WorldWideScience

Sample records for monocytogenes motility test

  1. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  2. Acanthamoeba feature a unique backpacking strategy to trap and feed on Listeria monocytogenes and other motile bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyscher, Dominik; Fieseler, Lars; Dons, Lone Elisabet

    2013-01-01

    Despite its prominent role as an intracellular human pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes normally features a saprophytic lifestyle, and shares many environmental habitats with predatory protozoa. Earlier studies claimed that Acanthamoeba may act as environmental reservoirs for L.?monocytogenes, wher......Despite its prominent role as an intracellular human pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes normally features a saprophytic lifestyle, and shares many environmental habitats with predatory protozoa. Earlier studies claimed that Acanthamoeba may act as environmental reservoirs for L.......?monocytogenes, whereas others failed to confirm this hypothesis. Our findings support the latter and provide clear evidence that L.?monocytogenes is unable to persist in Acanthamoeba castellanii and A.?polyphaga. Instead, external Listeria cells are rapidly immobilized on the surface of Acanthamoeba trophozoites...... that formation of backpacks is not specific for L.?monocytogenes, and independent of bacterial pathogenicity or virulence. Hence, backpacking appears to represent a unique and highly effective strategy of Acanthamoeba to trap and feed on motile bacteria....

  3. Acanthamoeba feature a unique backpacking strategy to trap and feed on Listeria monocytogenes and other motile bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyscher, Dominik; Fieseler, Lars; Dons, Lone; Loessner, Martin J; Schuppler, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Despite its prominent role as an intracellular human pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes normally features a saprophytic lifestyle, and shares many environmental habitats with predatory protozoa. Earlier studies claimed that Acanthamoeba may act as environmental reservoirs for L. monocytogenes, whereas others failed to confirm this hypothesis. Our findings support the latter and provide clear evidence that L. monocytogenes is unable to persist in Acanthamoeba castellanii and A. polyphaga. Instead, external Listeria cells are rapidly immobilized on the surface of Acanthamoeba trophozoites, forming large aggregates of densely packed bacteria that we termed backpacks. While the assembly of backpacks is dependent on bacterial motility, flagellation alone is not sufficient. Electron micrographs showed that the aggregates are held together by filaments of likely amoebal origin. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that shortly after the bacteria are collected, the amoeba can change direction of movement, phagocytose the backpack and continue to repeat the process. The phenomenon was also observed with avirulent L. monocytogenes mutants, non-pathogenic Listeria, and other motile bacteria, indicating that formation of backpacks is not specific for L. monocytogenes, and independent of bacterial pathogenicity or virulence. Hence, backpacking appears to represent a unique and highly effective strategy of Acanthamoeba to trap and feed on motile bacteria.

  4. A protein thermometer controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather D Kamp

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Facultative bacterial pathogens must adapt to multiple stimuli to persist in the environment or establish infection within a host. Temperature is often utilized as a signal to control expression of virulence genes necessary for infection or genes required for persistence in the environment. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that allow bacteria to adapt and respond to temperature fluctuations. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is a food-borne, facultative intracellular pathogen that uses flagellar motility to survive in the extracellular environment and to enhance initial invasion of host cells during infection. Upon entering the host, Lm represses transcription of flagellar motility genes in response to mammalian physiological temperature (37°C with a concomitant temperature-dependent up-regulation of virulence genes. We previously determined that down-regulation of flagellar motility is required for virulence and is governed by the reciprocal activities of the MogR transcriptional repressor and the bifunctional flagellar anti-repressor/glycosyltransferase, GmaR. In this study, we determined that GmaR is also a protein thermometer that controls temperature-dependent transcription of flagellar motility genes. Two-hybrid and gel mobility shift analyses indicated that the interaction between MogR and GmaR is temperature sensitive. Using circular dichroism and limited proteolysis, we determined that GmaR undergoes a temperature-dependent conformational change as temperature is elevated. Quantitative analysis of GmaR in Lm revealed that GmaR is degraded in the absence of MogR and at 37°C (when the MogR:GmaR complex is less stable. Since MogR represses transcription of all flagellar motility genes, including transcription of gmaR, changes in the stability of the MogR:GmaR anti-repression complex, due to conformational changes in GmaR, mediates repression or de-repression of flagellar motility genes in Lm. Thus, GmaR functions as

  5. CHALLENGE TESTS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN SALAMI: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mioni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Challenge tests are the preferable methodology to study the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes on ready to eat foods, according to Regulation (EC 2073/2005. Challenge testing using L. monocytogenes in seasoned salami from different food business operators showed, after seasoning of the product, a count reduction of the inoculated organisms without any further growth of the pathogen; however differences of L. monocytogenes behaviour could be observed according to different production protocols.

  6. A dynamical systems approach to actin-based motility in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotton, S.

    2010-11-01

    A simple kinematic model for the trajectories of Listeria monocytogenes is generalized to a dynamical system rich enough to exhibit the resonant Hopf bifurcation structure of excitable media and simple enough to be studied geometrically. It is shown how L. monocytogenes trajectories and meandering spiral waves are organized by the same type of attracting set.

  7. The MogR Transcriptional Repressor Regulates Nonhierarchal Expression of Flagellar Motility Genes and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are surface structures critical for motility and virulence of many bacterial species. In Listeria monocytogenes, MogR tightly represses expression of flagellin (FlaA during extracellular growth at 37 degrees C and during intracellular infection. MogR is also required for full virulence in a murine model of infection. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we determined that the severe virulence defect of MogR-negative bacteria is due to overexpression of FlaA. Specifically, overproduction of FlaA in MogR-negative bacteria caused pleiotropic defects in bacterial division (chaining phenotype, intracellular spread, and virulence in mice. DNA binding and microarray analyses revealed that MogR represses transcription of all known flagellar motility genes by binding directly to a minimum of two TTTT-N(5-AAAA recognition sites positioned within promoter regions such that RNA polymerase binding is occluded. Analysis of MogR protein levels demonstrated that modulation of MogR repression activity confers the temperature-specificity to flagellar motility gene expression. Epistasis analysis revealed that MogR repression of transcription is antagonized in a temperature-dependent manner by the DegU response regulator and that DegU further regulates FlaA levels through a posttranscriptional mechanism. These studies provide the first known example to our knowledge of a transcriptional repressor functioning as a master regulator controlling nonhierarchal expression of flagellar motility genes.

  8. An experimental and computational study of the effect of ActA polarity on the speed of Listeria monocytogenes actin-based motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne M Rafelski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium that moves within infected cells and spreads directly between cells by harnessing the cell's dendritic actin machinery. This motility is dependent on expression of a single bacterial surface protein, ActA, a constitutively active Arp2,3 activator, and has been widely studied as a biochemical and biophysical model system for actin-based motility. Dendritic actin network dynamics are important for cell processes including eukaryotic cell motility, cytokinesis, and endocytosis. Here we experimentally altered the degree of ActA polarity on a population of bacteria and made use of an ActA-RFP fusion to determine the relationship between ActA distribution and speed of bacterial motion. We found a positive linear relationship for both ActA intensity and polarity with speed. We explored the underlying mechanisms of this dependence with two distinctly different quantitative models: a detailed agent-based model in which each actin filament and branched network is explicitly simulated, and a three-state continuum model that describes a simplified relationship between bacterial speed and barbed-end actin populations. In silico bacterial motility required a cooperative restraining mechanism to reconstitute our observed speed-polarity relationship, suggesting that kinetic friction between actin filaments and the bacterial surface, a restraining force previously neglected in motility models, is important in determining the effect of ActA polarity on bacterial motility. The continuum model was less restrictive, requiring only a filament number-dependent restraining mechanism to reproduce our experimental observations. However, seemingly rational assumptions in the continuum model, e.g. an average propulsive force per filament, were invalidated by further analysis with the agent-based model. We found that the average contribution to motility from side-interacting filaments was actually a function of the Act

  9. Microbiological challenge testing for Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food: a practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Spanu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Food business operators (FBOs are the primary responsible for the safety of food they place on the market. The definition and validation of the product’s shelf-life is an essential part for ensuring microbiological safety of food and health of consumers. In the frame of the Regulation (EC No 2073/2005 on microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, FBOs shall conduct shelf-life studies in order to assure that their food does not exceed the food safety criteria throughout the defined shelf-life. In particular this is required for ready-to-eat (RTE food that supports the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Among other studies, FBOs can rely on the conclusion drawn by microbiological challenge tests. A microbiological challenge test consists in the artificial contamination of a food with a pathogen microorganism and aims at simulating its behaviour during processing and distribution under the foreseen storage and handling conditions. A number of documents published by international health authorities and research institutions describes how to conduct challenge studies. The authors reviewed the existing literature and described the methodology for implementing such laboratory studies. All the main aspects for the conduction of L. monocytogenes microbiological challenge tests were considered, from the selection of the strains, preparation and choice of the inoculum level and method of contamination, to the experimental design and data interpretation. The objective of the present document is to provide an exhaustive and practical guideline for laboratories that want to implement L. monocytogenes challenge testing on RTE food.

  10. Microbiological Challenge Testing for Listeria Monocytogenes in Ready-to-Eat Food: A Practical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Christian; Ibba, Michela; Pala, Carlo; Spanu, Vincenzo; De Santis, Enrico Pietro Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Food business operators (FBOs) are the primary responsible for the safety of food they place on the market. The definition and validation of the product’s shelf-life is an essential part for ensuring microbiological safety of food and health of consumers. In the frame of the Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005 on microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, FBOs shall conduct shelf-life studies in order to assure that their food does not exceed the food safety criteria throughout the defined shelf-life. In particular this is required for ready-to-eat (RTE) food that supports the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Among other studies, FBOs can rely on the conclusion drawn by microbiological challenge tests. A microbiological challenge test consists in the artificial contamination of a food with a pathogen microorganism and aims at simulating its behaviour during processing and distribution under the foreseen storage and handling conditions. A number of documents published by international health authorities and research institutions describes how to conduct challenge studies. The authors reviewed the existing literature and described the methodology for implementing such laboratory studies. All the main aspects for the conduction of L. monocytogenes microbiological challenge tests were considered, from the selection of the strains, preparation and choice of the inoculum level and method of contamination, to the experimental design and data interpretation. The objective of the present document is to provide an exhaustive and practical guideline for laboratories that want to implement L. monocytogenes challenge testing on RTE food. PMID:27800369

  11. Learn About GI Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us Learn About GI Motility Digestive Tract Disorders of the Esophagus Disorders ... Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us ...

  12. About GI Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us Learn About GI Motility Digestive Tract Disorders of the Esophagus Disorders ... Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us ...

  13. Control of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes in suckling-lamb meat evaluated using microbial challenge tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osés, S.M.; Diez, A.M.; Gómez, E.M.; Wilches-Pérez, D.; Luning, P.A.; Jaime, I.; Rovira, J.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes microbial challenge tests were performed on fresh suckling-lamb meat. Hind leg slices were chilly stored under two modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) environments (A: 15%O2/60%CO2/25%N2, B: 15%O2/30%CO2/55%N2) and vacuum packaging (V). Only E. coli was re

  14. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes by disinfectants and bacteriophages in suspension and stainless steel carrier tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitiemwong, N; Hazeleger, W C; Beumer, R R

    2014-12-01

    To simulate food contact surfaces with pits or cracks, stainless steel plates with grooves (depths between 0.2 and 5 mm) were constructed. These plates were artificially contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes in clean conditions, with organic soiling, or after 14 days of biofilm formation after which inactivation of the pathogen by Suma Tab D4 (sodium dichloroisocyanurate, 240 and 300 mg/liter), Suma Bac D10 (quaternary ammonium compound, 740 mg/liter), and bacteriophage suspension (Listex P100) was determined. Both chemical disinfectants performed well in suspension tests and in clean carrier tests according to the European standard with a reduction of more than 5 and 4 log units, respectively, of Listeria cells after 5 min of contact time. However, for the plates with grooves, the reduction could not meet the standard requirement, although a higher reduction of L. monocytogenes was observed in the shallow grooves compared with the deeper grooves. Furthermore, presence of food residues and biofilm reduced the effect of the disinfectants especially in the deep grooves, which was dependent on type of food substrate. Bacteriophages showed the best antimicrobial effect compared with the chemical disinfectants (sodium dichloroisocyanurate and quaternary ammonium compound) in most cases in the shallow grooves, but not in the deep grooves. The chlorine based disinfectants were usually less effective than quaternary ammonium compound. The results clearly demonstrate that surfaces with grooves influenced the antimicrobial effect of the chemical disinfectants and bacteriophages because the pathogen is protected in the deep grooves. The use of bacteriophages to inactivate pathogens on surfaces could be helpful in limited cases; however, use of large quantities in practice may be costly and phage-resistant strains may develop.

  15. Technological insights: Combined impedance manometry for esophageal motility testing-current results and further implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Nam Nguyen; Gerson Ricardo Souza Domingues; Frank Lammert

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on current aspects of the novel technology of combined impedance manometry for esophageal motility testing. It presents methodological features, summarizes current results and discusses implications for further research. The combined technique assesses simultaneously bolus transport and associated peristalsis, thus allowing detailed analysis of the relationships between bolus transit and esophageal motility. Recent studies demonstrate that combined impedance manometry provides important additional information about esophageal motility as compared to conventional manometry: (1) monitoring of bolus transport patterns, (2) calculation of bolus transit parameters, (3) evaluation of bolus clearance,(4) monitoring of swallow associated events such as air movement and reflux, and (5) investigation of the relationships between bolus transit and LES relaxation.Studies with healthy subjects have identified several useful parameters for comprehensive assessment of eosphageal function. These parameters were found to be pathological in patients with classical achalasia,mild GERD, and ineffective esophageal motility. The technology of combined impedance manometry provides an important new tool for esophageal function testing,advancing both clinical and basic research. However,several important issues remain to be standardized to make the technique suitable for widely clinical use.

  16. Predicted and observed growth of Listeria monocytogenes in seafood challenge tests and in naturally contaminated cold smoked salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel

    1998-01-01

    with various types of seafoods. Storage trials clearly showed the growth of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon to be markedly slower than growth in inoculated challenge tests. Consequently, all four models substantially overestimated growth in the naturally contaminated products......The performance of the Pathogen Modelling Program, the Food MicroModel, the Murphy-model and the Ross-model for growth of L. monocytogenes was evaluated by comparison with data from 100 seafood challenge tests and data from 13 storage trials with naturally contaminated sliced vacuum-packed cold-smoked....... Temperature, pH, NaCl/a(w) and lactate were measured in the storage trials and on the basis of these parameters, the Food MicroModel mu(max)-bias factor was 5.2. Clearly, the model could not be successfully validated with naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon. To improve the applicability of predictive...

  17. Bacterial Motility As a Biosignature: Tests at Icy Moon Analogue Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, J. L.; Lindensmith, C.; Deming, J. W.; Stocker, R.; Graff, E.; Serabyn, E.; Wallace, J. K.; Liewer, K.; Kuhn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Extraterrestrial life in our Solar System, if present, is almost certain to be microbial. Methods and technologies for unambiguous detection of living or extinct microorganisms are needed for life-detection missions to the Jovian and Saturnian moons, where liquid water is known to exist. Our research focuses specifically on microbial meaningful motion as a biosignature—"waving crowds" at the micron scale. Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is an excellent tool for unambiguous identification of bacterial and protozoal swimming, even in the presence of turbidity, drift, and currents. The design of a holographic instrument with bacteria scale resolution was described in the previous talk. In this presentation, we will illustrate the design challenges for construction of a field instrument for extreme environments and space, and present plans for scientific investigations at analogue sites for the coming season. The challenges of creating a field instrument involve performance trade-offs, the ability to operate at extreme temperatures, and handling large volumes of data. A fully autonomous instrument without external cables or power is also desirable, and this is something that previous holographic instruments have not achieved. The primary issues for space exploration are identification of a laser and drive electronics that are qualified for the expected radiation environments of the moons around gas giant planets. Tests in Earth analogue environments will establish performance parameters as well as answer scientific questions that traditional microscopic techniques cannot. Specifically, we will visit a Greenland field site to determine whether or not microorganisms are motile within the brine-filled interior network of sea ice, and if they can be autonomously tracked using the instrument. Motility within the liquid phase of a frozen matrix has been hypothesized to explain how bacteria contribute to the biogeochemical signatures detected in ice, but observational

  18. Predictive value of hypo-osmotic swelling test to identify viable non-motile sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WilliamM.Bucker

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To determine the predictive value of the hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test to identify viable, non-motile sperm. Methods: Semen samples from 20 men with severe asthenozoospermia underwent traditional seminal analysis, eosin-nigrosin (EN) staining and the HOS test. A further EN stain was then pexformed on a HOS pre-treated aliquot and a total of 2000 further sperm examined. Results: The median sperm density was 5.1 million/mL (IQR 4.3-13.1) and the median motility was 3.0 % (IQR 0-7). Seven samples showed complete asthenozoospermia. Initial EN staining showed 59 % viability (range 48-69) despite the poor standard parameters and 47 % (range 33-61) in thecomplete asthenozoospermia subgroup. The HOS test showed 49.9 % reacted overall (range 40-59) and 41.7 %(range 22-61) in the complete asthenozoospermia subgroup. The combined HOSfEN stain showed the positive pre-dictive value of the HOS test to identify viable sperm was 84.2 % overall and 79.7 % in the complete asthenozoospermia subgroup. Conclusion: The HOS test can effectively predict sperm viability in patients with severe and complete asthenozoospermia. ( Asian J Andro12003 Sep; 5: 209-212)

  19. Evaluation of applied biosystems MicroSeq real-time PCR system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food. Performance Tested Method 011002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbs, Robert S; Balachandran, Priya; Wong, Lily Y; Zoder, Patrick; Furtado, Manohar R; Petrauskene, Olga V; Cao, Yanxiang

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, more food companies are relying on molecular methods, such as PCR, for pathogen detection due to their improved simplicity, sensitivity, and rapid time to results. This report describes the validation of a new Real-Time PCR method to detect Listeria monocytogenes in nine different food matrixes. The complete system consists of the MicroSEQ L. monocytogenes Detection Kit, sample preparation, the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Real-Time PCR instrument, and RapidFinder Express software. Two sample preparation methods were validated: the PrepSEQ Nucleic Acid extraction kit and the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin sample preparation kit. The test method was compared to the ISO 11290-1 reference method using an unpaired-study design to detect L. monocytogenes in roast beef, cured bacon, lox (smoked salmon), lettuce, whole cow's milk, dry infant formula, ice cream, salad dressing, and mayonnaise. The MicroSEQ L. monocytogenes Detection Kit and the ISO 11290-1 reference method showed equivalent detection based on Chi-square analysis for all food matrixes when the samples were prepared using either of the two sample preparation methods. An independent validation confirmed these findings on smoked salmon and whole cow's milk. The MicroSEQ kit detected all 50 L. monocytogenes strains tested, and none of the 30 nontargeted bacteria strains.

  20. Dinoflagellates: Fossil motile-stage tests from the upper cretaceous of the Northern New Jersey coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    Fossil dinoflagellate tests have been considered to represent encysted, nonmotile stages. The discovery of flagellar porelike structures and probable trichocyst pores in the Upper Cretaceous genus Dinogymnium suggests that motile stage tests are also preserved as acid-resistant, organic-walled microfossils.

  1. Prevalence and challenge tests of Listeria monocytogenes in Belgian produced and retailed mayonnaise-based deli-salads, cooked meat products and smoked fish between 2005 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttendaele, M; Busschaert, P; Valero, A; Geeraerd, A H; Vermeulen, A; Jacxsens, L; Goh, K K; De Loy, A; Van Impe, J F; Devlieghere, F

    2009-07-31

    Processed ready-to-eat (RTE) foods with a prolonged shelf-life under refrigeration are at risk products for listeriosis. This manuscript provides an overview of prevalence data (n=1974) and challenge tests (n=299) related to Listeria monocytogenes for three categories of RTE food i) mayonnaise-based deli-salads (1187 presence/absence tests and 182 challenge tests), ii) cooked meat products (639 presence/absence tests and 92 challenge tests), and iii) smoked fish (90 presence/absence tests and 25 challenge tests), based on data records obtained from various food business operators in Belgium in the frame of the validation and verification of their HACCP plans over the period 2005-2007. Overall, the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in these RTE foods in the present study was lower compared to former studies in Belgium. For mayonnaise-based deli-salads, in 80 out of 1187 samples (6.7%) the pathogen was detected in 25 g. L. monocytogenes positive samples were often associated with smoked fish deli-salads. Cooked meat products showed a 1.1% (n=639) prevalence of the pathogen. For both food categories, numbers per gram never exceeded 100 CFU. L. monocytogenes was detected in 27.8% (25/90) smoked fish samples, while 4/25 positive samples failed to comply to the 100 CFU/g limit set out in EU Regulation 2073/2005. Challenge testing showed growth potential in 18/182 (9.9%) deli-salads and 61/92 (66%) cooked meat products. Nevertheless, both for deli-salads and cooked meat products, appropriate product formulation and storage conditions based upon hurdle technology could guarantee no growth of L. monocytogenes throughout the shelf-life as specified by the food business operator. Challenge testing of smoked fish showed growth of L. monocytogenes in 12/25 samples stored for 3-4 weeks at 4 degrees C. Of 45 (non-inoculated) smoked fish samples (13 of which were initially positive in 25 g) which were subjected to shelf-life testing, numbers exceeded 100 CFU/g in only one sample

  2. Scintigraphic test of gastric emptying and motility: preliminary results in patients with chronic gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, T. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Mueller-Schauenburg, W. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Goeke, M. [Abt. Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Luebeck, M. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Univ.-Krankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Gratz, K.F. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meier, P. [Abt. Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Manns, M. [Abt. Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Hundeshagen, H. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    To record gastric peristalsis using a conventional scintigraphic gastric emptying test the frame rate was increased to 1 frame per 3 s at 10, 30, and 50 min postprandially. The gastric contraction frequency was obtained from the first harmonic of a Fourier transform of a gastric region of interest (ROI) curve. The propagation of gastric contractions was better revealed from computed functional images of the phase and amplitude distribution as compared with the multiple scintigraphic images. The maximal count-rate changes per pixel were calculated as an estimate of the most prominent regional contractile activity of the gastric wall. Among 12 patients with chronic gastritis the group with more severe dyspeptic complaints (n = 6) had significantly higher count-rate changes per pixel when compared with the group with minor complaints (20.0, 21.1 and 14.2 vs 12.9, 12.0, and 10.4 counts/pixel X s at 10, 30, and 50 min. respectively; p < 0.05). The mean half-times of gastric emptying (61, SD 11 vs 54, SD 13 min) and the mean gastric contraction frequencies (2.99, SD 0.19; 3.09, SD 0.33; 3.07, SD 0.10 vs 3.15, SD 0.15; 3.17, SD 0.13; 3.23, SD 0.20 cycles/min at 10, 30, and 50 min, respectively) did not show significant differences between both groups. Our preliminary results agree with the hypothesis of the occurrence of more powerful, nonexpulsive gastric-wall contractions in patients with more severe dyspeptic complaints. Hence, additional quantification of gastric motility allowed a more detailed evaluation of gastric-motor-activity disorders that were for so long not accessible to conventional gastric-emptying tests. (orig.)

  3. Roche/BIOTECON Diagnostics LightCycler foodproof L. monocytogenes detection kit in combination with ShortPrep foodproof II Kit. Performance-Tested Method 070401.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, Benjamin; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia

    2006-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of L. monocytogenes in food based on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This advanced PCR method was designed to reduce the time needed to achieve results from PCR reactions and to enable the user to monitor the amplification of the PCR product simultaneously, in real-time. After DNA isolation using the Roche/BIOTECON Diagnostics ShortPrep foodproof II Kit (formerly called Listeria ShortPrep Kit) designed for the rapid preparation of L. monocytogenes DNA for direct use in PCR, the real-time detection of L. monocytogenes DNA is performed by using the Roche/BIOTECON Diagnostics LightCycler foodproof L. monocytogenes Detection Kit. This kit provides primers and hybridization probes for sequence-specific detection, convenient premixed reagents, and different controls for reliable interpretation of results. For repeatability studies, 20 different foods, covering the 15 food groups recommended from the AOAC Research Institute (AOAC RI) for L. monocytogenes detection were analyzed: raw meats, fresh produce/vegetables, processed meats, seafood, egg and egg products, dairy (cultured/noncultured), spices, dry foods, fruit/juices, uncooked pasta, nuts, confectionery, pet food, food dyes and colorings, and miscellaneous. From each food 20, samples were inoculated with a low level (1-10 colony-forming units (CFU)/25 g) and 20 samples with a high level (10-50 CFU/25 g) of L. monocytogenes. Additionally, 5 uninoculated samples were prepared from each food. The food samples were examined with the test kits and in correlation with the cultural methods according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) or U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook. After 48 h of incubation, the PCR method in all cases showed equal or better results than the reference cultural FDA/BAM or USDA/FSIS methods. Fifteen out of 20 tested food types

  4. Accuracy of sperm-cervical mucus penetration tests in evaluating sperm motility in semen: a systematic quantitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, Bolarinde; Afnan, Masoud; Papaioannou, Spyros; Sharif, Khaldoun; Björndahl, Lars; Coomarasamy, Aravinthan

    2003-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the accuracy of in-vitro sperm penetration into cervical mucus or substitutes in evaluating sperm motility in semen. This was a systematic quantitative review of test accuracy studies. The Cochrane library (2000:4), Medline (1966-2001), Embase (1988-2001) and SciSearch (1981-2001) were searched, in addition to manual searches of conference papers and bibliographies of known primary and review articles. Primary studies measuring in-vitro sperm penetration into cervical mucus, or substitutes (i.e. sperm-mucus penetration test, SMPT) and comparing results with sperm motility in semen were included. There were 18 primary diagnostic studies published in 17 papers, involving a total of 2580 samples. Fourteen primary diagnostic tests used vanguard distance as diagnostic criteria (SMPT(vd)) and the pooled likelihood ratio (LR) for positive (LR+) and negative (LR-) tests were 2.29 (1.82-2.87) and 0.52 (0.44-0.63) respectively. Four studies used diagnostic criteria based directly or indirectly on swim-up sperm count per high power field (SMPT(sc)) instead. Their pooled LR+ and LR- were 5.24 (3.36-8.18) and 0.15 (0.06-0.39) respectively. SMPT(vd) has a low accuracy in the evaluation of sperm motility in semen. However, SMPT(sc) was found to be more accurate. This method of using sperm concentration, instead of vanguard distance, as diagnostic criteria of in-vitro SMPT has potential as a useful laboratory-based sperm function test.

  5. [The influence of acute hypoxia on motility of rats in the open field test under the conditions of an altered photoperiod].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopova, I Iu

    2014-01-01

    The influence of acute hypoxia on the motility of rats under the conditions of an altered photoperiod in the open field test was studied. Thus, keeping the animals in constant darkness after the modeling of acute hypoxia leads to the depression of locomotive and exploratory components of the behavior. At the same time the animals that were kept under the conditions of constant light show a change in the correlation between the components of motility after the action of hypoxia.

  6. Quantifying Listeria monocytogenes prevalence and concentration in minced pork meat and estimating performance of three culture media from presence/absence microbiological testing using a deterministic and stochastic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andritsos, Nikolaos D; Mataragas, Marios; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Drosinos, Eleftherios H

    2013-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes poses a serious threat to public health, and the majority of cases of human listeriosis are associated with contaminated food. Reliable microbiological testing is needed for effective pathogen control by food industry and competent authorities. The aims of this work were to estimate the prevalence and concentration of L. monocytogenes in minced pork meat by the application of a Bayesian modeling approach, and also to determine the performance of three culture media commonly used for detecting L. monocytogenes in foods from a deterministic and stochastic perspective. Samples (n = 100) collected from local markets were tested for L. monocytogenes using in parallel the PALCAM, ALOA and RAPID'L.mono selective media according to ISO 11290-1:1996 and 11290-2:1998 methods. Presence of the pathogen was confirmed by conducting biochemical and molecular tests. Independent experiments (n = 10) for model validation purposes were performed. Performance attributes were calculated from the presence-absence microbiological test results by combining the results obtained from the culture media and confirmative tests. Dirichlet distribution, the multivariate expression of a Beta distribution, was used to analyze the performance data from a stochastic perspective. No L. monocytogenes was enumerated by direct-plating (concentration was estimated at 14-17 CFU/kg. Validation showed good agreement between observed and predicted prevalence (error = -2.17%). The results showed that all media were best at ruling in L. monocytogenes presence than ruling it out. Sensitivity and specificity varied depending on the culture-dependent method. None of the culture media was perfect in detecting L. monocytogenes in minced pork meat alone. The use of at least two culture media in parallel enhanced the efficiency of L. monocytogenes detection. Bayesian modeling may reduce the time needed to draw conclusions regarding L. monocytogenes presence and the uncertainty of the results

  7. Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell motility is a fascinating example of cell behavior which is fundamentally important to a number of biological and pathological processes. It is based on a complex self-organized mechano-chemical machine consisting of cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. In general, the cytoskeleton is responsible for the movement of the entire cell and for movements within the cell. The main challenge in the field of cell motility is to develop a complete physical description on how and why cells move. For this purpose new ways of modeling the properties of biological cells have to be found. This long term goal can only be achieved if new experimental techniques are developed to extract physical information from these living systems and if theoretical models are found which bridge the gap between molecular and mesoscopic length scales. Cell Motility gives an authoritative overview of the fundamental biological facts, theoretical models, and current experimental developments in this fascinating area.

  8. Chronic treatment with epigallocatechin gallate reduces motor hyperactivity and affects in vitro tested intestinal motility of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Assunta Potenza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Green tea catechins seem to contribute toward reducing body weight and fat. Objective: We aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of (–-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the most abundant catechin of green tea, reduces weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, an animal model of metabolic syndrome, by increasing motor activity and/or by altering gastrointestinal motility. Design: Nine-week-old SHR were randomly assigned to two groups and treated by gavage for 3 weeks with vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide or EGCG (200 mg/kg/day. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY control rats were treated with vehicle alone. The effect of chronic administration of EGCG was evaluated on open-field motor activity and on ex vivo colonic and duodenal motility. Moreover, in vitro acute effect of 20-min incubation with EGCG (100 µM or vehicle was evaluated in colonic and duodenal specimens from untreated WKY rats and SHR. Results: Vehicle-treated SHR were normoglycemic and hyperinsulinemic, and showed a reduction of plasma adiponectin when compared to vehicle-treated WKY rats. In addition, consistent with fasting glucose and insulin values, vehicle-treated SHR were more insulin resistant than age-matched vehicle-treated WKY rats. Chronic treatment for 3 weeks with EGCG improved insulin sensitivity, raised plasma adiponectin levels, and reduced food intake and weight gain in SHR. Vehicle-treated SHR showed increased open-field motor activity (both crossings and rearings when tested after each week of treatment. The overall hyperactivity of vehicle-treated SHR was significantly reduced to the levels of vehicle-treated WKY rats after 2 and 3 weeks of EGCG treatment. Colonic and duodenal preparations obtained from SHR chronically treated in vivo with EGCG showed reduced responses to carbachol (0.05–5 µM and increased inhibitory response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1–10 Hz, 13 V, 1 msec, 10-sec train duration, respectively. In vitro

  9. Chronic treatment with epigallocatechin gallate reduces motor hyperactivity and affects in vitro tested intestinal motility of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Maria Assunta; Montagnani, Monica; Nacci, Carmela; De Salvia, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Green tea catechins seem to contribute toward reducing body weight and fat. We aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin of green tea, reduces weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), an animal model of metabolic syndrome, by increasing motor activity and/or by altering gastrointestinal motility. Nine-week-old SHR were randomly assigned to two groups and treated by gavage for 3 weeks with vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide or EGCG (200 mg/kg/day). Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats were treated with vehicle alone. The effect of chronic administration of EGCG was evaluated on open-field motor activity and on ex vivo colonic and duodenal motility. Moreover, in vitro acute effect of 20-min incubation with EGCG (100 µM) or vehicle was evaluated in colonic and duodenal specimens from untreated WKY rats and SHR. Vehicle-treated SHR were normoglycemic and hyperinsulinemic, and showed a reduction of plasma adiponectin when compared to vehicle-treated WKY rats. In addition, consistent with fasting glucose and insulin values, vehicle-treated SHR were more insulin resistant than age-matched vehicle-treated WKY rats. Chronic treatment for 3 weeks with EGCG improved insulin sensitivity, raised plasma adiponectin levels, and reduced food intake and weight gain in SHR. Vehicle-treated SHR showed increased open-field motor activity (both crossings and rearings) when tested after each week of treatment. The overall hyperactivity of vehicle-treated SHR was significantly reduced to the levels of vehicle-treated WKY rats after 2 and 3 weeks of EGCG treatment. Colonic and duodenal preparations obtained from SHR chronically treated in vivo with EGCG showed reduced responses to carbachol (0.05-5 µM) and increased inhibitory response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-10 Hz, 13 V, 1 msec, 10-sec train duration), respectively. In vitro acute EGCG incubation (100 µM, 20 min) of colonic and

  10. 单增李斯特菌磁性试纸条层析体系的研究%Magnetic Test Paper Chromatography System for Listeria monocytogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林婷婷; 卢瑛; 潘迎捷

    2012-01-01

    将单增李斯特菌的多克隆抗体和羊抗鼠IgG(二抗)喷涂于硝酸纤维素膜(NC膜)上分别作为检测线C和质控线T.将单增李斯特菌的单克隆抗体与磁性纳米材料进行化学偶联构建磁性纳米探针,建立双抗夹心模式的检测试纸条.通过在层析体系中分别添加表面活性剂、盐离子、杂蛋白和糖类,探讨其对层析的影响,以提高检测的准确性和灵敏度.研究发现,在层析体系中添加一定浓度的Tween-20、KCl、BSA和葡聚糖,可以实现单增李斯特菌的快速检测.本文研究对今后研发类似磁性试纸条检测技术具有重要参考价值.%Anti-Ltsteria monocytogenes polyclonal antibody and goat anti-mouse IgG ( bi-antibody) were sprayed on the nitrocellulose membrane respectively as test line T and Ihe quality control line C. A double-antibody sandwich mode determination test paper was constructed by using anti-L. monocytogenes monoclonal antibody chemically coupled with magnetic nano-material as nano probe. By means of adding respective surfactants, salts ion, sundry protein, and carbohydrate to study their impact on chromatography system, in order to improve the accuracy and sensitivity of the test and determination. The study was found that certain concentration of Tween-20, KC1, BSA and dextran could realize rapid detection of L monocytogenes. This study has important reference value to research and develop the similar magnetic test paper determination technology in the coming years.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    The intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.

  12. Postenrichment population differentials using buffered Listeria enrichment broth: implications of the presence of Listeria innocua on Listeria monocytogenes in food test samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Ashley L; Dailey, Rachel C; Hitchins, Anthony D; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-11-01

    The recovery of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes from foods is complicated by the presence of competing microorganisms. Nonpathogenic species of Listeria pose a particular problem because variation in growth rate during the enrichment step can produce more colonies of these nontarget cells on selective and/or differential media, resulting in a preferential recovery of nonpathogens, especially Listeria innocua. To gauge the extent of this statistical barrier to pathogen recovery, 10 isolates each of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were propagated together from approximately equal initial levels using the current U. S. Food and Drug Administration's enrichment procedure. In the 100 isolate pairs, an average 1.3-log decrease was found in the 48-h enrichment L. monocytogenes population when L. innocua was present. In 98 of the 100 isolate pairs, L. innocua reached higher levels at 48 h than did L. monocytogenes, with a difference of 0.2 to 2.4 log CFU/ml. The significance of these population differences was apparent by an increase in the difficulty of isolating L. monocytogenes by the streak plating method. L. monocytogenes went completely undetected in 18 of 30 enrichment cultures even after colony isolation was attempted on Oxoid chromogenic Listeria agar. This finding suggests that although both Listeria species were present on the plate, the population differential between them restricted L. monocytogenes to areas of the plate with confluent growth and that isolated individual colonies were only L. innocua.

  13. Postenrichment Population Differentials Using Buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth: Implications of the Presence of Listeria innocua on Listeria monocytogenes in Food Test Samples†

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEYS, ASHLEY L.; DAILEY, RACHEL C.; HITCHINS, ANTHONY D.; SMILEY, R. DERIKE

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes from foods is complicated by the presence of competing microorganisms. Nonpathogenic species of Listeria pose a particular problem because variation in growth rate during the enrichment step can produce more colonies of these nontarget cells on selective and/or differential media, resulting in a preferential recovery of nonpathogens, especially Listeria innocua. To gauge the extent of this statistical barrier to pathogen recovery, 10 isolates each of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were propagated together from approximately equal initial levels using the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s enrichment procedure. In the 100 isolate pairs, an average 1.3-log decrease was found in the 48-h enrichment L. monocytogenes population when L. innocua was present. In 98 of the 100 isolate pairs, L. innocua reached higher levels at 48 h than did L. monocytogenes, with a difference of 0.2 to 2.4 log CFU/ml. The significance of these population differences was apparent by an increase in the difficulty of isolating L. monocytogenes by the streak plating method. L. monocytogenes went completely undetected in 18 of 30 enrichment cultures even after colony isolation was attempted on Oxoid chromogenic Listeria agar. This finding suggests that although both Listeria species were present on the plate, the population differential between them restricted L. monocytogenes to areas of the plate with confluent growth and that isolated individual colonies were only L. innocua. PMID:24215687

  14. Utility of the wireless motility capsule and lactulose breath testing in the evaluation of patients with Parkinson's disease who present with functional gastrointestinal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Andrew; Gandhy, Rita; Barlow, Carrolee; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2017-01-01

    Background The aetiology and origin of gastrointestinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) remains poorly understood. Gastroparesis, small bowel transit delay and bacterial overgrowth may, individually or collectively, play a role. Aims In patients with PD and functional gastrointestinal symptoms, we aimed to determine the utility of the wireless motility capsule and lactulose breath tests in further defining their symptoms' aetiology. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, consecutive patients with PD and functional gastrointestinal symptoms underwent clinical assessment, as well as wireless motility capsule and lactulose breath testing using standard protocols. Results We studied 65 patients with PD and various gastrointestinal symptoms. 35% exhibited gastroparesis by the wireless motility capsule study, 20% small bowel transit delay, while 8% had combined transit abnormalities, suggestive of overlapping gastric and small bowel dysmotility. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth was seen in 34% of cases. Symptoms of abdominal pain, regurgitation, bloating, nausea, vomiting, belching and weight loss could not distinguish between patients with or without gastroparesis, although bloating was significantly more prominent (p<0.001) overall and specifically more so in patients with slow small bowel transit (p<0.01). There was no relationship between delayed small bowel transit time and bacterial overgrowth (p=0.5); PD scores and duration were not correlated with either the transit findings or small bowel bacterial overgrowth. Conclusions Functional gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD may reflect gastroparesis, small bowel transit delay or both, suggesting motor and/or autonomic dysfunction, and may be associated with small bowel bacterial overgrowth. The wireless motility capsule and lactulose breath testing are non-invasive and useful in the assessment of these patients.

  15. Value of the hamster oocyte test and computerised measurements of sperm motility in predicting if four or more viable embryos will be obtained in an IVF cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, W C; Williams, K M; Harrison, S; Rees, J M; Ray, B D; McLaughlin, E A; Hull, M G

    2001-04-01

    The experimental group consisted of men from 81 couples waiting for in vitro fertilization (IVF), about half of whom had sperm dysfunction defined by a negative post-coital test. A diagnostic semen sample was subjected to a hamster oocyte penetration test (HOPT) after stimulation of the acrosome reaction with A23187 +/- pentoxifylline and to computerized sperm motility measurements (CASA) as well as conventional semen analysis according to the WHO protocol. Logistic regression was used to identify parameters that predicted the probability of achieving four or more viable embryos at IVF among the 65 couples from whom four or more oocytes were collected. The number of oocytes available and whether the woman had previously been pregnant (ever pregnant) were important factors but once these had been taken into account a number of sperm parameters had additional predictive power. The most useful of these were the percentage sperm static (CASA) or the percent sperm progressively motile (conventional semen analysis) in the Percoll preparation. A model incorporating the number of oocytes collected, ever pregnant and percentage sperm static achieved 85% correct prediction of outcome in the experimental dataset but only 62% correct prediction in an independent set of 280 IVF cycles. The percentage of hamster oocytes penetrated was a significant predictor but had no advantage over simple motility measurements. The results illustrate the difficulty of basing a prognosis for achieving satisfactory fertilization in IVF on the properties of spermatozoa.

  16. Control of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in an Iberian pork processing plant and selection of benzalkonium chloride-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Sagrario; López, Victoria; Martínez-Suárez, Joaquín V

    2014-05-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the different strains of Listeria monocytogenes collected at an Iberian pork processing plant and to investigate whether their specific characteristics were associated with prolonged survival in the plant. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 29 PFGE types were previously identified during a three-year period. Eight of these PFGE types persisted in the plant during that period. In the present study, a subset of 29 PFGE type strains, which represented the 29 different PFGE types, was further characterized by assessing the potential virulence, and using motility, surface attachment, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. After changing the disinfection procedures in the plant, the isolation rate of L. monocytogenes decreased, and only four of the 29 PFGE types, including three of the eight persistent PFGE types, were found the following year. These four "surviving" PFGE types included three from PCR serogroup IIa that were characterized by their low virulence mutations and low-level resistance to benzalkonium chloride (BAC). Furthermore, these PFGE types comprised the only BAC-resistant isolates found in the study, and they appear to have been selected due to the control of Listeria contamination. The resistance to increased sublethal concentrations of disinfectants may lead to prolonged survival of L. monocytogenes in food plants.

  17. VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes II (LMO2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John

    2013-01-01

    This AOAC GovVal study compared the VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes II (LMO2) to the Health Products and Food Branch MFHPB-30 reference method for detection of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) meats. The VIDAS LMO2 test is an automated enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay for the detection of L. monocytogenes in foods. The LMO2 test, following the enrichment procedure from the MFLP-33 method, also included use of the chromogenic media, chromID Ottaviani Agosti Agar (OAA) and chromID Lmono for confirmation of LMO2 presumptive results. In previous AOAC validation studies comparing the VIDAS LMO2 method to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual and U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service reference methods, LMO2 was approved as AOAC Official Method 2004.02 for the detection of L. monocytogenes in dairy products, vegetables, seafood, raw meats and poultry, and processed meats and poultry. The GovVal comparative study included 20 replicate test portions, each at two contamination levels for each matrix, where fractionally positive results (5-15 positive results/20 replicate portions tested) were obtained by at least one method at one level. Five uncontaminated controls were included. Chi-square analysis of the comparative data in this study indicates no statistical differences between the VIDAS LMO2 and the MFHPB-30 standard methods at the 5% level of significance. Confirmation of presumptive LMO2 results with the chromogenic OAA and Lmono media was shown to be equivalent to the appropriate reference method agars. The data demonstrate that the VIDAS LMO2 method is an acceptable alternative method to the MFHPB-30 standard culture method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in RTE meats, including liver paté, hot dogs, raw fermented sausage, sliced deli turkey, and sliced deli ham.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes: diagnostic problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.; Hazeleger, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    The first isolation methods for the detection of Listeria spp. were generally based on the direct culture of samples on simple agar media, but isolation of the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes was difficult. In time, new techniques were developed, based on a variety of selective and elective agents

  19. Listeria monocytogenes endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, B D; Evans, T; Sage, R

    1985-01-01

    A fatal case of endocarditis due to Listeria monocytogenes is reported. Case reports of endocarditis due to this organism are rare but indicate a higher mortality than with many other causes of bacterial endocarditis. The size of the problem may be underestimated because the organism has a "diphtheroid' appearance and may be incorrectly dismissed as a contaminant.

  20. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in CSF from Three Patients with Meningoencephalitis by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming; Zhou, Jiali; Zhu, Yicheng; Zhang, Yinxin; Lv, Xia; Sun, Ruixue; Shen, Ao; Ren, Haitao; Cui, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Encephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is rare but sometimes fatal. Early diagnosis is difficult using routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, while next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used for the detection and characterization of pathogens. Methods This study set up and applied unbiased NGS to detect L. monocytogenes in CSF collected from three cases of clinically suspected listeria meningoencephalitis. Results Three cases of patients with acute/subacute meningoencephalitis are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging and blood cultures led to a suspected diagnosis of L. monocytogenes, while the CSF cultures were negative. Unbiased NGS of CSF identified and sequenced reads corresponding to L. monocytogenes in all three cases. Conclusions This is the first report highlighting the feasibility of applying NGS of CSF as a diagnostic method for central nervous system (CNS) L. monocytogenes infection. Routine application of this technology in clinical microbiology will significantly improve diagnostic methods for CNS infectious diseases.

  1. LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES RISK EVALUATION IN READY TO EAT DELI PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Civera

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the major concerns for food safety. Its ability to survive and replicate at low temperature, pH and high salt concentration, makes the bacterium a threat, mostly for RTE products. For these reasons, the present research was aimed at detecting the ability of growth of L. monocytogenes in RTE products retrieved from one deli store. Samples were analysed for L. monocytogenes detection, then inoculated with the pathogen (105cell/ml and stored at refrigeration temperature for the duration of their shelf-life (15-60 days. In all the products L. monocytogenes was not detected before experimental contamination. The challenge test evidenced that experimentally inoculated L. monocytogenes was not able to multiply for the duration of the entire shelf-life. These results indicated that the tested products could be considered as foods which are not able to support the growth of L. monocytogenes, as indicated by E.C. Regulation 2073/05. However, in order to guarantee consumer’s safety, it needs to be emphasized the need of a correct application of the GMPs, required for lowering the risk of initial contamination.

  2. Actin-based motility of Listeria: Right-handed helical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes recruit cellular machinery to move in and between cells. Understanding the mechanism of motility, including force and torque generation and the resultant displacements, holds keys to numerous applications in medicine and biosensing. In this work, a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation is presented to illustrate that a biomechanical model of actin-based motility of a rigid surface through persistently attached filaments propelled by affinity-modulated molecular motors can produce a right-handed helical trajectory consistent with experimental observations. The implications of the mechanism to bacterial motility are discussed.

  3. Cytoskeleton and Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Risler, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The present article is an invited contribution to the Encyclopedia of Complexity and System Science, Robert A. Meyers Ed., Springer New York (2009). It is a review of the biophysical mechanisms that underly cell motility. It mainly focuses on the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and cell-motility mechanisms. Bacterial motility as well as the composition of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton is only briefly mentioned. The article is organized as follows. In Section III, I first present an overview of the diversity of cellular motility mechanisms, which might at first glance be categorized into two different types of behaviors, namely "swimming" and "crawling". Intracellular transport, mitosis - or cell division - as well as other extensions of cell motility that rely on the same essential machinery are briefly sketched. In Section IV, I introduce the molecular machinery that underlies cell motility - the cytoskeleton - as well as its interactions with the external environment of the cell and its main regulatory pathways. Sec...

  4. Isolation and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes from Retail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D.I. Alsheikh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria species are widely distributed in environment and L. monocytogenes are the causal agent of Listeriosis, the disease that can be serious and fatal to human and animals. The objectives of this study were to detect, isolate and identify Listeria monocytogenes from retail broiler chicken ready to eat meat products in restaurants-Khartoum state, Sudan. A total of 250 retail broiler chicken ready to eat meat products were collected from restaurants in Khartoum State, 50 sample from frozen chicken burger, 50 sample from frozen chicken sausages, 50 sample from frozen chicken meat balls (kofta, 50 sample from chicken shawerma and 50 sample from chicken mortedella, Listeria spp. were isolated by the conventional International Organization for Standardization method and L. monocytogenes identified by biochemical test. The results showed that out of total 250 samples, 95 (38% were found to be contaminated with Listeria spp. the isolation rate was as follows: L. monocytogenes (13.6%, L. ivanovi (20.8%, L. grayi (1.6%, L. seeligeri (0.8% and L. welshimeri (1.2%. The results presented in this study indicate the contamination of retail broiler chicken ready to eat meat products with L. monocytogenes. This study reported the occurrence and distribution of L. monocytogenes and other Listeria species in retail meat products (frozen chicken burger, frozen chicken sausages, frozen chicken meat balls (kofta, chicken shawerma and chicken mortedella, purchased from restaurants in Khartoum state Sudan.

  5. L. monocytogenes in a cheese processing facility: Learning from contamination scenarios over three years of sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückerl, I; Muhterem-Uyar, M; Muri-Klinger, S; Wagner, K-H; Wagner, M; Stessl, B

    2014-10-17

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changing patterns of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in a cheese processing facility manufacturing a wide range of ready-to-eat products. Characterization of L. monocytogenes isolates included genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Disinfectant-susceptibility tests and the assessment of L. monocytogenes survival in fresh cheese were also conducted. During the sampling period between 2010 and 2013, a total of 1284 environmental samples were investigated. Overall occurrence rates of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes were 21.9% and 19.5%, respectively. Identical L. monocytogenes genotypes were found in the food processing environment (FPE), raw materials and in products. Interventions after the sampling events changed contamination scenarios substantially. The high diversity of globally, widely distributed L. monocytogenes genotypes was reduced by identifying the major sources of contamination. Although susceptible to a broad range of disinfectants and cleaners, one dominant L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 5 could not be eradicated from drains and floors. Significantly, intense humidity and steam could be observed in all rooms and water residues were visible on floors due to increased cleaning strategies. This could explain the high L. monocytogenes contamination of the FPE (drains, shoes and floors) throughout the study (15.8%). The outcome of a challenge experiment in fresh cheese showed that L. monocytogenes could survive after 14days of storage at insufficient cooling temperatures (8 and 16°C). All efforts to reduce L. monocytogenes environmental contamination eventually led to a transition from dynamic to stable contamination scenarios. Consequently, implementation of systematic environmental monitoring via in-house systems should either aim for total avoidance of FPE colonization, or emphasize a first reduction of L. monocytogenes to sites where

  6. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in Idiazabal cheese Prevalencia de Listeria monocytogenes en queso Idiazabal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Arrese

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Raw-milk cheese has been identified in risk assessment as a food of greater concern to public health due to listeriosis. Objective: To determine the prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in semi-hard Idiazabal cheese manufactured by different producers in the Basque Country at consumer level. Methodology: A total of 51 Idiazabal cheese samples were obtained from 10 separate retail establishments, chosen by stratified random sampling. Samples were tested using the official standard ISO procedure 11290-1 for detection and enumeration methods. Results and conclusion: All cheese samples tested negative for L. monocytogenes. However, 9.8% tested positive for Listeria spp., different from L. monocytogenes. Positive samples came from two brands, two were natural and three were smoked. The presence of Listeria spss. suggests that the cheese making process and the hygiene whether at milking or during cheese making could be insufficient.Introducción: Listeria monocytogenes se ha asociado a quesos elaborados a partir de leche cruda, lo que supone un importante riesgo de salud pública debido a la listeriosis. Objetivo: Estudiar la prevalencia y los niveles de L. monocytogenes en quesos Idiazabal semi-curados de distintos productores del País Vasco, a nivel de consumidor. Metodología: Se analizaron 51 muestras de queso Idiazabal procedentes de 10 establecimientos de venta al público; el muestreo fue aleatorio y estratificado. Los análisis se hicieron según el método de detección y de enumeración del procedimiento estandarizado ISO 11290-1. Resultados y conclusión: Todas las muestras dieron negativo para L. monocytogenes. Sin embargo, el 9,8% dio positivo para Listeria spp., distinta de L. monocytogenes. Las muestras positivas procedían de dos marcas, dos eran quesos naturales y tres ahumados. La presencia de Listeria spss. sugiere que el procesado del queso y la higiene durante el ordeño o durante la fabricación podr

  7. Single cell swimming dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes using a nanoporous microfluidic platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Evan [University of Guelph, Canada; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Warriner, Keith [University of Guelph; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes remains a significant foodborne pathogen due to its virulence and ability to become established in food processing facilities. The pathogen is characterized by its ability to grow over a wide temperature range and withstand a broad range of stresses. The following reports on the chemotaxis and motility of the L. monocytogenes when exposed to relatively small concentrations of acetic acid. Using the developed nanoporous microfluidic device to precisely modulate the cellular environment, we exposed the individual Listeria cells to acetic acid and, in real time and with high resolution, observed how the cells reacted to the change in their surroundings. Our results showed that concentrations of acetic acid below 10 mM had very little, if any, effect on the motility. However, when exposed to 100 mM acetic acid, the cells exhibited a sharp drop in velocity and displayed a more random pattern of motion. These results indicate that at appropriate concentrations, acetic acid has the ability to disable the flagellum of the cells, thus impairing their motility. This drop in motility has numerous effects on the cell; its main effects being the obstruction of the cell's ability to properly form biofilms and a reduction in the overall infectivity of the cells. Since these characteristics are especially useful in controlling the proliferation of L. monocytogenes, acetic acid shows potential for application in the food industry as an active compound in designing a food packaging environment and as an antimicrobial agent.

  8. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  9. The Response Regulator ResD Plays a Role in Metabolism of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Sørensen, Martine; Ingmer, Hanne

    conditions in a resD mutant strain compared to the wild type. The majority of these were involved in motility and chemotaxis and in carbohydrate uptake such as mannose and cellobiose specific PTS uptake systems. The role of ResD for metabolism in L. monocytogenes was also studied by northern blot analysis...

  10. [Listeria monocytogenes in food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mícková, V

    1992-12-01

    As in recent years laboratory diagnostics of listeria has become part of food microbiology, the frequency of occurrence of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes has been followed in various kinds of foods for a year. A total of 51 strains of L. monocytogenes (7.2%) was isolated from 700 kinds of samples (raw milk, pasteurized milk, meat surface, poultry, cheeses, thermally not treated meat products, food--industry machinery). As can be seen in Tab. I, the highest number of strains was isolated from meat surfaces (13.5%), followed by meat--industry machinery (12.72%), poultry (10%) and cheeses (5%). The lower numbers of strains were found out in thermally not treated meat products (3.8%) and in raw milk (3.3%). Pasteurized milk did not contain any strains. Our findings in raw milk (3.3%) and in pasteurized milk (0) are in agreement with the data cited e. g. by authors from the USA (Lovett et al., 1987), who mention the value of 4.2% in raw milk and the zero value in pasteurized milk. The percentage of strains monitored in cheeses (5%) can be evaluated as low as the assortment of investigated cheeses was small (all strains were isolated from soft ripening cheeses). German authors (Tham et al., 1988) speak about the 2.5% percentage of L. monocytogenes strains; this is in keeping with our findings. The findings in thermally not treated meat products (3.8%) can be evaluated as low although the number of strains found in raw meat was high.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Molecular Serotyping and Pathogenic Potential of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Raman; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, an important bacterial pathogen, is responsible for foodborne illnesses worldwide. Examination of food samples for the presence of L. monocytogenes and assessment of their pathogenicity is usually an effective strategy in the prevention of listeriosis. In the present study, we have tested 307 samples of milk and milk products from various places in Tamil Nadu, India for the presence of L. monocytogenes using ISO 11290 and U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual methods. 16S rDNA sequencing and duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for prs and iap genes were used to identify L. monocytogenes at the species level. Fifteen of the 307 samples screen tested positive for L. monocytogenes. Molecular serotyping of the L. monocytogenes isolates by multiplex PCR revealed the predominance of the serogroups 1/2a and 4b. Fourteen of the 15 isolates contained all the virulence genes (inlA, inlB, hlyA, and plcA) screened for using multiplex PCR. Only one isolate of L. monocytogenes was negative for the plcA gene and in vitro phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C activity. L. monocytogenes strains that belong to the serogroup 4b exhibited higher nematocidal activity against Caenorhabditis elegans than the serogroup 1/2a. Worms infected with L. monocytogenes were symptomatic with aberrant contraction of body muscles, loss of pharyngeal pumping, and decreased locomotion, which highlights the pathogenic potential of the L. monocytogenes isolates.

