenic fungi that cleave host phospholipids, resulting in membrane destabilization and host cell penetration. However, knowledge o

  9. A maternally inherited autosomal point mutation in human phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) leads to male infertility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kashir, Junaid; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Jones, Celine; Lemmon, Bernadette; Chang Lee, Hoi; Hamer, Rebecca; Heindryckx, Bjorn; Deane, Charlotte M; De Sutter, Petra; Fissore, Rafael A; Parrington, John; Wells, Dagan; Coward, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    .... Certain types of male infertility are caused by failure of the sperm to activate the oocyte, a process normally regulated by calcium oscillations, thought to be induced by a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ...

  10. Ammodytoxin A, a highly lethal phospholipase A2 from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritonja, A; Gubensek, F

    1985-04-29

    The amino acid sequence of ammodytoxin A, the most toxic presynaptically active phospholipase A2 isolated from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom, was determined. The primary structure was deduced from peptides obtained by Staphylococcus aureus proteinase and trypsin digestion of reduced and carboxymethylated protein and from the automated Edman degradation of the N-terminal part of the non-reduced molecule. According to the sequence, the enzyme classifies to the subgroup IIA of the phospholipase A2 family of enzymes. The location of basic residues believed to be responsible for the toxic activity of presynaptically active phospholipases differs substantially from those in the highly toxic enzymes of other subgroups. Comparison of the sequence with sequences of other snake venom enzymes indicates that the toxic site(s) may not be the same in all subgroups of presynaptically active phospholipases.

  11. Comparative experimental infection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii in bovine trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cláudia E; Mol, Juliana P S; Garcia, Luize N N; Costa, Luciana F; Santos, Renato L; Paixão, Tatiane A

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular and invasive bacterium that has tropism to the placenta, and causes fetal morbidity and mortality in several mammalian species. While infection with L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii are known as important causes of abortion and reproductive failure in cattle, the pathogenesis of maternal-fetal listeriosis in this species is poorly known. This study used the bovine chorioallantoic membrane explant model to investigate the kinetics of L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, and L. innocua infections in bovine trophoblastic cells for up to 8 h post infection. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii were able to invade and multiply in trophoblastic cells without causing cell death or inducing expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Although L. innocua was unable to multiply in bovine trophoblastic cells, it induced transcription of the pro-inflammatory mediator CXCL6. This study demonstrated for the first time the susceptibility of bovine trophoblastic cells to L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii infection.

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes in an in vitro continuous flow gut model, but promotes invasion of L. monocytogenes in the gut of gnotobiotic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Licht, Tine Rask; Saadbye, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the pediocin AcH producing Lactobacillus plantarum DDEN 11007 and its non-producing plasmid-cured isogenic variant, DDEN 12305 to prevent the persistence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes EP2 in two gastrointestinal (GI) tract models was examined. In vitro studies conducted...... in a two-stage continuous flow system showed that L. plantarum DDEN 11007 inhibited L. monocytogenes EP2 under these conditions, while less effect was seen of the non-bacteriocin producing variant. The inhibitory effect was more pronounced at pH 5 than at pH 7. No effect on persistence of L. monocytogenes...... in the GI tract was seen in gnotobiotic rats colonized with either the pediocin AcH producing or the non-bacteriocin producing variant of L. plantarum when compared to rats inoculated with L. monocytogenes EP2 alone. Surprisingly, inoculation of the gnotobiotic animals with either of the L. plantarum...

  13. Synergistic activation of vascular TRPC6 channel by receptor and mechanical stimulation via phospholipase C/diacylglycerol and phospholipase A2/¿-hydroxylase/20-HETE pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Jensen, Lars Jørn; Jian, Zhong

    2009-01-01

    ). Single TRPC6 channel activity evoked by carbachol was also enhanced by a negative pressure added in the patch pipette. Mechanical potentiation of carbachol- or OAG-induced I(TRPC6) was abolished by small interfering RNA knockdown of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) or pharmacological inhibition of omega...... of receptor and mechanical stimulations may synergistically amplify transmembrane Ca(2+) mobilization through TRPC6 activation, thereby enhancing the vascular tone via phospholipase C/diacylglycerol and phospholipase A(2)/omega-hydroxylase/20-HETE pathways.......TRPC6 is a non-voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry/depolarization channel associated with vascular tone regulation and remodeling. Expressed TRPC6 channel responds to both neurohormonal and mechanical stimuli, the mechanism for which remains controversial. In this study, we examined the possible...

  14. Phospholipases of Mineralization Competent Cells and Matrix Vesicles: Roles in Physiological and Pathological Mineralizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Buchet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review aims to systematically and critically analyze the current knowledge on phospholipases and their role in physiological and pathological mineralization undertaken by mineralization competent cells. Cellular lipid metabolism plays an important role in biological mineralization. The physiological mechanisms of mineralization are likely to take place in tissues other than in bones and teeth under specific pathological conditions. For instance, vascular calcification in arteries of patients with renal failure, diabetes mellitus or atherosclerosis recapitulates the mechanisms of bone formation. Osteoporosis—a bone resorbing disease—and rheumatoid arthritis originating from the inflammation in the synovium are also affected by cellular lipid metabolism. The focus is on the lipid metabolism due to the effects of dietary lipids on bone health. These and other phenomena indicate that phospholipases may participate in bone remodelling as evidenced by their expression in smooth muscle cells, in bone forming osteoblasts, chondrocytes and in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Among various enzymes involved, phospholipases A1 or A2, phospholipase C, phospholipase D, autotaxin and sphingomyelinase are engaged in membrane lipid remodelling during early stages of mineralization and cell maturation in mineralization-competent cells. Numerous experimental evidences suggested that phospholipases exert their action at various stages of mineralization by affecting intracellular signaling and cell differentiation. The lipid metabolites—such as arachidonic acid, lysophospholipids, and sphingosine-1-phosphate are involved in cell signaling and inflammation reactions. Phospholipases are also important members of the cellular machinery engaged in matrix vesicle (MV biogenesis and exocytosis. They may favour mineral formation inside MVs, may catalyse MV membrane breakdown necessary for the release of mineral deposits into extracellular matrix (ECM, or

  15. A rapid phospholipase D assay using zirconium precipitation of anionic substrate phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, G.; Hansen, Harald S.; Chapman, K.D.

    2000-01-01

    Activation of phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in a number of signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic cells. The most common method for determination of PLD activity in vitro involves incubation with a radiolabeled substrate and lipid extraction followed by thin-layer chromatography in order ...... biochemical characterization of this anandamide-generating enzyme. - Petersen, G., K. D. Chapman, and H. S. Hansen. A rapid phospholipase D assay using zirconium precipitation of anionic substrate phospholipids: Application to N-acylethanolamine formation in vitro....

  16. Role of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 in cell growth and signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Hooks, Shelley B; Cummings, Brian S.

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipase A2(PLA2) are esterases that cleave glycerophospholipids to release fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Several studies demonstrate that PLA2 regulate growth and signaling in several cell types. However, few of these studies have focused on Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2(iPLA2 or Group VI PLA2). This class of PLA2 was originally suggested to mediate phospholipid remodeling in several cell types including macrophages. As such, it was labeled as a housekeeping protein and thought...

  17. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    outer vesicle layer scooting mode hydrolysis to analyze the interfacial kinetics, inhibition, and substrate preferences of bee venom phospholipase A2...California ABSTRACT The membrane -active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a...Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial

  18. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of a Drosophila phosphatidylinositol-specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linassier, C; MacDougall, L K; Domin, J; Waterfield, M D

    1997-02-01

    Molecular, biochemical and genetic characterization of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) have identified distinct classes of enzymes involved in processes mediated by activation of cell-surface receptors and in constitutive intracellular protein trafficking events. The latter process appears to involve a PtdIns-specific PI3K first described in yeast as a mutant, vps34, defective in the sorting of newly synthesized proteins from the Golgi to the vacuole. We have identified a representative member of each class of PI3Ks in Drosophila using a PCR-based approach. In the present paper we describe the molecular cloning of a PI3K from Drosophila, P13K_59F, that shows sequence similarity to Vps34. PI3K_59F encodes a protein of 108 kDa co-linear with Vps34 homologues, and with three regions of sequence similarity to other PI3Ks. Biochemical characterization of the enzyme, by expression of the complete coding sequence as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Sf9 cells, demonstrates that PI3K_59F is a PtdIns-specific PI3K that can utilize either Mg2+ or Mn2+. This activity is sensitive to inhibition both by non-ionic detergent (Nonidet P40) and by wortmannin (IC50 10 nM). PI3K_59F, therefore, conserves both the structural and biochemical properties of the Vps34 class of enzymes.

  19. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Morton

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni. Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  20. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  1. Mathematical modelling of growth of Listeria  monocytogenes in raw chilled pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, K; Wang, K; Liu, M; Liu, J; Zhu, L; Zhou, G

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated chilled pork. A cocktail of 26 meat-borne L. monocytogenes was inoculated to raw or sterile chilled pork to observe its growth at 4, 10, 16, 22 and 28°C respectively. The growth data were fitted by the Baranyi model and Ratkowsky square-root model. Results showed that the Baranyi model and Ratkowsky square-root model could describe the growth characteristics of L. monocytogenes at different temperatures reasonably well in raw chilled pork (1·0 ≤ Bf ≤ Af ≤ 1·1). Compared with the growth of L. monocytogenes in sterile chilled pork, the background microflora had no impact on the growth parameters of L. monocytogenes, except for the lag phase at low temperature storage. The microbial predictive models developed in this study can be used to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes during natural spoilage, and construct quantitative risk assessments in chilled pork. This study simulated the actual growth of Listeria monocytogenes in chilled pork to the maximum extent, and described its growth characteristics of L. monocytogenes during natural spoilage. This study showed that the background microflora had no impact on the growth parameters of L. monocytogenes, except for the lag phase at low temperature storage. The models developed in this study can be used to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes during refrigerated storage. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Inventing an arsenal: adaptive evolution and neofunctionalization of snake venom phospholipase A2 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Vincent J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication followed by functional divergence has long been hypothesized to be the main source of molecular novelty. Convincing examples of neofunctionalization, however, remain rare. Snake venom phospholipase A2 genes are members of large multigene families with many diverse functions, thus they are excellent models to study the emergence of novel functions after gene duplications. Results Here, I show that positive Darwinian selection and neofunctionalization is common in snake venom phospholipase A2 genes. The pattern of gene duplication and positive selection indicates that adaptive molecular evolution occurs immediately after duplication events as novel functions emerge and continues as gene families diversify and are refined. Surprisingly, adaptive evolution of group-I phospholipases in elapids is also associated with speciation events, suggesting adaptation of the phospholipase arsenal to novel prey species after niche shifts. Mapping the location of sites under positive selection onto the crystal structure of phospholipase A2 identified regions evolving under diversifying selection are located on the molecular surface and are likely protein-protein interactions sites essential for toxin functions. Conclusion These data show that increases in genomic complexity (through gene duplications can lead to phenotypic complexity (venom composition and that positive Darwinian selection is a common evolutionary force in snake venoms. Finally, regions identified under selection on the surface of phospholipase A2 enzymes are potential candidate sites for structure based antivenin design.

  3. Effect of polydatin on phospholipase A2 in lung tissues in rats with endotoxic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒仕瑜; 王兴勇; 凌智瑜; 卢仲毅

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of polydatin on phospholipase A2 in lung tissues in rats with endotoxic shock.Methods: Thirty-two healthy male Wistar rats were employed in this study. A total of 8 rats received normal saline intravenously (control group ), 8 rats received 10 mg/kg of endotoxin ( endotoxic shock group), 8 rats received 1 mg/kg of polydatin after endotoxin injection (polydatin treatment group), and 8 rats received 1 mg/kg of polydatin (polydatin prevention group ) 30 minutes before endotoxin injection. Mean arterial pressure was measured once half an hour. Lung tissues were collected 6 hours later. Phospholipase A2 activity was measured with acid titration. The gene expression of secretory phospholipase A2 type IIA was detected with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Meanwhile, the histological changes of the lungs among four groups were compared through microscopic examination. Results: Phospholipase A2 activity and the gene expression of secretory phospholipase A2 type ⅡA increased after endotoxin injection, but polydatin could inhibit these effects of endotoxin. Obvious morphological evidence could be found in the lung pathological sections and the protective effect of polydatin was most significant in the polydatin prevention group.Conclusions: Polydatin has prophylactic and therapeutic effects (the former is more distinct than the latter) on acutely injured lungs in rats with endotoxic shock and which suggests that polydatin may be a phospholipase A2 inhibitor.

  4. Modulation of membrane phospholipids, the cytosolic calcium influx and cell proliferation following treatment of B16-F10 cells with recombinant phospholipase-D from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Magnoni, Mariana Gabriel; Boia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism through which brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) cause dermonecrosis, dysregulated inflammatory responses, hemolysis and platelet aggregation, which are effects reported following spider bites, is currently attributed to the presence of phospholipase-D in the venom. In the present investigation, through two-dimensional immunoblotting, we observed immunological cross-reactivity for at least 25 spots in crude Loxosceles intermedia venom, indicating high expression levels for different isoforms of phospholipase-D. Using a recombinant phospholipase-D from the venom gland of L. intermedia (LiRecDT1) in phospholipid-degrading kinetic experiments, we determined that this phospholipase-D mainly hydrolyzes synthetic sphingomyelin in a time-dependent manner, generating ceramide 1-phosphate plus choline, as well as lysophosphatidylcholine, generating lysophosphatidic acid plus choline, but exhibits little activity against phosphatidylcholine. Through immunofluorescence assays with antibodies against LiRecDT1 and using a recombinant GFP-LiRecDT1 fusion protein, we observed direct binding of LiRecDT1 to the membrane of B16-F10 cells. We determined that LiRecDT1 hydrolyzes phospholipids in detergent extracts and from ghosts of B16-F10 cells, generating choline, indicating that the enzyme can access and modulate and has activity against membrane phospholipids. Additionally, using Fluo-4, a calcium-sensitive fluorophore, it was shown that treatment of cells with phospholipase-D induced an increase in the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, but without altering viability or causing damage to cells. Finally, based on the known endogenous activity of phospholipase-D as an inducer of cell proliferation and the fact that LiRecDT1 binds to the cell surface, hydrolyzing phospholipids to generate bioactive lipids, we employed LiRecDT1 as an exogenous source of phospholipase-D in B16-F10 cells. Treatment of the cells was effective in increasing their proliferation in a

  5. Patogénesis de Listeria monocytogenes, microorganismo zoonotico emergente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirvis Torres

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes además de ser un paradigma para la investigación inmunológica se ha convertidoen sistema modelo apropiado para el análisis de los mecanismos moleculares del parasitismo intracelularde otras bacterias. Investigadores en el área de la inmunología se interesaron en este microorganismocuando se reconoció el riesgo que representaba para la salud pública y la seguridad en la industria dealimentos. Desde mediados de los años 80’s se ha investigado la biología molecular de los marcadores devirulencia de este microorganismo, la biología celular de las interacciones de los marcadores de virulenciacon los receptores de la célula hospedero, el citoesqueleto, las vías de transducción de señales y losmecanismos de inmunidad mediada por células del hospedero. El propósito de esta revisión es describiralgunas características taxonómicas y filogenéticas de Listeria monocytogenes , la incidencia humana yanimal de varios serotipos, la fisiopatología de la infección , modelos animales y de cultivo celular utilizadospara estudios de virulencia, las poblaciones de riesgo, manifestaciones clínicas de listeriosis humana yanimal, el tratamiento, la organización genética y evolución de los determinantes de virulencia, losmecanismos empleados para interactuar con la célula hospedera, y los mecanismos para escapar de losprocesos de muerte celular y pasar de una célula infectada a otra. La información recopilada resulta degran importancia para el personal de salud, industria, consumidores y población de riesgo; razón por lacual Listeria monocytogenes es un patógeno que representa una amenaza para la salud pública mundial.

  6. Control of Listeria monocytogenes in food production plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available L. monocytogenes has been established in different plants for the production of food, including dairy plants, abattoirs, plants for the processing of fish, as well as those for the production of ready-to-eat (RTE food and this fact is being considered as the primary mechanism of food contamination with this bacteria. There is also the factor of numerous and diverse contaminated production equipment, because it has certain parts that are inaccessible for the necessary cleaning and disinfection. The temperature, position, as well as the material of the work surface are also linked to the contamination of plants with this bacteria. Investigations carried out so far have helped toward the better understanding of the manner and time of contamination of food items in the course of the production process, but there are still unresolved problems, including most certainly the biggest one - the adherence of bacteria and the creation of a biofilm, when the bacteria is in that condition more resistant to so-called stress factors which are usually used in the food industry for the purpose of decontamination of the surfaces with which foods come into contact. The control of L. monocytogenes in food production plants is possible primarily by using an integrated programme, compatible with the systems Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP and Good Hygiene Practice (GHP, necessary in the production of food that is safe for the consumer. Essentially, the control measures that can contribute to reducing the incidence of findings of L.monocytogenes in the finished product, as well as the reducing of the level of contamination with this bacteria are linked, on the one hand, with hygiene procedures in the production process, and, on the other, with the applied technological procedures.

  7. Carbon dioxide and nisin act synergistically on Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Chen, Y.H.; Chikindas, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the synergistic action of carbon dioxide and nisin on Listeria monocytogenes Scott A wild-type and nisin-resistant (Nis(r)) cells grown in broth at 4 degrees C. Carbon dioxide extended the lag phase and decreased the specific growth rate of both strains, but to a greater degree...... for cultures in CO2. This synergism between nisin and CO2 was examined mechanistically by following the leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from listerial liposomes. Carbon dioxide enhanced nisin-induced CF leakage, indicating that the synergistic action of CO2 and nisin occurs at the cytoplasmic membrane...

  8. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by fatty acids and monoglycerides.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L. L.; Johnson, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    Fatty acids and monoglycerides were evaluated in brain heart infusion broth and in milk for antimicrobial activity against the Scott A strain of Listeria monocytogenes. C12:0, C18:3, and glyceryl monolaurate (monolaurin) had the strongest activity in brain heart infusion broth and were bactericidal at 10 to 20 micrograms/ml, whereas potassium (K)-conjugated linoleic acids and C18:2 were bactericidal at 50 to 200 micrograms/ml. C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, glyceryl monomyristate, and glyceryl m...

  9. Genetic dissection of DivIVA functions in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaval, Karan Gautam; Hauf, Samuel; Rismondo, Jeanine; Hahn, Birgitt; Halbedel, Sven

    2017-10-02

    DivIVA is a membrane binding protein that clusters at curved membrane regions such as the cell poles and the membrane invaginations occurring during cell division. DivIVA proteins recruit many other proteins to these subcellular sites through direct protein-protein interactions. DivIVA-dependent functions are typically associated with cell growth and division, even though species-specific differences in the spectrum of DivIVA functions and their causative interaction partners exist. DivIVA from the Gram-positive human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has at least three different functions. In this bacterium, DivIVA is required for precise positioning of the septum at mid-cell, it contributes to secretion of autolysins required for breakdown of peptidoglycan at the septum after completion of cell division, and it is essential for flagellar motility. While the DivIVA interaction partners for control of division site selection are well-established, the proteins connecting DivIVA with autolysin secretion or swarming motility are completely unknown. We set out to identify divIVA alleles, in which these three DivIVA functions could be separated, since the question of the degree to which the three functions of L. monocytogenes DivIVA are interlinked could not be answered before. Here, we identify such alleles, and our results show that division site selection, autolysin secretion, and swarming represent three discrete pathways that are independently influenced by DivIVA. These findings provide the required basis for the identification of DivIVA interaction partners controlling autolysin secretion and swarming in the future.IMPORTANCE DivIVA of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a central scaffold protein that influences at least three different cellular processes, namely cell division, protein secretion and bacterial motility. How DivIVA coordinates these rather unrelated processes is not known. We here identify variants of L. monocytogenes DivIVA, in which

  10. Listeria monocytogenes HAZARD MANAGEMENT IN A TYPICAL PRODUCT: THE CIAUSCOLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Fisichella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate operative procedures that allow to minimize Listeria monocytogenes (L. m. hazard in the main traditional sausage of the internal areas of Marche (Italy: the Ciauscolo, that has received the quality trademark PGI. It is made from lean cuts of well mature pork that is finely minced, adding fat which give the salami his characteristic softness and flavour. It is characterized by having a very little maturing period that determine high aw levels and, for this peculiarity, it allows L. m development.

  11. Patogénesis de Listeria monocytogenes, microorganismo zoonotico emergente

    OpenAIRE

    Kirvis Torres; Sara Sierra; Raúl Poutou; Ana Carrascal; Marcela Mercado

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes además de ser un paradigma para la investigación inmunológica se ha convertidoen sistema modelo apropiado para el análisis de los mecanismos moleculares del parasitismo intracelularde otras bacterias. Investigadores en el área de la inmunología se interesaron en este microorganismocuando se reconoció el riesgo que representaba para la salud pública y la seguridad en la industria dealimentos. Desde mediados de los años 80’s se ha investigado la biología molecular de los ...

  12. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets.

  13. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Fiyinfoluwa Odedina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination.

  14. The fate of two Listeria monocytogenes serotypes in "cig kofte" at different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Hisamettin; Sagun, Emrullah; Sancak, Hakan; Sagdic, Osman

    2007-05-01

    Cig kofte is a traditional Turkish food prepared from minced beef, bulgur, onions, garlic and varieties of spices. It is generally consumed within a few hours. However, leftovers can be kept in refrigerator or in room temperature up to 24h until they are consumed. In this study, survival and growth of two Listeria monocytogenes serotypes were investigated in cig kofte during the storage. For this purpose, the prepared samples were separately contaminated with serotypes 1/2b or 4b of L. monocytogenes at the level of 10(4)CFU/g and stored at 4°C and 21°C. L. monocytogenes colonies were counted at the beginning, 3rd, 6th, 12th and 24th hours of the storage. At 4°C, L. monocytogenes 4b significantly increased (P0.05) during the storage period. At 21°C, both L. monocytogenes 1/2b and 4b increased significantly (Pcig kofte did not inhibit the growths of L. monocytogenes serotypes during the storage. These results indicated that L. monocytogenes was able to survive and grow in cig kofte at the both storage temperatures of 4°C and 21°C and cig kofte seemed to be a suitable medium for this pathogen.

  15. Relationship between Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in seafood processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Walid Q; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes as an outcome and Listeria spp. as an explanatory variable by food products, food contact surfaces, and nonfood contact surfaces in seafood processing plants by using peer-reviewed published data. Nine sets of prevalence data of L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. were collected from published studies and used for the analyses. Based on our analysis, the relationship between L. monocytogenes prevalence and Listeria spp. prevalence in food products (incoming raw materials and finish products) was significant (P = 0.04) with (low) R² = 0.36. Furthermore, Listeria spp. were not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes when testing food contact surfaces (R² = 0.10). Listeria spp. were a good indicator for L. monocytogenes only on nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.90). On the other hand, the presence of Listeria spp. on food contact surfaces (R² = 0.002) and nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.03) was not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes presence in food products. In general, prevalence of Listeria spp. does not seem to be a good indicator for L. monocytogenes prevalence in seafood processing plants.

  16. Ultra deep sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes sRNA transcriptome revealed new antisense RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Behrens

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive pathogen, and causative agent of listeriosis, has become a widely used model organism for intracellular infections. Recent studies have identified small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs as important factors for regulating gene expression and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Increased speed and reduced costs of high throughput sequencing (HTS techniques have made RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq the state-of-the-art method to study bacterial transcriptomes. We created a large transcriptome dataset of L. monocytogenes containing a total of 21 million reads, using the SOLiD sequencing technology. The dataset contained cDNA sequences generated from L. monocytogenes RNA collected under intracellular and extracellular condition and additionally was size fractioned into three different size ranges from 150 nt. We report here, the identification of nine new sRNAs candidates of L. monocytogenes and a reevaluation of known sRNAs of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Automatic comparison to known sRNAs revealed a high recovery rate of 55%, which was increased to 90% by manual revision of the data. Moreover, thorough classification of known sRNAs shed further light on their possible biological functions. Interestingly among the newly identified sRNA candidates are antisense RNAs (asRNAs associated to the housekeeping genes purA, fumC and pgi and potentially their regulation, emphasizing the significance of sRNAs for metabolic adaptation in L. monocytogenes.

  17. Ultra Deep Sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes sRNA Transcriptome Revealed New Antisense RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Sebastian; Widder, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Kefer, Nathalie; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Rattei, Thomas; Hain, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive pathogen, and causative agent of listeriosis, has become a widely used model organism for intracellular infections. Recent studies have identified small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) as important factors for regulating gene expression and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Increased speed and reduced costs of high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques have made RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) the state-of-the-art method to study bacterial transcriptomes. We created a large transcriptome dataset of L. monocytogenes containing a total of 21 million reads, using the SOLiD sequencing technology. The dataset contained cDNA sequences generated from L. monocytogenes RNA collected under intracellular and extracellular condition and additionally was size fractioned into three different size ranges from 150 nt. We report here, the identification of nine new sRNAs candidates of L. monocytogenes and a reevaluation of known sRNAs of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Automatic comparison to known sRNAs revealed a high recovery rate of 55%, which was increased to 90% by manual revision of the data. Moreover, thorough classification of known sRNAs shed further light on their possible biological functions. Interestingly among the newly identified sRNA candidates are antisense RNAs (asRNAs) associated to the housekeeping genes purA, fumC and pgi and potentially their regulation, emphasizing the significance of sRNAs for metabolic adaptation in L. monocytogenes. PMID:24498259

  18. Biotic and abiotic soil properties influence survival of Listeria monocytogenes in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Locatelli

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen responsible for the potentially fatal disease listeriosis and terrestrial ecosystems have been hypothesized to be its natural reservoir. Therefore, identifying the key edaphic factors that influence its survival in soil is critical. We measured the survival of L. monocytogenes in a set of 100 soil samples belonging to the French Soil Quality Monitoring Network. This soil collection is meant to be representative of the pedology and land use of the whole French territory. The population of L. monocytogenes in inoculated microcosms was enumerated by plate count after 7, 14 and 84 days of incubation. Analysis of survival profiles showed that L. monocytogenes was able to survive up to 84 days in 71% of the soils tested, in the other soils (29% only a short-term survival (up to 7 to 14 days was observed. Using variance partitioning techniques, we showed that about 65% of the short-term survival ratio of L. monocytogenes in soils was explained by the soil chemical properties, amongst which the basic cation saturation ratio seems to be the main driver. On the other hand, while explaining a lower amount of survival ratio variance (11%, soil texture and especially clay content was the main driver of long-term survival of L. monocytogenes in soils. In order to assess the effect of the endogenous soils microbiota on L. monocytogenes survival, sterilized versus non-sterilized soils microcosms were compared in a subset of 9 soils. We found that the endogenous soil microbiota could limit L. monocytogenes survival especially when soil pH was greater than 7, whereas in acidic soils, survival ratios in sterilized and unsterilized microcosms were not statistically different. These results point out the critical role played by both the endogenous microbiota and the soil physic-chemical properties in determining the survival of L. monocytogenes in soils.

  19. A note on challenge trials to determine the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong Dara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the EU, food is considered safe with regard to Listeria monocytogenes if the number of micro-organisms does not exceed 100 colony forming units (cfu/g throughout its shelf-life. Therefore, it is important to determine if a food supports growth of L. monocytogenes. Guidelines for conducting challenge tests for growth assessment of L. monocytogenes on foods were published by the European Union Reference Laboratory (EURL in 2014. The aim of this study was to use these guidelines to determine if refrigerated, fresh, whole, closed-cap, prepackaged mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus support the growth of L. monocytogenes. Three batches of mushrooms were artificially inoculated at approximately 100 cfu/g with a three-strain mix of L. monocytogenes and incubated for 2 days at 8°C followed by 4 days at 12°C. L. monocytogenes numbers were determined (in triplicate for each batch on days 0, 2 and 6. Water activity, pH and total bacterial counts were also determined. There was no increase in the number of L. monocytogenes above the threshold of 0.5 log cfu/g in any of the replicates. In 8 of 9 replicates, the numbers decreased indicating that A. bisporus do not support the growth of L. monocytogenes. As the EU regulations allow < 100 cfu/g if the food cannot support growth of L. monocytogenes, the significance of this study is that mushrooms with < 100 cfu/g may be within the regulations and therefore, quantitative rather than qualitative determination may be required.

  20. Growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms in fresh-cut cantaloupe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ting; Liu, Yanhong; Huang, Lihan

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes and background microorganisms in fresh-cut cantaloupe. Fresh-cut cantaloupe samples, inoculated with three main serotypes (1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b) of L. monocytogenes, were incubated at different temperatures, ranging from 4 to 43 °C, to develop kinetic growth models. During storage studies, the population of both background microorganisms and L. monocytogenes began to increase almost immediately, with little or no lag phase for most growth curves. All growth curves, except for two growth curves of L. monocytogenes 1/2a at 4 °C, developed to full curves (containing exponential and stationary phases), and can be described by a 3-parameter logistic model. There was no significant difference (P = 0.28) in the growth behaviors and the specific growth rates of three different serotypes of L. monocytogenes inoculated to fresh-cut cantaloupe. The effect of temperature on the growth of L. monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms was evaluated using three secondary models. For L. monocytogenes, the minimum and maximum growth temperatures were estimated by both the Ratkowsky square-root and Cardinal parameter models, and the optimum temperature and the optimum specific growth rate by the Cardinal parameter model. An Arrhenius-type model provided more accurate estimation of the specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes at temperatures <4 °C. The kinetic models developed in this study can be used by regulatory agencies and food processors for conducting risk assessment of L. monocytogenes in fresh-cut cantaloupe, and for estimating the shelf-life of fresh-cut products.

  1. Micellar bolaform and omega-carboxylate phosphatidylcholines as substrates for phospholipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K A; Soltys, C E; Yu, K; Roberts, M F

    1994-05-03

    A series of mixed-chain diacyl-PCs which contain an omega-COOH on the sn-2 chain [1-Cx-2-Cy-(COOH)-PC] and bolaform (1-Cx-2,2'-Cy-1'-Cx-PC) phosphatidylcholines were synthesized and examined as substrates for phospholipase A2 (Naja naja naja) and C (Bacillus cereus). There is very little detectable phospholipase A2 activity toward pure micellar 1-acyl-2-acyl-(omega-COOH) species. In addition, when these same omega-COOH species are present at concentrations above their CMCs, they are potent inhibitors of phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of other micellar lipids. In contrast, phospholipase C hydrolysis of the same 1-acyl-2-acyl-omega-COOH)-PC species proceeds with rates comparable to that of diheptanoyl-PC. The bolaform lipids, which are tethered through a common sn-2 acyl chain, (e.g., 1-C8-2,2'-C12-1'-C8-PC) display quite different kinetic results. Under limiting Ca2+ conditions (100 microM) all the available sn-2 acyl bonds of the dimer are hydrolyzed. However, at high Ca2+ concentrations (1-10 mM) the reaction curves have a biphasic nature, characterized by an initial burst of activity followed by much slower rate. This is consistent with only the micellar 1-acyl-2-acyl-(omega-COOH)-PC produced in situ from phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of the dimer acting as an inhibitor of subsequent phospholipase A2 activity. Phospholipase C hydrolysis of the PC dimer and the sn-2 omega-COOH PC is rapid, with both available glycerophosphate groups cleaved at presumably the same rate. These results are discussed in terms of the unique physical properties (as measured by NMR and fluorescence experiments) of these phospholipids.