  12. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  13. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  14. Assessment of Listeria sp. Interference Using a Molecular Assay To Detect Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittermann, Sandra I; Stanghini, Brenda; See, Ryan Soo; Melano, Roberto G; Boleszczuk, Peter; Murphy, Allana; Maki, Anne; Mallo, Gustavo V

    2016-01-01

    Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food is currently based on enrichment methods. When L. monocytogenes is present with other Listeria species in food, the species compete during the enrichment process. Overgrowth competition of the nonpathogenic Listeria species might result in false-negative results obtained with the current reference methods. This potential issue was noted when 50 food samples artificially spiked with L. monocytogenes were tested with a real-time PCR assay and Canada's current reference method, MFHPB-30. Eleven of the samples studied were from foods naturally contaminated with Listeria species other than those used for spiking. The real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes in all 11 of these samples; however, only 6 of these samples were positive by the MFHPB-30 method. To determine whether L. monocytogenes detection can be affected by other species of the same genus due to competition, an L. monocytogenes strain and a Listeria innocua strain with a faster rate of growth in the enrichment broth were artificially coinoculated at different ratios into ground pork meat samples and cultured according to the MFHPB-30 method. L. monocytogenes was detected only by the MFHPB-30 method when L. monocytogenes/L. innocua ratios were 6.0 or higher. In contrast, using the same enrichments, the real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes at ratios as low as 0.6. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that L. monocytogenes can be outcompeted by L. innocua during the MFHPB-30 enrichment phase. However, more reliable detection of L. monocytogenes in this situation can be achieved by a PCR-based method mainly because of its sensitivity.

  15. Genetic dissection of DivIVA functions in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaval, Karan Gautam; Hauf, Samuel; Rismondo, Jeanine; Hahn, Birgitt; Halbedel, Sven

    2017-10-02

    DivIVA is a membrane binding protein that clusters at curved membrane regions such as the cell poles and the membrane invaginations occurring during cell division. DivIVA proteins recruit many other proteins to these subcellular sites through direct protein-protein interactions. DivIVA-dependent functions are typically associated with cell growth and division, even though species-specific differences in the spectrum of DivIVA functions and their causative interaction partners exist. DivIVA from the Gram-positive human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has at least three different functions. In this bacterium, DivIVA is required for precise positioning of the septum at mid-cell, it contributes to secretion of autolysins required for breakdown of peptidoglycan at the septum after completion of cell division, and it is essential for flagellar motility. While the DivIVA interaction partners for control of division site selection are well-established, the proteins connecting DivIVA with autolysin secretion or swarming motility are completely unknown. We set out to identify divIVA alleles, in which these three DivIVA functions could be separated, since the question of the degree to which the three functions of L. monocytogenes DivIVA are interlinked could not be answered before. Here, we identify such alleles, and our results show that division site selection, autolysin secretion, and swarming represent three discrete pathways that are independently influenced by DivIVA. These findings provide the required basis for the identification of DivIVA interaction partners controlling autolysin secretion and swarming in the future.IMPORTANCE DivIVA of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a central scaffold protein that influences at least three different cellular processes, namely cell division, protein secretion and bacterial motility. How DivIVA coordinates these rather unrelated processes is not known. We here identify variants of L. monocytogenes DivIVA, in which

  16. Gender effects on esophageal motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas R.O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that there are no gender effects on esophageal motility. However, in previous studies the subjects did not perform multiple swallows and the quantitative features of esophageal contractions were not evaluated. In order to investigate the gender effects on esophageal motility we studied 40 healthy normal volunteers, 20 men aged 37 ± 15 years (mean ± SD, and 20 women aged 38 ± 14 years. We used the manometric method with an eight-lumen polyvinyl catheter and continuous perfusion. The upper and lower esophageal sphincter pressures were measured by the rapid pull-through method. With the catheter positioned with one lumen opening in the lower esophageal sphincter, and the others at 5, 10 and 15 cm above the sphincter, ten swallows of a 5-ml water bolus alternated with ten dry swallows were performed. Statistical analysis was done by the Student t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Gender differences (P<0.05 were observed for wet swallows in the duration of contractions 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (men: 3.7 ± 0.2 s, women: 4.5 ± 0.3 s, mean ± SEM, and in the velocity of contractions from 15 to 10 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (men: 4.7 ± 0.3 cm/s, women: 3.5 ± 0.2 cm/s. There was no difference (P>0.05 in sphincter pressure, duration and percentage of complete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, amplitude of contractions, or in the number of failed, multipeaked and synchronous contractions. We conclude that gender may cause some differences in esophageal motility which, though of no clinical significance, should be taken into consideration when interpreting esophageal motility tests.

  17. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimenez, B.; Dalgaard, Paw

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate and model the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage micro-organisms in cold-smoked salmon.Methods and Results: Growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Enterobacteriaceae, enterococci and Photobacterium phosphoreum were determined...... in two series of challenge tests with sliced and vacuum-packed cold-smoked salmon (SVP-CSS). The product contained a high level of smoke components and at 2degreesC levels of L. monocytogenes increased...

  18. [Hematometra & Listeria monocytogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Arzapalo, E; Pérez Mendizábal, A; Herrera Avalos, I; Gorozpe Calvillo, J I

    2001-05-01

    The hematometra is a nosological entity that may not always be attributed to an embryonic defect of the paramesonefros; cervical-vaginal infections such as etiological possibilities due to Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), cervix malignant neoplasias, iatrogenias due to endometrial ablation with Lasser, traumatic bloody uterine curetage and because of cervical cryocoagulation or electrocoagulation are also mentioned. The case to be reported is from a woman in reproductive stage, who is 32 years old, and had menarca at the age of 13, starting her sexual life at 31, not using any method to control her fertility. When having an eight-week amenorrhea after 8 months of marriage, she visited the doctor for assumed pregnancy, within the prenatal analysis a pelvic echographic study was requested, finding out images that we concluded as hematometra, having been drained and demonstrated the presence of LM by anti-Lm antibodies, being administered Azitromicina and Espiramicina.

  19. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Morton

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni. Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  20. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  1. Effects of Seminal Plasma Relaxin on Human Sperm Motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于宁妮; 陆欣; 徐胜; 冯京生; 吴明章

    1999-01-01

    To clarify the role of endogenous relaxin on sperm motility, relaxin in semen was neutraliged by anti-relaxin antibody in vitro.22 semen samples were collected from infertility clinic and tested with Hamilton-Thorn 2000 Motility Analyzer to detect spermmotility(%),progressive motility(%),path velocity (micro/sec) and velocity(0-4 grade) at the time of 0,15,30 and 60 min respectively.The results showed that sperm motility declined significantly after being incubated with anti-relaxin serum.Sperm progressive motility declined more obviously.This experiment revealed that endogenous relaxin could play an important role in the physiological process of maintaining sperm motility,especially progressive motility.

  2. Listeria spp., y L. monocytogenes EN LECHE CRUDA DE CABRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Albarracín C

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test non-pasteurized goat’s milk from the village of ‘la Garita’, Northern Santander, for Listeria monocytogenes. Material and methods. 90 samples of non-pasteurized goat’s milk were obtained over a 4 month period; pH and temperature of each sample were measured. The INVIMA technique was used to isolate L. monocytogenes; the species was confirmed by PCR. Results. The study showed that eight goat milk providers of the zone neither had refrigeration nor pasteurized the milk. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes was 3%; 15% of the samples had other species of Listeria. The milk obtained from this zone contained the pathogen that may cause listeriosis in children less than 5 years of age, pregnant women, adults and immunologically compromised patients. Conclusions. This study shows the occurrence of this pathogen in goat’s milk and identified areas of risk for those people who drink goat’s milk.

  3. Role of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Lappann, Martin; Knøchel, S

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that is capable of living in harsh environments. It is believed to do this by forming biofilms, which are surface-associated multicellular structures encased in a self-produced matrix. In this paper we show that in L. monocytogenes extracellular DNA...... (eDNA) may be the only central component of the biofilm matrix and that it is necessary for both initial attachment and early biofilm formation for 41 L. monocytogenes strains that were tested. DNase I treatment resulted in dispersal of biofilms, not only in microtiter tray assays but also in flow...... cell biofilm assays. However, it was also demonstrated that in a culture without eDNA, neither Listeria genomic DNA nor salmon sperm DNA by itself could restore the capacity to adhere. A search for additional necessary components revealed that peptidoglycan (PG), specifically N-acetylglucosamine (NAG...

  4. Case of Contamination by Listeria Monocytogenes in Mozzarella Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolli, Rita; Bossù, Teresa; Rodas, Eda Maria Flores; Di Giamberardino, Fabiola; Di Sirio, Alessandro; Vita, Silvia; De Angelis, Veronica; Bilei, Stefano; Sonnessa, Michele; Gattuso, Antonietta; Lanni, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Following a Listeria monocytogenes detection in a mozzarella cheese sampled at a dairy plant in Lazio Region, further investigations have been conducted both by the competent Authority and the food business operatordairy factory (as a part of dairy factory HACCP control). In total, 90 dairy products, 7 brine and 64 environmental samples have been tested. The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes was 24.4% in mozzarella cheese, and 9.4% in environmental samples, while brines were all negatives. Forty-seven strains of L. monocytogenes have been isolated, all belonging to 4b/4e serotype. In 12 of these, the macrorestriction profile has been determined by means of pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The profiles obtained with AscI enzyme showed a 100% similarity while those obtained with ApaI a 96.78% similarity. These characteristics of the isolated strains jointly with the production process of mozzarella cheese has allowed to hypothesise an environmental contamination. PMID:27800317

  5. Fødevarebetinget listeria monocytogenes endokarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Bundgaard, Henning; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Listeria monocytogenes is rare and mainly seen in immunosuppressed patients. Infection with L. monocytogenes has a mortality rate of 30%. We present a case report of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and endocarditis in a 70-year-old man with several co-morbidities and following four...... major surgical procedures. This illustrates the findings and characteristics in one of the 16 patients who died in 2013 and 2014 this summer due to sausage-related L. monocytogenes infection....

  6. Analytical bioconjugates, aptamers, enable specific quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Ah; Um, Hyun-Ju; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Sun Park, Tae; Min, Jiho; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2015-06-15

    As a major human pathogen in the Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes causes the bacterial disease listeriosis, which is a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacteria. We have developed an aptamer-based sandwich assay (ABSA) platform that demonstrates a promising potential for use in pathogen detection using aptamers as analytical bioconjugates. The whole-bacteria SELEX (WB-SELEX) strategy was adopted to generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity against live L. monocytogenes. Of the 35 aptamer candidates tested, LMCA2 and LMCA26 reacted to L. monocytogenes with high binding, and were consequently chosen as sensing probes. The ABSA platform can significantly enhance the sensitivity by employing a very specific aptamer pair for the sandwich complex. The ABSA platform exhibited a linear response over a wide concentration range of L. monocytogenes from 20 to 2×10(6) CFU per mL and was closely correlated with the following relationship: y=9533.3x+1542.3 (R(2)=0.99). Our proposed ABSA platform also provided excellent specificity for the tests to distinguish L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species and other bacterial genera (3 Listeria spp., 4 Salmonella spp., 2 Vibrio spp., 3 Escherichia coli and 3 Shigella spp.). Improvements in the sensitivity and specificity have not only facilitated the reliable detection of L. monocytogenes at extremely low concentrations, but also allowed for the development of a 96-well plate-based routine assay platform for multivalent diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment...... to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...

  8. Mechanotaxis and cell motility

    CERN Document Server

    Recho, Pierre; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mechanism of cell motility which is based on contraction and does not require protrusion. The contraction driven translocation of a cell is due to internal flow of the cytoskeleton generated by molecular motors. Each motor contributes to the stress field and simultaneously undergoes biased random motion in the direction of a higher value of this stress. In this way active cross-linkers use passive actin network as a medium through which they interact and self-organize. The model exhibits motility initiation pattern similar to the one observed in experiments on keratocytes.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes Prevalence and Characteristics in Retail Raw Foods in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Shi; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Chen, Moutong; Yan, Ze An; Hu, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in retail raw foods covering most provincial capitals in China were studied with testing of 1036 samples of vegetables, edible mushrooms, raw meat...

  10. Incidence and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes in foods available in Taiwan.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, H. C.; Chao, W L; Lee, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of foods were examined for the incidence of Listeria monocytogenes, and the bacterial isolates were further characterized. L. monocytogenes was selected on LiCl-phenylethanol-moxalactam agar after enrichments and identified by several biochemical, mobility, and CAMP tests. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 58.8% of pork samples, 50% of chicken carcasses, 38% of turkey parts, 34% of frozen semiready foods, 24% of beef steaks, 12.2% of vegetables, 10.5% of seafoods, and 4.4% of froze...

  11. High motility reduces grazing mortality of planktonic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Jurgens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the impact of bacterial swimming speed on the survival of planktonic bacteria in the presence of protozoan grazers. Grazing experiments with three common bacterivorous nanoflagellates revealed low clearance rates for highly motile bacteria. High-resolution video microscopy demonstrated ......(3), >50 mum s(-1)) illustrated the combined protective action of small cell size and high motility. Our findings suggest that motility has an important adaptive function in the survival of planktonic bacteria during protozoan grazing....

  12. Sphincter of Oddi motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P; Ebbehøj, N

    1996-01-01

    Gastroenterology. RESULTS: The SO is a zone with an elevated basal pressure with superimposed phasic contractions. It acts mainly as a resistor in the regulation of bile flow. Neurohormonal regulation influences the motility pattern. The contractions are under the control of slow waves. Clinical subgroups show...

  13. Sperm Motility in Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  14. Role of host GTPases in infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, Keith; Rigano, Luciano A; Dowd, Georgina C

    2014-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces internalization into mammalian cells and uses actin-based motility to spread within tissues. Listeria accomplishes this intracellular life cycle by exploiting or antagonizing several host GTPases. Internalization into human cells is mediated by the bacterial surface proteins InlA or InlB. These two modes of uptake each require a host actin polymerization pathway comprised of the GTPase Rac1, nucleation promotion factors, and the Arp2/3 complex. In addition to Rac1, InlB-mediated internalization involves inhibition of the GTPase Arf6 and participation of Dynamin and septin family GTPases. After uptake, Listeria is encased in host phagosomes. The bacterial protein GAPDH inactivates the human GTPase Rab5, thereby delaying phagosomal acquisition of antimicrobial properties. After bacterial-induced destruction of the phagosome, cytosolic Listeria uses the surface protein ActA to stimulate actin-based motility. The GTPase Dynamin 2 reduces the density of microtubules that would otherwise limit bacterial movement. Cell-to-cell spread results when motile Listeria remodel the host plasma membrane into protrusions that are engulfed by neighbouring cells. The human GTPase Cdc42, its activator Tuba, and its effector N-WASP form a complex with the potential to restrict Listeria protrusions. Bacteria overcome this restriction through two microbial factors that inhibit Cdc42-GTP or Tuba/N-WASP interaction.

  15. In silico reconstitution of actin-based symmetry breaking and motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dayel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells assemble viscoelastic networks of crosslinked actin filaments to control their shape, mechanical properties, and motility. One important class of actin network is nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex and drives both membrane protrusion at the leading edge of motile cells and intracellular motility of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. These networks can be reconstituted in vitro from purified components to drive the motility of spherical micron-sized beads. An Elastic Gel model has been successful in explaining how these networks break symmetry, but how they produce directed motile force has been less clear. We have combined numerical simulations with in vitro experiments to reconstitute the behavior of these motile actin networks in silico using an Accumulative Particle-Spring (APS model that builds on the Elastic Gel model, and demonstrates simple intuitive mechanisms for both symmetry breaking and sustained motility. The APS model explains observed transitions between smooth and pulsatile motion as well as subtle variations in network architecture caused by differences in geometry and conditions. Our findings also explain sideways symmetry breaking and motility of elongated beads, and show that elastic recoil, though important for symmetry breaking and pulsatile motion, is not necessary for smooth directional motility. The APS model demonstrates how a small number of viscoelastic network parameters and construction rules suffice to recapture the complex behavior of motile actin networks. The fact that the model not only mirrors our in vitro observations, but also makes novel predictions that we confirm by experiment, suggests that the model captures much of the essence of actin-based motility in this system.

  16. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Fiyinfoluwa Odedina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination.

  17. Relationship between Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in seafood processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Walid Q; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes as an outcome and Listeria spp. as an explanatory variable by food products, food contact surfaces, and nonfood contact surfaces in seafood processing plants by using peer-reviewed published data. Nine sets of prevalence data of L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. were collected from published studies and used for the analyses. Based on our analysis, the relationship between L. monocytogenes prevalence and Listeria spp. prevalence in food products (incoming raw materials and finish products) was significant (P = 0.04) with (low) R² = 0.36. Furthermore, Listeria spp. were not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes when testing food contact surfaces (R² = 0.10). Listeria spp. were a good indicator for L. monocytogenes only on nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.90). On the other hand, the presence of Listeria spp. on food contact surfaces (R² = 0.002) and nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.03) was not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes presence in food products. In general, prevalence of Listeria spp. does not seem to be a good indicator for L. monocytogenes prevalence in seafood processing plants.

  18. Sperm tail flexibility test: a simple test for selecting viable spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection from semen samples without motile spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Jonathas Borges

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The objective was to describe the results of the injection of immotile spermatozoa with flexible tails when only immotile spermatozoa are present in the semen sample. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to analyze the procedure results for 10 couples who participated in our intracytoplasmic sperm injection program. The sperm tail was considered flexible when it moved up and down independently of the head movement, and it was considered inflexible when the movement occurred together (tail plus head. The fertilization and pregnancy rate were analyzed. RESULTS: The normal fertilization rate (presence of 2 pronuclei was 30.3% (40/132, and the abnormal fertilization rate (presence of less than or more than 2 pronuclei was 6.81% (9/132. A total of 52 embryos were obtained with 9 transfer procedures performed (pregnancy rate: 11.12%. CONCLUSIONS: The sperm tail flexibility test (STFT is an easy and cost-effective way for selecting viable immotile spermatozoa and can be used as an alternative method for determining the viability of spermatozoa. This test seems to be a simple and risk-free method when compared to the swelling test.

  19. Neuroinfections due to Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streharova, A; Babjakova, A; Moravcikova, A; Harnicarova, A; Holeckova, K; Lesnakova, A; Sladeckova, V; Seckova, S; Kisac, P; Beno, P

    2007-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is not a rare pathogen causing meningitis, mainly in small children and in close contacts to livestock. The pathogen is naturally resistant to cephalosporins and some glycopeptides as well, therefore despite of syndromologic diagnosis of meningitis and initial therapy with 3rd generation cephalosporins according to the guidelines therapeutic failures with clinical consequences may occur.

  20. Biotic and abiotic soil properties influence survival of Listeria monocytogenes in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Locatelli

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen responsible for the potentially fatal disease listeriosis and terrestrial ecosystems have been hypothesized to be its natural reservoir. Therefore, identifying the key edaphic factors that influence its survival in soil is critical. We measured the survival of L. monocytogenes in a set of 100 soil samples belonging to the French Soil Quality Monitoring Network. This soil collection is meant to be representative of the pedology and land use of the whole French territory. The population of L. monocytogenes in inoculated microcosms was enumerated by plate count after 7, 14 and 84 days of incubation. Analysis of survival profiles showed that L. monocytogenes was able to survive up to 84 days in 71% of the soils tested, in the other soils (29% only a short-term survival (up to 7 to 14 days was observed. Using variance partitioning techniques, we showed that about 65% of the short-term survival ratio of L. monocytogenes in soils was explained by the soil chemical properties, amongst which the basic cation saturation ratio seems to be the main driver. On the other hand, while explaining a lower amount of survival ratio variance (11%, soil texture and especially clay content was the main driver of long-term survival of L. monocytogenes in soils. In order to assess the effect of the endogenous soils microbiota on L. monocytogenes survival, sterilized versus non-sterilized soils microcosms were compared in a subset of 9 soils. We found that the endogenous soil microbiota could limit L. monocytogenes survival especially when soil pH was greater than 7, whereas in acidic soils, survival ratios in sterilized and unsterilized microcosms were not statistically different. These results point out the critical role played by both the endogenous microbiota and the soil physic-chemical properties in determining the survival of L. monocytogenes in soils.

  1. A note on challenge trials to determine the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong Dara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the EU, food is considered safe with regard to Listeria monocytogenes if the number of micro-organisms does not exceed 100 colony forming units (cfu/g throughout its shelf-life. Therefore, it is important to determine if a food supports growth of L. monocytogenes. Guidelines for conducting challenge tests for growth assessment of L. monocytogenes on foods were published by the European Union Reference Laboratory (EURL in 2014. The aim of this study was to use these guidelines to determine if refrigerated, fresh, whole, closed-cap, prepackaged mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus support the growth of L. monocytogenes. Three batches of mushrooms were artificially inoculated at approximately 100 cfu/g with a three-strain mix of L. monocytogenes and incubated for 2 days at 8°C followed by 4 days at 12°C. L. monocytogenes numbers were determined (in triplicate for each batch on days 0, 2 and 6. Water activity, pH and total bacterial counts were also determined. There was no increase in the number of L. monocytogenes above the threshold of 0.5 log cfu/g in any of the replicates. In 8 of 9 replicates, the numbers decreased indicating that A. bisporus do not support the growth of L. monocytogenes. As the EU regulations allow < 100 cfu/g if the food cannot support growth of L. monocytogenes, the significance of this study is that mushrooms with < 100 cfu/g may be within the regulations and therefore, quantitative rather than qualitative determination may be required.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes and hemolytic Listeria innocua in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, S R; Stout, J C; Hanning, I B; Clement, A; Fortes, E D; den Bakker, H C; Wiedmann, M; Ricke, S C

    2012-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, saprophytic, Gram-positive bacterium and occasional food-borne pathogen, often associated with ready-to-eat meat products. Because of the increased consumer interest in organic, all natural, and free range poultry products, it is important to understand L. monocytogenes in the context of such systems. Pasture-reared poultry were surveyed over the course of two 8-wk rearing periods. Cecal, soil, and grass samples were collected for Listeria isolation and characterization. Seven of 399 cecal samples (or 1.75%) were Listeria-positive. All positive cecal samples were obtained from broilers sampled at 2 wk of age. Grass and soil samples were collected from the pasture both before and after introduction of the poultry. Environmental samples collected after introduction of poultry were significantly more likely to contain Listeria (P Listeria, sigB allelic typing, and hlyA PCR tests found that both L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, including hemolytic L. innocua, were recovered from the cecal and environmental (grass/soil) samples. The sigB allelic typing also revealed that (1) positive samples could be composed of 2 or more allelic types; (2) allelic types found in cecal samples could also be found in the environment; and (3) allelic types could persist through the 2 rearing periods. Our data indicate that both pasture-reared poultry and their environment can be contaminated with L. monocytogenes and hemolytic L. innocua.

  3. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by fatty acids and monoglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L L; Johnson, E A

    1992-02-01

    Fatty acids and monoglycerides were evaluated in brain heart infusion broth and in milk for antimicrobial activity against the Scott A strain of Listeria monocytogenes. C12:0, C18:3, and glyceryl monolaurate (monolaurin) had the strongest activity in brain heart infusion broth and were bactericidal at 10 to 20 micrograms/ml, whereas potassium (K)-conjugated linoleic acids and C18:2 were bactericidal at 50 to 200 micrograms/ml. C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, glyceryl monomyristate, and glyceryl monopalmitate were not inhibitory at 200 micrograms/ml. The bactericidal activity in brain heart infusion broth was higher at pH 5 than at pH 6. In whole milk and skim milk, K-conjugated linoleic acid was bacteriostatic and prolonged the lag phase especially at 4 degrees C. Monolaurin inactivated L. monocytogenes in skim milk at 4 degrees C, but was less inhibitory at 23 degrees C. Monolaurin did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in whole milk because of the higher fat content. Other fatty acids tested were not effective in whole or skim milk. Our results suggest that K-conjugated linoleic acids or monolaurin could be used as an inhibitory agent against L. monocytogenes in dairy foods.

  4. Motility of ureter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroth, H.J.; Steinstraesser, A.; Berberich, R.; Kloss, G.

    1985-01-01

    Motility of ureter. Changes of secretion-phase during sequential scintigraphy of the kidneys under the influence of Metamizol - a parameter to study the effect of Metamizol: The aim of the study is to get quantitative information about the effect of Metamizol (Novalgin) on the motility of the ureter. We compared the renal excretion of 99m-Tc-MDP (Tecebon) and the extent of flowing off towards gravity through the ureter with and without Metamizol. The effect of Metamizol is shown in comparing the final amplitudes of nephrograms recorded during sequential scintigraphy of the kidneys and comparing the integrals of these curves before and after injection of Metamizol. It can be demonstrated that the flow off towards gravity through the ureter is significantly diminished under Metamizol caused by its spasmolytic effect.

  5. Validation of the ANSR(®) Listeria monocytogenes Method for Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Selected Food and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Oscar; Alles, Susan; Le, Quynh-Nhi; Gray, R Lucas; Hosking, Edan; Pinkava, Lisa; Norton, Paul; Tolan, Jerry; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer; Chen, Yi; Ryser, Elliot; Odumeru, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Work was conducted to validate performance of the ANSR(®) for Listeria monocytogenes method in selected food and environmental matrixes. This DNA-based assay involves amplification of nucleic acid via an isothermal reaction based on nicking enzyme amplification technology. Following single-step sample enrichment for 16-24 h for most matrixes, the assay is completed in 40 min using only simple instrumentation. When 50 distinct strains of L. monocytogenes were tested for inclusivity, 48 produced positive results, the exceptions being two strains confirmed by PCR to lack the assay target gene. Forty-seven nontarget strains (30 species), including multiple non-monocytogenes Listeria species as well as non-Listeria, Gram-positive bacteria, were tested, and all generated negative ANSR assay results. Performance of the ANSR method was compared with that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedure for detection of L. monocytogenes in hot dogs, pasteurized liquid egg, and sponge samples taken from an inoculated stainless steel surface. In addition, ANSR performance was measured against the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference method for detection of L. monocytogenes in Mexican-style cheese, cantaloupe, sprout irrigation water, and guacamole. With the single exception of pasteurized liquid egg at 16 h, ANSR method performance as quantified by the number of positives obtained was not statistically different from that of the reference methods. Robustness trials demonstrated that deliberate introduction of small deviations to the normal assay parameters did not affect ANSR method performance. Results of accelerated stability testing conducted using two manufactured lots of reagents predicts stability at the specified storage temperature of 4°C of more than 1 year.

  6. [On the significance of Solcoseryl on fertility. 1. The effect of Solcoseryl on sperm motility in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheus, A; Heise, H; Hofmann, R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of different Solcoseryl (Solco, Basel, Switzerland) concentrations on the motility of human sperm were tested on 37 ejaculates taken from two subject groups. Altogether 111 motility studies were performed using the eosine vitality test. In view of the considerable variations associated with motility tests, Solcoseryl appeared to have no effect on sperm motility in the majority of cases in group 1. The observed improvement in motility (20%) was countered by still greater motility losses (27%). The results, obtained by studies on selected asthenospermia (group 2) are different, however: the 26% increase in motility was opposed to a motility loss of only 17%. A Solcoseryl concentration of 50% was found to have the best effects on motility. A general rise in sperm motility by means of Solcoseryl cannot be considered, although tests would appear advisable in isolated instances. Solcoseryl may be a valuable protective resuspension agent for insemination purposes.

  7. NCAM regulates cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Kawa, Anna; Walmod, Peter S; Belman, Vadym; Gallagher, Helen C; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Nina

    2002-01-15

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine inhibitor of NCAM-negative cell locomotion through a heterophilic interaction with a cell-surface receptor. As we showed that the two N-terminal immunoglobulin modules of NCAM, which are known to bind to heparin, were responsible for this inhibition, we presume that this receptor is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A model for the inhibitory effect of NCAM is proposed, which involves competition between NCAM and extracellular components for the binding to membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

  8. Competency based medical education in gastrointestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadlapati, R; Keswani, R N; Pandolfino, J E

    2016-10-01

    Traditional apprenticeship-based medical education methods focusing on subjective evaluations and case-volume requirements do not reliably produce clinicians that provide high-quality care in unsupervised practice. Consequently, training approaches are shifting towards competency based medical education, which incorporates robust assessment methods and credible standards of physician proficiency. However, current gastroenterology and hepatology training in the US continues to utilize procedural volume and global impressions without standardized criteria as markers of competence. In particular, efforts to optimize competency based training in gastrointestinal (GI) motility are not underway, even though GI motility disorders account for nearly half of outpatient gastroenterology visits. These deficiencies compromise the quality of patient care. Thus, there is a great need and opportunity to shift our focus in GI motility training towards a competency based approach. First, we need to clarify the variable rates of learning for individual diagnostic tests. We must develop integrated systems that standardize training and monitor physician competency for GI motility diagnostics. Finally, as a profession and society, we must create certification processes to credential competent physicians. These advances are critical to optimizing the quality of GI motility diagnostics in practice.

  9. Different transcriptional responses from slow and fast growth rate strains of Listeria monocytogenes adapted to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoska eCordero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8 ºC of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8 °C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  10. Heat resistance of an outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes in hot dog batter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, A S; Gombas, D E

    2001-03-01

    The heat resistance of a strain of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for a listeriosis outbreak in hot dogs was not higher than the heat resistance of other L. monocytogenes strains when tested in tryptic soy broth and in laboratory-prepared hot dog batter. For the thermal death time experiments, the cells were grown to stationary phase or were starved in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7, for 6 h at 30 degrees C. Starvation increased the heat resistance of L. monocytogenes in broth but not in hot dog batter. D-values in hot dog batter were higher than in broth. For the hot dog formulation used in this study, cooking the hot dog batter for 30 s at 71.1 degrees C (160 degrees F), or its equivalent using a z-value of 6 degrees C (11 degrees F), would inactivate 5 logs of L. monocytogenes.

  11. Heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in vegetables: evaluation of blanching processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, A S

    2001-03-01

    The heat resistance of a Listeria monocytogenes composite (serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b) was determined in fresh broccoli florets, sweet green peppers, onions, mushrooms, and peas using an end-point procedure in polyester pouches. The heat resistance of L. monocytogenes was higher in peas (D(60 degrees C) = 1.0 min) and mushrooms (D(60 degrees C) = 0.7 min) than in other vegetables tested (D(60 degrees C) in onions = 0.2 min) and was highest when cells were subjected to starvation before the thermal death time experiments (D(60 degrees C) of starved L. monocytogenes in mushrooms = 1.6 min). The results showed that blanching can be used as an antilisterial treatment (inactivation of 5 logs of L. monocytogenes) when the cold spot of vegetables is treated for at least 10 s at 75 degrees C or instantaneously (<1 s) at temperatures above 82 degrees C.

  12. Thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes during rapid and slow heating in sous vide cooked beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T B; Knøchel, S

    1996-06-01

    Heating at slowly rising temperatures is suspected to enhance thermotolerance in Listeria monocytogenes and, since anaerobic environments have been shown to facilitate resuscitation of heat-injured cells of this micro-organism, concern may arise about the possibility of L. monocytogenes surviving in minimally preserved products. The effect of rapid ( > 10 degrees C min-1) and slow (0.3 and 0.6 degrees C min-1) heating on survival of L. monocytogenes in sous vide cooked beef was therefore examined at mild processing temperatures of 56 degrees, 60 degrees and 64 degrees C. No statistically significant difference (P = 0.70) was observed between the tested heating regimes. Since the average pH of beef was low (5.6), and little or no effect was observed, a pH-dependency of heat shock-induced thermotolerance in L. monocytogenes is suggested to account for this result.

  13. Cross-contamination between processing equipment and deli meats by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Min; Takeuchi, Kazue; Zhang, Lei; Dohm, Cynthia B; Meyer, Joseph D; Hall, Paul A; Doyle, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Contamination of luncheon meats by Listeria monocytogenes has resulted in outbreaks of listeriosis and major product recalls. Listeriae can survive on processing equipment such as meat slicers which serve as a potential contamination source. This study was conducted to determine (i) the dynamics of cross-contamination of L. monocytogenes from a commercial slicer and associated equipment onto sliced meat products, (ii) the influence of sample size on the efficacy of the BAX-PCR and U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service enrichment culture assays to detect L. monocytogenes on deli meat, and (iii) the fate of L. monocytogenes on sliced deli meats of different types during refrigerated storage. Three types of deli meats, uncured oven-roasted turkey, salami, and bologna containing sodium diacetate and potassium lactate, were tested. A five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated at ca.10(3) CFU onto the blade of a commercial slicer. Five consecutive meat slices were packed per package, then vacuum sealed, stored at 4 degrees C, and sampled at 1 and 30 days postslicing. Two sample sizes, 25 g and contents of the entire package of meat, were assayed. Total numbers of L. monocytogenes-positive samples, including the two sample sizes and two sampling times, were 80, 9, and 3 for turkey, salami, and bologna, respectively. A higher percentage of turkey meat samples were L. monocytogenes positive when contents of the entire package were assayed than when the 25-g sample was assayed (12.5 and 7.5%, respectively). Lower inoculum populations of ca. 10(1) or 10(2) CFU of L. monocytogenes on the slicer blade were used for an additional evaluation of oven-roasted turkey using two additional sampling times of 60 and 90 days postslicing. L. monocytogenes-positive samples were not detected until 60 days postslicing, and more positive samples were detected at 90 days than at 60 days postslicing. When BAX-PCR and enrichment culture assays were

  14. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Films With Essential Oils Against Listeria monocytogenes on Cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Gordana D.; Klaus, Anita S.; P. Niksic, Miomir

    2016-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of listeriosis, due to consumption of ready-to-eat foods and fresh, shredded, minimally processed vegetables, occurs among pregnant women and the elderly. In order to reduce the prevalence of listeriosis among consumers, better protective measures are recommended. Chitosan films, with or without added essential oils, represent a modern, safe method of preserving the quality of such vegetables and significantly reducing the incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in these foods. Objectives The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of composite chitosan-gelatin films with and without essential oils against two strains of L. monocytogenes, ATCC 19115 and ATCC 19112, in fresh shredded cabbage. Methods Shredded cabbage was inoculated with L. monocytogenes and packed between two layers of the chitosan composite film, then placed in Petri dishes. The prepared samples were stored at 4°C then analyzed for total viable count on PALCAM agar while incubated at 37°C, every 24 hours for 7 days. Results Average L. monocytogenes content ranged from 4.2 - 5.4 log CFU/g, reaching values of 7.2 - 8.6 log CFU/g in samples of untreated cabbage. A complete reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 on cabbage was achieved after 120 hours in the presence of 0.5% chitosan film, whereas reduction of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 was achieved after 144 hours. In the presence of 1% chitosan film, the bacteria withered more quickly and complete reduction of both species of L. monocytogenes was achieved after 96 hours. Conclusions All tested formulations of chitosan films exhibited strong antimicrobial activity on the growth of both strains of L. monocytogenes on cabbage. The best effect was achieved with a 1% chitosan concentration. The addition of essential oils increased the antimicrobial activity of all tested films. PMID:27800143

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocins Activity Against Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Paula, Otávio Almeida Lino; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the activity of cell-free supernatant (CFS) containing bacteriocins on the formation and maintenance of biofilms developed by Listeria monocytogenes, and the associated effect of bacteriocins and ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on the formed biofilm. CFS from 9 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was tested for inhibitory activity against 85 L. monocytogenes isolates and 21 LAB strains. Then, 12 L. monocytogenes strains were selected based on genetic profiles and sensitivity to CFS and were subjected to an in vitro assay to assess biofilm formation in microtiter plates, considering different culture media and incubation conditions. Based on these results, 6 L. monocytogenes strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure to assess biofilm formation, being co-inoculated with CFS. In addition, these strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure, modified by adding the CFS after biofilm formation. Relevant decrease in biofilm formation was observed in the first experiment, but CFS added after biofilm formation did not eliminate them. CFS from Lactobacillus curvatus ET31 were selected due to its anti-biofilm activity, being associated to EDTA at different concentrations and tested for biofilm control of three strains of L. monocytogenes, using the same in vitro procedure described previously. Concentrated bacteriocin presented poor performance in eliminating formed biofilms, and EDTA concentration presented no evident interference on biofilm elimination. Twelve selected L. monocytogenes strains were positive for investigated virulence makers and negative for luxS gene, recognized as being involved in biofilm formation. Selected L. monocytogenes strains were able to produce biofilms under different conditions. CFSs have the potential to prevent biofilm formation, but they were not able to destroy already formed biofilms. Nevertheless, low concentrations of CFS combined with EDTA caused a relevant reduction in

  17. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated From Dairy and Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen and a serious threat to the public health in the world. Consumption of traditional foods such as dairy and meat products can be a major reason for relative abundance and isolation of these bacteria. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from dairy and meat products. Materials and Methods A total of 317 dairy products and meat-processed samples were collected. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed on each sample by the disk diffusion method (Kirby Bauer. Five reference loci were used for typing of L. monocytogenes strains by MLVA (Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis Technique. Results A total of 24 L. monocytogenes isolates were collected from the dairy and meat products. Resistance of isolated L. monocytogenes strains to penicillin G were 54.54% (from dairy products and 46.15% (from processed meat. Genetic relatedness of isolates were assessed by MLVA. Out of 13 different types, type 2 with 6 strains and type 3 with 4 strains, were the most common types. Conclusions MLVA analysis showed that samples obtained from different sources could have similar genetic profile. As a result, administration of penicillin in patients with listeriosis (especially pregnant women and antibiotic susceptibility test are recommended. The fast and accurate methods such as MLVA for tracking of pollution sources of L. monocytogenes are recommended during outbreaks.

  18. Frequency of contamination Listeria monocytogenes of raw dried cured vacuum packed sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Daskalov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to collect actual data concerning the frequency of contamination with Listeria monocytogenes of some very popular in Bulgaria raw dried cured vacuum packed sausages, produced from October 2004 till May 2008. 148 vacuum-packed samples were taken from 9 different food business operators during all seasons of the year. The samples were analyzed according to USDA method for meat foods. Ten specimens were positive for presence of Listeria monocytogenes equal to 6,75% of all tested samples. In two other raw dried cured sausages L.welshimeri and L.innocua were found, but these species are not pathogenic for consumers. In the period before the official implementation of HACCP system (01.01.2006 in Bulgaria, 52 samples were examined and 5 Listeria monocytogenes isolates were found (~10%. 2,5 years after the HACCP implementation, 96 specimens from the same meat factories were tested and 5 Listeria monocytogenes isolates (5,2% were detected. Samples taken from lots, produced in winter time were contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes more often (7 of all 10 than specimens taken during other seasons. Data were discussed through the point of view of the effectiveness of hygienic practices and HACCP system application. Also, application of ‘microbiological criterion’ set in COMMISSION REGULATION (EC No 2073/2005 for ready-to-eat foods unable to support the growth of L. monocytogenes was considered.

  19. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas Darwin

    There are two ways in which bacteria survive killing by antibiotics. The most well-known, is antibiotic resistance, which results from the acquisition of a resistance gene or mutation that allows bacteria to grow and divide in the presence of antibiotic concentrations that would normally kill other...... that are completely refractory to antibiotics due to the inactivity of cellular processes. Persister cells have been linked to treatment failures in several bacterial infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Preceding the start of this Ph......D project, Listeria monocytogenes was observed to form these antibiotic tolerant persister cells. L. monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, a rare, but often lethal disease, even with antibiotic treatment. It typically affects pregnant women, neonates, the elderly...

  20. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from three countries and antibiotic resistance differences among countries and Listeria monocytogenes serogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, M M; Bani Salman, A E; Lafi, S Q; Al-Abboodi, A R

    2015-06-01

    A total of 104 Listeria monocytogenes isolates from 330 fish samples from three countries were characterized by multiplex PCR for serogrouping and virulence markers determination and tested for antibiotics resistance. A 53·8% of the isolates belonged to serogroup 1/2a, 3a; 32% belonged to 1/2b, 3b, 7; 14·4% belonged to 4b, 4d, 4e and 1% belonged to 1/2c, 3c. All isolates exhibited resistance to at least one antibiotic but the resistance rates varied among countries. The isolates exhibited high resistance to penicillin, rifampicin, clindamycin, erythromycin and tetracycline, but low resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, gentamicin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin. When comparing countries, the resistance rate for rifampicin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid varied among countries. When comparing serogroup, 1/2a, 3a exhibited the highest resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline and vancomycin while serogroup 4b, 4d, 4e exhibited the highest resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. All isolates carried inlA, inlC, inlJ and lmo2672. Listeriolysin S was carried by 42 and 30% of 4b and 1/2b isolates respectively. Significance and impact of the study: This is one of few studies to correlate antibiotic resistance with Listeria monocytogenes serogroups. The study also compared the antibiotic resistance and serogroups of L. monocytogenes isolates from three countries in one single study. The findings of this study will be helpful in improving data on the antibiotics resistance of L. monocytogenes in developing countries and enriches the epidemiological and public health studies of L. monocytogenes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. An insight into the isolation, enumeration and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Woan-Fei Law

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB, Fraser broth and University of Vermont Medium (UVM Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as FDA-BAM, USDA-FSIS and ISO. Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, PALCAM, Oxford and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. MPN technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, DNA microarray and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labour-saving. In future, there are chances for the development of new techniques for the detection and identification of foodborne with improved features.

  2. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  3. Mechanics of motility initiation and motility arrest in crawling cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recho, Pierre; Putelat, Thibaut; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires transformation of a symmetric state into a polarized state. In contrast, motility arrest is associated with re-symmetrization of the internal configuration of a cell. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by the increased contractility of motor proteins but the conditions of re-symmetrization remain unknown. In this paper we show that if adhesion with the extra-cellular substrate is sufficiently low, the progressive intensification of motor-induced contraction may be responsible for both transitions: from static (symmetric) to motile (polarized) at a lower contractility threshold and from motile (polarized) back to static (symmetric) at a higher contractility threshold. Our model of lamellipodial cell motility is based on a 1D projection of the complex intra-cellular dynamics on the direction of locomotion. In the interest of analytical transparency we also neglect active protrusion and view adhesion as passive. Despite the unavoidable oversimplifications associated with these assumptions, the model reproduces quantitatively the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and reveals a crucial role played in cell motility by the nonlocal feedback between the mechanics and the transport of active agents. A prediction of the model that a crawling cell can stop and re-symmetrize when contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold still awaits experimental verification.

  4. Genome-wide analyses reveal lineage specific contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Listeria includes two closely related pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. L. monocytogenes is an opportunistic human foodborne and animal pathogen that includes two common lineages. While lineage I is more commonly found among human listeriosis cases, lineage II appears to be overrepresented among isolates from foods and environmental sources. This study used the genome sequences for one L. innocua strain and four L. monocytogenes strains representing lineages I and II, to characterize the contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of the L. innocua/L. monocytogenes core genome. Results Among the 2267 genes in the L. monocytogenes/L. innocua core genome, 1097 genes showed evidence for recombination and 36 genes showed evidence for positive selection. Positive selection was strongly associated with recombination. Specifically, 29 of the 36 genes under positive selection also showed evidence for recombination. Recombination was more common among isolates in lineage II than lineage I; this trend was confirmed by sequencing five genes in a larger isolate set. Positive selection was more abundant in the ancestral branch of lineage II (20 genes as compared to the ancestral branch of lineage I (9 genes. Additional genes under positive selection were identified in the branch separating the two species; for this branch, genes in the role category "Cell wall and membrane biogenesis" were significantly more likely to have evidence for positive selection. Positive selection of three genes was confirmed in a larger isolate set, which also revealed occurrence of multiple premature stop codons in one positively selected gene involved in flagellar motility (flaR. Conclusion While recombination and positive selection both contribute to evolution of L. monocytogenes, the relative contributions of these evolutionary forces seem to differ by L. monocytogenes lineages and

  5. Curved trajectories of actin-based motility in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2012-05-01

    Recent experiments have reported fascinating geometrical trajectories for actin-based motility of bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and functionalized beads. To understand the physical mechanism for these trajectories, we constructed a phenomenological model to study the motion of an actin-propelled disk in two dimensions. In our model, the force and actin density on the surface of the disk are influenced by the translation and rotation of the disk, which in turn is induced by the asymmetric distributions of those densities. We show that this feedback can destabilize a straight trajectory, leading to circular, S-shape and other geometrical trajectories observed in the experiments through bifurcations in the distributions of the force and actin density. The relation between our model and the models for self-propelled deformable particles is emphasized and discussed.

  6. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  7. Lineage specific recombination rates and microevolution in Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nightingale Kendra K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a saprotroph as well as an opportunistic human foodborne pathogen, which has previously been shown to consist of at least two widespread lineages (termed lineages I and II and an uncommon lineage (lineage III. While some L. monocytogenes strains show evidence for considerable diversification by homologous recombination, our understanding of the contribution of recombination to L. monocytogenes evolution is still limited. We therefore used STRUCTURE and ClonalFrame, two programs that model the effect of recombination, to make inferences about the population structure and different aspects of the recombination process in L. monocytogenes. Analyses were performed using sequences for seven loci (including the house-keeping genes gap, prs, purM and ribC, the stress response gene sigB, and the virulence genes actA and inlA for 195 L. monocytogenes isolates. Results Sequence analyses with ClonalFrame and the Sawyer's test showed that recombination is more prevalent in lineage II than lineage I and is most frequent in two house-keeping genes (ribC and purM and the two virulence genes (actA and inlA. The relative occurrence of recombination versus point mutation is about six times higher in lineage II than in lineage I, which causes a higher genetic variability in lineage II. Unlike lineage I, lineage II represents a genetically heterogeneous population with a relatively high proportion (30% average of genetic material imported from external sources. Phylograms, constructed with correcting for recombination, as well as Tajima's D data suggest that both lineages I and II have suffered a population bottleneck. Conclusion Our study shows that evolutionary lineages within a single bacterial species can differ considerably in the relative contributions of recombination to genetic diversification. Accounting for recombination in phylogenetic studies is critical, and new evolutionary models that

  8. Listeria monocytogenes in renal transplant recipients Listeria monocytogenes em pacientes pós-transplante renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Barroso HOFER

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Five cases of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriemia were observed from April to December 1985, among renal transplant recipients from the same hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. The patients were adults (mean age: 40.6 years, and the basic complain was fever, with no report of meningeal syndrome. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of two serovars, 1/2a and 4b, which were classified into three lysotypes. The four strains of serovar 4b showed the same antibiotype, with resistance to cefoxitin, clindamycin, oxacillin and penicillin.No período de abril a dezembro de 1985, foram observados cinco casos de listeriose em transplantados renais num mesmo hospital de São Paulo, SP. Os pacientes eram adultos (média de 40,6 anos tendo como queixa básica a febre. Laboratorialmente, em todos foram reconhecidos Listeria monocytogenes, caracterizada por dois sorovares 1/2a e 4b e três lisotipos distintos. As amostras do sorovar 4b apresentaram o mesmo antibiotipo: resistentes à cefoxitina, clindamicina, oxacilina e penicilina.

  9. A validated PCR-based method to detect Listeria monocytogenes using raw milk as a food model - Towards an international standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, M.; Wagner, M.; Vazquez-Boland, J.A.;

    2004-01-01

    A PCR assay with an internal amplification control was developed for Listeria monocytogenes. The assay has a 99% detection probability of seven cells per reaction. When tested against 38 L. monocytogenes strains and 52 nontarget strains, the PCR assay was 100% inclusive (positive signal from target...... be appropriate for international standardization....

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes to USDA and AOAC Culture Based Methods for the Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joelsson, Adam C; Brown, Ashley S; Puri, Amrita; Keough, Martin P; Gaudioso, Zara E; Siciliano, Nicholas A; Snook, Adam E

    2015-01-01

    Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a molecular based assay for the presumptive detection of Listeria monocytogenes from environmental surfaces, dairy, and ready-to-eat (RTE) food matrixes (hot dogs and deli meat). The assay utilizes a PCR detection method coupled with a rapid, visual, flow-based assay that develops in 3 min post PCR amplification and requires only 24 h of enrichment for maximum sensitivity. The Veriflow LM system eliminates the need for sample purification, gel electrophoresis, or fluorophore-based detection of target amplification, and does not require complex data analysis. This Performance Tested Method(SM) validation study demonstrated the ability of the Veriflow LM method to detect low levels of artificially inoculated L. monocytogenes in seven distinct environmental and food matrixes. In each unpaired reference comparison study, probability of detection analysis indicated no significant difference between the Veriflow LM method and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook 8.08 or AOAC 993.12 reference method. Fifty strains of L. monocytogenes were detected in the inclusivity study, while 39 nonspecific organisms were undetected in the exclusivity study. The study results show that Veriflow LM is a sensitive, selective, and robust assay for the presumptive detection of L. monocytogenes sampled from environmental, dairy, or RTE (hot dogs and deli meat) food matrixes.

  11. Characterization and antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from poultry and red meat in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Ennaji

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hayat Ennaji1,2, Mohammed Timinouni2, My Mustapha Ennaji3, Mohammed Hassar1, Nozha Cohen11Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Hygiène des Aliments et de l’Environnement, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 2Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Biologie Moléculaire, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 3Laboratoire de Virologie et Hygiène and Microbiologie., Faculté des Sciences et Techniques - Mohammedia, Université Hassan II, Mohammedia, MoroccoAbstract: This study was carried out on 426 samples of raw meats collected from butcheries and supermarkets in Casablanca, Morocco. The samples were examined for the occurrence of Listeria species. Strains of Listeria monocytogenes were characterized by several biochemical tests and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. β-hemolytic cultures and nonhemolytic isolates were tested for biochemical properties with the Listeria API test. Among the 43 Listeria species isolates; we identified 10 strains for L. monocytogenes (23.3%, 31 strains for L. innocua (72.1% and 2 strains for L. welshimeri (4.6%. Strains of L. monocytogenes were separated by multiplex PCR; two serogroups IIb and IVb were thus differentiated. Antibiotic susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to 21 antibiotics was determined by the disk diffusion method. All isolates were susceptible to a wide range of the tested antibiotics with the exception of nalidixic acid, colistine and cephalosporins second and third generation for which they were all resistant.Keywords: antibiotic susceptibility, Listeria monocytogenes, meat, PCR

  12. Listeria monocytogenes en comidas preparadas

    OpenAIRE

    Vila Brugalla, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Tradicionalmente Listeria monocytogenes no era considerado como un importante patógeno transmitido a través de los alimentos y, en consecuencia, no había recibido mucha atención por parte de la industria alimentaria. Los índices de listeriosis en la población humana siempre habían estado enormemente ensombrecidos por otras enfermedades transmitidas por los alimentos como la salmonelosis o la campilobacterosis, y la confirmación de brotes era poco frecuente. Sin embargo, los brotes de listerio...

  13. Effect of Listeria seeligeri or Listeria welshimeri on Listeria monocytogenes detection in and recovery from buffered Listeria enrichment broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rachel C; Welch, Lacinda J; Hitchins, Anthony D; Smiley, R Derike

    2015-04-01

    The presence of multiple species of Listeria in regulated food products is not uncommon and can complicate the recovery of Listeria monocytogenes particularly on a non-differentiating medium. The potential complications of Listeria seeligeri and Listeria welshimeri on the recovery of L. monocytogenes from inoculated food test samples using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) selective enrichment procedure was investigated. Post-enrichment enumeration, in the absence of food product, indicates that some L. seeligeri and L. monocytogenes pairings may have population differentials as great as 2.7 ± 0.1 logs with L. seeligeri being the predominant species. A similar observation was noted for L. welshimeri and L. monocytogenes pairings which resulted in population differentials as large as 3.7 ± 0.2 logs with L. welshimeri being the predominant species. Select strain pairings were used to inoculate guacamole, crab meat, broccoli, and cheese with subsequent recovery by the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method with 10 colonies per sample selected for confirmation. The presence of L. seeligeri had little effect on the recovery of L. monocytogenes. The presence of L. welshimeri resulted in the failure to recover L. monocytogenes in three out of the four food matrices. This work extends the observation that non-pathogenic species of Listeria can complicate the recovery of L. monocytogenes and that competition during selective enrichment is not limited to the presence of just Listeria innocua. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effect of Listeria seeligeri or Listeria welshimeri on Listeria monocytogenes detection in and recovery from buffered Listeria enrichment broth☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rachel C.; Welch, Lacinda J.; Hitchins, Anthony D.; Smiley, R. Derike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple species of Listeria in regulated food products is not uncommon and can complicate the recovery of Listeria monocytogenes particularly on a non-differentiating medium. The potential complications of Listeria seeligeri and Listeria welshimeri on the recovery of L. monocytogenes from inoculated food test samples using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) selective enrichment procedure was investigated. Post-enrichment enumeration, in the absence of food product, indicates that some L. seeligeri and L. monocytogenes pairings may have population differentials as great as 2.7 ± 0.1 logs with L. seeligeri being the predominant species. A similar observation was noted for L. welshimeri and L. monocytogenes pairings which resulted in population differentials as large as 3.7 ± 0.2 logs with L. welshimeri being the predominant species. Select strain pairings were used to inoculate guacamole, crab meat, broccoli, and cheese with subsequent recovery by the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method with 10 colonies per sample selected for confirmation. The presence of L. seeligeri had little effect on the recovery of L. monocytogenes. The presence of L. welshimeri resulted in the failure to recover L. monocytogenes in three out of the four food matrices. This work extends the observation that non-pathogenic species of Listeria can complicate the recovery of L. monocytogenes and that competition during selective enrichment is not limited to the presence of just Listeria innocua. PMID:25475325

  15. Examination of Listeria monocytogenes in Seafood Processing Facilities and Smoked Salmon in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Dara; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Zaouali, Sarah; Jordan, Kieran

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, a relatively rare but life-threatening disease primarily affecting immunocompromised individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in the seafood processing industry in the Republic of Ireland. The occurrence of L. monocytogenes was determined by regular sampling of both food samples and processing environment swabs at eight seafood processing facilities over two calendar years. All samples were analyzed by the International Organization for Standardization 11290-1 standard method, and the isolates were characterized by PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, serotyping, and the occurrence of some genes related to survival under stress (SSI-1, Tn6188, and bcrABC). A prevalence of 2.5% in 508 samples (433 environmental swabs and 75 food samples) was found. From the isolates obtained, eight different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles were identified, two occurring in more than one facility and one occurring in food and the environment. Five of the eight pulsotypes identified contained at least one of the three stress survival-related genes tested. The tolerance of the isolates to benzalkonium chloride, a representative quaternary ammonium compound, was also examined and ranged from 5.5 ± 0.5 to 8.5 ± 0.5 ppm of benzalkonium chloride. To evaluate the ability of smoked salmon to support the growth of L. monocytogenes, including the T4 widespread pulsotype that was isolated, a challenge test was performed on cold-smoked salmon obtained from two separate producers. The results showed clearly that both types of smoked salmon supported the growth of L. monocytogenes. Although occurrence of L. monocytogenes on seafood was low, this study showed that the smoked salmon used in this study can support the growth of L. monocytogenes; therefore, vigilance is required in the processing facilities to reduce the associated risk.

  16. Motility initiation in active gels

    CERN Document Server

    Recho, Pierre; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-01-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires a symmetry breaking mechanism which transforms a symmetric state into a polarized state. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by increased contractility of motor proteins. In this paper we argue that contraction can be responsible not only for the symmetry breaking transition but also for the incipient translocation of the segment of an active gel mimicking the crawling cell. Our model suggests that when the contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold, the cell can stop and re-symmetrizes. The proposed theory reproduces the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and the behavior of keratocytes prior to cell division.