  2. Role of phospholipase C in Dictyostelium : Formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and normal development in cells lacking phospholipase C activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drayer, A. Lyndsay; Kaay, Jeroen van der; Mayr, Georg W.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1994-01-01

    The micro-organism Dictyostelium uses extracellular cAMP to induce chemotaxis and cell differentiation. Signals are transduced via surface receptors, which activate G proteins, to effector enzymes. The deduced protein sequence of Dictyostelium discoideum phosphabidylinositol-specific phospholipase C

  3. Comparative evaluation of the VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes Xpress (LMX) for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in a variety of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John; Pittet, Jean-Louis; Hughes, Denise

    2013-01-01

    The VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes Xpress (LMX) test is an enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay designed for use with the automated VIDAS or mini-VIDAS instruments for the specific detection of L. monocytogenes using a 26 h proprietary enrichment broth. The VIDAS LMX method was validated according to harmonized AOAC Research Institute (RI) and Official Methods of Analysis guidelines in both the AOAC Performance Tested Method (PTM) and GovVal programs. In the PTM comparison studies, the VIDAS LMX method was compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual, and AOAC Official Methods. The comparative food studies consisted of two main parts: internal testing and AOAC independent laboratory testing, which included seven food matrixes (deli ham, processed cheese, vanilla ice cream, cooked shrimp, smoked white fish, frozen spinach, and peanut butter). As part of the AOAC R1 GovVal program, the VIDAS LMX method was compared to the Health Canada MFHPB-30 method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in five ready-to-eat (RTE) meats (hot dogs, deli turkey, deli ham, fermented sausage, and liver paté). Twenty replicates of each inoculation level and five uninoculated controls were evaluated in each study. The LMX method also included the use ofchromogenic media, chromID Ottaviani Agosti agar and chromID L. mono. agar, for confirmation of LMX presumptive results. In both the PTM and GovVal evaluations, there were no significant differences in the Chi-square values for the LMX method when compared to reference methods. The additional parameters tested in the PTM evaluation (inclusivity, exclusivity, ruggedness, stability, and lot-to-lot) satisfied the AOAC RI performance requirements. In both the PTM and GovVal validation studies, the VIDAS LMX method demonstrated reliability as a rapid qualitative method for next-day detection of L

  4. Listeria monocytogenes contamination in dairy plants: evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes environmental contamination in two cheese-making plants using sheeps milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ibba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes harbouring niches established in the processing plant support post-process contamination of dairy products made from pasteurised or thermised milk. The present study investigated L. monocytogenes environmental contamination in two sheep’s milk cheese-making plants. Persistence of contamination in the area at higher risk was also investigated. During a one-year survey 7 samplings were carried out in each dairy plant, along the production lines of Pecorino Romano and ricotta salata cheese. A total of 613 environmental samples collected from food contact and non-food contact surfaces were analysed according to ISO 11290-1:2005 standard method. Identification of the isolated strains was carried out by polymerase chain reaction. L. monocytogenes prevalence was 23.2% in dairy A and 13.1% in dairy B, respectively. The higher prevalence rate was found in the following areas: salting, products washing, packaging, ricotta salata storage and Pecorino Romano ripening rooms. L. monocytogenes was never found in the cheese-making area. The probability of observing samples positive for the presence of L. monocytogenes was asso- ciated with dairy plant, sampling area and the period of cheese-making (P<0.001. The greater persistence of contamination over time was observed in the washing, salting, and Pecorino Romano ripening areas. The control of persistent environmental contamination relies on the identification of L. monocytogenes niches within the processing environment and the prevention of harborage sites formation. The importance of strict cleaning and sanitising procedure in controlling L. monocytogenes environmental contamination is confirmed by the lower level of contamination observed after these procedures were correctly implemented.

  5. The galactolipase activity of Fusarium solani (phospho)lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallouli, Raida; Othman, Houcemeddine; Amara, Sawsan; Parsiegla, Goetz; Carriere, Frédéric; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2015-03-01

    The purified (phospho)lipase of Fusarium solani (FSL), was known to be active on both triglycerides and phospholipids. This study aimed at assessing the potential of this enzyme in hydrolyzing galactolipids. FSL was found to hydrolyze at high rates of synthetic medium chains monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (4658±146U/mg on DiC8-MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (3785±83U/mg on DiC8-DGDG) and natural long chain monogalactosyldiacylglycerol extracted from leek leaves (991±85U/mg). It is the microbial enzyme with the highest activity on galactolipids identified so far with a level of activity comparable to that of pancreatic lipase-related protein 2. FSL maximum activity on galactolipids was measured at pH8. The analysis of the hydrolysis product of natural MGDG from leek showed that FSL hydrolyzes preferentially the ester bond at the sn-1 position of galactolipids. To investigate the structure-activity relationships of FSL, a 3D model of this enzyme was built. In silico docking of medium chains MGDG and DGDG and phospholipid in the active site of FSL reveals structural solutions which are in concordance with in vitro tests.

  6. Phospholipase A2 subclasses in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiouli, Eirini; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E

    2009-10-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) catalyse the cleavage of fatty acids esterified at the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids. In acute lung injury-acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI-ARDS) several distinct isoenzymes appear in lung cells and fluid. Some are capable to trigger molecular events leading to enhanced inflammation and lung damage and others have a role in lung surfactant recycling preserving lung function: Secreted forms (groups sPLA2-IIA, -V, -X) can directly hydrolyze surfactant phospholipids. Cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2-IVA) requiring Ca2+ has a preference for arachidonate, the precursor of eicosanoids which participate in the inflammatory response in the lung. Ca(2+)-independent intracellular PLA2s (iPLA2) take part in surfactant phospholipids turnover within alveolar cells. Acidic Ca(2+)-independent PLA2 (aiPLA2), of lysosomal origin, has additionally antioxidant properties, (peroxiredoxin VI activity), and participates in the formation of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine in lung surfactant. PAF-AH degrades PAF, a potent mediator of inflammation, and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids but also leads to toxic metabolites. Therefore, the regulation of PLA2 isoforms could be a valuable approach for ARDS treatment.

  7. Immobilization of Lipid Substrates: Application on Phospholipase A2 Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkabounas, Athanassios; Georgiadou, Dimitra G; Argitis, Panagiotis; Psycharis, Vassilios; Nakos, George; Kosmas, Agni M; Lekka, Marilena E

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess a fluorimetric assay for the determination of total phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity in biological samples introducing the innovation of immobilized substrates on crosslinked polymeric membranes. The immobilized C(12)-NBD-PtdCho, a fluorescent analogue of phosphatidylcholine, exhibited excellent stability for 3 months at 4 °C and was not desorbed in the aqueous reaction mixture during analysis. The limit of detection was 0.5 pmol FA (0.2 pg) and the linear part of the response curve extended from 1 up to 190 nmol FA/h/mL sample. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (%RSD), were ≤6 and ≤9 %, respectively. Statistical comparison with other fluorescent methods showed excellent correlation and agreement. Semiempirical calculations showed a fair amount of electrostatic interaction between the NBD-labeled substrate and the crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol with the styryl pyridinium residues (PVA-SbQ) material, from the plane of which, the sn-2 acyl chain of the phospholipid stands out and is accessible by PLA(2). Atomic Force Microscopy revealed morphological alterations of the immobilized substrate after the reaction with PLA(2). Mass spectrometry showed that only C(12)-NBD-FA, the PLA(2 )hydrolysis product, was detected in the reaction mixture, indicating that PLA(2) recognizes PVA-SbQ/C(12)-NBD-PtdCho as a surface to perform catalysis.

  8. Anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibody in membranous nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weisong; Beck, Laurence H; Zeng, Caihong; Chen, Zhaohong; Li, Shijun; Zuo, Ke; Salant, David J; Liu, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) is a target autoantigen in adult idiopathic membranous nephropathy (MN), but the prevalence of autoantibodies against PLA2R is unknown among Chinese patients with MN. Here, we measured anti-PLA2R antibody in the serum of 60 patients with idiopathic MN, 20 with lupus-associated MN, 16 with hepatitis B (HBV)-associated MN, and 10 with tumor-associated MN. Among patients with idiopathic MN, 49 (82%) had detectable anti-PLA2R autoantibodies using a Western blot assay; an assay with greater sensitivity detected very low titers of anti-PLA2R in 10 of the remaining 11 patients. Using the standard assay, we detected anti-PLA2R antibody in only 1 patient with lupus, 1 with HBV, and 3 with cancer, producing an overall specificity of 89% in this cohort limited to patients with secondary MN. The enhanced assay detected low titers of anti-PLA2R in only 2 additional samples of HBV-associated MN. In summary, these results suggest that PLA2R is a major target antigen in Chinese idiopathic MN and that detection of anti-PLA2R is a sensitive test for idiopathic MN.

  9. CONTROL OF ANGIOGENESIS BY INHIBITOR OF PHOSPHOLIPASE A2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wenming(陈文明); Li Lihong(李利红); Zhu Jiazhi(朱嘉芷); Liu Jinwei(刘晋玮); Soria Jeannette; Soria Claudine; Yedgar Saul

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential effects of angiogenic process by secretory phospholipase A2(sPLA2) inhibitor-HyPE (linking N-derivatized phosphatidyl-ethanolamine to hyaluronic acid) on human bone marrow endothelial cell line (HBME-1). Methods In order to examine the suppressing effects of HyPE on HBME-1 proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation, HBME-1 were activated by angiogenic factor, specifically by basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and oncostatin M (OSM) (at a final concentration of 25, 20, and 2.5 ng/mL, respectively), then HBME-1 proliferation, migration, and tube formation were studied in the absence or presence of HyPE. HBME-1 tube formation was specially analyzed in fibrin gel. Results HyPE effectively inhibited HBME-1 proliferation and migration as a dose-dependent manner,whatever HBME-1 were grown in the control culture medium or stimulated with b-FGF, VEGF, or OSM.In fibrin, the formations of HBME-1 derived tube-like structures were enhanced by all angiogenic factors,but these were strongly suppressed by HyPE. Conclusions The results support the involvement of sPLA2 in angiogenesis. It is proposed that sPLA2inhibitor introduces a novel approach in the control of cancer development.

  10. Inhibitory effects of Swietenia macrophylla on myotoxic phospholipases A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Pereañez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Activity-guided fractionation of an ethanol-soluble extract of the leaves of Swietenia macrophylla King, Meliaceae, led to several fractions. As a result, sample Sm13-16, 23 had the most promising activity against phospholipases A2 (PLA2, Asp49 and Lys49 types. This fraction inhibited PLA2 activity of the Asp49 PLA2, when aggregated substrate was used. On the other hand, this activity was weakly neutralized when monodispersed substrate was used. In addition, Sm13-16, 23 inhibited, in a dose dependent manner, the cytotoxicity, myotoxicity and edema induced by PLA2s, as well as the anticoagulant activity of Asp49 PLA2. Overall, this fraction exhibited a better inhibition of the toxic activities induced by the Lys49 PLA2than those caused by the Asp49 PLA2. The spectral data of Sm13-16, 23 suggested the presence of aromatic compounds (UV λ max (nm 655, 266, and 219; IR λ max KBr (cm-1: ~ 3600-3000 (OH, 2923.07 and 1438.90 (C-H, 1656.69 (C = O, 1618.63 and 1607.67 (C-O, 1285.47772.60. We suggest that phenolic compounds could interact and inhibit the toxins by several mechanisms. Further analysis of the compounds present in the active fraction could be a relevant contribution in the treatment of accidents caused by snake envenomation.

  11. Dual Functions of Phospholipase in Plant Response to Drought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueyun Hong; Suqin Zheng; Xuemin Wang

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipase Dα1 (PLDα1) has been shown to mediate the abscisic acid regulation of stomatal movements.Arabidopsis plants deficient in PLDα1 increased,whereas PLDoLl-overexpressing tobacco decreased,transpirational water loss.In the early stage of drought,the decrease in water loss was associated with a rapid stomatal closure caused by a high level of PLD in PLDα1-overexpressing plants.However,in the late stage of drought,the overexpressing plants displayed more susceptibility to drought than control plants.PLDα1 activity in the overexpressing plants was much higher than that of control plants in which drought also induced an increase in PLDα1 activity.The high level of PLDα1 activity was correlated to membrane degradation in late stages of drought,as demonstrated by ionic leakage and lipid peroxidation.These findings indicate that a high level of PLDα1 expression has different effects on plant response to water deficits.It promotes stomatal closure at earlier stages,but disrupts membranes in prolonged drought stress.These findings are discussed in relation to the understanding of PLD functions and potential applications.

  12. Identification of a new phospholipase D in Carica papaya latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkafi, Slim; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Fendri, Imen; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Barouh, Nathalie; Fouquet, Benjamin; Scheirlinckx, Frantz; Villeneuve, Pierre; Carrière, Frédéric

    2012-05-15

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a lipolytic enzyme involved in signal transduction, vesicle trafficking and membrane metabolism. It catalyzes the hydrolysis and transphosphatidylation of glycerophospholipids at the terminal phosphodiester bond. The presence of a PLD in the latex of Carica papaya (CpPLD1) was demonstrated by transphosphatidylation of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) in the presence of 2% ethanol. Although the protein could not be purified to homogeneity due to its presence in high molecular mass aggregates, a protein band was separated by SDS-PAGE after SDS/chloroform-methanol/TCA-acetone extraction of the latex insoluble fraction. This material was digested with trypsin and the amino acid sequences of the tryptic peptides were determined by micro-LC/ESI/MS/MS. These sequences were used to identify a partial cDNA (723 bp) from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of C. papaya. Based upon EST sequences, a full-length gene was identified in the genome of C. papaya, with an open reading frame of 2424 bp encoding a protein of 808 amino acid residues, with a theoretical molecular mass of 92.05 kDa. From sequence analysis, CpPLD1 was identified as a PLD belonging to the plant phosphatidylcholine phosphatidohydrolase family.

  13. A fluorogenic, small molecule reporter for mammalian phospholipase C isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weigang; Hicks, Stephanie N; Sondek, John; Zhang, Qisheng

    2011-03-18

    Phospholipase C isozymes (PLCs) catalyze the conversion of the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) into two second messengers, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. This family of enzymes are key signaling proteins that regulate the physiological responses of many extracellular stimuli such as hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Aberrant regulation of PLCs has been implicated in various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. How, when, and where PLCs are activated under different cellular contexts are still largely unknown. We have developed a fluorogenic PLC reporter, WH-15, that can be cleaved in a cascade reaction to generate fluorescent 6-aminoquinoline. When applied in enzymatic assays with either pure PLCs or cell lysates, this reporter displays more than a 20-fold fluorescence enhancement in response to PLC activity. Under assay conditions, WH-15 has comparable K(m) and V(max) with the endogenous PIP(2). This novel reporter will likely find broad applications that vary from imaging PLC activity in live cells to high-throughput screening of PLC inhibitors.

  14. MHC class Jb-restricted cell responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerksiek, K M; Pamer, E G

    1999-12-01

    Murine infection with Listeria monocytogenes induces CD8+ T cell responses specific for bacterial peptides that are presented on the infected cell surface by MHC class Ia and MHC class Ib molecules. We have used MHC tetramers to demonstrate that CD8+ T cells restricted by the H2-M3 MHC class Ib molecules constitute a substantial portion of the T cell response to L. monocytogenes infection. The in vivo size and kinetics of MHC class Ib-restricted T cell populations suggests that they play a prominent role in bacterial clearance following primary L. monocytogenes infection.

  15. Listeria monocytogenes in poultry and poultry products: Epidemiological investigations in seven Danish abattoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojeniyi, B.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Jensen, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    abattoirs including poultry processing line samples, and final products were also examined for L. monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 0 . 3% to 18 . 7% of the samples collected in the different abattoirs. Epidemiological typing of 247 L. monocytogenes isolates, including serotyping, phage...... typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping revealed 62 different clones. Based upon typability and discriminatory power, DNA typing methods used were found equally suitable as epidemiological markers. Serotyping and phage typing were not found useful as epidemiological markers for poultry...

  16. Sigma B Contributes to PrfA-Mediated Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Nadon, Celine A.; Bowen, Barbara M.; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of the Listeria monocytogenes positive regulatory factor A protein (PrfA) is initiated from either of two promoters immediately upstream of prfA (prfAp1 and prfAp2) or from the upstream plcA promoter. We demonstrate that prfAp2 is a functional σB-dependent promoter and that a sigB deletion mutation affects the virulence phenotype of L. monocytogenes. Thus, the alternative sigma factor σB contributes to virulence in L. monocytogenes.

  17. Incidence and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes in foods available in Taiwan.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, H. C.; Chao, W L; Lee, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of foods were examined for the incidence of Listeria monocytogenes, and the bacterial isolates were further characterized. L. monocytogenes was selected on LiCl-phenylethanol-moxalactam agar after enrichments and identified by several biochemical, mobility, and CAMP tests. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 58.8% of pork samples, 50% of chicken carcasses, 38% of turkey parts, 34% of frozen semiready foods, 24% of beef steaks, 12.2% of vegetables, 10.5% of seafoods, and 4.4% of froze...

  18. Listeria monocytogenes Infection in a Sugar Glider (Petaurus breviceps) - New Mexico, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M; Takacs, N; Ragsdale, J; Levenson, D; Marquez, C; Roache, K; Tarr, C L

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that can infect and cause disease in many species. In this case report, we describe a case of L. monocytogenes infection causing sepsis in a sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps). The sugar glider consumed a varied diet consisting of human food items, including cantaloupe. A nationwide outbreak of L. monocytogenes foodborne illness associated with cantaloupes occurred simultaneously with this incident case. In this case, the bacterial strains from the outbreak and glider were genetically distinct. Although rare, veterinarians should be aware of the emergence of foodborne pathogens' ability to infect exotic animals residing in domestic environments.

  19. Bacteriophage predation promotes serovar diversification in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Marcel R; Morax, Laurent S; Hüls, Vanessa J; Huwiler, Simona G; Leclercq, Alexandre; Lecuit, Marc; Loessner, Martin J

    2015-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen classified into distinct serovars (SVs) based on somatic and flagellar antigens. To correlate phenotype with genetic variation, we analyzed the wall teichoic acid (WTA) glycosylation genes of SV 1/2, 3 and 7 strains, which differ in decoration of the ribitol-phosphate backbone with N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and/or rhamnose. Inactivation of lmo1080 or the dTDP-l-rhamnose biosynthesis genes rmlACBD (lmo1081-1084) resulted in loss of rhamnose, whereas disruption of lmo1079 led to GlcNAc deficiency. We found that all SV 3 and 7 strains actually originate from a SV 1/2 background, as a result of small mutations in WTA rhamnosylation and/or GlcNAcylation genes. Genetic complementation of different SV 3 and 7 isolates using intact alleles fully restored a characteristic SV 1/2 WTA carbohydrate pattern, including antisera reactions and phage adsorption. Intriguingly, phage-resistant L. monocytogenes EGDe (SV 1/2a) isolates featured the same glycosylation gene mutations and were serotyped as SV 3 or 7 respectively. Again, genetic complementation restored both carbohydrate antigens and phage susceptibility. Taken together, our data demonstrate that L. monocytogenes SV 3 and 7 originate from point mutations in glycosylation genes, and we show that phage predation represents a major driving force for serovar diversification and evolution of L. monocytogenes.

  20. Identification of Listeria monocytogenes on Green Mussels and Cockle Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiati Puji Rahayu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGreen mussel (Perna viridis and cockle shell (Anadara granosa are one of many sources of animal protein which is many cultivated in Indonesia because their price is relatively affordable. This study was conducted to identify the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in 27 samples of green mussels and 3 samples of cockle shells using real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (real-time PCR and biochemical methods. The target gene for amplification in real-time PCR was an hlyA gene because this gene was a determinant of virulence genes that produce listeriolysin O. Primers used in this study were forward primer DG69 (GTG CCG GGT AAA AGA CCA TA and reverse primer DG74 (CGC CAC TGA GAT ACT AT and fluorescence signals indicator using SYBR Green I. The results of analysis using real-time PCR were negative Listeria monocytogenes in all samples, while using biochemical methods there was one of 30 samples contaminated by Listeria welshimeri.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF ACTION OF DISINFECTANTS AGAINST LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES BIOFILMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. CABEÇA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to assess the action of various disinfectants used in food industry against biofilm cells of Listeria monocytogenes formed on stainless steel surfaces during 24, 72 and 120 hours. Numbers of viable biofilm cells decreased after treatment with all the tested disinfectants (iodine, biguanide, quaternary ammonium compounds, peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite. Sodium hypochlorite was the most effective disinfectant against the biofilm cells, while biguanide and iodine were the least. Scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated attached cells on stainless steel surfaces after treatment with all the disinfectants. These observations showed that microorganisms were not completely removed from stainless steel surfaces after treatment with the disinfectants, however, the attachment did not means the viability of remaining cells. The biofilm age in hours (24, 72 and 120 had no apparent influence on resistance of microbiological cells to the disinfectants under study. In conclusion biofilm cells of L. monocytogenes can withstand disinfectants action.

  2. Cross-contamination between processing equipment and deli meats by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Min; Takeuchi, Kazue; Zhang, Lei; Dohm, Cynthia B; Meyer, Joseph D; Hall, Paul A; Doyle, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Contamination of luncheon meats by Listeria monocytogenes has resulted in outbreaks of listeriosis and major product recalls. Listeriae can survive on processing equipment such as meat slicers which serve as a potential contamination source. This study was conducted to determine (i) the dynamics of cross-contamination of L. monocytogenes from a commercial slicer and associated equipment onto sliced meat products, (ii) the influence of sample size on the efficacy of the BAX-PCR and U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service enrichment culture assays to detect L. monocytogenes on deli meat, and (iii) the fate of L. monocytogenes on sliced deli meats of different types during refrigerated storage. Three types of deli meats, uncured oven-roasted turkey, salami, and bologna containing sodium diacetate and potassium lactate, were tested. A five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated at ca.10(3) CFU onto the blade of a commercial slicer. Five consecutive meat slices were packed per package, then vacuum sealed, stored at 4 degrees C, and sampled at 1 and 30 days postslicing. Two sample sizes, 25 g and contents of the entire package of meat, were assayed. Total numbers of L. monocytogenes-positive samples, including the two sample sizes and two sampling times, were 80, 9, and 3 for turkey, salami, and bologna, respectively. A higher percentage of turkey meat samples were L. monocytogenes positive when contents of the entire package were assayed than when the 25-g sample was assayed (12.5 and 7.5%, respectively). Lower inoculum populations of ca. 10(1) or 10(2) CFU of L. monocytogenes on the slicer blade were used for an additional evaluation of oven-roasted turkey using two additional sampling times of 60 and 90 days postslicing. L. monocytogenes-positive samples were not detected until 60 days postslicing, and more positive samples were detected at 90 days than at 60 days postslicing. When BAX-PCR and enrichment culture assays were

  3. Lactadherin inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 activity on pre-apoptotic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Nyegaard

    Full Text Available Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is a critical component of insect and snake venoms and is secreted by mammalian leukocytes during inflammation. Elevated secretory PLA2 concentrations are associated with autoimmune diseases and septic shock. Many sPLA2's do not bind to plasma membranes of quiescent cells but bind and digest phospholipids on the membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells. The capacity of these phospholipases to digest membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells correlates to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. In the present study, the ability of the phosphatidyl-L-serine-binding protein, lactadherin to inhibit phospholipase enzyme activity has been assessed. Inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on phospholipid vesicles exceeded 90%, whereas inhibition of Naja mossambica sPLA2 plateaued at 50-60%. Lactadherin inhibited 45% of activity of Naja mossambica sPLA2 and >70% of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on the membranes of human NB4 leukemia cells treated with calcium ionophore A23187. The data indicate that lactadherin may decrease inflammation by inhibiting sPLA2.

  4. Conductimetric assays for the hydrolase and transferase activities of phospholipase D enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezna, M; Lawrence, A J

    1994-05-01

    Measurement of solution electrical conductance (conductimetry) is a simple direct assay method for the protogenic, hydrolytic reactions catalyzed by all phospholipase enzymes. The technique is especially suitable for assay of phospholipase D (PLD) enzymes where cleavage of zwitterionic substrates reinforces the pH dependent conductance change and allows the method to be used over a much wider pH range than the equivalent titrimetric assay. The ability to detect zwitterion cleavage enables the method to assay reactions in which phospholipase D transfers neutral, or anionic, alcohol species to the zwitterionic substrates phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The method can follow the sequential attack by different phospholipases and provides a simple technique for investigating the effect of substrate structure on susceptibility to various phospholipase enzymes. The results confirm that PLD from Streptomyces chromofuscus can attack lysophospholipids, but cannot transfer primary alcohols to the phosphatidyl residue, while the PLD from savoy cabbage is an efficient transferase, but cannot attack lysophospholipids. The data suggest that the bacterial PLD fails to act as a transferase because it hydrolyzes the transphosphatidylation products. Some phosphatidyl alcohols are more highly susceptible to PLA2 attack than the parent phosphatidyl choline derivatives.

  5. Determination of germ tube, phospholipase, and proteinase production by bloodstream isolates of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Souza Mattei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Candida albicans is a commensal and opportunistic agent that causes infection in immunocompromised individuals. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of this yeast, including the production of germ tubes (GTs and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate GT production and phospholipase and proteinase activities in bloodstream isolates of C. albicans. Methods One hundred fifty-three C. albicans isolates were obtained from blood samples and analyzed for GT, phospholipase, and proteinase production. The assays were performed in duplicate in egg yolk medium containing bovine serum albumin and human serum. Results Detectable amounts of proteinase were produced by 97% of the isolates, and 78% of the isolates produced phospholipase. GTs were produced by 95% of the isolates. A majority of the isolates exhibited low levels of phospholipase production and high levels of proteinase production. Conclusions Bloodstream isolates of C. albicans produce virulence factors such as GT and hydrolytic enzymes that enable them to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  6. Proteinase and phospholipase activity as virulence factors in Candida species isolated from blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan das, Vinitha; Ballal, Mamatha

    2008-12-31

    The number of nosocomial blood stream infections due to Candida species has increased over the past few decades. In order to establish an infection, opportunistic pathogens have to evade the immune system, survive, divide in the host environment, and spread to other tissues. Proteinase and phospholipase secretion has been implicated as potential virulence factors for some Candida species responsible for catheter related candidemia in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with indwelling devices. We therefore have aimed at demonstrating the secretion of proteinase and phospholipase enzymes as virulent factors by Candida species isolated from blood samples collected from ICUs, dialysis units and oncology units. One hundred and fourteen isolates of Candida species were obtained from the blood samples and the isolates include 37 Candida albicans, 7 Candida glabrata, 5 Candida guilliermondii, 3 Candida kefyr, 45 Candida krusei, 5 Candida parapsilosis, and 12 Candida tropicalis. Proteinase assay was performed by using the Staib et al method. Phospholipase assay was performed by using the method of Samaranayake et al. Precipitation zone (Pz value) was determined. The percentage of isolates which produced detectable amounts of proteinase is 74.56% and 44.73% of isolates produced detectable amounts of phospholipase. We believe that production of both phospholipase and proteinase enzimes could be an important virulence factor for several Candida species.

  7. Disruption of phospholipase B gene, PLB1, increases the survival of baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Imai, K; Oishi, H; Tamai, Y

    1996-12-15

    An uracil auxotrophic mutant of baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii, which is resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, was complemented by transformation with YEp24 which harbors 2 microns origin and URA3 derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phospholipase B in T. delbrueckii cells is active in both acidic and alkaline conditions. However, activity of phospholipase B gene (PLB1) in cells of disruption mutant (plb1:: URA3) was lost in both conditions, which indicates that all phospholipase B activity is encoded by a single gene (or a single polypeptide) in these yeast cells. Over-expression of PLB1 with YEp plasmid vector in T. delbrueckii cells showed approximately 2.5-fold increase in phospholipase B activity, comparing with that in wild-type cells. Cells of plb1 delta mutant showed increased survival when cells of plb1 delta mutant and wild-type strain were incubated in water at 30 degrees C. Cells of PLB1-over-expressed strain died rapidly even during the cultivation period, indicating that phospholipase B activity may be a determinant for the survival of this yeast.

  8. The first phospholipase inhibitor from the serum of Vipera ammodytes ammodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sribar, Jernej; Kovacic, Lidija; Draskovic, Petra; Faure, Grazyna; Krizaj, Igor

    2007-12-01

    Ammodytoxins are neurotoxic secretory phospholipase A(2) molecules, some of the most toxic components of the long-nosed viper (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes) venom. Envenomation by this and by closely related vipers is quite frequent in southern parts of Europe and serotherapy is used in the most severe cases. Because of occasional complications, alternative medical treatment of envenomation is needed. In the present study, ammodytoxin inhibitor was purified from the serum of V. a. ammodytes using two affinity procedures and a gel exclusion chromatography step. The ammodytoxin inhibitor from V. a. ammodytes serum consists of 23- and 25-kDa glycoproteins that form an oligomer, probably a tetramer, of about 100 kDa. N-terminal sequencing and immunological analysis revealed that both types of subunit are very similar to gamma-type secretory phospholipase A(2) inhibitors. The ammodytoxin inhibitor from V. a. ammodytes serum is a potent inhibitor of phospholipase activity and hence probably also the neurotoxicity of ammodytoxins. Discovery of the novel natural inhibitor of these potent secretory phospholipase A(2) toxins opens up prospects for the development of new types of small peptide inhibitors for use in regulating the physiological and pathological activities of secretory phospholipases A(2).

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes to USDA and AOAC Culture Based Methods for the Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joelsson, Adam C; Brown, Ashley S; Puri, Amrita; Keough, Martin P; Gaudioso, Zara E; Siciliano, Nicholas A; Snook, Adam E

    2015-01-01

    Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a molecular based assay for the presumptive detection of Listeria monocytogenes from environmental surfaces, dairy, and ready-to-eat (RTE) food matrixes (hot dogs and deli meat). The assay utilizes a PCR detection method coupled with a rapid, visual, flow-based assay that develops in 3 min post PCR amplification and requires only 24 h of enrichment for maximum sensitivity. The Veriflow LM system eliminates the need for sample purification, gel electrophoresis, or fluorophore-based detection of target amplification, and does not require complex data analysis. This Performance Tested Method(SM) validation study demonstrated the ability of the Veriflow LM method to detect low levels of artificially inoculated L. monocytogenes in seven distinct environmental and food matrixes. In each unpaired reference comparison study, probability of detection analysis indicated no significant difference between the Veriflow LM method and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook 8.08 or AOAC 993.12 reference method. Fifty strains of L. monocytogenes were detected in the inclusivity study, while 39 nonspecific organisms were undetected in the exclusivity study. The study results show that Veriflow LM is a sensitive, selective, and robust assay for the presumptive detection of L. monocytogenes sampled from environmental, dairy, or RTE (hot dogs and deli meat) food matrixes.

  10. NATURAL ATYPICAL LISTERIA INNOCUA STRAINS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES PATHOGENICITY ISLAND 1 GENES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The detection of the human foodborne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, in food, environmental samples and clinical specimens associated with cases of listeriosis, a rare but high mortality-rate disease, requires distinguishing the pathogen from other Listeria species. Speciation...

  11. Heat resistance of an outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes in hot dog batter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, A S; Gombas, D E

    2001-03-01

    The heat resistance of a strain of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for a listeriosis outbreak in hot dogs was not higher than the heat resistance of other L. monocytogenes strains when tested in tryptic soy broth and in laboratory-prepared hot dog batter. For the thermal death time experiments, the cells were grown to stationary phase or were starved in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7, for 6 h at 30 degrees C. Starvation increased the heat resistance of L. monocytogenes in broth but not in hot dog batter. D-values in hot dog batter were higher than in broth. For the hot dog formulation used in this study, cooking the hot dog batter for 30 s at 71.1 degrees C (160 degrees F), or its equivalent using a z-value of 6 degrees C (11 degrees F), would inactivate 5 logs of L. monocytogenes.

  12. PRÉVALENCE DE LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES DANS LE LAIT CRU DE VACHE AU LIBAN NORD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad al Kassaa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Al Kassaa Imad, Khaled el Omari, Marwa Saati, Bachar Ismail and Monzer Hamze. 2016. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in raw cow milk in north Lebanon. Lebanese Science Journal, 17(1: 39-45. Listeriosis, although a zoonosis, is an invasive disease that can affect newborns, pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Clinical manifestations can be expressed by febrile gastroenteritis, invasive forms including severe sepsis, meningitis, rhombencephalitis, prenatal infections and abortions. Species of Listeria bacteria are ubiquitous and adaptable to the environment in animal and plant foods. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in 100 samples of fresh cow milk collected from different areas of North Lebanon. Listeria monocytogenes was detected by using the Grand VIDAS technique (Biomérieux France. The results obtained revealed the absence of Listeria monocytogenes in all analyzed samples.

  13. Visualization of gold and platinum nanoparticles interacting with Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Szeliga, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    -Au and nano-Pt respectively), with Salmonella Enteritidis (Gram-negative) and Listeria monocytogenes (Gram-positive), to reveal possibilities of constructing bacteria-nanoparticle vehicles. Methods: Hydrocolloids of nano-Au or nano-Pt were added to two bacteria suspensions in the following order: nano......-Au + Salmonella Enteritidis; nano-Au + Listeria monocytogenes; nano-Pt + Salmonella Enteritidis; nano-Pt + Listeria monocytogenes. Samples were inspected by transmission electron microscope. Results: Visualization of morphological interaction between nano-Au and Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes...... of Salmonella Enteritidis, nano-Pt were seen inside bacteria cells, probably bound to DNA and partly left bacterial cells. After washing and centrifugation, some of the nano-Pt-DNA complexes were observed within Salmonella Enteritidis. Conclusion: The results indicate that the bacteria could be used...

  14. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody able to detect live Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølve, Marianne; Boel, Jeppe; Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal Listeria antibody, designated B4, was evaluated. The ability of the antibody to bind to viable bacteria belonging to Listeria spp, compared to bacteria of the same species killed by beat treatment, acid or base treatment, sanitizers, and irradiation was examined. The antibody was found...... to react with viable L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, but not with heat-killed (72 degrees C, 5 min) strains of these organisms. When L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were killed by methods other than heat treatment, it was ambiguous whether the antibody detected the organism or not. It was concluded...... that the B4 antibody has potential to be used in an immune capture step to capture live L, monocytogenes and L. innocua from foods prior to identification of L. monocytogenes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)....

  15. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant...... with enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC......-transporter permease) presented in the sequenced strain L. monocytogenes str. 4b F2365. This disrupted gene, denoted lm.G_1771, encoded a protein with 10 transmembrane helixes. The revertant, LM-49RE, was obtained by replacing lm.G_1771::Tn917 with lm.G_1771 via homologous recombination. We found that LM-49RE formed...

  16. Effects of ultraviolet-B exposure on the resistance to Listeria monocytogenes in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch W; Garssen J; de Klerk A; Herremans MMPT; Dortant P; de Gruijl FR; van Loveren H; LPI; VIR; UU

    1996-01-01

    Een Listeria monocytogenes infectiemodel in de rat werd gebruikt om de immuunsuppressieve activiteit van ultraviolet-B straling (UVB) te onderzoeken. Ratten werden dagelijks blootgesteld aan suberythemale hoeveelheden UVB straling gedurende 5 of 7 opeenvolgende dagen. Twee verschillende UV bronnen

  17. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in soft blue-white cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosshaug, Per Sand; Detmer, Ann; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model simulating growth over time of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in a soft blue-white cheese. The physicochemical properties in a matrix such as cheese are essential controlling factors influencing the growth of L. monocytogenes....... We developed a predictive tertiary model of the bacterial growth of L. monocytogenes as a function of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. We measured the variations over time of the physicochemical properties in the cheese. Our predictive model was developed based on broth data produced...... production and retail conditions showed that the number of L. monocytogenes cells increases 3 to 3.5 log within the shelf life of the cheese....

  18. Inhibitory effect of liposome-entrapped lemongrass oil on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H Y; Wu, J; Lin, L

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in dairy products is of mounting public concern. To inhibit bacterial growth, we engineered stimuli-responsive liposomes containing lemongrass oil for this study. The controlled release of liposome-entrapped lemongrass oil is triggered by listerolysin O, secreted by L. monocytogenes. We investigated the antibiotic activities of lemongrass oil liposomes against L. monocytogenes in cheese. We also assessed their possible effects on the quality of the cheese. Liposomes containing lemongrass oil (5.0mg/mL) presented the optimal polydispersity index (0.246), zeta-potential (-58.9mV) and entrapment efficiency (25.7%). The liposomes displayed satisfactory antibiotic activity against L. monocytogenes in cheese over the storage period at 4°C. We observed no effects on the physical and sensory properties of the cheese after the liposome treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NATURAL ATYPICAL LISTERIA INNOCUA STRAINS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES PATHOGENICITY ISLAND 1 GENES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The detection of the human foodborne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, in food, environmental samples and clinical specimens associated with cases of listeriosis, a rare but high mortality-rate disease, requires distinguishing the pathogen from other Listeria species. Speciation...

  20. Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupes during dump tank washing and hydrocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent listeriosis outbreaks and recalls associated with cantaloupes urge for studies to understand the mechanisms of cantaloupe contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. Postharvest practices such as washing and hydrocooling were suggested to facilitate the contamination of fresh fruits by human pat...

  1. Heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in vegetables: evaluation of blanching processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, A S

    2001-03-01

    The heat resistance of a Listeria monocytogenes composite (serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b) was determined in fresh broccoli florets, sweet green peppers, onions, mushrooms, and peas using an end-point procedure in polyester pouches. The heat resistance of L. monocytogenes was higher in peas (D(60 degrees C) = 1.0 min) and mushrooms (D(60 degrees C) = 0.7 min) than in other vegetables tested (D(60 degrees C) in onions = 0.2 min) and was highest when cells were subjected to starvation before the thermal death time experiments (D(60 degrees C) of starved L. monocytogenes in mushrooms = 1.6 min). The results showed that blanching can be used as an antilisterial treatment (inactivation of 5 logs of L. monocytogenes) when the cold spot of vegetables is treated for at least 10 s at 75 degrees C or instantaneously (<1 s) at temperatures above 82 degrees C.

  2. Thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes during rapid and slow heating in sous vide cooked beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T B; Knøchel, S

    1996-06-01

    Heating at slowly rising temperatures is suspected to enhance thermotolerance in Listeria monocytogenes and, since anaerobic environments have been shown to facilitate resuscitation of heat-injured cells of this micro-organism, concern may arise about the possibility of L. monocytogenes surviving in minimally preserved products. The effect of rapid ( > 10 degrees C min-1) and slow (0.3 and 0.6 degrees C min-1) heating on survival of L. monocytogenes in sous vide cooked beef was therefore examined at mild processing temperatures of 56 degrees, 60 degrees and 64 degrees C. No statistically significant difference (P = 0.70) was observed between the tested heating regimes. Since the average pH of beef was low (5.6), and little or no effect was observed, a pH-dependency of heat shock-induced thermotolerance in L. monocytogenes is suggested to account for this result.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes Prevalence and Characteristics in Retail Raw Foods in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Shi; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Chen, Moutong; Yan, Ze An; Hu, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in retail raw foods covering most provincial capitals in China were studied with testing of 1036 samples of vegetables, edible mushrooms, raw meat...

  4. Evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes survival in ice cream mixes flavored with herbal tea using Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Ismet; Golec, Adem; Karaman, Safa; Sagdic, Osman; Kayacier, Ahmed

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the effects of the incorporation of some herbal teas at different concentrations into the ice cream mix on the population of Listeria monocytogenes were studied using Taguchi method. The ice cream mix samples flavored with herbal teas were prepared using green tea and sage at different concentrations. Afterward, fresh culture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated into the samples and the L. monocytogenes was counted at different storage periods. Taguchi method was used for experimental design and analysis. In addition, some physicochemical properties of samples were examined. Results suggested that there was some effect, although little, on the population of L. monocytogenes when herbal tea was incorporated into the ice cream mix. Additionally, the use of herbal tea caused a decrease in the pH values of the samples and significant changes in the color values.

  5. DMPD: Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10080535 Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activ...ation. Gijon MA, Leslie CC. J Leukoc Biol. 1999 Mar;65(3):330-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation... of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. PubmedID 10080535 Title Regulation

  6. Plasma Lipoprotein-associated Phospholipase A(2) Is Inversely Correlated with Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin-kexin Type 9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Alexander; Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Lambert, Gilles; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Background and Aims. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) is a proatherogenic phospholipase A(2), which is predominantly complexed to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. Proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) provides a key step in LDL metabolism by stimulating

  7. Plasma Lipoprotein-associated Phospholipase A(2) Is Inversely Correlated with Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin-kexin Type 9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Alexander; Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Lambert, Gilles; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) is a proatherogenic phospholipase A(2), which is predominantly complexed to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. Proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) provides a key step in LDL metabolism by stimulating L

  8. Studies on phospholipase A and its zymogen from porcine pancreas III. Action of the enzyme on short-chain lecithins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, G.H. de; Bonsen, P.P.M.; Pieterson, W.A.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1971-01-01

    1. 1. Short-chain lecithins (with C6, C7, and C8 fatty acid esters) have been used to study kinetically the enzymatic hydrolysis by pancreatic phospholipase A (EC 3.1.1.4) in aqueous systems, without the addition of emulsifiers. 2. 2. Although phospholipase A is able to attack these substrates

  9. Forty five years with membrane phospholipids, phospholipases and lipid mediators: A historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chap, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    Phospholipases play a key role in the metabolism of phospholipids and in cell signaling. They are also a very useful tool to explore phospholipid structure and metabolism as well as membrane organization. They are at the center of this review, covering a period starting in 1971 and focused on a number of subjects in which my colleagues and I have been involved. Those include determination of phospholipid asymmetry in the blood platelet membrane, biosynthesis of lysophosphatidic acid, biochemistry of platelet-activating factor, first attempts to define the role of phosphoinositides in cell signaling, and identification of novel digestive (phospho)lipases such as pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2) or phospholipase B. Besides recalling some of our contributions to those various fields, this review makes an appraisal of the impressive and often unexpected evolution of those various aspects of membrane phospholipids and lipid mediators. It is also the occasion to propose some new working hypotheses.

  10. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-09

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  11. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  12. Phospholipase A2 from sheep erythrocyte membranes. Ca2+ dependence and localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, E; Zahler, P

    1979-02-02

    The calcium dependence and the time course of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine degradation by sheep erythrocyte membrane suspensions in presence of Triton X-100 were investigated. One enzyme with phospholipase A2 specificity was found to be responsible for both phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine degradation. The localization of this enzyme in the membrane of the sheep erythrocyte was investigated by proteolytic treatment of sealed erythrocyte ghosts from the outside and of ghosts which had both sides of the membrane exposed to chymotrypsin. The inability of sealed ghosts to take up chymotrypsin was followed by flux measurements of [14C]dextran carboxyl previously trapped in the ghosts. No efflux of the marker was found during the proteolytic treatment. By comparing the residual phospholipase activities in the membranes from both ghost preparations, we concluded that the phospholipase is oriented to the exterior of the sheep erythrocyte.

  13. Interisland evolution of Trimeresurus flavoviridis venom phospholipase A(2) isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chijiwa, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Nakashima, Kinichi; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Hattori, Shosaku; Ohno, Motonori

    2003-03-01

    Trimeresurus flavoviridis snakes inhabit the southwestern islands of Japan. A phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), named PL-Y, was isolated from Okinawa T. flavoviridis venom and its amino acid sequence was determined from both protein and cDNA. PL-Y was unable to induce edema. In contrast, PLA-B, a PLA(2) from Tokunoshima T. flavoviridis venom, which is different at only three positions from PL-Y, is known to induce edema. A new PLA(2), named PLA-B', which is similar to PLA-B, was cloned from Amami-Oshima T. flavoviridis venom gland. Three T. flavoviridis venom basic [Asp(49)]PLA(2) isozymes, PL-Y (Okinawa), PLA-B (Tokunoshima), and PLA-B' (Amami-Oshima), are identical in the N-terminal half but have one to four amino acid substitutions in the beta1-sheet and its vicinity. Such interisland sequence diversities among them are due to isolation in the different environments over 1 to 2 million years and appear to have been brought about by natural selection for point mutation in their genes. Otherwise, a major PLA(2), named PLA2, ubiquitously exists in the venoms of T. flavoviridis snakes from the three islands with one to three synonymous substitutions in their cDNAs. It is assumed that the PLA2 gene is a prototype among T. flavoviridis venom PLA(2) isozyme genes and has hardly undergone nonsynonymous mutation as a principal toxic component. Phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequences revealed that T. flavoviridis PLA(2) isozymes are clearly separated into three groups, PLA2 type, basic [Asp(49)]PLA(2) type, and [Lys(49)]PLA(2) type. Basic [Asp(49)]PLA(2)-type isozymes may manifest their own particular toxic functions different from those of the isozymes of the PLA2 type and [Lys(49)]PLA(2) type.

  14. Anti-phospholipase A₂ receptor antibodies in recurrent membranous nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattah, A; Ayalon, R; Beck, L H; Sethi, S; Sandor, D G; Cosio, F G; Gandhi, M J; Lorenz, E C; Salant, D J; Fervenza, F C

    2015-05-01

    About 70% of patients with primary membranous nephropathy (MN) have circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) antibodies that correlate with disease activity, but their predictive value in post-transplant (Tx) recurrent MN is uncertain. We evaluated 26 patients, 18 with recurrent MN and 8 without recurrence, with serial post-Tx serum samples and renal biopsies to determine if patients with pre-Tx anti-PLA2R are at increased risk of recurrence as compared to seronegative patients and to determine if post-Tx changes in anti-PLA2R correspond to the clinical course. In the recurrent group, 10/17 patients had anti-PLA2R at the time of Tx versus 2/7 patients in the nonrecurrent group. The positive predictive value of pre-Tx anti-PLA2R for recurrence was 83%, while the negative predictive value was 42%. Persistence or reappearance of post-Tx anti-PLA2R was associated with increasing proteinuria and resistant disease in 6/18 cases; little or no proteinuria occurred in cases with pre-Tx anti-PLA2R and biopsy evidence of recurrence in which the antibodies resolved with standard immunosuppression. Some cases with positive pre-Tx anti-PLA2R were seronegative at the time of recurrence. In conclusion, patients with positive pre-Tx anti-PLA2R should be monitored closely for recurrent MN. Persistence or reappearance of antibody post-Tx may indicate a more resistant disease.

  15. Phospholipase A2 regulates eicosanoid class switching during inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Paul C; Gosselin, David; Reichart, Donna; Glass, Christopher K; Dennis, Edward A

    2014-09-02

    Initiation and resolution of inflammation are considered to be tightly connected processes. Lipoxins (LX) are proresolution lipid mediators that inhibit phlogistic neutrophil recruitment and promote wound-healing macrophage recruitment in humans via potent and specific signaling through the LXA4 receptor (ALX). One model of lipoxin biosynthesis involves sequential metabolism of arachidonic acid by two cell types expressing a combined transcellular metabolon. It is currently unclear how lipoxins are efficiently formed from precursors or if they are directly generated after receptor-mediated inflammatory commitment. Here, we provide evidence for a pathway by which lipoxins are generated in macrophages as a consequence of sequential activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a receptor for endotoxin, and P2X7, a purinergic receptor for extracellular ATP. Initial activation of TLR4 results in accumulation of the cyclooxygenase-2-derived lipoxin precursor 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in esterified form within membrane phospholipids, which can be enhanced by aspirin (ASA) treatment. Subsequent activation of P2X7 results in efficient hydrolysis of 15-HETE from membrane phospholipids by group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2, and its conversion to bioactive lipoxins by 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate how a single immune cell can store a proresolving lipid precursor and then release it for bioactive maturation and secretion, conceptually similar to the production and inflammasome-dependent maturation of the proinflammatory IL-1 family cytokines. These findings provide evidence for receptor-specific and combinatorial control of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoid biosynthesis, and potential avenues to modulate inflammatory indices without inhibiting downstream eicosanoid pathways.

  16. Phospholipase C-epsilon regulates epidermal morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael P Vázquez-Manrique

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Migration of cells within epithelial sheets is an important feature of embryogenesis and other biological processes. Previous work has demonstrated a role for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3-mediated calcium signalling in the rearrangement of epidermal cells (also known as hypodermal cells during embryonic morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. However the mechanism by which IP(3 production is stimulated is unknown. IP(3 is produced by the action of phospholipase C (PLC. We therefore surveyed the PLC family of C. elegans using RNAi and mutant strains, and found that depletion of PLC-1/PLC-epsilon produced substantial embryonic lethality. We used the epithelial cell marker ajm-1::gfp to follow the behaviour of epidermal cells and found that 96% of the arrested embryos have morphogenetic defects. These defects include defective ventral enclosure and aberrant dorsal intercalation. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy we show that the migration of the ventral epidermal cells, especially of the leading cells, is slower and often fails in plc-1(tm753 embryos. As a consequence plc-1 loss of function results in ruptured embryos with a Gex phenotype (gut on exterior and lumpy larvae. Thus PLC-1 is involved in the regulation of morphogenesis. Genetic studies using gain- and loss-of-function alleles of itr-1, the gene encoding the IP(3 receptor in C. elegans, demonstrate that PLC-1 acts through ITR-1. Using RNAi and double mutants to deplete the other PLCs in a plc-1 background, we show that PLC-3/PLC-gamma and EGL-8/PLC-beta can compensate for reduced PLC-1 activity. Our work places PLC-epsilon into a pathway controlling epidermal cell migration, thus establishing a novel role for PLC-epsilon.

  17. Ca2+ Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei Phosphoinositide Phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Keller, Sharon; Moore, Christina A; Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-05-01

    We characterized a phosphoinositide phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from the procyclic form (PCF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The protein contains a domain organization characteristic of typical PI-PLCs, such as X and Y catalytic domains, an EF-hand calcium-binding motif, and a C2 domain, but it lacks a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In addition, the T. brucei PI-PLC (TbPI-PLC) contains an N-terminal myristoylation consensus sequence found only in trypanosomatid PI-PLCs. A peptide containing this N-terminal domain fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) was targeted to the plasma membrane. TbPI-PLC enzymatic activity was stimulated by Ca(2+) concentrations below the cytosolic levels in the parasite, suggesting that the enzyme is constitutively active. TbPI-PLC hydrolyzes both phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), with a higher affinity for PIP2. We found that modification of a single amino acid in the EF-hand motif greatly affected the protein's Ca(2+) sensitivity and substrate preference, demonstrating the role of this motif in Ca(2+) regulation of TbPI-PLC. Endogenous TbPI-PLC localizes to intracellular vesicles and might be using an intracellular source of PIP2. Knockdown of TbPI-PLC expression by RNA interference (RNAi) did not result in growth inhibition, although enzymatic activity was still present in parasites, resulting in hydrolysis of PIP2 and a contribution to the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)/diacylglycerol (DAG) pathway. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. [Overexpression, purification and characterization of phospholipase C from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhong; Zhang, Liang; Gu, Zhenghua; Ding, Zhongyang; Shi, Guiyang

    2014-10-04

    In this study, we constructed two recombinant Escherichia coli strains to produce phospholipase C (PLC) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. The recombinant enzymes were purified to homogeneity and characterized. [Methods] We cloned the PLC encoding gene plc1, plc2 from genome DNA of A. calcoaceticus ATCC17902. The amplified fragments were inserted into pET28a(+ to obtain expression plasmids. E. coli BL21 (DE3) harboring the above plasmids were cultivated and induced with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside to express PLCs. The recombinant PLCs were purified by affinity chromatography and their catalytic properties were characterized. Two PLCs from A. calcoaceticus were cloned and functional expressed in E. coli. The recombinant enzymes have activities of 31,160 +/- 418 U/mg for PLC1 and 13640 +/- 354 U/mg for PLC2, when using p-nitrophenyl phosphorycholine as substrate. The purified PLC1 and PLC2 exhibited optimum temperature at 65 degrees C and 50 degrees C, respectively. Their optimal pH were 8 and 7.5, respectively. PLC2 was stable under 40 degrees C and pH at 8, whereas the residual activity of PLC1 was less than 25% in the same condition. Mg2+ and Ca2+ stimulated two enzymes activity, whereas Zn2. stimulated PLC1 and inhibited PLC2. PLC1 and PLC2 hydrolyzed phosphatidylinositol. It is the first time to express and characterize the PLC gene from A. calcoaceticus ATCC17902. These research results provide reference for the study of food-safety microbiological PLC.

  19. Phospholipase C-epsilon regulates epidermal morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael P Vázquez-Manrique

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Migration of cells within epithelial sheets is an important feature of embryogenesis and other biological processes. Previous work has demonstrated a role for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3-mediated calcium signalling in the rearrangement of epidermal cells (also known as hypodermal cells during embryonic morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. However the mechanism by which IP(3 production is stimulated is unknown. IP(3 is produced by the action of phospholipase C (PLC. We therefore surveyed the PLC family of C. elegans using RNAi and mutant strains, and found that depletion of PLC-1/PLC-epsilon produced substantial embryonic lethality. We used the epithelial cell marker ajm-1::gfp to follow the behaviour of epidermal cells and found that 96% of the arrested embryos have morphogenetic defects. These defects include defective ventral enclosure and aberrant dorsal intercalation. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy we show that the migration of the ventral epidermal cells, especially of the leading cells, is slower and often fails in plc-1(tm753 embryos. As a consequence plc-1 loss of function results in ruptured embryos with a Gex phenotype (gut on exterior and lumpy larvae. Thus PLC-1 is involved in the regulation of morphogenesis. Genetic studies using gain- and loss-of-function alleles of itr-1, the gene encoding the IP(3 receptor in C. elegans, demonstrate that PLC-1 acts through ITR-1. Using RNAi and double mutants to deplete the other PLCs in a plc-1 background, we show that PLC-3/PLC-gamma and EGL-8/PLC-beta can compensate for reduced PLC-1 activity. Our work places PLC-epsilon into a pathway controlling epidermal cell migration, thus establishing a novel role for PLC-epsilon.

  20. Acanthamoeba feature a unique backpacking strategy to trap and feed on Listeria monocytogenes and other motile bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyscher, Dominik; Fieseler, Lars; Dons, Lone Elisabet

    2013-01-01

    Despite its prominent role as an intracellular human pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes normally features a saprophytic lifestyle, and shares many environmental habitats with predatory protozoa. Earlier studies claimed that Acanthamoeba may act as environmental reservoirs for L.?monocytogenes, wher......Despite its prominent role as an intracellular human pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes normally features a saprophytic lifestyle, and shares many environmental habitats with predatory protozoa. Earlier studies claimed that Acanthamoeba may act as environmental reservoirs for L.......?monocytogenes, whereas others failed to confirm this hypothesis. Our findings support the latter and provide clear evidence that L.?monocytogenes is unable to persist in Acanthamoeba castellanii and A.?polyphaga. Instead, external Listeria cells are rapidly immobilized on the surface of Acanthamoeba trophozoites...... that formation of backpacks is not specific for L.?monocytogenes, and independent of bacterial pathogenicity or virulence. Hence, backpacking appears to represent a unique and highly effective strategy of Acanthamoeba to trap and feed on motile bacteria....

  1. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes on cold-smoked salmon by nisin and carbon dioxide atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Huss, Hans Henrik; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    of nisin to CO2 packed cold-smoked salmon resulted in a 1 to 2 log reduction of L. monocytogenes followed by a lag phase of 8 and 20 days in salmon with 500 and 1000 IU nisin/g, respectively. The levels of L. monocytogenes remained below 10(3) cfu/g during 27 days of storage at both concentrations of nisin...

  2. Aerobic plate counts and ATP levels correlate with Listeria monocytogenes detection in retail delis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammons, Susan R; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Roof, Sherry; Oliver, Haley F

    2015-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes an estimated 1,591 cases of illness and 255 deaths annually in the United States, the majority of which are attributed to ready-to-eat deli meats processed in retail delis. Because retail delis distribute product directly to consumers, rapid methods to validate cleaning and sanitation are needed to improve retail food safety. This study investigated the relationships among ATP levels, standard aerobic plate count (APC), and L. monocytogenes presence in fully operational delis. Fifteen full-service delis were concurrently sampled for ATP, APC, and L. monocytogenes during preoperational hours once monthly for 3 months. Fifteen additional delis were recruited for 6 months of operational sampling (n = 30). A 1-log increase in APC was equivalent to a 3.3-fold increase in the odds of detecting L. monocytogenes (P < 0.001) and a 1.9-log increase in L monocytogenes population (P = 0.03). An ATP level increase of 1 log relative light unit correlated to a 0.22-log increase in APC (P < 0.001). A preoperational ATP level mean increase by 1 log relative light unit increased the odds of detecting L. monocytogenes concurrently fourfold. A 0.5-log increase in mean ATP level during preoperational sampling corresponded to a 2% increase in the predicted L. monocytogenes prevalence during operation (P < 0.01). Additionally, 10 statistically representative sites were identified and recommended for use in sanitation monitoring programs. Our data support the use of ATP as a rapid method to validate effective cleaning and sanitation to reduce L. monocytogenes in retail delis.

  3. Distribution of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes in the western part of the Sea of Okhotsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhova, V. E.; Sosnin, V. A.; Buzoleva, L. S.; Shakirov, R. B.

    2010-04-01

    The Amur River’s influence on the distribution of the opportunistic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes in the western part of the Sea of Okhotsk is discussed. The presence of Listeria in the seawater, sea ice, and sediments on the northeastern Sakhalin shelf and slope supports the idea of its connection with the Amur River discharge. The hypothesis of the allochtonic parentage of L. monocytogenes in the sea’s development is proved.

  4. Vascular Endograft Infection with Listeria monocytogenes reated with Surgical Debridement but without Graft Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Tanner-Steinmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The awareness of Listeria monocytogenes as a pathogen in meningitis and bacteremia in immunosuppressed patients is high. We report a case of vascular graft infection due to Listeria monocytogenes as an example of a less well-known manifestation of listeriosis and focus on the possible treatment procedures emphasizing a management with surgical debridement but preservation of the endograft, in contrast to the gold standard treatment of vascular graft infections which consists of a removal of the graft.

  5. An insight into the isolation, enumeration and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Woan-Fei Law

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB, Fraser broth and University of Vermont Medium (UVM Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as FDA-BAM, USDA-FSIS and ISO. Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, PALCAM, Oxford and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. MPN technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, DNA microarray and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labour-saving. In future, there are chances for the development of new techniques for the detection and identification of foodborne with improved features.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films With Essential Oils Against Listeria monocytogenes on Cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Gordana D.; Klaus, Anita S.; P. Niksic, Miomir

    2016-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of listeriosis, due to consumption of ready-to-eat foods and fresh, shredded, minimally processed vegetables, occurs among pregnant women and the elderly. In order to reduce the prevalence of listeriosis among consumers, better protective measures are recommended. Chitosan films, with or without added essential oils, represent a modern, safe method of preserving the quality of such vegetables and significantly reducing the incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in these foods. Objectives The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of composite chitosan-gelatin films with and without essential oils against two strains of L. monocytogenes, ATCC 19115 and ATCC 19112, in fresh shredded cabbage. Methods Shredded cabbage was inoculated with L. monocytogenes and packed between two layers of the chitosan composite film, then placed in Petri dishes. The prepared samples were stored at 4°C then analyzed for total viable count on PALCAM agar while incubated at 37°C, every 24 hours for 7 days. Results Average L. monocytogenes content ranged from 4.2 - 5.4 log CFU/g, reaching values of 7.2 - 8.6 log CFU/g in samples of untreated cabbage. A complete reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 on cabbage was achieved after 120 hours in the presence of 0.5% chitosan film, whereas reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 was achieved after 144 hours. In the presence of 1% chitosan film, the bacteria withered more quickly and complete reduction of both species of L. monocytogenes was achieved after 96 hours. Conclusions All tested formulations of chitosan films exhibited strong antimicrobial activity on the growth of both strains of L. monocytogenes on cabbage. The best effect was achieved with a 1% chitosan concentration. The addition of essential oils increased the antimicrobial activity of all tested films. PMID:27800143

  7. Incidence of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in a small-scale mushroom production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Prema; Murugesan, Latha; Knabel, Stephen J; Verghese, Bindhu; Chikthimmah, Naveen; Laborde, Luke F

    2013-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen of significant concern to the agricultural and food processing industry because of its ability to grow and persist in cool and moist environments and its association with listeriosis, a disease with a very high mortality rate. Although there have been no listeriosis outbreaks attributed to fresh mushrooms in the United States, retail surveys and recalls are evidence that L. monocytogenes contamination of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) can occur. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Listeria spp., including L. monocytogenes, in a small-scale mushroom production facility on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University in the United States. Of 184 samples taken from five production zones within the facility, 29 (15.8%) samples were positive for Listeria spp. Among the Listeria spp. isolates, L. innocua was most prevalent (10.3%) followed by L. welshimeri (3.3%), L. monocytogenes (1.6%), and L. grayi (0.5%). L. monocytogenes was recovered only from the phase I raw material composting area. Isolates of L. monocytogenes were confirmed and serotyped by multiplex PCR. The epidemiological relatedness of the three L. monocytogenes isolates to those serotypes or lineages frequently encountered in listeriosis infections was determined by multi-virulence-locus sequence typing using six virulence genes, namely, prfA, inlB, inlC, dal, clpP, and lisR. The phylogenetic positions of the three isolates in the dendrogram prepared with data from other isolates of L. monocytogenes showed that all isolates were grouped with serotype 4a, lineage IIIA. To date, this serotype has rarely been reported in foodborne disease outbreaks.

  8. Functional impact of mutational activation on the Listeria monocytogenes central virulence regulator PrfA

    OpenAIRE

    Miner, Maurine D.; Port, Gary C.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional activator PrfA is required for the expression of virulence factors necessary for Listeria monocytogenes pathogenesis. PrfA is believed to become activated following L. monocytogenes entry into the cytosol of infected host cells resulting in the induction of target genes whose products are required for bacterial intracellular growth and cell-to-cell spread. Several mutations have been identified that appear to lock PrfA into its highly activated cytosolic form (known as prf...

  9. Growth Potential of Listeria Monocytogenes and Staphylococcus Aureus on Fresh-Cut Tropical Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ke; Hu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Aili; Xu, Yongping; Sarengaowa; Li, Xiaobo; Bai, Xue

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the fate of Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and natural microbiota on fresh-cut tropical fruits (pitaya, mango, papaya and pineapple) with commercial PVC film at different storage temperature (5, 13, and 25 °C). The results showed that S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, and natural microbiota increased significantly on fresh-cut tropical fruits at 25 °C. Both pathogen and natural microbiota were able to grow on fresh-cut tropical fruits at 13 °C. The maximum population of L. monocytogenes was higher than that of S. aureus on fresh-cut tropical fruits. L. monocytogenes and S. aureus could survive without growth on fresh-cut pitaya, mango, and papaya at 5 °C. The population of L. monocytogenes declined significantly on fresh-cut pineapple at all temperature, indicating composition of fresh-cut pineapple could inhibit growth of L. monocytogenes. However, S. aureus was still able to grow on fresh-cut pineapple at storage temperature. Thus, this study suggests that 4 kinds of fresh-cut tropical fruits (pitaya, mango, papaya, and pineapple) should be stored at low temperature to extend shelf life as well as to ensure the safety of fresh-cut fruits. The data collected in this study demonstrated that L. monocytogenes and S. aureus were able to grow on fresh-cut tropical fruits at different temperatures. These results could be of interest in knowing the capacity of tropical fruits to support the growth of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. This information may also be useful to local and state regulatory officials responsible for food safety.

  10. Control of Listeria monocytogenes in turkey deli loaves using organic acids as formulation ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, T; Alvarado, C Z; Brashears, M M; Thompson, L D; McKee, S R; Berrang, M

    2009-10-01

    The growth of Listeria monocytogenes in further-processed meat products has become a major concern and an important food safety issue. The meat and poultry industries have incorporated interventions such as organic acids in marinades to inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes. In this study, organic acids were utilized in the raw product and as a postcook dip to determine their inhibitory effect on the growth of L. monocytogenes in turkey deli loaves. The turkey deli loaves were processed, cooked, cooled, inoculated with streptomycin-resistant L. monocytogenes, and then dipped. Treatments were potassium lactate (PL) in the raw product with sodium lactate (SL), sodium diacetate (SD) dip, PL with SL/PL/SD dip, SL with SL/SD dip, and SL with SL/PL/SD dip. There was also a positive (inoculated) and negative (noninoculated) control, which was dipped in distilled water. Days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 were sampled for L. monocytogenes. There were no differences (P>0.05) among the organic acid treatments in the turkey deli loaves at any time points; therefore, all of the treatments increased the lag phase of L. monocytogenes, extending the shelf-life of the product. However, there was a difference between the treatments and the positive control at d 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56. The growth of L. monocytogenes increased immediately in the positive control, whereas the negative control appeared to have no growth. These organic acids can provide meat processors with a useful method for extending the lag phase of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat and poultry products.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes incidence changes and diversity in some Brazilian dairy industries and retail products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxaran, Virginie; In Lee, Sarah Hwa; Chaul, Luiza Toubas

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a severe foodborne disease. In Brazil, despite very few reported cases of listeriosis, the pathogen has been repeatedly isolated from dairies. This has led the government to implement specific legislation to reduce the hazard. Here, we determined the ....... monocytogenes in dairies and retail products emphasize the need for continuous surveillance of this pathogen in the Brazilian dairy industry. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocins Activity Against Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Paula, Otávio Almeida Lino; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the activity of cell-free supernatant (CFS) containing bacteriocins on the formation and maintenance of biofilms developed by Listeria monocytogenes, and the associated effect of bacteriocins and ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on the formed biofilm. CFS from 9 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was tested for inhibitory activity against 85 L. monocytogenes isolates and 21 LAB strains. Then, 12 L. monocytogenes strains were selected based on genetic profiles and sensitivity to CFS and were subjected to an in vitro assay to assess biofilm formation in microtiter plates, considering different culture media and incubation conditions. Based on these results, 6 L. monocytogenes strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure to assess biofilm formation, being co-inoculated with CFS. In addition, these strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure, modified by adding the CFS after biofilm formation. Relevant decrease in biofilm formation was observed in the first experiment, but CFS added after biofilm formation did not eliminate them. CFS from Lactobacillus curvatus ET31 were selected due to its anti-biofilm activity, being associated to EDTA at different concentrations and tested for biofilm control of three strains of L. monocytogenes, using the same in vitro procedure described previously. Concentrated bacteriocin presented poor performance in eliminating formed biofilms, and EDTA concentration presented no evident interference on biofilm elimination. Twelve selected L. monocytogenes strains were positive for investigated virulence makers and negative for luxS gene, recognized as being involved in biofilm formation. Selected L. monocytogenes strains were able to produce biofilms under different conditions. CFSs have the potential to prevent biofilm formation, but they were not able to destroy already formed biofilms. Nevertheless, low concentrations of CFS combined with EDTA caused a relevant reduction in

  13. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  14. Longitudinal monitoring of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria phages in seafood processing environments in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Benjakul, Soottawat; Kim Vu, Hue Thi; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2017-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen commonly found in environments of seafood processing, thus presenting a challenge for eradication from seafood processing facilities. Monitoring the prevalence and subtype diversity of L. monocytogenes together with phages that are specific to Listeria spp. ("Listeria phages") will provide knowledge on the bacteria-phage ecology in food processing plants. In this work, a total of 595 samples were collected from raw material, finished seafood products and environmental samples from different sites of a seafood processing plant during 17 sampling visits in 1.5 years of study. L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. (non-monocytogenes) were found in 22 (3.7%) and 43 (7.2%) samples, respectively, whereas 29 Listeria phages were isolated from 9 (1.5%) phage-positive samples. DNA fingerprint analysis of L. monocytogenes isolates revealed 11 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles, with two subtypes were frequently observed over time. Our data reveal a presence of Listeria phages within the same seafood processing environments where a diverse set of L. monocytogenes subtypes was also found. Although serotype 4b was observed at lower frequency, data indicate that isolates from this seafood processing plant belonged to both epidemiologically important serotypes 1/2a and 4b, which may suggest a potential public health risk. Phages (all showed a unique genome size of 65 ± 2 kb) were classified into 9 host range groups, representing both broad- and narrow-host range. While most L. monocytogenes isolates from this facility were susceptible to phages, five isolates showed resistance to 12-20 phages. Variations in phage host range among Listeria phages isolated from food processing plant may affect a presence of a diverse set of L. monocytogenes isolates derived from the same processing environment in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular analysis of the iap gene of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from cheeses in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Análise molecular do gene iap de Listeria monocytogenes isoladas de queijos no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozi Fagundes de Mello

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The polymorphic region sequences in the iap gene were analyzed in 25 strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from cheeses in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, and compared with reference strains. This investigation distinguished two clusters of L. monocytogenes: I (20 strains and II (5 strains.A seqüência da região polimórfica do gene iap foi analisada em 25 cepas de Listeria monocytogenes isoladas de queijo no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul e comparadas com cepas referências. Esta investigação distinguiu L. monocytogenes em dois grupos: I (20 cepas e II (5 cepas.