  17. Fluxes of Ca2+ and K+ are required for the listeriolysin O-dependent internalization pathway of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadia, Stephen; Seveau, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for the life-threatening food-borne disease listeriosis. This disease mainly affects elderly and immunocompromised individuals, causing bacteremia and meningoencephalitis. In pregnant women, L. monocytogenes infection leads to abortion and severe infection of the fetus or newborn. The L. monocytogenes intracellular life cycle is critical for pathogenesis. Previous studies have established that the major virulence factor of L. monocytogenes, the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO), is sufficient to induce L. monocytogenes internalization into human epithelial cell lines. This internalization pathway strictly requires the formation of LLO pores in the plasma membrane and can be stimulated by the heterologous pore-forming toxin pneumolysin, suggesting that LLO acts nonspecifically by forming transmembrane pores. The present work tested the hypothesis that Ca2+ and K+ fluxes subsequent to perforation by LLO control L. monocytogenes internalization. We report that L. monocytogenes perforates the host cell plasma membrane in an LLO-dependent fashion at the early stage of invasion. In response to perforation, host cells undergo Ca2+ -dependent but K+ -independent resealing of their plasma membrane. In contrast to the plasma membrane resealing process, LLO-induced L. monocytogenes internalization requires both Ca2+ and K+ fluxes. Further linking ion fluxes to bacterial internalization, treating cells with a combination of Ca2+ and K+ ionophores but not with individual ionophores is sufficient to induce efficient internalization of large cargoes, such as 1-μm polystyrene beads and bacteria. We propose that LLO-induced L. monocytogenes internalization requires a Ca2+ - and K+ -dependent internalization pathway that is mechanistically distinct from the process of plasma membrane resealing.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. contamination patterns in retail delicatessen establishments in three U.S. states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Courtenay; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Wright, Emily; Warchocki, Steven; Roof, Sherry; Kause, Janell R; Bauer, Nathan; Ibrahim, Salam; Wiedmann, Martin; Oliver, Haley F

    2014-11-01

    Postprocessing contamination in processing plants has historically been a significant source of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat delicatessen meats, and therefore a major cause of human listeriosis cases and outbreaks. Recent risk assessments suggest that a majority of human listeriosis cases linked to consumption of contaminated deli meats may be due to L. monocytogenes contamination that occurs at the retail level. To better understand the ecology and transmission of Listeria spp. in retail delicatessens, food and nonfood contact surfaces were tested for L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. in a longitudinal study conducted in 30 retail delis in three U.S. states. In phase I of the study, seven sponge samples were collected monthly for 3 months in 15 delis (5 delis per state) prior to start of daily operation; in phase II, 28 food contact and nonfood contact sites were sampled in each of 30 delis during daily operation for 6 months. Among the 314 samples collected during phase I, 6.8% were positive for L. monocytogenes. Among 4,503 samples collected during phase II, 9.5% were positive for L. monocytogenes; 9 of 30 delis showed low L. monocytogenes prevalence (Listeria spp. isolates, including 184 Listeria innocua, 48 Listeria seeligeri, and 13 Listeria welshimeri were characterized. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to characterize 446 L. monocytogenes isolates. PFGE showed that for 12 of 30 delis, one or more PFGE types were isolated on at least three separate occasions, providing evidence for persistence of a given L. monocytogenes subtype in the delis. For some delis, PFGE patterns for isolates from nonfood contact surfaces were distinct from patterns for occasional food contact surface isolates, suggesting limited cross-contamination between these sites in some delis. This study provides longitudinal data on L. monocytogenes contamination patterns in retail delis, which should facilitate further development of control strategies in

  19. Methanogens, Methane and Gastrointestinal Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation of the undigested polysaccharide fraction of carbohydrates produces hydrogen in the intestine which is the substrate for methane production by intestinal methanogens. Hydrogen and methane are excreted in the flatus and in breath giving the opportunity to indirectly measure their production using breath testing. Although methane is detected in 30%-50% of the healthy adult population worldwide, its production has been epidemiologically and clinically associated with constipation related diseases, like constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. While a causative relation is not proven yet, there is strong evidence from animal studies that methane delays intestinal transit, possibly acting as a neuromuscular transmitter. This evidence is further supported by the universal finding that methane production (measured by breath test) is associated with delayed transit time in clinical studies. There is also preliminary evidence that antibiotic reduction of methanogens (as evidenced by reduced methane production) predicts the clinical response in terms of symptomatic improvement in patients with constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, we have not identified yet the mechanism of action of methane on intestinal motility, and since methane production does not account for all constipation associated cases, there is need for high quality clinical trials to examine methane as a biomarker for the diagnosis or as a biomarker that predicts antibiotic treatment response in patients with constipation related disorders. PMID:24466443

  20. Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes virulence in the Galleria mellonella insect larvae model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakic Martinez, Mira; Ferguson, Martine; Datta, Atin R.

    2017-01-01

    Several animal models have been used to understand the molecular basis of the pathogenicity, infectious dose and strain to strain variation of Listeria monocytogenes. The greater wax worm Galleria mellonella, as an alternative model, provides some useful advantages not available with other models and has already been described as suitable for the virulence assessment of various pathogens including L. monocytogenes. The objectives of this study are: 1) confirming the usefulness of this model with a wide panel of Listeria spp. including non-pathogenic L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri and animal pathogen L. ivanovii; 2) assessment of virulence of several isogenic in-frame deletion mutants in virulence and stress related genes of L. monocytogenes and 3) virulence assessment of paired food and clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes from 14 major listeriosis outbreaks occurred worldwide between 1980 and 2015. Larvae injected with different concentrations of Listeria were incubated at 37°C and monitored over seven days for time needed to kill 50% of larvae (LT50) and to determine change of bacterial population in G. mellonella, 2 and 24 hours post-inoculation. Non-pathogenic members of Listeria and L. ivanovii showed significantly (P monocytogenes strains. Isogenic mutants of L. monocytogenes with the deletions in prfA, plcA, hly, actA and virR genes, also showed significantly (P monocytogenes strains related to non-invasive (gastroenteritis) outbreaks of listeriosis showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower virulence than isolates of the same serotype obtained from outbreaks with invasive symptoms. The difference, however, was dose and strain- dependent. No significant differences in virulence were observed among the serotype tested in this study. PMID:28898264

  1. Use of germicidal UV light to reduce low numbers of Listeria monocytogenes on raw chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, M E; Meinersmann, R J; Frank, J F

    2013-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a common constituent of the microbiological community in poultry processing plants and can be found in low numbers on raw poultry. Raw meat is the most important source of this pathogen in commercial cooking facilities. Germicidal UV light was tested as a means to kill L. monocytogenes inoculated onto broiler breast fillets. Treatments at 800 μW/ cm(2) for 5 s to 5 min of exposure were tested against inocula of 35 to 60 cells per fillet. All fillets were sampled by rinsing in enrichment broth, and surviving pathogens were quantified using most-probable-number (MPN) analysis. Five replications each with 5 fillets per treatment were analyzed to achieve 25 sample fillets per treatment. All treatment times resulted in a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes numbers compared with paired untreated controls. Treated samples retained 0.2 to 1.5 MPN L. monocytogenes per fillet, and exposure time had no significant effect on the number of surviving cells. A 5-s treatment with germicidal UV light has potential as an intervention method to limit the transfer of L. monocytogenes on raw skinless breast fillets from a slaughter plant to a cooking plant.

  2. Trajectories of Listeria-type motility in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2012-12-01

    Force generated by actin polymerization is essential in cell motility and the locomotion of organelles or bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments on actin-based motility have observed geometrical trajectories including straight lines, circles, S-shaped curves, and translating figure eights. This paper reports a phenomenological model of an actin-propelled disk in two dimensions that generates geometrical trajectories. Our model shows that when the evolutions of actin density and force per filament on the disk are strongly coupled to the disk self-rotation, it is possible for a straight trajectory to lose its stability. When the instability is due to a pitchfork bifurcation, the resulting trajectory is a circle; a straight trajectory can also lose stability through a Hopf bifurcation, and the resulting trajectory is an S-shaped curve. We also show that a half-coated disk, which mimics the distribution of functionalized proteins in Listeria, also undergoes similar symmetry-breaking bifurcations when the straight trajectory loses stability. For both a fully coated disk and a half-coated disk, when the trajectory is an S-shaped curve, the angular frequency of the disk self-rotation is different from that of the disk trajectory. However, for circular trajectories, these angular frequencies are different for a fully coated disk but the same for a half-coated disk.

  3. Surface motility of Myxococcus Xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, Maxsim; Hu, William; Jin, Fan; Zhao, Kun; Shi, Wenyuan; Wong, Gerard

    2011-03-01

    We examine the surface motility of Myxococcus Xanthus, a bacterium species found in soil that exhibits a broad range of self-organizing behavior, including predatory ``swarms'' and survival-enhancing ``fruiting bodies.'' To quantify the effects of exopolysaccharides (EPS) on surface adhesion and motility, we use modified versions of particle tracking algorithms from colloid physics to analyze bacterial trajectories, and compare the wild type (WT) strain to EPS knockout and EPS overproducer strains. We find that EPS deficiency leads to an increase in the number of ``standing'' bacteria oriented normal to the surface, attached by one end with minimal motility. EPS overproduction, by contrast, suppresses this phenotype. A detailed investigation of the influence of EPS on Myxococcus social motility will be presented.

  4. Antibiotic therapy for Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C C; Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients, but it has been rarely reported in Taiwan. We reviewed 13 cases of L. monocytogenes bacteremia at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 12-year period. All of the patients had underlying diseases. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and neurologic signs were found in 6 patients. Most of the patients received penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin with an aminoglycoside. Corticosteroids were used in 9 of 13 patients. The overall mortality directly due to L. monocytogenes bacteremia was 31%. However, patients treated with cephalosporins or oxacillin had higher mortality than those treated with penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin (p = 0.05). Given the increasing number of immunosuppressed patients in Taiwan, it is likely that more cases will be encountered. Physicians in Taiwan should be aware of L. monocytogenes bacteremia and its treatment.

  5. Bacterial motility on abiotic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gibiansky, Maxsim

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are structured microbial communities which are widespread both in nature and in clinical settings. When organized into a biofilm, bacteria are extremely resistant to many forms of stress, including a greatly heightened antibiotic resistance. In the early stages of biofilm formation on an abiotic surface, many bacteria make use of their motility to explore the surface, finding areas of high nutrition or other bacteria to form microcolonies. They use motility appendages, incl...

  6. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E Navarro; SJ Alonso; R Navarro; J Trujillo; E Jorge

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaphthalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastrointestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats.METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses,intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanolplant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg),cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2× 10-4, 6.4 × 10-4 and 1.2 × 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated.RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase.Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride.CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs.Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain.

  7. Isolation and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes in Processed Meat by a Combined Cultural-molecular Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Ingianni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation and identification of Listeria monocytogenes in processed meat samples by a combined cultural-molecular method is described. It allows the identification of Listeria strains by means of a hybridization technique with a specific DNA probe directed to the listerial internalin gene. The specificity of this method was found to be 100% and sensitivity was as low as 1 CFU/2.5 g of food sample. A total of 278 meat samples were tested in comparison with PCR and conventional cultural assays. A total of 42 (15.4% L. monocytogenes were detected. PCR analysis gave 3 false negative results and culture failed to detect the Listeria in 5 cases. With this cultural-molecular method the identification and quantitative detection of L. monocytogenes were achieved within 36 hours and no false positive or negative tests were obtained, thus fitting most food industry requirements.

  8. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in European cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    2017-01-01

    Both in Europe and worldwide cheese has caused important outbreaks of listeriosis and can be a vehicle for transmission of Listeria monocytogenes to consumers. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using scientific literature and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports...... understanding of L. monocytogenes prevalence in different types of cheeses and provided results that can be useful as input for quantitative microbiological risk assessment modelling....

  9. Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes in Whole Avocado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Evans, Peter; Hammack, Thomas S; Brown, Eric W; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, tree fruits have emerged as a new concern for Listeria monocytogenes contamination. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the potential internalization of L. monocytogenes from the surface of avocados into the edible portions of the fruit during certain postharvest practices simulated in a laboratory setting. One set of intact avocados was spot inoculated with L. monocytogenes on the stem scar, and the second set was hydrocooled in water contaminated with L. monocytogenes. Under these experimental conditions, L. monocytogenes internalized into the avocado pulp through the stem or stem scar after both spot inoculation and hydrocooling. In avocados spot inoculated with 50, 130, 500, and 1,300 CFU per fruit, bacteria were detected in the edible portion adjacent to the stem scar within 15 days postinoculation during storage at 4°C. In avocados hydrocooled in water containing L. monocytogenes at 10(6) and 10(8) CFU/ml, bacteria reached the bottom end of the fruit, and the populations in the edible portion adjacent to the stem scar reached up to 5.90 to 7.19 log CFU/g within 10 to 15 days during storage at 4°C. Dye mixed with inoculum was useful for guiding subsequent sampling, but dye penetration patterns were not always consistent with bacterial penetration.

  10. High-pressure processing of Gorgonzola cheese: influence on Listeria monocytogenes inactivation and on sensory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carminati, D; Gatti, M; Bonvini, B; Neviani, E; Mucchetti, G

    2004-08-01

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes on the rind of Gorgonzola cheese is difficult to avoid. This contamination can easily occur as a consequence of handling during ripening. The aims of this study were to determine the efficiency of high-pressure processing (HPP) for inactivation of L. monocytogenes on cheese rind and to evaluate the influence of HPP treatments on sensory characteristics. Gorgonzola cheese rinds, after removal, were inoculated (about 7.0 log CFU/g) with L. monocytogenes strains previously isolated from other Gorgonzola cheeses. The inoculated cheese rinds were processed with an HPP apparatus under conditions of pressure and time ranging from 400 to 700 MPa for 1 to 15 min. Pressures higher than 600 MPa for 10 min or 700 MPa for 5 min reduced L. monocytogenes more than 99%. A reduction higher than 99.999% was achieved pressurizing cheese rinds at 700 MPa for 15 min. Lower pressure or time treatments were less effective and varied in effectiveness with the cheese sample. Changes in sensory properties possibly induced by the HPP were evaluated on four different Gorgonzola cheeses. A panel of 18 members judged the treated and untreated cheeses in a triangle test. Only one of the four pressurized cheeses was evaluated as different from the untreated sample. HPP was effective in the reduction of L. monocytogenes on Gorgonzola cheese rinds without significantly changing its sensory properties. High-pressure technology is a useful tool to improve the safety of this type of cheese.

  11. Molecular characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from animal products in a city of Northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilyan Rosmery Luizaga de Monteiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen causes listeriosis, a fatal disease in about 30% of cases that affects mainly immunocompromised persons. The aim of this research was to characterize L. monocytogenes pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE types isolated from meat products collected at public markets in Araguaina city, TO. Sixty samples of raw ground beef and frescal sausage were analyzed during the second half of 2008. Five out of 30 samples (16.7% of raw ground beef tested positive for L. monocytogenes, three of which were classified as serotype 1/2b and two as serotype 4b. Among the 30 samples of sausage collected, two strains of L. monocytogenes were isolated (6.7%, one of them belonging to serotype 1/2a and the other belonging to serotype 1/2b. The restriction enzymes used were ApaI and SmaI. Similarities among the strains were determined by Dice coefficient. The macro restriction profile obtained by using SmaI enzyme allowed the distribution of seven strains in two clusters, two pulsotypes and two subtypes. The result indicates that L. monocytogenes isolates, belonging to serotype 4b, 1/2a and 1/2b, are strongly correlated within the same serotype group, and in some cases among different serotypes, suggesting that they have a common source.

  12. An outbreak of an unusual strain of Listeria monocytogenes infection in North-East Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpo, Emmanuel; Leith, Jayne; Smith-Palmer, Alison; Bell, John; Parks, Duncan; Browning, Fiona; Byers, Lynn; Corrigan, Helen; Webster, Diana; Karcher, Anne M; Murray, Andrew; Storey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection is an important cause of illness and hospitalization in vulnerable individuals. In the present study, we describe a community outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes in the North-East region of Scotland, which was epidemiologically, environmentally and microbiologically linked to a local meat product and ready-to-eat product manufacturer. Infected individuals were interviewed, and an environmental investigation was conducted. Clinical and environmental samples were tested by culture, and isolates were typed by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP). Three cases of Listeria monocytogenes were linked geographically, had the same serotype (1/2a) and were indistinguishable by fAFLP type XII.6. The human, food and environmental isolates were of the same serotype and were indistinguishable by molecular typing. This is the first community outbreak of L. monocytogenes reported in Scotland since the current outbreak surveillance was established in 1996. Epidemiological and laboratory evidence indicated poor hand hygiene, unhygienic practices and cross-contamination throughout the manufacturing process of ready-to-eat foods as a possible cause of the outbreak. More stringent control of commercial food establishments that provide ready-to-eat food and the need to advise specifically vulnerable groups, e.g., pregnant women, of the risk of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat food is urgently needed. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A new bovine conjunctiva model shows that Listeria monocytogenes invasion is associated with lysozyme resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jessica; Owen, A Rhys; Glanvill, Amy; Francis, Asher; Maboni, Grazieli; Nova, Rodrigo J; Wapenaar, Wendela; Rees, Catherine; Tötemeyer, Sabine

    2015-08-31

    Listerial keratoconjunctivitis ('silage eye') is a wide spread problem in ruminants causing economic losses to farmers and impacts negatively on animal welfare. It results from direct entry of Listeria monocytogenes into the eye, often following consumption of contaminated silage. An isolation protocol for bovine conjunctival swabbing was developed and used to sample both infected and healthy eyes bovine eyes (n=46). L. monocytogenes was only isolated from one healthy eye sample, and suggests that this organism can be present without causing disease. To initiate a study of this disease, an infection model was developed using isolated conjunctiva explants obtained from cattle eyes post slaughter. Conjunctiva were cultured and infected for 20 h with a range of L. monocytogenes isolates (n=11), including the healthy bovine eye isolate and also strains isolated from other bovine sources, such as milk or clinical infections. Two L. monocytogenes isolates (one from a healthy eye and one from a cattle abortion) were markedly less able to invade conjunctiva explants, but one of those was able to efficiently infect Caco2 cells indicating that it was fully virulent. These two isolates were also significantly more sensitive to lysozyme compared to most other isolates tested, suggesting that lysozyme resistance is an important factor when infecting bovine conjunctiva. In conclusion, we present the first bovine conjunctiva explant model for infection studies and demonstrate that clinical L. monocytogenes isolates from cases of bovine keratoconjunctivitis are able to infect these tissues.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of chitosan coatings and films against Listeria monocytogenes on black radish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Gordana D; Klaus, Anita S; Nikšić, Miomir P

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of chitosan coatings prepared with acetic or lactic acid, as well as of composite chitosan-gelatin films prepared with essential oils, was evaluated in fresh shredded black radish samples inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115 and L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 during seven days of storage at 4°C. The chitosan coating prepared with acetic acid showed the most effective antibacterial activity. All tested formulations of chitosan films exhibited strong antimicrobial activity on the growth of L. monocytogenes on black radish, although a higher inhibition of pathogens was achieved at higher concentrations of chitosan. The antimicrobial effect of chitosan films was even more pronounced with the addition of essential oils. Chitosan-gelatin films with thyme essential oils showed the most effective antimicrobial activity. A reduction of 2.4log10CFU/g for L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 and 2.1log10CFU/g for L. monocytogenes ATCC 19112 was achieved in the presence of 1% chitosan film containing 0.2% of thyme essential oil after 24h of storage. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementation of statistical tools to support identification and management of persistent Listeria monocytogenes contamination in smoked fish processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malley, Thomas J V; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Roof, Sherry; Warchocki, Steven; Nightingale, Kendra; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes persistence in food processing plants is a key source of postprocessing contamination of ready-to-eat foods. Thus, identification and elimination of sites where L. monocytogenes persists (niches) is critical. Two smoked fish processing plants were used as models to develop and implement environmental sampling plans (i) to identify persistent L. monocytogenes subtypes (EcoRI ribotypes) using two statistical approaches and (ii) to identify and eliminate likely L. monocytogenes niches. The first statistic, a binomial test based on ribotype frequencies, was used to evaluate L. monocytogenes ribotype recurrences relative to reference distributions extracted from a public database; the second statistic, a binomial test based on previous positives, was used to measure ribotype occurrences as a risk factor for subsequent isolation of the same ribotype. Both statistics revealed persistent ribotypes in both plants based on data from the initial 4 months of sampling. The statistic based on ribotype frequencies revealed persistence of particular ribotypes at specific sampling sites. Two adaptive sampling strategies guided plant interventions during the study: sampling multiple times before and during processing and vector swabbing (i.e., sampling of additional sites in different directions [vectors] relative to a given site). Among sites sampled for 12 months, a Poisson model regression revealed borderline significant monthly decreases in L. monocytogenes isolates at both plants (P = 0.026 and 0.076). Our data indicate elimination of an L. monocytogenes niche on a food contact surface; niches on nonfood contact surfaces were not eliminated. Although our data illustrate the challenge of identifying and eliminating L. monocytogenes niches, particularly at nonfood contact sites in small and medium plants, the methods for identification of persistence we describe here should broadly facilitate science-based identification of microbial persistence.

  16. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irene; Martinucci; Nicola; de; Bortoli; Maria; Giacchino; Giorgia; Bodini; Elisa; Marabotto; Santino; Marchi; Vincenzo; Savarino; Edoardo; Savarino

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophagealmotility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from nonerosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  17. In vitro activity of naturally occurring peptides (defensins against Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento Maria da Graça F.

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoclaved distilled water samples were inoculated with L. monocytogenes strain V7 and strain VPH-1, and incubated aerobically, at 30 C for 48 hours. Each strain was tested individually, and growth curves were determined at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 21, 24, and 48 hours. The growth or survival of L. monocytogenes was similar for both strains, with survivors at 24 hour-incubation. The microbicidal activity of one synthetic cationic peptide (NP-2 was examined against L. monocytogenes strain V7, in a water system. Antibacterial activity of NP-2 (1, 5, and 10 g/ml was best expressed at 60 minute-incubation, with 10 g/ml of peptide, at 30 C.

  18. Thermal inactivation and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes in smoked tench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Branciari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study for the evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes inactivation during a hot smoking process in tench was performed using Listeria innocua strains. Furthermore, the survival of L. monocytogenes in smoked tench was determined after post-processing in contaminated samples, evaluating the growth potential during storage. L. innocua was not detected after the smoking process. In the challenge test, the growth potential of L. monocytogenes was 5.68 log colony forming unit g−1. The results showed that hot smoking at an inner temperature around 72°C is able to eliminate the microorganism. Nevertheless, the product is able to support the growth of the pathogen if post-process contamination occurs, as the food is suitable for Listeria multiplication. Product recontamination should be prevented by means of appropriate application of hygiene measures.

  19. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A.F.; Motta, Amanda S.; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g−1) previously inoculated with a suspension of 102 cfu g−1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products. PMID:24688506

  20. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltaire Sant'Anna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g-1 previously inoculated with a suspension of 10² cfu g-1 of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  1. Antibacterial activity of bacteriocin-like substance P34 on Listeria monocytogenes in chicken sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Quadros, Deoni A F; Motta, Amanda S; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) P34 against Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in chicken sausage. The BLS was applied to chicken sausages (256 AU g(-1)) previously inoculated with a suspension of 10(2) cfu g(-1) of L. monocytogenes. BLS P34 inhibited the indicator microorganism in situ in all incubation times for up to 10 days at 5 °C. The effectiveness of BLS P34 was increased when it was added in combination with nisin. The bacteriocin was also tested in natural eatable natural bovine wrapping (salty semi-dried tripe) against the same indicator microorganism, also showing inhibitory capability in vitro. BLS P34 showed potential to control L. monocytogenes in refrigerated meat products.

  2. Use Carum copticum essential oil for controlling the Listeria monocytogenes growth in fish model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Rabiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the antibacterial effect of Carum copticum essential oil (Ajowan EO against Listeria monocytogenes in fish model system. Ajowan EO chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectral analysis and the highest concentration of Carum copticum essential oil without any significant changes on sensory properties of kutum fish (Rutilus frisii kutum was assigned. Then the inhibitory effect of Ajowan EO at different concentrations in presence of salt and smoke component was tested on L. monocytogenes growth in fish peptone broth (FPB, kutum broth and cold smoked kutum broth at 4 ºC for 12 days. Ajowan EO completely decreased the number of L. monocytogenes in FPB after 12 days of storage, however, antimicrobial effect of EO significantly reduced in kutum and cold smoked kutum broth. Addition of 4% NaCl and smoke component improved the anti-listerial activity of Ajowan EO in all fish model broths.

  3. Use Carum copticum essential oil for controlling the Listeria monocytogenes growth in fish model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiey, Soghra; Hosseini, Hedayat; Rezaei, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antibacterial effect of Carum copticum essential oil (Ajowan EO) against Listeria monocytogenes in fish model system. Ajowan EO chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectral analysis and the highest concentration of Carum copticum essential oil without any significant changes on sensory properties of kutum fish (Rutilus frisii kutum) was assigned. Then the inhibitory effect of Ajowan EO at different concentrations in presence of salt and smoke component was tested on L. monocytogenes growth in fish peptone broth (FPB), kutum broth and cold smoked kutum broth at 4 °C for 12 days. Ajowan EO completely decreased the number of L. monocytogenes in FPB after 12 days of storage, however, antimicrobial effect of EO significantly reduced in kutum and cold smoked kutum broth. Addition of 4% NaCl and smoke component improved the anti-listerial activity of Ajowan EO in all fish model broths.

  4. Sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes to sanitizers used in the meat processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, Nadya; Favrin, Stacy; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2002-12-01

    Nineteen Listeria monocytogenes strains were characterized by automated ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and plasmid profiling to determine the relationship between genotype and sanitizer resistance. Isolates within a ribogroup had a consistent sensitivity or resistance phenotype except for ribogroup C isolates. All isolates with resistance phenotypes harbored two plasmids. The sensitivity of L. monocytogenes strains to quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) was correlated with sensitivity to sanitizers and antibiotics with other modes of action. All isolates tested contained the mdrL gene, which encodes an efflux pump that confers resistance to QACs and is both chromosome and plasmid borne.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnancy and neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pascale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors report a fatal neonatal sepsis caused by Listeria monocytogenes. While the diagnostic procedure aimed to identify the microrganism is described, it is emphasized the importance to recover Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS and L. monocytogenes by means of vaginal-rectal swab culture. The intrapartum screening for L. monocytogenes, by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR providing results in 75 minutes is also evaluated.

  6. Effect of citral and carvacrol on the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, S F; Silva-Angulo, A B; Rosenthal, A; Rodrigo, D; Martínez, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria innocua (L. innocua) and Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) cells in the presence of citral and carvacrol at sublethal concentrations in an agar medium. The presence of terpenes in the L. monocytogenes and L. innocua culture medium provided a reduction in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all the antibiotics tested. These effects were dependent on the concentration of terpenes present in the culture medium. The combination of citral and carvacrol potentiated antibiotic activity by reducing the MIC values of bacitracin and colistin from 32.0 and 128.0 μg ml⁻¹ to 1.0 and 2.0 μg ml⁻¹, respectively. Thus, both Listeria species became more susceptible to these drugs. In this way, the colistin and bacitracin resistance of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua was reversed in the presence of terpenes. Results obtained in this study show that the phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity, reducing the MIC values of cultured L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. Phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity of erythromycin, bacitracin and colistin by reducing the MIC values of cultured Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. This effect in reducing the MIC values of the antibiotics tested in both micro-organisms was increased when natural antimicrobials were combined. This finding indicated that the combination among terpenes and antibiotic may contribute in reducing the required dosage of antibiotics due to the possible effect of terpenes on permeation barrier of the micro-organism cell membrane. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Stochastic models of cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradinaru, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Cell motility and migration are central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and errors during this process can lead to major diseases. Consequently, the mechanisms and phenomenology of cell motility are currently under intense study. In recent years, a new...... interdisciplinary field focusing on the study of biological processes at the nanoscale level, with a range of technological applications in medicine and biological research, has emerged. The work presented in this thesis is at the interface of cell biology, image processing, and stochastic modeling. The stochastic...... models introduced here are based on persistent random motion, which I apply to real-life studies of cell motility on flat and nanostructured surfaces. These models aim to predict the time-dependent position of cell centroids in a stochastic manner, and conversely determine directly from experimental...

  8. Motility of electric cable bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces...... with a highly variable speed of 0.50.3 ms1 (meanstandard deviation) and time between reversals of 155108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic......-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment....

  9. Loss of viability of Listeria monocytogenes in contaminated processed cheese during storage at 4, 12 and 22 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidis, Apostolos S; Boutsiouki, Paraskevi; Papageorgiou, Demetrios K

    2010-09-01

    The behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes in a processed cheese product was evaluated over time by inoculating the product with three different L. monocytogenes strains (Scott A, CA and a strain isolated from processed cheese) at three different inoculation levels (ca. 6x10(5), ca. 6x10(3) and 10(2)CFU/g of cheese or less) and after storage of the contaminated products at 4, 12 or 22 degrees C. Growth of L. monocytogenes was not observed in any of the experimental trials (experiments involving different combinations of strain, inoculum level and storage temperature) throughout the storage period. L. monocytogenes populations decreased over time with a rate that was strain- and storage temperature-dependent. Nonetheless, for cheeses that had been inoculated with the higher inoculum and stored at 4 degrees C viable populations of L. monocytogenes could be detected for up to nine months post-inoculation. The L. monocytogenes survival curves obtained from the different trials were characterised by a post-inoculation phase during which the populations remained essentially unchanged (lag phase) followed by a phase of logarithmic decline. The duration of the lag phase and the rate of inactivation of L. monocytogenes in the different trials were estimated based on data from the linear descending portions of the survival curves. In addition, a non-linear Weibull-type equation was fitted to the data from each survival curve with satisfactory results. The results of the present study emphasize that, according to the definition laid down in the European Union Regulation 1441/2007, the processed cheese product tested in this work should be considered and classified as one that does not support the growth of L. monocytogenes under reasonable foreseeable conditions of distribution and storage. However, post-processing contamination of the product should be austerely avoided as the pathogen can survive in the product for extended periods of time, particularly under refrigerated

  10. BIOTECON diagnostics foodproof Listeria monocytogenes Detection Kit, 5' nuclease in combination with the foodproof ShortPrep II Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, Benjamin; Grönewald, Cordt; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food. The method is based on real-time PCR using hydrolysis probes (5' Nuclease). This advanced PCR method was designed to reduce the time necessary to achieve results from PCR reactions and to enable the user to monitor the amplification of the PCR product simultaneously, in real-time. After DNA isolation using the BIOTECON foodproof ShortPrep II Kit designed for the rapid preparation of L. monocytogenes DNA for direct use in PCR, the real-time detection of L. monocytogenes DNA is carried out using the foodproof Listeria monocytogenes Detection Kit. The kit provides primers and hydrolysis probes for sequence-specific detection, convenient premixed reagents, and controls for reliable interpretation of results. For the internal comparison study, three different foods (soft cheese, coalfish, and smoked ham) were analyzed, chosen from the 15 food groups recommended by the AOAC Research Institute for detection of L. monocytogenes. From each food, 20 samples were inoculated with a low level (1-10 CFU/25 g) and 20 samples with a high level (10-50 CFU/25 g) of L. monocytogenes. Additionally, five nonspiked samples were prepared from each food. Depending on the matrix, the food samples were examined with the test kits and compared with the cultural methods according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual or the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook.

  11. Isolation of [i]Listeria monocytogenes[/i] from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Hassan Moosavy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Lighvan cheese is a semi-hard cheese which has a popular market in Iran and neighboring countries. The aim of this study was evaluating the contamination of milks used for Lighvan cheese making with[i] Listeria monocytogenes[/i]. Raw milk samples were randomly collected from different cheese producing factories (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories. Isolation of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L. monocytogenes. 9 samples (50% of the 18 collected samples from milk tanks in Lighvan cheese producing factories were contaminated with [i]L. monocytogenes[/i]. The concentration of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] in all 9 positive samples was 40 CFU/ml. This study is the first report of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] contamination in raw milks used for Lighvan cheese production in Iran. Regarding the fact that these cheeses are produced from raw milk and no heating process is performed on them its milk contamination can be a potential risk for consumers.

  12. Motility of Electric Cable Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces with a highly variable speed of 0.5 ± 0.3 μm s−1 (mean ± standard deviation) and time between reversals of 155 ± 108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed ...

  13. Comparative evaluation of the VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes Xpress (LMX) for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in a variety of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John; Pittet, Jean-Louis; Hughes, Denise

    2013-01-01

    The VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes Xpress (LMX) test is an enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay designed for use with the automated VIDAS or mini-VIDAS instruments for the specific detection of L. monocytogenes using a 26 h proprietary enrichment broth. The VIDAS LMX method was validated according to harmonized AOAC Research Institute (RI) and Official Methods of Analysis guidelines in both the AOAC Performance Tested Method (PTM) and GovVal programs. In the PTM comparison studies, the VIDAS LMX method was compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual, and AOAC Official Methods. The comparative food studies consisted of two main parts: internal testing and AOAC independent laboratory testing, which included seven food matrixes (deli ham, processed cheese, vanilla ice cream, cooked shrimp, smoked white fish, frozen spinach, and peanut butter). As part of the AOAC R1 GovVal program, the VIDAS LMX method was compared to the Health Canada MFHPB-30 method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in five ready-to-eat (RTE) meats (hot dogs, deli turkey, deli ham, fermented sausage, and liver paté). Twenty replicates of each inoculation level and five uninoculated controls were evaluated in each study. The LMX method also included the use ofchromogenic media, chromID Ottaviani Agosti agar and chromID L. mono. agar, for confirmation of LMX presumptive results. In both the PTM and GovVal evaluations, there were no significant differences in the Chi-square values for the LMX method when compared to reference methods. The additional parameters tested in the PTM evaluation (inclusivity, exclusivity, ruggedness, stability, and lot-to-lot) satisfied the AOAC RI performance requirements. In both the PTM and GovVal validation studies, the VIDAS LMX method demonstrated reliability as a rapid qualitative method for next-day detection of L

  14. Modeling and predicting the growth boundary of Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Dalgaard, Paw

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial effect of diacetate and lactate against Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in challenge tests with vacuum-packaged or modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) cold-smoked salmon, marinated salmon, cold-smoked Greenland halibut, marinated Greenland halibut, and gravad salmon. MAP cold...

  15. Combined action of nisin and carvacrol on Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, I.E.; Smid, E.J.

    1999-01-01

    Nisin, a small antimicrobial protein, was tested for its bactericidal action against Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus and a typical biphasic reduction of the viable count was observed. The reduction was most fast during the first 10 min of exposure, while the viable count remained stable i

  16. Control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh cheese using protective lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, M C; Silva, C C G; Ribeiro, S C; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Rosa, H J D

    2014-11-17

    In the past years, there has been a particular focus on the application of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in controlling the growth of pathogenic bacteria in foods. The aim of this study was to select LAB strains with antimicrobial activity, previously isolated from a traditional Azorean artisanal cheese (Pico cheese), in order to identify those with the greatest potential in reducing Listeria monocytogenes in fresh cheese. Eight bacteriocin producer strains identified as Lactococcus lactis (1) and Enterococcus faecalis (7) were tested. In general, the bacteriocin-producing strains presented a moderate growth in fresh cheese at refrigeration temperatures (4 °C), increasing one log count in three days. They exhibited slow acidification capacity, despite the increased production of lactic acid displayed by some strains after 24h. Bacteriocin activity was only detected in the whey of fresh cheese inoculated with two Enterococcus strains, but all cheeses made with bacteriocin-producing strains inhibited L. monocytogenes growth in the agar diffusion bioassay. No significant differences were found in overall sensory evaluation made by a non-trained panel of 50-52 tasters using the isolates as adjunct culture in fresh cheese, with the exception of one Enterococcus strain. To test the effect of in situ bacteriocin production against L. monocytogenes, fresh cheese was made from pasteurized cows' milk inoculated with bacteriocin-producing LAB and artificially contaminated with approximately 10(6) CFU/mL of L. monocytogenes. The numbers of L. monocytogenes were monitored during storage of fresh cheese at refrigeration temperature (4 °C) for up to 15 days. All strains controlled the growth of L. monocytogenes, although some Enterococcus were more effective in reducing the pathogen counts. After 7 days, this reduction was of approximately 4 log units compared to the positive control. In comparison, an increase of 4 log CFU/mL in pathogen numbers was

  17. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella by combinations of oriental mustard, malic acid, and EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaimat, Amin N; Holley, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial activities of oriental mustard extract alone or combined with malic acid and EDTA were investigated against Salmonella spp. or Listeria monocytogenes at different temperatures. Five strain Salmonella or L. monocytogenes cocktails were separately inoculated in Brain Heart Infusion broth containing 0.5% (w/v) aqueous oriental mustard extract and incubated at 4 °C to 21 °C for 21 d. For inhibitor combination tests, Salmonella Typhimurium 02:8423 and L. monocytogenes 2-243 were individually inoculated in Mueller Hinton broth containing the mustard extract with either or both 0.2% (w/v) malic acid and 0.2% (w/v) EDTA and incubated at 10 °C or 21 °C for 10 to 14 d. Mustard extract inhibited growth of the L. monocytogenes cocktail at 4 °C up to 21 d (2.3 log10 CFU/mL inhibition) or at 10 °C for 7 d (2.4 log10 CFU/mL inhibition). Salmonella spp. viability was slightly, but significantly reduced by mustard extract at 4 °C by 21 d. Although hydrolysis of sinigrin in mustard extract by both pathogens was 2 to 6 times higher at 21 °C than at 4 °C to 10 °C, mustard was not inhibitory at 21 °C, perhaps because of the instability of its hydrolysis product (allyl isothiocyanate). At 21 °C, additive inhibitory effects of mustard extract with EDTA or malic acid led to undetectable levels of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 7 d and 10 d, respectively. At 10 °C, S. Typhimurium was similarly susceptible, but combinations of antimicrobials were not more inhibitory to L. monocytogenes than the individual agents.

  18. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in cured deli-style Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kathleen A; McDonnell, Lindsey M; Von Tayson, Roxanne; Wanless, Brandon; Badvela, Mani

    2013-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes growth can be controlled on ready-to-eat meats through the incorporation of antimicrobial ingredients into the formulation or by postlethality kill steps. However, alternate approaches are needed to provide options that reduce sodium content but maintain protection against pathogen growth in meats after slicing. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibition of L. monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in high-moisture, cured turkey stored at 4 or 7°C. Six formulations of sliced, cured (120 ppm of NaNO2 ), deli-style turkey were tested, including control without antimicrobials, 3.2% lactate-diacetate blend (LD), 0.4% of a liquid propionate-benzoate-containing ingredient, or 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5% of a liquid propionate-containing ingredient. Products were inoculated with 5 log CFU L. monocytogenes per 100-g package (3 log CFU/ml rinsate), vacuum-sealed, and stored at 4 or 7°C for up to 12 weeks; and populations were enumerated by plating on modified Oxford agar. As expected, the control without antimicrobials supported rapid growth, with >2 log average per ml rinsate increase within 4 weeks of storage at 4°C, whereas growth was observed at 6 weeks for the LD treatment. For both replicate trials, all treatments that contained liquid propionate or propionate-benzoate limited L. monocytogenes growth to an increase of 1-log increase) was observed in individual samples for all propionate-containing treatments at weeks 10, 11, and 12. As expected, L. monocytogenes grew more rapidly when products were stored at 7°C, but trends in relative inhibition were similar to those observed at 4°C. These results verify that propionate-based ingredients inhibit growth of L. monocytogenes on sliced, high-moisture, cured turkey and can be considered as an alternative to reduce sodium-based salts while maintaining food safety.

  19. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes on Frozen Red Raspberries by Using UV-C Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yen-Te; Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Zhang, Hongchao; Killinger, Karen; Sablani, Shyam

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of UV-C treatment was determined on the reduction of foodborne pathogens on artificially contaminated frozen food surfaces. At first, the UV-C inactivation rates on 100 μl of the respective cocktails of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella , and Listeria monocytogenes covered underneath 0.5-cm-thick ice were examined. Simultaneously, the energy percentage of UV-C transmitted through the ice was determined. The experiments showed that more than 65% of the UV-C light energy passed through the ice and that UV-C susceptibility was in the descending order of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella , and L. monocytogenes . L. monocytogenes , the most UV-C-resistant strain, was then selected to test on frozen raspberries. The UV-C inactivation kinetic data of L. monocytogenes were well described using the Weibull equation. During 720 s of UV-C exposure, with a total dose of 7.8 × 10(2) mJ/cm(2), a 1.5-log CFU/g reduction of L. monocytogenes population on the surface of frozen red raspberries was noted. No significant differences in total anthocyanins, total phenolics, and total antioxidant activity were observed between UV-C-treated and untreated frozen berries immediately after treatment. At the end of 9 months of storage at -35°C, UV-C-treated berries had statistically lower total phenolics, higher total anthocyanins, and similar total antioxidant activity compared with untreated berries. This study shows that UV-C light can be used to reduce the L. monocytogenes population on frozen raspberries.

  20. Prevalence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes contamination of seafood varies with product category. The highest prevalence was found in cold- smoked fish (34-60%), while the lowest was found in heat- treated and cured seafood (4-12%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes differed greatly in cold-smoked salmon between...... production sites, ranging from monocytogenes. The organism showed moderate growth...... in naturally contaminated cold-smoked, and 'gravad', fish while the growth appeared faster in hot smoked fish. Thus L. monocytogenes is not under control in these products. Finally, the prevalence and growth of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon are discussed in relation...

  1. Prevalence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes contamination of seafood varies with product category. The highest prevalence was found in cold- smoked fish (34-60%), while the lowest was found in heat- treated and cured seafood (4-12%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes differed greatly in cold-smoked salmon between...... production sites, ranging from monocytogenes. The organism showed moderate growth...... in naturally contaminated cold-smoked, and 'gravad', fish while the growth appeared faster in hot smoked fish. Thus L. monocytogenes is not under control in these products. Finally, the prevalence and growth of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon are discussed in relation...

  2. Social motility in african trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oberholzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are devastating human and animal pathogens that cause significant human mortality and limit economic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies of trypanosome biology generally consider these protozoan parasites as individual cells in suspension cultures or in animal models of infection. Here we report that the procyclic form of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei engages in social behavior when cultivated on semisolid agarose surfaces. This behavior is characterized by trypanosomes assembling into multicellular communities that engage in polarized migrations across the agarose surface and cooperate to divert their movements in response to external signals. These cooperative movements are flagellum-mediated, since they do not occur in trypanin knockdown parasites that lack normal flagellum motility. We term this behavior social motility based on features shared with social motility and other types of surface-induced social behavior in bacteria. Social motility represents a novel and unexpected aspect of trypanosome biology and offers new paradigms for considering host-parasite interactions.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes survival in refrigerator dill pickles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyung; D'Sa, Elaine M; Harrison, Mark A; Harrison, Judy A; Andress, Elizabeth L

    2005-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can survive and grow in refrigerated foods with pH values of approximately 4.0 to 5.0 and salt concentrations of 3 to 4%. Home-fermented refrigerator dill pickles fit this description. Contamination of this product with L. monocytogenes could cause serious problems because these items are not heated prior to consumption. L. monocytogenes survival and growth patterns were investigated in refrigerator dill pickles at 1.3, 3.8, and 7.6% salt concentrations. Pickling cucumbers were dipped into an inoculum of L. monocytogenes, brine mixtures were added, and cucumbers were held at room temperature for 1 week and then refrigerated for up to 3 months. The pH, NaCl percentage, titratable acidity percentage, and total populations of Listeria and aerobic, psychrotrophic, and lactic acid bacteria were measured at the addition of brine, after 2, 4, and 7 days of storage at room temperature, and then weekly during refrigerated storage. The initial Listeria population was 5.4 to 5.6 log CFU/cm2 on cucumber surfaces and 3.9 to 4.6 log CFU/g internally. There was an approximate 0.3- to 1-log increase during room temperature fermentation followed by a population decline during refrigerator storage, with a greater decrease in the brines with the highest NaCl concentration. Up to 49 days, the internal tissue of pickles with 1.3, 3.8, or 7.6% salt concentrations were presumptively positive for L. monocytogenes by the enrichment method, and at 91 days the surfaces of such pickles were still positive for L. monocytogenes. Populations of total aerobes and lactic acid bacteria increased during room temperature storage and decreased gradually during refrigerated storage.

  4. Effect of growth and recovery temperatures on pressure resistance of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Adrienne E H; Neetoo, Hudaa S; Chen, Haiqiang

    2010-01-01

    Experimental conditions can affect the outcome of bacterial stress-tolerance assays. Growth conditions that optimize microbial recovery should be established to help evaluate the effectiveness of treatment conditions for food safety. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of growth and recovery temperatures on pressure resistance of early stationary-phase Listeria monocytogenes in milk. The tested conditions were the following: (1) L. monocytogenes was grown at various temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 43 degrees C), suspended in ultra-high temperature (UHT) -processed whole milk, pressure-treated at 400 MPa for 2 min at 21 degrees C and recovered on Tryptic Soy Agar supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSAYE) at 35 degrees C; (2) L. monocytogenes was grown at 35 and 43 degrees C, pressure treated in milk (400 and 500 MPa, respectively, for 2 min at 21 degrees C) and recovered on TSAYE at various temperatures (4, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 degrees C); (3) L. monocytogenes originally grown at 35 degrees C, was pressure treated in milk (400 or 450 MPa for 2 min at 21 degrees C), and recovered on TSAYE at 10 degrees C for various time intervals (1, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12 days) then at 35 degrees C for 5 days. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in pressure-resistance of L. monocytogenes grown at 10 to 25 degrees C with approximately 6.5-log CFU/ml population reductions. At growth temperatures greater than 25 degrees C, pressure resistance increased with less than 1-log CFU/ml reduction observed for L. monocytogenes originally grown at 43 degrees C. After pressure treatment, regardless of growth temperature and pressure treatment, the greatest recovery of L. monocytogenes was within the 4 to 20 degrees C range; maximum recovery at 10 degrees C required approximately 24 days. The time for comparable post-pressure treatment recovery could be reduced by incubation at 10 degrees C for at least 2 days followed by incubation at 35

  5. In vitro activity of naturally occurring peptides (defensins against Listeria monocytogenes Ação in vitro de peptídeos naturais (defensinas sobre Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça F. Nascimento

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoclaved distilled water samples were inoculated with L. monocytogenes strain V7 and strain VPH-1, and incubated aerobically, at 30 C for 48 hours. Each strain was tested individually, and growth curves were determined at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 21, 24, and 48 hours. The growth or survival of L. monocytogenes was similar for both strains, with survivors at 24 hour-incubation. The microbicidal activity of one synthetic cationic peptide (NP-2 was examined against L. monocytogenes strain V7, in a water system. Antibacterial activity of NP-2 (1, 5, and 10 g/ml was best expressed at 60 minute-incubation, with 10 g/ml of peptide, at 30 C.Amostras de água destilada, autoclavadas, foram inoculadas com L. monocytogenes cepa V7 e cepa VPH-1, e incubadas, aerobicamente, a 30ºC por 48 horas. Cada cepa foi testada individualmente, e determinou-se curvas de crescimento a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 21, 24, e 48 horas. O crescimento ou sobrevivência das duas cepas foi semelhante e encontrou-se sobreviventes em 24 horas de incubação. Examinou-se a atividade bactericida de um dos peptídeos catiônicos sintéticos (NP-2 contra L. monocytogenes cepa V7, em sistema aquoso. A atividade antibacteriana de NP-2 (1, 5, and 10µg/ml foi melhor aos 60 minutos de incubação, com 10µg/ml de peptídeo, a 30 C.

  6. REAL-TIME PCR DETECTION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FOOD SAMPLES OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Pochop

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to follow the contamination of food with Listeria monocytogenes by using Step One real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. We used the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit for isolation of DNA and SensiFAST SYBR Hi-ROX Kit for the real-time PCR performance. In 24 samples of food of animal origin without incubation were detected strains of Listeria monocytogenes in 15 samples (swabs. Nine samples were negative. Our results indicated that the real-time PCR assay developed in this study could sensitively detect Listeria monocytogenes in food of animal origin without incubation. This could prevent infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes, and also could benefit food manufacturing companies by extending their product’s shelf-life as well as saving the cost of warehousing their food products while awaiting pathogen testing results. The rapid real-time PCR-based method performed very well compared to the conventional method. It is a fast, simple, specific and sensitive way to detect nucleic acids, which could be used in clinical diagnostic tests in the future.

  7. QUANTIFICATION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN MILK BY MPN-PCR AND MPN-CULTURE METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahzad Hosseini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the MPN-PCR (Most Probable Number- Polymerase Chain Reaction and MPN-Culture methods in enumerating of Listeria monocytogenes in milk. In order to compare the accuracy of these methods, 103 cell/ml Listeria monocytogenes and different background bacteria which may be present in raw milk, were inoculated in sterilized milk. After preparing serial dilutions, three replicates per dilution were inoculated in tubes containing listeria enrichment broth. After 48 hours of incubation, for MPN-Culture three inoculated replicates were subcultured on Oxford agar and suspected colonies were confirmed by performing by biochemical tests. For MPN-PCR assay, the DNA extraction was performed from the three inoculated replicates which were already used for MPN-Culture and PCR assay was performed using primers specific for Listeria monocytogenes. The experiment was repeated three times and the average of enumerated bacteria was calculated by each method separately. Statistical analysis using one sample Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that enumeration by MPN-PCR method was more accurate than enumeration by MPN-Culture method. The result of this study showed that MPN-PCR method in comparision with MPN-Culture even in the presence of different background microorganisms is more rapid and reliable. It is concluded that MPN-PCR method facilitates the enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes without excessive work and could be considered as an alternative to MPN-Culture technique.

  8. Growth Potential of Listeria Monocytogenes in Sliced Turkey Bresaola Packed in Modified Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosciani-Cunico, Elena; D’Amico, Stefano; Sfameni, Chiara; Bertasi, Barbara; Losio, Marina N.; Serraino, Andrea; Daminelli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    According to EC Regulation No 2073/2005, for food business operators that produce ready-to-eat (RTE) product, it is crucial to be able to demonstrate if the product supports the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. The objective of the study was therefore to evaluate the behaviour of L. monocytogenes in sliced RTE turkey bresaola (made by cured turkey breast 4.5% NaCl, 1% sodium lactate, sodium nitrite 150 ppm and flavouring) during the shelf life of the product, simulating a contamination during the slicing operation. Considering a shelf life of 90 days, as defined by manufacturer, the packages of sliced bresaola were stored at 5°C for 7 days and at 8°C for the remaining storage time (83 days). L. monocytogenes count decreased during storage test from 1.43/1.98 log cfu/g in the three batches tested to 1.03 log cfu/g in one batch and to undetectable levels in the other two batches. The results show that the investigated product is unable to support the growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:27800323

  9. Validation of a Previously Developed Geospatial Model That Predicts the Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in New York State Produce Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Shiwakoti, Suvash; Bergholz, Peter; Grohn, Yrjo; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Technological advancements, particularly in the field of geographic information systems (GIS), have made it possible to predict the likelihood of foodborne pathogen contamination in produce production environments using geospatial models. Yet, few studies have examined the validity and robustness of such models. This study was performed to test and refine the rules associated with a previously developed geospatial model that predicts the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in produce farms in New York State (NYS). Produce fields for each of four enrolled produce farms were categorized into areas of high or low predicted L. monocytogenes prevalence using rules based on a field's available water storage (AWS) and its proximity to water, impervious cover, and pastures. Drag swabs (n = 1,056) were collected from plots assigned to each risk category. Logistic regression, which tested the ability of each rule to accurately predict the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, validated the rules based on water and pasture. Samples collected near water (odds ratio [OR], 3.0) and pasture (OR, 2.9) showed a significantly increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation compared to that for samples collected far from water and pasture. Generalized linear mixed models identified additional land cover factors associated with an increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation, such as proximity to wetlands. These findings validated a subset of previously developed rules that predict L. monocytogenes prevalence in produce production environments. This suggests that GIS and geospatial models can be used to accurately predict L. monocytogenes prevalence on farms and can be used prospectively to minimize the risk of preharvest contamination of produce. PMID:26590280

  10. Enrichment dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes and the associated microbiome from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Andrea; Ramachandran, Padmini; Reed, Elizabeth; White, James R; Hasan, Nur; Subramanian, Poorani; Ryan, Gina; Jarvis, Karen; Grim, Christopher; Daquiqan, Ninalynn; Hanes, Darcy; Allard, Marc; Colwell, Rita; Brown, Eric; Chen, Yi

    2016-11-16

    Microbiota that co-enrich during efforts to recover pathogens from foodborne outbreaks interfere with efficient detection and recovery. Here, dynamics of co-enriching microbiota during recovery of Listeria monocytogenes from naturally contaminated ice cream samples linked to an outbreak are described for three different initial enrichment formulations used by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Organization of Standardization (ISO), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Enrichment cultures were analyzed using DNA extraction and sequencing from samples taken every 4 h throughout 48 h of enrichment. Resphera Insight and CosmosID analysis tools were employed for high-resolution profiling of 16S rRNA amplicons and whole genome shotgun data, respectively. During enrichment, other bacterial taxa were identified, including Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, Serratia, Pseudomonas, Erwinia, and Streptococcus spp. Surprisingly, incidence of L. monocytogenes was proportionally greater at hour 0 than when tested 4, 8, and 12 h later with all three enrichment schemes. The corresponding increase in Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus spp.indicated these taxa co-enriched in competition with L. monocytogenes during early enrichment hours. L. monocytogenes became dominant after 24 h in all three enrichments. DNA sequences obtained from shotgun metagenomic data of Listeria monocytogenes at 48 h were assembled to produce a consensus draft genome which appeared to have a similar tracking utility to pure culture isolates of L. monocytogenes. All three methods performed equally well for enrichment of Listeria monocytogenes. The observation of potential competitive exclusion of L. mono by Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus in early enrichment hours provided novel information that may be used to further optimize enrichment formulations. Application of Resphera Insight for high-resolution analysis of 16S amplicon sequences accurately identified L. monocytogenes

  11. Control options for Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik; Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech

    2000-01-01

    At least three outbreaks of listeriosis associated with seafood have been reported. Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the general environment including fresh water, coastal water and live fish from these areas. Contamination or recontamination of seafood may also take place during...

  12. Listeria monocytogenes : nog steeds een probleem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is net als vele andere bacteriële voedselpathogenen al tientallen jaren bekend. De meeste grondstoffen voor voedingsmiddelen komen uit de akker- en tuinbouw, de veehouderij en de visserij. Besmetting vindt daar plaats met micro-organismen afkomstig uit grond, fecaliën, water,

  13. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ELMALI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objectives of this study were i to isolate Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in broiler wing meat samples, ii to confirm the isolates by PCR, based on prs and hly A gene sequences, iii to determine the seasonal and monthly distribution of the isolates. A total of 120 broiler wing meat samples (60 packaged pieces wrapped using strech film in styrofoam plates and 60 unpackaged pieces bought from different markets in Hatay province were analysed. Listeria spp. was isolated from 57 (47.5% out of 120 samples. Fifty-four, out of 57 Listeria spp. isolates were identified as L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes was isolated from the samples collected during the spring, winter, summer, and autumn at the levels of 26.6%, 40%, 53.3%, 60%, respectively. In this study, the isolation rates were found to be the highest in autumn, while the isolation rates were found to be the lowest in spring. As a consequence, high prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in poultry wing meat samples may pose a risk for human health. We consider that with obeying the rules of good hygiene practices (GHP, good manufacturing practices (GMP and HACCP can minimize the contamination with Listeria spp.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes : nog steeds een probleem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is net als vele andere bacteriële voedselpathogenen al tientallen jaren bekend. De meeste grondstoffen voor voedingsmiddelen komen uit de akker- en tuinbouw, de veehouderij en de visserij. Besmetting vindt daar plaats met micro-organismen afkomstig uit grond, fecaliën, water,

  15. Barriers to bacterial motility on unsaturated surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    contributes to microbial spatial dynamics. In bacteria, active dispersal is enabled by a diversity of appendages and, in the case of swarming motility, by the secretion of surface active biomolecules. It is however unclear to which degree di_erent types of motility can take place in the soil pores, a habitat...... and their isogenic mutants unable to express various type of motility we aimed to quantify the physical limits of bacterial motility. Our results demonstrate how hydration controls bacterial motility under unsaturated conditions. They can form the base of improved biodegradation models that include microbial...