  16. Recombinant Lipases and Phospholipases and Their Use as Biocatalysts for Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia M. Borrelli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipases and phospholipases are interfacial enzymes that hydrolyze hydrophobic ester linkages of triacylglycerols and phospholipids, respectively. In addition to their role as esterases, these enzymes catalyze a plethora of other reactions; indeed, lipases also catalyze esterification, transesterification and interesterification reactions, and phospholipases also show acyltransferase, transacylase and transphosphatidylation activities. Thus, lipases and phospholipases represent versatile biocatalysts that are widely used in various industrial applications, such as for biodiesels, food, nutraceuticals, oil degumming and detergents; minor applications also include bioremediation, agriculture, cosmetics, leather and paper industries. These enzymes are ubiquitous in most living organisms, across animals, plants, yeasts, fungi and bacteria. For their greater availability and their ease of production, microbial lipases and phospholipases are preferred to those derived from animals and plants. Nevertheless, traditional purification strategies from microbe cultures have a number of disadvantages, which include non-reproducibility and low yields. Moreover, native microbial enzymes are not always suitable for biocatalytic processes. The development of molecular techniques for the production of recombinant heterologous proteins in a host system has overcome these constraints, as this allows high-level protein expression and production of new redesigned enzymes with improved catalytic properties. These can meet the requirements of specific industrial process better than the native enzymes. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the structural and functional features of lipases and phospholipases, to describe the recent advances in optimization of the production of recombinant lipases and phospholipases, and to summarize the information available relating to their major applications in industrial processes.

  17. In vitro differential activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases of clinical isolates of Candida

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    Aurean D'Eça Júnior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Candida yeasts are commensals; however, if the balance of normal flora is disrupted or the immune defenses are compromised, Candida species can cause disease manifestations. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of Candida, including the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases in clinical isolates of Candida spp. METHODS: Eighty-two isolates from hospitalized patients collected from various sites of origin were analyzed. Phospholipase production was performed in egg yolk medium and the production of proteinase was verified in a medium containing bovine serum albumin. The study was performed in triplicate. RESULTS: Fifty-six (68.3% of isolates tested were phospholipase positive and 16 (44.4% were positive for proteinase activity. C. tropicalis was the species with the highest number of positive isolates for phospholipase (91.7%. Statistically significant differences were observed in relation to production of phospholipases among species (p<0,0001 and among the strains from different sites of origin (p=0.014. Regarding the production of acid protease, the isolates of C. parapsilosis tested presented a larger number of producers (69.2%. Among the species analyzed, the percentage of protease producing isolates did not differ statistically (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901 (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of C. non-albicans and all C. albicans isolates were great producers of hydrolytic enzymes and, consequently, might be able to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  18. Phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida spp. isolates from vulvovaginitis in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhani, S; Sepahvand, A; Mirzaee, M; Anbari, K

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida isolates from 82 vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and to study the relationship of these activities with vulvovaginitis. Totally 82 Candida isolates from vagina samples of VVC patients were randomly collected over the period between September and December 2014 from hospitalized patients at the general hospitals of Lorestan province, Iran. Isolates were previously identified by conventional mycological methods. The phospholipase and proteinase activities were evaluated by Egg yolk agar, Tween 80 opacity medium and agar plate methods. The most common Candida species was identified Candida albicans (n=34, 41.5%), followed by Candida famata (n=13, 15.8%), Candida tropicalis (n=11, 13.4%), and Candida parapsilosis (n=9, 11%). The most phospholipase activity was observed in Candida colliculosa (40%), followed by C. famata (38.5%), and Candida krusei (33.3%). The findings revealed that the correlation between phospholipase production by Candida spp. and the presence of VVC was not found to be statistically significant (P=0.91). All Candida spp. exhibited considerable proteinase activity; so that 100% of C. colliculosa, C. parapsilosis, Candida kefyr, and Candida intermedia isolates produced high proteinase activity with Pz 4+ scores. There was a significant correlation between proteinase production by Candida spp. and the presence of VVC (P=0.009). The obtained findings revealed that Candida spp. isolates may produce both virulence factors, phospholipase and proteinase. Although the phospholipase production was only observed in Candida spp. and VVC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Regulation of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in cultured chick embryonic muscle treated with phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, R; Kent, C

    1980-11-25

    Cultures of embryonic chick muscle cells grown in medium containing phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens incorporated [3H]choline into lipid at a rate 3- to 5-fold higher than control cultures. To determine the mechanism by which stimulation of phosphatidylcholine synthesis occurred in phospholipase C-treated cells, activities of enzymes and levels of intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway for phosphatidylcholine were examined. Activities of choline kinase, choline phosphotransferase, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, acylglycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, and phosphatidic acid phosphatase in phospholipase C-treated cells were the same or only slightly higher than in control cells. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, on the other hand, was 3 times as active in homogenates from phospholipase C-treated cells. Levels of phosphocholine decreased and levels of CDP-choline increased in phospholipase C-treated cells, and a calculation of the disequilibrium ratio indicated that the cytidylyltransferase reaction was not at equilibrium. The cytidylyltransferase was, thus, identified as the regulatory enzyme for choline flux in these cells. The cytidylyltransferase was located in both the cytosolic and particulate fractions from cultured muscle cells and a much larger portion of enzyme activity was associated with the particulate fraction in cells treated with phospholipase C. Sonicated preparations of total chick lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine greatly stimulated the cytosolic cytidylyltransferase activity but had no effect on the particulate enzyme. Neither stimulation of incorporation of [3H]choline into lipid nor activation of the cytidylyltransferase was dependent on protein synthesis. A model for the mechanism of regulation of phosphatidylcholine synthesis in embryonic chick muscle is presented.

  20. Research progress in phospholipase%磷脂酶研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁丽; 常明; 刘睿杰; 刘元法; 王兴国; 金青哲

    2013-01-01

    The phospholipases.including phospholipase A1,A2,B,C and D.that are a complex and crucially important group of enzymes that exit in organism and can specifically hydrolyze the intramolecular ester bond of p-hosphoglycerides releasing different products. Thus,phospholipases are widely used in phosphoglycerides transformation. The extraction of phospholipases from animal organs by the traditional means cannot meet the current industry requirements,however,the study of microbial source phospholipases and the rapid development of gene engineering not only broaden the sources of them but also improve their properties effectively. The paper reviewed the progress in the screening of the high yield strain and phospholipases molecular modification and transformation.%磷脂酶是在生物体内存在的可以水解甘油磷脂的一类酶,其中主要包括磷脂酶A1、AC、B、C和D,它们特异地作用于磷脂分子内部的各个酯键,形成不同的产物,被广泛用于甘油磷脂的改造.依靠传统手段从动物脏器中提取的磷脂酶已经不能满足目前生产的需求,而微生物来源磷脂酶的筛选及其基因工程发展迅速,显著拓宽了磷脂酶的来源,同时又有效地改善了磷脂酶的性质本文综述了近年磷脂酶高产微生物菌株的选育、磷脂酶的分子改造以及修饰方面取得的进展.

  1. Listeriosis outbreak in dairy cattle caused by an unusual Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundrant, Brittany N; Hutchins, Tony; den Bakker, Henk C; Fortes, Esther; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A listeriosis outbreak, in dairy cattle, with a high case mortality and acute death after onset of symptoms was investigated using gross pathology and bacteriologic approaches, including molecular characterization of a clinical Listeria monocytogenes isolate. In a herd of 315 animals, 9 animals showed clinical symptoms consistent with listeriosis, including 3 animals that died within 2-4 days after acute onset of clinical signs, 4 animals that were euthanized, and 2 that survived. Initial EcoRI ribotyping and serotyping indicated that this outbreak was caused by an unusual L. monocytogenes serotype 4b strain, which was classified into lineage III. Further characterization of this isolate by DNA sequencing-based subtyping methods indicated that the strain responsible for this outbreak represented a unique genotype as supported by its classification into a new sigB allelic type, which has not been identified previously among >290 isolates, and by compelling phylogenetic evidence. While lineage III isolates are generally rare, they seem to be more common among L. monocytogenes isolates from animals with clinical signs of listeriosis. This is the first report of a particularly severe clinical course of disease associated with infection by a lineage III strain. The high prevalence of Listeria spp., including L. monocytogenes, in the farm environments may favor emergence and evolution of novel, and possibly more virulent, L. monocytogenes strains. Continued monitoring of animal listeriosis cases and outbreaks may not only improve animal health but also aid in the early discovery of newly emerging L. monocytogenes strains.

  2. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated From Dairy and Meat Products

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    Bahador

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen and a serious threat to the public health in the world. Consumption of traditional foods such as dairy and meat products can be a major reason for relative abundance and isolation of these bacteria. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from dairy and meat products. Materials and Methods A total of 317 dairy products and meat-processed samples were collected. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed on each sample by the disk diffusion method (Kirby Bauer. Five reference loci were used for typing of L. monocytogenes strains by MLVA (Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis Technique. Results A total of 24 L. monocytogenes isolates were collected from the dairy and meat products. Resistance of isolated L. monocytogenes strains to penicillin G were 54.54% (from dairy products and 46.15% (from processed meat. Genetic relatedness of isolates were assessed by MLVA. Out of 13 different types, type 2 with 6 strains and type 3 with 4 strains, were the most common types. Conclusions MLVA analysis showed that samples obtained from different sources could have similar genetic profile. As a result, administration of penicillin in patients with listeriosis (especially pregnant women and antibiotic susceptibility test are recommended. The fast and accurate methods such as MLVA for tracking of pollution sources of L. monocytogenes are recommended during outbreaks.

  3. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in raw bovine milk and milk products from central highlands of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyoum, Eyasu Tigabu; Woldetsadik, Daniel Asrat; Mekonen, Tesfu Kassa; Gezahegn, Haile Alemayehu; Gebreyes, Wondwossen Abebe

    2015-11-30

    Listeria monocytogenes is of major significance in human and veterinary medicine. Most human Listeria infections are foodborne and the association of contaminated milk and dairy produce consumption with human listeriosis is noteworthy. In Ethiopia, there is limited data regarding the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in raw bovine milk and dairy products. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in raw bovine milk and dairy produce. A total of 443 milk and milk product samples were microbiologically analyzed following methods recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual to isolate Listeria spp. The overall prevalence of Listeria spp. was 28.4% and specifically that of L. monocytogenes was 5.6%. Taking the prevalence of Listeria spp. into consideration, cheese was found to be highly contaminated at 60%, followed by pasteurized milk samples (40%), raw milk (18.9%) and yoghurt (5%). Considering the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes only, raw milk had the lowest contamination while cheese had the highest, followed by pasteurized milk and yoghurt. Raw milk and milk products produced in urban and peri-urban areas of central Ethiopia were contaminated with pathogenic bacteria, L. monocytogenes. The detection of this pathogen in raw milk and milk products warrants an urgent regulatory mechanism to be put in place and also the potential role of milk processing plants in the contamination of dairy products should be investigated.

  4. Rapid and sensitive detection of Listeria monocytogenes by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Meng-Jun; Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Pu, Jun-Hua; Ge, Qing-Lian; Tang, Xiu-Jun; Gao, Yu-Shi

    2011-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was designed for detection of Listeria monocytogenes, which is an important food-borne kind of pathogenic bacteria causing human and animal disease. The primers set for the hlyA gene consist of six primers targeting eight regions on specific gene. The LAMP assay could be performed within 40 min at 65°C in a water bath. Amplification products were visualized by calcein and manganous ion and agarose gel electrophoresis. Sensitivity of the LAMP assay for detection of L. monocytogenes in pure cultures was 2.0 CFU per reaction. The LAMP assay was 100-fold higher sensitive than that of the conventional PCR assay. Taking this way, 60 chicken samples were investigated for L. monocytogenes. The accuracy of LAMP was shown to be 100% when compared to the "gold standard" culture-biotechnical, while the PCR assay failed to detect L. monocytogenes in two of the positive samples. It is shown that LAMP assay can be used as a sensitive, rapid, and simple detection tool for the detection of L. monocytogenes and will facilitate the surveillance for contamination of L. monocytogenes in food.

  5. Frequency of contamination Listeria monocytogenes of raw dried cured vacuum packed sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Daskalov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to collect actual data concerning the frequency of contamination with Listeria monocytogenes of some very popular in Bulgaria raw dried cured vacuum packed sausages, produced from October 2004 till May 2008. 148 vacuum-packed samples were taken from 9 different food business operators during all seasons of the year. The samples were analyzed according to USDA method for meat foods. Ten specimens were positive for presence of Listeria monocytogenes equal to 6,75% of all tested samples. In two other raw dried cured sausages L.welshimeri and L.innocua were found, but these species are not pathogenic for consumers. In the period before the official implementation of HACCP system (01.01.2006 in Bulgaria, 52 samples were examined and 5 Listeria monocytogenes isolates were found (~10%. 2,5 years after the HACCP implementation, 96 specimens from the same meat factories were tested and 5 Listeria monocytogenes isolates (5,2% were detected. Samples taken from lots, produced in winter time were contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes more often (7 of all 10 than specimens taken during other seasons. Data were discussed through the point of view of the effectiveness of hygienic practices and HACCP system application. Also, application of ‘microbiological criterion’ set in COMMISSION REGULATION (EC No 2073/2005 for ready-to-eat foods unable to support the growth of L. monocytogenes was considered.

  6. Characterization of a Mutant Listeria monocytogenes Strain Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Li JIANG; Hou-Hui SONG; Xue-Yan CHEN; Chun-Lin KE; Jing-Jing XU; Ning CHEN; Wei-Huan FANG

    2005-01-01

    To construct a recombinant strain of Listeria monocytogenes for the expression of heterologous genes, homologous recombination was utilized for insertional mutation, targeting its listeriolysin O gene(hly). The gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as the indicator of heterologous gene expression. The gene gfp was inserted into hly downstream from its promoter and signal sequence by an overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction, and was then cloned into the shuttle plasmid pKSV7 for allelic exchange with the L. monocytogenes chromosome. Homologous recombination was achieved by growing the electro-transformed L. monocytogenes cells on chloramphenicol plates at a non-permissive temperature.Sequencing analysis indicated correct insertion of the target gene in-frame with the signal sequence. The recombinant strain expressed GFP constitutively as revealed by fluorescence microscopy. The mutant strain L. monocytogenes hly-gfp lost its hemolytic activity as visualized on the blood agar or when analyzed with the culture supernatant samples. Such insertional mutation resulted in a reduced virulence of about 2 logs less than its parent strain L. monocytogenes 10403s as shown by the 50%-lethal-dose assays in the mouse and embryonated chicken egg models. These results thus demonstrate that mutated L. monocytogenes could be a potential carrier for the expression of heterologous passenger genes or could act as an indicator organism in the food industry.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Effect of honokiol on exotoxin proteins listeriolysin O and p60 secreted by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rizeng; Zhao, Ziwen; Guo, Na; Liu, Zonghui; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Wenli; Li, Xiaoxu; Shi, Ce; Nie, Dandan; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Tao; Ma, Wenchen; Yu, Lu; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is considered one of the most important foodborne pathogens. The virulence-related proteins listeriolysin O (LLO) and p60 are critical factors involved in Listeria pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of honokiol on LLO and p60 secreted from L. monocytogenes. A listeriolysin assay was used to investigate the haemolytic activities of L. monocytogenes exposed to honokiol, and the secretion of LLO and p60 was detected by immunoblot analysis. Additionally, the influence of honokiol on the transcription of LLO and p60 genes (hly and iap, respectively) was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR. TNF-α release assays were performed to elucidate the biological relevance of changes in LLO and p60 secretion induced by honokiol. According to the data, honokiol showed good anti-L. monocytogenes activity, with MICs of 8-16 μg ml(-1), and the secretion of LLO and p60 was decreased by honokiol. In addition, the transcription of hly and iap was inhibited by honokiol. Our results indicate that TNF-α production by RAW264.7 cells stimulated with L. monocytogenes supernatants was inhibited by honokiol. Based on these data, we propose that honokiol could be used as a promising natural compound against L. monocytogenes and its virulence factors.

  9. Susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms and planktonic cultures to hydrogen peroxide in food processing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyun Sun; Kim, Younghoon; Oh, Sejong; Jeon, Woo Min; Frank, Joseph F; Kim, Sae Hun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that Listeria monocytogenes formed biofilms on the surface of food processing equipment, and may survive sanitization treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes grown in either a biofilm or planktonic culture when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Twelve strains of biofilm-forming L. monocytogenes and their planktonic counterparts were treated with various concentrations of H(2)O(2) (1, 6, and 10%), and the cell survival was then determined at 10-min exposure intervals. When grown as a biofilm, L. monocytogenes was significantly more resistant to H(2)O(2) than under planktonic culture conditions. Planktonic L. monocytogenes strains exhibited significantly different susceptibility to 1% H(2)O(2). Equally interestingly, biofilms of the 12 L. monocytogenes strains also inhibited different survival rates after being treated with 6 and 10% H(2)O(2). However, most of the biofilms recovered to a population of 2-9 log CFU/glass fiber filter (GFF) after a 24-h re-growth period. These results indicate that there was no significant correlation between the H(2)O(2) resistance of biofilm- and planktonic-cultured cells, and suggest that different mechanisms for the resistance to sanitation or disinfection underly the persistence of certain strains in food-processing environments.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes Is Resistant to Lysozyme through the Regulation, Not the Acquisition, of Cell Wall-Modifying Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, TP; Loukitcheva, A; Zemansky, J; Wheeler, R; Boneca, IG; Portnoy, DA

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward geneti...

  11. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimenez, B.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate and model the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon.Methods and Results: Growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Enterobacteriaceae, enterococci and Photobacterium phosphoreum were determined...... in two series of challenge tests with sliced and vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon (SVP-CSS). The product contained a high level of smoke components and at 2degreesC levels of L. monocytogenes increased...

  12. Listeria monocytogenes Is Resistant to Lysozyme through the Regulation, Not the Acquisition, of Cell Wall-Modifying Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Thomas P.; Loukitcheva, Anastasia; Zemansky, Jason; Wheeler, Richard; Boneca, Ivo G.; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that is highly resistant to lysozyme, a ubiquitous enzyme of the innate immune system that degrades cell wall peptidoglycan. Two peptidoglycan-modifying enzymes, PgdA and OatA, confer lysozyme resistance on L. monocytogenes; however, these enzymes are also conserved among lysozyme-sensitive nonpathogens. We sought to identify additional factors responsible for lysozyme resistance in L. monocytogenes. A forward geneti...

  13. Lipolytic enzymes in bovine thyroid tissue. I. Subcellular localization, purification and characterization of acid phospholipase A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wolf, M; Lagrou, A; Hilderson, H J; Dierick, W

    1978-12-01

    In mammalian cells the catabolism of membrane phosphoglycerides proceeds probably entirely through a deacylation pathway catalysed by phospholipase A and lysophospholipase (Wise & Elwyn, 1965). In the initial attack of diacylphosphoglycerides by phospholipase A two enzymatic activities with different positional specificities have been distinguished: phospholipase A1 (phosphatidate 1-acyl hydrolase EN 3.1.1.32) and phospholipase A2 (phosphatidate 2-acyl hydrolase EN 3.1.1.4) (Van Deenen & De Haas, 1966). Studies on these intracellular phospholipases were mainly concerned with their subcellular localization. Only occasionally more detailed enzymatic investigations have been conducted on them, in contrast to export phospholipases e.g. from snake venom, bee venom and porcine pancreas, which have been extensively investigated (Brockerhoff & Jensen 1974a). In a previous paper (De Wolf et al., 1976a), the presence of phospholipase A1 and phospholipase A2 activities in bovine thyroid was demonstrated, using 1-[9, 10-3H] stearoyl-2-[1-14C] linoleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine as a substrate. Optimal activity was observed in both instances at pH 4. Addition of the anionic detergent sodium taurocholate increased the A2 type activity and decreased the A1 type activity suggesting the presence of different enzymes. The lack of influence of Ca2+-ions and EDTA and the acid pH optima could suggest lysosomal localization. In this paper the subcellular distribution of both acid phospholipase activities is described as well as a purification scheme for phospholipase A1. Some characteristics of the purified enzyme preparation are discussed.

  14. Calcium-independent phospholipases A2 and their roles in biological processes and diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanadham, Sasanka; Ali, Tomader; Ashley, Jason W.; Bone, Robert N.; Hancock, William D.; Lei, Xiaoyong

    2015-01-01

    Among the family of phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are the Ca2+-independent PLA2s (iPLA2s) and they are designated group VI iPLA2s. In relation to secretory and cytosolic PLA2s, the iPLA2s are more recently described and details of their expression and roles in biological functions are rapidly emerging. The iPLA2s or patatin-like phospholipases (PNPLAs) are intracellular enzymes that do not require Ca2+ for activity, and contain lipase (GXSXG) and nucleotide-binding (GXGXXG) consensus sequences. T...

  15. Secretory Phospholipase A2 Hydrolysis Phospholipid Analogs is Dependent on Water Accessibility to the Active Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Møller, Martin S.; Jørgensen, Kent

    2007-01-01

    A new and unnatural type of phospholipids with the head group attached to the 2-position of the glycerol backbone has been synthesized and shown to be a good substrate for secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2). To investigate the unexpected sPLA2 activity, we have compared three different phospholip......A new and unnatural type of phospholipids with the head group attached to the 2-position of the glycerol backbone has been synthesized and shown to be a good substrate for secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2). To investigate the unexpected sPLA2 activity, we have compared three different...

  16. Physiological damages of Listeria monocytogenes treated by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, M; Tholozan, J L; Federighi, M; Pilet, M F

    2002-11-15

    High hydrostatic pressure is a new food preservation technology known for its capacity to inactivate spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. This study investigated the damages inflicted on Listeria monocytogenes cells treated by high pressure for 10 min at 400 MPa in pH 5.6 citrate buffer. Under these conditions, no cell growth occurred after 48 h on plate count agar. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that cellular morphology was not really affected. Measuring propidium iodide (PI) staining followed by flow cytometry demonstrated that membrane integrity was damaged in a small part of the population, although the membrane potential evaluated by oxonol fluorescence or measured by analytical methods was reduced from - 86 to - 5 mV. These results for the first time showed that such combined methods as fluorescent dyes monitored by flow cytometry and physiological activity measurements provide valuable indications on cellular viability.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility of listeria monocytogenes from food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Knöchel, Susanne; Hasman, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    for susceptibility to ceftiofur, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, florfenicol, penicillin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, tiamulin, trimethoprim, and co-trimoxazole, and the disinfectants benzalkonium chloride and triclosan, by determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). All...... isolates were resistant to ceftiofur, but susceptible to the other antibiotics. A single isolate had a MIC of 4 mg/L for ciprofloxacin. For tiamulin. the MIC values were around the breakpoint used. Most isolates had MICs for triclosan at 16 mg/L. The MICs for benzalkonium chloride formed a bimodal...... distribution, with 105 isolates having a MIC of 4 mg/L and 9 isolates MICs of 16 and 32 mg/L. This study showed that Danish isolates of L. monocytogenes have not developed or acquired resistance to antimicrobial agents used for treatment or disinfection, except for benzalkonium chloride. The MICs for triclosan...

  18. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vincent F. Tablang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was complicated by hepatic encephalopathy, seizures and multi-organ failure. This case emphasizes that a high index of suspicion should be maintained for timely diagnosis and treatment. Listerial peritonitis should be suspected in patients with end-stage liver disease and inadequate response to conventional antibiotics within 48–72 h. Ampicillin/sulbactam should be initiated while awaiting results of ascitic fluid or blood culture.

  19. Infective endocarditis caused by Listeria monocytogenes forming a pseudotumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara Yonekawa, Akiko; Iwasaka, Sho; Nakamura, Hisataka; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Kadowaki, Masako; Uchida, Yujiro; Odashiro, Keita; Shimoda, Shinji; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Akashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman with breast cancer and metastasis under chemotherapy suffered from fever, pleural effusion and pericardial effusion. Despite the administration of treatment with cefozopran and prednisolone, the patient's fever relapsed. An electrocardiogram identified a new complete atrioventricular block and an echocardiogram revealed vegetation with an unusual pseudotumoral mass in the right atrium. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient was eventually diagnosed with right-sided infective endocarditis, which improved following the six-week administration of ampicillin and gentamicin. Homemade yoghurt was suspected to be the cause of infection in this case. Listeria endocarditis is rare; however, physicians should pay more attention to preventing this fatal disease in immunocompromised patients.

  20. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode...... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....

  1. Outbreak investigation identifies a single Listeria monocytogenes strain in sheep with different clinical manifestations, soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, M; Thomann, A; Böttcher, S; Frey, J; Oevermann, A

    2015-08-31

    Listeria (L.) monocytogenes causes orally acquired infections and is of major importance in ruminants. Little is known about L. monocytogenes transmission between farm environment and ruminants. In order to determine potential sources of infection, we investigated the distribution of L. monocytogenes genetic subtypes in a sheep farm during a listeriosis outbreak by applying four subtyping methods (MALDI-TOF-MS, MLST, MLVA and PFGE). L. monocytogenes was isolated from a lamb with septicemia and from the brainstem of three sheep with encephalitis. Samples from the farm environment were screened for the presence of L. monocytogenes during the listeriosis outbreak, four weeks and eight months after. L. monocytogenes was found only in soil and water tank swabs during the outbreak. Four weeks later, following thorough cleaning of the barn, as well as eight months later, L. monocytogenes was absent in environmental samples. All environmental and clinical L. monocytogenes isolates were found to be the same strain. Our results show that the outbreak involving two different clinical syndromes was caused by a single L. monocytogenes strain and that soil and water tanks were potential infection sources during this outbreak. However, silage cannot be completely ruled out as the bales fed prior to the outbreak were not available for analysis. Faeces samples were negative, suggesting that sheep did not act as amplification hosts contributing to environmental contamination. In conclusion, farm management appears to be a crucial factor for the limitation of a listeriosis outbreak.

  2. Eugenol in combination with lactic acid bacteria attenuates Listeria monocytogenes virulence in vitro and in invertebrate model Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Upadhyaya, Indu; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human enteric pathogen that causes severe foodborne illness in high-risk populations. Crossing the intestinal barrier is the first critical step for Listeria monocytogenes infection. Therefore, reducing L. monocytogenes colonization and invasion of intestinal epithelium and production of virulence factors could potentially control listeriosis in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentration (SIC) of the plant-derived antimicrobial eugenol, either alone, or in combination with five lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely Bifidobacterium bifidum (NRRL-B41410), Lactobacillus reuteri (B-14172), Lactobacillus fermentum (B-1840), Lactobacillus plantarum (B-4496) and Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis (B-633) in reducing Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to and invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Additionally, the effect of the aforementioned treatments on Listeria monocytogenes listeriolysin production, epithelial E-cadherin binding and expression of virulence genes was investigated. Moreover, the in vivo efficacy of eugenol-LAB treatments in reducing Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the invertebrate model Galleria mellonella was studied. Eugenol and LAB, either alone or in combination, significantly reduced Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to and invasion of intestinal cells (P eugenol-LAB treatments decreased Listeria monocytogenes haemolysin production, E-cadherin binding and virulence gene expression (P eugenol-LAB treatments significantly enhanced the survival rates of G. mellonella infected with lethal doses of Listeria monocytogenes (P eugenol either alone or in combination with LAB, and justify further investigations in a mammalian model.

  3. The survival of Listeria monocytogenes during long term desiccation is facilitated by sodium chloride and organic material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Mordhorst, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    One specific DNA-subtype, as determined by RAPD, of Listeria monocytogenes persisted in a fish slaughterhouse for years, even during months with no production where the plant was cleaned and kept dry. We hypothesised that tolerance to desiccation could be a factor in explaining the persistence of L...... monocytogenes in food processing environments and the purpose of the present study was to determine ability of L monocytogenes to survive desiccation on stainless steel under simulated food processing conditions. Viable counts of eight different L. monocytogenes strains exposed to different soils and relative...... humidities (RHs) during desiccation decreased significantly (p...

  4. Modeling the inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis on poultry products exposed to pulsed UV light

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keklik, Nene M; Demirci, Ali; Puri, Virendra M; Heinemann, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed UV light inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium on unpackaged and vacuum-packaged chicken breast, Listeria monocytogenes on unpackaged and vacuum-packaged chicken frankfurters, and Salmonella...

  5. Structural comparison of phospholipase-A2-binding regions in phospholipase-A2 receptors from various mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, K; Ishizaki, J; Kishino, J; Ohara, O; Arita, H

    1994-10-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequence of a mouse cDNA encoding the receptor for pancreatic group I phospholipase A2 (PLA2-I). Interspecies structural comparison of the mouse receptor with bovine PLA2-I receptor, whose structure had been clarified, revealed that the fourth carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD)-like domain (CRD-like 4) was the most conserved among the domains in the PLA2-I receptor, suggesting the functional importance of CRD-like 4. A transient expression experiment with a truncated form of the receptor consisting of three CRD-like domains, from the third to the fifth, demonstrated that the PLA2-I-binding site of the receptor is constituted from these three CRD-like domains, supporting the functional indispensability of CRD-like 4 in the receptor. Since the PLA2-I-binding region was thus assigned to be CRD-like domains 3-5, we further analyzed the structures of the PLA2-I-binding regions in the PLA2-I receptors from the rat, rabbit and human. Furthermore, the obtained PLA2-I receptor cDNA fragments from these animals made it possible to examine the tissue expression patterns of this receptor in various mammals. The results, together with the results of the genomic structural analysis of this gene, indicated that a PLA2 receptor recently characterized by Lambeau et al. [Lambeau, G., Ancian, P., Barhanin, J. & Lazdunski, M. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 1575-1578] is a rabbit counterpart of the PLA2-I receptor although these two PLA2 receptors have distinctive PLA2-binding specificities.