  16. Axoneme Structure from Motile Cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2017-01-03

    The axoneme is the main extracellular part of cilia and flagella in eukaryotes. It consists of a microtubule cytoskeleton, which normally comprises nine doublets. In motile cilia, dynein ATPase motor proteins generate sliding motions between adjacent microtubules, which are integrated into a well-orchestrated beating or rotational motion. In primary cilia, there are a number of sensory proteins functioning on membranes surrounding the axoneme. In both cases, as the study of proteomics has elucidated, hundreds of proteins exist in this compartmentalized biomolecular system. In this article, we review the recent progress of structural studies of the axoneme and its components using electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, mainly focusing on motile cilia. Structural biology presents snapshots (but not live imaging) of dynamic structural change and gives insights into the force generation mechanism of dynein, ciliary bending mechanism, ciliogenesis, and evolution of the axoneme. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Physical models of cell motility

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book surveys the most recent advances in physics-inspired cell movement models. This synergetic, cross-disciplinary effort to increase the fidelity of computational algorithms will lead to a better understanding of the complex biomechanics of cell movement, and stimulate progress in research on related active matter systems, from suspensions of bacteria and synthetic swimmers to cell tissues and cytoskeleton.Cell motility and collective motion are among the most important themes in biology and statistical physics of out-of-equilibrium systems, and crucial for morphogenesis, wound healing, and immune response in eukaryotic organisms. It is also relevant for the development of effective treatment strategies for diseases such as cancer, and for the design of bioactive surfaces for cell sorting and manipulation. Substrate-based cell motility is, however, a very complex process as regulatory pathways and physical force generation mechanisms are intertwined. To understand the interplay between adhesion, force ...

  18. Testing of the Anorectal and Pelvic Floor Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact Anorectal and Pelvic ...

  19. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of undissociated lactic, acetic, citric and propionic acid for Listeria monocytogenes under conditions relevant to cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmenhove, Ellen; van Valenberg, Hein J F; Zwietering, Marcel H; van Hooijdonk, Toon C M; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2016-09-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of undissociated lactic acid were determined for six different Listeria monocytogenes strains at 30 °C and in a pH range of 4.2-5.8. Small increments in pH and acid concentrations were used to accurately establish the growth/no growth limits of L. monocytogenes for these acids. The MICs of undissociated lactic acid in the pH range of 5.2-5.8 were generally higher than at pH 4.6 for the different L. monocytogenes strains. The average MIC of undissociated lactic acid was 5.0 (SD 1.5) mM in the pH range 5.2-5.6, which is relevant to Gouda cheese. Significant differences in MICs of undissociated lactic acid were found between strains of L. monocytogenes at a given pH, with a maximum observed level of 9.0 mM. Variations in MICs were mostly due to strain variation. In the pH range 5.2-5.6, the MICs of undissociated lactic acid were not significantly different at 12 °C and 30 °C. The average MICs of undissociated acetic acid, citric acid, and propionic acid were 19.0 (SD 6.5) mM, 3.8 (SD 0.9) mM, and 11.0 (SD 6.3) mM, respectively, for the six L. monocytogenes strains tested in the pH range 5.2-5.6. Variations in MICs of these organic acids for L. monocytogenes were also mostly due to strain variation. The generated data contribute to improved predictions of growth/no growth of L. monocytogenes in cheese and other foods containing these organic acids.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF ACTION OF DISINFECTANTS AGAINST LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES BIOFILMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. CABEÇA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to assess the action of various disinfectants used in food industry against biofilm cells of Listeria monocytogenes formed on stainless steel surfaces during 24, 72 and 120 hours. Numbers of viable biofilm cells decreased after treatment with all the tested disinfectants (iodine, biguanide, quaternary ammonium compounds, peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite. Sodium hypochlorite was the most effective disinfectant against the biofilm cells, while biguanide and iodine were the least. Scanning electron microscopy observations demonstrated attached cells on stainless steel surfaces after treatment with all the disinfectants. These observations showed that microorganisms were not completely removed from stainless steel surfaces after treatment with the disinfectants, however, the attachment did not means the viability of remaining cells. The biofilm age in hours (24, 72 and 120 had no apparent influence on resistance of microbiological cells to the disinfectants under study. In conclusion biofilm cells of L. monocytogenes can withstand disinfectants action.

  1. Optical immunosensors for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis from food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Arun K.; Geng, Tao; Lathrop, Amanda; Valadez, Angela; Morgan, Mark T.

    2004-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are two major foodborne pathogens of significant concern. Two optical evanescent wave immunosensors were evaluated for detection: Antibody-coupled fiber-optic biosensor and a surface plasmon resonant (SPR) immunosensor. In the fiber-optic sensor, polyclonal antibodies for the test organisms were immobilized on polystyrene fiber wave -guides using streptavidin - biotin chemistry. Cyanine 5 -labeled monoclonal antibodies C11E9 (for L. monocytogenes) and SF-11 (for Salmonella Enteritidis) were used to generate a specific fluorescent signal. Signal acquisition was performed by launching a laser-light (635 nm) from an Analyte-2000. This immunosensor was able to detect 103 - 109 cfu/ml of L. monocytogenes or 106-109 cfu/ml of Salmonella Enteritidis and the assays were conducted at near real-time with results obtained within one hour of sampling. The assays were specific and showed signal even in the presence of other microorganisms such as E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella Typhimurium. In the SPR system, IAsys instrument (resonant mirror sensor) was used. Monoclonal antibody-C11E9 was directly immobilized onto a carboxylate cuvette. Whole Listeria cells at various concentrations did not yield any signal while surface protein extracts did. Crude protein extracts from L. monocytogenes and L. innocua had average binding responses of around 150 arc sec (0.25 ng/mm2), which was significantly different from L. grayi, L. ivanovii, or L. welshimeri with average responses of Salmonella Enteritidis.

  2. The study of effect bacteriocin producing Lactoco ccus lactis on Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirhossieni, M.Sc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and purpose: Dairy products often associated with problems such as short shelf life and poor hygiene control. A novel approach is to utilize bacteriocin or bacteriocin producer strains, to control undesirable micro flora as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus in foods. Hence, we studied the effect of nisin like producing Lactococcus lactis against Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus, in order to compare the isolated strain within different countries.Materials and Methods: In this research we studied the effect of nisin like producing Lactococcus lactis, with producer spot test method. We also used supernatant from 24 h culture of Lactoccus lactis. Moreover, we studied the effect of bacteriocin on Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus growth curves.Results: The growth of both strains was inhibited by the bacteriocin. Conclusion: According to our results, the bacteriocin could be used in liquid food with bacteriocin added directly or as a starter culture in fermentation. This would inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes; furthermore, Bacillus cereus is used to reduce food poisoning for fermented food products.

  3. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in the river receiving the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Taherkhani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Listeria spp. in the river water before and after discharge of the effluent of the municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 66 samples were collected bi-weekly over 4 months from eleven discrete sampling locations in Zayandehrood River, Iran. Three sampling sites were located above the discharge point and five sites were located after the discharge point of WWTP. Samples were also collected from the influent and the effluent of WWTP. Listeria spp. were isolated using a selective enrichment procedure and a subculture onto polymyxin-acriflavine-lithium chloride-ceftazidime-esculin-mannitol Agar. All isolates were subjected to standard biochemical tests. Results: L. monocytogenes was isolated from influent (83%, effluent (50% and (18.5% river water. Listeria spp. was not found before the discharge point in river water. However, L. monocytogenes was isolated in samples collected from 200 m (33%, 500 m (33%, 2 km (16.5%, 5 km (16.5% and 10 km (16.5% downstream from the WWTP. Listeria innocua (9% and Listeria seeligeri (10% were the second most frequently isolated species. Conclusion: During the wastewater treatment, Listeria spp. is not removed completely. L. monocytogenes is widely distributed in the Zayandehrood river. L. monocytogenes released into surface water demonstrates a potential risk for public health. These results indicate the need for appropriate water management in order to reduce human and animal exposure to such pathogens.

  4. In vitro Selection of DNA Aptamers and Fluorescence-Based Recognition for Rapid Detection Listeria monocytogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-qing; LIAN Ying-qi; GAO Chao; YU Xiao-feng; ZHU Ming; ZONG Kai; CHEN Xue-jiao; YAN Yi

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are speciifc nucleic acid sequences that can bind to a wide range of nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid targets with high afifnity and speciifcity. Nucleic acid aptamers are selected in vitro from single stranded DNA or RNA ligands containing random sequences of up to a few hundred nucleotides. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was used to select and PCR amplify DNA sequences (aptamers) capable of binding to and detecting Listeria monocytogenes, one of the major food-borne pathogens. A simpliifed afifnity separation approach was employed, in which L. monocytogenes in exponential (log) phase of growth was used as the separation target. A lfuorescently-labeled aptamer assay scheme was devised for detecting L. monocytogenes. This report described a novel approach to the detection of L. monocytogenes using DNA aptamers. Aptamers were developed by nine rounds of SELEX. A high afifnity aptamer was successfully selected from the initial random DNA pool, and its secondary structure was also investigated. One of aptamers named e01 with the highest afifnity was further tested in aptamer-peroxidase and aptamer-lfuorescence staining protocols. This study has proved the principle that the whole-cell SELEX could be a promising technique to design aptamer-based molecular probes for dectection of pathogenic microorganisms without tedious isolation and puriifcation of complex markers or targets.

  5. Isolation and detection of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry meat by standard culture methods and PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kureljušić, J.; Rokvić, N.; Jezdimirović, N.; Kureljušić, B.; Pisinov, B.; Karabasil, N.

    2017-09-01

    Listeria is the genus of a bacteria found in soil and water and some animals, including poultry and cattle. It can be present in raw milk and food made from raw milk. It can also live in food processing plants and contaminate a variety of processed meats. Microscopically, Listeria species appear as small, Gram-positive rods, which are sometimes arranged in short chains. In direct smears, they can be coccoid, so they can be mistaken for streptococci. Longer cells can resemble corynebacteria. Flagella are produced at room temperature but not at 37°C. Haemolytic activity on blood agar has been used as a marker to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes among other Listeria species, but it is not an absolutely definitive criterion. Further biochemical characterization is necessary to distinguish between the different Listeria species. The objective of this study was to detect, isolate and identify Listeria monocytogenes from poultry meat. Within a period of six months from January to June 2017, a total of 15 samples were collected. Three samples were positive for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. Biochemical and microbiological tests as well as PCR technique using specific primers were used to confirm L. Monocytogenes in the samples.

  6. Fluorescence amplified fragment length polymorphism compared to pulsed field gel electrophoresis for Listeria monocytogenes subtyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roussel Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeriosis is a severe infection which mainly affects pregnant women, neonates and immuno-compromised adults. ANSES’s Laboratory for Food safety has been the European Union Reference Laboratory (EURL for L. monocytogenes in the food chain since 2006. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE is routinely used in the EURL for the surveillance of L. monocytogenes isolated from foods, animals and the environment. One of the main EURL activities is to evaluate alternative molecular subtyping methods to PFGE, and integrate their use within the National Reference Laboratories (NRL network. Since 2008, the United Kingdom (UK-NRL for L. monocytogenes at the Health Protection Agency (HPA, London, has used fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (fAFLP for the routine surveillance of L. monocytogenes isolated from human clinical cases, food and food processing environments in the UK. This study compares fAFLP with PFGE for subtyping L. monocytogenes. Results A panel of 109 L. monocytogenes isolates from either human cases of listeriosis, foods, food processing environments and animals were used for the comparative evaluation. Among these, 2 strains were tested from duplicate culture by both methods. The panel also included field isolates, isolates associated with outbreaks or sporadic cases and reference strains. The two strains tested in duplicate displayed the same fAFLP and PFGE types. Strains known to be epidemiologically associated with one another were found to have unique PFGE and fAFLP types. FAFLP and PFGE divided the strains into 76 and 82 distinct profiles, or types, respectively. The discriminatory index calculated was 0.993 and 0.996 for fAFLP and PFGE, respectively. Conclusions The discriminatory ability of fAFLP was similar to that of PFGE for the subtyping of L. monocytogenes isolates. As a less labour intensive technique fAFLP may be a better method to use than PFGE in investigating outbreaks of human

  7. Assessment of gastrointestinal motility using three different assays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Cristina; Poli, Enzo

    2010-11-01

    The protocols detailed in this unit are designed to assess the motor activity of different gastric and intestinal muscle preparations in vitro and the effects of drugs that modulate gastrointestinal motility. The preparations described are characterized by different contractile behaviors, consisting of spontaneous (duodenum), neurogenic (ileum), and drug-stimulated (fundus, ileum) motility; these reproduce motility patterns occurring in the gut wall in vivo. These protocols document the variety of factors that can influence the responses of isolated tissues and describe how such tissues can be used for testing substances that affect gut movements. These preparations allow evaluation of direct interactions with the processes that control contractile machinery, as well as indirect effects resulting from the modification of neurotransmitter release from myenteric neurons. These models can be exploited to assay novel compounds undergoing preclinical development or to evaluate the functional toxicity exerted by environmental or alimentary pollutants, like xenobiotics and naturally occurring toxins, as well as the mechanisms underlying these effects.

  8. Cyclic di-GMP-dependent signaling pathways in the pathogenic Firmicute Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We characterized key components and major targets of the c-di-GMP signaling pathways in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, identified a new c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide responsible for motility inhibition, cell aggregation, and enhanced tolerance to disinfectants and desiccation, and provided first insights into the role of c-di-GMP signaling in listerial virulence. Genome-wide genetic and biochemical analyses of c-di-GMP signaling pathways revealed that L. monocytogenes has three GGDEF domain proteins, DgcA (Lmo1911, DgcB (Lmo1912 and DgcC (Lmo2174, that possess diguanylate cyclase activity, and three EAL domain proteins, PdeB (Lmo0131, PdeC (Lmo1914 and PdeD (Lmo0111, that possess c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. Deletion of all phosphodiesterase genes (ΔpdeB/C/D or expression of a heterologous diguanylate cyclase stimulated production of a previously unknown exopolysaccharide. The synthesis of this exopolysaccharide was attributed to the pssA-E (lmo0527-0531 gene cluster. The last gene of the cluster encodes the fourth listerial GGDEF domain protein, PssE, that functions as an I-site c-di-GMP receptor essential for exopolysaccharide synthesis. The c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide causes cell aggregation in minimal medium and impairs bacterial migration in semi-solid agar, however, it does not promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The exopolysaccharide also greatly enhances bacterial tolerance to commonly used disinfectants as well as desiccation, which may contribute to survival of L. monocytogenes on contaminated food products and in food-processing facilities. The exopolysaccharide and another, as yet unknown c-di-GMP-dependent target, drastically decrease listerial invasiveness in enterocytes in vitro, and lower pathogen load in the liver and gallbladder of mice infected via an oral route, which suggests that elevated c-di-GMP levels play an overall negative role in listerial virulence.

  9. Cyclic di-GMP-dependent signaling pathways in the pathogenic Firmicute Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Hong; Köseoğlu, Volkan K; Güvener, Zehra T; Myers-Morales, Tanya; Reed, Joseph M; D'Orazio, Sarah E F; Miller, Kurt W; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-08-01

    We characterized key components and major targets of the c-di-GMP signaling pathways in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, identified a new c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide responsible for motility inhibition, cell aggregation, and enhanced tolerance to disinfectants and desiccation, and provided first insights into the role of c-di-GMP signaling in listerial virulence. Genome-wide genetic and biochemical analyses of c-di-GMP signaling pathways revealed that L. monocytogenes has three GGDEF domain proteins, DgcA (Lmo1911), DgcB (Lmo1912) and DgcC (Lmo2174), that possess diguanylate cyclase activity, and three EAL domain proteins, PdeB (Lmo0131), PdeC (Lmo1914) and PdeD (Lmo0111), that possess c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. Deletion of all phosphodiesterase genes (ΔpdeB/C/D) or expression of a heterologous diguanylate cyclase stimulated production of a previously unknown exopolysaccharide. The synthesis of this exopolysaccharide was attributed to the pssA-E (lmo0527-0531) gene cluster. The last gene of the cluster encodes the fourth listerial GGDEF domain protein, PssE, that functions as an I-site c-di-GMP receptor essential for exopolysaccharide synthesis. The c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide causes cell aggregation in minimal medium and impairs bacterial migration in semi-solid agar, however, it does not promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The exopolysaccharide also greatly enhances bacterial tolerance to commonly used disinfectants as well as desiccation, which may contribute to survival of L. monocytogenes on contaminated food products and in food-processing facilities. The exopolysaccharide and another, as yet unknown c-di-GMP-dependent target, drastically decrease listerial invasiveness in enterocytes in vitro, and lower pathogen load in the liver and gallbladder of mice infected via an oral route, which suggests that elevated c-di-GMP levels play an overall negative role in listerial virulence.

  10. Use of antimicrobial biodegradable packaging to control Listeria monocytogenes during storage of cooked ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Begonya; Aymerich, Teresa; Monfort, Josep M; Garriga, Margarita

    2007-11-30

    The antimicrobial effect against L. monocytogenes of biodegradable films (alginate, zein and polyvinyl alcohol) containing enterocins was investigated. Survival of the pathogen was studied by means of challenge tests performed at 6 degrees C during 8 and 29 days, for air-packed and vacuum-packed sliced cooked ham, respectively. Air packaging was tested with two concentrations of enterocins (200 and 2000 AU/cm2). Control air-packed cooked ham showed an increase of L. monocytogenes from 10(4) to 10(7) CFU/g after 8 days. By contrast, packaging with antimicrobial films effectively slowed down the pathogen's growth, leading to final counts lower than in control lots. Air-packaging with alginate films containing 2000 AU/cm2 of enterocins effectively controlled L. monocytogenes for 8 days. An increase of only 1 log unit was observed in zein and polyvinyl alcohol lots at the same enterocin concentration. Vacuum packaging with films containing enterocins (2000 AU/cm2) also delayed the growth of the pathogen. No increase from inoculated levels was observed during 15 days in antimicrobial alginate films. After 29 days of storage, the lowest counts were obtained in samples packed with zein and alginate films containing enterocins, as well as with zein control films. The most effective treatment for controlling L. monocytogenes during 6 degrees C storage was vacuum-packaging of sliced cooked ham with alginate films containing 2000 AU/cm2 of enterocins. From the results obtained it can concluded that antimicrobial packaging can improve the safety of sliced cooked ham by delaying and reducing the growth of L. monocytogenes.

  11. Type I interferon promotes cell-to-cell spread of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Suzanne E; Sit, Brandon; Shaker, Andrew; Currie, Elissa; Tan, Joël M J; van Rijn, Jorik; Higgins, Darren E; Brumell, John H

    2017-03-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) play a critical role in antiviral immune responses, but can be deleterious to the host during some bacterial infections. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) induces a type I IFN response by activating cytosolic antiviral surveillance pathways. This is beneficial to the bacteria as mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR1(-/-) ) are resistant to systemic infection by Lm. The mechanisms by which type I IFNs promote Lm infection are unclear. Here, we show that IFNAR1 is required for dissemination of Lm within infection foci in livers of infected mice and for efficient cell-to-cell spread in vitro in macrophages. IFNAR1 promotes ActA polarization and actin-based motility in the cytosol of host cells. Our studies suggest type I IFNs directly impact the intracellular life cycle of Lm and provide new insight into the mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to exploit the type I IFN response. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparison of two multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budniak Sylwia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to optimise and compare two multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples including the liver, brain, and blood. Material and Methods: Three strains of L. monocytogenes and single strains of each of the species: L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. grayi, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri were used. Additionally, five other species of bacterium were used to evaluate the specificity of the tests. Results: Specific amplification products were obtained for both multiplex PCR assays, which confirmed the tested strains as Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Isolates of other species did not yield PCR products. Conclusion: Both multiplex PCR assays proved to be significantly sensitive and highly-specific methods for the detection of Listeria strains.

  13. Spontaneous symmetry breaking for geometrical trajectories of actin-based motility in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Actin-based motility is important for many cellular processes. In this article we extend our previous studies of an actin-propelled circular disk in two dimensions to an actin-propelled spherical bead in three dimensions. We find that for an achiral load the couplings between the motion of the load and the actin network induce a series of bifurcations, starting with a transition from rest to moving state, followed by a transition from straight to planar curves, and finally a further transition from motion in a plane to one with torsion. To address the intriguing, experimentally observed chiral motility of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, we also study the motility of a spherical load with a built-in chirality. For such a chiral load, stable circular trajectories are no longer found in numerical simulations. Instead, helical trajectories with handedness that depends on the chirality of the load are found. Our results reveal the relation between the symmetry of actin network and the trajectories of actin-propelled loads.

  14. A novel method to assess gastric accommodation and peristaltic motility in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Pieter; Nielsen, Maria Astin; Hirsch, Ika; Svensson, David; Gillberg, Per-Göran; Hultin, Leif

    2008-01-01

    To simultaneously study gastric accommodation and peristaltic motility in the whole stomach of conscious rats by measuring intragastric pressure (IGP) during test-meal infusion. After an overnight fast, a test-meal infusion system and a catheter to measure IGP were connected to a chronically implanted gastric fistula. IGP was measured during infusion of an X-ray-opaque, non-nutritious viscous test meal (0.25-2 ml min(-1)); gastric motility and emptying were assessed by X-ray fluoroscopy. Peristaltic motility-induced IGP waves were quantified as a motility index (wave amplitude divided by wavelength). Experiments were performed in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and in the high-anxiety Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Moreover, the effects of 30 mg kg(-1) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 1 mg kg(-1) atropine or 20 mg kg(-1) molsidomine were tested in SD rats. Compared with SD rats, IGP increased significantly faster during stomach distension in WKY rats, indicating impaired accommodation in the latter strain. Motility indices did not differ between the two strains. L-NAME significantly increased IGP during stomach distension, indicating decreased gastric accommodation. However, no change in motility indices was observed with L-NAME. Treatment with atropine significantly increased IGP and decreased motility indices, indicating decreased gastric accommodation and motility. Molsidomine significantly decreased IGP during stomach distension but did not affect motility. The results correspond to X-ray observations, and confirm literature data. We conclude that IGP measurement during test-meal infusion represents an efficient and novel method to compare gastric accommodation and peristaltic motility in the whole stomach of conscious rats.

  15. Determination of Listeria monocytogenes Growth during Mushroom Production and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Leong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the EU, food is considered safe with regard to Listeria monocytogenes if its numbers do not exceed 100 CFU/g throughout the shelf-life of the food. Therefore, it is important to determine if a food supports growth of L. monocytogenes. Challenge studies to determine the ability of a food to support growth of L. monocytogenes are essential as predictive modelling often overestimates the growth ability of L. monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to determine if growth of L. monocytogenes was supported during the production and distribution of mushrooms. A three-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated onto three independent batches of whole mushrooms, sliced mushrooms, mushroom casing and mushroom substrate at a concentration of about 100–1000 CFU/g. The batches were incubated at potential abuse temperatures, as a worst case scenario, and at intervals during storage L. monocytogenes numbers, % moisture and pH were determined. The results showed that the sliced and whole mushrooms had the ability to support growth, while mushroom casing allowed survival but did not support growth. Mushroom substrate showed a rich background microflora that grew on Listeria selective media and this hindered enumeration of L. monocytogenes. In the case of this study, Combase predictions were not always accurate, indicating that challenge studies may be a necessary part of growth determination of L. monocytogenes.

  16. Listeria monocytogenes en alimentos: ¿son todos los aislamientos igual de virulentos? Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes: are all the isolates equally virulent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. López

    2006-12-01

    . monocytogenes strains. Despite this great step forward, there is not a single marker available to test the virulence of field isolates of this species. In the future, the combination of different molecular markers will probably allow the screening of food contamination by only the virulent clones of L. monocytogenes, thus improving the prevention of foodborne human listeriosis.

  17. Protective effect of Carnobacterium spp. against Listeria monocytogenes during host cell invasion using in vitro HT29 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Pilchova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of listeriosis results mainly from the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to attach, invade, replicate and survive within various cell types in mammalian tissues. In this work, the effect of two bacteriocin-producing Carnobacterium (C. divergens V41 and C. maltaromaticum V1 and three non-bacteriocinogenic strains: (C. divergens V41C9, C. divergens 2763 and C. maltaromaticum 2762 was investigated on the reduction of L. monocytogenes Scott A plaque-forming during human infection using the HT-29 in vitro model. All Carnobacteria tested resulted in a reduction in the epithelial cell invasion caused by L. monocytogenes Scott A. To understand better the mechanism underlying the level of L. monocytogenes infection inhibition by Carnobacteria, infection assays from various pretreatments of Carnobacteria were assessed. The results revealed the influence of bacteriocin production combined with a passive mechanism of mammalian cell monolayers protection by Carnobacteria. These initial results showing a reduction in L. monocytogenes virulence on epithelial cells by Carnobacteria would be worthwhile analyzing further as a promising probiotic tool for human health.

  18. The ability of Listeria monocytogenes PI-PLC to facilitate escape from the macrophage phagosome is dependent on host PKCbeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussin, Mathilde A; Leitges, Michael; Goldfine, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes are facultative intracellular pathogenic bacteria that can infect macrophages as well as non-professional phagocytes. After entry in the host cell, the bacteria escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. In murine macrophages and in cell lines derived from these cells, escape of L. monocytogenes from the phagosome is absolutely dependent on listeriolysin O (LLO) and facilitated by a secreted phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Work in this laboratory has previously demonstrated a LLO and PI-PLC-dependent translocation of host PKCbeta isoforms. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCbeta resulted in a significant reduction in permeabilization of the phagosome, and in the number of bacteria reaching the cytosol. These findings led to the prediction that the bacterial PI-PLC promotes escape through the production of diacylglycerol leading to the activation of host PKCbeta. To test this hypothesis, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMf) obtained from PKCbeta knockout (PKCbetaKO) or C57Bl/6 mice were infected with L. monocytogenes. We observed that wild-type L. monocytogenes escapes from the phagosome of PKCbetaKO BMMf as well as from C57Bl/6 BMMf. However, in PKCbetaKO BMMf, L. monocytogenes uses a PI-PLC-independent, but phosphatidylcholine-preferring PLC (PC-PLC)-dependent pathway to facilitate escape. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that PI-PLC promotes escape through mobilization of host PKCbeta.

  19. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua Isolated from Swine Slaughterhouses and Meat Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Zanolli Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  20. Evaluation of the transfer of Listeria monocytogenes from stainless steel and high-density polyethylene to Bologna and American cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Andrés; McLandsborough, Lynne A

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors involved in the transfer of Listeria monocytogenes from surfaces to foods. We evaluated the influence of surface type (stainless steel and high-density polyethylene), inoculation method (biofilm growth and attached cells), hydration level (visibly dry and wet), and food type (bologna and American cheese). Each experiment included all 16 combinations and was repeated 11 times. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes was used to inoculate stainless steel and high-density polyethylene either as growing biofilms or attached cells. Slides were placed on a universal testing machine and brought into contact with food at a constant pressure (45 kPa) and time (30 s). Food slices were blended, the number of transferred cells was determined by plating, and the efficiency of transfer (EOT) was calculated. The results strongly suggest that stainless steel surfaces transferred more L. monocytogenes to foods than did polyethylene (P = 0.05). Independent of the surface, biofilms tended to transfer more L. monocytogenes to foods (EOT = 0.57) than did attached cells (EOT = 0.16). Among foods, L. monocytogenes was transferred to bologna more easily than to cheese (P 0.05). We hypothesize that drying weakens cell-to-cell interactions in biofilms and cell-to-surface interactions of biofilms and thus allows increased transfer of cells to food products.

  1. Sublethal injury and virulence changes in Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua treated with antimicrobials carvacrol and citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A; Genovés, S; Martorell, P; Zanini, S F; Rodrigo, D; Martinez, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two antimicrobial substances, carvacrol and citral, on Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua cells, as well as possible virulence changes in injured cells, using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model test. The results indicated that the percentage of sublethal damage was higher in L. monocytogenes than in L. innocua. The results of the study carried out by using C. elegans indicated that C. elegans fed in a lawn of L. monocytogenes previously treated with carvacrol showed a loss in life span (p ≤ 0.05) as compared with L. monocytogenes treated with citral, Escherichia coli OP50 as a negative control, and treated and untreated L. innocua. Egg laying was also affected: worms fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. monocytogenes laid fewer eggs than those fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. innocua or fed with OP50 as a negative control. Worms fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. innocua also laid fewer eggs than those fed with OP50 as a negative control. A phenotype named bag of worms and an undescribed new one, "vulva inflammation", were also observed.

  2. Comparative Study of the Effects of Citral on the Growth and Injury of Listeria innocua and Listeria monocytogenes Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Angulo, Angela B.; Zanini, Surama F.; Rosenthal, Amauri; Rodrigo, Dolores; Klein, Günter; Martínez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of citral on growth and on the occurrence of sublethal damage in Listeria innocua Serovar 6a (CECT 910) and Listeria monocytogenes Serovar 4b (CECT 4032) cells that were exposed to citral as a natural antimicrobial agent. Two initial inoculum concentrations were considered in this investigation: 102 and 106 cfu/mL. Citral exhibited antilisterial activity against L. innocua and L. monocytogenes, and the observed effects were dependent on the concentration of citral present in the culture medium (0, 0.150 and 0.250 μL/mL) (p ≤ 0.05). L. innocua had a shorter lag phase than L. monocytogenes, and the two species had nearly identical maximum specific growth rates. These results indicate that L. innocua could be used as surrogate for L. monocytogenes when testing the effects of this antimicrobial. Significant differences in the lag phase and growth rate were observed between the small and large inoculum concentration (p ≤ 0.05). Citral-treated L. innocua and L. monocytogenes that were recovered on selective medium (i.e., TSA-YE-SC) had a shorter lag phase and a higher maximum specific growth rate than cells that were recovered on non-selective medium (i.e., TSA-YE) (p ≤ 0.05). This result suggests that damage occurs at sublethal concentrations of citral. PMID:25643164

  3. Predominance and Distribution of a Persistent Listeria monocytogenes Clone in a Commercial Fresh Mushroom Processing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Latha; Kucerova, Zuzana; Knabel, Stephen J; LaBorde, Luke F

    2015-11-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Listeria spp. in a commercial fresh mushroom slicing and packaging environment. Samples were collected at three different sampling periods within a 13-month time interval. Of the 255 environmental samples collected, 18.8% tested positive for L. monocytogenes, 4.3% for L. innocua, and 2.0% for L. grayi. L. monocytogenes was most often found on wet floors within the washing and slicing and packaging areas. Each of the 171 L. monocytogenes isolates found in the environment could be placed into one of three different serotypes; 1/2c was predominant (93.6%), followed by 1/2b (3.5%) and 1/2a (2.9%). Of 58 isolates subtyped using multi-virulence-locus sequence typing, all 1/2c isolates were identified as virulence type (VT) 11 (VT11), all 1/2b isolates were VT105, and 1/2a isolates were either VT107 or VT56. VT11 was designated as the predominant and persistent clone in the environment because it was isolated repeatedly at numerous locations throughout the study. The overall predominance and persistence of VT11 indicates that it likely colonized the mushroom processing environment. Areas adjacent to the trench drain in the washing and slicing area and a floor crack in the packaging area may represent primary harborage sites (reservoirs) for VT11. Improvements made to sanitation procedures by company management after period 2 coincided with a significant (P ≤ 0.001) reduction in the prevalence of L. monocytogenes from 17.8% in period 1 and 30.7% in period 2 to 8.5% in period 3. This suggests that targeted cleaning and sanitizing procedures can be effective in minimizing the occurrence of L. monocytogenes contamination in processing facilities. Additional research is needed to understand why VT11 was predominant and persistent in the mushroom processing environment.

  4. Highly Invasive Listeria monocytogenes Strains Have Growth and Invasion Advantages in Strain Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilelidou, Evangelia A; Rychli, Kathrin; Manthou, Evanthia; Ciolacu, Luminita; Wagner, Martin; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Listeria monocytogenes strains can be present in the same food sample; moreover, infection with more than one L. monocytogenes strain can also occur. In this study we investigated the impact of strain competition on the growth and in vitro virulence potential of L. monocytogenes. We identified two strong competitor strains, whose growth was not (or only slightly) influenced by the presence of other strains and two weak competitor strains, which were outcompeted by other strains. Cell contact was essential for growth inhibition. In vitro virulence assays using human intestinal epithelial Caco2 cells showed a correlation between the invasion efficiency and growth inhibition: the strong growth competitor strains showed high invasiveness. Moreover, invasion efficiency of the highly invasive strain was further increased in certain combinations by the presence of a low invasive strain. In all tested combinations, the less invasive strain was outcompeted by the higher invasive strain. Studying the effect of cell contact on in vitro virulence competition revealed a complex pattern in which the observed effects depended only partially on cell-contact suggesting that competition occurs at two different levels: i) during co-cultivation prior to infection, which might influence the expression of virulence factors, and ii) during infection, when bacterial cells compete for the host cell. In conclusion, we show that growth of L. monocytogenes can be inhibited by strains of the same species leading potentially to biased recovery during enrichment procedures. Furthermore, the presence of more than one L. monocytogenes strain in food can lead to increased infection rates due to synergistic effects on the virulence potential.

  5. Validation of the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Instrument for Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In 2013, the Thermo Scientific™ SureTect™ Listeria monocytogenes Real-Time PCR Assay was certified by the AOAC Research Institute (RI) Performance Tested Methods (SM) program as a rapid method for the detection of L. monocytogenes from a wide range of food matrixes and surface samples. This report details the method modification studies undertaken to extend the analysis of this PCR assay to the Applied Biosystems™ 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and Applied Biosystems RapidFinder™ Express 2.0 software allowing the use of the SureTect assay on a 96 well format PCR cycler in addition to the current workflow, which uses the 24 well Thermo Scientific PikoReal™ PCR Instrument and Thermo Scientific SureTect software. Because this study was deemed by AOAC-RI to be a level 2 method modification study, a representative range of food matrixes covering raw ground turkey, 2% fat pasteurized milk, and bagged lettuce as well as stainless steel surface samples were analyzed with the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and RapidFinder Express 2.0 software. All testing was conducted in comparison to the reference method detailed in International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6579:2002. No significant difference by probability of detection statistical analysis was found between the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay or the ISO reference method methods for any of the matrixes analyzed during the study.

  6. Validation of the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Instrument for Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Arizanova, Julia; Crabtree, David; Simpson, Helen; Evans, Katharine; Vaahtoranta, Laura; Palomäki, Jukka-Pekka; Artimo, Paulus; Huang, Feng; Liikanen, Maria; Koskela, Suvi

    2016-05-01

    In 2013, the Thermo Scientific™ SureTect™ Listeria monocytogenes Real-Time PCR Assay was certified by the AOAC Research Institute (RI) Performance Tested Methods(SM) program as a rapid method for the detection of L. monocytogenes from a wide range of food matrixes and surface samples. This report details the method modification studies undertaken to extend the analysis of this PCR assay to the Applied Biosystems™ 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and Applied Biosystems RapidFinder™ Express 2.0 software allowing the use of the SureTect assay on a 96 well format PCR cycler in addition to the current workflow, which uses the 24 well Thermo Scientific PikoReal™ PCR Instrument and Thermo Scientific SureTect software. Because this study was deemed by AOAC-RI to be a level 2 method modification study, a representative range of food matrixes covering raw ground turkey, 2% fat pasteurized milk, and bagged lettuce as well as stainless steel surface samples were analyzed with the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and RapidFinder Express 2.0 software. All testing was conducted in comparison to the reference method detailed in International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6579:2002. No significant difference by probability of detection statistical analysis was found between the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay or the ISO reference method methods for any of the matrixes analyzed during the study.

  7. Adaptive growth responses of Listeria monocytogenes to acid and osmotic shifts above and across the growth boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belessi, C-I A; Le Marc, Y; Merkouri, S I; Gounadaki, A S; Schvartzman, S; Jordan, K; Drosinos, E H; Skandamis, P N

    2011-01-01

    The effect of acid and osmotic shifts on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated at 10°C. Two types of shifts were tested: (i) within the range of pH and water activity (a(w)) levels that allow growth of L. monocytogenes and (ii) after habituation at no-growth conditions back to growth-permitting conditions. A L. monocytogenes cheese isolate, with high survival capacity during cheesemaking, was inoculated (10(2) CFU/ml) in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract at six pH levels (5.1 to 7.2; adjusted with lactic acid) and 0.5% NaCl (a(w) 0.995), or four a(w) levels (0.995 to 0.93, adjusted with 0.5 to 10.5% NaCl) at pH 7.2 and grown to early stationary phase. L. monocytogenes was then shifted (at 10(2) CFU/ml) to each of the aforementioned growth-permitting pH and a(w) levels and incubated at 10°C. Shifts from no-growth to growth-permitting conditions were carried out by transferring L. monocytogenes habituated at pH 4.9 or a(w) 0.90 (12.5% NaCl) for 1, 5, and 10 days to all pH and a(w) levels permitting growth. Reducing a(w) or pH at different levels in the range of 0.995 to 0.93 and 7.2 to 5.1, respectively, decreased the maximum specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes. The lag time of the organism increased with all osmotic downshifts, as well as by the reduction of pH to 5.1. Conversely, any type of shift within pH 5.5 to 7.2 did not markedly affect the lag times of L. monocytogenes. The longer the cells were incubated at no-growth a(w) (0.90), the faster they initiated growth subsequently, suggesting adaptation to osmotic stress. Conversely, extended habituation at pH 4.9 had the opposite effect on subsequent growth of L. monocytogenes, possibly due to cell injury. These results suggest that there is an adaptation or injury rate induced at conditions inhibiting the growth of the pathogen. Thus, quantifying adaptation phenomena under growth-limiting environments, such as in fermented dairy and meat products or products preserved in

  8. Colovesical fistula presenting as Listeria monocytogenes bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Mark

    2015-03-31

    We present a case of colovesical fistula presenting with a clinical syndrome of urosepsis subsequently demonstrated to be due to Listeria monocytogenes bacteraemia. The patient had a history of previous rectal cancer with a low anterior resection and a covering ileostomy that had been reversed 6 months prior to this presentation. L. monocytogenes was also isolated among mixed enteric organisms on urine culture. There were no symptoms or signs of acute gastrointestinal listeriosis or meningoencephalitis. This unusual scenario prompted concern regarding the possibility of communication between bowel and bladder, which was subsequently confirmed with CT and a contrast enema. The patient recovered well with intravenous amoxicillin and to date has declined surgical management of his colovesical fistula. This case illustrates the importance of considering bowel pathology when enteric organisms such as Listeria are isolated from unusual sites.

  9. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    2013-01-01

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC...... class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular...... bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP...

  10. Prevalence and Level of Listeria monocytogenes in Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y I; Burall, Laurel S; Macarisin, Dumitru; Pouillot, Régis; Strain, Errol; DE Jesus, Antonio J; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Hua; Ali, Laila; Tatavarthy, Aparna; Zhang, Guodong; Hu, Lijun; Day, James; Kang, Jihun; Sahu, Surasri; Srinivasan, Devayani; Klontz, Karl; Parish, Mickey; Evans, Peter S; Brown, Eric W; Hammack, Thomas S; Zink, Donald L; Datta, Atin R

    2016-11-01

    A most-probable-number (MPN) method was used to enumerate Listeria monocytogenes in 2,320 commercial ice cream scoops manufactured on a production line that was implicated in a 2015 listeriosis outbreak in the United States. The analyzed samples were collected from seven lots produced in November 2014, December 2014, January 2015, and March 2015. L. monocytogenes was detected in 99% (2,307 of 2,320) of the tested samples (lower limit of detection, 0.03 MPN/g), 92% of which were contaminated at ice cream products linked to a listeriosis outbreak provided a unique data set for further understanding the risk associated with L. monocytogenes contamination for highly susceptible populations.

  11. Development and validation of an antigen capture ELISA based on monoclonal antibodies specific for Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Lelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the identification of Listeria monocytogenes in food was standardised and validated. The assay was refined by analysing samples of meat, seafood, dairy products, pasta and flour. The method was found to be 100% specific for Listeria spp. tested, with a limit of sensitivity of 6.6 × 10(3 colony-forming units (cfu/ml. Comparison of L. monocytogenes capture ELISA against the official International Organization for Standardization (ISO method 11290-1:1996 for the isolation and identification of L. monocytogenes in food matrices produced a significant concordance index. The assay was validated on food matrices including meat, seafood and dairy products in line with ISO 16140:2003 concerning qualitative analytical methods. The assay was found to be accurate, specific, sensitive, selective, reproducible and fast, resulting in lower costs and faster turnaround in microbiological screening of foods.

  12. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Gastrointestinal Motility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yaylali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastrointestinal motility and serum thyroid hormone levels are closely related. Our aim was to analyze whether there is a disorder in esophagogastric motor functions as a result of hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods. The study group included 30 females (mean age ± SE 45.17 ± 2.07 years with primary hypothyroidism and 10 healthy females (mean age ± SE 39.40 ± 3.95 years. All cases underwent esophagogastric endoscopy and scintigraphy. For esophageal scintigraphy, dynamic imaging of esophagus motility protocol, and for gastric emptying scintigraphy, anterior static gastric images were acquired. Results. The mean esophageal transit time (52.56 ± 4.07 sec for patients; 24.30 ± 5.88 sec for controls; P=.02 and gastric emptying time (49.06 ± 4.29 min for the hypothyroid group; 30.4 ± 4.74 min for the control group; P=.01 were markedly increased in cases of hypothyroidism. Conclusion. Hypothyroidism prominently reduces esophageal and gastric motor activity and can cause gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  13. The occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in imported ready-to-eat foods in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yumiko; Monden, Shuko; Igimi, Shizunobu; Yamamoto, Shigeki

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative analyses of Listeria monocytogenes in imported ready-to-eat (RTE) foods sold at retail stores in Japan were performed. Of the 77 non-cooked meat products, 6 samples (7.8%) tested positive. The levels of contamination of 4 of the samples were below 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/g, which is the microbiological criterion for L. monocytogenes in RTE foods as determined by Codex. However, Listeria cells at levels of 100 and 400 CFU/g were detected in a salami sample and a raw ham sample, respectively. All of the 70 cheese samples and the 3 samples made from raw ham and cheese showed negative test results. These results suggest that imported RTE foods are potential sources of the causative agent of listeriosis.

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility in benzalkonium chloride-resistant and -susceptible Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Sagrario; López, Pilar; López, Victoria; Martínez-Suárez, Joaquín V

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether Listeria monocytogenes strains with resistance to a commonly used biocide display any cross-resistance to antibiotics. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 29 different PFGE types were previously identified in an Iberian pig abattoir and processing plant. Only three PFGE types were resistant to benzalkonium chloride (BAC), but they represented a significant proportion of the PFGE types surviving in the plant after 4 years. In the present study, a subset of 29 strains, representing the 29 different PFGE types, underwent antibiotic susceptibility testing. Antibiotic susceptibility was assessed by Etest, utilizing 12 commonly prescribed antibiotics. All of the 29 strains were susceptible to all of the antibiotics tested. The study revealed that this group of different PFGE types of L. monocytogenes, including those resistant to BAC, possesses uniform sensitivity to antibiotics.

  15. Induction and stability of oxidative stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes EGD (Bug600) and F1057 in sublethal concentrations of H2O2 and NaOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Abrew Abeysundara, Piumi; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Soni, Kamlesh A; Sharma, Chander S; Mahmoud, Barakat

    2016-12-05

    Food processing and food handling environments may contain residual levels of sanitizers or cleaners which may trigger oxidative stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to determine the induction and stability of oxidative stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes EGD (Bug600) (serotype 1/2a) and F1057 (serotype 4b) at different concentrations and times of sublethal oxidative stress induced by H2O2 or sublethal alkali stress induced by NaOH at 37°C. Both L. monocytogenes Bug600 and F1057 strains showed significantly higher survival in lethal oxidative stress (1000ppm H2O2) after pre-exposure to 50ppm H2O2 for 30min compared to control cells (no pre-exposure to H2O2). When the cells were pre-exposed to sublethal alkali stress by NaOH, the oxidative stress adaptation was induced within 5min in L. monocytogenes. The survival of both L. monocytogenes strains was increased by 2 to 4.5 logs in lethal oxidative stress when the cells were pre-exposed to sublethal alkali stress at pH9 from 5 to 120min by NaOH compared to control cells (no pre-exposure to sublethal alkali pH). Two other alkali reagents tested (KOH and NH4OH) also induced oxidative stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes. For both L. monocytogenes strains, the oxidative stress adaptation induced by sublethal H2O2 was reversible in 30min and that induced by sublethal alkali stress was reversible within 60min at 37°C in the absence of such sublethal stress. These findings show that sublethal oxidative or alkali stress conditions can induce oxidative stress adaptation that may increase the risk of survival of L. monocytogenes cells in lethal oxidative stress.

  16. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  17. 78 FR 23901 - Interagency Risk Assessment-Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Interagency Risk Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail... risk assessment (QRA), ``Interagency Risk Assessment--Listeria monocytogenes in Retail Delicatessens... and on the FSIS Web site at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Listeria-Transcript_062309.pdf ). II....

  18. Incidence and control of Listeria monocytogenes in foods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk; Schlundt, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The Danish regulatory policy on Listeria monocytogenes in foods is based on the principles of HACCP and was developed using a health risk assessment approach. The Danish policy focuses examinations and criteria for L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods and is based on a combination of inspection...

  19. Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms to sanitizing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes is notorious for its capacity to colonize the environment and equipment of food processing facilities and to persist in the processing plant ecosystem, sometimes for decades. Such persistence is mediated by multiple attributes of L. monocytogenes, including the pathogen’s capa...

  20. Application Progress of Recombinant Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes in Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Xiaojiao; Bai Lin; Yang Xu

    2015-01-01

    Much progress of application of bacterial vaccine in treatment and prevention of tumor was acquired,which showed broad prospect in clinical study of animals and humans. Listeria monocytogenes( L. monocytogenes) was considered much important by virtue of its special characteristic of biology and immunology.L. monocytogenes was ingested by professional or part-time phagocytes,survived and proliferated in the phagocytes under synergism of toxic factor secreted by itself,meanwhile,the cellular and humoral immune response was induced. Antigenic gene of specific tumor was loaded in the attenuated L. monocytogenes,which can enhance immune response of host cells. Effective cell targeted to enter tumor tissue and acted on tumor cells to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Tumor degenerated not easy to reappear. Therefore,recombinant attenuated L. monocytogenes was a safe and effective anti-cancer vaccine vector. Now the work of researchers mainly focuses on solving practical problem in clinical application. Biological characteristics of L. monocytogenes,feasibility and superiority of L. monocytogenes as targeted vaccine vector,problem and prospect of L. monocytogenes in clinical application of anti-tumor were reviewed in this paper.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes growth limits and stress resistance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der S.

    2008-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic rod, which is the causative agent of listeriosis. Due to the severity of the disease and the fact that its incidence is increasing in numerous European countries, L. monocytogenes is of great public health concer

  2. Genome sequences of Listeria monocytogenes strains with resistance to arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes frequently exhibits resistance to arsenic. We report here the draft genome sequences of eight genetically diverse arsenic-resistant L. monocytogenes strains from human listeriosis and food-associated environments. Availability of these genomes would help to elucidate the role ...

  3. Listeria monocytogenes internalizes in Romaine Lettuce grown in greenhouse conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in a number of outbreaks involving fresh produce, including an outbreak in 2016 resulting from contaminated packaged salads. The persistence and internalization potential of L. monocytogenes in romaine lettuce was evaluated, and the persistence of two L. mo...

  4. Survival strategies of Listeria monocytogenes - roles of regulators and transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Outbreaks of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes are mainly associated with ready-to-eatfoods. Survival strategies of L. monocytogenes in relation to minimally processed foods were studied.

  5. Atlas(®) Listeria monocytogenes LmG2 Detection Assay Using Transcription Mediated Amplification to Detect Listeria monocytogenes in Selected Foods and Stainless Steel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bres, Vanessa; Yang, Hua; Hsu, Ernie; Ren, Yan; Cheng, Ying; Wisniewski, Michele; Hanhan, Maesa; Zaslavsky, Polina; Noll, Nathan; Weaver, Brett; Campbell, Paul; Reshatoff, Michael; Becker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Atlas Listeria monocytogenes LmG2 Detection Assay, developed by Roka Bioscience Inc., was compared to a reference culture method for seven food types (hot dogs, cured ham, deli turkey, chicken salad, vanilla ice cream, frozen chocolate cream pie, and frozen cheese pizza) and one surface (stainless steel, grade 316). A 125 g portion of deli turkey was tested using a 1:4 food:media dilution ratio, and a 25 g portion for all other foods was tested using 1:9 food:media dilution ratio. The enrichment time and media for Roka's method was 24 to 28 h for 25 g food samples and environmental surfaces, and 44 to 48 h for 125 g at 35 ± 2°C in PALCAM broth containing 0.02 g/L nalidixic acid. Comparison of the Atlas Listeria monocytogenes LmG2 Detection Assay to the reference method required an unpaired approach. For each matrix, 20 samples inoculated at a fractional level and five samples inoculated at a high level with a different strain of Listeria monocytogenes were tested by each method. The Atlas Listeria monocytogenes LmG2 Detection Assay was compared to the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC INTERNATIONAL 993.12 method for dairy products, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service, Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook 8.08 method for ready-to-eat meat and environmental samples, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 10 method for frozen foods. In the method developer studies, Roka's method, at 24 h (or 44 h for 125 g food samples), had 126 positives out of 200 total inoculated samples, compared to 102 positives for the reference methods at 48 h. In the independent laboratory studies, vanilla ice cream, deli turkey and stainless steel grade 316 were evaluated. Roka's method, at 24 h (or 44 h for 125 g food samples), had 64 positives out of 75 total inoculated samples compared to 54 positives for the reference methods at 48 h. The Atlas Listeria monocytogenes LmG2 Detection Assay detected all 50

  6. Gaslike model of social motility

    CERN Document Server

    Parravano, A; 10.1103/PhysRevE.78.026120

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model to represent the motility of social elements. The model is completely deterministic, possesses a small number of parameters, and exhibits a series of properties that are reminiscent of the behavior of comunities in social-ecological competition; these are: (i) similar individuals attract each other; (ii) individuals can form stable groups; (iii) a group of similar individuals breaks into subgroups if it reaches a critical size; (iv) interaction between groups can modify the distribution of the elements as a result of fusion, fission, or pursuit; (v) individuals can change their internal state by interaction with their neighbors. The simplicity of the model and its richness of emergent behaviors, such as, for example, pursuit between groups, make it a useful toy model to explore a diversity of situations by changing the rule by which the internal state of individuals is modified by the interactions with the environment.

  7. Effect of chemical sanitizers with and without ultrasonication on Listeria monocytogenes as a biofilm within polyvinyl chloride drain pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of a biofilm in a floor drain, L. monocytogenes is exceedingly difficult to eradicate with standard sanitizing protocols. The objective of these studies was to test the use of ultra-sonication to break up biofilm architecture allowing chemical sanitizers to contact cells directly. L. monoc...

  8. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendeluk Gabriela Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010. A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03, achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms.

  9. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of bergamot essential oils on different Listeria monocytogenes strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania M. Marotta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are aromatic and volatile substances extracted from plants and characterized by antimicrobial activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity (agar disc-diffusion method of seven different bergamot essential oils (BEOs on eight Listeria monocytogenes strains. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of most efficient BEOs was estimated. Extremely variable results for agar disc-diffusion method for L. monocytogenes strains were reported. One of the tested microorganisms resulted insensible to all the BEOs; 3 strains showed an inhibition from weak to null and the remaining 4 a variable susceptibility. Among the BEOs tested, one showed a strong activity against four pathogenic strains. Four BEOs revealed weak, moderate or null activity in all the 7 sensitive strains, while for two oils only a weak or no activity was reported. MIC values were 0.625 μL/mL for the most efficient BEO, 2.5 and 5 μL/mL for the other samples that showed moderate inhibition. Experiment results are significantly related to the strains tested (P<0.01, rather than the BEO employed (P>0.01. In conclusion, we can consider BEO as a natural technological hurdle for Listeria monocytogenes in combination with other preservation strategies. Finally, this study underlines the necessity to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EOs on a significant strains number of the same bacteria.

  10. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of Bergamot Essential Oils on Different Listeria Monocytogenes Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Stefania M; Giarratana, Filippo; Parco, Alessio; Neri, Domenico; Ziino, Graziella; Giuffrida, Alessandro; Panebianco, Antonio

    2016-09-20

    Essential oils are aromatic and volatile substances extracted from plants and characterized by antimicrobial activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity (agar disc-diffusion method) of seven different bergamot essential oils (BEOs) on eight Listeria monocytogenes strains. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of most efficient BEOs was estimated. Extremely variable results for agar disc-diffusion method for L. monocytogenes strains were reported. One of the tested microorganisms resulted insensible to all the BEOs; 3 strains showed an inhibition from weak to null and the remaining 4 a variable susceptibility. Among the BEOs tested, one showed a strong activity against four pathogenic strains. Four BEOs revealed weak, moderate or null activity in all the 7 sensitive strains, while for two oils only a weak or no activity was reported. MIC values were 0.625 μL/mL for the most efficient BEO, 2.5 and 5 μL/mL for the other samples that showed moderate inhibition. Experiment results are significantly related to the strains tested (P0.01). In conclusion, we can consider BEO as a natural technological hurdle for Listeria monocytogenes in combination with other preservation strategies. Finally, this study underlines the necessity to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EOs on a significant strains number of the same bacteria.

  11. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Callan-Jones, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  12. Evaluation of Urea-motility-indole medium for recognition and differentiation of Salmonella and Shigella species in stool cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Fraile, M; Vega Aleman, D; Fernandez Gutierrez, C

    1980-01-01

    A semisolid urea-motility-indole medium designed for detection in Enterobacteriaceae of urease activity, motility, and indole production in one tube was prepared and evaluated. The formulation of the medium was similar to that of Christensen urea agar, but the agar concentration was 0.2%, and 1% tryptone was added. Results with 687 strains of Enterobacteriaceae were the same as those obtained with standard test media (98% overall agreement). The urea-motility-indole medium was also used in co...

  13. Analysis of multilocus sequence typing and virulence characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from Chinese retail ready-to-eat food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi eWu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eighty Listeria monocytogenes isolates were obtained from Chinese retail ready-to-eat (RTE food and were previously characterized with serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility tests. The aim of this study was to characterize the subtype and virulence potential of these L. monocytogenes isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST, virulence-associate genes, epidemic clones (ECs and sequence analysis of the important virulence factor: internalin A (inlA. The result of MLST revealed that these L. monocytogenes isolates belonged to 14 different sequence types (STs. With the exception of four new STs (ST804, ST805, ST806 and ST807, all other STs observed in this study have been associated with human listeriosis and outbreaks to varying extents. Six virulence-associate genes (inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, hly and llsX were selected and their presence was investigated using PCR. All strains carried inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, and hly, whereas 38.8% (31/80 of strains harbored the listeriolysin S genes (llsX. A multiplex PCR assay was used to evaluate the presence of markers specific to epidemic clones of L. monocytogenes and identified 26.3% (21/80 of ECI in the 4b-4d-4e strains. Further study of inlA sequencing revealed that most strains contained the full-length InlA required for host cell invasion, whereas three mutations lead to premature stop codons (PMSC within a novel PMSCs at position 326 (GAA→TAA. MLST and inlA sequence analysis results were concordant, and different virulence potentials within isolates were observed. These findings suggest that L. monocytogenes isolates from RTE food in China could be virulent and be capable of causing human illness. Furthermore, the STs and virulence profiles of L. monocytogenes isolates have significant implications for epidemiological and public health studies of this pathogen.