  6. Cardiolipin hydrolysis by human phospholipases A2. The multiple enzymatic activities of human cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, A G; Kinkaid, A R; Wilton, D C

    1998-02-05

    The ability of mammalian phospholipases A2 (PLA2) to hydrolyse cardiolipin (diphosphatidylglycerol) was monitored with a fluorescent displacement assay which allows the use of natural phospholipid substrates. The mammalian enzymes used were porcine pancreatic (Group I) secretory PLA2 (sPLA2), human non-pancreatic (Group II) sPLA2 and human cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2). High activity was observed with porcine pancreas sPLA2 whereas the human sPLA2 demonstrated only minimal activity with this substrate. In comparison, sPLA2 from Naja naja venom (Group I) also showed only modest activity with this substrate. Since many lipases possess PLA1 activity, a representative enzyme from Rhizopus arrhizus was also assessed for its ability to hydrolyse cardiolipin which proved to be a good substrate for this fungal lipase. In all cases dilysocardiolipin was the major product while some monolyso intermediate was detected after chromatographic separation. Human cPLA2 was unable to hydrolyse cardiolipin at a significant rate, however, both monolysocardiolipin and dilysocardiolipin, which are prepared by the PLA2-catalysed hydrolysis of cardiolipin, were good substrates providing a further example of the extensive lysophospholipase activity of this enzyme. Moreover, cardiolipin that was initially hydrolysed in situ with either excess porcine pancreatic PLA2 or R. arrhizus lipase (PLA1) was subsequently hydrolysed by human cPLA2. One explanation of this result is that human cPLA2 is able to hydrolyse both 1-acyl and 2-acyl-lysophospholipids. (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. L-glutamine Induces Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, Lior; Burg-Golani, Tamar; Sigal, Nadejda; Rose, Jessica; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2017-01-01

    The high environmental adaptability of bacteria is contingent upon their ability to sense changes in their surroundings. Bacterial pathogen entry into host poses an abrupt and dramatic environmental change, during which successful pathogens gauge multiple parameters that signal host localization. The facultative human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes flourishes in soil, water and food, and in ~50 different animals, and serves as a model for intracellular infection. L. monocytogenes identifies host entry by sensing both physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (e.g., metabolite concentrations) factors. We report here that L-glutamine, an abundant nitrogen source in host serum and cells, serves as an environmental indicator and inducer of virulence gene expression. In contrast, ammonia, which is the most abundant nitrogen source in soil and water, fully supports growth, but fails to activate virulence gene transcription. We demonstrate that induction of virulence genes only occurs when the Listerial intracellular concentration of L-glutamine crosses a certain threshold, acting as an on/off switch: off when L-glutamine concentrations are below the threshold, and fully on when the threshold is crossed. To turn on the switch, L-glutamine must be present, and the L-glutamine high affinity ABC transporter, GlnPQ, must be active. Inactivation of GlnPQ led to complete arrest of L-glutamine uptake, reduced type I interferon response in infected macrophages, dramatic reduction in expression of virulence genes, and attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. These results may explain observations made with other pathogens correlating nitrogen metabolism and virulence, and suggest that gauging of L-glutamine as a means of ascertaining host localization may be a general mechanism. PMID:28114430

  8. Stochastically modeling Listeria monocytogenes growth in farm tank milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Isabelle; Pouillot, Régis; Denis, Jean-Baptiste

    2005-10-01

    This article presents a Listeria monocytogenes growth model in milk at the farm bulk tank stage. The main objective was to judge the feasibility and value to risk assessors of introducing a complex model, including a complete thermal model, within a microbial quantitative risk assessment scheme. Predictive microbiology models are used under varying temperature conditions to predict bacterial growth. Input distributions are estimated based on data in the literature, when it is available. If not, reasonable assumptions are made for the considered context. Previously published results based on a Bayesian analysis of growth parameters are used. A Monte Carlo simulation that forecasts bacterial growth is the focus of this study. Three scenarios that take account of the variability and uncertainty of growth parameters are compared. The effect of a sophisticated thermal model taking account of continuous variations in milk temperature was tested by comparison with a simplified model where milk temperature was considered as constant. Limited multiplication of bacteria within the farm bulk tank was modeled. The two principal factors influencing bacterial growth were found to be tank thermostat regulation and bacterial population growth parameters. The dilution phenomenon due to the introduction of new milk was the main factor affecting the final bacterial concentration. The results show that a model that assumes constant environmental conditions at an average temperature should be acceptable for this process. This work may constitute a first step toward exposure assessment for L. monocytogenes in milk. In addition, this partly conceptual work provides guidelines for other risk assessments where continuous variation of a parameter needs to be taken into account.

  9. Symptomatic hydrocephalus in a newborn infected with listeria monocytogenes Hidrocefalia sintomática em um recém-nascido infectado com Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía L. Laciar

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes produce a wide range of clinical symptoms which include cerebral abscesses, meningitis and nonmeningitic parenchymal cerebritis. A case study is presented of early listeriosis with signs of meningitis accompanied with septicemia and complicated with severe hydrocephalus.As infecções do sistema nervoso central produzidas por Listeria monocytogenes provocam una grande variedade de sintomas clínicos que incluem abscessos cerebrais, meningites e cerebrites parenquimáticas não meningíticas. Apresenta-se um caso de listeriose precoce com sinais de meningite acompanhada de septicemia e agravado com hidrocefalia grave.

  10. Sequence homology between phospholipase and its inhibitor in snake venom. The primary structure of phospholipase A2 of vipoxin from the venom of the Bulgarian viper (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes, Serpentes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheva, I; Kleinschmidt, T; Aleksiev, B; Braunitzer, G

    1987-04-01

    The amino-acid sequence of phospholipase A2 from the neurotoxin vipoxin of the Bulgarian Viper (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes, Serpentes) is presented. The enzyme consists of 122 amino-acid residues including 7 disulfide bonds and thus belongs to phospholipases A2 group IIA. The sequence was determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact chain and of the peptides obtained after tryptic hydrolysis of the oxidized chain. The short cleavage time of 30 min and another limited tryptic digestion of the oxidized and citraconylated chain provided overlapping peptides. Sequencing was done with liquid- and gas-phase sequenators. The complete alignment of all peptides was facilitated by the high degree of homology with known viperid venom phospholipases A2. In common with mammalian phospholipases, the tryptophan residue in position 30 (essential for enzymatic activity) as well as the histidine in position 47 in the active site are present. Vipoxin phospholipase A2 shows 53.3% homology with another phospholipase A2 from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom (Ammodytoxin B), whereas 62% homology was found between both subunits of vipoxin phospholipase A2 and its inhibitor. This high degree of identity can be accounted for in terms of a common origin by gene duplication.

  11. Epidemiological Survey of Listeria monocytogenes in a gravlax salmon processing line Epidemiologia de Listeria monocytogenes em uma linha de processamento de salmão gravlax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D. Cruz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a cause of concern to food industries, mainly for those producing ready-to-eat (RTE products. This microorganism can survive processing steps such as curing and cold smoking and is capable of growing under refrigeration temperatures. Its presence in RTE fish products with extended shelf life may be a risk to the susceptible population. One example of such a product is gravlax salmon; a refrigerated fish product not exposed to listericidal processes and was the subject of this study. In order to evaluate the incidence and dissemination of L. monocytogenes 415 samples were collected at different steps of a gravlax salmon processing line in São Paulo state, Brazil. L. monocytogenes was confirmed in salmon samples (41%, food contact surfaces (32%, non-food contact surfaces (43% and of food handlers' samples (34%, but could not be detected in any ingredient. 179 L. monocytogenes isolates randomly selected were serogrouped and typed by PFGE. Most of L. monocytogenes strains belonged to serogroup 1 (73%. 61 combined pulsotypes were found and a dendrogram identified six clusters: most of the strains (120 belonged to cluster A. It was suggested that strains arriving into the plant via raw material could establish themselves in the processing environment contaminating the final product. The wide dissemination of L. monocytogenes in this plant indicates that a great effort has to be taken to eliminate the microorganism from these premises, even though it was not observed multiplication of the microorganism in the final product stored at 4ºC up to 90 days.Listeria monocytogenes é um patógenode grande preocupação para as indústrias alimentícias, principalmente aquelas produtoras de alimentos prontos para consumo (RTE. Este microrganismo pode sobreviver às etapas de cura e defumação a frio, além de tolerar temperaturas de refrigeração. A presença de L. monocytogenes em pescados RTE com vida de prateleira longa

  12. Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Simon, Tabassome; Exeter, Holly J.; Folkersen, Lasse; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guardiola, Montse; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Carruthers, Kathryn F.; Horne, Benjamin D.; Brunisholz, Kimberly D.; Mega, Jessica L.; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Li, Mingyao; Leusink, Maarten; Trompet, Stella; Verschuren, Jeffrey J.W.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Dehghan, Abbas; Nelson, Christopher P.; Kotti, Salma; Danchin, Nicolas; Scholz, Markus; Haase, Christiane L.; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Staines-Urias, Eleonora; Goel, Anuj; van 't Hooft, Ferdinand; Gertow, Karl; de Faire, Ulf; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Tremoli, Elena; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Holdt, Lesca M.; Beutner, Frank; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Breitling, Lutz P.; Brenner, Hermann; Thiery, Joachim; Dallmeier, Dhayana; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Hofker, Marten H.; Tedgui, Alain; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Adamkova, Vera; Pitha, Jan; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cramer, Maarten J.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Klungel, Olaf H.; Kumari, Meena; Whincup, Peter H.; Morrow, David A.; Braund, Peter S.; Hall, Alistair S.; Olsson, Anders G.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Trip, Mieke D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Koenig, Wolfgang; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Teupser, Daniel; Day, Ian N.M.; Carlquist, John F.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Morris, Richard W.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Poledne, Rudolf; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Keating, Brendan J.; van der Harst, Pim; Price, Jackie F.; Mehta, Shamir R.; Yusuf, Salim; Witteman, Jaqueline C.M.; Franco, Oscar H.; Jukema, J. Wouter; de Knijff, Peter; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Rader, Daniel J.; Farrall, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kivimaki, Mika; Fox, Keith A.A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Palmer, Tom M.; Eriksson, Per; Paré, Guillaume; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Mallat, Ziad; Casas, Juan P.; Talmud, Philippa J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease. Background Higher circulating levels of sPLA2-IIA mass or sPLA2 enzyme activity have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, it is not clear if this association is causal. A recent phase III clinical trial of an sPLA2 inhibitor (varespladib) was stopped prematurely for lack of efficacy. Methods We conducted a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis of 19 general population studies (8,021 incident, 7,513 prevalent major vascular events [MVE] in 74,683 individuals) and 10 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cohorts (2,520 recurrent MVE in 18,355 individuals) using rs11573156, a variant in PLA2G2A encoding the sPLA2-IIA isoenzyme, as an instrumental variable. Results PLA2G2A rs11573156 C allele associated with lower circulating sPLA2-IIA mass (38% to 44%) and sPLA2 enzyme activity (3% to 23%) per C allele. The odds ratio (OR) for MVE per rs11573156 C allele was 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98 to 1.06) in general populations and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.90 to 1.03) in ACS cohorts. In the general population studies, the OR derived from the genetic instrumental variable analysis for MVE for a 1-log unit lower sPLA2-IIA mass was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96 to 1.13), and differed from the non-genetic observational estimate (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.61 to 0.79). In the ACS cohorts, both the genetic instrumental variable and observational ORs showed a null association with MVE. Instrumental variable analysis failed to show associations between sPLA2 enzyme activity and MVE. Conclusions Reducing sPLA2-IIA mass is unlikely to be a useful therapeutic goal for preventing cardiovascular events. PMID:23916927

  13. Moderate alcohol consumption and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Berg, R. van den; Kok, F.J.; Helander, A.; Vermunt, S.H.F.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims: To investigate the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress and whether these effects are modified by BMI. Methods and results: Eleven lean (BMI: 18.5-25 kg/m2) and 9 overweight (BMI

  14. Hydrolysis of synthetic mixed-acid phosphatides by phospholipase A from human pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, L.L.M. van; Haas, Gerard H. de; Heemskerk, C.H.Th.

    1963-01-01

    An investigation was made into the action of a human pancreatic phospholipase A on various synthetic phosphatides. L-α-Phosphatidyl ethanolamines were readily hydrolysed in an aqueous system by this enzyme. Synthetic lecithins, however, were not attacked in an appreciable rate by the mammalian phosp

  15. Modification of the tetrodotoxin receptor in Electrophorus electricus by phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J K

    1981-08-06

    The effects of phospholipase A2 treatment on the tetrodotoxin receptors in Electrophorus electricus was studied. (1) The binding of [3H]tetrodotoxin to electroplaque membranes was substantially reduced by treatment of the membranes with low concentrations of phospholipase A2 from a number of sources, including bee venom, Vipera russelli and Crotalus adamanteus and by beta-bungarotoxin. (2) Phospholipase A2 from bee venom and from C. adamanteus both caused extensive hydrolysis of electroplaque membrane phospholipids although the substrate specificity differed. Analysis of the phospholipid classes hydrolyzed revealed a striking correlation between loss of toxin binding and hydrolysis of phosphatidylethanolamine but not of phosphatidylserine. (3) The loss of toxin binding could be partially reversed by treatment of the membranes with bovine serum albumin, conditions which are known to remove hydrolysis products from the membrane. (4) Equilibrium binding studies on the effects of phospholipase A2 treatment of [3H]tetrodotoxin binding showed that the reduction reflected loss of binding sites and not a change in affinity. (5) These results are interpreted in terms of multiple equilibrium states of the tetrodotoxin-receptors with conformations determined by the phospholipid environment.

  16. Lactadherin inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 activity on pre-apoptotic leukemia cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Steffen; Novakovic, Valerie A.; Rasmussen, Jan Trige

    2013-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) is a critical component of insect and snake venoms and is secreted by mammalian leukocytes during inflammation. Elevated secretory PLA2 concentrations are associated with autoimmune diseases and septic shock. Many sPLA2’s do not bind to plasma membranes...

  17. The action of cobra venom phospholipase A2 isoenzymes towards intact human erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, B.; Sibenius Trip, M.; Verheij, H.M.; Zevenbergen, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    1. 1. Cobra venom phospholipase A2 from three different sources has been fractionated into different isoenzymes by DEAE ion-exchange chromatography. 2. 2. Treatment of intact human erythrocytes with the various isoenzymes revealed significant differences in the degree of phosphatidylcholine hydroly

  18. Phospholipase A(2) - An enzyme that is sensitive to the physics of its substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Lise Pernille Kristine; Jørgensen, Kent; Mouritsen, O.G.

    2002-01-01

    A simple statistical mechanical model of lipid bilayers is proposed to account for the non-equilibrium action of the enzyme phospholipase A(2). The enzyme hydrolyses lipid-bilayer substrates and produces product molecules that lead to local variations in the bilayer interfacial pressure. Computer...

  19. Molecular and genetics approaches for investigation of phospholipase D role in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volotovsky I. D.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of publications ñoncerning the role of phospholipase D (PLD in regulation of metabolism in plant cells. Analysis of molecular and genetic studies suggest that PLD is an important component of various hormonal and stress signaling pathways

  20. Phytophthora infestans has a plethora of phospholipase D enzymes including a subclass that has extracellular activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.J.G.; Hassen, H.H.; Govers, F.

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, an

  1. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of fluorogenic phospholipids and evaluation in assays of phospholipases A, C and D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piel, Mathilde S.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Brask, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    lyso-(dansyl-FA)-GPE-dabcyl (6) and (dansyl-FA)2-GPE-dabcyl (7) were synthesized by a chemoenzymatic strategy, in which preparation of (6) further included a novel selective enzymatic esterification step. As proof of concept, activity of a handful of phospholipases, one from each of the PLA1, PLA2, PLC...

  2. Effect of synthetic and natural phospholipids on N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gitte; Pedersen, Anders H; Pickering, Darryl S

    2009-01-01

    by the action of a phospholipase D enzyme (NAPE-PLD). Anandamide, OEA, and PEA are all bioactive lipids that may influence, amongst others: neuroinflammation, food intake, and oocyte implantation. Here we have synthesized a number of NAPE analogues with variation in the phosphoester structure. The NAPE...

  3. Elevated plasma phospholipase A2 and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Denizot

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical study reports that blood levels of the pro-inflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF did not change in colorectal cancer patients. In contrast, plasma levels of two enzymatic activities, one implicated in PAF production (i.e. phospholipase A2 and one in PAF degradation (i.e. PAF acetylhydrolase activity were significantly elevated.

  4. Bactericidal properties of group IIA and group V phospholipases A2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grönroos, J.O.; Laine, V.J.O.; Janssen, M.J.W.; Egmond, M.R.; Nevalainen, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Group V phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a recently characterized 14-kDa secretory PLA2 of mammalian heart and macrophage-derived cells. Group IIA PLA2, which is structurally close to group V PLA2, has been shown to kill Gram-positive bacteria in vitro and to prevent symptoms of Gram-positive infection in

  5. Hydrolysis of synthetic mixed-acid phosphatides by phospholipase A from human pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, L.L.M. van; Haas, Gerard H. de; Heemskerk, C.H.Th.

    1963-01-01

    An investigation was made into the action of a human pancreatic phospholipase A on various synthetic phosphatides. L-α-Phosphatidyl ethanolamines were readily hydrolysed in an aqueous system by this enzyme. Synthetic lecithins, however, were not attacked in an appreciable rate by the mammalian phosp

  6. Hydrolysis of synthetic mixed-acid phosphatides by phospholipase A from human pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, L.L.M. van; Haas, Gerard H. de; Heemskerk, C.H.Th.

    1963-01-01

    An investigation was made into the action of a human pancreatic phospholipase A on various synthetic phosphatides. L-α-Phosphatidyl ethanolamines were readily hydrolysed in an aqueous system by this enzyme. Synthetic lecithins, however, were not attacked in an appreciable rate by the mammalian

  7. Synthesis of structured phospholipids by immobilized phospholipase A2 catalyzed acidolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Xu, Xuebing

    2007-01-01

    Acyl modification of the sn-2 position in phospholipids (PLs) was conducted by acidolysis reaction using immobilized phospholipase A2 (PLA2) as the catalyst. In the first stage we screened different carriers for their ability to immobilize PLA2. Several carriers were able to fix the enzyme...

  8. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of fluorogenic phospholipids and evaluation in assays of phospholipases A, C and D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Mathilde S; Peters, Günther H J; Brask, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipases are ubiquitous in nature and the target of significant research aiming at both their physiological roles and technical applications in e.g. the food industry. In the search for sensitive and selective phospholipase assays, we have focused on synthetic FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) substrates. This has led to the development of a facile, easily scalable and low cost synthesis of fluorogenic phospholipids featuring the dansyl/dabcyl fluorophore/quencher-pair on the fatty acid ω-position and on the phosphatidylethanolamine head group, respectively. Hence, the two substrates lyso-(dansyl-FA)-GPE-dabcyl (6) and (dansyl-FA)2-GPE-dabcyl (7) were synthesized by a chemoenzymatic strategy, in which preparation of (6) further included a novel selective enzymatic esterification step. As proof of concept, activity of a handful of phospholipases, one from each of the PLA1, PLA2, PLC and PLD classes, were assayed using substrates (6) and (7), and the kinetic parameter kcat/KM was determined. The PLA1 (Lecitase Ultra™) was found to be highly active on both substrates, whereas the PLD (from white cabbage) had no activity, presumably due to steric effects associated with the dabcyl-functionalization of the head group. It was further substantiated that the substrates are specific towards phospholipase activity as the tested lipase (Lipolase™) showed close to zero activity.

  9. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and coronary calcification - The Rotterdam coronary calcification study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardys, Isabella; Oei, Hok-Hay S.; Hofman, Albert; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Although several studies have recently suggested that lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an independent predictor of coronary events, only one study has examined the association between Lp-PLA2 and coronary calcification, using young adults. We investigated the associat

  10. X-ray structure of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at atomic resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, RA; Rozeboom, HJ; Kalk, KH; Murshudov, GN; Wilson, KS; Dijkstra, BW

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation and a CCD camera, X-ray data have been collected from wild-type bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at 100 K to 0.97 Angstrom resolution allowing full anisotropic refinement. The final model has a conventional R factor of 9.44% for all reflections, with a mean standard u

  11. Didecanoyl phosphatidylcholine is a superior substrate for assaying mammalian phospholipase D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Jensen, T.; Morgan, C.P.;

    1996-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) activity in crude or solubilized membranes from mammalian tissues is difficult to detect with the current assay techniques, unless a high radioactive concentration of substrate and/or long incubation times are employed. Generally, the enzyme has to be extracted and partially...

  12. Relationship between erythrocyte membrane phase properties and susceptibility to secretory phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Katrina B; Ohran, Allison J; Hawes, Andrea C; Hazlett, Theodore L; Gratton, Enrico; Judd, Allan M; Bell, John D

    2002-11-26

    Normally, cell membranes resist hydrolysis by secretory phospholipase A(2). However, upon elevation of intracellular calcium, the cells become susceptible. Previous investigations demonstrated a possible relationship between changes in lipid order caused by increased calcium and susceptibility to phospholipase A(2). To further explore this relationship, we used temperature as an experimental means of manipulating membrane physical properties. We then compared the response of human erythrocytes to calcium ionophore at various temperatures in the range of 20-50 degrees C using fluorescence spectroscopy and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. The steady state fluorescence emission of the environment-sensitive probe, laurdan, revealed that erythrocyte membrane order decreases systematically with temperature throughout this range, especially between 28 and 45 degrees C. Furthermore, the ability of calcium ionophore to induce increased membrane order and susceptibility to phospholipase A(2) depended similarly on temperature. Both responses to calcium influx were enhanced as membrane fluidity increased. Analysis of the spatial distribution of laurdan fluorescence at several temperatures indicated that the ordering effect of intracellular calcium on fluid membranes generates an increase in the number of fluid-solid boundaries. Hydrolysis of the membrane appeared to progress outward from these boundaries. We conclude that phospholipase A(2) prefers to hydrolyze lipids in fluid regions of human erythrocyte membranes, but primarily when those regions coexist with domains of ordered lipids.

  13. The action of cobra venom phospholipase A2 isoenzymes towards intact human erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, B.; Sibenius Trip, M.; Verheij, H.M.; Zevenbergen, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    1. 1. Cobra venom phospholipase A2 from three different sources has been fractionated into different isoenzymes by DEAE ion-exchange chromatography. 2. 2. Treatment of intact human erythrocytes with the various isoenzymes revealed significant differences in the degree of phosphatidylcholine hydroly

  14. Moderate alcohol consumption and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Berg, van den R.; Kok, F.J.; Helander, A.; Vermunt, S.H.F.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims To investigate the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress and whether these effects are modified by BMI. Methods and results Eleven lean (BMI: 18.5¿25 kg/m2) and 9 overweight (BMI &g

  15. A secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuroprotection and anti-apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howells David W

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipase A2 liberates free fatty acids and lysophospholipids upon hydrolysis of phospholipids and these products are often associated with detrimental effects such as inflammation and cerebral ischemia. The neuroprotective effect of neutral phospholipase from snake venom has been investigated. Results A neutral anticoagulant secretory phospholipase A2 (nPLA from the venom of Naja sputatrix (Malayan spitting cobra has been found to reduce infarct volume in rats subjected to focal transient cerebral ischemia and to alleviate the neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Real-time PCR based gene expression analysis showed that anti-apoptotic and pro-survival genes have been up-regulated in both in vivo and in vitro models. Staurosporine or OGD mediated apoptotic cell death in astrocytoma cells has also been found to be reduced by nPLA with a corresponding reduction in caspase 3 activity. Conclusion We have found that a secretory phospholipase (nPLA purified from snake venom could reduce infarct volume in rodent stroke model. nPLA, has also been found to reduce neuronal cell death, apoptosis and promote cell survival in vitro ischemic conditions. In all conditions, the protective effects could be seen at sub-lethal concentrations of the protein.

  16. Evolution of a Rippled Membrane during Phospholipase A2 Hydrolysis Studied by Time-Resolved AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent;

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) for lipid membrane curvature is explored by monitoring, through time-resolved atomic force microscopy, the hydrolysis of supported double bilayers in the ripple phase. The ripple phase presents a corrugated morphology. PLA2 is shown to have higher activi...

  17. Phospholipase D activation correlates with microtubule reorganization in living plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Dhonukshe; A.M. Laxalt; J. Goedhart; Th.W.J. Gadella; T. Munnik

    2003-01-01

    A phospholipase D (PLD) was shown recently to decorate microtubules in plant cells. Therefore, we used tobacco BY-2 cells expressing the microtubule reporter GFP-MAP4 to test whether PLD activation affects the organization of plant microtubules. Within 30 min of adding n-butanol, a potent activator

  18. Structure of Bovine Pancreatic Phospholipase A2 at 1.7Å Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kalk, Kor H.; Hol, Wim G.J.; Drenth, Jan

    1981-01-01

    The crystal structure of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 has been refined to 1.7 Å resolution. The starting model for this refinement was the previously published structure at a resolution of 2.4 Å. This model was adjusted to the multiple isomorphous replacement map with Diamond’s real space refi

  19. Molecular Cloning and Expression of a Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drayer, A. Lyndsay; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1992-01-01

    A number of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases C (PLC) of different species have recently been cloned. The predicted amino acid sequences of these isoforms contain two highly conserved domains. Here we report the identification of a PLC gene of Dictyostelium by using the polymerase chain

  20. Differential phospholipid-labeling suggests two subtypes of phospholipase D in rat Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, L.; Hansen, Harald S.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the transphosphatidylation activity of phospholipase D (PLD) under different substrate labeling conditions, in order to investigate whether PLD in rat Leydig cells exhibited any substrate preferences for the alkyl- or acyl-form of phosphatidylcholine (P...

  1. Characteristics and Lethality of a Novel Recombinant Dermonecrotic Venom Phospholipase D from Hemiscorpius lepturus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Elham; Behdani, Mahdi; Hosseininejad Chafi, Mohammad; Moazzami, Reza; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Khalaj, Vahid; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Pooshang Bagheri, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Hemoscorpius lepturus is the most medically important scorpion in Iran. The clinical signs of H. lepturus envenomation are remarkably similar to those reported for brown spiders, including dermonecrosis, hematuria, renal failure and even death. The lethality and toxicity of brown spiders’ venom have been attributed to its phospholipase D activity. This study aims to identify a phospholipase D with possible lethality and dermonecrotic activity in H. lepturus venom. In this study, a cDNA library of the venom glands was generated by Illumina RNA sequencing. Phospholipase D (PLD) from H. lepturus was characterized according to its significant similarity with PLDs from brown spiders. The main chain designated as Hl-RecPLD1 (the first recombinant isoform of H. lepturus PLD) was cloned, expressed and purified. Sphingomyelinase, dermonecrotic and lethal activities were examined. Hl-PLD1 showed remarkable sequence similarity and structural homology with PLDs of brown spiders. The conformation of Hl-PLD1 was predicted as a “TIM beta/alpha-barrel”. The lethal dose 50 (LD50) and dermonecrotic activities of Hl-RecPLD1 were determined as 3.1 µg/mouse and 0.7 cm2 at 1 µg respectively. It is the first report indicating that a similar molecular evolutionary mechanism has occurred in both American brown spiders and this Iranian scorpion. In conclusion, Hl-RecPLD1 is a highly active phospholipase D, which would be considered as the lethal dermonecrotic toxin in H. lepturus venom. PMID:28335389

  2. Reducing levels of Listeria monocytogenes contamination on raw salmon with acidified sodium chlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Cheng; Morrissey, Michael T

    2003-05-01

    The antimicrobial activity of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) against Listeria monocytogenes in salmon was studied. Raw salmon (whole fish and fillets) inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10(3) CFU/cm2 or 10(4) CFU/g) were washed with ASC solution (50 ppm) for 1 min and stored at -18 degrees C for 1 month (whole salmon) or in ice for 7 days (fillets). L. monocytogenes populations were determined for whole salmon after frozen storage and for fillets on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of storage. A wash with ASC solution followed by ASC glazing did not reduce L. monocytogenes on the skin of whole salmon during frozen storage. However, the wash resulted in an L. monocytogenes reduction of 0.5 log CFU/g for salmon fillets. The populations of L. monocytogenes in fillets increased slowly during ice storage, but the growth of these populations was retarded by ASC ice. By day 7, the populations were 0.25 log units smaller in fillets stored in ASC ice and 0.62 log units smaller in fillets that had been washed with ASC solution and stored in ASC ice than in control fillets. Treatment with ASC also reduced total plate counts (TPCs) by 0.43 log CFU/cm2 on the skin of whole salmon and by 0.31 log CFU/g in fillets. The TPCs for skin decreased during frozen storage but increased gradually for fillets stored at 5 degrees C or in ice. However, TPCs of ASC-treated samples were lower than those for controls at any point during the study. Washing with ASC solution significantly (P < 0.05) reduced TPCs on the skin of whole salmon and in fillets, as well as L. monocytogenes in fillets. The antimicrobial activity of ASC was enhanced when salmon was washed with ASC solution and stored in ASC ice.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Nisin on Listeria monocytogenes Inoculated into Surimi and Minced Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rezaei

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Listeria monocytogenes has already established as an important food born pathogen which induce listeriosis in human. Use of bacteriocins to provide food safety has been increased dramatically. Nisin has a wide spectrum inhibitory effect than the other bacteriocins and inhibits food-borne pathogens such as L. monocytogenes and many other Gram-positive spoilage microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Nisin on population of Listeria monocytogenes and the role of changes in food components on the antilisterial properties of Nisin. Materials & Methods: The minced meat and surimi samples were inoculated by 1×104 cfu/g of L. monocytogenes. Then samples exposed to Nisin at the levels of 500 or 1000 IU/g were prepared. All treatments after packaging in plastic bags were kept for 12 days at refrigerator temperature. Samples were cultured on CHROMagarTM Listeria every 2 days and the number of listeria monocytogenes was counted. Results: two different concentrations of Nisin (500 or 1000 IU/g was not able to inhibit L. monocytogenes below the acceptable level for raw food (100 cells per g in minced meat and surimi of silver carp. But the number of bacteria reduces more in fish surimi as compared to the mince meal. Also, antilisterial activity of Nisin was reduced during the storage period. Conclusion: Inhibitory property of Nisin against L. monocytogenes in surimi significantly was higher than the minced (P<0.05. So it is possible the antilisterial properties of Nisin will increase by elimination of some enzymes during processing.

  5. Examination of Listeria monocytogenes in Seafood Processing Facilities and Smoked Salmon in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Dara; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Zaouali, Sarah; Jordan, Kieran

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, a relatively rare but life-threatening disease primarily affecting immunocompromised individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in the seafood processing industry in the Republic of Ireland. The occurrence of L. monocytogenes was determined by regular sampling of both food samples and processing environment swabs at eight seafood processing facilities over two calendar years. All samples were analyzed by the International Organization for Standardization 11290-1 standard method, and the isolates were characterized by PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, serotyping, and the occurrence of some genes related to survival under stress (SSI-1, Tn6188, and bcrABC). A prevalence of 2.5% in 508 samples (433 environmental swabs and 75 food samples) was found. From the isolates obtained, eight different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles were identified, two occurring in more than one facility and one occurring in food and the environment. Five of the eight pulsotypes identified contained at least one of the three stress survival-related genes tested. The tolerance of the isolates to benzalkonium chloride, a representative quaternary ammonium compound, was also examined and ranged from 5.5 ± 0.5 to 8.5 ± 0.5 ppm of benzalkonium chloride. To evaluate the ability of smoked salmon to support the growth of L. monocytogenes, including the T4 widespread pulsotype that was isolated, a challenge test was performed on cold-smoked salmon obtained from two separate producers. The results showed clearly that both types of smoked salmon supported the growth of L. monocytogenes. Although occurrence of L. monocytogenes on seafood was low, this study showed that the smoked salmon used in this study can support the growth of L. monocytogenes; therefore, vigilance is required in the processing facilities to reduce the associated risk.

  6. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes by real-time PCR in processed meat and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Eun Jeong; Song, Bo Ra; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Young Jo; Moon, Jin San; Wee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Seok; Yoon, Yohan

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in different ready-to-eat foods using real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Various concentrations (10(0) to 10(5) CFU/ml) of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 were inoculated into ham, sausage, ground meat, processed milk, cheese, and infant formula. L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 in the samples was then enumerated on Oxford agar, and DNA was extracted from the samples before and after incubation at 36°C for 4 h. A set of primers and hybridization probe designed in this study was then used to detect the pathogen. The standard curve was then prepared by plotting cycle threshold values for each dilution versus L. monocytogenes cell counts (log CFU). The specificity of the set of primers and hybridization probe was appropriate. A 4-h incubation at 36°C before DNA extraction produced optimum standard curves in comparison to the results for a 0-h incubation. Thus, a 4-h incubation at 36°C was applied for monitoring L. monocytogenes in collected food samples. To monitor L. monocytogenes in foods, 533 samples (ham, 129; sausage, 226; ground meat, 72; processed cheese, 54; processed milk, 42; and infant formula, 10) were collected from retail markets and from the step before pasteurization in plants. Of all 533 samples, 4 samples (0.8%) showed positive signals in RT-PCR. Two samples from hams (1.6%) and two samples from sausages (0.9%) were determined to be positive for L. monocytogenes at processed meat and milk products.