  14. Highly specific fiber optic immunosensor coupled with immunomagnetic separation for detection of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and immunoassays are widely used for pathogen detection. However, novel technology platforms with highly selective antibodies are essential to improve detection sensitivity, specificity and performance. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Internalin A (InlA) and p30 were generated and used on paramagnetic beads of varying diameters for concentration, as well as on fiber-optic sensor for detection. Results Anti-InlA MAb-2D12 (IgG2a subclass) was specific for Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, and p30-specific MAb-3F8 (IgM) was specific for the genus Listeria. At all bacterial concentrations (103–108 CFU/mL) tested in the IMS assay; the 1-μm diameter MyOne beads had significantly higher capture efficiency (P Listeria antibody (9 %). Furthermore, capture efficiency for MyOne-2D12 was highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii. Subsequently, we captured L. monocytogenes by MyOne-2D12 and MyOne-3F8 from hotdogs inoculated with mono- or co-cultures of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua (10–40 CFU/g), enriched for 18 h and detected by fiber-optic sensor and confirmed by plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays. The detection limit for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii by the fiber-optic immunosensor was 3 × 102 CFU/mL using MAb-2D12 as capture and reporter antibody. Selective media plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays confirmed the IMS and fiber-optic results. Conclusions IMS coupled with a fiber-optic sensor using anti-InlA MAb is highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii and enabled detection of these pathogens at low levels from buffer or food. PMID:23176167

  15. Prevalence and Genetic Characteristics of Meatborne Listeria monocytogenes Isolates from Livestock Farms in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyemin; Kim, Sejeong; Lee, Soomin; Lee, Heeyoung; Ha, Jimyeong; Lee, Jeeyeon; Choi, Yukyung; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Yoon, Yohan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes on livestock farms in Korea and determine their serotypes and genetic correlations. Twenty-five livestock farms in Korea (central: 15, south west: 7, south east: 3) were visited 2-3 times, and 2,018 samples (feces: 677, soil: 680, silage: 647, sludge: 14) were collected. Samples were enriched in LEB (Listeria enrichment broth) and Fraser broth media, and then plated on Palcam agar. The isolates were identified by PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Then, the serotypes, presence of virulence genes (actA, inlA, inlB, plcB, and hlyA), and antibiotic resistance were determined. Genetic correlations among the isolates were evaluated by analyzing the restriction digest pattern with AscI. Of the 2,018 samples, only 3 (0.15%) soil samples (FI-1-FI-3) from 1 farm in the south east region were positive for L. monocytogenes. Based on biochemical tests and multiplex PCR, the serotype of the isolates were 4ab (FI-1 and FI-3) and 3a (FI-2), which are not common in foodborne L. monocytogenes. The 3a serotype isolate was positive for all tested virulence genes, whereas the 4ab serotype isolates were only positive for hlyA, actA, and inlA. The isolates were resistant to all 12 tested antibiotics, especially FI-3. The genetic correlations among the isolates were 100% for those of the same serotype and 26.3% for those of different serotypes. These results indicate that the prevalence of L. monocytogenes on livestock farms in Korea is low; however, the isolates are pathogenic and antibiotic resistant. PMID:28115889

  16. Monitoring occurrence and persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in foods and food processing environments in the Republic of Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara eLeong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although rates of listeriosis are low in comparison to other foodborne pathogenic illnesses, listeriosis poses a significant risk to human health as the invasive form can have a mortality rate as high as 30%. Food processors, especially those who produce ready-to-eat products, need to be vigilant against Listeria monocytogenes, the causative pathogen of listeriosis, and as such, the occurrence of L. monocytogenes in food and in the food processing environment needs to be carefully monitored. To examine the prevalence and patterns of contamination in food processing facilities in Ireland, 48 food processors submitted 8 samples every 2 months from March 2013 to March 2014 to be analyzed for L. monocytogenes. No positive samples were detected for 38% of the processing facilities tested. Isolates found at the remaining 62% of facilities were characterized by serotyping and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. A general L. monocytogenes prevalence of 4.6% was seen in all samples analyzed with similar rates seen in food and environmental samples. Differences in prevalence were seen across different food processors, food sectors, sampling months etc. and PFGE analysis allowed for the examination of contamination patterns and for the identification of several persistent strains. Seven of the food processing facilities tested showed contamination with persistent strains and evidence of bacterial transfer from the processing environment to food (the same pulsotype found in both was seen in four of the food processing facilities tested.

  17. Monitoring occurrence and persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in foods and food processing environments in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Dara; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Jordan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Although rates of listeriosis are low in comparison to other foodborne pathogenic illness, listeriosis poses a significant risk to human health as the invasive form can have a mortality rate as high as 30%. Food processors, especially those who produce ready-to-eat (RTE) products, need to be vigilant against Listeria monocytogenes, the causative pathogen of listeriosis, and as such, the occurrence of L. monocytogenes in food and in the food processing environment needs to be carefully monitored. To examine the prevalence and patterns of contamination in food processing facilities in Ireland, 48 food processors submitted 8 samples every 2 months from March 2013 to March 2014 to be analyzed for L. monocytogenes. No positive samples were detected at 38% of the processing facilities tested. Isolates found at the remaining 62% of facilities were characterized by serotyping and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). A general L. monocytogenes prevalence of 4.6% was seen in all samples analyzed with similar rates seen in food and environmental samples. Differences in prevalence were seen across different food processors, food sectors, sampling months etc. and PFGE analysis allowed for the examination of contamination patterns and for the identification of several persistent strains. Seven of the food processing facilities tested showed contamination with persistent strains and evidence of bacterial transfer from the processing environment to food (the same pulsotype found in both) was seen in four of the food processing facilities tested.

  18. Background and Objective: Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterium transferred by foods and is the agent of many sporadic and epidemic diseases in humans. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of L. monocytogenes and to determinine their antibiotic resistance profile in red meats. Material and Methods: this cross-sectional study was performed on 400 red meat samples obtained from industrial slaughterhouses placed in Kerman, Iran. First, the samples were enriched with Simultaneous Enrichment Broth (SEB, and then plated onto Palcam agar and Tryptic Soy Broth Yeast Extract Broth (TSAYE. After identification of the isolates based on biochemical tests and PCR, the isolates were checked for their antibiotic resistance profile using disk Diffusion Results: of 400 samples, 12 samples (3% were contaminated with different species of Listeria. Using PCR, hly gene was recognized in eight samples (2% of L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in isolation rate of lamb samples compared to cow ones. While all of the isolates were resistant to clindamycin, amikacin and chloramphenicol, they were sensitive to penicillin. Conclusion: in spite of low rate of infection in red meat samples in Kerman city, due to high risk of Listeria contamination in red meats, we recommend applying a routine screening to identify this bacterium in our county.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kargar, M. (PhD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterium transferred by foods and is the agent of many sporadic and epidemic diseases in humans. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of L. monocytogenes and to determinine their antibiotic resistance profile in red meats. Material and Methods: this cross-sectional study was performed on 400 red meat samples obtained from industrial slaughterhouses placed in Kerman, Iran. First, the samples were enriched with Simultaneous Enrichment Broth (SEB, and then plated onto Palcam agar and Tryptic Soy Broth Yeast Extract Broth (TSAYE. After identification of the isolates based on biochemical tests and PCR, the isolates were checked for their antibiotic resistance profile using disk Diffusion Results: of 400 samples, 12 samples (3% were contaminated with different species of Listeria. Using PCR, hly gene was recognized in eight samples (2% of L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in isolation rate of lamb samples compared to cow ones. While all of the isolates were resistant to clindamycin, amikacin and chloramphenicol, they were sensitive to penicillin. Conclusion: in spite of low rate of infection in red meat samples in Kerman city, due to high risk of Listeria contamination in red meats, we recommend applying a routine screening to identify this bacterium in our county

  19. Stochastically modeling Listeria monocytogenes growth in farm tank milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Isabelle; Pouillot, Régis; Denis, Jean-Baptiste

    2005-10-01

    This article presents a Listeria monocytogenes growth model in milk at the farm bulk tank stage. The main objective was to judge the feasibility and value to risk assessors of introducing a complex model, including a complete thermal model, within a microbial quantitative risk assessment scheme. Predictive microbiology models are used under varying temperature conditions to predict bacterial growth. Input distributions are estimated based on data in the literature, when it is available. If not, reasonable assumptions are made for the considered context. Previously published results based on a Bayesian analysis of growth parameters are used. A Monte Carlo simulation that forecasts bacterial growth is the focus of this study. Three scenarios that take account of the variability and uncertainty of growth parameters are compared. The effect of a sophisticated thermal model taking account of continuous variations in milk temperature was tested by comparison with a simplified model where milk temperature was considered as constant. Limited multiplication of bacteria within the farm bulk tank was modeled. The two principal factors influencing bacterial growth were found to be tank thermostat regulation and bacterial population growth parameters. The dilution phenomenon due to the introduction of new milk was the main factor affecting the final bacterial concentration. The results show that a model that assumes constant environmental conditions at an average temperature should be acceptable for this process. This work may constitute a first step toward exposure assessment for L. monocytogenes in milk. In addition, this partly conceptual work provides guidelines for other risk assessments where continuous variation of a parameter needs to be taken into account.

  20. Initial adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to solid surfaces under liquid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szlavik, Julie; Soares Paiva, Dionísio; Mørk, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    strains of L. monocytogenes was investigated under liquid flow at two levels of shear stress on six different surfaces using a flow chamber set-up with microscopy measurements. The surfaces tested were glass and PVC, and glass coated with beef extract, casein, and homogenised and unhomogenised milk....... In addition, the effect of prior environmental stress (5% NaCl, low nutrient availability) on initial adhesion was investigated. The hydrophobicity of the investigated surfaces was determined by contact angle measurements and the surface properties of the investigated L. monocytogenes strains were determined.......001) was observed but not of interactions between surface-shear stress. No correlation between surface hydrophobicity and IAR was observed. Addition of 5% NaCl during propagation resulted in a decrease in IAR whilst propagation in low nutrient media caused an increase indicating a general change in surface...

  1. Evaluation of the 3M™ Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) 2 - Listeria monocytogenes for the Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in a Variety of Foods and Select Environmental Surfaces: Collaborative Study, First Action 2016.08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Patrick; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Monteroso, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    The 3M™ Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) 2 - Listeria monocytogenes uses loop-mediated isothermal amplification of unique DNA target sequences combined with bioluminescence to rapidly detect Listeria monocytogenes in a broad range of food types and on environmental surfaces. Using an unpaired study design, technicians from 13 laboratories located in the United States and Canada compared the 3M MDA 2 - Listeria monocytogenes to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook Chapter 8.09 "Isolation and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes from Red Meat, Poultry, and Egg Products, and Environmental Samples" reference method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in deli turkey and raw chicken breast fillet. Each matrix was evaluated at three levels of contamination: an uninoculated control level (0 CFU/test portion), a low inoculum level (0.2-2 CFU/test portion), and a high inoculum level (2-5 CFU/test portion). Statistical analysis was conducted according to the probability of detection (POD) statistical model. Results obtained for the low inoculum level test portions produced a difference in the collaborating laboratory POD (dLPOD) value of 0.04 with a 95% confidence interval of (-0.08, 0.17) for deli turkey, indicating that the difference between methods was not statistically significant at the 0.05 probability level. For raw chicken breast fillet, a dLPOD value of 0.16 with a 95% confidence interval of (0.04, 0.28) indicated a statistically significant difference, with an observed higher proportion of positive results by the candidate method compared to the reference method.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of some of the south-Indian spices against serotypes of Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Aeromonas hydrophila Atividade antimicrobiana de condimentos do sul da India sobre Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes e Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Indu

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity of extracts of Allium sativum (garlic, Myristica fragrans (nutmeg, Zingiber officinale (ginger, Allium cepa (onion and Piper nigrum (pepper has been evaluated against 20 different serogroups of Escherichia coli, 8 serotypes of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Aeromonas hydrophila. Garlic extract showed excellent antibacterial activity against all the test organisms, except L. monocytogenes. Nutmeg showed good anti-listerial activity, although activity against E. coli and Salmonella were serotype dependent. Both garlic and nutmeg extracts were effective against A. hydrophila. Extracts of ginger showed inhibitory activity against two serogroups of E. coli: as O8 (enterotoxigenic E. coli and O88 only. Extracts of onion and pepper did not show any antibacterial activity against the test organisms.Avaliou-se a atividade antimicrobiana de extratos de alho (Allium sativum, noz-moscada (Mysritica frangrans, gengibre (Zingiber officinale cebola (Allium cepa e pimenta do reino (Piper nigrum sobre 20 sorotipos de Escherichia coli, 8 sorotipos de Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes e Aeromonas hydrophila. O alho apresentou atividade antimicrobiana excelente sobre todos os microrganismos testados, excepto L. monocytogenes. A noz-moscada apresentou boa atividade antilisteria, emboara atividade sobre E. coli e Salmonella tenha sido sorotipo-dependente. Tanto alho como noz-moscada foram eficientes contra A. hydrophila. O extrato de gengibre apresentou atividade inibitória sobre dois sorotipos de E. coli: 08 (enterotoxigenico e 088. Os extratos de cebola e pimenta do reino não apresentaram nenhuma atividade contra os microrganismos testados.

  3. Influence of Organic Material and Biofilms on Disinfectant Efficacy Against Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Nyati

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of organic material and biofilm formation on the efficacy of Suma Tab D4 chlorine tablets and Suma Bac D10 quaternary ammonium compound (QAC against Listeria monocytogenes was determined in suspension and on stainless steel and polystyrene surfaces according to standard disinfectant test methodology. Exposure to 200 and 740 mg L-1 QAC and to 150 mg L-1 active chlorine resulted in a > 5.0 log10 CFU mL-1 and > 5.0 log10 CFU/coupon reduction of six L. monocytogenes strains within one minute, in suspension tests, and on stainless steel surfaces, respectively. Additionally, there was a reduction by as much as 5 log10 CFU/coupon or 5 log10 CFU/well of reference strains EGDe and Scott A biofilms within five minutes on stainless steel and polystyrene surfaces. Organic material, added as bovine serum albumin at 0.3% (w/v completely prevented the inactivation of L. monocytogenes in 150 mg L-1 chlorine, while reductions of only 0.6 +- 0.1 log10 CFU mL-1 were recorded in the presence of UHT milk at 3% (v/v. In contrast, reductions of 5 log10 CFU mL-1 were recorded within one minute on exposure to 740 mg L-1 QAC in the presence of 0.3% (w/v bovine serum albumin and within two minutes in the presence of 20 % (v/v UHT milk. Although Suma D4 chlorine tablets and Suma Bac D10 QAC are effective listericidal agents at recommended concentrations, Suma Tab D4 chlorine efficacy against L. monocytogenes is impaired by the presence of low concentrations of organic material, while Suma Bac D10 QAC maintains its listericidal activity in high organic loads.

  4. PATOGENESIS DE Listeria monocytogenes, MICROORGANISMO ZOONOTICO EMERGENTE.

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Kirvis; Sierra, Sara; Potou, Raul; Carrascal, Ana; Mercado, Marcela

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes además de ser un paradigma para la investigación inmunológica se ha convertido en sistema modelo apropiado para el análisis de los mecanismos moleculares del parasitismo intracelular de otras bacterias. Investigadores en el área de la inmunología se interesaron en este microorganismo cuando se reconoció el riesgo que representaba para la salud pública y la seguridad en la industria de alimentos. Desde mediados de los años 80’s se ha investigado la biología molecular de ...

  5. Cell motility, morphology, viability and proliferation in response to nanotopography on silicon black

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Gradinaru, Cristian; Wierzbicki, Rafal;

    2012-01-01

    viability and proliferation show little dependence on substrate type. We conclude that motility analysis can show a wide range of cell responses e. g. over a factor of two in cell speed to different nano-topographies, where standard assays, such as viability or proliferation, in the tested cases show much...... standard measurements of cell viability, proliferation, and morphology on various surfaces. We also analyzed the motility of cells on the same surfaces, as recorded in time lapse movies of sparsely populated cell cultures. We find that motility and morphology vary strongly with nano-patterns, while...

  6. Genes involved in Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation at a simulated food processing plant temperature of 15 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercey, Marta J; Hingston, Patricia A; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2016-04-16

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic foodborne bacterium whose persistence in food processing environments is in part attributed to its biofilm formation. Most biofilm studies have been carried out at 30-37 °C rather than at temperatures found in the food processing plants (i.e., 10-20 °C). The objective of the present study was to mine for novel genes that contribute to L. monocytogenes biofilm formation at 15 °C using the random insertional mutagenesis approach. A library of 11,024 L. monocytogenes 568 (serotype 1/2a) Himar1 insertional mutants was created. Mutants with reduced or enhanced biofilm formation at 15 °C were detected in microtiter plate assays with crystal violet and safranin staining. Fourteen mutants expressed enhanced biofilm phenotypes, and harbored transposon insertions in genes encoding cell wall biosynthesis, motility, metabolism, stress response, and cell surface associated proteins. Deficient mutants (n=5) contained interruptions in genes related to peptidoglycan, teichoic acid, or lipoproteins. Enhanced mutants produced significantly (pbiofilm formed on stainless steel (SS) coupons at 15 °C (48 h) than deficient mutants, which were also more sensitive to benzalkonium chloride. All biofilm deficient mutants and four enhanced mutants in the microtiter plate assay (flaA, cheR, lmo2563 and lmo2488) formed no biofilm in a peg lid assay (Calgary biofilm device) while insertions in lmo1224 and lmo0543 led to excess biofilm in all assays. Two enhanced biofilm formers were more resistant to enzymatic removal with DNase, proteinase K or pectinase than the parent strain. Scanning electron microscopy of individual biofilms made by five mutants and the parent on SS surfaces showed formation of heterogeneous biofilm with dense zones by immotile mutants, while deficient mutants exhibited sparse growth. In conclusion, interruptions of 9 genes not previously linked to biofilm formation in L. monocytogenes (lmo2572, lmo2488 (uvrA), lmo1224, lmo0434

  7. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by Enterococcus mundtii isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigwood, T; Hudson, J A; Cooney, J; McIntyre, L; Billington, C; Heinemann, J A; Wall, F

    2012-12-01

    Two bacterial isolates with inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes and Enterococcus faecalis were obtained from soil. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization identified them as Enterococcus mundtii, a species whose ability to compete with L. monocytogenes is relatively unexplored compared to other members of the genus. The thermal stability of the inhibitory factor and its sensitivity to proteolytic enzymes indicate that it is most likely a bacteriocin. Both isolates grew at comparable rates to L. monocytogenes at 5 °C and 10 °C in vitro. One isolate killed L. monocytogenes when it reached concentrations of 10(6)-10(8) CFU ml(-1). Minimum inocula of 10(6) and 10(5) CFU ml(-1) of E. mundtii were required to reduce and maintain L. monocytogenes concentrations beneath the level of detection at 5 °C and 10 °C, respectively. In situ experiments at 5 °C showed that E. mundtii inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes on vacuum-packed cold smoked salmon during its four week shelf life. E. mundtii could, therefore, control the growth of L. monocytogenes at low temperatures, indicating a potential application in controlling this pathogen in chilled foods. To control growth of Listeria, the concentration of E. mundtii needs to be high, but it is possible that a purified bacteriocin could be used to achieve the same effect.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of the Nisin Z producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Lc08 against Listeria monocytogenes in skim milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Perin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The presented study aimed to verify the effect of different pH values, enzyme solutions and heat treatments on the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocinogenic strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Lc08 and to test their antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes in reconstituted skim milk at refrigeration temperatures. This strain was previously described as a nisin Z producer and capable of inhibiting L. monocytogenes growth in in vitro tests. The antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin cell-free supernatant of Lc08 was sensitive to enzyme treatments (except papain. The pH values and heating (65ºC for 30min, 75ºC for 15s had no apparent effect on the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin produced by Lc08. Only treatment at autoclave conditions result in loss of their antimicrobial activity. Lc08 presented antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes in the milk system after 12h at 25ºC. No effect was found at 7ºC. The results show the application viability of the Lc08 in food systems as a biopreservative against L. monocytogenes.

  9. Plankton motility patterns and encounter rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    measure of run length to reaction distance determines whether the underlying encounter is ballistic or diffusive. Since ballistic interactions are intrinsically more efficient than diffusive, we predict that organisms will display motility with long correlation run lengths compared to their reaction...... distances to their prey, but short compared to the reaction distances of their predators. We show motility data for planktonic organisms ranging from bacteria to copepods that support this prediction. We also present simple ballistic and diffusive motility models for estimating encounter rates, which lead...

  10. Role of lactic acid bacteria as a biosanitizer to prevent attachment of Listeria monocytogenes F6900 on deli slicer contact surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndahetuye, Jean Baptiste; Koo, Ok Kyung; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Ricke, Steven C; Crandall, Philip G

    2012-08-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the attachment of three lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains and their combination in a cocktail, to stainless steel coupons from a deli slicer, and their ability to inhibit the attachment of Listeria monocytogenes. In a previous study, three LAB strains, Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus amylovorus, and Lactobacillus animalis, were isolated from ready-to-eat meat and exhibited antilisterial effect. In the study reported here, hydrophobicity tests were determined according to the method of microbial adhesion to solvent. The attachment of the cells was evaluated on stainless steel coupons from deli slicers. Extracellular carbohydrates were determined with a colorimetric method. Based on these tests, L. animalis exhibited the greatest hydrophobicity (26.3%), and its adherence increased sharply from 24 to 72 h, whereas L. amylovorus yielded the lowest hydrophobicity (3.86%) and was weakly adherent. Although P. acidilactici had moderate hydrophobicity (10.1%), it adhered strongly. The attached LAB strains produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher total carbohydrates than their planktonic counterparts did, which is an important characteristic for attachment. Three conditions were simulated to evaluate the ability of the LAB cocktail (10(8) CFU/ml) to competitively exclude L. monocytogenes (10(3) CFU/ml) on the surface of the coupons. The coupons were pretreated with the LAB cocktail for 24 h prior to the addition of L. monocytogenes, simultaneously treated with the LAB cocktail and L. monocytogenes, or pretreated with L. monocytogenes 24 h prior to the addition of the LAB cocktail. The LAB cocktail was able to reduce the attachment L. monocytogenes significantly (P < 0.05). The LAB cocktail indicated potential attachment on stainless steel and bacteriostatic activity toward L. monocytogenes attached on stainless steel, which indicates a possible role for LAB as a biosanitizer in the food industry.

  11. Deterministic patterns in cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Ido; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-12-01

    Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.

  12. Motility-Induced Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled particles include both self-phoretic synthetic colloids and various microorganisms. By continually consuming energy, they bypass the laws of equilibrium thermodynamics. These laws enforce the Boltzmann distribution in thermal equilibrium: The steady state is then independent of kinetic parameters. In contrast, self-propelled particles tend to accumulate where they move more slowly. They may also slow down at high density for either biochemical or steric reasons. This creates positive feedback, which can lead to motility-induced phase separation (MIPS) between dense and dilute fluid phases. At leading order in gradients, a mapping relates variable-speed, self-propelled particles to passive particles with attractions. This deep link to equilibrium phase separation is confirmed by simulations but generally breaks down at higher order in gradients: New effects, with no equilibrium counterpart, then emerge. We give a selective overview of the fast-developing field of MIPS, focusing on theory and simulation but including a brief speculative survey of its experimental implications.

  13. Incorporation of Listeria monocytogenes strains in raw milk biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Christiane; Ifland, Andrea; Naumann, Annette; Kleta, Sylvia; Noll, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms develop successively on devices of milk production without sufficient cleaning and originate from the microbial community of raw milk. The established biofilm matrices enable incorporation of pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause a continuous contamination of food processing plants. L. monocytogenes is frequently found in raw milk and non-pasteurized raw milk products and as part of a biofilm community in milk meters and bulk milk tanks. The aim of this study was to analyze whether different L. monocytogenes strains are interacting with the microbial community of raw milk in terms of biofilm formation in the same manner, and to identify at which stage of biofilm formation a selected L. monocytogenes strain settles best. Bacterial community structure and composition of biofilms were analyzed by a cloning and sequencing approach and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The chemical composition of biofilms was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while settled L. monocytogenes cells were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Addition of individual L. monocytogenes strains to raw milk caused significant shifts in the biofilm biomass, in the chemical as well as in the bacterial community composition. Biofilm formation and attachment of L. monocytogenes cells were not serotype but strain specific. However, the added L. monocytogenes strains were not abundant since mainly members of the genera Citrobacter and Lactococcus dominated the bacterial biofilm community. Overall, added L. monocytogenes strains led to a highly competitive interaction with the raw milk community and triggered alterations in biofilm formation.

  14. Comparison of the hydrophobic grid-membrane filter DNA probe method and the Health Protection Branch standard method for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W; Malik, M N; Peterkin, P I; Sharpe, A N

    1996-07-01

    The standard Health Protection Branch (HPB) method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in foods involves lengthy enrichment, selection and biochemical testing, requiring up to 8 days to complete. A hydrophobic grid-membrane filter (HGMF) method employing a digoxigenin-labelled listeriolysin O probe required 5 days to complete, and included an image-analysis system for electronic data acquisition. A total of 200 food samples encompassing 8 high-risk food groups (soft and semi-soft cheeses, packaged raw vegetables, frozen cooked shrimp, ground poultry, ground pork, ground beef, jellied meats, and pâté) were screened for the presence of L. monocytogenes by the two methods. Overall, 32 (16%) and 30 (15%) of the naturally-contaminated food samples tested positive for L. monocytogenes by the HPB and DNA methods, respectively. The DNA probe method was highly specific in discriminating L. monocytogenes from other Listeria spp. present in 50 of the samples tested. Results showed 94% sensitivity and 100% specificity between the two methods. The HGMF DNA probe method is an efficient and reliable alternative to the HPB standard method for detecting L. monocytogenes in foods.

  15. LACTIC FLORA-LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Colombo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The EC Regulation 2073/2005 (1 requires that food processors evaluate the capability of ready-to-use (RTE products to support the development of Listeria monocytogenes when their pH and aW values are favourable to the growth of this microorganism. It is renown that the lactic flora plays an important role in many different foods, both from a technological and a food safety standpoint. This study was aimed to observe the behaviour and the potential anti-Listeria effect of some natural lactic flora present in Italian liver patè crostini (chicken heart and liver, anchovies, onions, capers, starch, no added preservatives through the Combase Predictor – Max Growth Rate predictive software. The natural lactic flora of the crostini demonstrated a variable capability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes which depends upon : the concentration of the lactic flora at the beginning of the shelf life period and the subsequent lag phase, the possible release of anti-Listeria substances, and the maximum growth rate.

  16. Silver as antibacterial towards Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eBelluco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a serious foodborne pathogen that can contaminate food during processing and can grow during food shelf-life. New types of safe and effective food contact materials embedding antimicrobial agents, like silver, can play an important role in the food industry. The present work aimed at evaluating the in vitro growth kinetics of different strains of L. monocytogenes in the presence of silver, both in its ionic and nano form. The antimicrobial effect was determined by assaying the number of culturable bacterial cells, which formed colonies after incubation in the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs or silver nitrate (AgNO3. Ionic release experiments were performed in parallel. A different reduction of bacterial viability between silver ionic and nano forms was observed, with a time delayed effect exerted by AgNPs. An association between antimicrobial activity and ions concentration was shown by both silver chemical forms, suggesting the major role of ions in the antimicrobial mode of action.

  17. Effect of 655 nm laser different powers on dog sperm motility parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Baqués, M. I.; Rigau, T.; Rivera, M. M.; Rodríguez-Gil, J. E.; Rigau, J.

    2006-04-01

    Introduction: One of the most appreciated features of the sperm is its motility, which depends on a big energy consumption despite differences among species. Laser acts direct or indirectly on mitochondria increasing ATP production. Material and method: By means of a Computer Aided Sperm Analysis (CASA) we have studied the effects of a 655 nm continuous wave diode laser irradiation at different power outputs with a dose of 3.3418 J on sperm motility. After an eosine-nigrosine stain to establish its quality, the second fraction of fresh beagle dog sperm was divided into 5 groups, 1 control and four to be irradiated respectively with an average output power of 6.84 mW, 15.43 mW, 33.05 mW and 49.66 mW. At times 0 and 45 minutes from irradiation pictures were taken and analysed with the Sperm class Analyzer SCA2002 programme. The motility parameters of 4987 spermatozoa studied were: curvilinear velocity (VCL), progressive velocity (VSL), straightness (STR), wobble (WOB), average path velocity (VAP), linearity (LIN), mean amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALHmed), beat cross frequency (BCF) and the total motility (MT). At time 15 minutes after irradiation a hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) was done. Results: Several motility parameters that affect the overall motile sperm subpopulation structure have been changed by different output powers of a 655 nm diode laser irradiation, and prevents the decrease of the sperm motility properties along time.

  18. Microbial background flora in small-scale cheese production facilities does not inhibit growth and surface attachment of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, B C T; Heir, E; Møretrø, T; Skaar, I; Langsrud, S

    2013-10-01

    The background microbiota of 5 Norwegian small-scale cheese production sites was examined and the effect of the isolated strains on the growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes was investigated. Samples were taken from the air, food contact surfaces (storage surfaces, cheese molds, and brine) and noncontact surfaces (floor, drains, and doors) and all isolates were identified by sequencing and morphology (mold). A total of 1,314 isolates were identified and found to belong to 55 bacterial genera, 1 species of yeast, and 6 species of mold. Lactococcus spp. (all of which were Lactococcus lactis), Staphylococcus spp., Microbacterium spp., and Psychrobacter sp. were isolated from all 5 sites and Rhodococcus spp. and Chryseobacterium spp. from 4 sites. Thirty-two genera were only found in 1 out of 5 facilities each. Great variations were observed in the microbial background flora both between the 5 producers, and also within the various production sites. The greatest diversity of bacteria was found in drains and on rubber seals of doors. The flora on cheese storage shelves and in salt brines was less varied. A total of 62 bacterial isolates and 1 yeast isolate were tested for antilisterial activity in an overlay assay and a spot-on-lawn assay, but none showed significant inhibitory effects. Listeria monocytogenes was also co-cultured on ceramic tiles with bacteria dominating in the cheese production plants: Lactococcus lactis, Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus equorum, Rhodococcus spp., or Psychrobacter spp. None of the tested isolates altered the survival of L. monocytogenes on ceramic tiles. The conclusion of the study was that no common background flora exists in cheese production environments. None of the tested isolates inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes. Hence, this study does not support the hypothesis that the natural background flora in cheese production environments inhibits the growth or survival of L. monocytogenes.

  19. Deciphering the intracellular metabolism of Listeria monocytogenes by mutant screening and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes resides and proliferates within the cytoplasm of epithelial cells. While the virulence factors essentially contributing to this step of the infection cycle are well characterized, the set of listerial genes contributing to intracellular replication remains to be defined on a genome-wide level. Results A comprehensive library of L. monocytogenes strain EGD knockout mutants was constructed upon insertion-duplication mutagenesis, and 1491 mutants were tested for their phenotypes in rich medium and in a Caco-2 cell culture assay. Following sequencing of the plasmid insertion site, 141 different genes required for invasion of and replication in Caco-2 cells were identified. Ten in-frame deletion mutants were constructed that confirmed the data. The genes with known functions are mainly involved in cellular processes including transport, in the intermediary metabolism of sugars, nucleotides and lipids, and in information pathways such as regulatory functions. No function could be ascribed to 18 genes, and a counterpart of eight genes is missing in the apathogenic species L. innocua. Mice infection studies revealed the in vivo requirement of IspE (Lmo0190 involved in mevalonate synthesis, and of the novel ABC transporter Lmo0135-0137 associated with cysteine transport. Based on the data of this genome-scale screening, an extreme pathway and elementary mode analysis was applied that demonstrates the critical role of glycerol and purine metabolism, of fucose utilization, and of the synthesis of glutathione, aspartate semialdehyde, serine and branched chain amino acids during intracellular replication of L. monocytogenes. Conclusion The combination of a genetic screening and a modelling approach revealed that a series of transporters help L. monocytogenes to overcome a putative lack of nutrients within cells, and that a high metabolic flexibility contributes to the intracellular replication of

  20. Nanovesicle encapsulation of antimicrobial peptide P34: physicochemical characterization and mode of action on Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Malheiros, Patrícia; Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; Brandelli, Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptide P34, a substance showing antibacterial activity against pathogenic and food spoilage bacteria, was encapsulated in liposomes prepared from partially purified soybean phosphatidylcholine, and their physicochemical characteristics were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by agar diffusion assay using Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 as indicator strain. A concentration of 3,200 AU/mL of P34 was encapsulated in nanovesicles and stocked at 4 °C. No significant difference ( p > 0.05) in the biological activity of free and encapsulated P34 was observed through 24 days. Size and PDI of liposomes, investigated by light scattering analysis, were on average 150 nm and 0.22 respectively. Zeta potential was -27.42 mV. There was no significant change ( p > 0.05) in the physicochemical properties of liposomes during the time of evaluation. The liposomes presented closed spherical morphology as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mode of action of liposome-encapsulated P34 under L. monocytogenes cells was investigated by TEM. Liposomes appeared to adhere but not fuse with the bacterial cell wall, suggesting that the antimicrobial is released from nanovesicles to act against the microorganism. The effect of free and encapsulated P34 was tested against L. monocytogenes, showing that free bacteriocin inhibited the pathogen more quickly than the encapsulated P34. Liposomes prepared with low-cost lipid showed high encapsulation efficiency for a new antimicrobial peptide and were stable during storage. The mode of action against the pathogen L. monocytogenes was characterized.

  1. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluoxetine causes decrease in intestinal motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Afzal

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Our study has indicated that fluoxetine on isolated ileal intestinal smooth muscle decrease the motility and this decrease in motility is possibly due to the inability of fluoxetine in vitro to enhance the serotonergic transmission and also because of the interaction of these agents with some of the other receptors, present in the intestinal smooth muscles. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 265-268

  3. A kinetic mechanism for cell sorting based on local variations in cell motility

    OpenAIRE

    Strandkvist, Charlotte; Juul, Jeppe; Baum, Buzz; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Duke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of cell sorting relies on physical difference, either in the interfacial properties or motile force, between cell types. But is such asymmetry a prerequisite for cell sorting? We test this using a minimal model in which the two cell populations are identical with respect to their physical properties and differences in motility arise solely from how cells interact with their surroundings. The model resembles the Schelling model used in social sciences to study segrega...

  4. Sperm characteristics and motility in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (Sauvage, 1878) and Pangasius djambal Bleeker, 1846 (Pangasiidae, Siluriformes)

    OpenAIRE

    Legendre, Marc; Cosson, J; Subagja, J.

    2008-01-01

    A drop in osmotic pressure appeared as the main trigger for initiating spermatozoa motility in the two catfish species studied. Motility duration was particularly short in both species (20 to 30 s). Sperm preserved at 4 degrees C in a saline medium (NaCl 155-175 mM, pH 7.5-8.5) Survived longer than in any of the other media tested.

  5. Flagellar motility in eukaryotic human parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Timothy; Engstler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A huge variety of protists rely on one or more motile flagella to either move themselves or move fluids and substances around them. Many of these flagellates have evolved a symbiotic or parasitic lifestyle. Several of the parasites have adapted to human hosts, and include agents of prevalent and serious diseases. These unicellular parasites have become specialised in colonising a wide range of biological niches within humans. They usually have diverse transmission cycles, and frequently manifest a variety of distinct morphological stages. The motility of the single or multiple flagella plays important but understudied roles in parasite transmission, host invasion, dispersal, survival, proliferation and pathology. In this review we provide an overview of the important human pathogens that possess a motile flagellum for at least part of their life cycle. We highlight recently published studies that aim to elucidate motility mechanisms, and their relevance for human disease. We then bring the physics of swimming at the microscale into context, emphasising the importance of interdisciplinary approaches for a full understanding of flagellate motility - especially in light of the parasites' microenvironments and population dynamics. Finally, we summarise some important technological aspects, describing challenges for the field and possibilities for motility analyses in the future.

  6. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  7. Ghrelin family of peptides and gut motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Akihiro; Ataka, Koji; Fujino, Kazunori; Chen, Chih-Yen; Kato, Ikuo; Fujimiya, Mineko; Inui, Akio

    2011-04-01

    Acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, and obestatin are three peptides isolated from the gastrointestinal tract and encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Three ghrelin gene products participate in modulating appetite, adipogenesis, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, immune, sleep, memory, anxiety, cognition, and stress. We have investigated the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on fed and fasted motor activities in the stomach and duodenum of freely moving conscious rats by manometric method. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intravenous (IV) administration of acyl ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV and IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin disrupted fasted motor activity in the antrum. Changes in gastric motility induced by IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin were antagonized by ICV administration of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 2 receptor antagonist. IV administration of obestatin decreased the percentage motor index in the antrum and prolonged the time taken to return to fasted motility in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV administration of CRF 1 and 2 receptor antagonists prevented the effects of obestatin on gastroduodenal motility. Ghrelin gene products regulate feeding-associated gastroduodenal motility. Stomach may regulate various functions including gastrointestinal motility via acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and obestatin as an endocrine organ. Increasing knowledge of the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on gastrointestinal motility could lead to innovative new therapies for functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  8. Genes Associated with Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in Listeria monocytogenes as Revealed by Insertional Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, Patricia A.; Piercey, Marta J.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen whose survival in food processing environments may be associated with its tolerance to desiccation. To probe the molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to adapt to desiccation stress, a transposon library of 11,700 L. monocytogenes mutants was screened, using a microplate assay, for strains displaying increased or decreased desiccation survival (43% relative humidity, 15°C) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The desiccation phenotypes of selected mutants were subsequently assessed on food-grade stainless steel (SS) coupons in TSB plus 1% glucose (TSB-glu). Single transposon insertions in mutants exhibiting a change in desiccation survival of >0.5 log CFU/cm2 relative to that of the wild type were determined by sequencing arbitrary PCR products. Strain morphology, motility, and osmotic stress survival (in TSB-glu plus 20% NaCl) were also analyzed. The initial screen selected 129 desiccation-sensitive (DS) and 61 desiccation-tolerant (DT) mutants, out of which secondary screening on SS confirmed 15 DT and 15 DS mutants. Among the DT mutants, seven immotile and flagellum-less strains contained transposons in genes involved in flagellum biosynthesis (fliP, flhB, flgD, flgL) and motor control (motB, fliM, fliY), while others harbored transposons in genes involved in membrane lipid biosynthesis, energy production, potassium uptake, and virulence. The genes that were interrupted in the 15 DS mutants included those involved in energy production, membrane transport, protein metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, oxidative damage control, and putative virulence. Five DT and 14 DS mutants also demonstrated similar significantly (P < 0.05) different survival relative to that of the wild type when exposed to osmotic stress, demonstrating that some genes likely have similar roles in allowing the organism to survive the two water stresses. PMID:26025900

  9. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by Buffered Dry Vinegar in Reduced-Sodium Ready-to-Eat Uncured Turkey Stored at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badvela, Mani K; Dickson, James S; Sebranek, Joseph G; Schroeder, William D

    2016-08-01

    A reduced-sodium ready-to-eat (RTE) uncured turkey was manufactured with buffered dry vinegar treatments to validate the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage microflora and to determine the effects on sensory and quality attributes. Samples were stored at 4°C for 12 weeks, and the study was independently replicated three times. Two different five-strain inocula of L. monocytogenes obtained from different sources were used for evaluating the efficacy of the buffered dry vinegar treatments. The results showed that 0.6 and 0.8% buffered dry vinegar with a sodium base (BDV-SB) and buffered dry vinegar with a potassium base (BDV-PB) at 0.7 and 0.9% controlled L. monocytogenes for 12 weeks. The untreated control product containing no buffered dry vinegar showed >1 log increase in L. monocytogenes populations counts at the end of 2 weeks. Statistical analysis confirmed that the dry vinegar treatments inhibited (P > 0.05) the growth of L. monocytogenes compared with the untreated control. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were seen in the inhibition of L. monocytogenes between the two different five-strain inocula. Instrumental color results showed no significant differences between the treatments. Purge loss results showed no significant differences between the dry vinegar treatments, but significant differences were seen between the untreated control and dry vinegar treatments at a few testing intervals. The overall results indicated that the dry vinegar ingredients (6.66 to 8.83 mM acetic acid in the finished product) were effective in inhibiting L. monocytogenes obtained from multiple sources in reduced-sodium RTE uncured turkey stored at 4°C without adversely impacting the quality attributes.

  10. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from organic and conventional poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B I; Fente, C A; Calo-Mata, P; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2008-12-01

    The presence of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes was determined in 55 samples of organic poultry meat and in 61 samples of conventional poultry meat. A total of 220 E. coli, 192 S. aureus, and 71 L. monocytogenes strains were analyzed by an agar disk diffusion assay for their resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, fosfomycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole (E. coli); chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, oxacillin, and sulfisoxazole (S. aureus); and chloramphenicol, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole, and vancomycin (L. monocytogenes). The results indicated a significantly higher (P poultry meat as compared with conventional poultry meat. E. coli isolated from organic poultry meat exhibited lower levels of antimicrobial resistance against 7 of the 10 antimicrobials tested as compared with isolates recovered from conventional meat. In the case of S. aureus and L. monocytogenes isolated from conventional poultry, antimicrobial resistance was significantly higher only for doxycycline as compared with strains isolated from organic poultry. In the case of E. coli, the presence of multiresistant strains was significantly higher (P poultry meat as compared with organic poultry meat. Organically farmed poultry samples showed significantly lower development of antimicrobial resistance in intestinal bacteria such as E. coli.

  11. Elongated cells of Listeria monocytogenes in biofilms in the presence of sucrose and bacteriocin-producing Leuconostoc mesenteroides A11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane Priscilla Ratti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen which may survive in biofilms and persist in food processing plants. In this study, the ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (bac+ and bac- to inhibit biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 was studied with stainless steel coupons immersed in BHI broth and BHI broth plus sucrose in combination with the Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB. Adhered cells were collected with swabs and enumerated on selective agars (Oxford for listeria and MRS for leuconostoc. Leuconostoc mesenteroides bac+ in co-culture with L. monocytogenes was effective to inhibit biofilm formation by listeria for up to 3 hours of incubation, but at 24 hours, biofilm was present in all conditions tested, as confirmed by observations of stainless steel coupons under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. It was also observed that in the presence of L. mesenteroides bac+ in BHI plus sucrose, a high number of elongated cells of L. monocytogenes was present, which may indicate an adaptation response of the pathogen to stress conditions with important implications for food safety.

  12. Nectophotometer: an infrared motility monitor used to rapidly identify toxicity in effluents and receiving waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Pinto, Richard W.; Santelli, John

    2007-04-01

    A change in the motility pattern of fish and aquatic invertebrates when initially exposed to a toxin has long been used in tests designed to signal the presence of toxins in effluents and receiving waters. We have discovered that the level of motility change occurring within 2.5 hours of exposure to all concentrations of a test toxicant correlates well with mortality observed after three days exposure to the toxin, but that the first 30 minutes of exposure is a poor predictor of mortality. Defining this 'best to use exposure time' can increase the sensitivity of toxicity monitoring systems to a weak toxin, one that causes a motility change so minor that it may otherwise go unnoticed. Motility is monitored and automatically recorded using a Nectophotometer, an automated bio-monitor with computer interface that senses interruptions of infrared beams when organisms separately exposed to multiple concentrations of a toxin move through the beams. In our tests changes in the motility of Artemia salina within the first 2.5 hours of exposure predict 3 day mortality with an average accuracy of 89%. The Nectophotometer has promise for allowing rapid assessment of the toxicity to invertebrates and fish, and may also be used to assess airborne toxicity if motile insects respond in a similar manner.

  13. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O mediates a novel entry pathway of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Vadia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to invade and survive within host cells. Among the most studied facultative intracellular pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes is known to express two invasins-InlA and InlB-that induce bacterial internalization into nonphagocytic cells. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO facilitates bacterial escape from the internalization vesicle into the cytoplasm, where bacteria divide and undergo cell-to-cell spreading via actin-based motility. In the present study we demonstrate that in addition to InlA and InlB, LLO is required for efficient internalization of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes (HepG2. Surprisingly, LLO is an invasion factor sufficient to induce the internalization of noninvasive Listeria innocua or polystyrene beads into host cells in a dose-dependent fashion and at the concentrations produced by L. monocytogenes. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying LLO-induced bacterial entry, we constructed novel LLO derivatives locked at different stages of the toxin assembly on host membranes. We found that LLO-induced bacterial or bead entry only occurs upon LLO pore formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy studies show that LLO-coated beads stimulate the formation of membrane extensions that ingest the beads into an early endosomal compartment. This LLO-induced internalization pathway is dynamin-and F-actin-dependent, and clathrin-independent. Interestingly, further linking pore formation to bacteria/bead uptake, LLO induces F-actin polymerization in a tyrosine kinase-and pore-dependent fashion. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a bacterial pathogen perforates the host cell plasma membrane as a strategy to activate the endocytic machinery and gain entry into the host cell.

  14. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O mediates a novel entry pathway of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadia, Stephen; Arnett, Eusondia; Haghighat, Anne-Cécile; Wilson-Kubalek, Elisabeth M; Tweten, Rodney K; Seveau, Stephanie

    2011-11-01

    Intracellular pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to invade and survive within host cells. Among the most studied facultative intracellular pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes is known to express two invasins-InlA and InlB-that induce bacterial internalization into nonphagocytic cells. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO) facilitates bacterial escape from the internalization vesicle into the cytoplasm, where bacteria divide and undergo cell-to-cell spreading via actin-based motility. In the present study we demonstrate that in addition to InlA and InlB, LLO is required for efficient internalization of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes (HepG2). Surprisingly, LLO is an invasion factor sufficient to induce the internalization of noninvasive Listeria innocua or polystyrene beads into host cells in a dose-dependent fashion and at the concentrations produced by L. monocytogenes. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying LLO-induced bacterial entry, we constructed novel LLO derivatives locked at different stages of the toxin assembly on host membranes. We found that LLO-induced bacterial or bead entry only occurs upon LLO pore formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy studies show that LLO-coated beads stimulate the formation of membrane extensions that ingest the beads into an early endosomal compartment. This LLO-induced internalization pathway is dynamin-and F-actin-dependent, and clathrin-independent. Interestingly, further linking pore formation to bacteria/bead uptake, LLO induces F-actin polymerization in a tyrosine kinase-and pore-dependent fashion. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a bacterial pathogen perforates the host cell plasma membrane as a strategy to activate the endocytic machinery and gain entry into the host cell.

  15. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  16. FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 10, 2003: Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 10 describes procedures for analysis of food samples and may be adapted for assessment of solid, particulate, aerosol, liquid and water samples containing Listeria monocytogenes.

  17. Growth inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Bech Hansen, T.; Garrido, P.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: This study elucidates the mechanisms by which a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Methods and Results: Listeria monocytogenes was exposed to live cultures of a bacteriocin-negative variant of C. piscicola A9b in co-culture, in a diffusion...... chamber system, and to a cell-free supernatant. Suppression of maximum cell density (0-3.5 log units) of L. monocytogenes was proportional to initial levels of C. pisciola (10(3)-10(7) CFU ml(-1)). Cell-to-cell contact was not required to cause inhibition. The cell-free C. piscicola supernatant caused...... a decrease in L. monocytogenes maximum cell density, which was abolished by glucose addition but not by amino acid, vitamin or mineral addition. The fermentate also gave rise to a longer lag phase and a reduction in growth rate. These effects were independent of glucose and may have been caused by acetate...

  18. Pyelonephritis with bacteremia caused by Listeria monocytogenes: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Shunsuke; Hase, Ryota; Toguchi, Akihiro; Otsuka, Yoshihito; Hosokawa, Naoto

    2017-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a well-known cause of meningitis, colitis, and bacteremia; however, obstructive pyelonephritis caused by L. monocytogenes has never been reported. We herein report on a 90-year-old Japanese woman with obstructive pyelonephritis and bacteremia due to uterus carcinoma invading the ureter. She was admitted to our hospital complaining of fever and chills, and her physical examination revealed left costovertebral angle tenderness. Computed tomography showed hydronephrosis and complete ureteral obstruction due to tumor invasion. Blood and urine cultures upon nephrostomy revealed the growth of L. monocytogenes. We treated the patient with two weeks of intravenous ampicillin and an additional one-week treatment of oral sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. This case shows the importance to recognize L. monocytogenes as a potential causative agent of urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum) in three markets of Valencia, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Mérida, Luis Guillermo; Morón de Salim, Alba; Alfieri Graterol, Ana Yudith; Gamboa, Orlando

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of L. monocytogenes in tomatoes and coriander obtained from three different markets, during eight weeks were determined. 192 samples were evaluated: 96 of tomatoes, and 96 of coriander. The isolation of L. monocytogenes was performed using COVENIN 3718:2001. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 12.0. Kolmogorov Smirnov, Mann Whitney U, Kruskal Wallis U test; Spearman's correlation were applied, and p<0.05 significance level was aplied. It was not found significant differences between the medias values and standard deviations of Most Probable Number (MPN) of Listeria spp to tomatoes and coriander during the eight weeks of recollection in the markets; neither between the distributions of MPN of tomatoes and coriander from the markets (Chi2=5,233 p<0,073; Chi2=1,624 p<0,444 respectively) neither the samples per weeks (Chi2=6,547 p<0,477; Chi2=2,667 p<0,914 respectively). In the number of MPN between tomatoes and coriander both distributions were significant different according to test U Mann Whitney U=3040,5 (Z=-4,216 p<0,0001). It was found statistical significance (p<0,001) between the number of MPN of tomatoes and coriander. The presence of Listeria spp in tomatoe was 41,66% (25,0% L. monocytogenes and 16,7% L. ivanovii); in coriander 77,08% (36,5% L. monocytogenes, 33,3% L. ivanovii and 7,3% L. seelige). We concluded that the high level of L. monocytogenes in tomatoes and coriander is independent of the markets store; we see the necessity of a microbiological control on the irrigation system, collection and distribution to ensure the quality of the product.

  20. Eye Motility Alterations in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated a sample of individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP with the aim of assessing the presence or absence of ocular motility (OM disorders. Materials and Methods. We included 23 out of the 25 individuals from the sample (9 females and 14 males with an average visual acuity of 6/10. Results. The cover test about the vertical deviation in near distance showed an r/l in 3.45% and an l/r in 6.9%. The assessment of OM showed that 39.1% of the sample had a severe hyperfunction of the IO of the right eye and a severe hyperfunction (34.5% of the SO of the left eye; 21.8% had a moderate hypofunction of right SO with a moderate percentage of hypofunction of 17.5% for the SO of the left eye; 30.5%, however, showed a serious hypofunction of the SR of both eyes; 21.7% of the sample showed a hyperfunction in both eyes of the IR. Conclusion. This alteration, however, is not attributable to either a high refractive defect (medium-low myopia: −1 diopter ±3 SD or to a severely impaired binocular vision (visual acuity, motor fusion, and stereopsis are normal or within a range of values commonly accepted. Therefore, the disorders of OM lead to a genetic origin.

  1. Eye Motility Alterations in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Raffaele; Comberiati, Anna Maria; Galeoto, Giovanni; Fratipietro, Manuela; Arrico, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated a sample of individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with the aim of assessing the presence or absence of ocular motility (OM) disorders. Materials and Methods. We included 23 out of the 25 individuals from the sample (9 females and 14 males) with an average visual acuity of 6/10. Results. The cover test about the vertical deviation in near distance showed an r/l in 3.45% and an l/r in 6.9%. The assessment of OM showed that 39.1% of the sample had a severe hyperfunction of the IO of the right eye and a severe hyperfunction (34.5%) of the SO of the left eye; 21.8% had a moderate hypofunction of right SO with a moderate percentage of hypofunction of 17.5% for the SO of the left eye; 30.5%, however, showed a serious hypofunction of the SR of both eyes; 21.7% of the sample showed a hyperfunction in both eyes of the IR. Conclusion. This alteration, however, is not attributable to either a high refractive defect (medium-low myopia: -1 diopter ±3 SD) or to a severely impaired binocular vision (visual acuity, motor fusion, and stereopsis are normal or within a range of values commonly accepted). Therefore, the disorders of OM lead to a genetic origin.

  2. Caratterizzazione biomolecolare di listeria monocytogenes in suini regolarmente macellati

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes è un batterio patogeno responsabile di una malattia potenzialmente molto grave per l’uomo. L’infezione avviene soprattutto tramite l’ingestione di alimenti di origine animale contaminati, e può propagarsi per via transplacentare al feto. Il potenziale patogeno di L. monocytogenes è dovuto soprattutto a caratteristici fattori di virulenza con i quali alcuni ceppi sono in grado di attaccare la cellula dell’organismo ospite potendo aderire, invadere, moltiplicare e prop...

  3. Listeria monocytogenes does not survive ingestion by Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akya, Alisha; Pointon, Andrew; Thomas, Connor

    2010-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium capable of infecting humans, particularly pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. Although the intracellular invasion and pathogenesis of listeriosis in mammalian tissues has been well studied, little is known about the ecology of L. monocytogenes , and in particular the environmental reservoir for this bacterium has not been identified. This study used short-term co-culture at 15, 22 and 37 degrees C to examine the interaction of L. monocytogenes strains with Acanthamoeba polyphaga ACO12. Survival of L. monocytogenes cells phagocytosed by monolayers of trophozoites was assessed by culture techniques and microscopy. A. polyphaga trophozoites eliminated bacterial cells within a few hours post-phagocytosis, irrespective of the incubation temperature used. Wild-type L. monocytogenes and a phenotypic listeriolysin O mutant were unable to either multiply or survive within trophozoites. By contrast, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium C5 cells used as controls were able to survive and multiply within A. polyphaga trophozoites. The data presented indicate that A. polyphaga ACO12 is unlikely to harbour L. monocytogenes, or act as an environmental reservoir for this bacterium.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes, a down-to-earth pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Piveteau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the food-borne life threatening disease listeriosis. This pathogenic bacterium received much attention in the endeavor of deciphering the cellular mechanisms that underlie the onset of infection and its ability to adapt to the food processing environment. Although information is available on the presence of L. monocytogenes in many environmental niches including soil, water, plants, foodstuff and animals, understanding the ecology of L. monocytogenes in outdoor environments has received less attention. Soil is an environmental niche of pivotal importance in the transmission of this bacterium to plants and animals. Soil composition, microbial communities and macrofauna are extrinsic edaphic factors that direct the fate of L. monocytogenes in the soil environment. Moreover, farming practices may further affect its incidence. The genome of L. monocytogenes presents an extensive repertoire of genes encoding transport proteins and regulators, a characteristic of the genome of ubiquitous bacteria. Postgenomic analyses bring new insights in the process of soil adaptation. In the present paper focussing on soil, we review these extrinsic and intrinsic factors that drive environmental adaptation of L. monocytogenes.

  5. Inhibition of sortase A by chalcone prevents Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongen; Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Bing; Niu, Xiaodi; Song, Meng; Luo, Zhaoqing; Lu, Gejin; Liu, Bowen; Zhao, Xiaoran; Wang, Jianfeng; Deng, Xuming

    2016-04-15

    The critical role of sortase A in gram-positive bacterial pathogenicity makes this protein a good potential target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we report for the first time the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes sortase A and identify the active sites that mediate its transpeptidase activity. We also used a sortase A (SrtA) enzyme activity inhibition assay, simulation, and isothermal titration calorimetry analysis to discover that chalcone, an agent with little anti-L. monocytogenes activity, could significantly inhibit sortase A activity with an IC50 of 28.41 ± 5.34 μM by occupying the active site of SrtA. The addition of chalcone to a co-culture of L. monocytogenes and Caco-2 cells significantly inhibited bacterial entry into the cells and L. monocytogenes-mediated cytotoxicity. Additionally, chalcone treatment decreased the mortality of infected mice, the bacterial burden in target organs, and the pathological damage to L. monocytogenes-infected mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that chalcone is a promising candidate for the development of treatment against L. monocytogenes infection.