  7. Tolerance to quaternary ammonium compound disinfectants may enhance growth of Listeria monocytogenes in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Schirmer, Bjørn C T; Heir, Even; Fagerlund, Annette; Hjemli, Pernille; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-01-16

    The antibacterial effect of disinfectants is crucial for the control of Listeria monocytogenes in food processing environments. Tolerance of L. monocytogenes to sublethal levels of disinfectants based on quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) is conferred by the resistance determinants qacH and bcrABC. The presence and distribution of these genes have been anticipated to have a role in the survival and growth of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments where QAC based disinfectants are in common use. In this study, a panel of 680 L. monocytogenes from nine Norwegian meat- and salmon processing plants were grouped into 36 MLVA profiles. The presence of qacH and bcrABC was determined in 101 isolates from the 26 most common MLVA profiles. Five MLVA profiles contained qacH and two contained bcrABC. Isolates with qacH and bcrABC showed increased tolerance to the QAC Benzalkonium chloride (BC), with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 5-12, 10-13 and monocytogenes when the sample BC levels were high (>100ppm). A sample with lower BC concentrations (14ppm of chain length C-12 and 2.7ppm of chain length C-14) inhibited growth of L. monocytogenes not containing bcrABC or qacH, compared to strains with these genes. The study has shown that L. monocytogenes harbouring the QAC resistance genes qacH and bcrABC are prevalent in the food industry and that residuals of QAC may be present in concentrations after sanitation in the industry that result in a growth advantage for bacteria with such resistance genes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the Galleria mellonella insect larvae model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakic Martinez, Mira; Ferguson, Martine; Datta, Atin R.

    2017-01-01

    Several animal models have been used to understand the molecular basis of the pathogenicity, infectious dose and strain to strain variation of Listeria monocytogenes. The greater wax worm Galleria mellonella, as an alternative model, provides some useful advantages not available with other models and has already been described as suitable for the virulence assessment of various pathogens including L. monocytogenes. The objectives of this study are: 1) confirming the usefulness of this model with a wide panel of Listeria spp. including non-pathogenic L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri and animal pathogen L. ivanovii; 2) assessment of virulence of several isogenic in-frame deletion mutants in virulence and stress related genes of L. monocytogenes and 3) virulence assessment of paired food and clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes from 14 major listeriosis outbreaks occurred worldwide between 1980 and 2015. Larvae injected with different concentrations of Listeria were incubated at 37°C and monitored over seven days for time needed to kill 50% of larvae (LT50) and to determine change of bacterial population in G. mellonella, 2 and 24 hours post-inoculation. Non-pathogenic members of Listeria and L. ivanovii showed significantly (P monocytogenes strains. Isogenic mutants of L. monocytogenes with the deletions in prfA, plcA, hly, actA and virR genes, also showed significantly (P monocytogenes strains related to non-invasive (gastroenteritis) outbreaks of listeriosis showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower virulence than isolates of the same serotype obtained from outbreaks with invasive symptoms. The difference, however, was dose and strain- dependent. No significant differences in virulence were observed among the serotype tested in this study. PMID:28898264

  9. Evolution and Diversity of Listeria monocytogenes from Clinical and Food Samples in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a significant foodborne pathogen causing severe systemic infections in humans with high mortality rates. The objectives of this work were to establish a phylogenetic framework of L. monocytogenes from China and to investigate sequence diversity among different serotypes. We selected 17 L. monocytogenes strains recovered from patients and foods in China representing serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 1/2c. Draft genome sequences were determined using Illumina MiSeq technique and associated protocols. Open reading frames were assigned using prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline by NCBI. Twenty-four published genomes were included for comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis. More than 154,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified from multiple genome alignment and used to reconstruct maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree. The 41 genomes were differentiated into lineages I and II, which consisted of 4 and 11 subgroups, respectively. A clinical strain from China (SHL009 contained significant SNP differences compared to the rest genomes, whereas clinical strain SHL001 shared most recent common ancestor with strain SHL017 from food. Moreover, clinical strains SHL004 and SHL015 clustered together with two strains (08-5578 and 08-5923 recovered from an outbreak in Canada. Partial sequences of a plasmid found in the Canadian strain were also present in SHL004. We investigated the presence of various genes and gene clusters associated with virulence and subgroup-specific genes, including internalins, L. monocytogenes pathogenicity islands (LIPIs, L. monocytogenes genomic islands (LGIs, stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/cas system. A novel genomic island, denoted as LGI-2 was identified. Comparative sequence analysis revealed differences among the L. monocytogenes strains related to virulence, survival abilities, and attributes against foreign genetic

  10. Metal ion homeostasis in Listeria monocytogenes and importance in host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Helen E; Roberts, Ian S; Cavet, Jennifer S

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for one of the most life-threatening food-borne infections and the leading cause of food-poisoning associated deaths in the UK. Infection may be of the unborn/newly born infant where disease may manifest as listeric abortion, stillbirth or late-onset neonatal listeriosis, while in adults, infection usually affects the central nervous system causing meningitis. Crucial to the survival of L. monocytogenes, both inside and outside the host, is its ability to acquire metals which act as cofactors for a broad range of its cellular proteins. However, L. monocytogenes must also protect itself against the innate toxicity of metals. The importance of metals in host-pathogen interactions is illustrated by the restriction of metals (including zinc and iron) in vertebrates in response to infection and the use of high levels of metals (copper and zinc) as part of the antimicrobial defences within host phagocytes. As such, L. monocytogenes is equipped with various mechanisms to tightly control its cellular metal pools and avoid metal poisoning. These include multiple DNA-binding metal-responsive transcription factors, metal-acquisition, metal-detoxification and metal-storage systems, some of which represent key L. monocytogenes virulence determinants. This review discusses current knowledge of the role of metals in L. monocytogenes infections, with a focus on the mechanisms that contribute to zinc and copper homeostasis in this organism. The requirement to precisely control cellular metal levels may impose a vulnerability to L. monocytogenes which can be exploited in antimicrobials and therapeutics.

  11. Leucocins 4010 from Leuconostoc carnosum cause a matrix related decrease in intracellular pH of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Weihuan; Budde, Birgitte Bjørn; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A mixed culture of single cells of Listeria monocytogenes and the bacteriocin producing Leuconostoc carnosum 4010 showed growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes, although the intracellular pH (pHi) of L. monocytogenes followed by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy was not affected. Furthermore, L...

  12. Phospholipase D family member 4, a transmembrane glycoprotein with no phospholipase D activity, expression in spleen and early postnatal microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Yoshikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phospholipase D (PLD catalyzes conversion of phosphatidylcholine into choline and phosphatidic acid, leading to a variety of intracellular signal transduction events. Two classical PLDs, PLD1 and PLD2, contain phosphatidylinositide-binding PX and PH domains and two conserved His-x-Lys-(x(4-Asp (HKD motifs, which are critical for PLD activity. PLD4 officially belongs to the PLD family, because it possesses two HKD motifs. However, it lacks PX and PH domains and has a putative transmembrane domain instead. Nevertheless, little is known regarding expression, structure, and function of PLD4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PLD4 was analyzed in terms of expression, structure, and function. Expression was analyzed in developing mouse brains and non-neuronal tissues using microarray, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. Structure was evaluated using bioinformatics analysis of protein domains, biochemical analyses of transmembrane property, and enzymatic deglycosylation. PLD activity was examined by choline release and transphosphatidylation assays. Results demonstrated low to modest, but characteristic, PLD4 mRNA expression in a subset of cells preferentially localized around white matter regions, including the corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter, during the first postnatal week. These PLD4 mRNA-expressing cells were identified as Iba1-positive microglia. In non-neuronal tissues, PLD4 mRNA expression was widespread, but predominantly distributed in the spleen. Intense PLD4 expression was detected around the marginal zone of the splenic red pulp, and splenic PLD4 protein recovered from subcellular membrane fractions was highly N-glycosylated. PLD4 was heterologously expressed in cell lines and localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Moreover, heterologously expressed PLD4 proteins did not exhibit PLD enzymatic activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results showed that PLD4 is a non

  13. Genome comparison of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4a strain HCC23 with selected lineage I and lineage II L. monocytogenes strains and other Listeria strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Paul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by specific serotypes within genetic lineages I and II. The genome sequence of Listeria monocytogenes lineage III strain HCC23 (serotype 4a enables whole genomic comparisons across all three L. monocytogenes lineages. Protein cluster analysis indicated that strain HCC23 has the most unique protein pairs with nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua. Orthology analysis of the genome sequences of representative strains from the three L. monocytogenes genetic lineages and L. innocua (CLIP11262 identified 319 proteins unique to nonpathogenic strains HCC23 and CLIP11262 and 58 proteins unique to pathogenic strains F2365 and EGD-e. BLAST comparison of these proteins with all the sequenced L. monocytogenes and L. innocua revealed 126 proteins unique to serotype 4a and/or L. innocua; 14 proteins were only found in pathogenic serotypes. Some of the 58 proteins unique to pathogenic strains F2365 and EGD-e were previously published and are already known to contribute to listerial virulence.

  14. Stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1) survey in Listeria monocytogenes reveals an insert common to listeria innocua in sequence type 121 L. monocytogenes strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Ingeborg; Klinger, Sonja; Dooms, Maxime; Flekna, Gabriele; Stessl, Beatrix; Leclercq, Alexandre; Hill, Colin; Allerberger, Franz; Wagner, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes strains (n = 117) were screened for the presence of stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1). SSI-1(+) strains (32.5%) belonged mainly to serotypes 1/2c, 3b, and 3c. All sequence type 121 (ST-121) strains included (n = 7) possessed homologues to Listeria innocua genes lin0464 and lin0465 instead of SSI-1.

  15. Expression of enzymatically inactive wasp venom phospholipase A1 in Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Borodina

    Full Text Available Wasp venom allergy is the most common insect venom allergy in Europe. It is manifested by large local reaction or anaphylactic shock occurring after a wasp sting. The allergy can be treated by specific immunotherapy with whole venom extracts. Wasp venom is difficult and costly to obtain and is a subject to composition variation, therefore it can be advantageous to substitute it with a cocktail of recombinant allergens. One of the major venom allergens is phospholipase A1, which so far has been expressed in Escherichia coli and in insect cells. Our aim was to produce the protein in secreted form in yeast Pichia pastoris, which can give high yields of correctly folded protein on defined minimal medium and secretes relatively few native proteins simplifying purification.Residual amounts of enzymatically active phospholipase A1 could be expressed, but the venom protein had a deleterious effect on growth of the yeast cells. To overcome the problem we introduced three different point mutations at the critical points of the active site, where serine137, aspartate165 or histidine229 were replaced by alanine (S137A, D165A and H229A. All the three mutated forms could be expressed in P. pastoris. The H229A mutant did not have any detectable phospholipase A1 activity and was secreted at the level of several mg/L in shake flask culture. The protein was purified by nickel-affinity chromatography and its identity was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The protein could bind IgE antibodies from wasp venom allergic patients and could inhibit the binding of wasp venom to IgE antibodies specific for phospholipase A1 as shown by Enzyme Allergo-Sorbent Test (EAST. Moreover, the recombinant protein was allergenic in a biological assay as demonstrated by its capability to induce histamine release of wasp venom-sensitive basophils.The recombinant phospholipase A1 presents a good candidate for wasp venom immunotherapy.

  16. Exosomes account for vesicle-mediated transcellular transport of activatable phospholipases and prostaglandins[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subra, Caroline; Grand, David; Laulagnier, Karine; Stella, Alexandre; Lambeau, Gérard; Paillasse, Michael; De Medina, Philippe; Monsarrat, Bernard; Perret, Bertrand; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc; Record, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are bioactive vesicles released from multivesicular bodies (MVB) by intact cells and participate in intercellular signaling. We investigated the presence of lipid-related proteins and bioactive lipids in RBL-2H3 exosomes. Besides a phospholipid scramblase and a fatty acid binding protein, the exosomes contained the whole set of phospholipases (A2, C, and D) together with interacting proteins such as aldolase A and Hsp 70. They also contained the phospholipase D (PLD) / phosphatidate phosphatase 1 (PAP1) pathway leading to the formation of diglycerides. RBL-2H3 exosomes also carried members of the three phospholipase A2 classes: the calcium-dependent cPLA2-IVA, the calcium-independent iPLA2-VIA, and the secreted sPLA2-IIA and V. Remarkably, almost all members of the Ras GTPase superfamily were present, and incubation of exosomes with GTPγS triggered activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2)and PLD2. A large panel of free fatty acids, including arachidonic acid (AA) and derivatives such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandinJ2 (15-d PGJ2), were detected. We observed that the exosomes were internalized by resting and activated RBL cells and that they accumulated in an endosomal compartment. Endosomal concentrations were in the micromolar range for prostaglandins; i.e., concentrations able to trigger prostaglandin-dependent biological responses. Therefore exosomes are carriers of GTP-activatable phospholipases and lipid mediators from cell to cell. PMID:20424270

  17. Expression of Phospholipases A2 and C in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreville, Solange; Coulombe, Stéphanie; Carrier, Patrick; Gelb, Michael H.; Guérin, Sylvain L.; Salesse, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To achieve a better understanding of the involvement of phospholipases in the inflammation and wound-healing processes in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs), expression of phospholipase A2s (PLA2s) and phospholipase Cs (PLCs) was examined in the human corneal epithelium. Methods Specific primers were designed for RT-PCR amplification of the known secreted (s)PLA2, cytosolic (c)PLA2, and PLC mRNAs. Corresponding PCR products were cloned and the DNA sequenced. Immunofluorescence of flatmounted corneal sections and Western blot analyses were used to detect the PLA2s and PLCs expressed by HCECs. Results The mRNAs for the following phospholipases were detected by RT-PCR in the HCECs: sPLA2GIII, -GX, and -GXIIA; cPLA2α and -γ; PLCβ1, -β2, -β3, -β4, -γ1, -γ2, -δ1, -δ3, -δ4, and -ε. Immunofluorescence analyses conducted on corneal epithelium cryosections and Western blot on freshly isolated HCECs demonstrated the presence of sPLA2GIII, -GX, and -GXIIA; cPLA2α and -γ; and PLCβ2, -β3, -γ1, -γ2, and -δ3. Conclusions Many phospholipase isoforms are expressed by HCECs and may play a major role in signal transduction (PLCs) as well as in the release of precursors of potent mediators of inflammation, such as leukotrienes and prostaglandins (PLA2s). Moreover, the sPLA2s expressed by the corneal epithelium could be involved in the normal antibacterial activity in the tears and in wound healing. PMID:15505048

  18. Biocontrole de Listeria monocytogenes por Pediococcus acidilactici em couve minimamente processada Biocontrol of Listeria monocytogenes by Pediococcus acidilactici in fresh-cut kale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanessa Altimiras Costa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou um sistema de biocontrole para inibição de Listeria monocytogenes em couve minimamente processada, objetivando sua segurança durante estocagem sob refrigeração e em condições de abuso de temperatura. O potencial inibitório de bactérias láticas tolerantes ao sal e psicrotróficas contaminantes naturais da couve e Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC 9649 e Lactobacillus casei CCT 1465 foram avaliadas contra L. monocytogenes. O isolado de couve identificado como P. acidilactici CCA3 inibiu L. monocytogenes a 10 e 15 °C em ágar MRS e foi selecionado como possível agente de biocontrole. O número de L. monocytogenes na couve minimamente processada aumentou 3,7 e 4,7 ciclos logarítmicos a 5 e 10 °C, respectivamente, após 20 dias de armazenamento e 4,6 ciclos logarítmicos após oito dias a 15 °C. Entretanto, quando 10(8 UFC.g-1 de P. acidilactici CCA3 foram inoculados no produto processado, o crescimento de L. monocytogenes reduziu 2,3 ciclos logarítmicos sob temperatura abusiva de 15 °C. A acidez titulável e as características sensoriais da couve não foram alteradas pela presença de CCA3 ao longo do período de vida útil. Estes resultados sugerem o potencial de aplicação dos bioconservantes na couve minimamente processada, que necessitam estar associados à refrigeração e sanitização para garantir segurança.This study evaluated a biological control system for the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in minimally processed kale focusing on its freshness under refrigeration and extreme temperatures. The inhibitory potential of salt and cold tolerant lactic bacteria from natural microflora of kale, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC 9649, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus casei CCT 1465 strains were evaluated against L. monocytogenes. Pediococcus acidilactici CCA3 isolated from kale exhibited a large inhibition zone of L. monocytogenes at 10 and 15 °C in MRS agar and was

  19. Self-contained chlorine dioxide generation and delivery pods for controlling Listeria monocytogenes in model floor drains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that has been associated with poultry products. This organism is ubiquitous in nature and has been found to enter poultry further processing plants on incoming raw product. Once in the plant, L. monocytogenes can become a long term persistent colonize...

  20. Gene expression profiling of a nisin-sensitive Listeria monocytogenes Scott A CtsR deletion mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of significant threat to public health. Nisin is the only bacteriocin that can be used as a food preservative. Due to its antimicrobial activity, it can be used to control Listeria monocytogenes in food; however, the antimicrobial mechanism of nisin ...

  1. Population Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4b Isolates from Sporadic Human Listeriosis in the United States, 2003-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes can cause severe foodborne disease (listeriosis). Serotype 4b strains have resulted in numerous outbreaks, repeatedly involving three epidemic clones (ECI, ECII, and ECIa). Little is known about population structure of L. monocytogenes serotype 4b from sporadic listeriosis, ev...

  2. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain...

  3. Low, medium and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes exhibits sophisticated adaptive mechanisms to counteract higher levels of lethal acid, heat, salt or oxidative stresses after pre-exposure to sublethal concentrations of homogenous stress. A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with initi...

  4. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  5. Effect of salt, smoke compound and temperature on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in salmon during simulated smoking processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In smoked fish processes, smoking is the only step that is capable of inactivating pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, that contaminate the raw fish. The objectives of this study were to examine and develop a model to describe the survival of L. monocytogenes in salmon as affected by salt, s...

  6. Occurrence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes Recovered from Blue Crab Meat and Blue Crab Processing Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the environment. The ubiquitous nature of this bacterium can result in contamination of foods. Listeriosis is a food-borne disease caused by consumption of L. monocytogenes-contaminated food. It is a public health problem of low incidence but high mort...

  7. Determining If Phylogenetic Relatedness of Listeria Monocytogenes Isolates Corresponds to Persistence in Poultry Processing Plants Using Whole-Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Controlling Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat meat and poultry products and in food processing facilities is challenging. Surveys have found that some L. monocytogenes types are more persistent in processing facilities than others, but the reason is unknown. It is possible persist...

  8. Spatial and Temporal Factors Associated with an Increased Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Spinach Fields in New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While rain and irrigation events have been associated with an increased prevalence of foodborne pathogens in produce production environments, quantitative data are needed to determine the effects of various spatial and temporal factors on the risk of produce contamination following these events. This study was performed to quantify these effects and to determine the impact of rain and irrigation events on the detection frequency and diversity of Listeria species (including L. monocytogenes) and L. monocytogenes in produce fields. Two spinach fields, with high and low predicted risks of L. monocytogenes isolation, were sampled 24, 48, 72, and 144 to 192 h following irrigation and rain events. Predicted risk was a function of the field's proximity to water and roads. Factors were evaluated for their association with Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation by using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). In total, 1,492 (1,092 soil, 334 leaf, 14 fecal, and 52 water) samples were collected. According to the GLMM, the likelihood of Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolation from soil samples was highest during the 24 h immediately following an event (odds ratios [ORs] of 7.7 and 25, respectively). Additionally, Listeria species and L. monocytogenes isolates associated with irrigation events showed significantly lower sigB allele type diversity than did isolates associated with precipitation events (P = monocytogenes contamination. Small changes in management practices (e.g., not irrigating fields before harvest) may therefore reduce the risk of L. monocytogenes contamination of fresh produce. PMID:26116668

  9. Growth control of Listeria monocytogenes on cold-smoked salmon using a competitive lactic acid bacteria flora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Gram, Lone; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    . sake LKE5 caused strong sulfurous off-flavors and was rejected as a culture for biopreservation of cold-smoked salmon. A bacteriocin-producing strain of C. piscicola (A9b) initially caused a 7-day lag phase of L. monocytogenes, followed by a reduction in numbers of L. monocytogenes from 10(3) CFU...

  10. A study on the effects of some laboratory-derived genetic mutations on biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.; Parvathi, A.; George, J.; Krohne, G.; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya

    and transmission of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat products in retail and food service environments. J Food Prot 70: 2172-2198 McLaughlan AM, Foster SJ (1998). Molecular characterization of an autolytic amidase of Listeria monocytogenes EGD. Microbiol...

  11. In vitro activity of naturally occurring peptides (defensins against Listeria monocytogenes Ação in vitro de peptídeos naturais (defensinas sobre Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça F. Nascimento

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoclaved distilled water samples were inoculated with L. monocytogenes strain V7 and strain VPH-1, and incubated aerobically, at 30 C for 48 hours. Each strain was tested individually, and growth curves were determined at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 21, 24, and 48 hours. The growth or survival of L. monocytogenes was similar for both strains, with survivors at 24 hour-incubation. The microbicidal activity of one synthetic cationic peptide (NP-2 was examined against L. monocytogenes strain V7, in a water system. Antibacterial activity of NP-2 (1, 5, and 10 g/ml was best expressed at 60 minute-incubation, with 10 g/ml of peptide, at 30 C.Amostras de água destilada, autoclavadas, foram inoculadas com L. monocytogenes cepa V7 e cepa VPH-1, e incubadas, aerobicamente, a 30ºC por 48 horas. Cada cepa foi testada individualmente, e determinou-se curvas de crescimento a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 21, 24, e 48 horas. O crescimento ou sobrevivência das duas cepas foi semelhante e encontrou-se sobreviventes em 24 horas de incubação. Examinou-se a atividade bactericida de um dos peptídeos catiônicos sintéticos (NP-2 contra L. monocytogenes cepa V7, em sistema aquoso. A atividade antibacteriana de NP-2 (1, 5, and 10µg/ml foi melhor aos 60 minutos de incubação, com 10µg/ml de peptídeo, a 30 C.

  12. Effect of gamma-irradiation on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes and allergenicity of cherry tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoriki, Setsuko; Bari, Latiful; Kitta, Kazumi; Ohba, Mika; Ito, Yasuhiro; Tsujimoto, Yuka; Kanamori, Norihito; Yano, Erika; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Yukio; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2009-07-01

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh produce is a growing concern because of the possibility of food-borne illness. Ionizing radiation is an effective non-thermal means of eliminating pathogenic bacteria in fresh produce; however, the effect of ionizing irradiation on the allergenic properties of the host commodities remains unknown. This study aimed (i) to determine the effective dose of gamma-irradiation in eliminating L. monocytogenes on whole cherry tomatoes and (ii) to evaluate the effect of gamma-irradiation on the allergenic properties of tomato proteins. Cherry tomatoes that were inoculated with a mixture of five L. monocytogenes strains were treated with gamma-rays from a 60Co source. A 1.25 kGy dose of gamma-irradiation was found to be sufficient to eliminate L. monocytogenes on whole cherry tomatoes. The immunoblot profile of serum samples obtained from two patients with tomato allergy revealed that gamma-irradiation did not affect the allergenicity of tomato proteins for up to 7 days after irradiation when the tomatoes were stored at 20 °C. Additionally, the m-RNA levels of β-fructofuranosidase, polygalacturonase, pectin esterase, and superoxide dismutase, the main allergenic proteins in tomato, were not affected by the applied irradiation dose. Thus, this study demonstrated that a 1.25 kGy dose of gamma-irradiation effectively eliminates L. monocytogenes on cherry tomatoes without affecting the expression of allergenic proteins in the fruits.

  13. Suppression of Listeria monocytogenes by the Native Micro-Flora in Teewurst Sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michline Brice

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern consumers are interested in the use of non-chemical methods to control pathogens when heat sterilization is not an option. Such is the case with teewurst sausage, a raw spreadable sausage and a popular German commodity. Although Listeria was not found in teewurst, the optimal microbial growing conditions of teewurst coupled with the ubiquity of L. monocytogenes in nature, makes the possibility of contamination of products very possible. This pilot study was conducted to examine teewurst’s native micro-flora’s ability to suppress the outgrowth of L. monocytogenes at 10 °C using standard plate counts and PCR-DGGE. Traditional plating methods showed L. monocytogenes growth significantly decreased when in competition with the teewurst’s native micro-flora (p < 0.05. The native micro-flora of the teewurst suppressed the overall growth of L. monocytogenes by an average of two logs, under these conditions. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE amplicons with unique banding patterns were extracted from DGGE gel for identification. Brochothrix thermosphacta and Lactobacillus curvatus were identified as a part of the teewurst’s native micro-flora. Although the native micro-flora did not decrease L. monocytogenes to below limits of detection, it was enough of a decrease to warrant further investigation.

  14. Route of Infection Determines the Impact of Type I Interferons on Innate Immunity to Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Kernbauer

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen which causes mild to life threatening disease in humans. Ingestion of contaminated food delivers the pathogen to the gastrointestinal tract, where it crosses the epithelial barrier and spreads to internal organs. Type I interferons (IFN-I are produced during infection and decrease host resistance after systemic delivery of L. monocytogenes. Here we show that mice benefit from IFN-I production following infection with L. monocytogenes via the gastrointestinal route. Intragastric infection lead to increased lethality of IFN-I receptor chain 1-deficient (Ifnar1-/- animals and to higher bacterial numbers in liver and spleen. Compared to infection from the peritoneum, bacteria infecting via the intestinal tract localized more often to periportal and pericentral regions of the liver and less frequently to the margins of liver lobes. Vigorous replication of intestine-borne L. monocytogenes in the livers of Ifnar1-/- mice 48 h post infection was accompanied by the formation of large inflammatory infiltrates in this organ and massive death of surrounding hepatocytes. This was not observed in Ifnar1-/- mice after intraperitoneal infection. The inflammatory response to infection is shaped by alterations in splenic cytokine production, particularly IFNγ, which differs after intragastric versus intraperitoneal infection. Taken together, our data suggest that the adverse or beneficial role of a cytokine may vary with the route of infection and that IFN-I are not harmful when infection with L. monocytogenes occurs via the natural route.

  15. Efficacy of Acetic Acid against Listeria monocytogenes Attached to Poultry Skin during Refrigerated Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Fandos, Elena; Herrera, Barbara

    2014-09-11

    This work evaluates the effect of acetic acid dipping on the growth of L. monocytogenes on poultry legs stored at 4 °C for eight days. Fresh inoculated chicken legs were dipped into either a 1% or 2% acetic acid solution (v/v) or distilled water (control). Changes in mesophiles, psychrotrophs, Enterobacteriaceae counts and sensorial characteristics (odor, color, texture and overall appearance) were also evaluated. The shelf life of the samples washed with acetic acid was extended by at least two days over the control samples washed with distilled water. L. monocytogenes counts before decontamination were 5.57 log UFC/g, and after treatment with 2% acetic acid (Day 0), L. monocytogenes counts were 4.47 log UFC/g. Legs washed with 2% acetic acid showed a significant (p acetic acid. This study demonstrates that while acetic acid did reduce populations of L. monocytogenes on meat, it did not completely inactivate the pathogen. The application of acetic acid may be used as an additional hurdle contributing to extend the shelf life of raw poultry and reducing populations of L. monocytogenes.

  16. Effect of gamma-irradiation on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes and allergenicity of cherry tomatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoriki, Setsuko [National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)], E-mail: setsuko@affrc.go.jp; Bari, Latiful; Kitta, Kazumi; Ohba, Mika; Ito, Yasuhiro; Tsujimoto, Yuka [National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Kanamori, Norihito [Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8686 (Japan); Yano, Erika; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Yukio [School of Agriculture, Kinki University, Nara-city, Nara 631-8505 (Japan); Kawamoto, Shinichi [National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh produce is a growing concern because of the possibility of food-borne illness. Ionizing radiation is an effective non-thermal means of eliminating pathogenic bacteria in fresh produce; however, the effect of ionizing irradiation on the allergenic properties of the host commodities remains unknown. This study aimed (i) to determine the effective dose of gamma-irradiation in eliminating L. monocytogenes on whole cherry tomatoes and (ii) to evaluate the effect of gamma-irradiation on the allergenic properties of tomato proteins. Cherry tomatoes that were inoculated with a mixture of five L. monocytogenes strains were treated with gamma-rays from a {sup 60}Co source. A 1.25 kGy dose of gamma-irradiation was found to be sufficient to eliminate L. monocytogenes on whole cherry tomatoes. The immunoblot profile of serum samples obtained from two patients with tomato allergy revealed that gamma-irradiation did not affect the allergenicity of tomato proteins for up to 7 days after irradiation when the tomatoes were stored at 20 deg. C. Additionally, the m-RNA levels of {beta}-fructofuranosidase, polygalacturonase, pectin esterase, and superoxide dismutase, the main allergenic proteins in tomato, were not affected by the applied irradiation dose. Thus, this study demonstrated that a 1.25 kGy dose of gamma-irradiation effectively eliminates L. monocytogenes on cherry tomatoes without affecting the expression of allergenic proteins in the fruits.

  17. Characterization and antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from poultry and red meat in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Ennaji

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hayat Ennaji1,2, Mohammed Timinouni2, My Mustapha Ennaji3, Mohammed Hassar1, Nozha Cohen11Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Hygiène des Aliments et de l’Environnement, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 2Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Biologie Moléculaire, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 3Laboratoire de Virologie et Hygiène and Microbiologie., Faculté des Sciences et Techniques - Mohammedia, Université Hassan II, Mohammedia, MoroccoAbstract: This study was carried out on 426 samples of raw meats collected from butcheries and supermarkets in Casablanca, Morocco. The samples were examined for the occurrence of Listeria species. Strains of Listeria monocytogenes were characterized by several biochemical tests and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. β-hemolytic cultures and nonhemolytic isolates were tested for biochemical properties with the Listeria API test. Among the 43 Listeria species isolates; we identified 10 strains for L. monocytogenes (23.3%, 31 strains for L. innocua (72.1% and 2 strains for L. welshimeri (4.6%. Strains of L. monocytogenes were separated by multiplex PCR; two serogroups IIb and IVb were thus differentiated. Antibiotic susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to 21 antibiotics was determined by the disk diffusion method. All isolates were susceptible to a wide range of the tested antibiotics with the exception of nalidixic acid, colistine and cephalosporins second and third generation for which they were all resistant.Keywords: antibiotic susceptibility, Listeria monocytogenes, meat, PCR

  18. High-pressure processing of Gorgonzola cheese: influence on Listeria monocytogenes inactivation and on sensory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carminati, D; Gatti, M; Bonvini, B; Neviani, E; Mucchetti, G

    2004-08-01

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes on the rind of Gorgonzola cheese is difficult to avoid. This contamination can easily occur as a consequence of handling during ripening. The aims of this study were to determine the efficiency of high-pressure processing (HPP) for inactivation of L. monocytogenes on cheese rind and to evaluate the influence of HPP treatments on sensory characteristics. Gorgonzola cheese rinds, after removal, were inoculated (about 7.0 log CFU/g) with L. monocytogenes strains previously isolated from other Gorgonzola cheeses. The inoculated cheese rinds were processed with an HPP apparatus under conditions of pressure and time ranging from 400 to 700 MPa for 1 to 15 min. Pressures higher than 600 MPa for 10 min or 700 MPa for 5 min reduced L. monocytogenes more than 99%. A reduction higher than 99.999% was achieved pressurizing cheese rinds at 700 MPa for 15 min. Lower pressure or time treatments were less effective and varied in effectiveness with the cheese sample. Changes in sensory properties possibly induced by the HPP were evaluated on four different Gorgonzola cheeses. A panel of 18 members judged the treated and untreated cheeses in a triangle test. Only one of the four pressurized cheeses was evaluated as different from the untreated sample. HPP was effective in the reduction of L. monocytogenes on Gorgonzola cheese rinds without significantly changing its sensory properties. High-pressure technology is a useful tool to improve the safety of this type of cheese.

  19. Molecular characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from animal products in a city of Northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilyan Rosmery Luizaga de Monteiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen causes listeriosis, a fatal disease in about 30% of cases that affects mainly immunocompromised persons. The aim of this research was to characterize L. monocytogenes pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE types isolated from meat products collected at public markets in Araguaina city, TO. Sixty samples of raw ground beef and frescal sausage were analyzed during the second half of 2008. Five out of 30 samples (16.7% of raw ground beef tested positive for L. monocytogenes, three of which were classified as serotype 1/2b and two as serotype 4b. Among the 30 samples of sausage collected, two strains of L. monocytogenes were isolated (6.7%, one of them belonging to serotype 1/2a and the other belonging to serotype 1/2b. The restriction enzymes used were ApaI and SmaI. Similarities among the strains were determined by Dice coefficient. The macro restriction profile obtained by using SmaI enzyme allowed the distribution of seven strains in two clusters, two pulsotypes and two subtypes. The result indicates that L. monocytogenes isolates, belonging to serotype 4b, 1/2a and 1/2b, are strongly correlated within the same serotype group, and in some cases among different serotypes, suggesting that they have a common source.

  20. Pathogen-nematode interaction: Nitrogen supply of Listeria monocytogenes during growth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Tanja; Kutzner, Erika; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2016-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultatively intracellular human pathogen. Due to its saprophytic lifestyle, L. monocytogenes is assumed to infect and proliferate within soil organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. However, little is known about the nutrient usages and metabolite fluxes in this bacterium-nematode interaction. Here, we established a nematode colonization model for L. monocytogenes and a method for the efficient separation of the pathogen from the nematodal gut. Following (15)N labelling of C. elegans and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based (15)N isotopologue analysis, we detected a high basal metabolic rate of the nematode, and observed a significant metabolic flux from nitrogenous compounds of the nematode to listerial proteins during proliferation of the pathogen in the worm's intestine. For comparison, we also measured the N fluxes from the gut content into listerial proteins using completely (15)N-labelled Escherichia coli OP50 as food for C. elegans. In both settings, L. monocytogenes prefers the direct incorporation of histidine, arginine and lysine over their de novo biosynthesis. Our data suggest that colonization of nematodes is a strategy of L. monocytogenes to increase its access to N-rich nutrients.

  1. Dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes colonisation in a newly-opened meat processing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolocan, Andrei Sorin; Nicolau, Anca Ioana; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Borda, Daniela; Oniciuc, Elena Alexandra; Stessl, Beatrix; Gurgu, Leontina; Wagner, Martin; Jordan, Kieran

    2016-03-01

    This study determined the colonisation scenario of Listeria monocytogenes in a newly-opened ready-to-eat meat processing facility using a combination of classical microbiology and molecular biology techniques. Samples (n=183), including food contact surfaces, non-food contact surfaces, raw materials and food samples, collected on four sampling occasions, were analysed for L. monocytogenes by the ISO 11290:1996 standard method and by real-time PCR applied to the second enrichment broth from the ISO method. No L. monocytogenes were detected on the first sampling occasion, but by the second sampling occasion a persistent clone had colonised the facility. Analysis of the second enrichment of the ISO method by real-time PCR was more sensitive for the detection of L. monocytogenes than the ISO method alone. In order to reduce the risk of cross contamination and the public health risk, awareness and proactive measures are required to control L. monocytogenes from the first days of production in a newly opened meat processing facility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of Efflux Pumps in Adaptation and Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to Benzalkonium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, N. A.; Wolffs, P. F. G.; Brovko, L. Y.; Griffiths, M. W.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, potential mechanisms underlying resistance and adaptation to benzalkonium chloride (BC) in Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. Two groups of strains were studied. The first group consisted of strains naturally sensitive to BC which could be adapted to BC. The second group consisted of naturally resistant strains. For all adapted isolates, there was a correlation between the resistance to BC and ethidium bromide, but this was not the case for the naturally resistant isolates. To investigate the role of efflux pumps in adaptation or resistance, reserpine, an efflux pump inhibitor, was added to the strains. Addition of reserpine to the sensitive and adapted strains resulted in a decrease in the MIC for BC, whereas no such decrease was observed for the resistant strains, indicating that efflux pumps played no role in the innate resistance of certain strains of L. monocytogenes to this compound. Two efflux pumps (MdrL and Lde) have been described in L. monocytogenes. Studies showed low and intermediate levels of expression of the genes encoding the efflux pumps for two selected resistant strains, H7764 and H7962, respectively. Adaptation to BC of sensitive isolates of L. monocytogenes resulted in significant increases in expression of mdrl (P < 0.05), but no such increase was observed for lde for two adapted strains of L. monocytogenes, LJH 381 (P = 0.91) and C719 (P = 0.11). This indicates that the efflux pump Mdrl is at least partly responsible for the adaptation to BC. PMID:16672496

  3. Removal of Listeria monocytogenes dual-species biofilms using combined enzyme-benzalkonium chloride treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Pedro; Carballo-Justo, Alba; Draper, Lorraine A; Cabo, Marta L

    2017-01-01

    The effects of pronase (PRN), cellulase (CEL) or DNaseI alone or combined with benzalkonium chloride (BAC) against Listeria monocytogenes-carrying biofilms were assayed. The best removal activity against L. monocytogenes-Escherichia coli biofilms was obtained using DNaseI followed by PRN and CEL. Subsequently, a modified logistic model was used to quantify the combined effects of PRN or DNaseI with BAC. A better BAC performance after PRN compared to DNaseI eradicating L. monocytogenes was observed. In E. coli the effects were the opposite. Finally, effects of DNaseI and DNaseI-BAC treatments were compared against two different L. monocytogenes-carrying biofilms. DNaseI-BAC was more effective against L. monocytogenes when co-cultured with E. coli. Nonetheless, comparing the removal effects after BAC addition, these were higher in mixed-biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens. However, a high number of released viable cells was observed after combined treatments. These results open new perspectives of enzymes as an anti-biofilm strategy for environmental pathogen control.

  4. Rapid and visual detection of Listeria monocytogenes based on nanoparticle cluster catalyzed signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisha; Huang, Ru; Liu, Weipeng; Liu, Hongxing; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2016-12-15

    Foodborne pathogens pose a significant threat to human health worldwide. The identification of foodborne pathogens needs to be rapid, accurate and convenient. Here, we constructed a nanoparticle cluster (NPC) catalyzed signal amplification biosensor for foodborne pathogens visual detection. In this work, vancomycin (Van), a glycopeptide antibiotic for Gram-positive bacteria, was used as the first molecular recognition agent to capture Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes). Fe3O4 NPC modified aptamer, was used as the signal amplification nanoprobe, specifically recognize to the cell wall of L. monocytogenes. As vancomycin and aptamer recognize L. monocytogenes at different sites, the sandwich recognition showed satisfied specificity. Compared to individual Fe3O4 nanoparticle (NP), NPC exhibit collective effect-enhanced catalytic activity for the color reaction of chromogenic substrate. The change in absorbance or color could represent the concentration of target. Using the Fe3O4 NPC-based signal amplification method, L. monocytogenes whole cells could be directly assayed within a linear range of 5.4×10(3)-10(8) cfu/mL and a visual limit of detection of 5.4×10(3) cfu/mL. Fe3O4 NPC-based method was more sensitive than the Fe3O4 NP-based method. All these attractive characteristics of highly sensitivity, visual and labor-saving, make the biosensor possess a potential application for foodborne pathogenic bacteria detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An outbreak of an unusual strain of Listeria monocytogenes infection in North-East Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpo, Emmanuel; Leith, Jayne; Smith-Palmer, Alison; Bell, John; Parks, Duncan; Browning, Fiona; Byers, Lynn; Corrigan, Helen; Webster, Diana; Karcher, Anne M; Murray, Andrew; Storey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection is an important cause of illness and hospitalization in vulnerable individuals. In the present study, we describe a community outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in the North-East region of Scotland, which was epidemiologically, environmentally and microbiologically linked to a local meat product and ready-to-eat product manufacturer. Infected individuals were interviewed, and an environmental investigation was conducted. Clinical and environmental samples were tested by culture, and isolates were typed by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP). Three cases of Listeria monocytogenes were linked geographically, had the same serotype (1/2a) and were indistinguishable by fAFLP type XII.6. The human, food and environmental isolates were of the same serotype and were indistinguishable by molecular typing. This is the first community outbreak of L. monocytogenes reported in Scotland since the current outbreak surveillance was established in 1996. Epidemiological and laboratory evidence indicated poor hand hygiene, unhygienic practices and cross-contamination throughout the manufacturing process of ready-to-eat foods as a possible cause of the outbreak. More stringent control of commercial food establishments that provide ready-to-eat food and the need to advise specifically vulnerable groups, e.g., pregnant women, of the risk of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food is urgently needed. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in milk using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junping; Xie, Xinfang; Feng, Jinsong; Chen, Jessica C; Du, Xin-jun; Luo, Jiangzhao; Lu, Xiaonan; Wang, Shuo

    2015-07-02

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-positive, rod-shape foodborne bacterium causing invasive infection, listeriosis, in susceptible populations. Rapid and high-throughput detection of this pathogen in dairy products is critical as milk and other dairy products have been implicated as food vehicles in several outbreaks. Here we evaluated confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (785 nm laser) coupled with chemometric analysis to distinguish six closely related Listeria species, including L. monocytogenes, in both liquid media and milk. Raman spectra of different Listeria species and other bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli) were collected to create two independent databases for detection in media and milk, respectively. Unsupervised chemometric models including principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were applied to differentiate L. monocytogenes from Listeria and other bacteria. To further evaluate the performance and reliability of unsupervised chemometric analyses, supervised chemometrics were performed, including two discriminant analyses (DA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA). By analyzing Raman spectra via two DA-based chemometric models, average identification accuracies of 97.78% and 98.33% for L. monocytogenes in media, and 95.28% and 96.11% in milk were obtained, respectively. SIMCA analysis also resulted in satisfied average classification accuracies (over 93% in both media and milk). This Raman spectroscopic-based detection of L. monocytogenes in media and milk can be finished within a few hours and requires no extensive sample preparation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms by bacteriocin-producing bacteria isolated from mushroom substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolocan, A S; Pennone, V; O'Connor, P M; Coffey, A; Nicolau, A I; McAuliffe, O; Jordan, K

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the ability of naturally occurring bacteria isolated from mushroom substrate to prevent biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes or to remove existing biofilms in mushroom production facilities. It is generally recognized that L. monocytogenes forms biofilms that can facilitate its survival in food-processing environments. Eleven bacteriocin-producing isolates were identified and the bacteriocins characterized based on heat and enzyme inactivation studies. Further characterization was undertaken by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, PCR and sequencing. Production of nisin Z (by Lactococcus lactis isolates), subtilomycin (by Bacillus subtilis isolates) and lichenicidin (by Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus sonorensis isolates) was detected. In co-culture with L. monocytogenes, the bacteriocin-producing strains could prevent biofilm formation and reduce pre-formed biofilms. Mushroom substrate can be a source of bacteriocin-producing bacteria that can antagonize L. monocytogenes. The results highlight the potential of bacteriocin-producing strains from mushroom substrate to reduce L. monocytogenes biofilm in food production environments, contributing to a reduction in the risk of food contamination from the environment. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Identification of a Peptide-Pheromone that Enhances Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Host Cell Vacuoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Alonzo, Francis; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades mammalian cells and escapes from membrane-bound vacuoles to replicate within the host cell cytosol. Gene products required for intracellular bacterial growth and bacterial spread to adjacent cells are regulated by a transcriptional activator known as PrfA. PrfA becomes activated following L. monocytogenes entry into host cells, however the signal that stimulates PrfA activation has not yet been defined. Here we provide evidence for L. monocytogenes secretion of a small peptide pheromone, pPplA, which enhances the escape of L. monocytogenes from host cell vacuoles and may facilitate PrfA activation. The pPplA pheromone is generated via the proteolytic processing of the PplA lipoprotein secretion signal peptide. While the PplA lipoprotein is dispensable for pathogenesis, bacteria lacking the pPplA pheromone are significantly attenuated for virulence in mice and have a reduced efficiency of bacterial escape from the vacuoles of nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Mutational activation of PrfA restores virulence and eliminates the need for pPplA-dependent signaling. Experimental evidence suggests that the pPplA peptide may help signal to L. monocytogenes its presence within the confines of the host cell vacuole, stimulating the expression of gene products that contribute to vacuole escape and facilitating PrfA activation to promote bacterial growth within the cytosol. PMID:25822753

  9. Meningoencephalitis and Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. coinfection in a dolphin in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattarola, Carla; Giorda, Federica; Iulini, Barbara; Pintore, Maria Domenica; Pautasso, Alessandra; Zoppi, Simona; Goria, Maria; Romano, Angelo; Peletto, Simone; Varello, Katia; Garibaldi, Fulvio; Garofolo, Giuliano; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Marsili, Letizia; Bozzetta, Elena; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dondo, Alessandro; Mignone, Walter; Casalone, Cristina

    2016-02-25

    Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. can infect a wide range of species, including humans. In cetaceans, meningoencephalitis has been associated with T. gondii and Brucella spp. infection, whereas to our knowledge, L. monocytogenes infection has not previously been reported. Meningoencephalitis and L. monocytogenes, T. gondii and Brucella spp. were identified by means of both direct and indirect laboratory techniques in an adult female striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba found stranded in January 2015 on the Ligurian Sea coast, northwestern Italy. The animal was emaciated, and histopathology disclosed severe meningoencephalitis. The nature of the inflammatory response and intra-lesional protozoa were consistent with a mixed infection by L. monocytogenes, T. gondii and Brucella spp. We believe this is an unprecedented case of infection by 3 zoonotic pathogens and also the first bacteriologically confirmed case report of neurolisteriosis in cetaceans. Cerebral toxoplasmosis and neurobrucellosis may have led to the animal's disorientation and stranding, with L. monocytogenes having likely exacerbated the coinfection leading to the demise of this dolphin.

  10. An ecological perspective of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms in food processing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Wladir B; Cutter, Catherine N

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can enter the food chain at virtually any point. However, food processing environments seem to be of particular importance. From an ecological point of view, food processing facilities are microbial habitats that are constantly disturbed by cleaning and sanitizing procedures. Although L. monocytogenes is considered ubiquitous in nature, it is important to recognize that not all L. monocytogenes strains appear to be equally distributed; the distribution of the organism seems to be related to certain habitats. Currently, no direct evidence exists that L. monocytogenes-associated biofilms have played a role in food contamination or foodborne outbreaks, likely because biofilm isolation and identification are not part of an outbreak investigation, or the definition of biofilm is unclear. Because L. monocytogenes is known to colonize surfaces, we suggest that contamination patterns may be studied in the context of how biofilm formation is influenced by the environment within food processing facilities. In this review, direct and indirect epidemiological and phenotypic evidence of lineage-related biofilm formation capacity to specific ecological niches will be discussed. A critical view on the development of the biofilm concept, focused on the practical implications, strengths, and weaknesses of the current definitions also is discussed. The idea that biofilm formation may be an alternative surrogate for microbial fitness is proposed. Furthermore, current research on the influence of environmental factors on biofilm formation is discussed.

  11. A new bovine conjunctiva model shows that Listeria monocytogenes invasion is associated with lysozyme resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jessica; Owen, A Rhys; Glanvill, Amy; Francis, Asher; Maboni, Grazieli; Nova, Rodrigo J; Wapenaar, Wendela; Rees, Catherine; Tötemeyer, Sabine

    2015-08-31

    Listerial keratoconjunctivitis ('silage eye') is a wide spread problem in ruminants causing economic losses to farmers and impacts negatively on animal welfare. It results from direct entry of Listeria monocytogenes into the eye, often following consumption of contaminated silage. An isolation protocol for bovine conjunctival swabbing was developed and used to sample both infected and healthy eyes bovine eyes (n=46). L. monocytogenes was only isolated from one healthy eye sample, and suggests that this organism can be present without causing disease. To initiate a study of this disease, an infection model was developed using isolated conjunctiva explants obtained from cattle eyes post slaughter. Conjunctiva were cultured and infected for 20 h with a range of L. monocytogenes isolates (n=11), including the healthy bovine eye isolate and also strains isolated from other bovine sources, such as milk or clinical infections. Two L. monocytogenes isolates (one from a healthy eye and one from a cattle abortion) were markedly less able to invade conjunctiva explants, but one of those was able to efficiently infect Caco2 cells indicating that it was fully virulent. These two isolates were also significantly more sensitive to lysozyme compared to most other isolates tested, suggesting that lysozyme resistance is an important factor when infecting bovine conjunctiva. In conclusion, we present the first bovine conjunctiva explant model for infection studies and demonstrate that clinical L. monocytogenes isolates from cases of bovine keratoconjunctivitis are able to infect these tissues.

  12. [Bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal extract of Aloe vera gel on cultures of Listeria monocytogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Mérida, Luis Guillermo; Morón de Salim, Alba; Catinella, Rosangela; Castillo, Luis

    2012-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacteria responsible for food borne diseases (FBD). The effect of Aloe vera gel extract as a possible bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal against Listeria monocytogenes, was checked by determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the time of minimum inhibition (TMI) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) solutions extract of Aloe vera gel in different concentrations on cultures of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7635. We applied the agar diffusion method, using solutions of extract of Aloe vera gel at concentrations of 0 to 100% for the MIC. The TMI was determined by growth curves in trypticase soy broth with an initial inoculum of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7635 of 108 CFU/mL in each solution. It was determined that the MIC was 10% extract of Aloe vera gel and TMI was 5 hours at concentrations of 10%, 20% and 30% of Aloe vera, while concentrations of 50, 80, 90 and 100%, the time was 8 hours. It was found that indeed the Aloe vera gel is bacteriostatic power on Listeria monocytogenes (p < 0.001), but yet, no bactericidal effect was obtained in our study.

  13. Use of germicidal UV light to reduce low numbers of Listeria monocytogenes on raw chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, M E; Meinersmann, R J; Frank, J F

    2013-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a common constituent of the microbiological community in poultry processing plants and can be found in low numbers on raw poultry. Raw meat is the most important source of this pathogen in commercial cooking facilities. Germicidal UV light was tested as a means to kill L. monocytogenes inoculated onto broiler breast fillets. Treatments at 800 μW/ cm(2) for 5 s to 5 min of exposure were tested against inocula of 35 to 60 cells per fillet. All fillets were sampled by rinsing in enrichment broth, and surviving pathogens were quantified using most-probable-number (MPN) analysis. Five replications each with 5 fillets per treatment were analyzed to achieve 25 sample fillets per treatment. All treatment times resulted in a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes numbers compared with paired untreated controls. Treated samples retained 0.2 to 1.5 MPN L. monocytogenes per fillet, and exposure time had no significant effect on the number of surviving cells. A 5-s treatment with germicidal UV light has potential as an intervention method to limit the transfer of L. monocytogenes on raw skinless breast fillets from a slaughter plant to a cooking plant.

  14. Age-Dependent Differences in Systemic and Cell-Autonomous Immunity to L. monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Sherrid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Host defense against infection can broadly be categorized into systemic immunity and cell-autonomous immunity. Systemic immunity is crucial for all multicellular organisms, increasing in importance with increasing cellular complexity of the host. The systemic immune response to Listeria monocytogenes has been studied extensively in murine models; however, the clinical applicability of these findings to the human newborn remains incompletely understood. Furthermore, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell, known as “cell-autonomous immunity,” appears most relevant following infection with L. monocytogenes; as the main target, the monocyte is centrally important to innate as well as adaptive systemic immunity to listeriosis. We thus suggest that the overall increased risk to suffer and die from L. monocytogenes infection in the newborn period is a direct consequence of age-dependent differences in cell-autonomous immunity of the monocyte to L. monocytogenes. We here review what is known about age-dependent differences in systemic innate and adaptive as well as cell-autonomous immunity to infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of chitosan coatings and films against Listeria monocytogenes on black radish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Gordana D; Klaus, Anita S; Nikšić, Miomir P

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of chitosan coatings prepared with acetic or lactic acid, as well as of composite chitosan-gelatin films prepared with essential oils, was evaluated in fresh shredded black radish samples inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115 and L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 during seven days of storage at 4°C. The chitosan coating prepared with acetic acid showed the most effective antibacterial activity. All tested formulations of chitosan films exhibited strong antimicrobial activity on the growth of L. monocytogenes on black radish, although a higher inhibition of pathogens was achieved at higher concentrations of chitosan. The antimicrobial effect of chitosan films was even more pronounced with the addition of essential oils. Chitosan-gelatin films with thyme essential oils showed the most effective antimicrobial activity. A reduction of 2.4log10CFU/g for L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 and 2.1log10CFU/g for L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 was achieved in the presence of 1% chitosan film containing 0.2% of thyme essential oil after 24h of storage. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-01-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with freshor cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature...... cheese to improvemodel performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese....... The developed models were successfully validated by using 25 growth rates for L. monocytogenes, 17 growth rates for lactic acid bacteria and a total of 26 growth curves for simultaneous growth of L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. These data were used in combination with bias...

  17. Sensitive enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in various naturally contaminated matrices using a membrane filtration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Léna; Brasseur, Emilie; Doux, Camille; Lombard, Bertrand; Besse, Nathalie Gnanou

    2015-06-01

    For the enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) in food, a sensitive enumeration method has been recently developed. This method is based on a membrane filtration of the food suspension followed by transfer of the filter on a selective medium to enumerate L. monocytogenes. An evaluation of this method was performed with several categories of foods naturally contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The results obtained with this technique were compared with those obtained from the modified reference EN ISO 11290-2 method for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in food, and are found to provide more precise results. In most cases, the filtration method enabled to examine a greater quantity of food thus greatly improving the sensitivity of the enumeration. However, it was hardly applicable to some food categories because of filtration problems and background microbiota interference.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes encephalitis mimicking Herpes Simplex virus encephalitis: the differential diagnostic importance of cerebrospinal fluid lactic acid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Fatehpuria, Ritu; Eisenstein, Lawrence E

    2007-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a common cause of bacterial meningitis in elderly patients and in those with impaired cellular immunity. The most common central nervous system infection caused by L. monocytogenes is acute bacterial meningitis; meningoencephalitis is uncommon and encephalitis is rare. Early diagnosis of L. monocytogenes meningitis is difficult because only 50% of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stains are negative. L. monocytogenes is one of the few central nervous system pathogens associated with red blood cells in the CSF. When L. monocytogenes presents as encephalitis with red blood cells in the CSF, the clinical presentation mimics most closely herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 encephalitis. Because the therapies for L. monocytogenes and HSV-1 are different, early diagnostic differentiation is clinically important. The CSF lactic acid is the best way to rapidly differentiate between these two entities; the CSF lactic acid level is elevated in L. monocytogenes but is not elevated in HSV-1 encephalitis. The case presented is an elderly man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who presented with encephalitis. Advanced age and chronic lymphocytic leukemia predispose him to a wide variety of pathogens, but the rapidity and severity of his clinical presentation made L. monocytogenes and HSV-1 encephalitis the most likely diagnostic possibilities. The CSF Gram stain was negative, but the elevated CSF lactic acid levels with encephalitis and red blood cells in the CSF indicated L. monocytogenes as the most likely pathogen. We present a case of L. monocytogenes encephalitis mimicking HSV-1 encephalitis. While receiving ampicillin therapy, the patient remained unresponsive for more than 1 week and then suddenly regained consciousness and recovered without neurologic sequelae.

  19. Genetic characteristics of Japanese clinical Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Miya

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes causes foodborne illnesses through consumption of ready-to-eat foods. Although 135-201annual listeriosis cases have been estimated in Japan, the details regarding the clinical isolates such as infection source, virulence level, and other genetic characteristics, are not known. In order to uncover the trends of listeriosis in Japan and use the knowledge for prevention measures to be taken, the genetic characteristics of the past human clinical isolates needs to be elucidated. For this purpose, multilocus tandem-repeat sequence analysis (MLTSA and multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST were used in this study. The clinical isolates showed a variety of genetically distant genotypes, indicating they were from sporadic cases. However, the MVLST profiles of 7 clinical isolates were identical to those of epidemic clone (EC I isolates, which have caused several serious outbreaks in other countries, suggesting the possibility that they have strong virulence potential and originated from a single outbreak. Moreover, 6 Japanese food isolates shared their genotypes with ECI isolates, indicating that there may be risks for listeriosis outbreak in Japan. This is the first investigational study on genetic characteristics of Japanese listeriosis isolates. The listeriosis cases happened in the past are presumably sporadic, but it is still possible that some isolates with strong virulence potential have caused listeriosis outbreaks, and future listeriosis risks also exist.

  20. Comparative Genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 Subgroup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward M.; Allnutt, Theodore; Bradbury, Mark I.; Fanning, Séamus; Chandry, P. Scott

    2016-01-01

    The ST204 subgroup of Listeria monocytogenes is among the most frequently isolated in Australia from a range of environmental niches. In this study we provide a comparative genomics analysis of food and food environment isolates from geographically diverse sources. Analysis of the ST204 genomes showed a highly conserved core genome with the majority of variation seen in mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and phage insertions. Most strains (13/15) harbored plasmids, which although varying in size contained highly conserved sequences. Interestingly 4 isolates contained a conserved plasmid of 91,396 bp. The strains examined were isolated over a period of 12 years and from different geographic locations suggesting plasmids are an important component of the genetic repertoire of this subgroup and may provide a range of stress tolerance mechanisms. In addition to this 4 phage insertion sites and 2 transposons were identified among isolates, including a novel transposon. These genetic elements were highly conserved across isolates that harbored them, and also contained a range of genetic markers linked to stress tolerance and virulence. The maintenance of conserved mobile genetic elements in the ST204 population suggests these elements may contribute to the diverse range of niches colonized by ST204 isolates. Environmental stress selection may contribute to maintaining these genetic features, which in turn may be co-selecting for virulence markers relevant to clinical infection with ST204 isolates. PMID:28066377

  1. Distinct Neurotoxicity Profile of Listeriolysin O from Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Jana; Hupp, Sabrina; Bischoff, Carolin; Foertsch, Christina; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Iliev, Asparouh I.

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) are protein toxins that originate from Gram-positive bacteria and contribute substantially to their pathogenicity. CDCs bind membrane cholesterol and build prepores and lytic pores. Some effects of the toxins are observed in non-lytic concentrations. Two pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes, cause fatal bacterial meningitis, and both produce toxins of the CDC family—pneumolysin and listeriolysin O, respectively. It has been demonstrated that pneumolysin produces dendritic varicosities (dendrite swellings) and dendritic spine collapse in the mouse neocortex, followed by synaptic loss and astrocyte cell shape remodeling without elevated cell death. We utilized primary glial cultures and acute mouse brain slices to examine the neuropathological effects of listeriolysin O and to compare it to pneumolysin with identical hemolytic activity. In cultures, listeriolysin O permeabilized cells slower than pneumolysin did but still initiated non-lytic astrocytic cell shape changes, just as pneumolysin did. In an acute brain slice culture system, listeriolysin O produced dendritic varicosities in an NMDA-dependent manner but failed to cause dendritic spine collapse and cortical astrocyte reorganization. Thus, listeriolysin O demonstrated slower cell permeabilization and milder glial cell remodeling ability than did pneumolysin and lacked dendritic spine collapse capacity but exhibited equivalent dendritic pathology. PMID:28098781

  2. Pathways of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in the meat processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbakken, T; Kapperud, G; Caugant, D A

    1996-08-01

    One hundred and thirty-three isolates of Listeria monocytogenes from deboned fresh meat, production environment, cold cuts from five meat processing plants and from one plant producing cured dried sausages, were characterized using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. On the basis of electrophoretically demonstrable allelic variation at 21 enzyme loci, 21 electrophoretic types (ETs) were distinguished. Analysis of the genetic relationships among the 21 ETs revealed two distinct clusters: Cluster A and Cluster B. With the exception of two isolates from one plant, all isolates from deboned fresh meat belonged to Cluster B. During processing of cold cuts, however, isolates belonging to Cluster A became more frequent, and only one of the 37 isolates from cold cuts belonged to Cluster B. In contrast, six of the nine isolates from cured dried sausages had ETs in Cluster B. One clone of Cluster A, ET-6 was isolated from cold cuts in four of six plants. This is one of the ETs most frequently recovered from patients in Norway. Isolates of ET-6 were further characterized using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of chromosomal DNA. Six distinct restriction patterns were distinguished among the 44 ET-6 strains. In one plant, four different RFLP patterns could be identified. Two clone variants seemed to have colonized different areas in this plant for at least four years. However, in each of the other plants, all ET-6 isolates had the same RFLP patterns.

  3. Role of host GTPases in infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, Keith; Rigano, Luciano A; Dowd, Georgina C

    2014-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces internalization into mammalian cells and uses actin-based motility to spread within tissues. Listeria accomplishes this intracellular life cycle by exploiting or antagonizing several host GTPases. Internalization into human cells is mediated by the bacterial surface proteins InlA or InlB. These two modes of uptake each require a host actin polymerization pathway comprised of the GTPase Rac1, nucleation promotion factors, and the Arp2/3 complex. In addition to Rac1, InlB-mediated internalization involves inhibition of the GTPase Arf6 and participation of Dynamin and septin family GTPases. After uptake, Listeria is encased in host phagosomes. The bacterial protein GAPDH inactivates the human GTPase Rab5, thereby delaying phagosomal acquisition of antimicrobial properties. After bacterial-induced destruction of the phagosome, cytosolic Listeria uses the surface protein ActA to stimulate actin-based motility. The GTPase Dynamin 2 reduces the density of microtubules that would otherwise limit bacterial movement. Cell-to-cell spread results when motile Listeria remodel the host plasma membrane into protrusions that are engulfed by neighbouring cells. The human GTPase Cdc42, its activator Tuba, and its effector N-WASP form a complex with the potential to restrict Listeria protrusions. Bacteria overcome this restriction through two microbial factors that inhibit Cdc42-GTP or Tuba/N-WASP interaction.

  4. Distinct Neurotoxicity Profile of Listeriolysin O from Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Maurer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs are protein toxins that originate from Gram-positive bacteria and contribute substantially to their pathogenicity. CDCs bind membrane cholesterol and build prepores and lytic pores. Some effects of the toxins are observed in non-lytic concentrations. Two pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes, cause fatal bacterial meningitis, and both produce toxins of the CDC family—pneumolysin and listeriolysin O, respectively. It has been demonstrated that pneumolysin produces dendritic varicosities (dendrite swellings and dendritic spine collapse in the mouse neocortex, followed by synaptic loss and astrocyte cell shape remodeling without elevated cell death. We utilized primary glial cultures and acute mouse brain slices to examine the neuropathological effects of listeriolysin O and to compare it to pneumolysin with identical hemolytic activity. In cultures, listeriolysin O permeabilized cells slower than pneumolysin did but still initiated non-lytic astrocytic cell shape changes, just as pneumolysin did. In an acute brain slice culture system, listeriolysin O produced dendritic varicosities in an NMDA-dependent manner but failed to cause dendritic spine collapse and cortical astrocyte reorganization. Thus, listeriolysin O demonstrated slower cell permeabilization and milder glial cell remodeling ability than did pneumolysin and lacked dendritic spine collapse capacity but exhibited equivalent dendritic pathology.

  5. Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML) Controls Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribet, David; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; Ferhi, Omar; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Varet, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is the main organizer of stress-responsive subnuclear structures called PML nuclear bodies. These structures recruit multiple interactors and modulate their abundance or their posttranslational modifications, notably by the SUMO ubiquitin-like modifiers. The involvement of PML in antiviral responses is well established. In contrast, the role of PML in bacterial infection remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that PML restricts infection by the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes but not by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. During infection, PML undergoes oxidation-mediated multimerization, associates with the nuclear matrix, and becomes de-SUMOylated due to the pore-forming activity of the Listeria toxin listeriolysin O (LLO). These events trigger an antibacterial response that is not observed during in vitro infection by an LLO-defective Listeria mutant, but which can be phenocopied by specific induction of PML de-SUMOylation. Using transcriptomic and proteomic microarrays, we also characterized a network of immunity genes and cytokines, which are regulated by PML in response to Listeria infection but independently from the listeriolysin O toxin. Our study thus highlights two mechanistically distinct complementary roles of PML in host responses against bacterial infection. PMID:28074026

  6. Comparative Genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 Subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward M; Allnutt, Theodore; Bradbury, Mark I; Fanning, Séamus; Chandry, P Scott

    2016-01-01

    The ST204 subgroup of Listeria monocytogenes is among the most frequently isolated in Australia from a range of environmental niches. In this study we provide a comparative genomics analysis of food and food environment isolates from geographically diverse sources. Analysis of the ST204 genomes showed a highly conserved core genome with the majority of variation seen in mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and phage insertions. Most strains (13/15) harbored plasmids, which although varying in size contained highly conserved sequences. Interestingly 4 isolates contained a conserved plasmid of 91,396 bp. The strains examined were isolated over a period of 12 years and from different geographic locations suggesting plasmids are an important component of the genetic repertoire of this subgroup and may provide a range of stress tolerance mechanisms. In addition to this 4 phage insertion sites and 2 transposons were identified among isolates, including a novel transposon. These genetic elements were highly conserved across isolates that harbored them, and also contained a range of genetic markers linked to stress tolerance and virulence. The maintenance of conserved mobile genetic elements in the ST204 population suggests these elements may contribute to the diverse range of niches colonized by ST204 isolates. Environmental stress selection may contribute to maintaining these genetic features, which in turn may be co-selecting for virulence markers relevant to clinical infection with ST204 isolates.