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of the accessory genome of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk C den Bakker

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne bacterial pathogen, is comprised of four phylogenetic lineages that vary with regard to their serotypes and distribution among sources. In order to characterize lineage-specific genomic diversity within L. monocytogenes, we sequenced the genomes of eight strains from several lineages and serotypes, and characterized the accessory genome, which was hypothesized to contribute to phenotypic differences across lineages. The eight L. monocytogenes genomes sequenced range in size from 2.85-3.14 Mb, encode 2,822-3,187 genes, and include the first publicly available sequenced representatives of serotypes 1/2c, 3a and 4c. Mapping of the distribution of accessory genes revealed two distinct regions of the L. monocytogenes chromosome: an accessory-rich region in the first 65° adjacent to the origin of replication and a more stable region in the remaining 295°. This pattern of genome organization is distinct from that of related bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. The accessory genome of all lineages is enriched for cell surface-related genes and phosphotransferase systems, and transcriptional regulators, highlighting the selective pressures faced by contemporary strains from their hosts, other microbes, and their environment. Phylogenetic analysis of O-antigen genes and gene clusters predicts that serotype 4 was ancestral in L. monocytogenes and serotype 1/2 associated gene clusters were putatively introduced through horizontal gene transfer in the ancestral population of L. monocytogenes lineage I and II.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes a pathogen down-to-earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure eVivant

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the food-borne life threatening disease listeriosis. This pathogenic bacterium received much attention in the endeavour of deciphering the cellular mechanisms that underlie the onset of infection and its ability to adapt to the food processing environment. Although information is available on the presence of L. monocytogenes in many environmental niches including soil, water, plants, foodstuff and animals, understanding the ecology of L. monocytogenes in outdoor environments has received less attention. Soil is an environmental niche of pivotal importance in the transmission of this bacterium to plants and animals. Soil composition, microbial communities and macrofauna are extrinsic edaphic factors that direct the fate of L. monocytogenes in the soil environment. Moreover, farming practices may further affect its incidence. The genome of L. monocytogenes presents an extensive repertoire of genes encoding transport proteins and regulators, a characteristic of the genome of ubiquitous bacteria. Postgenomic analyses bring new insights in the process of soil adaptation. In the present paper focussing on soil, we review these extrinsic and intrinsic factors that drive environmental adaptation of L. monocytogenes.

  8. Effect of overdose zinc on mouse testis and its relation with sperm count and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Günfer; Abban, Gülcin; Turgut, Sabahat; Take, Gülnur

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of excessive zinc intake on the testes and on sperm count and motility in mice. Thirty Balb c mice were divided randomly into 3 groups of 10 animals in each. Group I acted as controls; group II was supplied with drinking water containing 1.5 g/100 mL Zn, and group III was supplied with drinking water containing 2.5 g/100 mL Zn. The animals were sacrificed after 3 wk supplementation and the epididymis and testis were quickly excised. A negative correlation between Zn dose and sperm count and motility was found. The sperm count in group III was significantly lower than in groups II and I (psperm motility in group III was significantly lower than in the controls (pzinc significantly alter sperm motility.

  9. A kinetic mechanism for cell sorting based on local variations in cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandkvist, Charlotte; Juul, Jeppe; Baum, Buzz; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Duke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of cell sorting relies on physical difference, either in the interfacial properties or motile force, between cell types. But is such asymmetry a prerequisite for cell sorting? We test this using a minimal model in which the two cell populations are identical with respect to their physical properties and differences in motility arise solely from how cells interact with their surroundings. The model resembles the Schelling model used in social sciences to study segregation phenomena at the scale of societies. Our results demonstrate that segregation can emerge solely from cell motility being a dynamic property that changes in response to the local environment of the cell, but that additional mechanisms are necessary to reproduce the envelopment behaviour observed in vitro. The time course of segregation follows a power law, in agreement with the scaling reported from experiment and in other models of motility-driven segregation. PMID:25485079

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MOTILITY AND VIABILITY PARAMETERS OF FROZEN-THAWED BULL SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliška Špaleková

    2013-02-01

    velocity parameters and ALH between the group A and B were detected. Occurrence of spermatozoa with disrupted membranes, dead/necrotic spermatozoa and apoptotic spermatozoa was significantly lower in the group A. Bulls in the group A showed significantly higher cleavage rate of embryos. These motility and viability characteristics are associated with a higher embryo cleavage rate in in vitro fertilization test.

  11. Statistical physical models of cellular motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward J.

    Cellular motility is required for a wide range of biological behaviors and functions, and the topic poses a number of interesting physical questions. In this work, we construct and analyze models of various aspects of cellular motility using tools and ideas from statistical physics. We begin with a Brownian dynamics model for actin-polymerization-driven motility, which is responsible for cell crawling and "rocketing" motility of pathogens. Within this model, we explore the robustness of self-diffusiophoresis, which is a general mechanism of motility. Using this mechanism, an object such as a cell catalyzes a reaction that generates a steady-state concentration gradient that propels the object in a particular direction. We then apply these ideas to a model for depolymerization-driven motility during bacterial chromosome segregation. We find that depolymerization and protein-protein binding interactions alone are sufficient to robustly pull a chromosome, even against large loads. Next, we investigate how forces and kinetics interact during eukaryotic mitosis with a many-microtubule model. Microtubules exert forces on chromosomes, but since individual microtubules grow and shrink in a force-dependent way, these forces lead to bistable collective microtubule dynamics, which provides a mechanism for chromosome oscillations and microtubule-based tension sensing. Finally, we explore kinematic aspects of cell motility in the context of the immune system. We develop quantitative methods for analyzing cell migration statistics collected during imaging experiments. We find that during chronic infection in the brain, T cells run and pause stochastically, following the statistics of a generalized Levy walk. These statistics may contribute to immune function by mimicking an evolutionarily conserved efficient search strategy. Additionally, we find that naive T cells migrating in lymph nodes also obey non-Gaussian statistics. Altogether, our work demonstrates how physical

  12. Cellular Motility--Experiments on Contractile and Motile Mechanisms in the Slime Mould, Physarum Polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R. P.; Stewart, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Actin and myosin have now been demonstrated to be important constituents of many eukaryotic cells. Their role is primarily that of a contractile system underlying all aspects of cellular motility. Described here is a simple experimental system to demonstrate quantitatively aspects of motility and its regulation in a slime mold. (Author/MA)

  13. Tektin 3 is required for progressive sperm motility in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Angshumoy; Lin, Yi-Nan; Agno, Julio E.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2008-01-01

    Tektins are evolutionarily-conserved flagellar (and ciliary) filamentous proteins present in the axoneme and peri-axonemal structures in diverse metazoan species. We have previously shown that tektin 3 (TEKT3) and tektin 4 (TEKT4) are male germ cell-enriched proteins, and that TEKT4 is essential for coordinated and progressive sperm motility in mice. Here we report that male mice null for TEKT3 produce sperm with reduced motility (47.2% motility) and forward progression, and increased flagellar structural bending defects. Male TEKT3-null mice however maintain normal fertility in two different genetic backgrounds tested, in contrast to TEKT4-null mice. Furthermore, male mice null for both TEKT3 and TEKT4 show subfertility on a mixed B6;129 genetic background, significantly different from either single knockouts, suggesting partial non-redundant roles for these two proteins in sperm physiology. Our results suggest that tektins are potential candidate genes for non-syndromic asthenozoospermia in humans. PMID:18951373

  14. EFFECTS OF METHYLNALTREXONE ON GUINEA PIG GASTROINTESTINAL MOTILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Laura; Huynh, Jennifer; Vegezzi, Gaia; Sternini, Catia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of methylnaltrexone (MNTX), a peripherally acting μ opioid receptor (μOR) antagonist, on gastrointestinal (GI) motility in naïve vs. opiate-chronically treated guinea pigs in vitro and in vivo. We have used the electrically stimulated muscle twitch contractions of longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparations and total GI transit as measure of GI motility. In LMMP preparations of naïve guinea pigs, MNTX (1–30 μM) induced a significant, dose-response reduction of morphine-induced inhibition of electrically stimulated muscle twitch contractions, with an IC50 of 9.4 10−8M. By contrast, MNTX abolished the inhibitory effect of acute morphine at any concentration tested (1–30 μM) in the guinea pigs chronically treated with opiates. In vivo, MNTX (10–50 mg s.c.) did not affect GI transit in naïve guinea pigs when administered acutely or for 5 consecutive days, but reversed the GI transit delay induced by chronic morphine treatment. These findings show that MNTX is effective in reversing opiate-induced inhibition of GI motility acting at peripheral μORs, but does not exert a pharmacologic effect on GI transit in the absence of opiate stimulation. PMID:23361094

  15. Use of a novel medium, the Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium, for isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from raw or non-pasteurized foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gonzáles, N E; Martínez-Chávez, L; Cabrera-Díaz, E; Martínez-Cárdenas, C; Gutiérrez-González, P; Castillo, A

    2016-05-01

    Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium (PCOM), a novel selective and differential plating medium for Listeria monocytogenes was compared with Modified Oxford Agar (MOX) for efficacy to isolate L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. naturally present in non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese (n = 50), non-pasteurized fresh squeezed orange juice (n = 50), raw beef chunks (n = 36), and fresh cabbage (n = 125). Samples were collected from retail markets and farms in Mexico and tested following the US Department of Agriculture enrichment technique. Listeria spp. were isolated from 23.4% of analyzed samples, and from those, 75.0% corresponded to raw beef chunks, 38.0% to non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese, and 30.0% to fresh squeezed orange juice. No Listeria spp. were isolated from fresh cabbage samples. L. monocytogenes was recovered from 15.3% of food samples analyzed. Non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese showed the highest proportion of L. monocytogenes positive samples (36.0%), followed by orange juice (26.0%) and raw beef (25.0%). The frequency of isolation of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes was not different (P > 0.05) between PCOM and MOX. The advantages of using PCOM when comparing to MOX, include the easier way to identify Listeria species, the lower cost per plate and the availability of its ingredients for Latin-American countries.

  16. Evaluation of the Thermo Scientific SureTect Listeria monocytogenes Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Leon-Velarde, Carlos; Larson, Nathan; Dave, Keron; Evans, Katharine; Crabtree, David; Hughes, Annette; Hopper, Craig; Simpson, Helen; Withey, Sophie; Oleksiuk, Milena; Holopainen, Jani; Wickstrand, Nina; Kauppinen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    The Thermo Scientific SureTect Listeria monocytogenes Assay is a new real-time PCR assay for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food and environmental samples. This assay was validated using the AOAC Research Institute (AOAC-RI) Performance Tested Methods program in comparison to the reference method detailed in International Organization for Standardization 11290-1:1996, including Amendment 1:2004 with the following foods and food contact surfaces: smoked salmon, processed cheese, fresh bagged spinach, fresh cantaloupe, cooked prawns (chilled product), cooked sliced turkey meat (chilled product), ice cream, pork frankfurters, salami, ground raw beef meat (12% fat), plastic, and stainless steel. All matrixes were tested by Thermo Fisher Scientific, Microbiology Division, Basingstoke, UK. In addition, three matrixes (pork frankfurters, bagged lettuce, and stainless steel) were analyzed independently as part of the AOAC-RI controlled laboratory study by the University of Guelph, Canada. Using probability of detection (POD) statistical analysis, a significant difference was demonstrated between the candidate and reference methods for salami, cooked sliced turkey and ice cream in favor of the SureTect assay. For all other matrixes, no significant difference by POD was seen between the two methods during the study. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing was also conducted with 53 and 30 isolates, respectively, which demonstrated that the SureTect assay was able to detect all serotypes of L. monocytogenes. None of the exclusivity isolates analyzed were detected by the SureTect assay. Ruggedness testing was conducted to evaluate the performance of the assay with specific method deviations outside the recommended parameters open to variation, i.e., enrichment time and temperature and lysis temperature, which demonstrated that the assay gave reliable performance. Accelerated stability testing was also conducted, validating the assay shelf life.

  17. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  18. Analysis of process factors of dry fermented salami to control Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Novelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenge tests are a clear opportunity for manufacturers interested in the evaluation of their management system with the aim to reduce the spread of foodborne pathogens. This is a main concern especially in ready-to-eat food in relation to the risk associated with Listeria monocytogenes. For small and medium-scale food industry the manufacturing practices and products formulation are characterised by a wider variability and poor repeatability. The use of ad hoc challenge test and the comparison among different processing systems are strongly required. This paper reports a preliminary comparison among different challenge tests (n=12 commissioned by three manufacturers of raw-fermented salami during a period of three years (2013-2016. The challenge tests were designed to evaluate the growth potential (δ of L. monocytogenes during the whole processing period of the salami. The doughs were prepared according to different formulations: the simplest formulation was represented by the use of salt, potassium nitrate, black pepper and starter cultures, while the most composited formulations also included the use of sugars and ascorbic acid in addition to nitrite salt. All the processing steps were conducted within an experimental laboratory dedicated for the processing of meat. After stuffing, the salami were dried and ripened under temperature and relative humidity control. The sugar inclusion can be considered as a protective factor, while the drying step at high temperature (above 20°C was associated with higher δ values (δ>0.5 log10 cfu/g. The addition of starter cultures, and the subsequent acidification highlighted the importance of pH as the parameter able to affect the L. monocytogenes growth.

  19. Ketotifen, a mast cell blocker improves sperm motility in asthenospermic infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Saharkhiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of ketotifen on sperm motility of asthenospermic infertile men. Setting and Design: It is a prospective study designed in vivo. Materials and Methods: In this interventional experimental study, a total of 40 infertile couples with asthenospermic infertility factor undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART cycles were enrolled. The couples were randomly assigned to one of two groups at the starting of the cycle. In control group (n = 20, the men did not receive Ketotifen, while in experiment group (n = 20, the men received oraly ketotifen (1 mg Bid for 2 months. Semen analysis, under optimal circumferences, was obtained prior to initiation of treatment. The second semen analysis was done 2-3 weeks after stopped ketotifen treatment and sperm motility was defined. Clinical pregnancy was identified as the presence of a fetal sac by vaginal ultrasound examination. Statistical Analysis Used: All data are expressed as the mean ± standard error of mean (SEM. t test was used for comparing the data of the control and treated groups. Results: The mean sperm motility increased significantly (from 16.7% to 21.4% after ketotifen treatment (P < 0.001. This sperm motility improvement was more pronounced in the primary infertility cases (P < 0.003. The rate of pregnancy was 12.5% in infertile couples that their men receiving 1 mg/twice a day ketotifen. In 52% of infertile men′s semen, the percentage of sperm motility was increased from 5% to 35% and this sperm motility improvement was also observed in 33% of necrospermia (0% motility cases. Conclusion: These results suggest that ketotifen may represent as a novel therapeutic approach to improve sperm motility in the infertile men with cause of asthenospermia or necrospermia.

  20. Effects of Cadmium on Rat Sperm Motility Evaluated With Computer Assisted Sperm Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study effects of cadmium on rat sperm motility evaluated with computer assisted sperm analysis. Methods  Different doses of cadmium chloride (0.2,0.4,0.8mg Cd/kg BW) were administrated ip to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Control animals received the same volume of 0.9% NaCl solution. After 7 days, the rats were sacrificed with their testes removed. A part of one testis was used for testicular sperm head counts and daily sperm production observation. The motility of spermatozoa obtained from cauda epididymides using the “diffusion”method was measured by computer assisted sperm analysis(CASA). Results  The sperm head counts and daily sperm production decreased significantly in the high dose group. The motility of spermatozoa in the middle dose group was reduced significantly. No motile sperm was found in the high dose group. The results suggest that germinal epithelium was impaired irreversibly in a short time to produce toxic effects on spermatogenesis at high cadmium doses. Conclusion  Cadmium may reduce sperm motility at a dose far below the dose affecting sperm production at this time point. The motility of sperm is an early and sensitive endpoint for the assessment of cadmium toxicity on male reproduction.

  1. Surface growth of a motile bacterial population resembles growth in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Daniel A; Mayo, Avraham; Bren, Anat; Alon, Uri

    2012-12-07

    The growth behavior in well-mixed bacterial cultures is relatively well understood. However, bacteria often grow in heterogeneous conditions on surfaces where their growth is dependent on spatial position, especially in the case of motile populations. For such populations, the relation between growth, motility and spatial position is unclear. We developed a microscope-based assay for quantifying in situ growth and gene expression in space and time, and we observe these parameters in populations of Escherichia coli swimming in galactose soft agar plates. We find that the bacterial density and the shape of the motile population, after an initial transient, are constant in time. By considering not only the advancing population but also the fraction that lags behind, we propose a growth model that relates spatial distribution, motility and growth rate. This model, that is similar to bacterial growth in a chemostat predicts that the fraction of the population lagging behind is inversely proportional to the velocity of the motile population. We test this prediction by modulating motility using inducible expression of the flagellar sigma factor FliA. Finally, we observe that bacteria in the chemotactic ring express higher relative levels of the chemotaxis and galactose metabolism genes fliC, fliL and galE than those that stay behind in the center of the plate.

  2. Exposure of rainbow trout milt to mercury and cadmium alters sperm motility parameters and reproductive success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Grzegorz J., E-mail: dietrich@pan.olsztyn.pl [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dietrich, Mariola; Kowalski, R.K. [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dobosz, Stefan [Department of Salmonid Research, Inland Fisheries Institute, Rutki 83-330 Zukowo (Poland); Karol, Halina; Demianowicz, Wieslaw; Glogowski, Jan [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland)

    2010-05-10

    In the current work, seminal plasma was used for the first time as an incubation medium for monitoring short-time exposure effects of sublethal concentrations of mercury and cadmium ions on rainbow trout sperm. Sperm motility parameters (CASA) and hatching rates were used as gamete quality markers. Additionally live/dead sperm viability test and comet assay of DNA fragmentation were performed. We demonstrated that computer-assisted sperm motility analysis (CASA) may serve as a predictor of reproductive success, when milt contaminated with heavy metals is used. Results presented in this study demonstrate that mercury ions altered sperm motility characteristics at 1-10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l and hatching rates at 10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l after 4 h of exposure. Although mercury ions affected sperm motility parameters immediately after dilution with milt as well as at 4 h of exposure, no differences in sperm motility parameters were found between intact and mercury-treated milt after 24 h of exposure. Our results suggest that rainbow trout seminal plasma has a protective role against the toxic effects of mercury ions of rainbow trout sperm motility.

  3. A field guide to bacterial swarming motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Daniel B

    2010-09-01

    How bacteria regulate, assemble and rotate flagella to swim in liquid media is reasonably well understood. Much less is known about how some bacteria use flagella to move over the tops of solid surfaces in a form of movement called swarming. The focus of bacteriology is changing from planktonic to surface environments, and so interest in swarming motility is on the rise. Here, I review the requirements that define swarming motility in diverse bacterial model systems, including an increase in the number of flagella per cell, the secretion of a surfactant to reduce surface tension and allow spreading, and movement in multicellular groups rather than as individuals.

  4. A bio-inspired inner-motile photocatalyst film: a magnetically actuated artificial cilia photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dunpu; Wang, Wei; Peng, Fengping; Kou, Jiahui; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2014-04-01

    improved to approximately 3.0 times that of the traditional planar film. The inner-motile photocatalyst film also exhibits high photocatalytic durability and can be reused several times with ease. Furthermore, this feasible yet versatile platform can be extended to other photocatalyst systems, such as TiO2, P25, ZnO, and Co3O4 systems, to improve their photocatalytic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data including details of the fabrication scheme, TEM images of TiO2 deposited on G-COOH, optical microscopy images and mechanical properties of the artificial cilia, details of the mixing performance of actuated cilia, schematic drawing of the experimental setup for the photocatalytic test, photocatalytic kinetics curves, and the efficiency and generality of the new inner-motile photocatalyst film. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00644e

  5. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of smear- or mold-ripened cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvartzman, M Sol; Gonzalez-Barron, Ursula; Butler, Francis; Jordan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Surface-ripened cheeses are matured by means of manual or mechanical technologies posing a risk of cross-contamination, if any cheeses are contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. In predictive microbiology, primary models are used to describe microbial responses, such as growth rate over time and secondary models explain how those responses change with environmental factors. In this way, primary models were used to assess the growth rate of L. monocytogenes during ripening of the cheeses and the secondary models to test how much the growth rate was affected by either the pH and/or the water activity (aw) of the cheeses. The two models combined can be used to predict outcomes. The purpose of these experiments was to test three primary (the modified Gompertz equation, the Baranyi and Roberts model, and the Logistic model) and three secondary (the Cardinal model, the Ratowski model, and the Presser model) mathematical models in order to define which combination of models would best predict the growth of L. monocytogenes on the surface of artificially contaminated surface-ripened cheeses. Growth on the surface of the cheese was assessed and modeled. The primary models were firstly fitted to the data and the effects of pH and aw on the growth rate (μmax) were incorporated and assessed one by one with the secondary models. The Logistic primary model by itself did not show a better fit of the data among the other primary models tested, but the inclusion of the Cardinal secondary model improved the final fit. The aw was not related to the growth of Listeria. This study suggests that surface-ripened cheese should be separately regulated within EU microbiological food legislation and results expressed as counts per surface area rather than per gram.

  6. Toxicity of copper, lead, and cadmium on the motility of two marine microalgae Isochrysis galbana and Tetraselmis chui

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxu Liu; Xueliang Chai; Yanqing Shao; Lihua Hu; Qilang Xie; Hongxi Wu

    2011-01-01

    Computer assisted movement tracking was used to characterize the motility of two marine microalgae, lsochrysis galbana and Tetraselrnis chui, and to investigate the toxicity of Cu, Pb, and Cd on motile percentage, curvilinear velocity, average path velocity, straight line velocity, linearity, straightness, and wobble. Except for motile percentage, all other motility parameters differed significantly between I. galbana and T. chui. Based on relative motile percentage data, the median effective concentration (EC50) of Cu on the motility of I. galbana and T. chui was 31.4 and 1.3 μmol/L, respectively, while for Pb it was 37.8 and 10.9 μmol/L and for Cd it was 121.6 and 37.8 μmol/L, respectively. Compared to I. galbana, T. chui was more sensitive to all tested metals. The toxic effect of the heavy metals on motility exhibited the following decreasing order for both species: Cu > Pb > Cd. Our results indicate that I. galbana and T. chui motility is sensitive to heavy metals and can be used as an indicator for toxicology bioassays.

  7. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes serovars by using artificial neural network analysis of Fourier-transformed infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffo-Scheer, Cecilia A; Schmitt, Jürgen; Scherer, Siegfried

    2007-02-01

    A classification system based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with artificial neural network analysis was designed to differentiate 12 serovars of Listeria monocytogenes using a reference database of 106 well-defined strains. External validation was performed using a test set of another 166 L. monocytogenes strains. The O antigens (serogroup) of 164 strains (98.8%) could be identified correctly, and H antigens were correctly determined in 152 (91.6%) of the test strains. Importantly, 40 out of 41 potentially epidemic serovar 4b strains were unambiguously identified. FTIR analysis is superior to PCR-based systems for serovar differentiation and has potential for the rapid, simultaneous identification of both species and serovar of an unknown Listeria isolate by simply measuring a whole-cell infrared spectrum.

  8. Retail Survey of Brazilian Milk and Minas Frescal Cheese and a Contaminated Dairy Plant To Establish Prevalence, Relatedness, and Sources of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J. Renaldi F.; Santos, Emilia M. P.; Arcuri, Edna F.; Lange, Carla C.; Brito, Maria A. V. P.; Souza, Guilherme N.; Cerqueira, Mônica M. P. O.; Beltran, J. Marcela Soto; Call, Jeffrey E.; Liu, Yanhong; Porto-Fett, Anna C. S.; Luchansky, John B.

    2008-01-01

    A study was designed to recover Listeria monocytogenes from pasteurized milk and Minas frescal cheese (MFC) sampled at retail establishments (REs) and to identify the contamination source(s) of these products in the corresponding dairy processing plant. Fifty milk samples (9 brands) and 55 MFC samples (10 brands) were tested from REs located in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil. All milk samples and 45 samples from 9 of 10 MFC brands tested negative for L. monocytogenes; however, “brand F” of MFC obtained from REs 119 and 159 tested positive. Thus, the farm/plant that produced brand F MFC was sampled; all samples from the milking parlor tested negative for L. monocytogenes, whereas several sites within the processing plant and the MFC samples tested positive. All 344 isolates recovered from retail MFC, plant F MFC, and plant F environmental samples were serotype 1/2a and displayed the same AscI or ApaI fingerprints. Since these results established that the storage coolers served as the contamination source of the MFC, plant F was closed so that corrective renovations could be made. Following renovation, samples from sites that previously tested positive for the pathogen were collected from the processing environment and from MFC on multiple visits; all tested negative for L. monocytogenes. In addition, on subsequent visits to REs 159 and 119, all MFC samples tested negative for the pathogen. Studies are ongoing to quantify the prevalence, levels, and types of L. monocytogenes in MFC and associated processing plants to lessen the likelihood of listeriosis in Brazil. PMID:18502929

  9. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis. However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water. Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce–associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Gooneratne, Ravi; Hussain, Malik Altaf

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis). However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water). Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce–associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges. PMID:28282938

  11. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  12. Directed Autonomic Flow : Functional Motility Fluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehn, Philipp T.; de Miranda, Barbara Santos; van Rijn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Unidirectional coherent motion of a self-moving droplet is achieved and combined in a functional motility fluidic chip for chemical reactions via a novel and straightforward approach. The droplet shows both increased movement speeds and displacement distances without any input of energy. Nanoparticl

  13. Growth Kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in Broth and Beef Frankfurters– Determination of Lag Phase Duration and Exponential Growth Rate under Isothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to develop a new kinetic model to describe the isothermal growth of microorganisms. The new model was tested with Listeria monocytogenes in broth and frankfurters, and compared with two commonly used models - Baranyi and modified Gompertz models. Bias factor (BF)...

  14. Comparison of subtypes of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from naturally contaminated watershed samples using a combination of non-selective and selective enrichment methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two enrichment methods for Listeria monocytogenes using Immuno Magnetic Separation were tested to determine if they selected the same subtypes of isolates. Both methods included a non-selective enrichment and one included subculture in Fraser Broth. Naturally contaminated watershed samples from the ...

  15. 单增李斯特菌生物膜及其形成机制的研究进展%Research on the biofilm and its mechanism of Listeria monocytogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯春林; 方维焕

    2011-01-01

    单增李斯特菌(Lm)是重要的人兽共患食源性病原菌.Lm生物膜与其致病性和耐药性密切相关.影响Lm生物膜形成的关键因子有鞭毛糖蛋白、胞外基质和群体感应系统等.鞭毛糖蛋白能促进菌体聚集,从而直接影响生物膜的形成.胞外DNA参与Lm粘附和生物膜早期的形成,并与胞外多糖和胞外结合蛋白一起构成生物膜胞外基质.Lm的Agr群体感应系统正调控生物膜形成,是一种集合毒力因子、耐药因子和生物膜的整体水平调控网络体系.%Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive pathogen involved in numerous foodborne disease outbreaks.The biofilm of Listeria monocytogenes is closely related to its pathogenicity and drug resistance.The key factors that have effects on biofilm formation are flagella glycoprotein, extracellular matrix and quorum sensing.Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes is dependent on flagellar motility to propel the cells towards a surface prior to attachment.The biofilm matrix of Listeria monocytogenes contains extracellular DNA, exopolysaccharides and biofilm-associated protein, and the extracellular DNA plays an important role in initial adhesion and the early stage of biofilm formation.The Agr system is a peptide-mediated quorum sensing system in Listeria monocytogenes, which is regulatory network system that involved in the virulence factors, resistance factors and the biofilm formation.

  16. Esophageal motility disorders; Motilitaetsstoerungen des Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [German] Zum Verstaendnis der Motilitaet des Oesophagus sind muskulaere Architektur und Verteilung der quergestreiften und glatten Muskelfasern von Bedeutung. Die Physiologie des Oesophagus wird in soweit kurz dargestellt, als sie fuer das Verstaendnis von peristaltischen Stoerungen notwendig ist. Neben der Erfassung rein morphologischer Kriterien ist bei der Untersuchung der Speiseroehre eine diagnostische Bewertung der Motilitaet erforderlich. Es stehen uns heute strahlungsarme dynamische Aufzeichnungsverfahren (digitale dynamische Aufzeichnung, Videofluoroskopie) mit Bildsequenzen von 4-30 Bildern/s zur Verfuegung. Die Kombination einer funktionellen Methode zur Darstellung der Morphologie und der

  17. Use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysts as alternative means for Listeria monocytogenes biofilm disinfection in food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorianopoulos, N G; Tsoukleris, D S; Panagou, E Z; Falaras, P; Nychas, G-J E

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) against Listeria monocytogenes bacterial biofilm. Different TiO(2) nanostructured thin films were deposited on surfaces such as stainless steel and glass using the doctor-blade technique. All the surfaces were placed in test tubes containing Brain Heart (BH) broth and inoculated with L. monocytogenes. Test tubes were then incubated for 10 days at 16°C in order to allow biofilm development. After biofilm formation, the surfaces were illuminated by ultraviolet A light (UVA; wavelength of 315-400 nm). The quantification of biofilms was performed using the bead vortexing method, followed by agar plating and/or by conductance measurements (via the metabolic activity of biofilm cells). The presence of the TiO(2) nanoparticles resulted in a fastest log-reduction of bacterial biofilm compared to the control test. The biofilm of L. monocytogenes for the glass nanoparticle 1 (glass surface modified by 16% w/v TiO(2)) was found to have decreased by 3 log CFU/cm(2) after 90 min irradiation by UVA. The use of TiO(2) nanostructured photocatalysts as alternative means of disinfecting contaminated surfaces presents an intriguing case, which by further development may provide potent disinfecting solutions. Surface modification using nanostructured titania and UV irradiation is an innovative combination to enhance food safety and economizing time and money.

  18. Construction of deletion mutants in the phosphotransferase transport system and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters in Listeria monocytogenes and analysis of their growth under different stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ceruso

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional genomics approaches enable us to investigate the biochemical, cellular, and physiological properties of each gene product and are nowadays applied to enhance food safety by understanding microbial stress responses in food and host-pathogen interactions. Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes listeriosis and is difficult to eliminate this pathogen since it can survive under multiple stress conditions such as low pH and low temperature. Detailed studies are needed to determine its mode of action and to understand the mechanisms that protect the pathogen when it is subjected to stress. In this study, deletion mutants of phosphotransferase transport system genes (PTS and adenosine triphosphate(ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 were created using molecular techniques. These mutants and the wild-type were tested under different stress conditions, such as in solutions with different NaCl concentration, pH value and for nisin resistance. Results demonstrate that the behaviour of these deletion mutants is different from the wild type. In particular, deleted genes may be involved in L. monocytogenes resistance to nisin and to acid and salt concentrations. Functional genomics research on L. monocytogenes allows a better understanding of the genes related to stress responses and this knowledge may help in intervention strategies to control this food-borne pathogen. Furthermore, specific gene markers can be used to identify and subtype L. monocytogenes. Thus, future development of this study will focus on additional functional analyses of important stress response-related genes, as well as on methods for rapid and sensitive detection of L. monocytogenes such as using DNA microarrays.

  19. The frequency of Listeria monocytogenes strains recovered from clinical and non-clinical samples using phenotypic methods and confirmed by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abazar pournajaf

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes listeriosis which has extensive clinical manifestations. Infections with L. monocytogenes are a serious threat to immunocompromised persons. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of L. monocytogenes strains recovered from clinical and non-clinical samples using phenotypic methods and confirmed by PCR. Materials and Methods: In this study, 617 specimens were analyzed. All specimens were cultured in the specific PALCAM agar. Colonies were initially identified by routine biochemical tests. Finally, PCR assays using primers specific for inlA gene were performed. Results: In all, 46 (8.2% L. monocytogenes isolates were recovered from 617 specimens. Fourteen (8.2% strains, including 4 (7.5%, 2 (5.7%, 5 (14.2% and 3 (8.5% isolates were obtained from placental tissue, urine, vaginal and rectal swabs, respectively. In addition, 9 (7.4% strains of L. monocytogenes which were isolated from 107 different dairy products originated from cheese 5 (7.1%, cream 2 (10% and kashk 2 (11.7%, respectively. Among 11 (5.2% strains isolated from 210 different meat products, 5 (5.5%, 4 (7.2% and 2 (3% strains belonged to sausage, meat and poultry extracts, respectively. Finally, 12 (9.2% Listeria strains were recovered from 130 animal specimens that included 6 (10%, 4 (8% and 2 (10% strains from goat, sheep and cattle, respectively. Furthermore, all Listeria isolates (100% were found to be carriers of  inlA gene in PCR assay. Conclusion: The present study showed that the clinical and non-clinical specimens were contaminated with L. monocytogenes. So, it seems necessary to use a simple and standard technique such as PCR for rapid detection of this organism from various sources.

  20. Molecular ecology of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in small and very small ready-to-eat meat processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shanna K; Roof, Sherry; Boyle, Elizabeth A; Burson, Dennis; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Sofos, John N; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to track Listeria contamination patterns in ready-to-eat meats from six small or very small meat processing plants located in three states over 1 year. A total of 688 environmental sponge samples were collected from nonfood contact surfaces during bimonthly visits to each plant. Overall, L. monocytogenes was isolated from 42 (6.1%) environmental samples, and its prevalence ranged from 1.7 to 10.8% across different plants. Listeria spp., other than L. monocytogenes, were isolated from 9.5% of samples overall, with the prevalence ranging from 1.5 to 18.3% across different plants. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes correlated well with that of other Listeria spp. for some but not all plants. One L. monocytogenes isolate representing each positive sample was characterized by molecular serotyping, EcoRI ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing. Seven sample sites tested positive for L. monocytogenes on more than one occasion, and the same ribotype was detected more than once at five of these sites. Partial sigB sequencing was used to speciate other Listeria spp. isolates and assign an allelic type to each isolate. Other Listeria spp. were isolated more than once from 14 sample sites, and the same sigB allelic type was recovered at least twice from seven of these sites. One plant was colonized by an atypical hemolytic L. innocua strain. Our findings indicate that small and very small meat processing plants that produce ready-to-eat meat products are characterized by a varied prevalence of Listeria, inconsistent correlation between contamination by L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp., and a unique Listeria molecular ecology.

  1. An animated model of reticulorumen motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gookin, Jody L; Foster, Derek M; Harvey, Alice M; McWhorter, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Understanding reticulorumen motility is important to the assessment of ruminant health and optimal production, and in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Accordingly, the teaching of reticulorumen motility is a staple of all veterinary curricula. This teaching has historically been based on written descriptions, line drawings, or pressure tracings obtained during contraction sequences. We developed an animated model of reticulorumen motility and hypothesized that veterinary students would prefer use of the model over traditional instructional methods. First-year veterinary students were randomly allocated to one of two online learning exercises: with the animated model (Group A) or with text and line drawings (Group B) depicting reticulorumen motility. Learning was assessed with a multiple-choice quiz and feedback on the learning alternatives was obtained by survey. Seventy-four students participated in the study, including 38/42 in Group A and 36/36 in Group B. Sixty-four out of 72 students (89%) responded that they would prefer use of the animated model if only one of the two learning methods was available. A majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that the animated model was easy to understand and improved their knowledge and appreciation of the importance of reticulorumen motility, and would recommend the model to other veterinary students. Interestingly, students in Group B achieved higher scores on examination than students in Group A. This could be speculatively attributed to the inclusion of an itemized list of contraction sequences in the text provided to Group B and failure of Group A students to read the text associated with the animations.

  2. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  3. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  4. Computer aided boar semen motility analysis for cereulide detection in different food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkovic, Andreja; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Debevere, Johan

    2007-02-28

    Computer Aided Semen Analysis (CASA) study of the boar semen motility has been demonstrated to be an appropriate assay for detection of cereulide (Bacillus cereus emetic toxin). Application of the boar semen bio-assay to detect cereulide directly in foods requires investigation of potential interference of food components, preservatives and other microbial and chemical food contaminants with the bio-assay. Current study provides evidence that none of included Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins A, B, C and D nor B. cereus Hemolysin BL (HBL) and non-hemolytic enterotoxin (NHE) and three mycotoxins (Sterigmatocystin, Fumonisin B1 and Patulin) exhibited a toxic impact on semen progressive motility. Aflatoxin M1, M3 and zearalenone impaired semen motility only at concentrations (0.004 mg ml(-1), 0.1 mg ml(-1) and 10 mg ml(-1), respectively) much higher than those found in foods and those permitted by legislation, in comparison to cereulide which induces motility cease at concentrations lower than 20 ng ml(-1). Ten commonly used preservatives, namely potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, (DL) malic acid, citric acid, (L+) tartaric acid, acetic acid, (DL) lactic acid, (L+) ascorbic acid, sodium chloride and sucrose induced no cease in spermatozoa motility even at preservative concentrations higher than permitted by legislation. Dioxins, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and acrylamide had no acute effect on spermatozoa motility at concentrations of 500 and 10,000 mg ml(-1), respectively. Robustness of computer aided boar semen motility analysis, tested with 14 different foods inoculated with cereulide producing B. cereus, showed distinct cereulide production in seven samples (although B. cereus growth to counts higher than 8 log CFU g(-1) was noted in 11 samples), in amounts close to those reported in foodborne outbreaks. Test evaluation in 33 samples suspected to hold cereulide showed actual cereulide presence in ten samples and no interference of food matrix

  5. Effect of zinc treatment on intestinal motility in experimentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    meal and the mechanisms of action of zinc sulphate on motility were investigated. The effective ... The positive action of zinc in acute ..... of gastrointestinal motility by inhibiting acetylcholine ... activity in smooth muscle is initiated by a Ca2+-.

  6. Evaluation of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus sakei 1 against Listeria monocytogenes 1/2a growth and haemolytic activity Avaliação de Lactobacillus sakei 1 produtor de bacteriocina frente a Listeria monocytogenes 1/2a e sua atividade hemolítica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael C.R. Martinez

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus sakei 1 was cultivated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth (24 h at 25ºC. The culture supernatant was neutralized, filter sterilized and used to test the activity of bacteriocin against Listeria monocytogenes 1/2a, at 8ºC and 15ºC. Non-bacteriocinogenic Lactobacillus sakei ATCC 15521 was used as a negative control. L. monocytogenes 1/2a was inoculated in culture supernatant medium from L. sakei 1 and L. sakei ATCC 15521 and the listerial populations were determined after 0, 5 and 10 days. The bacteriocin production was quantified as arbitrary units per mL (AU/mL using agar antagonism test. Additionally, to investigate if L. monocytogenes virulence pattern could be changed after bactericion exposure, the ability of L. monocytogenes to cause haemolysis in sheep red blood cells was determined, before and after exposure to bacteriocin at 8ºC. In the presence of the antimicrobial peptide, at 8ºC, L. monocytogenes population decreased, but growth of resistant cells was observed. At 15ºC, there was no difference between test and control. Furthermore, the haemolytic activity of L. monocytogenes 1/2a was not altered by exposure to L. sakei 1 bacteriocin, which suggests no change in its virulence pattern.Lactobacillus sakei 1 produtor de bacteriocina foi cultivado em caldo Infusão Cérebro-Coração por 24h a 25ºC. O sobrenadante da cultura foi neutralizado, esterilizado por filtração e usado para testar a atividade da bacteriocina frente a Listeria monocytogenes 1/2a, a 8ºC e 15ºC. Lactobacillus sakei ATCC 15521 não bacteriocinogênico, foi utilizado como controle negativo. L. monocytogenes 1/2a foi inoculada no sobrenadante da cultura de L.sakei 1 e L. sakei ATCC 15521 e as populações listeriais foram determinadas após 0, 5 e 10 dias. A produção de bacteriocina foi quantificada como unidades arbitrárias por mL (UA/mL, utilizando-se o teste de antagonismo em ágar. Adicionalmente, para investigar se o padr

  7. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  8. Animal models for oral transmission of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E F D'Orazio

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as a food borne pathogen in humans since the 1980s, but we still understand very little about oral transmission of L. monocytogenes or the host factors that determine susceptibility to gastrointestinal infection, due to the lack of an appropriate small animal model of oral listeriosis. Early feeding trials suggested that many animals were highly resistant to oral infection, and the more reproducible intravenous or intraperitoneal routes of inoculation soon came to be favored. There are a fair number of previously published studies using an oral infection route, but the work varies widely in terms of bacterial strain choice, the methods used for oral transmission, and various manipulations used to enhance infectivity. This mini review will summarize the published literature using oral routes of L. monocytogenes infection and will highlight recent technological advances that have made oral infection a more attractive model system.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes response regulators important for stress tolerance and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, B H; Ingmer, H

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sensing by two-component signal transduction systems is likely to play a role for growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes both during transmission in food products and within a host organism. Two-component systems typically consist of a membrane-associated sensor histidine...... kinase and a gene regulatory protein, the response regulator (RR). We have identified seven putative RR genes in L. monocytogenes LO28 by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotide primers. By insertional inactivation we obtained data suggesting that three of the putative RRs contribute to the pathogenicity...... of L. monocytogenes in mice. Strikingly, the mutants that were attenuated in virulence also had a decreased ability to grow in the presence of various stress conditions potentially encountered in an infection process. Thus, our data point to a connection between the ability of the putative two...

  10. Rhombencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a pastured bull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Carolina; Varela, Gustavo; Mota, María Inés; Gianneechini, Ruben; Rivero, Rodolfo

    2017-03-01

    A pastured 2-y-old cross-breed bull developed brainstem encephalitis (rhombencephalitis); Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from the brain. In the brainstem, there was perivascular cuffing, multiple microabscesses, and positive immunostaining for L. monocytogenes. Samples of bovine feces, water, feedstuffs, milking parlor soil, and bulk tank milk were collected from the dairy farm. Seven isolates of the genus Listeria were obtained, 6 of L. innocua and 1 of L. monocytogenes, which was found in the pasture where the bull grazed. Both isolates belonged to serotype 4b and were positive for internalins A, C, and J. According to the DNA fragment patterns of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the isolates were closely related. The source of infection was the pasture, implying that listeriosis should not be discounted in cases with compatible clinical signs but the absence of silage feeding.

  11. Controlling Listeria monocytogenes and Leuconostoc mesenteroides in Uncured Deli-style Turkey Breast Using a Clean Label Antimicrobial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyker, Robert E; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Seman, Dennis L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Interest in natural/organic meat products has resulted in the need to validate the effectiveness of clean label antimicrobials to increase safety and shelf life of these products. A Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was used to investigate the effects of varying levels of moisture, pH, and a commercial "clean-label" antimicrobial (cultured sugar-vinegar blend; CSVB) on the growth rate of Listeria monocytogenes and Leuconostoc mesenteroides in uncured turkey stored at 4 °C for 16 wk. Twenty treatment combinations of moisture (60% to 80%), pH (5.8 to 6.4), and CSVB (2.5% to 5.0%) were evaluated during phase I to develop growth curves for both microbe types, whereas the interactive effects of pH (5.8 to 6.4) and CSVB (0.0 to 4.75) were tested in 16 treatment combinations during Phase II at a single moisture level using L. monocytogenes only. CSVB inhibited L. monocytogenes growth in 14 of the 20 treatments tested in Phase I and in 12 of the 16 treatments in Phase II through 16 and 8 wk, respectively. In contrast, CSVB had little effect on L. mesenteroides, with growth inhibited in only 4 of 20 treatments in Phase I and was therefore not tested further in Phase II. Significant interactions of the RSM design coefficients yielded a predictive model for L. mesenteroides growth rate, but due to lack of growth, no growth rate model was developed for L. monocytogenes. CSVB was found to be an effective antilisteral antimicrobial, while having little effect on a spoilage microorganism.

  12. Modulation of vagal tone enhances gastroduodenal motility and reduces somatic pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjaer, J B; Bergmann, S; Brock, C

    2016-01-01

    algometry, conditioned pain modulation using a cold pressor test and a liquid meal ultrasonographic gastroduodenal motility test were performed. KEY RESULTS: Cardiac vagal tone increased during active treatment with t-VNS and DSB compared to sham (p = 0.009). In comparison to sham, thresholds to bone pain...... increased (p = 0.001), frequency of antral contractions increased (p = 0.004) and gastroduodenal motility index increased (p = 0.016) with active treatment. However, no effect on muscle pain thresholds and conditioned pain modulation was seen. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: This experimental study suggests...

  13. Keberadaan Bakteri Listeria monocytogenes pada Keju Gouda Produksi Lokal dan Impor (PRESENCE OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN LOCAL AND IMPORTED GOUDA CHEESES)

    OpenAIRE

    Debby Fadhilah Pazra; Trioso Purnawarman; Denny Widaya Lukman

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is included in the foodborne pathogen, which has been associated with severaloutbreaks of human listeriosis especially in high risk groups. Listeria monocytogenes could be found inGouda cheeses because of poor hygienic and sanitation practices. In addition, this bacteria could surviveduring the making of cheese and cheese ripening process. The purpose of this study was to identify thepresence of L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheeses and how the safety lev...

  14. Diversity and distribution of Listeria monocytogenes in meat processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Belén; Perich, Adriana; Gómez, Diego; Yangüela, Javier; Rodríguez, Alicia; Garriga, Margarita; Aymerich, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a major concern for the meat processing industry because many listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to meat product consumption. The aim of this study was to elucidate L. monocytogenes diversity and distribution across different Spanish meat processing plants. L. monocytogenes isolates (N = 106) collected from food contact surfaces of meat processing plants and meat products were serotyped and then characterised by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were serotyped as 1/2a (36.8%), 1/2c (34%), 1/2b (17.9%) and 4b (11.3%). MLST identified ST9 as the most predominant allelic profile (33% of isolates) followed by ST121 (16%), both of which were detected from several processing plants and meat products sampled in different years, suggesting that those STs are highly adapted to the meat processing environment. Food contact surfaces during processing were established as an important source of L. monocytogenes in meat products because the same STs were obtained in isolates recovered from surfaces and products. L. monocytogenes was recovered after cleaning and disinfection procedures in two processing plants, highlighting the importance of thorough cleaning and disinfection procedures. Epidemic clone (EC) marker ECI was identified in 8.5%, ECIII was identified in 2.8%, and ECV was identified in 7.5% of the 106 isolates. Furthermore, a selection of presumably unrelated ST9 isolates was analysed by multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST). Most ST9 isolates had the same virulence type (VT11), confirming the clonal origin of ST9 isolates; however, one ST9 isolate was assigned to a new VT (VT95). Consequently, MLST is a reliable tool for identification of contamination routes and niches in processing plants, and MVLST clearly differentiates EC strains, which both contribute to the improvement of L. monocytogenes control programs in the meat industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly specific fiber optic immunosensor coupled with immunomagnetic separation for detection of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça Marcelo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunomagnetic separation (IMS and immunoassays are widely used for pathogen detection. However, novel technology platforms with highly selective antibodies are essential to improve detection sensitivity, specificity and performance. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against Internalin A (InlA and p30 were generated and used on paramagnetic beads of varying diameters for concentration, as well as on fiber-optic sensor for detection. Results Anti-InlA MAb-2D12 (IgG2a subclass was specific for Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, and p30-specific MAb-3F8 (IgM was specific for the genus Listeria. At all bacterial concentrations (103–108 CFU/mL tested in the IMS assay; the 1-μm diameter MyOne beads had significantly higher capture efficiency (P 5 CFU/mL was significantly higher (P Listeria antibody (9 %. Furthermore, capture efficiency for MyOne-2D12 was highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii. Subsequently, we captured L. monocytogenes by MyOne-2D12 and MyOne-3F8 from hotdogs inoculated with mono- or co-cultures of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua (10–40 CFU/g, enriched for 18 h and detected by fiber-optic sensor and confirmed by plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays. The detection limit for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii by the fiber-optic immunosensor was 3 × 102 CFU/mL using MAb-2D12 as capture and reporter antibody. Selective media plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays confirmed the IMS and fiber-optic results. Conclusions IMS coupled with a fiber-optic sensor using anti-InlA MAb is highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii and enabled detection of these pathogens at low levels from buffer or food.

  16. Listeria monocytogenes Prevalence and Characteristics in Retail Raw Foods in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Wu

    Full Text Available The prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in retail raw foods covering most provincial capitals in China were studied with testing of 1036 samples of vegetables, edible mushrooms, raw meat, aquatic products and quick-frozen products from September 2012 to January 2014. The total prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes was 20.0% (207/1036, and the most probable number (MPN values of 65.7% of the positive samples ranged from 0.3 to 110 MPN/g. Geographical differences were observed in this survey, and the results of both qualitative and quantitative methods indicated that the levels in the samples from North China were higher than those in the samples from South China. A total of 248 isolates were analyzed, of which approximately half belonged to molecular serogroup 1/2a-3a (45.2%, followed by 1/2b-3b-7 (30.6%, 1/2c-3c (16.1%, 4b-4d-4e (5.2% and 4a-4c (2.8%. Most of the isolates carried hly (100%, inlB (98.8%, inlA (99.6%, inlC (98.0% and inlJ (99.2%, and 44.8% of the isolates were llsX-positive. Seventeen epidemic clones (ECs were detected, with 7 strains belonging to ECI (2.8% and 10 belonging to ECIII (4.03%. Resistance to clindamycin (46.8% was commonly observed, and 59 strains (23.8% were susceptible to all 14 tested antibiotics, whereas 84 (33.9% showed an intermediate level of resistance or were resistant to two or more antibiotics, including 7 multi-resistant strains that exhibited resistance to more than 10 antibiotics. The data obtained in the present study provides useful information for assessment of the possible risk posed to Chinese consumers, and this information will have a significant public health impact in China. Furthermore, the presence of virulence markers, epidemic clones, as well as the antibiotic resistance amongst the isolates strongly implies that many of these strains might be capable of causing listeriosis, and more accurate treatment of human listeriosis with effective antibiotics should be considered. This

  17. Listeria monocytogenes Prevalence and Characteristics in Retail Raw Foods in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Chen, Moutong; Yan, Ze′an; Hu, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and levels of Listeria monocytogenes in retail raw foods covering most provincial capitals in China were studied with testing of 1036 samples of vegetables, edible mushrooms, raw meat, aquatic products and quick-frozen products from September 2012 to January 2014. The total prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes was 20.0% (207/1036), and the most probable number (MPN) values of 65.7% of the positive samples ranged from 0.3 to 110 MPN/g. Geographical differences were observed in this survey, and the results of both qualitative and quantitative methods indicated that the levels in the samples from North China were higher than those in the samples from South China. A total of 248 isolates were analyzed, of which approximately half belonged to molecular serogroup 1/2a-3a (45.2%), followed by 1/2b-3b-7 (30.6%), 1/2c-3c (16.1%), 4b-4d-4e (5.2%) and 4a-4c (2.8%). Most of the isolates carried hly (100%), inlB (98.8%), inlA (99.6%), inlC (98.0%) and inlJ (99.2%), and 44.8% of the isolates were llsX-positive. Seventeen epidemic clones (ECs) were detected, with 7 strains belonging to ECI (2.8%) and 10 belonging to ECIII (4.03%). Resistance to clindamycin (46.8%) was commonly observed, and 59 strains (23.8%) were susceptible to all 14 tested antibiotics, whereas 84 (33.9%) showed an intermediate level of resistance or were resistant to two or more antibiotics, including 7 multi-resistant strains that exhibited resistance to more than 10 antibiotics. The data obtained in the present study provides useful information for assessment of the possible risk posed to Chinese consumers, and this information will have a significant public health impact in China. Furthermore, the presence of virulence markers, epidemic clones, as well as the antibiotic resistance amongst the isolates strongly implies that many of these strains might be capable of causing listeriosis, and more accurate treatment of human listeriosis with effective antibiotics should be considered. This

  18. Transferable tetracycline resistance in Listeria monocytogenes from food in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshaban, Manoocheher; Ferrini, Anna Maria; Mannoni, Veruscka; Oliva, Brunello; Aureli, Paolo

    2002-07-01

    Mechanisms of tetracycline resistance were investigated in two recent Listeria monocytogenes isolates from food, with L. innocua 52P tet(r) as a control. Tetracycline resistance was transferred conjugatively from all three strains to L. ivanovii and from one isolate and the control to Enterococcus faecalis. Molecular analysis demonstrated a chromosomal location for the tet determinant, which was identified as tetM in all cases. These studies are the first to show that L. monocytogenes from food could be a source of tetracycline resistance genes able to spread to other micro-organisms.

  19. Variations in virulence between different electrophoretic types of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk

    2000-01-01

    A total of 245 strains of Listeria monocytogenes, representing 33 different electrophoretic types (ETs), were examined quantitatively for haemolytic activity. No significant difference was observed in the mean haemolytic activity between different ETs. Eighty four out of 91 strains examined were...... compared with 3.64 among food isolates). The explanation for this may be that more virulent strains are more prone to cause human infection. It is, however, also possible that strains oft. monocytogenes may become more virulent while multiplying in a living organism compared with multiplying in foods....

  20. Nalaz bakterije Listeria monocytogenes u ribi i ribljim proizvodima

    OpenAIRE

    Rožman, Jelena; Njari, dr. sc. Bela; Kozačinski, dr. sc. Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Listerioza je bolest koja se prenosi hranom a bakterija Listeria monocytogenes je jedan od najznačajnijih javnozdravstvenih problema i uvjet prometa hrane u svijetu. Prije svega povezana je s konzumacijom gotovih proizvoda. U ovom radu je pretražena svježa riba (brancin) i riblji proizvodi (dimljena i marinirana riba, orada i brancin) na nalaz bakterije L. monocytogenes. Također, pretraženi su uzorci brisova uzeti s radnih površina i ruku djelatnika u pogonima prerade morske ribe. Bakterija L...

  1. Listeria monocytogenes response regulators important for stress tolerance and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, B H; Ingmer, H

    2001-01-01

    Environmental sensing by two-component signal transduction systems is likely to play a role for growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes both during transmission in food products and within a host organism. Two-component systems typically consist of a membrane-associated sensor histidine...... of L. monocytogenes in mice. Strikingly, the mutants that were attenuated in virulence also had a decreased ability to grow in the presence of various stress conditions potentially encountered in an infection process. Thus, our data point to a connection between the ability of the putative two-component...

  2. Using experimental evolution to explore natural patterns between bacterial motility and resistance to bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskella, Britt; Taylor, Tiffany B; Bates, Jennifer; Buckling, Angus

    2011-11-01

    Resistance of bacteria to phages may be gained by alteration of surface proteins to which phages bind, a mechanism that is likely to be costly as these molecules typically have critical functions such as movement or nutrient uptake. To address this potential trade-off, we combine a systematic study of natural bacteria and phage populations with an experimental evolution approach. We compare motility, growth rate and susceptibility to local phages for 80 bacteria isolated from horse chestnut leaves and, contrary to expectation, find no negative association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility or growth rate. However, because correlational patterns (and their absence) are open to numerous interpretations, we test for any causal association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility using experimental evolution of a subset of bacteria in both the presence and absence of naturally associated phages. Again, we find no clear link between the acquisition of resistance and bacterial motility, suggesting that for these natural bacterial populations, phage-mediated selection is unlikely to shape bacterial motility, a key fitness trait for many bacteria in the phyllosphere. The agreement between the observed natural pattern and the experimental evolution results presented here demonstrates the power of this combined approach for testing evolutionary trade-offs.

  3. Prevalence of Listeria species including L. monocytogenes from apparently healthy animals at Baroda Zoo, Gujarat State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Yadav

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeriosis is a infectious bacterial disease of domestic and wild animals and humans. A total of 56 faecal samples were collected from mammals and birds at Baroda Zoo, Vadodara, Gujarat State, India. Confirmation of the isolates was based on biochemical tests followed by phenotypic characterization by hemolysis on sheep blood agar, Christie Atkins Munch-Petersen (CAMP test, phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC assay and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC assay. The isolates were subjected to genotypic characterization with the help of polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay for five virulence-associated genes, plcA, prfA, hlyA, actA and iap. Listeria monocytogenes isolates were further subjected to multiplex-PCR based serotyping. From 56 samples three (5.36% were found positive for Listeria spp. of which one (1.79% was identified as L. monocytogenes and two (3.57% were identified as L. innocua. The isolate of L. monocytogenes was hemolytic, CAMP positive, PI-PLC positive, hlyA, pclA and prfA positive by PCR and turned out to be PC-PLC positive and was serotyped as 4b.

  4. Shelf life extension of ricotta cheese using coatings of galactomannans from nonconventional sources incorporating nisin against Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joana T; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Souza, Bartolomeu W S; Carmo Avides, Maria do; Vicente, António A

    2010-02-10

    Shelf life extension of Ricotta cheese was evaluated at 4 degrees C upon the use of edible coatings made of galactomannans from Gleditsia triacanthos incorporating nisin against Listeria monocytogenes. Three different treatments were tested in cheese: samples without coating; samples with coating without nisin; and samples with coating containing 50 IU x g(-1) of nisin. To test the effectiveness of the treatments against L. monocytogenes, the surface of the cheese was inoculated with a suspension of the microorganism. Microbiological and physical-chemical analyses of the cheese samples were performed during 28 days. Results showed that the cheese coated with nisin-added galactomannan film was the treatment presenting the best results in terms of microbial growth delay (p < 0.05). The addition of nisin also affects (p < 0.05) the physical and mechanical properties of the films: O(2) permeability decreased from 1.84 to 1.35 x 10(-12) cm(3) x (Pa x s x m)(-1); CO(2) permeability increased from 1.96 to 6.31 x 10(-12) cm(3).(Pa x s x m)(-1); opacity increased from 3.68 to 4.59%; tensile strength ranged from 0.84 to 1.46 MPa; and elongation at break improved from 50.93 to 68.16%. These results demonstrate that novel galactomannan-based edible coatings, when combined with nisin, may provide consumer-friendly alternatives to reduce L. monocytogenes postcontamination on cheese products during storage.

  5. The microbiological quality of ready-to-eat salads in Turkey: a focus on Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurler, Zeki; Pamuk, Sebnem; Yildirim, Yeliz; Ertas, Nurhan

    2015-03-02

    The microbiological safety of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods is of special concern as they are not exposed to further processing before consumption. In the present study, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. were isolated from 15(6%) and 21(8%) samples respectively out of 261 RTE foods commercialized in Turkey. Escherichia coli was present in 10(4%) samples analyzed. Psychrotrophic aerobic populations >6logCFU/g were found in 36 (14%) of the samples, while total coliforms were detected in 155 (59%) of samples analyzed. All of the Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes isolates tested, exhibited resistance to one or more antimicrobial agents used. For Salmonella spp. isolates, resistance to penicillin (69%), erythromycin (38%), gentamicin (36%), tetracycline (36%) neomycin (33%), ampicillin (33%), amikacin (33%), vancomycin (33%), streptomycin (29%) cefotaxime (9%) and oxacillin (9%) was observed. For L. monocytogenes isolates, resistance to erythromycin (23%) and cephalothin (20%) was evident. The presence of pathogens and the relatively high resistance among the bacteria tested in RTE foods could pose public health and therapeutic problems in consumers. These results indicate the need of implementing hygienic rules in the production chain of RTE foods to ensure microbiological safety and to improve shelf life.

  6. Reliable and Rapid Identification of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria Species by Artificial Neural Network-Based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffo, Cecilia A.; Schmitt, Jürgen; Wenning, Mareike; von Stetten, Felix; Scherer, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation of the species within the genus Listeria is important for the food industry but only a few reliable methods are available so far. While a number of studies have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify bacteria, the extraction of complex pattern information from the infrared spectra remains difficult. Here, we apply artificial neural network technology (ANN), which is an advanced multivariate data-processing method of pattern analysis, to identify Listeria infrared spectra at the species level. A hierarchical classification system based on ANN analysis for Listeria FTIR spectra was created, based on a comprehensive reference spectral database including 243 well-defined reference strains of Listeria monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri, and L. welshimeri. In parallel, a univariate FTIR identification model was developed. To evaluate the potentials of these models, a set of 277 isolates of diverse geographical origins, but not included in the reference database, were assembled and used as an independent external validation for species discrimination. Univariate FTIR analysis allowed the correct identification of 85.2% of all strains and of 93% of the L. monocytogenes strains. ANN-based analysis enhanced differentiation success to 96% for all Listeria species, including a success rate of 99.2% for correct L. monocytogenes identification. The identity of the 277-strain test set was also determined with the standard phenotypical API Listeria system. This kit was able to identify 88% of the test isolates and 93% of L. monocytogenes strains. These results demonstrate the high reliability and strong potential of ANN-based FTIR spectrum analysis for identification of the five Listeria species under investigation. Starting from a pure culture, this technique allows the cost-efficient and rapid identification of Listeria species within 25 h and is suitable for use in a routine food microbiological laboratory. PMID

  7. Cluster analysis reveals a binary effect of storage on boar sperm motility function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Heiko; Petrunkina, Anna M; Harrison, Robin A P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-06-01

    Storage of liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa is associated with a loss of fertilising ability of the preserved spermatozoa, which standard semen parameters barely reflect. Monitoring responses to molecular effectors of sperm function (e.g. bicarbonate) has proven to be a more sensitive approach to investigating storage effects. Bicarbonate not only initiates capacitation in spermatozoa, but also induces motility activation. This occurs at ejaculation, but also happens throughout passage through the oviduct. In the present study we tested whether the specific response of boar sperm subpopulations to bicarbonate, as assessed by motility activation, is altered with the duration of storage in vitro. Three ejaculates from each of seven boars were diluted in Beltsville thawing solution and stored at 17°C. Only minor changes in the parameters of diluted semen were revealed over a period of 72h storage. For assessment of bicarbonate responses, subsamples of diluted spermatozoa were centrifuged through a discontinuous Percoll gradient after 12, 24 and 72h storage. Subsequently, spermatozoa were incubated in two Ca2+-free variants of Tyrode's medium either without (TyrControl) or with (TyrBic) 15mM bicarbonate, and computer-aided sperm analysis motility measurements were made. Cluster analysis of imaging data from motile spermatozoa revealed the presence of five major sperm subpopulations with distinct motility characteristics, differing between TyrBic and TyrControl at any given time (Psperm motility function descriptors to storage: although the quantitative descriptor (percentage of motile spermatozoa) declines in washed semen samples, the qualitative descriptor (percentage of spermatozoa stimulated into fast linear motion by bicarbonate) is sustained independent of the duration of storage.

  8. SirA orthologs affect both motility and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodier, R I; Ahmer, B M

    2001-04-01

    The sirA gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium encodes a two-component response regulator of the FixJ family that has a positive regulatory influence on the expression of type III secretion genes involved with epithelial cell invasion and the elicitation of bovine gastroenteritis. SirA orthologs in Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Erwinia control the expression of distinct virulence genes in these genera, but an evolutionarily conserved target of SirA regulation has never been identified. In this study we tested the hypothesis that sirA may be an ancient member of the flagellar regulon. We examined the effect of a sirA mutation on transcriptional fusions to flagellar promoters (flhD, fliE, fliF, flgA, flgB, fliC, fliD, motA, and fliA) while using fusions to the virulence gene sopB as a positive control. SirA had only small regulatory effects on all fusions in liquid medium (less than fivefold). However, in various types of motility agar plates, sirA was able to activate a sopB fusion by up to 63-fold while repressing flagellar fusions by values exceeding 100-fold. Mutations in the sirA orthologs of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa result in defects in either motility or motility gene regulation, suggesting that control of flagellar regulons may be an evolutionarily conserved function of sirA orthologs. The implications for our understanding of virulence gene regulation in the gamma Proteobacteria are discussed.

  9. Motility states in bidirectional cargo transport

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Sarah; Santen, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular cargos which are transported by molecular motors move stochastically along cytoskeleton filaments. In particular for bidirectionally transported cargos it is an open question whether the characteristics of their motion can result from pure stochastic fluctuations or whether some coordination of the motors is needed. The results of a mean-field model of cargo-motors dynamics, which was proposed by M\\"uller et al.[1] suggest the existence of high motility states which would result from a stochastic tug-of-war. Here we analyze a non-mean field extension of their model, that takes explicitly the position of each motor into account. We find that high motility states then disappear. We consider also a mutual motor-motor activation, as an explicit mechanism of motor coordination. We show that the results of the mean-field model are recovered only in case of a strong motor-motor activation in the limit of a high number of motors.

  10. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J.; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2016-07-01

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers.

  11. Automated measurement of cell motility and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goff Julie

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time-lapse microscopic imaging provides a powerful approach for following changes in cell phenotype over time. Visible responses of whole cells can yield insight into functional changes that underlie physiological processes in health and disease. For example, features of cell motility accompany molecular changes that are central to the immune response, to carcinogenesis and metastasis, to wound healing and tissue regeneration, and to the myriad developmental processes that generate an organism. Previously reported image processing methods for motility analysis required custom viewing devices and manual interactions that may introduce bias, that slow throughput, and that constrain the scope of experiments in terms of the number of treatment variables, time period of observation, replication and statistical options. Here we describe a fully automated system in which images are acquired 24/7 from 384 well plates and are automatically processed to yield high-content motility and morphological data. Results We have applied this technology to study the effects of different extracellular matrix compounds on human osteoblast-like cell lines to explore functional changes that may underlie processes involved in bone formation and maintenance. We show dose-response and kinetic data for induction of increased motility by laminin and collagen type I without significant effects on growth rate. Differential motility response was evident within 4 hours of plating cells; long-term responses differed depending upon cell type and surface coating. Average velocities were increased approximately 0.1 um/min by ten-fold increases in laminin coating concentration in some cases. Comparison with manual tracking demonstrated the accuracy of the automated method and highlighted the comparative imprecision of human tracking for analysis of cell motility data. Quality statistics are reported that associate with stage noise, interference by non

  12. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  13. New advances in gastrointestinal motility research

    CERN Document Server

    Pullan, A; Farrugia, G

    2013-01-01

    Research into gastrointestinal motility has received renewed interest in part due to recent advances in the techniques for measuring the structure and function of gastrointestinal cells, tissue and organs. The integration of this wealth of data into biophysically based computation models can aid in interpretation of experimental and clinical measurements and the refinement of measurement techniques. The contents of this book span multiple scales - from cell, tissue, organ, to whole body and is divided into four broad sections covering: i) gastrointestinal cellular activity and tissue structure; (ii) techniques for measuring, analyzing and visualizing high-resolution extra-cellular recordings; (iii) methods for sensing gastroelectrical activity using non-invasive bio-electro-magnetic fields and for modulating the underlying gastric electrical activity, and finally; (iv) methods for assessing manometric and videographic motility patterns and the application of these data for predicting the flow and mixing behav...

  14. Endocytic reawakening of motility in jammed epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverno, Chiara; Corallino, Salvatore; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bergert, Martin; Li, Qingsen; Leoni, Marco; Disanza, Andrea; Frittoli, Emanuela; Oldani, Amanda; Martini, Emanuele; Lendenmann, Tobias; Deflorian, Gianluca; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ong, Kok Haur; Uroz, Marina; Trepat, Xavier; Parazzoli, Dario; Maiuri, Paolo; Yu, Weimiao; Ferrari, Aldo; Cerbino, Roberto; Scita, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Dynamics of epithelial monolayers has recently been interpreted in terms of a jamming or rigidity transition. How cells control such phase transitions is, however, unknown. Here we show that RAB5A, a key endocytic protein, is sufficient to induce large-scale, coordinated motility over tens of cells, and ballistic motion in otherwise kinetically arrested monolayers. This is linked to increased traction forces and to the extension of cell protrusions, which align with local velocity. Molecularly, impairing endocytosis, macropinocytosis or increasing fluid efflux abrogates RAB5A-induced collective motility. A simple model based on mechanical junctional tension and an active cell reorientation mechanism for the velocity of self-propelled cells identifies regimes of monolayer dynamics that explain endocytic reawakening of locomotion in terms of a combination of large-scale directed migration and local unjamming. These changes in multicellular dynamics enable collectives to migrate under physical constraints and may be exploited by tumours for interstitial dissemination.

  15. Postadaptational Resistance to Benzalkonium Chloride and Subsequent Physicochemical Modifications of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Monica S.; Favrin, Stacy; Romanova, Nadya; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2002-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes, are capable of adapting to disinfectants used in industrial settings after prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations. However, the consequent alterations of the cell surface due to sanitizer adaptation of this pathogen are not fully understood. Two resistant and four sensitive L. monocytogenes strains from different sources were progressively subcultured with increasing sublethal concentrations of a surfactant, benzalkonium chloride (BC). To evaluate the effects of acquired tolerance to BC, parent and adapted strains were compared by using several morphological and physiological tests. Sensitive strains showed at least a fivefold increase in the MIC, while the MIC doubled for resistant strains after the adaptation period. The hydrophobicities of cells of parent and adapted strains were similar. Serological testing indicated that antigen types 1 and 4 were both present on the cell surface of adapted cells. The data suggest that efflux pumps are the major mechanism of adaptation in sensitive strains and are less important in originally resistant isolates. A different, unknown mechanism was responsible for the original tolerance of resistant isolates. In an originally resistant strain, there was a slight shift in the fatty acid profile after adaptation, whereas sensitive strains had similar profiles. Electron micrographs revealed morphological differences after adaptation. The changes in cell surface antigens, efflux pump utilization, and fatty acid profiles suggest that different mechanisms are used by resistant and sensitive strains for adaptation to BC. PMID:12406712

  16. Association between a case study of asymptomatic ovine listerial mastitis and the contamination of soft cheese and cheese processing environment with Listeria monocytogenes in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado, Cristina M B S; Grant, Kathie A; Halford-Maw, Robin; Hampton, Mike D; Ferreira, Maria A S S; McLauchlin, Jim

    2009-06-01

    For 5 months, the udders of milking ewes, raw ewe's milk, cheese, and the plant and environment of a cheese manufacturer in Portugal were investigated using standard methods for the presence of Listeria spp. An association between subclinical mastitis and Listeria monocytogenes in a single lactating sheep was investigated by visual inspection of udders for signs of inflammation, application of somatic cell counts, the California mastitis test, pH measurement to milk, and culture of L. monocytogenes and Staphylococcus spp. To track the routes of contamination by L. monocytogenes, 103 isolates were characterized by molecular serotyping and amplified fragment length polymorphism, and a selection was further tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This study provides molecular and epidemiological evidence tracking the persistence of a single L. monocytogenes strain causing a subclinical udder infection without obvious inflammation in a single ewe. This infection was the likely source of contamination of raw milk that was subsequently used to produce unpasteurised milk cheese and resulted in a single strain of this bacterium colonizing the processing environment and the final cheese product.

  17. Application of bacteriocinogenic Enterococcus mundtii CRL35 and Enterococcus faecium ST88Ch in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera Pingitore, Esteban; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Sesma, Fernando; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo

    2012-10-01

    Several strains of Enterococcus spp. are capable of producing bacteriocins with antimicrobial activity against important bacterial pathogens in dairy products. In this study, the bacteriocins produced by two Enterococcus strains (Enterococcus mundtii CRL35 and Enterococcus faecium ST88Ch), isolated from cheeses, were characterized and tested for their capability to control growth of Listeria monocytogenes 426 in experimentally contaminated fresh Minas cheese during refrigerated storage. Both strains were active against a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms and bacteriocin absorption to various L. monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19443 and Lactobacillus sakei ATCC 15521 varied according to the strain and the testing conditions (pH, temperature, presence of salts and surfactants). Growth of L. monocytogenes 426 was inhibited in cheeses containing E. mundtii CRL35 up to 12 days at 8 °C, evidencing a bacteriostatic effect. E. faecium ST88Ch was less effective, as the bacteriostatic affect occurred only after 6 days at 8 °C. In cheeses containing nisin (12.5 mg/kg), less than one log reduction was observed. This research underlines the potential application of E. mundtii CRL35 in the control of L. monocytogenes in Minas cheese.

  18. Electrical Signaling in Motile and Primary Cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Steven J Kleene; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved for their structure and also for their sensory functions. They serve as antennae for extracellular information. Whether the cilia are motile or not, they respond to environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli and signal to the cell body. The information from extracellular stimuli is commonly converted to electrical signals through the repertoire of ion-conducting channels in the ciliary membrane resulting in changes in concentrations of ions, esp...

  19. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to quantify the adherence and mechanical properties of an array of L. monocytogenes strains and their surface biopolymers. First, eight L. monocytogenes strains that represented the two major lineages of the species were compared for their adherence and mechanics at cellular and molecular levels. Our results indicated that strains of lineage' II were characterized by higher adhesion and Young's moduli, longer and more rigid surface biopolymers and lower specific and nonspecific forces when compared to lineage' I strains. Additionally, adherence and mechanical properties of eight L. monocytogenes epidemic and environmental strains were probed. Our results pointed to that environmental and epidemic strains representative of a given lineage were similar in their adherence and mechanical properties when investigated at a cellular level. However, when the molecular properties of the strains were considered, epidemic strains were characterized by higher specific and nonspecific forces, shorter, denser and more flexible biopolymers compared to environmental strains. Second, the role of environmental pH conditions of growth on the adhesion and mechanics of a pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe was investigated. Our results pointed to a transition in the adhesion energies for cells cultured at pH 7. In addition, when the types of molecular forces that govern the adhesion were quantified using Poisson statistical approach and using a new proposed method, specific hydrogen-bond energies dominated the bacterial adhesion process. Such a finding is instrumental to researchers designing methods to control bacterial adhesion. Similarly, bacterial cells underwent a transition in their mechanical properties. We have shown that cells cultured at pH 7 were the most rigid compared to those cultured in lower or higher pH conditions of growth. Due to transitions observed in adherence and mechanics when cells were cultured at pH 7, we hypothesized that

  20. Microbial changes and growth of Listeria monocytogenes during chilled storage of brined shrimp (Pandalus borealis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Kjeldgaard, Jette; Modberg, Anne; Vest, Mette Bohn; Bøknaes, Niels; Koort, Joanna; Björkroth, Johanna; Dalgaard, Paw

    2008-06-10

    Thirteen storage trials and ten challenge tests were carried out to examine microbial changes, spoilage and the potential growth of Listeria monocytogenes in brined shrimp (Pandalus borealis). Shrimp in brine as well as brined and drained shrimp in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) were produced and studied. Different recipes were used to study the effect of preserving parameters (organic acids, pH and NaCl) on growth of microorganisms and shelf life at 7-8 degrees C or 12 degrees C. Particularly, brines with different concentrations of (i) benzoic, citric and sorbic acids or (ii) acetic, citric and lactic acids were studied. Furthermore, the effect of adding diacetate to brined shrimp was evaluated. A single batch of cooked and peeled shrimp was used to study both industrially and manually processed brined shrimp with respect to the effect of process hygiene on microbial changes and the shelf life of products. Concentrations of microorganisms on newly produced brined shrimp from an industrial scale processing line were 1.0-2.3 log (CFU g(-1)) higher than comparable concentrations in manually processed samples. This resulted in a substantially shorter shelf life and a more diverse spoilage microflora of the industrially processed brined shrimp. In addition, shelf life of brined shrimp was affected by the types and concentrations of organic acids and by the storage temperature as expected. The effect of MAP was less pronounced. Eighty-two isolates from the spoilage microflora of brined shrimp were identified and they included 53 lactic acid bacteria, 6 coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp., 18 Pseudomonas fluorescens and 5 yeast isolates. After storage at 7 degrees C, P. fluorescens, Enterococcus-like isolates, E. malodoratus, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. and Lactobacillus sakei constituted the dominating microflora of shrimp in brines that contained benzoic, citric and sorbic acids as preservatives. L. sakei dominated the

  1. Benzalkonium chloride and heavy-metal tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes from retail foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongyang; Li, Yanli; Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Yamasaki, Shinji; Shi, Lei; Li, Jian-rong; Yan, He

    2014-11-03

    Phenotypic and genotypic tolerance in 71 Listeria monocytogenes isolates from different varieties of foods to benzalkonium chloride (BC) and cadmium were investigated by susceptibility test and molecular methods. To investigate the role of efflux pumps in BC tolerance, reserpine, an efflux pump inhibitor, was added to the BC tolerant strains. Tolerance to BC and cadmium were 26.8% (19/71) and 49.3% (35/71) respectively. Strains with BC tolerance were significantly more frequent among those of serotype 4b (100%, 6/6) than among those of serotype 1/2a (or 3a) (13.5%, 5/37), which represent the predominant number of strains (52.1%, 37/71). Tolerance to cadmium was encountered among 62.2% (23/37) and 50.0% (3/6) of the serotype 1/2a (or 3a) and 4b strains, respectively, and among 19.0% (4/21) of the strains of the serotype 1/2c. All of the 10 (14.1%) isolates found to be BC and cadmium co-tolerance were isolated from raw meat or quick-frozen food made of wheat flour and rice. Five multi-drug resistant strains were tolerant to cadmium as well. Among 71 isolates examined, one contained qacA and three contained qacEΔ1-sul. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detection of qacA and qacEΔ1-sul in L. monocytogenes, an indication of the possible horizontal transfer of the two genes. Addition of reserpine to the tolerant strains resulted in the loss of tolerance among seven out of 19 BC strains, suggesting a certain role the efflux pump played in mediating BC tolerance. Of the three distinct cadA types known to date in L. monocytogenes, the cadA1 and cadA2 genes were detected among 24 (33.8%) and three (4.2%) isolates respectively. The presence of cadA1 and cadA2 largely corresponded to the susceptibility phenotype. A subset (9/35 [25.7%]) of the cadmium-tolerant isolates lacked the known cadmium resistance determinants. These findings suggest that food products could act as a reservoir for L. monocytogenes harboring tolerance to BC and cadmium and will further

  2. Host range and in vitro lysis of Listeria monocytogenes seafood isolates by bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Geevika J Ganegama; Cruz, Cristina D; Dias-Wanigasekera, Beatrice M; McIntyre, Lynn; Billington, Craig; Hudson, Andrew; Flint, Steve H; Mutukumira, Anthony N

    2014-12-01

    Listeria-infecting bacteriophages (listeriaphages) can be used to control Listeria monocytogenes in the food industry. However, the sensitivity of many of seafood-borne Listeria strains to phages has not been reported. This research investigated the host ranges of three listeriaphages (FWLLm1, FWLLm3 and FWLLm5) by the formation of lytic zones and plaques on host lawns and in vitro lysis kinetics of listeriaphage FWLLm3. The study also predicted the phage titres required to lyse host cells. The host ranges of the phages were determined using 50 L. monocytogenes strains, of which 48 were isolated from the seafood industry and two from clinical cases. Of the 50 strains, 36 were tested at 25 and 30 ℃ and the remainder (14) at 15 and 25 ℃. Based on the formation of either discrete plaques or lytic zones (host kill zones), the host ranges of FWLLm1, FWLLm3 and FWLLm5 were about 87%, 81% and 87%, respectively, at 25 ℃. Six L. monocytogenes strains from the seafood environment were insensitive to all three phages, while the other seafood strains (42) were phage-sensitive. The adsorption rate constant (k value) of listeriaphage FWLLm3 was between 1.2 × 10(-9) and 1.6 × 10(-9 )ml/min across four host strains in tryptic soy broth at 25 ℃. The cultures (at 3-4 log colony-forming unit (CFU/ml) were completely lysed ( 8.7 log phage-forming units (PFU/ml) for 30 min. Re-growth of phage-infected cultures was not detected after 24 h. The effective empirical phage titre was similar to the calculated titre using a kinetic model. Results indicate the potential use of the three phages for controlling L. monocytogenes strains in seafood processing environments. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanxi [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Massoudieh, Arash [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Liang, Xiaomeng [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hu, Dehong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kamai, Tamir [Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan (Israel); Ginn, Timothy R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zilles, Julie L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nguyen, Thanh H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  4. A WASp-binding type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase required for actin polymerization-driven endosome motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fanny S; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M; Blumer, Kendall J

    2005-10-10

    Endosomes in yeast have been hypothesized to move through the cytoplasm by the momentum gained after actin polymerization has driven endosome abscision from the plasma membrane. Alternatively, after abscission, ongoing actin polymerization on endosomes could power transport. Here, we tested these hypotheses by showing that the Arp2/3 complex activation domain (WCA) of Las17 (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein [WASp] homologue) fused to an endocytic cargo protein (Ste2) rescued endosome motility in las17DeltaWCA mutants, and that capping actin filament barbed ends inhibited endosome motility but not endocytic internalization. Motility therefore requires continual actin polymerization on endosomes. We also explored how Las17 is regulated. Endosome motility required the Las17-binding protein Lsb6, a type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase. Catalytically inactive Lsb6 interacted with Las17 and promoted endosome motility. Lsb6 therefore is a novel regulator of Las17 that mediates endosome motility independent of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate synthesis. Mammalian type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases may regulate WASp proteins and endosome motility.

  5. Evidence that a modified type IV pilus-like system powers gliding motility and polysaccharide secretion in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayatan, Behzad; Meeks, John C; Risser, Douglas D

    2015-12-01

    In filamentous cyanobacteria, the mechanism of gliding motility is undefined but posited to be driven by a polysaccharide secretion system known as the junctional pore complex (JPC). Recent evidence implies that the JPC is a modified type IV pilus-like structure encoded for in part by genes in the hps locus. To test this hypothesis, we conducted genetic, cytological and comparative genomics studies on hps and pil genes in Nostoc punctiforme, a species in which motility is restricted to transiently differentiated filaments called hormogonia. Inactivation of most hps and pil genes abolished motility and abolished or drastically reduced secretion of hormogonium polysaccharide, and the subcellular localization of several Pil proteins in motile hormogonia corresponds to the site of the junctional pore complex. The non-motile ΔhpsE-G strain, which lacks three glycosyltransferases that synthesize hormogonium polysaccharide, could be complemented to motility by the addition of medium conditioned by wild-type hormogonia. Based on this result, we speculate that secretion of hormogonium polysaccharide facilitates but does not provide the motive force for gliding. Both the Hps and Pil homologs characterized in this study are almost universally conserved among filamentous cyanobacteria, with the Hps homologs rarely found in unicellular strains. These results support the theory that Hps and Pil proteins compose the JPC, a type IV pilus-like nanomotor that drives motility and polysaccharide secretion in filamentous cyanobacteria.

  6. Bacterial motility in the sea and its ecological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Riemann, Lasse; Azam, F.

    2001-01-01

    Motility could be an important adaptation of heterotrophic bacteria and archaea, and it may have ecological and biogeochemical implications. However, the limited observations so far show that only a small fraction (=10%) of bacteria is motile. We report a systematic 10 mo long field study off......, and heterotrophic nanoflagellates. However, it was positively related with particulate organic carbon throughout diel sampling on 24 to 26 September 1997. During a mesocosm diatom bloom % motile rose sharply as the bloom crashed, suggesting algal detritus may elicit motility. Enhanced % motile resulted in increased...... swimming. Our results show that a variable fraction of marine bacteria is able to respond to loci of organic matter, e.g. organic particles and algae, and that motility underlies dynamic patterns of ecological relationships (symbiosis, competition, parasitism) between bacteria and algae. Since motility may...

  7. Assay of sperm motility to study the effects of metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timourian, H.; Watchmaker, G.

    1984-01-01

    A method for quantitating sperm motility is applied here to study the effects of metal ions on animal cells. The quantitative technique is based on orienting sperm by subjecting them to flow and then measuring their capacity for returning to randomness when the orienting force is discontinued. The optical anisotropy of sperm permits determination of orientation with a spectrophotometer equipped with a flow cell. A wide range of concentrations of zinc, copper, and nickel ions were tested to determine their effects on the motility of sea-urchin sperm. Sea urchins are a ready and convenient source of sperm. Since energy production in sperm depends on their limited supply of endogenous substrate, this test system gives us a simple screening procedure for comparing the effects of various agents on the cell's capacity for utilizing energy. Nickel at concentrations higher than 10..pi../sup 5/M had an initial depressing effect on motility; however, this effect was eventually overcome, and in some cases overcompensation resulted in an increase motility. Zinc had either an enhancing or a depressing effect, depending not only on its concentration but on the time of exposure. At 10/sup -5/M it enhanced motility if present at the time the sperm were first shed in seawater, the time of high respiration. At 10..pi../sup 4/M it depressed motility only if present during the period of decreasing respiration, 1 to 2 hr after being shed into seawater. Copper depressed activity at 10..pi../sup 4/M to 10..pi../sup 6/M at all times tested.

  8. A Mach-Zender Holographic Microscope for Quantifying Bacterial Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, B.; Nadeau, J. L.; Serabyn, E.; Wallace, J. K.; Liewer, K.; Kuhn, J.; Graff, E.; Lindensmith, C.

    2014-12-01

    New microscopic techniques have revolutionized cell biology over the past two decades. However, there are still biological processes whose details elude us, especially those involving motility: e.g. feeding behavior of microorganisms in the ocean, or migration of cancer cells to form metastases. Imaging prokaryotes, which range in size from several hundred nm to a few microns, is especially challenging. An emerging technique to address these issues is Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM). DHM is an imaging technique that uses the interference of light to record and reproduce three-dimensional magnified images of objects. This approach has several advantages over ordinary brightfield microscopy for fieldwork: a larger depth of field, hands-off operation, robustness regarding environmental conditions, and large sampling volumes with quantitative 3D records of motility behavior. Despite these promising features, real-time DHM was thought to be impractical for technological and computational reasons until recently, and there has so far been very limited application of DHM to biology. Most existing instruments are limited in performance by their particular (e.g. in-line, lens-less, phase-shifting) approach to holography. These limitations can be mitigated with an off-axis dual-path configuration. Here we describe the design and implementation of a design for a Mach-Zehnder-type holographic microscope with diffraction-limited lateral resolution, with intended applications in environmental microbiology. We have achieved sub-micron resolution and three-dimensional tracking of prokaryotic and eukaryotic test strains designed to represent different modes and speeds of microbial motility. Prokaryotes are Escherichia coli, Vibrio alginolyticus, and Bacillus subtilis. Each shows a characteristic motility pattern, as we illustrate in holographic videos in sample chambers 0.6 mm in depth. The ability to establish gradients of attractants with bacterial taxis towards the

  9. Multi-environment model estimation for motility analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Sznitman

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-known model organism used to investigate fundamental questions in biology. Motility assays of this small roundworm are designed to study the relationships between genes and behavior. Commonly, motility analysis is used to classify nematode movements and characterize them quantitatively. Over the past years, C. elegans' motility has been studied across a wide range of environments, including crawling on substrates, swimming in fluids, and locomoting through microfluidic substrates. However, each environment often requires customized image processing tools relying on heuristic parameter tuning. In the present study, we propose a novel Multi-Environment Model Estimation (MEME framework for automated image segmentation that is versatile across various environments. The MEME platform is constructed around the concept of Mixture of Gaussian (MOG models, where statistical models for both the background environment and the nematode appearance are explicitly learned and used to accurately segment a target nematode. Our method is designed to simplify the burden often imposed on users; here, only a single image which includes a nematode in its environment must be provided for model learning. In addition, our platform enables the extraction of nematode 'skeletons' for straightforward motility quantification. We test our algorithm on various locomotive environments and compare performances with an intensity-based thresholding method. Overall, MEME outperforms the threshold-based approach for the overwhelming majority of cases examined. Ultimately, MEME provides researchers with an attractive platform for C. elegans' segmentation and 'skeletonizing' across a wide range of motility assays.

  10. Actin filament attachments for sustained motility in vitro are maintained by filament bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Hu

    Full Text Available We reconstructed cellular motility in vitro from individual proteins to investigate how actin filaments are organized at the leading edge. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of actin filaments, we tested how profilin, Arp2/3, and capping protein (CP function together to propel thin glass nanofibers or beads coated with N-WASP WCA domains. Thin nanofibers produced wide comet tails that showed more structural variation in actin filament organization than did bead substrates. During sustained motility, physiological concentrations of Mg(2+ generated actin filament bundles that processively attached to the nanofiber. Reduction of total Mg(2+ abolished particle motility and actin attachment to the particle surface without affecting actin polymerization, Arp2/3 nucleation, or filament capping. Analysis of similar motility of microspheres showed that loss of filament bundling did not affect actin shell formation or symmetry breaking but eliminated sustained attachments between the comet tail and the particle surface. Addition of Mg(2+, Lys-Lys(2+, or fascin restored both comet tail attachment and sustained particle motility in low Mg(2+ buffers. TIRF microscopic analysis of filaments captured by WCA-coated beads in the absence of Arp2/3, profilin, and CP showed that filament bundling by polycation or fascin addition increased barbed end capture by WCA domains. We propose a model in which CP directs barbed ends toward the leading edge and polycation-induced filament bundling sustains processive barbed end attachment to the leading edge.

  11. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  12. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Salmon Roe - a kinetic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in unsalted and salted (3%) salmon roe. Growth curves, developed using inoculated samples incubated at constant temperatures between 5 and 30 degrees C, were analyzed by curve-fitting to the Huang and Baran...

  13. LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NEW COMMUNITY REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bragagnolo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years in the countries of the European Union have occurred profound and radical changes regarding the safety and hygiene of foodstuffs. The aim of this work is to highlight the significant changes made by the recent legislation in the control of Listeria monocytogenes.

  14. Studies on the risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, S.; Dufrenne, J.; Teunis, P.; Chackraborty, T.

    1998-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to Listeria monocytogenes, and high numbers may be ingested during consumption of certain types of food. However, epidemiological investigations show that listeriosis is a rare disease. Risk assessment studies using an animal mouse model indicate that almost all L. mono

  15. Overlevingsstrategieën Listeria monocytogenes bij lage temperatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen that may cause severe infections in humans. Many outbreaks caused by this organism have been associated with ready-to-eat foods wich may have undergone some form of minimal processing, or have been contaminated after processing. Ready-to-eat

  16. Neonatal infection with Listeria monocytogenes: Rare, but serious

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Stuijvenberg, M.; Spanjaard, L.; Bergman, K.A.

    2006-01-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, three infants, two girls and a boy, were found to have an invasive infection with Listeria monocytogenes. They received intensive care including respiratory and circulatory support, antibiotics, and treatment of the neurological complications when possible. One of the girls

  17. Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in silage products of Shahrekord city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sharifzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in the silage samples. Methods: Silage samples obtained from 150 different farms in Shahrekord city (Iran and after DNA extraction, all samples were analyzed by PCR technique using one pair of primers for presence of this pathogen. The amplified products were detected on 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis. Results: Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 4 (2% of the 150 samples. The detection of this bacterium from silage samples in Shahrekord city indicated that these products could create a serious risk in public health of animal and human. The findings showed that in positive silage samples for Listeria monocytogenes, the pH value was about five and it was due to bacterial activity in these products. Conclusions: The quality of silage and hygiene parameters and good herd health management play an important role in the microbiological quality of herd and farm. Considering the high specificity and sensitivity of the employed PCR technique, it is recommended to be useful technique for identification of Listeria monocytogenes.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes : the nature, public health aspects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal Production Research Advances ... New food borne infectious diseases have continued to emerge world over in the food industries. ... Its' public health importance cannot be over emphasized as L. monocytogenes causes huge economic ... It is therefore, suggested that proper control strategies, good quality control ...

  19. Quantifying strain variability in modeling growth of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aryani, D.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth kinetics can differ from the actual behavior of the target microorganisms. In the present study, the impact of strain variability on maximum specific growth rate (µmax) (h- 1) was quantified using twenty Listeria monocytogenes strains. The µmax was determined as functi

  20. Genome sequesnce of lineage III Listeria monocytogenes strain HCC23

    Science.gov (United States)

    More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotypes within lineages I and II. Serotypes within lineage III (4a and 4c) are commonly isolated from environmental and food specimens. We report the first complete genome sequence of a lineage III isolate, HCC2...

  1. The Continuous Challenge of Characterizing the Foodborne Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Woodward, Joshua John; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen commonly isolated from food processing environments and food products. This organism can multiply at refrigeration temperatures, form biofilms on different materials and under various conditions, resist a range of environmental stresses, and contaminate food products by cross-contamination. L. monocytogenes is recognized as the causative agent of listeriosis, a serious disease that affects mainly individuals from high-risk groups, such as pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Listeriosis can be considered a disease that has emerged along with changing eating habits and large-scale industrial food processing. This disease causes losses of billions of dollars every year with recalls of contaminated foods and patient medical treatment expenses. In addition to the immune status of the host and the infecting dose, the virulence potential of each strain is crucial for the development of disease symptoms. While many isolates are naturally virulent, other isolates are avirulent and unable to cause disease; this may vary according to the presence of molecular determinants associated with virulence. In the last decade, the characterization of genetic profiles through the use of molecular methods has helped track and demonstrate the genetic diversity among L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from various sources. The purposes of this review were to summarize the main methods used for isolation, identification, and typing of L. monocytogenes and also describe its most relevant virulence characteristics.

  2. Overlevingsstrategieën Listeria monocytogenes bij lage temperatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen that may cause severe infections in humans. Many outbreaks caused by this organism have been associated with ready-to-eat foods wich may have undergone some form of minimal processing, or have been contaminated after processing. Ready-to-eat

  3. Whole genome sequence-based serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Lennkh, Anna; Murer, Andrea; Springer, Burkhard; Blaschitz, Marion; Indra, Alexander; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner; Sensen, Christoph W

    2016-10-10

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is currently becoming the method of choice for characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in national reference laboratories (NRLs). WGS is superior with regards to accuracy, resolution and analysis speed in comparison to several other methods including serotyping, PCR, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and multivirulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST), which have been used thus far for the characterization of bacterial isolates (and are still important tools in reference laboratories today) to control and prevent listeriosis, one of the major sources of foodborne diseases for humans. Backward compatibility of WGS to former methods can be maintained by extraction of the respective information from WGS data. Serotyping was the first subtyping method for L. monocytogenes capable of differentiating 12 serovars and national reference laboratories still perform serotyping and PCR-based serogrouping as a first level classification method for Listeria monocytogenes surveillance. Whole genome sequence based core genome MLST analysis of a L. monocytogenes collection comprising 172 isolates spanning all 12 serotypes was performed for serogroup determination. These isolates clustered according to their serotypes and it was possible to group them either into the IIa, IIc, IVb or IIb clusters, respectively, which were generated by minimum spanning tree (MST) and neighbor joining (NJ) tree data analysis, demonstrating the power of the new approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  5. Studies on the risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, S.; Dufrenne, J.; Teunis, P.; Chackraborty, T.

    1998-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to Listeria monocytogenes, and high numbers may be ingested during consumption of certain types of food. However, epidemiological investigations show that listeriosis is a rare disease. Risk assessment studies using an animal mouse model indicate that almost all L.

  6. Atividade antimicrobiana de bactérias lácticas de embutidos curados frente a Listeria monocytogenes Antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Brazilian dry fermented sausages against Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Prado

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Cepas de bactérias lácticas recuperadas de 336 colônias isoladas e selecionadas foram submetidas ao teste de atividade antimicrobiana direta, que identificou as produtoras de substâncias antimicrobianas capazes de inibir in vitro o desenvolvimento de duas cepas indicadoras de Listeria monocytogenes. As 108 cepas que inibiram diretamente pelo menos uma das cepas indicadoras receberam a denominação DTEI e foram selecionadas para o teste de atividade antimicrobiana indireta contra as mesmas cepas de L. monocytogenes, assim como frente a outras cepas de bactérias lácticas de origens diversas. Essa atividade inibidora indireta foi avaliada por meio de sobrenadantes isentos de células, esterilizados por meio de microfiltração, eliminando-se os principais compostos responsáveis por ela, como por exemplo os ácidos orgânicos e o peróxido de hidrogênio, mediante o ajuste do pH e a liofilização dos sobrenadantes. Oito cepas de bactérias lácticas apresentaram atividade antimicrobiana indireta frente a pelo menos um dos microrganismos indicadores utilizados, sugerindo terem produzido substâncias semelhantes a bacteriocinas. Três destas cepas foram caracterizadas e identificadas como pertencentes ao gênero Lactobacillus sp.The direct antimicrobial activity of 336 samples of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from Brazilian dry fermented sausages, was evaluated in vitro against two strains of Listeria monocytogenes, using agar diffusion assay. A total of 108 strains of lactic acid bacteria showed direct inhibitory activity against at least one of the two strains of Listeria monocytogenes, probably due to production of organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, and oxygen metabolites, in addition to other substances. These 108 strains were further tested for indirect antimicrobial activity against the same strains of Listeria monocytogenes, as well as against other strains of lactic acid bacteria. Indirect antimicrobial activity was evaluated using

  7. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  8. Nisin resistance of Listeria monocytogenes is increased by exposure to salt stress and is mediated via LiaR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholz, Teresa M; Tang, Silin; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2013-09-01

    Growth of Listeria monocytogenes on refrigerated, ready-to-eat food is a significant food safety concern. Natural antimicrobials, such as nisin, can be used to control this pathogen on food, but little is known about how other food-related stresses may impact how the pathogen responds to these compounds. Prior work demonstrated that exposure of L. monocytogenes to salt stress at 7°C led to increased expression of genes involved in nisin resistance, including the response regulator liaR. We hypothesized that exposure to salt stress would increase subsequent resistance to nisin and that LiaR would contribute to increased nisin resistance. Isogenic deletion mutations in liaR were constructed in 7 strains of L. monocytogenes, and strains were exposed to 6% NaCl in brain heart infusion broth and then tested for resistance to nisin (2 mg/ml Nisaplin) at 7°C. For the wild-type strains, exposure to salt significantly increased subsequent nisin resistance (P nisin resistance of wild-type strains, ΔliaR strains were significantly more sensitive to nisin (P nisin. Transcript levels of LiaR-regulated genes were induced by salt stress, and lmo1746 and telA were found to contribute to LiaR-mediated salt-induced nisin resistance. These data suggest that environmental stresses similar to those on foods can influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes to antimicrobials such as nisin, and potential cross-protective effects should be considered when selecting and applying control measures for this pathogen on ready-to-eat foods.

  9. Efficacy of activated alginate-based nanocomposite films to control Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage flora in rainbow trout slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboofetileh, Mehdi; Rezaei, Masoud; Hosseini, Hedayat; Abdollahi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils of clove, coriander, caraway, marjoram, cinnamon, and cumin were tested for their antilisterial activity by application of agar diffusion assay (experiment 1). Marjoram essential oil (MEO) showed the highest inhibitory effect, followed by clove and cinnamon. Subsequently, these essential oils were incorporated to alginate/clay nanocomposite films and antilisterial effectiveness of the films was studied in a model solid food system during 12 days at 10 °C (experiment 2). The results revealed that the films with MEO were more effective against Listeria monocytogenes in the model step. Finally, alginate-clay film incorporating 1 % MEO was applied to inoculated trout slices during refrigerated storage (4 °C) for 15 days (experiment 3). The control and the wrapped fish samples were analyzed periodically for microbiological (L. monocytogenes, total viable count, psychrotrophic count) and chemical (TVB-N) properties. The results demonstrated that alginate-clay films enriched with 1 % MEO significantly delayed the growth of L. monocytogenes during the 15-day storage with final counts reaching 6.23 log CFU/g while the counts in control samples were significantly higher reaching 7.38 log CFU/g (p < 0.05). Furthermore, active films efficiently reduced total viable count and psychrotrophic count as well as TVB-N in the fish slice during refrigerated storage.

  10. Maltose and maltodextrin utilization by Listeria monocytogenes depend on an inducible ABC transporter which is repressed by glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Gopal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the environment as well as in the vertebrate intestine, Listeriae have access to complex carbohydrates like maltodextrins. Bacterial exploitation of such compounds requires specific uptake and utilization systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We could show that Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species contain genes/gene products with high homology to the maltodextrin ABC transporter and utilization system of B. subtilis. Mutant construction and growth tests revealed that the L. monocytogenes gene cluster was required for the efficient utilization of maltodextrins as well as maltose. The gene for the ATP binding protein of the transporter was located distant from the cluster. Transcription analyses demonstrated that the system was induced by maltose/maltodextrins and repressed by glucose. Its induction was dependent on a LacI type transcriptional regulator. Repression by glucose was independent of the catabolite control protein CcpA, but was relieved in a mutant defective for Hpr kinase/phosphorylase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data obtained show that in L. monocytogenes the uptake of maltodextrin and, in contrast to B. subtilis, also maltose is exclusively mediated by an ABC transporter. Furthermore, the results suggest that glucose repression of the uptake system possibly is by inducer exclusion, a mechanism not described so far in this organism.

  11. [Inhibition of menstrual uterine motility with four beta-adrenergic drugs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, R; Cobo, E

    1981-01-01

    Effects of the sublingual administration of four beta-adrenoceptor drugs on the uterine motility in 40 normal menstruating women were studied. The drugs and total doses tested were: orciprenaline (40 mg), Partusisten (10 mg), salbutamol (8 mg) and isoxsuprine (40 mg). The uterine and antidiuretic activities were studied before and after administration of each one. All those drugs employed reduced greatly the uterine contractions in all the patients. The cardiovascular side-effects were minimal and well tolerated. It suggested that the adrenergic system has an important role in the control of uterine motility during human menstruation.

  12. Cell Shapes and Traction Forces Determine Stress in Motile Confluent Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingbo; Bi, Dapeng; Czajkowski, Michael; Manning, Lisa; Marchetti, Cristina

    Collective cell migration is a highly regulated process involved in wound healing, cancer metastasis and morphogenesis. The understanding of the regulatory mechanism requires the study of mechanical interactions among cells that coordinate their active motion. To this end, we develop a method that determines cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces. This approach allows us for the first time to calculate membrane tensions and hydrostatic pressures at a cellular level in collective migrating cell layers out of equilibrium. It helps us understand the mechanical origin of tissue stresses as previous inferred using Traction Force Microscopy (TFM). We test this approach on a new model of motile confluent tissue, which we term Self-propelled Voronoi Model (SPV) that incorporates cell elasticity, Contractility and motility. With the model, we explore the mechanical properties of confluent motile tissue as a function of cell activities and cell shapes in various geometries.

  13. Dietary probiotic supplement positively affects sperm motility in obese murine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Alipour, Hiva; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    at assessing the use of L.Rhamnusus on obese male fertility characteristics. We proposed that this probiotic can not only reduce the weight but in parallel would enhance sperm motility in obese male mice. Diet-induced obese C57BL/6NTac mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups and treated with a single daily...... dose (1x109CFU) of L.Rhamnusus (test group) or physiological saline (control group) for 4 weeks. Sperm motility and kinematics were assessed by the Sperm Class Analyzer (SCA). The control group maintained a raising trend in weight gain leading to a significant difference on week 5 continuing to week 8...... percentage of progressive sperm, suggesting a possible increase in pregnancy. The effect mechanism of L.Rhamnusus could be either through direct influence on sperm motility or indirectly due to the promotion of weight loss. The latter hypothesis is due to the fact that weight-loss leads to scrotal...

  14. Identification and functional characterization of pfm, a novel gene involved in swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fang; Li, Yingli; Xu, Haijing; Xia, Huiming; Yin, Tengfei; Yao, Hongming; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Xiuming; Bai, Yanling; Jin, Shouguang; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2007-10-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen, has a single polar flagellum which is an important virulence and colonization factor by providing swimming motility. This paper describes the functional characterization of a novel gene pfm (PA2950) of P. aeruginosa. The pfm encodes a protein that is similar to a number of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases of other bacterial species. Mutation of this gene results in a defect in swimming motility which can be completed back to that of wild type by a plasmid containing the pfm. Interestingly, the pfm mutant possesses an intact flagellum which does not rotate, thus giving rise to a non-motile phenotype. The pfm gene is encoded on an operon together with two upstream genes which code for electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF). Yeast two-hybrid tests indicated that the PFM interacts with the ETF, suggesting that the putative dehydrogenase (PFM) is involved in energy metabolism that is critical for the rotation of flagellum in P. aeruginosa.

  15. Realizing the Physics of Motile Cilia Synchronization with Driven Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Cilia and flagella in biological systems often show large scale cooperative behaviors such as the synchronization of their beats in "metachronal waves." These are beautiful examples of emergent dynamics in biology, and are essential for life, allowing diverse processes from the motility of eukaryotic microorganisms, to nutrient transport and clearance of pathogens from mammalian airways. How these collective states arise is not fully understood, but it is clear that individual cilia interact mechanically, and that a strong and long-ranged component of the coupling is mediated by the viscous fluid. We review here the work by ourselves and others aimed at understanding the behavior of hydrodynamically coupled systems, and particularly a set of results that have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically by studying actively driven colloidal systems. In these controlled scenarios, it is possible to selectively test aspects of living motile cilia, such as the geometrical arrangement, the effects of the driving profile and the distance to no-slip boundaries. We outline and give examples of how it is possible to link model systems to observations on living systems, which can be made on microorganisms, on cell cultures or on tissue sections. This area of research has clear clinical application in the long term, as severe pathologies are associated with compromised cilia function in humans.

  16. Antimicrobial treatments to control Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, António; Kamnetz, Mary B; Gadotti, Camila; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2017-06-01

    Queso fresco, is a Hispanic non-fermented cheese highly susceptible to contamination with L. monocytogenes. This research was aimed to determine the effect of GRAS antimicrobial ingredients to control L. monocytogenes. Antimicrobials included caprylic acid (CA), Nisaplin(®) (N, 2.5% nisin), a mixture of sodium lactate and sodium diacetate (SL/SD), Lactococcus lactis sbp. lactis DPC 3147, monolaurin, and lactic acid (LA). Batches of queso fresco curds were inoculated with 10(4) CFU/g and stored at 4 °C for three weeks. During storage the count of L. monocytogenes reached 7 to 8 Log CFU/g in control samples. Most individual antimicrobial treatments resulted in less than 1 Log CFU/g reductions in final counts, with the exception of N (0.5 g/kg) and CA (2.9 g/kg) that caused more than 3 and 5 Log CFU/g differences with controls, respectively. Mixtures of ingredients were more effective in inhibiting L. monocytogenes growth, and treatments with N and CA consistently delivered 6 Log CFU/g less counts than controls. Supplementation of 12 g/kg LA to treatments with SL/SD (3%/0.22%) caused differences of more than 4 Log CFU/g in final Listeria populations. Samples treated with the binary mixtures of N and CA (0.5 and 0.7 g/kg, respectively) were evaluated in a consumer panel (n = 67). Panelists slightly preferred control and commercial over treated samples, but all samples were in average rated between "slightly liking" and "moderately liking." These experiments indicated that combined use of antimicrobial ingredients may be an effective way to control the population of Listeria monocytogenes in queso fresco.

  17. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry production in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaly, Marianne; Toquin, Marie-Therese; Le Nôtre, Yolene; Fravalo, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    This study aimed to update and create a data set from laying hens and broilers regarding contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. Two hundred laying-hen flocks were sampled, with 88 flocks reared in cages and 112 reared on the floor. One hundred forty-five broiler flocks were sampled, with 85 conventional and 60 free-range flocks. A total of 774 and 725 samples were analyzed from laying hens and broilers, respectively. L. monocytogenes was detected in 31 of 200 flocks, yielding an estimated prevalence of 15.5% in laying-hen flocks. Among positive flocks, there appeared a significant (P = 0.004) difference between caged and floor-reared hens, with a higher detection in dust samples from floor-reared hens. In positive caged hen flocks, significant (P = 0.028) differences between dust and fecal samples appeared, with a higher detection in feces than in dust samples. In broiler flocks, L. monocytogenes was isolated in 46 of 145 flocks, yielding an estimated prevalence of 32% (28% in conventional flocks versus 37% in the free-range flocks). L. monocytogenes was isolated in samples taken from conventional flocks with a lower frequency than in free-range flocks (13 versus 18%, respectively). The serotyping of L. monocytogenes strains showed that the majority belonged to type 1/2a in laying-hen flocks (74.3%) and in broiler flocks (40.5%). A significant difference (P = 0.007) between laying hens and broilers was shown for serogroup 4 and for serovar 1/2b (P = 0.007); these serogroups were more prevalent in broilers (40%) than in laying hens (5.7%).

  18. HYGIENIC EVALUATIONS AND LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES BEHAVIOUR IN THE PRODUCTION OF ‘NDUJA DI SPILINGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Giarratana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the hygienic and qualitative parameters of a traditional meat product from Calabria, named ‘Nduja di Spilinga, characterised by an high amount in fat (50% and chilli pepper (25%. In this regard, 30 products, weight 500g, were prepared with and without chilli pepper (respectively, p-series: 15 products and np-series:15 products and analysed for the count of Enterobacteria (Ent, Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB, Gram+Catalase+Cocci (GCC+ and Yeasts. Furthermore pH, aw and Free Fatty Acids (FFA, expressed as percentage of oleic acid on 100g of total fat (TF, were evaluated. Finally, in order to estimate the potential compliance with the Regulation (EC 2073/05 and further modifications, a challenge test for Listeria monocytogenes was carried out. Obtained data show a high decrease, during the seasoning, of Enterobacteria and L. monocytogenes especially in samples of pseries, according to their lower pH values than np-series samples. With regard to the microflora of technological interest, Yeast were the only population which significantly increases during the seasoning of p-series products, presumably influencing the increase of FFA which reached the highest concentration (5.75% oleic acid/TF at the same time in which Yeasts reached maximum population density (17th day.

  19. Inhibitory effect of carob (Ceratonia siliqua) leaves methanolic extract on Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissani, Nadhem; Coroneo, Valentina; Fattouch, Sami; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2012-10-10

    In recent years, there has been great development in the search for new natural compounds for food preservation aimed at a partial or total replacement of currently popular antimicrobial chemicals. Carob (Ceratonia siliqua) offers a natural promising alternative for food safety and bioconservation. In this work, the methanolic extract of carob leaves (MECL) was tested for the ability to inhibit the growth of a range of microorganisms. MECL inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes at 28.12 μg/mL by the broth microdilution method. The effect of this bacteriostatic concentration on the growth of this bacterium revealed a pattern of inhibition characterized by (a) a resumed growth phase, which showed a lower rate of growth if compared with controls; and (b) first a lag and then a stationary phase at a lower bacterium concentration. The study of the chemical composition of MECL by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry showed the presence of gallic acid, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, myricitrin, isoquercitin, catechin, chlorogenic acid, and malic acid. L. monocytogenes growth inhibition was recorded for myricitrin and gallic acid at 450 μg/mL and for (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and isoquercitin, respectively, at 225 and 112.5 μg/mL. Taking into account that proline is a ligand of proline dehydrogenase (PDH), the use of this compound leads us to hypothesize the mode of action of MECL constituents.

  20. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE LIVER OF MICE CHALLENGED WITH Listeria monocytogenes IN SIX ZONES OF NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enurah L U

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fifty four strains of Listeria monocytogenes were isolated from fresh raw milk and abattoir effluent. Uniform distribution pattern of the isolates in the six zones of Nigeria viz Southwest, Southeast, Southsouth, Norhwest, Northeast and Northcentral is evidence that food contamination with this organism may be a source of foodborne outbreak s in Nigeria. Present study investigated the pathogenic nature of the strains. The pathogenic strains were isolated by culturing on 7% Sheep Blood Agar for evidence of haemolysis and were used to challenge thr ee out of four groups of laboratory bred mice for pathogenicity test. The Group 1 mice were given 1ml of sterile distilled water orally and served as control, groups 2, 3 and 4 with 1.6 x 10 5cfu/ml orally, subcutaneously and intraperitoneally respectively. Experimental animals were successfully observed up to six days for clinical signs and possible mortality. All the infected mice that died were subjected to post - mortem examination which showed change with liver abscess with congested gall bladder containing purulent bile. Histopathology sections of the liver showed hepatocyte necrosis with infiltration of degenerative neutrophils, lymphocytes and few plasma cells compared to control. The study confirmed the presence of pathogenic strains of L.monocytogenes in all zones of Nigeria and their presence in the food may pose serious health hazards

  1. [Analysis of the microbiological quality and potential presence of Listeria monocytogenes in custard apple (Annona muricata), mango (Mangifera indica) and passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) pulps from Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Breymann, Juliana; Chaves, Carolina; Arias, María Laura

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to determine some of the indicators associated to shelf life, hygiene, process and storage conditions for some of custard apple, mango and passion fruit pulps distributed by the main supermarket chains of the Metropolitan Area of San José, Costa Rica, as well as to examine the potential presence of Listeria monocytogenes in them. Sixty fruit pulp samples were analyzed. Tests included pH determination, total aerobic plate count, yeasts and mold count, lactic bacteria count, total and fecal most probable number and the presence/absence of Listeria monocytogenes in 25 g of the product. Fruit pulp's pH ranged between 3,1 and 3,9, and the microbiological counts obtained were relatively low except for one industry. None of the samples analyzed presented total or fecal coliforms. The presence of Listeria monocytogenes was confirmed in three samples, all of them coming from industry C. Low microbiological counts obtained may be due to the addition of preserving substances and to the pasteurization of some of the products; lack of these two elements may allow the presence of dangerous bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes.