  7. Infectious Dose of Listeria monocytogenes in Outbreak Linked to Ice Cream, United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouillot, Régis; Klontz, Karl C; Chen, Yi; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Doyle, Matthew; Bally, Kären M; Strain, Errol; Datta, Atin R; Hammack, Thomas S; Van Doren, Jane M

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between the number of ingested Listeria monocytogenes cells in food and the likelihood of developing listeriosis is not well understood. Data from an outbreak of listeriosis linked to milkshakes made from ice cream produced in 1 factory showed that contaminated products were distributed widely to the public without any reported cases, except for 4 cases of severe illness in persons who were highly susceptible. The ingestion of high doses of L. monocytogenes by these patients infected through milkshakes was unlikely if possible additional contamination associated with the preparation of the milkshake is ruled out. This outbreak illustrated that the vast majority of the population did not become ill after ingesting a low level of L. monocytogenes but raises the question of listeriosis cases in highly susceptible persons after distribution of low-level contaminated products that did not support the growth of this pathogen.

  8. Antibacterial activity of aromatic plants essential oils from Serbia against the Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Anita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of the growth and survival of pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115, which are of significant importance in food hygiene. Essential oils extracted from Salvia officinalis L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Majorana hortensis Moench., Thymus vulgaris L., Carum carvi L., Pimpinella anisum L. and Coriandrum sativum L. were evaluated. Antibacterial activity was done by the disk diffusion method in the presence of pure essential oils and four suspensions in alcohol. The best results obtained with Thymus vulgaris and Majorana hortensis essential oils, which were acting microbicidaly on both observed strains of Listeria monocytogenes, even in the small concentration. Because some of the essential oils were highly inhibitory even in small quantities to selected pathogenic bacteria, they may provide alternatives to conventional antimicrobial additives in foods. .

  9. Changes in Gene Expression during Adaptation of Listeria monocytogenes to the Soil Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piveteau, Pascal; Depret, Géraldine; Pivato, Barbara; Garmyn, Dominique; Hartmann, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen responsible for listeriosis. In order to study the processes underlying its ability to adapt to the soil environment, whole-genome arrays were used to analyse transcriptome modifications 15 minutes, 30 minutes and 18 h after inoculation of L. monocytogenes EGD-e in soil extracts. Growth was observed within the first day of incubation and large numbers were still detected in soil extract and soil microcosms one year after the start of the experiment. Major transcriptional reprofiling was observed. Nutrient acquisition mechanisms (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems and ABC transporters) and enzymes involved in catabolism of specific carbohydrates (β-glucosidases; chitinases) were prevalent. This is consistent with the overrepresentation of the CodY regulon that suggests that in a nutrient depleted environment, L. monocytogenes recruits its extensive repertoire of transporters to acquire a range of substrates for energy production. PMID:21966375

  10. Study of Growth Potential of Listeria Monocytogenes in Low Fat Salami: An Innovative Italian Meat Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosciani-Cunico, Elena; Pavoni, Enrico; Bertasi, Barbara; Daminelli, Paolo; Finazzi, Guido; Losio, Marina N.; Varisco, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, consequently to EC Regulation no. 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods, some Italian food businnes operators (FBOs) leaders in the meat sector, invested in research to develop innovative products such as low fat salami, containing up to 30% less fat than the traditional one. For FBOs it is essential to demonstrate for each production process whether the substrate allows the growth of L. monocytogenes and whether L. monocytogenes could reach or exceed the limit of 100 cfu g–1 at the end of the shelf life, as stated by EC Regulation no. 2073/2005. In the present study, the growth potential of L. monocytogenes during the shelf life of low fat salami packed in modified atmosphere was evaluated. The results show that the product is unable to support the growth of pathogen, even if the storage temperature is between 8 and 12°C. PMID:27800321

  11. In vitro activity of naturally occurring peptides (defensins against Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento Maria da Graça F.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoclaved distilled water samples were inoculated with L. monocytogenes strain V7 and strain VPH-1, and incubated aerobically, at 30 C for 48 hours. Each strain was tested individually, and growth curves were determined at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 21, 24, and 48 hours. The growth or survival of L. monocytogenes was similar for both strains, with survivors at 24 hour-incubation. The microbicidal activity of one synthetic cationic peptide (NP-2 was examined against L. monocytogenes strain V7, in a water system. Antibacterial activity of NP-2 (1, 5, and 10 g/ml was best expressed at 60 minute-incubation, with 10 g/ml of peptide, at 30 C.

  12. [Monitoring of a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) plan for Listeria monocytogenes control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, G B; Apraiz, P M

    2003-01-01

    The monitoring of a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) plan for the Listeria monocytogenes control in the cooked and frozen meat section of a thermo-processing meat plant was evaluated. Seventy "non-product-contact" surface samples and fourteen finished product samples were examined. Thirty eight positive sites for the presence of Listeria sp. were obtained. Twenty-two isolates were identified as L. monocytogenes, two as L. seeligeri and fourteen as L. innocua. Non isolates were obtained from finished product samples. The detection of L. monocytogenes in cooked and frozen meat section environment showed the need for the HACCP plan to eliminate or prevent product contamination in the post-thermal step.

  13. Isolation and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes in Processed Meat by a Combined Cultural-molecular Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Ingianni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation and identification of Listeria monocytogenes in processed meat samples by a combined cultural-molecular method is described. It allows the identification of Listeria strains by means of a hybridization technique with a specific DNA probe directed to the listerial internalin gene. The specificity of this method was found to be 100% and sensitivity was as low as 1 CFU/2.5 g of food sample. A total of 278 meat samples were tested in comparison with PCR and conventional cultural assays. A total of 42 (15.4% L. monocytogenes were detected. PCR analysis gave 3 false negative results and culture failed to detect the Listeria in 5 cases. With this cultural-molecular method the identification and quantitative detection of L. monocytogenes were achieved within 36 hours and no false positive or negative tests were obtained, thus fitting most food industry requirements.

  14. Thermal inactivation and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes in smoked tench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Branciari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study for the evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes inactivation during a hot smoking process in tench was performed using Listeria innocua strains. Furthermore, the survival of L. monocytogenes in smoked tench was determined after post-processing in contaminated samples, evaluating the growth potential during storage. L. innocua was not detected after the smoking process. In the challenge test, the growth potential of L. monocytogenes was 5.68 log colony forming unit g−1. The results showed that hot smoking at an inner temperature around 72°C is able to eliminate the microorganism. Nevertheless, the product is able to support the growth of the pathogen if post-process contamination occurs, as the food is suitable for Listeria multiplication. Product recontamination should be prevented by means of appropriate application of hygiene measures.

  15. The use of Listeria monocytogenes as a DNA delivery vector for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen that lyses the phagosomal vacuole of infected cells, proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm and can actively enter adjacent cells. The pathogen is therefore well suited to exploitation as a vector for the delivery of DNA to target cells as the lifecycle favors cellular targeting with vector amplification and the potential for cell-to-cell spread. We have recently demonstrated DNA transfer by L. monocytogenes in growing tumors in murine models. Our approach exploited an ampicillin sensitive stain of L. monocytogenes which can be lysed through systemic administration of ampicillin to facilitate release of plasmid DNA for expression by infected mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the implications of this technology and the potential for future improvements of the system.

  16. Effect of ripeness stage during processing on Listeria monocytogenes growth on fresh-cut 'Conference' pears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colás-Medà, Pilar; Abadias, Maribel; Alegre, Isabel; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada

    2015-08-01

    There are several factors that affect the shelf life of fresh-cut fruit, including the cultivar, the ripeness stage of the fruit during processing and the fruit's storage atmosphere and temperature. The effect of fruit ripeness during processing on the survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes on fresh-cut 'Conference' pear slices at different temperatures (5, 10 and 20 °C) was studied. The four ripeness stages studied in this work (assessed by a fruit's firmness) were mature-green (54-60 N), partially ripe (43-53 N), ripe (31-42 N) and overripe (fresh-cut pear, the growth potential of L. monocytogenes increased with increasing temperature. A pear's ripeness stage during processing is an important consideration to ensure the quality of a fresh-cut pear, but it is not as important for preventing L. monocytogenes growth at common storage temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A.F.; Motta, Amanda S.; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g−1) previously inoculated with a suspension of 102 cfu g−1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products. PMID:24688506

  18. Inhibition Effect of Herbal Preservatives on Listeria monocytogenes on Chilled Pork

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liu; KONG Baohua; DIAO Xinping; LIU Jing

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the growth situation of Listeria monocytogenes on chilled pork and the effect of herbal preservatives on this pathogen.The inhibitions of herbal preservatives were identified. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of cinnamon and clove were all 0.79 mg·mL-1,while the rosemary was 1.58 mg.mL-1.And the composite herbal preservatives were got through orthogonal experiment.The optimum proportion was as following on agar medium:1.16 mg·mL-1 cinnamon+2.38 mg·mL-1 rosemary+3.17mg·mL-1 clove (herb combination number 5),while on chilled pork,the strong inhibition of L.monocytogenes was showed,which demonstrated that the surface application of herb combination resulted in an effective delay of L.monocytogenes growth.

  19. Teichoic acid is the major polysaccharide present in the Listeria monocytogenes biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauge, Thomas; Sadovskaya, Irina; Faille, Christine; Benezech, Thierry; Maes, Emmanuel; Guerardel, Yann; Midelet-Bourdin, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the Listeria monocytogenes biofilm and particularly the nature of the carbohydrates in the biofilm extracellular matrix and culture supernatant versus to cell wall carbohydrates. Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a and 4b strains were able to form complex biofilms embedded in an extracellular matrix. The soluble carbohydrates from biofilm extracellular matrix and culture supernatant were identified as teichoic acids, structurally identical to cell wall teichoic acids. In addition, the DSS 1130 BFA2 strain had a serotype 1/2a teichoic acid lacking N-acetyl glucosamine glycosylation due to a mutation in the lmo2550 gene. Consequently, we hypothesized that the extracellular teichoic acids in L. monocytogenes biofilms have the same origin as cell wall teichoic acid. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Optimizing the balance between host and environmental survival skills: lessons learned from Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Freitag, Nancy E

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pathogens – organisms that survive in the outside environment but maintain the capacity to cause disease in mammals – navigate the challenges of life in habitats that range from water and soil to the cytosol of host cells. The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes has served for decades as a model organism for studies of host–pathogen interactions and for fundamental paradigms of cell biology. This ubiquitous saprophy te has recently become a model for understanding how an environmental bacterium switches to life within human cells. This review describes how L. monocytogenes balances life in disparate environments with the help of a critical virulence regulator known as PrfA. Understanding L. monocytogenes survival strategies is important for gaining insight into how environmental microbes become pathogens. PMID:22827306

  1. Listeria monocytogenes cross-contamination of cheese: risk throughout the food supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauders, B D; D'Amico, D J

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been the most common microbial cause of cheese-related recalls in both the United States and Canada in recent years. Since L. monocytogenes is inactivated by pasteurization, the majority of these cases have been linked to environmental and cross-contamination of fresh-soft, soft-ripened, and semi-soft cheeses. Cross-contamination of foods with L. monocytogenes is a continuous risk throughout the food supply chain and presents unique challenges for subsequent illness and outbreak investigations. Reports on outbreaks of listeriosis attributed to cross-contamination downstream from primary processing help highlight the critical role of epidemiological investigation coupled with coordinated molecular subtyping and surveillance in the recognition and investigation of complex foodborne outbreaks. Despite their complexity, environmental sampling throughout the supply chain coupled with improved genotyping approaches and concomitant analysis of foodborne illness epidemiological exposure data are needed to help resolve these and similar cases more rapidly and with greater confidence.

  2. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltaire Sant'Anna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g-1 previously inoculated with a suspension of 10² cfu g-1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes and other contaminants in fresh cheese and cream from Zagreb city area domestic production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Markov

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine whether the cream cheese and cream that are produced in the traditional manner at home and are free to sale on Zagreb markets, meet microbiological requirements for foodstuffs (OG 46/94, 20/01, 40/01. Particular attention is given to research of bacteria Listeria monocytogenes presence in these foods, because of its exceptional hazards to human health. It was found that a majority of 64 (53 % from a total of 120 studied dairy products samples were contaminated with microbial pathogens, of which 16 % are waste in the cream cheese, and 37 % in cream samples. 39 samples of cheese and 50 samples of cream did not fulfil the conditions prescribed by the Croatian Guidelines, primarily due to the contamination with yeasts and moulds. In 10 cheese and cream samples where L. monocytogenes is proven by classical microbiological methods, PCR method confirmed L. monocytogenes in only one cream sample.

  4. Microbial diversity and structure are drivers of the biological barrier effect against Listeria monocytogenes in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Nowak, Virginie; Piveteau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of pathogenic organisms is important in order to monitor their transmission in the environment and the related health hazards. We investigated the relationship between soil microbial diversity and the barrier effect against Listeria monocytogenes invasion. By using a dilution-to-extinction approach, we analysed the consequence of eroding microbial diversity on L. monocytogenes population dynamics under standardised conditions of abiotic parameters and microbial abundance in soil microcosms. We demonstrated that highly diverse soil microbial communities act as a biological barrier against L. monocytogenes invasion and that phylogenetic composition of the community also has to be considered. This suggests that erosion of diversity may have damaging effects regarding circulation of pathogenic microorganisms in the environment.

  5. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A F; Motta, Amanda S; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g(-1)) previously inoculated with a suspension of 10(2) cfu g(-1) of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  6. Study of growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes in low fat salami: an innovative Italian meat product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Dalzini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, consequently to EC Regulation no. 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods, some Italian food businnes operators (FBOs leaders in the meat sector, invested in research to develop innovative products such as low fat salami, containing up to 30% less fat than the traditional one. For FBOs it is essential to demonstrate for each production process whether the substrate allows the growth of L. monocytogenes and whether L. monocytogenes could reach or exceed the limit of 100 cfu g–1 at the end of the shelf life, as stated by EC Regulation no. 2073/2005. In the present study, the growth potential of L. monocytogenes during the shelf life of low fat salami packed in modified atmosphere was evaluated. The results show that the product is unable to support the growth of pathogen, even if the storage temperature is between 8 and 12°C.

  7. Study of Growth Potential of Listeria Monocytogenes in Low Fat Salami: An Innovative Italian Meat Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzini, Elena; Cosciani-Cunico, Elena; Pavoni, Enrico; Bertasi, Barbara; Daminelli, Paolo; Finazzi, Guido; Losio, Marina N; Varisco, Giorgio

    2014-01-21

    In the last years, consequently to EC Regulation no. 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods, some Italian food businnes operators (FBOs) leaders in the meat sector, invested in research to develop innovative products such as low fat salami, containing up to 30% less fat than the traditional one. For FBOs it is essential to demonstrate for each production process whether the substrate allows the growth of L. monocytogenes and whether L. monocytogenes could reach or exceed the limit of 100 cfu g(-1) at the end of the shelf life, as stated by EC Regulation no. 2073/2005. In the present study, the growth potential of L. monocytogenes during the shelf life of low fat salami packed in modified atmosphere was evaluated. The results show that the product is unable to support the growth of pathogen, even if the storage temperature is between 8 and 12°C.

  8. Use Carum copticum essential oil for controlling the Listeria monocytogenes growth in fish model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Rabiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the antibacterial effect of Carum copticum essential oil (Ajowan EO against Listeria monocytogenes in fish model system. Ajowan EO chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectral analysis and the highest concentration of Carum copticum essential oil without any significant changes on sensory properties of kutum fish (Rutilus frisii kutum was assigned. Then the inhibitory effect of Ajowan EO at different concentrations in presence of salt and smoke component was tested on L. monocytogenes growth in fish peptone broth (FPB, kutum broth and cold smoked kutum broth at 4 ºC for 12 days. Ajowan EO completely decreased the number of L. monocytogenes in FPB after 12 days of storage, however, antimicrobial effect of EO significantly reduced in kutum and cold smoked kutum broth. Addition of 4% NaCl and smoke component improved the anti-listerial activity of Ajowan EO in all fish model broths.

  9. Use Carum copticum essential oil for controlling the Listeria monocytogenes growth in fish model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiey, Soghra; Hosseini, Hedayat; Rezaei, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antibacterial effect of Carum copticum essential oil (Ajowan EO) against Listeria monocytogenes in fish model system. Ajowan EO chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectral analysis and the highest concentration of Carum copticum essential oil without any significant changes on sensory properties of kutum fish (Rutilus frisii kutum) was assigned. Then the inhibitory effect of Ajowan EO at different concentrations in presence of salt and smoke component was tested on L. monocytogenes growth in fish peptone broth (FPB), kutum broth and cold smoked kutum broth at 4 °C for 12 days. Ajowan EO completely decreased the number of L. monocytogenes in FPB after 12 days of storage, however, antimicrobial effect of EO significantly reduced in kutum and cold smoked kutum broth. Addition of 4% NaCl and smoke component improved the anti-listerial activity of Ajowan EO in all fish model broths.

  10. An improved cloning vector for construction of gene replacements in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojie; Kathariou, S

    2003-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium implicated in severe food-borne illness (listeriosis) in humans. The construction of well-defined gene replacements in the genome of L. monocytogenes has been instrumental to several genetic studies of the virulence and other attributes of the organism. Construction of such mutations by currently available procedures, however, tends to be labor intensive, and gene replacement mutants are sometimes difficult to recover due to lack of direct selection for the construct. In this study we describe the construction and use of plasmid vector pGF-EM, which can be conjugatively transferred from Escherichia coli S17-1 to L. monocytogenes and which provides the genetic means for direct selection of gene replacements.

  11. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on hams shortly after vacuum packaging by spray application of lauric arginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, P J; Dorsa, W J

    2009-12-01

    This study measured and compared the short-term efficacy levels of lauric arginate (LAE) as a postlethality treatment against Listeria monocytogenes present on varied surfaces of large-diameter hams. Preliminary in vitro work demonstrated a 5-log inactivation of L. monocytogenes in 5,000- and 9,090-ppm LAE solutions within 180 min at 4.4 and 23 degrees C. Six different whole-muscle ham types were inoculated with L. monocytogenes at ca. 7-log CFU per ham and spray treated with between 15 and 29 ml of a 9,090-ppm LAE solution, or an equal volume of water (control), prior to vacuum packaging. After 48 h at 4.4 degrees C, populations were recovered from ham and interior packaging surfaces by using a surface rinse method with Dey-Engley neutralizing broth followed by plating on modified Oxford medium. Logarithmic reductions of L. monocytogenes exceeding 2 log CFU/cm(2) of ham surfaces were achieved by LAE treatment on all ham types. Hams with 1,129 cm(2) of surface area that had been processed by drenching in liquid smoke had 3.84 and 2.67 CFU/cm(2) 48 h following treatment with 18 ml of water or LAE, respectively, but increasing treatment volumes to 22 ml significantly reduced (P < 0.05) L. monocytogenes levels to 0.65 log CFU/cm(2). This study demonstrated the efficacy of LAE against L. monocytogenes on several ham types, thereby validating it as a postlethality treatment for inactivation of the pathogen.

  12. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella by combinations of oriental mustard, malic acid, and EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaimat, Amin N; Holley, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial activities of oriental mustard extract alone or combined with malic acid and EDTA were investigated against Salmonella spp. or Listeria monocytogenes at different temperatures. Five strain Salmonella or L. monocytogenes cocktails were separately inoculated in Brain Heart Infusion broth containing 0.5% (w/v) aqueous oriental mustard extract and incubated at 4 °C to 21 °C for 21 d. For inhibitor combination tests, Salmonella Typhimurium 02:8423 and L. monocytogenes 2-243 were individually inoculated in Mueller Hinton broth containing the mustard extract with either or both 0.2% (w/v) malic acid and 0.2% (w/v) EDTA and incubated at 10 °C or 21 °C for 10 to 14 d. Mustard extract inhibited growth of the L. monocytogenes cocktail at 4 °C up to 21 d (2.3 log10 CFU/mL inhibition) or at 10 °C for 7 d (2.4 log10 CFU/mL inhibition). Salmonella spp. viability was slightly, but significantly reduced by mustard extract at 4 °C by 21 d. Although hydrolysis of sinigrin in mustard extract by both pathogens was 2 to 6 times higher at 21 °C than at 4 °C to 10 °C, mustard was not inhibitory at 21 °C, perhaps because of the instability of its hydrolysis product (allyl isothiocyanate). At 21 °C, additive inhibitory effects of mustard extract with EDTA or malic acid led to undetectable levels of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 7 d and 10 d, respectively. At 10 °C, S. Typhimurium was similarly susceptible, but combinations of antimicrobials were not more inhibitory to L. monocytogenes than the individual agents.

  13. PCR experion automated electrophoresis system to detect Listeria monocytogenes in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibato, Elisabetta; Gattuso, Antonietta; Minucci, Angelo; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Toti, Laura; Castagnola, Massimo; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gianfranceschi, Monica Virginia

    2009-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is frequently found as a contaminant in raw and ready-to-eat foods. The ability of L. monocytogenes to multiply at refrigeration temperatures and to grow in a wide range of pH values is of particular concern for food safety. According to the European Union regulation on microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, L. monocytogenes must be absent in some categories of ready-to-eat foods. The standard microbiological method for L. monocytogenes detection in foods (ISO 11290-1: 1996 (ISO, International Organization for Standardization)) is cost and time consuming. Developments of rapid, cost-effective and automated diagnostic methods to detect food-borne pathogens in foods continue to be a major concern for the industry and public health. The aim of this study was the development of a rapid, sensitive and specific molecular detection method for L. monocytogenes. To this purpose, we have applied a capillary electrophoresis method to a PCR protocol (PCR-EES (EES, experion automated electrophoresis system)) for detecting L. monocytogenes in food. In particular, a microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system (experion automated electrophoresis system, Bio-Rad Laboratories, USA) was used for the rapid and automatic analysis of the amplicons. Fifty naturally contaminated samples were analysed with this method and the results were compared with those obtained with ISO method. Moreover, the microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system was compared with classical gel electrophoresis (PCR-CGE). The results showed that after 24 h of culture enrichment, the PCR-EES showed a relative accuracy of 100% with ISO, while using PCR-CGE decreased it down to 96%. After 48 h of enrichment, both PCR-EES and PCR-CGE showed an accuracy of 100% with ISO.

  14. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in cured deli-style Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kathleen A; McDonnell, Lindsey M; Von Tayson, Roxanne; Wanless, Brandon; Badvela, Mani

    2013-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes growth can be controlled on ready-to-eat meats through the incorporation of antimicrobial ingredients into the formulation or by postlethality kill steps. However, alternate approaches are needed to provide options that reduce sodium content but maintain protection against pathogen growth in meats after slicing. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibition of L. monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in high-moisture, cured turkey stored at 4 or 7°C. Six formulations of sliced, cured (120 ppm of NaNO2 ), deli-style turkey were tested, including control without antimicrobials, 3.2% lactate-diacetate blend (LD), 0.4% of a liquid propionate-benzoate-containing ingredient, or 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5% of a liquid propionate-containing ingredient. Products were inoculated with 5 log CFU L. monocytogenes per 100-g package (3 log CFU/ml rinsate), vacuum-sealed, and stored at 4 or 7°C for up to 12 weeks; and populations were enumerated by plating on modified Oxford agar. As expected, the control without antimicrobials supported rapid growth, with >2 log average per ml rinsate increase within 4 weeks of storage at 4°C, whereas growth was observed at 6 weeks for the LD treatment. For both replicate trials, all treatments that contained liquid propionate or propionate-benzoate limited L. monocytogenes growth to an increase of 1-log increase) was observed in individual samples for all propionate-containing treatments at weeks 10, 11, and 12. As expected, L. monocytogenes grew more rapidly when products were stored at 7°C, but trends in relative inhibition were similar to those observed at 4°C. These results verify that propionate-based ingredients inhibit growth of L. monocytogenes on sliced, high-moisture, cured turkey and can be considered as an alternative to reduce sodium-based salts while maintaining food safety.

  15. Effect of citral and carvacrol on the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, S F; Silva-Angulo, A B; Rosenthal, A; Rodrigo, D; Martínez, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria innocua (L. innocua) and Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) cells in the presence of citral and carvacrol at sublethal concentrations in an agar medium. The presence of terpenes in the L. monocytogenes and L. innocua culture medium provided a reduction in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all the antibiotics tested. These effects were dependent on the concentration of terpenes present in the culture medium. The combination of citral and carvacrol potentiated antibiotic activity by reducing the MIC values of bacitracin and colistin from 32.0 and 128.0 μg ml⁻¹ to 1.0 and 2.0 μg ml⁻¹, respectively. Thus, both Listeria species became more susceptible to these drugs. In this way, the colistin and bacitracin resistance of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua was reversed in the presence of terpenes. Results obtained in this study show that the phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity, reducing the MIC values of cultured L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. Phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity of erythromycin, bacitracin and colistin by reducing the MIC values of cultured Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. This effect in reducing the MIC values of the antibiotics tested in both micro-organisms was increased when natural antimicrobials were combined. This finding indicated that the combination among terpenes and antibiotic may contribute in reducing the required dosage of antibiotics due to the possible effect of terpenes on permeation barrier of the micro-organism cell membrane. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on Frozen Red Raspberries by Using UV-C Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yen-Te; Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Zhang, Hongchao; Killinger, Karen; Sablani, Shyam

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of UV-C treatment was determined on the reduction of foodborne pathogens on artificially contaminated frozen food surfaces. At first, the UV-C inactivation rates on 100 μl of the respective cocktails of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella , and Listeria monocytogenes covered underneath 0.5-cm-thick ice were examined. Simultaneously, the energy percentage of UV-C transmitted through the ice was determined. The experiments showed that more than 65% of the UV-C light energy passed through the ice and that UV-C susceptibility was in the descending order of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella , and L. monocytogenes . L. monocytogenes , the most UV-C-resistant strain, was then selected to test on frozen raspberries. The UV-C inactivation kinetic data of L. monocytogenes were well described using the Weibull equation. During 720 s of UV-C exposure, with a total dose of 7.8 × 10(2) mJ/cm(2), a 1.5-log CFU/g reduction of L. monocytogenes population on the surface of frozen red raspberries was noted. No significant differences in total anthocyanins, total phenolics, and total antioxidant activity were observed between UV-C-treated and untreated frozen berries immediately after treatment. At the end of 9 months of storage at -35°C, UV-C-treated berries had statistically lower total phenolics, higher total anthocyanins, and similar total antioxidant activity compared with untreated berries. This study shows that UV-C light can be used to reduce the L. monocytogenes population on frozen raspberries.

  17. Fat content increases the lethality of ultra-high-pressure homogenization on Listeria monocytogenes in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig-Sagués, A X; Velázquez, R M; Montealegre-Agramont, P; López-Pedemonte, T J; Briñez-Zambrano, W J; Guamis-López, B; Hernandez-Herrero, M M

    2009-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes CCUG 15526 was inoculated at a concentration of approximately 7.0 log(10) cfu/mL in milk samples with 0.3, 3.6, 10, and 15% fat contents. Milk samples with 0.3 and 3.6% fat content were also inoculated with a lower load of approximately 3.0 log(10) cfu/mL. Inoculated milk samples were subjected to a single cycle of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH) treatment at 200, 300, and 400 MPa. Microbiological analyses were performed 2 h after the UHPH treatments and after 5, 8, and 15 d of storage at 4 degrees C. Maximum lethality values were observed in samples treated at 400 MPa with 15 and 10% fat (7.95 and 7.46 log(10) cfu/mL), respectively. However, in skimmed and 3.6% fat milk samples, complete inactivation was not achieved and, during the subsequent 15 d of storage at 4 degrees C, L. monocytogenes was able to recover and replicate until achieving initial counts. In milk samples with 10 and 15% fat, L. monocytogenes recovered to the level of initial counts only in the milk samples treated at 200 MPa but not in the milk samples treated at 300 and 400 MPa. When the load of L. monocytogenes was approximately 3.0 log(10) cfu/mL in milk samples with 0.3 and 3.6% fat, complete inactivation was not achieved and L. monocytogenes was able to recover and grow during the subsequent cold storage. Fat content increased the maximum temperature reached during UHPH treatment; this could have contributed to the lethal effect achieved, but the amount of fat of the milk had a stronger effect than the temperature on obtaining a higher death rate of L. monocytogenes.

  18. Tn6188 - a novel transposon in Listeria monocytogenes responsible for tolerance to benzalkonium chloride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneliese Müller

    Full Text Available Controlling the food-borne pathogen Listeria (L. monocytogenes is of great importance from a food safety perspective, and thus for human health. The consequences of failures in this regard have been exemplified by recent large listeriosis outbreaks in the USA and Europe. It is thus particularly notable that tolerance to quaternary ammonium compounds such as benzalkonium chloride (BC has been observed in many L. monocytogenes strains. However, the molecular determinants and mechanisms of BC tolerance of L. monocytogenes are still largely unknown. Here we describe Tn6188, a novel transposon in L. monocytogenes conferring tolerance to BC. Tn6188 is related to Tn554 from Staphylococcus (S. aureus and other Tn554-like transposons such as Tn558, Tn559 and Tn5406 found in various Firmicutes. Tn6188 comprises 5117 bp, is integrated chromosomally within the radC gene and consists of three transposase genes (tnpABC as well as genes encoding a putative transcriptional regulator and QacH, a small multidrug resistance protein family (SMR transporter putatively associated with export of BC that shows high amino acid identity to Smr/QacC from S. aureus and to EmrE from Escherichia coli. We screened 91 L. monocytogenes strains for the presence of Tn6188 by PCR and found Tn6188 in 10 of the analyzed strains. These isolates were from food and food processing environments and predominantly from serovar 1/2a. L. monocytogenes strains harboring Tn6188 had significantly higher BC minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs (28.5 ± 4.7 mg/l than strains without Tn6188 (14 ± 3.2 mg/l. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR we could show a significant increase in qacH expression in the presence of BC. QacH deletion mutants were generated in two L. monocytogenes strains and growth analysis revealed that ΔqacH strains had lower BC MICs than wildtype strains. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that Tn6188 is responsible for BC tolerance in various L

  19. Rhomboencephalitis and cerebral abscess due to l. monocytogenes: a clinical challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, S.; Valverde, A

    2013-01-01

    A Listeria monocytogenes é um bacilo gram positivo, anaeróbio facultativo e responsável por envolvimento do sistema nervoso central em 30 a 55% dos casos. As manifestações mais frequentes são a meningite aguda e subaguda, seguida da bacteriémia, romboencefalite e abcessos cerebrais ou medulares. Apresentamos um caso clínico de uma romboencefalite e abcessos cerebrais por L. monocytogenes. Concluímos que é importante considerar sempre o diagnóstico de infecção por este agente em doent...

  20. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh and fermented Italian sausages and ribotyping of contaminating strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cesare, Alessandra; Mioni, Renzo; Manfreda, Gerardo

    2007-11-30

    Listeria monocytogenes has been detected in fresh as well as dry and semidry fermented sausages, rendering preparation and consumption of these products as a potential risk to human health. The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the L. monocytogenes prevalence in 288 fresh and 237 fermented sausages produced in northern Italy; (2) to quantify the average pathogen Most Probable Number (MPN) per g of sausage; (3) to evaluate the sausage strain genetic diversity by automated PvuII ribotyping; and (4) to predict the pathogenicity lineage of these isolates determining their DuPont Identification Library Codes (DUP-IDs) by EcoRI ribotyping. The overall prevalence of L. monocytogenes in the sampled sausages was 28.2%. The percentage of L. monocytogenes positive fresh sausages was significantly higher than that of fermented sausages (i.e. 38.9 vs 15.2%), which had a pathogen load always lower than 10 MPN/g. In contrast, 16.1% of fresh sausages were contaminated by 10 to 100 MPN/g and 20.5% had more than 100 MPN/g. PvuII successfully discriminated sausage isolates with a Simpson's numerical index of discrimination of 0.637. A total of 12 and 9 different PvuII ribogroups were identified among 47 fresh and 24 fermented randomly selected sausage strains, respectively. Six of those ribogroups were shared between strains contaminating both kinds of sausages. According to the evaluation of the strain DUP-IDs, the majority of the isolates investigated in this study were part of the type II L. monocytogenes pathogenicity lineage, but type I lineage strains were identified among fermented sausage isolates. In conclusion, L. monocytogenes prevalence in Italian sausages was estimated to be around 28.2%. However, 84.2% of the samples were contaminated by less than 100 MPN of L. monocytogenes per g and the majority of L. monocytogenes contaminating strains would be classified in the type II pathogenicity lineage, including serotypes 1/2a, 1/2c and 3a.