  2. Magnetic bead based immuno-detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables using the Bio-Plex suspension array system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J B; Basavanna, U

    2015-04-01

    Listeriosis, a disease contracted via the consumption of foods contaminated with pathogenic Listeria species, can produce severe symptoms and high mortality in susceptible people and animals. The development of molecular methods and immuno-based techniques for detection of pathogenic Listeria in foods has been challenging due to the presence of assay inhibiting food components. In this study, we utilize a macrophage cell culture system for the isolation and enrichment of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables for subsequent identification using the Luminex xMAP technique. Macrophage monolayers were exposed to infant formula, lettuce and celery contaminated with L. monocytogenes or L. ivanovii. Magnetic microspheres conjugated to Listeria specific antibody were used to capture Listeria from infected macrophages and then analyzed using the Bio-Plex 200 analyzer. As few as 10 CFU/mL or g of L. monocytogenes was detected in all foods tested. The detection limit for L. ivanovii was 10 CFU/mL in infant formula and 100 CFU/g in leafy greens. Microsphere bound Listeria obtained from infected macrophage lysates could also be isolated on selective media for subsequent confirmatory identification. This method presumptively identifies L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii from infant formula, lettuce and celery in less than 28 h with confirmatory identifications completed in less than 48 h.

  3. [Evaluation of the effect of probiotic cultures added to commercial yogurt over a known population of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes, Xinia; Railey, Dylana; Arias, María Laura; Chaves, Carolina

    2004-09-01

    The effect of probiotic cultures over Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 during yogurt storage was evaluated. Two different yogurt brands, one with additional probiotic cultures (Lactobacillus casei and L. acidophilus) were inoculated with known populations (106 UFC/g) of either L. monocytogenes or E. coli O157:H7 in three different times and stored for 32 days at 5 degrees C. Every four days the count of lactic bacteria, the added pathogens and pH was evaluated, according to the methodology described in the Bacteriological Analytical Manual. The pH and lactic bacteria population were constant during the testing period. Yogurt with additional probiotic cultures reduced the population of L. monocytogenes in 8 days, the population of E. coli O157:H7 in 16; yogurt with no additional probiotics took 20 days to reduce L. monocytogenes to non-detectable levels and even after 28 days of storage, E. coli O157:H7 was cultured. In this work, the beneficial effects of additional probiotic cultures in yogurt is confirmed again.

  4. Tracking Listeria monocytogenes contamination and virulence-associated characteristics in the ready-to-eat meat-based food products industry according to the hygiene level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, A R; Gama, L T; Fraqueza, M J

    2017-02-02

    Listeria monocytogenes isolates collected from final products and food contact surfaces of 10 ready-to-eat meat-based food products (RTEMP) producing industries were analyzed to relate their virulence-associated characteristics and genetic profiles with the hygiene assessment of those industries. Together with sample collection, an audit was performed to evaluate the implemented food safety management system and to investigate the specific audit requisites more associated to the occurrence of those L. monocytogenes serogroups frequently related with human disease. L. monocytogenes was present in 18% of the samples. The isolates (n=62) were serogrouped and detection of virulence-associated genes inlA, inlB, inlC and inlJ, and also plcA, hlyA, actA and iap was done by multiplex PCR. After this initial characterization, selected isolates (n=31) were submitted to antibiotic resistance testing by the disk diffusion method for the currently most used human and veterinary antibiotics and resistance was low. These isolates were also subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Genotyping and serogrouping of L. monocytogenes isolates revealed a genetically diverse population. Our data indicate that contamination of final products does not seem to be uniquely related to the sampled food surfaces. The occurrence of those L. monocytogenes serogroups more commonly associated with human disease in industries with a high hygienic audit classification could be the result of a previous identification of the pathogen, with an enforcement of the hygiene program without recognizing the real source of contamination. This reinforces the importance of a conjoined diagnosis using audit data and microbiological testing. Food safety management systems of those industries need improvement, particularly in cleaning and sanitizing operations, analytical control, preventive maintenance, personal hygiene and root cause analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Hyperinvasiveness and increased intercellular spread of Listeria monocytogenes sequence type 1 are independent of listeriolysin S, internalin F and internalin J1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sebastian; Bärtschi, Michelle; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna

    2017-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a genetically heterogeneous species, which is divided into evolutionary lineages and clonal complexes (CCs). Not all L. monocytogenes isolates are equally likely to cause disease, with CC1, and in particular sequence type (ST) 1, being the most prevalent complex in human and ruminant infections and more specifically in neurolisteriosis. While the major factors that determine neurotropism are unknown, the L. monocytogenes CC1 strains harbour listeriolysin S (lls) and particular alleles of internalin (inl) F and inlJ, which are not present in CCs commonly isolated from food and the environment. The aim of this study was to analyse the role of these factors in cellular infection. A ST1 field strain (JF5203) from CC1 isolated from a bovine rhombencephalitis case was used to create deletion mutants. These were tested alongside the parental strain and EGD-e (CC9), in different culture models representing L. monocytogenes targets (neurons, microglia, placenta, intestine and macrophages). The phenotype was assessed by quantification of c.f.u. from cell lysates and immunofluorescence analysis. Compared to EGD-e, the ST1 strain JF5203 was hyperinvasive and exhibited increased intercellular spread. However, deletion of llsB, inlF or inlJ1, had no significant effect on infection or growth in the culture models tested. Our results underline the importance of using relevant clinical strains when investigating L. monocytogenes virulence. We show that despite the association with CC1, llsB, inlF and inlJ1 are not involved in the hyperinvasiveness and efficient intercellular spread of ST1 in various cell types.

  6. Effect of octenidine hydrochloride on planktonic cells and biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Norris, Carol E; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2009-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen capable of forming biofilms and persisting in food processing environments for extended periods of time, thereby potentially contaminating foods. The efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH) for inactivating planktonic cells and preformed biofilms of L. monocytogenes was investigated at 37, 21, 8, and 4 degrees C in the presence and absence of organic matter (rehydrated nonfat dry milk). OH rapidly killed planktonic cells and biofilms of L. monocytogenes at all four temperatures. Moreover, OH was equally effective in killing L. monocytogenes biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel matrices in the presence and absence of organic matter. The results underscore OH's ability to prevent establishment of L. monocytogenes biofilms by rapidly killing planktonic cells and to eliminate preformed biofilms, thus suggesting that it could be used as a disinfectant to prevent L. monocytogenes from persisting in food processing environments.

  7. Inhibition of listeriolysin O oligomerization by lutein prevents Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bowen; Teng, Zihao; Wang, Jianfeng; Lu, Gejin; Deng, Xuming; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    The foodborne pathogenic bacterial species Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) has caused incalculable damages to public health, and its successful infection requires various virulence factors, including Listeriolysin O (LLO). By forming pores in phagosomal membranes and even in some organelles, LLO plays an indispensable role in the ability of L. monocytogenes to escape from host immune attacks. Because of its critical role, LLO offers an appropriate therapeutic target against L. monocytogenes infection. Here, lutein, a natural small molecule existing widely in fruits and vegetables, is demonstrated as an effective inhibitor of LLO that works by blocking its oligomerization during invasion without showing significant bacteriostatic activity. Further assays applying lutein in cell culture models of invasion and in animal models showed that lutein could effectively inhibit L. monocytogenes infection. Overall, our results indicate that lutein may represent a promising and novel therapeutic agent against L. monocytogenes infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  9. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes Controls Virus Load after Vaginal Challenge with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E.; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and del...

  10. Swimming and swarming motility properties of peanut-nodulating rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Julio C; Dardanelli, Marta S; Giordano, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Motility allows populations of bacteria to rapidly reach and colonize new microniches or microhabitats. The motility of rhizobia (symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria that nodulate legume roots) is an important factor determining their competitive success. We evaluated the effects of temperature, incubation time, and seed exudates on swimming and swarming motility of five strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. (peanut-nodulating rhizobia). Swimming motility was increased by exudate exposure for all strains except native Pc34. In contrast, swarming motility was increased by exudate exposure for native 15A but unchanged for the other four strains. All five strains displayed the ability to differentiate into swarm cells. Morphological examination by scanning electron microscopy showed that the length of the swarm cells was variable, but generally greater than that of vegetative cells. Our findings suggest the importance of differential motility properties of peanut-nodulating rhizobial strains during agricultural inoculation and early steps of symbiotic interaction with the host.

  11. Bringing statistics up to speed with data in analysis of lymphocyte motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Kenneth; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Moses, Melanie E; Cannon, Judy L

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon (2P) microscopy provides immunologists with 3D video of the movement of lymphocytes in vivo. Motility parameters extracted from these videos allow detailed analysis of lymphocyte motility in lymph nodes and peripheral tissues. However, standard parametric statistical analyses such as the Student's t-test are often used incorrectly, and fail to take into account confounds introduced by the experimental methods, potentially leading to erroneous conclusions about T cell motility. Here, we compare the motility of WT T cell versus PKCθ-/-, CARMA1-/-, CCR7-/-, and PTX-treated T cells. We show that the fluorescent dyes used to label T cells have significant effects on T cell motility, and we demonstrate the use of factorial ANOVA as a statistical tool that can control for these effects. In addition, researchers often choose between the use of "cell-based" parameters by averaging multiple steps of a single cell over time (e.g. cell mean speed), or "step-based" parameters, in which all steps of a cell population (e.g. instantaneous speed) are grouped without regard for the cell track. Using mixed model ANOVA, we show that we can maintain cell-based analyses without losing the statistical power of step-based data. We find that as we use additional levels of statistical control, we can more accurately estimate the speed of T cells as they move in lymph nodes as well as measure the impact of individual signaling molecules on T cell motility. As there is increasing interest in using computational modeling to understand T cell behavior in in vivo, these quantitative measures not only give us a better determination of actual T cell movement, they may prove crucial for models to generate accurate predictions about T cell behavior.

  12. Bringing statistics up to speed with data in analysis of lymphocyte motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Letendre

    Full Text Available Two-photon (2P microscopy provides immunologists with 3D video of the movement of lymphocytes in vivo. Motility parameters extracted from these videos allow detailed analysis of lymphocyte motility in lymph nodes and peripheral tissues. However, standard parametric statistical analyses such as the Student's t-test are often used incorrectly, and fail to take into account confounds introduced by the experimental methods, potentially leading to erroneous conclusions about T cell motility. Here, we compare the motility of WT T cell versus PKCθ-/-, CARMA1-/-, CCR7-/-, and PTX-treated T cells. We show that the fluorescent dyes used to label T cells have significant effects on T cell motility, and we demonstrate the use of factorial ANOVA as a statistical tool that can control for these effects. In addition, researchers often choose between the use of "cell-based" parameters by averaging multiple steps of a single cell over time (e.g. cell mean speed, or "step-based" parameters, in which all steps of a cell population (e.g. instantaneous speed are grouped without regard for the cell track. Using mixed model ANOVA, we show that we can maintain cell-based analyses without losing the statistical power of step-based data. We find that as we use additional levels of statistical control, we can more accurately estimate the speed of T cells as they move in lymph nodes as well as measure the impact of individual signaling molecules on T cell motility. As there is increasing interest in using computational modeling to understand T cell behavior in in vivo, these quantitative measures not only give us a better determination of actual T cell movement, they may prove crucial for models to generate accurate predictions about T cell behavior.

  13. Gastric electrical stimulation optimized to inhibit gastric motility reduces food intake in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Geng-Qing; Zhu, Hongbing; Lei, Yong; Yuan, Charlene; Starkebaum, Warren; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that that a method of gastric electrical stimulation (GES) optimized to inhibit gastric motility was effective in reducing food intake in dogs. Female dogs with a gastric cannula and gastric serosal electrodes were studied in three experiments: (1) to determine the best parameters and locations of GES in inhibiting gastric tone, slow waves, and contractions in dogs;( 2) to investigate the reproducibility of the inhibitory effects of GES; and (3) to study the effect of the GES method on food intake in dogs. (1) For GES to exert significant effects on gastric motility, a pulse width of ≥2 ms was required, and with other appropriate inhibitory parameters, GES was able to increase gastric volume by 190.4 %, reduce antral contractions by 39.7 %, and decrease the percentage of normal slow waves by 47.6 %. In addition, the inhibitory effect of GES was more potent with the stimulation electrodes placed along the lesser or greater curvature than placed in the middle, and more potent with the electrodes placed in the distal stomach than in the proximal stomach; (2) the inhibitory effects of GES on gastric motility were reproducible; (3) the GES method optimized to inhibit gastric motility produced a 20 % reduction in food intakes in non-obese dogs. GES with appropriate parameters inhibits gastric motility, and the effects are reproducible. The GES method optimized to inhibit gastric motility reduces food intake in healthy dogs and may have a therapeutic potential for treating obesity.

  14. Aging and intestinal motility: a review of factors that affect intestinal motility in the aged.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Denis

    2012-02-03

    Normal aging is associated with significant changes in the function of most organs and tissues. In this regard, the gastrointestinal tract is no exception. The purpose of this review is to detail the important age-related changes in motor function of the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract and to highlight some of the important motility changes that may occur, either in relation to common age-related disorders, or as a result of certain drugs commonly prescribed in the aged. A major confounding factor in the interpretation of motor phenomena throughout the gastrointestinal tract in this age group is the frequent coexistence of neurological, endocrinological and other disease states, which may be independently associated with dysmotility. Overall, current data are insufficient to implicate normal aging as a cause of dysmotility in the elderly. Normal aging is associated with various changes in gastrointestinal motility, but the clinical significance of such changes remains unclear. More important is the impact of various age-related diseases on gastrointestinal motility in the elderly: for example, long-standing diabetes mellitus may reduce gastric emptying in up to 50% of patients; depression significantly prolongs whole-gut transit time; hypothyroidism may prolong oro-caecal transit time; and chronic renal failure is associated with impaired gastric emptying. In addition, various, frequently used drugs in the elderly cause disordered gastrointestinal motility. These drugs include anticholinergics, especially antidepressants with an anticholinergic effect, opioid analgesics and calcium antagonists.

  15. Identifying ingredients that delay outgrowth of Listeria monocytogenes in natural, organic, and clean-label ready-to-eat meat and poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Lindsey M; Glass, Kathleen A; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify ingredients that inhibit Listeria monocytogenes in natural, organic, or clean-label ready-to-eat meat and poultry products. Fourteen ingredients were screened in uncured (no-nitrate-or-nitrite-added), traditional-cured (156 ppm of purified sodium nitrite), cultured (alternative cured, natural nitrate source, and Staphylococcus carnosus), or preconverted (alternative cured, natural nitrite source) turkey slurries. Slurries were cooked, cooled, inoculated to yield 3 log CFU/ml L. monocytogenes, stored at 4°C, and tested weekly for 4 weeks. Three antimicrobial ingredients, 1.5 % vinegar-lemon-cherry powder blend, 2.5 % buffered vinegar, and 3.0 % cultured sugar-vinegar blend, were incorporated into alternative-cured ham and uncured roast beef and deli-style turkey breast. Controls included all three meat products without antimicrobial ingredients and a traditional-cured ham with 2.8 % sodium lactate-diacetate. Cooked, sliced products were inoculated with 3 log CFU/g L. monocytogenes, vacuum packed, and stored at 4 or 7°C, for up to 12 weeks. For control products without antimicrobial agents stored at 4°C, a 2-log L. monocytogenes increase was observed at 2 weeks for ham and turkey and at 4 weeks for roast beef. Growth (>1-log increase) in the sodium lactate-diacetate was delayed until week 6. Compared with the control, the addition of either vinegar-lemon-cherry powder blend or buffered vinegar delayed L. monocytogenes growth for an additional 2 weeks, while the addition of cultured sugar-vinegar blend delayed growth for an additional 4 weeks for both ham and turkey. The greatest L. monocytogenes delay was observed in roast beef containing any of the three antimicrobial ingredients, with no growth detected through 12 weeks at 4°C for all the treatments. As expected, L. monocytogenes grew substantially faster in products stored at 7°C than at 4°C. These data suggest that antimicrobial ingredients from a natural source

  16. Inflammasome-Mediated Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes-Stimulated Immunity Is Independent of Myelomonocytic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cassandra R.; Dustin, Michael L.; Sauer, John-Demian

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the Nlrc4 inflammasome results in the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 through caspase-1 and induction of pyroptosis. L. monocytogenes engineered to activate Nlrc4 by expression of Legionella pneumophilia flagellin (L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA) are less immunogenic for CD8+ T cell responses than wt L. monocytogenes. It is also known that IL-1β orchestrates recruitment of myelomonocytic cells (MMC), which have been shown to interfere with T cell-dendritic cells (DC) interactions in splenic white pulp (WP), limiting T cell priming and protective immunity. We have further analyzed the role of MMCs in the immunogenicity of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA. We confirmed that MMCs infiltrate the WP between 24–48 hours in response to wt L. monocytogenes infection and that depletion of MMCs enhances CD8+ T cell priming and protective memory. L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA elicited accelerated recruitment of MMCs into the WP. While MMCs contribute to control of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA, MMC depletion did not increase immunogenicity of L.p.FlaA expressing strains. There was a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA in CD8α+ DCs independent of MMCs. These findings suggest that limiting inflammasome activation is important for bacterial accumulation in CD8α+ DCs, which are known to be critical for T cell response to L. monocytogenes. PMID:24349458

  17. Microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods under special consideration of risk assessment approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    This paper shortly summarizes data related to risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes. From available data on risk assessment, it is concluded that the levels of L. monocytogenes consumed is an important factor affecting the incidence of listeriosis. Foods that do not support the growth of L....... monocytogenes are unlikely to be a source of listeriosis, whereas foods that support the growth to high levels, should be the target of risk management efforts. Based on current epidemiological information from several countries, a concentration of L. monocytogenes not exceeding 100/g of food at the time...

  18. Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in Mediterranean-Style Dry Fermented Sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Meloni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphological, physiological and epidemiological features of L. monocytogenes, together with the severity of human listeriosis infections, make L. monocytogenes of particular concern for manufacturers of cold-stored “ready to eat” (RTE foods. L. monocytogenes has been isolated from a wide variety of RTE foods and is responsible for several outbreaks associated with the consumption of RTE meat, poultry, dairy, fish and vegetable products. Although L. monocytogenes is among the most frequently-detected pathogens in dry fermented sausages, these products could be included in the category of RTE products in which the growth of L. monocytogenes is not favored and have rarely been implicated in listeriosis outbreaks. However, L. monocytogenes is highly difficult to control in fermented sausage processing environments due to its high tolerance to low pH and high salt concentration. In many Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages, an empirical application of the hurdle technology often occurs and the frequent detection of L. monocytogenes in these products at the end of ripening highlights the need for food business operators to properly apply hurdle technology and to control the contamination routes of L. monocytogenes in the processing plants. In the following, through an up-to-date review of (personal and un- published data, the main aspects of the presence of L. monocytogenes in Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages will be discussed.

  19. Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in Mediterranean-Style Dry Fermented Sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Domenico

    2015-03-12

    The morphological, physiological and epidemiological features of L. monocytogenes, together with the severity of human listeriosis infections, make L. monocytogenes of particular concern for manufacturers of cold-stored "ready to eat" (RTE) foods. L. monocytogenes has been isolated from a wide variety of RTE foods and is responsible for several outbreaks associated with the consumption of RTE meat, poultry, dairy, fish and vegetable products. Although L. monocytogenes is among the most frequently-detected pathogens in dry fermented sausages, these products could be included in the category of RTE products in which the growth of L. monocytogenes is not favored and have rarely been implicated in listeriosis outbreaks. However, L. monocytogenes is highly difficult to control in fermented sausage processing environments due to its high tolerance to low pH and high salt concentration. In many Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages, an empirical application of the hurdle technology often occurs and the frequent detection of L. monocytogenes in these products at the end of ripening highlights the need for food business operators to properly apply hurdle technology and to control the contamination routes of L. monocytogenes in the processing plants. In the following, through an up-to-date review of (personal and un-) published data, the main aspects of the presence of L. monocytogenes in Mediterranean-style dry fermented sausages will be discussed.

  20. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis due to Listeria monocytogenes: importance of enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Saroj; Connor, Martin; Donaldson, Shona; Austin, Hannah; Foster, Adele

    2010-09-01

    A case of Listeria monocytogenes induced spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is reported in a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis. It is an indolent illness and may not show a neutrophil reaction in peritoneal fluid. Enrichment broth was required to isolate L monocytogenes in the patient. This is not routinely used in the UK and therefore isolates may be missed. L monocytogenes remains sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin and gentamicin, but is resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics. The rising incidence of listeriosis in the population suggests that the incidence of SBP from L monocytogenes is likely to increase.

  1. Inflammasome-mediated inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes-stimulated immunity is independent of myelomonocytic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra R Williams

    Full Text Available Activation of the Nlrc4 inflammasome results in the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 through caspase-1 and induction of pyroptosis. L. monocytogenes engineered to activate Nlrc4 by expression of Legionella pneumophilia flagellin (L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA are less immunogenic for CD8(+ T cell responses than wt L. monocytogenes. It is also known that IL-1β orchestrates recruitment of myelomonocytic cells (MMC, which have been shown to interfere with T cell-dendritic cells (DC interactions in splenic white pulp (WP, limiting T cell priming and protective immunity. We have further analyzed the role of MMCs in the immunogenicity of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA. We confirmed that MMCs infiltrate the WP between 24-48 hours in response to wt L. monocytogenes infection and that depletion of MMCs enhances CD8(+ T cell priming and protective memory. L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA elicited accelerated recruitment of MMCs into the WP. While MMCs contribute to control of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA, MMC depletion did not increase immunogenicity of L.p.FlaA expressing strains. There was a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA in CD8α(+ DCs independent of MMCs. These findings suggest that limiting inflammasome activation is important for bacterial accumulation in CD8α(+ DCs, which are known to be critical for T cell response to L. monocytogenes.

  2. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Michel R Leroux

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-a...

  3. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn P. J.; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Michel R Leroux

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-a...

  4. Antibacterial activity of domestic Balkan donkey milk toward Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarić Ljubiša Ć.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of raw milk from Domestic Balkan donkey breed toward Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Examination of antibacterial activity was performed in artificially contaminated milk samples by monitoring the changes of count of viable cells of tested bacteria during 8 hours of incubation at 38°C. Lysozyme and fatty acids contents were also determined in donkey milk. The obtained results indicated inhibitory effect of donkey milk toward both tested bacteria. The lysozyme content in the analyzed milk samples was ranged from 0.67 to 3.54 g/L. The most abundant fatty acids with known antibacterial activity toward Gram positive bacteria were linoleic, lauric and oleic acid.

  5. Applicability of the EN ISO 11290-1 standard method for Listeria monocytogenes detection in presence of new Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Léna; Angelidis, Apostolos S; Boussaid, Djouher; Brasseur, Emilie Decourseulles; Manso, Eléonore; Gnanou Besse, Nathalie

    2016-12-05

    During the past six years, new species of the genus Listeria have been isolated from foods and other environmental niches worldwide. The Standard method EN ISO 11290-1 that is currently under revision will include in its scope all Listeria species in addition to L. monocytogenes. The objective of this project was to evaluate the ability of the Standard EN ISO 11290-1 method to detect and identify the newly discovered Listeria spp., and to assess potential over-growth effects of the new species in mixed cultures with L. monocytogenes during each step of the enrichment process. This objective was addressed by the generation of necessary data on the behavior of the new species during the pre-enrichment and the enrichment steps of the reference method as well as data on their phenotypic characteristics on rich and selective media used for isolation and identification. Most of the new Listeria species developed well on selective agar media for Listeria, however the recovery of some species was difficult due to poor growth in Half Fraser and Fraser broth. Good results (consistently positive) were obtained for confirmation at the genus level via the catalase test, the Gram test and the blueish appearance test on non-selective medium, but not with the VP test, as most of the new species yielded a negative result. In the light of results obtained in co-culture experiments and inhibition tests, and considering the growth rates in Half Fraser and Fraser broths, the new species do not seem to interfere with the detection of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Growth and inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth and validation in ground pork meat during simulated home storage abusive temperature and home pan-frying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground pork meat with natural microbiota and inoculated with low initial densities (1-10 or 10-100 CFU/g of Salmonella enterica or Listeria monocytogenes was stored under abusive temperature at 10°C and thermally treated by a simulated home pan-frying procedure. The growth and inactivation characteristics were also evaluated in broth. In ground pork meat, the population of S. enterica increased by less than one log after 12-days of storage at 10°C, whereas L. monocytogenes increased by 2.3 to 2.8 log units. No unusual intrinsic heat resistance of the pathogens was noted when tested in broth at 60°C although shoulders were observed on the inactivation curves of L. monocytogenes. After growth of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes at 10°C for 5 days to levels of 1.95 log CFU/g and 3.10 log CFU/g, respectively, in ground pork meat, their inactivation in the burger subjected to a simulated home pan-frying was studied. After thermal treatment S. enterica was undetectable but L. monocytogenes was recovered in three out of six of the 25 g burger samples. Overall, the present study shows that data on growth and inactivation of broths are indicative but may underestimate as well as overestimate behavior of pathogens and thus need confirmation in food matrix conditions to assess food safety in reasonably foreseen abusive conditions of storage and usual home pan-frying of of meat burgers in Belgium.

  7. Identification and Subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes by MALDI-TOF-MS%单增李斯特氏菌MALDI-TOF-MS鉴定与分型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王耀; 曹际娟; 赵昕; 郑秋月; 王刚; 田卓; 史媛媛; 曹远银

    2012-01-01

    In order to establish a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry(MALDI-TOF-MS) method for the rapid identification and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes,37 Listeria monocytogenes isolates were tested using MALDI-TOF-MS and characteristic protein fingerprints from their spectra were acquired and summarized into standard spectra to construct a database for the identification of Listeria monocytogenes.The method was highly reliable as demonstrated by the results obtained by the method for standard Listeria monocytogenes strains.Based on the identification database constructed,the Listeria monocytogenes isolates were classed into 9 subtypes at the protein level.%为建立单增李斯特氏菌的基质辅助激光解吸电离飞行时间质谱(MALDI-TOF-MS)快速鉴定与分型方法,实验收集37株单增李斯特氏菌分离株,应用MALDI-TOF-MS采集图谱,获取独特的蛋白质指纹图谱,汇总成标准图谱,建立单增李斯特氏菌鉴定数据库。采用单增李斯特氏菌标准菌株进行验证,表明鉴定结果的可信度很高。在数据库信息的基础上,对37株单增李斯特氏菌分离株进行聚类分型。分型结果表明,在蛋白质水平上,MALDI-TOF-MS可把37株单增李斯特氏菌分成9个型别。

  8. Molecular analysis of the role of osmolyte transporters opuCA and betL in Listeria monocytogenes after cold and freezing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Hanene; Elabed, Hamouda; Ben Slama, Rihab; Rhim, Amel; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of humans and other animals. The striking ability to survive several stresses usually used for food preservation makes L. monocytogenes one of the biggest concerns to the food industry. This ubiquity can be partly explained by the ability of the organism to grow and persist at very low temperatures, a consequence of its ability to accumulate cryoprotective compound called osmolytes. A quantitative RT-PCR assay was used to measure mRNA transcript accumulation for the stress response genes opuCA and betL (encoding carnitine and betaine transporters, respectively) and the housekeeping gene 16S rRNA. Assays were conducted on mid-exponential phase L. monocytogenes cells exposed to conditions reflecting cold and freezing stress, conditions usually used to preserve foods. We showed that expression of the two cold-adapted genes encoded the transporters of the cryoprotectants carnitine and betaine in ATCC 19115 and the food-isolated L. monocytogenes S1 is induced after cold and freezing stress exposure. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis of the genes encoding opuCA and betL revealed that each transporter is induced to different degrees upon cold shock of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 and S1. Our results confirm an increase in carnitine uptake at low temperatures more than in betaine after cold-shocked temperature compared to the non-stress control treatment. It was concluded the use of carnitine and betaine as cryoprotectants is essential for rapid induction of the tested stress response under conditions typically encountered during food preservation.

  9. Motility Evaluation in the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Sherine M; Kalra, Gorav; Moshiree, Baha

    2016-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suffer frequently from functional bowel diseases (FBD) and motility disorders. Management of FBD and motility disorders in IBD combined with continued treatment of a patient's IBD symptoms will likely lead to better clinical outcomes and improve the patient's quality of life. The goals of this review were to summarize the most recent literature on motility disturbances in patients with IBD and to give a brief overview of the ranges of motility disturbances, from reflux disease to anorectal disorders, and discuss their diagnosis and specific management.

  10. Small intestine motility development in newborn mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woliński, Jarosław; Słupecka-Ziemilska, Monika; Boryczka, Maria; Grzesiak, Paulina; Kwiatkowski, Jakub; Kotarba, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been working to improve the understanding of gastrointestinal motility. The first major discovery was the observation of a migrating myoelectric complex that turned out to be a universal occurrence among vertebrates. Further inquires resulted in a detailed description of its development during different stages of ontogeny. Some time before that, a cornerstone had been laid for a breakthrough that would come years later. That cornerstone came in the form of interstitial cells of Cajal whose true role could not be discerned until the discovery of a CD117 receptor - their main marker. With the ability to precisely mark interstitial cells of Cajal, a wave of subsequent new experiments and observations connected them to the occurrence of slow waves and allowed an understanding of the mechanism responsible for their generation. Some of these findings suggested that Cajal cells might have a role in the development of several motility disorders thus opening an avenue of research that requires the usage of both traditional and advanced diagnostic methods.

  11. Mechanics and polarity in cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, D.; Zanzottera, A.

    2016-09-01

    The motility of a fish keratocyte on a flat substrate exhibits two distinct regimes: the non-migrating and the migrating one. In both configurations the shape is fixed in time and, when the cell is moving, the velocity is constant in magnitude and direction. Transition from a stable configuration to the other one can be produced by a mechanical or chemotactic perturbation. In order to point out the mechanical nature of such a bistable behaviour, we focus on the actin dynamics inside the cell using a minimal mathematical model. While the protein diffusion, recruitment and segregation govern the polarization process, we show that the free actin mass balance, driven by diffusion, and the polymerized actin retrograde flow, regulated by the active stress, are sufficient ingredients to account for the motile bistability. The length and velocity of the cell are predicted on the basis of the parameters of the substrate and of the cell itself. The key physical ingredient of the theory is the exchange among actin phases at the edges of the cell, that plays a central role both in kinematics and in dynamics.

  12. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies.

  13. Epilepsy-induced motility of differentiated neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xuejun; Münzner, Gert; Zhao, Shanting; Tinnes, Stefanie; Kowalski, Janina; Häussler, Ute; Young, Christina; Haas, Carola A; Frotscher, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Neuronal ectopia, such as granule cell dispersion (GCD) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), has been assumed to result from a migration defect during development. Indeed, recent studies reported that aberrant migration of neonatal-generated dentate granule cells (GCs) increased the risk to develop epilepsy later in life. On the contrary, in the present study, we show that fully differentiated GCs become motile following the induction of epileptiform activity, resulting in GCD. Hippocampal slice cultures from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein in differentiated, but not in newly generated GCs, were incubated with the glutamate receptor agonist kainate (KA), which induced GC burst activity and GCD. Using real-time microscopy, we observed that KA-exposed, differentiated GCs translocated their cell bodies and changed their dendritic organization. As found in human TLE, KA application was associated with decreased expression of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin, particularly in hilar interneurons. Together these findings suggest that KA-induced motility of differentiated GCs contributes to the development of GCD and establish slice cultures as a model to study neuronal changes induced by epileptiform activity.

  14. Gastrointestinal motility and functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Zai, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Osamu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Digestive tract motility patterns are closely related to the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID), and these patterns differ markedly between the interdigestive period and the postprandial period. The characteristic motility pattern in the interdigestive period is so-called interdigestive migrating contraction (IMC). IMCs have a housekeeping role in the intestinal tract, and could also be related to FGID. IMCs arising from the stomach are called gastrointestinal IMCs (GI-IMC), while IMCs arising from the duodenum without associated gastric contractions are called intestinal IMCs (I-IMC). It is thought that I-IMCs are abnormal in FGID. Transport of food residue to the duodenum via gastric emptying is one of the most important postprandial functions of the stomach. In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), abnormal gastric emptying is a possible mechanism of gastric dysfunction. Accordingly, delayed gastric emptying has attracted attention, with prokinetic agents and herbal medicines often being administered in Japan to accelerate gastric emptying in patients who have anorexia associated with dyspepsia. Recently, we found that addition of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) to a high-calorie liquid diet rich in casein promoted gastric emptying in healthy men. Therefore, another potential method of improving delayed gastric emptying could be activation of chemosensors that stimulate the autonomic nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a role for MSG in the management of delayed gastric emptying in patients with FD.

  15. Identification of the full set of Listeria monocytogenes penicillin-binding proteins and characterization of PBPD2 (Lmo2812

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Juan A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs can be visualized by their ability to bind radiolabeled or fluorescent β-lactam derivatives both whole cells and membrane/cell enriched fractions. Analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes genome sequence predicted ten genes coding for putative PBPs, but not all of their products have been detected in studies using radiolabeled antibiotics, thus hindering their characterization. Here we report the positive identification of the full set of L. monocytogenes PBPs and the characteristics of the hitherto undescribed PBPD2 (Lmo2812. Results Eight L. monocytogenes PBPs were identified by the binding of fluorescent β-lactam antibiotic derivatives Boc-FL, Boc-650 and Amp-Alexa430 to proteins in whole cells or membrane/cell wall extracts. The gene encoding a ninth PBP (Lmo2812 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged protein. The affinity purified recombinant protein had DD-carboxypeptidase activity and preferentially degraded low-molecular-weight substrates. L. monocytogenes mutants lacking the functional Lmo2812 enzyme were constructed and, compared to the wild-type, the cells were longer and slightly curved with bent ends. Protein Lmo1855, previously designated PBPD3, did not bind any of the antibiotic derivatives tested, similarly to the homologous enterococcal protein VanY. Conclusions Nine out of the ten putative L. monocytogenes PBP genes were shown to encode proteins that bind derivatives of β-lactam antibiotics, thus enabling their positive identification. PBPD2 (Lmo2812 was not visualized in whole cell extracts, most probably due to its low abundance, but it was shown to bind Boc-FL after recombinant overexpression and purification. Mutants lacking Lmo2812 and another low molecular mass (LMM PBP, PBP5 (PBPD1 - both with DD-carboxypeptidase activity - displayed only slight morphological alterations, demonstrating that they are dispensable for cell survival and

  16. Motility-indole-lysine medium for presumptive identification of enteric pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, L B; Mirrett, S

    1975-09-01

    Detection of lysine decarboxylase activity is a useful supplement to reactions on triple sugar-iron (TSI) and urea agars in the initial examination of suspected pathogenic isolates from fecal cultures. Owing to the added value of motility and indole production in the differentiation of enteric pathogens, we prepared and evaluated a motility-indole-lysine (MIL) medium. The following 890 organisms were tested: 264 Shigella, 2 Edwardsiella, 182 Salmonella enteritidis, 235 S. typhi, 3 Arizona, 32 Yersinia enterocolitica, and 172 other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With few exceptions the MIL medium gave the same results as the standard motility, indole, and lysine decarboxylase (Moeller) test media. All discrepancies were with the indole reaction, which was weak in 2 of 67 strains of Escherichia coli and falsely negative in 6 of 32 strains of Y. enterocolitica. When both TSI agar and lysine-iron agar (LIA) slants are used in the evaluation isolates from fecal cultures, detection of H2S is duplicated. Both LIA and MIL medium detect lysine decarboxylase and deaminase activity equally well. Because of its ability to detect motility and indole production, the MIL medium is more useful than LIA when used with TSI agar. The combination of TSI agar, MIL medium, and urea agar enables reliable initial recognition of enteric pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae.

  17. Motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to SOS-inducible biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappa, Shakinah T; Maredia, Reshma; Phipps, Kara; Haskins, William E; Weitao, Tao

    2013-12-01

    DNA-damaging antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin induce biofilm formation and the SOS response through autocleavage of SOS-repressor LexA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the biofilm-SOS connection remains poorly understood. It was investigated with 96-well and lipid biofilm assays. The effects of ciprofloxacin were examined on biofilm stimulation of the SOS mutant and wild-type strains. The stimulation observed in the wild-type in which SOS was induced was reduced in the mutant in which LexA was made non-cleavable (LexAN) and thus SOS non-inducible. Therefore, the stimulation appeared to involve SOS. The possible mechanisms of inducible biofilm formation were explored by subproteomic analysis of outer membrane fractions extracted from biofilms. The data predicted an inhibitory role of LexA in flagellum function. This premise was tested first by functional and morphological analyses of flagellum-based motility. The flagellum swimming motility decreased in the LexAN strain treated with ciprofloxacin. Second, the motility-biofilm assay was performed, which tested cell migration and biofilm formation. The results showed that wild-type biofilm increased significantly over the LexAN. These results suggest that LexA repression of motility, which is the initial event in biofilm development, contributes to repression of SOS-inducible biofilm formation.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac G.M. Gahan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive encounters with acidic environments (which include the glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase systems, and those which enable the organism to cope with bile acids (including bile salt hydrolase and competition with the resident microbiota. An increased understanding of how the pathogen survives in this environment is likely to inform the future design of novel prophylactic approaches that exploit specific pharmabiotics; including probiotics, prebiotics or phages.

  19. Keberadaan Bakteri Listeria monocytogenes pada Keju Gouda Produksi Lokal dan Impor (PRESENCE OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN LOCAL AND IMPORTED GOUDA CHEESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debby Fadhilah Pazra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is included in the foodborne pathogen, which has been associated with severaloutbreaks of human listeriosis especially in high risk groups. Listeria monocytogenes could be found inGouda cheeses because of poor hygienic and sanitation practices. In addition, this bacteria could surviveduring the making of cheese and cheese ripening process. The purpose of this study was to identify thepresence of L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheeses and how the safety level of the Goudacheese against contamination of L. monocytogenes. This study used the conventional method in accordancewith the Bacteriological Analytical Manual, US Food and Drug Administration and Bergey’s Manual ofDeterminative Bacteriology to detect the presence of L. monocytogenes at 15 samples of local Gouda cheeseand 15 samples of imported Gouda cheese sold in supermarkets in Jakarta and Bogor. The results of thisstudy showed that was not found L. monocytogenes in local and imported Gouda cheese. It could be concludedthat is Gouda cheese relatively safe from L. monocytogenes and meets Indonesian National Standard.

  20. Transcriptional and phenotypic responses of Listeria monocytogenes to chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleitner, Aaron M; Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T; Linton, Richard L; Oliver, Haley F

    2014-05-01

    Significant food-borne disease outbreaks have occurred from consumption of ready-to-eat foods, including produce, contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Challenging food matrices (e.g., cantaloupe, sprouts) with limited processing steps postharvest to reduce pathogen loads have underscored a need for new mitigation strategies. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is increasingly being used in produce and other food systems to reduce food-borne pathogen levels. The goal of this study was to characterize the transcriptional response and survival of L. monocytogenes 10403S exposed to ClO2. The transcriptional profile of log-phase cells exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 for 15 min was defined by whole-genome microarray. A total of 340 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Among the differentially expressed genes, 223 were upregulated (fold change ≥ 1.5; adjusted P value < 0.05) in role categories responsible for protein fate, cellular processes, and energy metabolism. There were 113 and 16 genes differentially expressed belonging to regulatory networks of σ(B) and CtsR, respectively. We assessed L. monocytogenes 10403S survival after exposure to 100, 300, and 500 mg/liter aqueous ClO2 in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth; there was a significant difference between cells exposed to 500 mg/liter ClO2 and those exposed to all other conditions over time (P value < 0.05). Isogenic ΔsigB and ΔctsR mutants exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 were more sensitive to ClO2 than the wild type under the same conditions. These results provide an initial insight into the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to survive sublethal ClO2 and further our understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of this increasingly used sanitizer.

  1. How Listeria monocytogenes organizes its surface for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe eCarvalho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for the manifestation of human listeriosis, an opportunistic foodborne disease with an associated high mortality rate. The key to the pathogenesis of listeriosis is the capacity of this bacterium to trigger its internalization by non-phagocytic cells and to survive and even replicate within phagocytes. The arsenal of virulence proteins deployed by L. monocytogenes to successfully promote the invasion and infection of host cells has been progressively unveiled over the past decades. A large majority of them are located at the cell envelope, which provides an interface for the establishment of close interactions between these bacterial factors and their host targets. Along the multistep pathways carrying these virulence proteins from the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane to their cell envelope destination, a multiplicity of auxiliary proteins must act on the immature polypeptides to ensure that they not only maturate into fully functional effectors but also are placed or guided to their correct position in the bacterial surface. As the major scaffold for surface proteins, the cell wall and its metabolism are critical elements in listerial virulence. Conversely, the crucial physical support and protection provided by this structure make it an ideal target for the host immune system. Therefore, mechanisms involving fine modifications of cell envelope components are activated by L. monocytogenes to render it less recognizable by the innate immunity sensors or more resistant to the activity of antimicrobial effectors. This review provides a state-of-the-art compilation of the mechanisms used by L. monocytogenes to organize its surface for virulence, with special focus on those proteins that work behind the frontline, either supporting virulence effectors or ensuring the survival of the bacterium within its host.

  2. How Listeria monocytogenes organizes its surface for virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filipe; Sousa, Sandra; Cabanes, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for the manifestation of human listeriosis, an opportunistic foodborne disease with an associated high mortality rate. The key to the pathogenesis of listeriosis is the capacity of this bacterium to trigger its internalization by non-phagocytic cells and to survive and even replicate within phagocytes. The arsenal of virulence proteins deployed by L. monocytogenes to successfully promote the invasion and infection of host cells has been progressively unveiled over the past decades. A large majority of them is located at the cell envelope, which provides an interface for the establishment of close interactions between these bacterial factors and their host targets. Along the multistep pathways carrying these virulence proteins from the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane to their cell envelope destination, a multiplicity of auxiliary proteins must act on the immature polypeptides to ensure that they not only maturate into fully functional effectors but also are placed or guided to their correct position in the bacterial surface. As the major scaffold for surface proteins, the cell wall and its metabolism are critical elements in listerial virulence. Conversely, the crucial physical support and protection provided by this structure make it an ideal target for the host immune system. Therefore, mechanisms involving fine modifications of cell envelope components are activated by L. monocytogenes to render it less recognizable by the innate immunity sensors or more resistant to the activity of antimicrobial effectors. This review provides a state-of-the-art compilation of the mechanisms used by L. monocytogenes to organize its surface for virulence, with special focus on those proteins that work “behind the frontline”, either supporting virulence effectors or ensuring the survival of the bacterium within its host. PMID:24809022

  3. Targeting of the central nervous system by Listeria monocytogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Among bacteria that reach the central nervous system (CNS), Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is one of deadliest, in human and ruminant. This facultative intracellular bacterium has the particularity to induce meningitis, meningoencephalitis and rhombencephalitis. Mechanisms by which Lm accesses the CNS remain poorly understood, but two major routes of infection have been proposed, based on clinical, in vitro and in vivo observations. A retrograde neural route is likely to occur in ruminants upon ...

  4. Effects of L-carnitine and L-acetyl-carnitine on testicular sperm motility and chromatin quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aliabadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sperm cells extracted from testes (TESE have poor chromatin quality and motility. Various substances are used in the laboratory to increase sperm motility and improve the ART outcomes; however, there are few research which considered improving both sperm motility and chromatin quality. Objective: The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the improvement of the testicular sperm motility and chromatin quality exposed to L-carnitine (LC and L-acetyl-carnitine (LAC, which are normally concentrated in testis and epididymis, compared with Pentoxifylline (PF, which used for sperm motility enhancement in IVF procedures. Materials and Methods: TESE samples from 30 male mice divided into four parts. The sperm samples were added to Ham' F10 (control or the media contained 1.76mM of LC, LAC or PF, then, the samples were kept in the room temperature for 30, 90 and 180 min. At each time step, sperm motility and chromatin quality were assessed. Chromatin quality was evaluated by chromomycin A3 and aniline blue. Statistical analysis was performed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA. A p-value less than 0.05 were accepted as a statistically significant difference. Results: The results showed LC, LAC and PF significantly increased the sperm motility. However, sperm chromatin quality only improved significantly by administration of LC and LAC. Conclusion: Administration of LC and LAC to the testicular sperm samples can lead to improve both sperm motility and chromatin quality. It may be because they can mimic in vivo sperm condition during late spermatogenesis.

  5. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in a multi-species biofilm with Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium and control through sanitation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Fernandes, Meg; Kabuki, Dirce Yorika; Kuaye, Arnaldo Yoshiteru

    2015-05-04

    The formation of mono-species biofilm (Listeria monocytogenes) and multi-species biofilms (Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and L. monocytogenes) was evaluated. In addition, the effectiveness of sanitation procedures for the control of the multi-species biofilm also was evaluated. The biofilms were grown on stainless steel coupons at various incubation temperatures (7, 25 and 39°C) and contact times (0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days). In all tests, at 7°C, the microbial counts were below 0.4 log CFU/cm(2) and not characteristic of biofilms. In mono-species biofilm, the counts of L. monocytogenes after 8 days of contact were 4.1 and 2.8 log CFU/cm(2) at 25 and 39°C, respectively. In the multi-species biofilms, Enterococcus spp. were present at counts of 8 log CFU/cm(2) at 25 and 39°C after 8 days of contact. However, the L. monocytogenes in multi-species biofilms was significantly affected by the presence of Enterococcus spp. and by temperature. At 25°C, the growth of L. monocytogenes biofilms was favored in multi-species cultures, with counts above 6 log CFU/cm(2) after 8 days of contact. In contrast, at 39°C, a negative effect was observed for L. monocytogenes biofilm growth in mixed cultures, with a significant reduction in counts over time and values below 0.4 log CFU/cm(2) starting at day 4. Anionic tensioactive cleaning complemented with another procedure (acid cleaning, disinfection or acid cleaning+disinfection) eliminated the multi-species biofilms under all conditions tested (counts of all micro-organisms<0.4 log CFU/cm(2)). Peracetic acid was the most effective disinfectant, eliminating the multi-species biofilms under all tested conditions (counts of the all microorganisms <0.4 log CFU/cm(2)). In contrast, biguanide was the least effective disinfectant, failing to eliminate biofilms under all the test conditions.

  6. Towards a systemic understanding of Listeria monocytogenes metabolism during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo M Fuchs

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne human pathogen that can cause invasive infection in susceptible animals and humans. For proliferation within hosts, this facultative intracellular pathogen uses a reservoir of specific metabolic pathways, transporter and enzymatic functions whose expression requires the coordinated activity of a complex regulatory network. The highly adapted metabolism of L. monocytogenes strongly depends on the nutrient composition of various milieus encountered during infection. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies revealed the spatial-temporal dynamic of gene expression of this pathogen during replication within cultured cells or in vivo. Metabolic clues are the utilization of unusual C2- and C3-bodies, the metabolism of pyruvate, thiamine availability, the uptake of peptides, the acquisition or biosynthesis of certain amino acids, and the degradation of glucose-phosphate via the pentose phosphate pathway. These examples illustrate the interference of in vivo conditions with energy, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, thus affecting listerial growth. The exploitation, analysis and modelling of the available data sets served as a first attempt to a systemic understanding of listerial metabolism during infection. L. monocytogenes might serve as a model organism for systems biology of a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium.

  7. Recombinant Probiotic Expressing Listeria Adhesion Protein Attenuates Listeria monocytogenes Virulence In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ok Kyung; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular foodborne pathogen, infects immunocompromised hosts. The primary route of transmission is through contaminated food. In the gastrointestinal tract, it traverses the epithelial barrier through intracellular or paracellular routes. Strategies to prevent L. monocytogenes entry can potentially minimize infection in high-risk populations. Listeria adhesion protein (LAP) aids L. monocytogenes in crossing epithelial barriers via the paracellular route. The use of recombinant probiotic bacteria expressing LAP would aid targeted clearance of Listeria from the gut and protect high-risk populations from infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The objective was to investigate the ability of probiotic bacteria or LAP-expressing recombinant probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei (LbpLAP) to prevent L. monocytogenes adhesion, invasion, and transwell-based transepithelial translocation in a Caco-2 cell culture model. Several wild type probiotic bacteria showed strong adhesion to Caco-2 cells but none effectively prevented L. monocytogenes infection. Pre-exposure to LbpLAP for 1, 4, 15, or 24 h significantly (Pmonocytogenes in Caco-2 cells, whereas pre-exposure to parental Lb. paracasei had no significant effect. Similarly, LbpLAP pre-exposure reduced L. monocytogenes translocation by as much as 46% after 24 h. LbpLAP also prevented L. monocytogenes-mediated cell damage and compromise of tight junction integrity. Furthermore, LbpLAP cells reduced L. monocytogenes-mediated cell cytotoxicity by 99.8% after 1 h and 79% after 24 h. Conclusions/Significance Wild type probiotic bacteria were unable to prevent L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. In contrast, LbpLAP blocked adhesion, invasion, and translocation of L. monocytogenes by interacting with host cell receptor Hsp60, thereby protecting cells from infection. These data show promise for the use of recombinant probiotics in preventing L. monocytogenes infection in high

  8. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  9. Resistance to Biocides in Listeria monocytogenes Collected in Meat-Processing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conficoni, Daniele; Losasso, Carmen; Cortini, Enzo; Di Cesare, Andrea; Cibin, Veronica; Giaccone, Valerio; Corno, Gianluca; Ricci, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of microorganisms exerting resistance to biocides is a challenge to meat-processing environments. Bacteria can be intrinsically resistant to biocides but resistance can also be acquired by adaptation to their sub-lethal concentrations. Moreover, the presence of biocide resistance determinants, which is closely linked to antibiotic resistance determinants, could lead to co-selection during disinfection practices along the food chain, and select cross-resistant foodborne pathogens. The purpose of this work was to test the resistance of wild strains of Listeria monocytogenes, isolated from pork meat processing plants, toward benzalkonium chloride (BC), used as proxy of quaternary ammonium compounds. Furthermore, the expression of two non-specific efflux pumps genes (lde and mdrL) under biocide exposure was evaluated. L. monocytogenes were isolated from five processing plants located in the Veneto region (northeast of Italy) before and after cleaning and disinfection (C&D) procedures. A total of 45 strains were collected: 36 strains before and nine after the C&D procedures. Collected strains were typed according to MLST and ERIC profiles. Strains sampled in the same site, isolated before, and after the C&D procedures and displaying the same MLST and ERIC profiles were tested for their sensitivity to different concentrations of BC, in a time course assay. The expression of non-specific efflux pumps was evaluated at each time point by qPCR using tufA gene as housekeeping. A differential expression of the two investigated genes was observed: lde was found to be more expressed by the strains isolated before C&D procedures while its expression was dose-dependent in the case of the post C&D procedures strain. On the contrary, the expression of mdrL was inhibited under low biocidal stress (10 ppm BC) and enhanced in the presence of high stress (100 ppm BC). These findings suggests a possible role for C&D procedures to select L. monocytogenes persisters, pointing

  10. Resistance to biocides in Listeria monocytogenes collected in meat-processing environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Conficoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of microorganisms exerting resistance to biocides is a challenge to meat-processing environments. Bacteria can be intrinsically resistant to biocides but resistance can also be acquired by adaptation to their sub-lethal concentrations. Moreover the presence of biocide resistance determinants, which is closely linked to antibiotic resistance determinants, could lead to co-selection during disinfection practices along the food chain and select cross-resistant foodborne pathogens. The purpose of this work was to test the resistance of wild strains of Listeria monocytogenes, isolated from pork meat processing plants, towards benzalkonium chloride (BC, used as proxy of quaternary ammonium compounds. Furthermore, the expression of two non-specific efflux pumps genes (lde and mdrL under biocide exposure was evaluated. Listeria monocytogenes were isolated from five processing plants located in the Veneto region (northeast of Italy before and after cleaning and disinfection (C&D procedures. A total of 45 strains were collected: 36 strains before and 9 after the C&D procedures. Collected strains were typed according to MLST and ERIC profiles. Strains sampled in the same site, isolated before and after the C&D procedures and displaying the same MLST and ERIC profiles were tested for their sensitivity to different concentrations of BC, in a time course assay. The expression of non-specific efflux pumps was evaluated at each time point by qPCR using tufA gene as housekeeping. A differential expression of the two investigated genes was observed: lde was found to be more expressed by the strains isolated before C&D procedures while its expression was dose-dependent in the case of the post C&D procedures strain. On the contrary, the expression of mdrL was inhibited under low biocidal stress (10 ppm BC and enhanced in the presence of high stress (100 ppm BC. These findings suggests a possible role for C&D procedures to select Listeria monocytogenes

  11. Survey for Listeria monocytogenes in and on Ready-to-Eat Foods from Retail Establishments in the United States (2010 through 2013): Assessing Potential Changes of Pathogen Prevalence and Levels in a Decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchansky, John B; Chen, Yuhuan; Porto-Fett, Anna C S; Pouillot, Régis; Shoyer, Bradley A; Johnson-DeRycke, Rachel; Eblen, Denise R; Hoelzer, Karin; Shaw, William K; van Doren, Jane M; Catlin, Michelle; Lee, Jeehyun; Tikekar, Rohan; Gallagher, Daniel; Lindsay, James A; Dennis, Sherri

    2017-06-01

    A multiyear interagency Listeria monocytogenes Market Basket Survey was undertaken for selected refrigerated ready-to-eat foods purchased at retail in four FoodNet sites in the United States. Food samples from 16 food categories in six broad groups (seafood, produce, dairy, meat, eggs, and combination foods) were collected weekly at large national chain supermarkets and independent grocery stores in California, Maryland, Connecticut, and Georgia for 100 weeks between December 2010 and March 2013. Of the 27,389 total samples, 116 samples tested positive by the BAX PCR system for L. monocytogenes , and the pathogen was isolated and confirmed for 102 samples. Among the 16 food categories, the proportion of positive samples (i.e., without considering clustering effects) based on recovery of a viable isolate of L. monocytogenes ranged from 0.00% (95% confidence interval: 0.00, 0.18) for the category of soft-ripened and semisoft cheese to 1.07% (0.63, 1.68) for raw cut vegetables. Among the 571 samples that tested positive for Listeria-like organisms, the proportion of positive samples ranged from 0.79% (0.45, 1.28) for soft-ripened and semisoft cheese to 4.76% (2.80, 7.51) for fresh crab meat or sushi. Across all 16 categories, L. monocytogenes contamination was significantly associated with the four states (P monocytogenes , levels ranged from monocytogenes prevalence ranged from 0.11% (0.03, 0.34) for sprouts (prepackaged) to 1.01% (0.58, 1.74) for raw cut vegetables (prepackaged).

  12. A Biomechanical Model for Dictyostelium Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Buenemann, Mathias; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Sander, Leonard M

    2009-01-01

    The crawling motion of Dictyostelium discoideum on substrata involves a number of coordinated events including cell contractions and cell protrusions. The mechanical forces exerted on the substratum during these contractions have recently been quantified using traction force experiments. Based on the results from these experiments, we present a biomechanical model of Dictyostelium discoideum motility with an emphasis on the adhesive properties of the cell-substratum contact. Our model assumes that the cell contracts at a constant rate and is bound to the substratum by adhesive bridges which are modeled as elastic springs. These bridges are established at a spatially uniform rate while detachment occurs at a spatially varying, load-dependent rate. Using Monte-Carlo simulations and assuming a rigid substratum, we find that the cell speed depends only weakly on the adhesive properties of the cell-substratum, in agreement with experimental data. Varying the parameters that control the adhesive and contractile pro...

  13. Pediatric Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: Challenges and a Clinical Update

    OpenAIRE

    Chumpitazi, Bruno; Nurko, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    Pediatric gastrointestinal motility disorders are common and can range from relatively benign conditions such as functional constipation to more serious disorders such as achalasia, Hirschsprung disease, and intestinal pseudoobstruction. Performing and interpreting motility evaluations in children presents unique challenges and is complicated by a dearth of control information, underlying gastrointestinal developmental maturation, technical challenges (eg, catheter size limitations), and pati...

  14. Motility - Finding a Way to Mobility Attitude and Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Aslak Aamot

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the notion of motility as a way of understanding individual attitude and behavior in relation to mobility. Motility provides an elaborate understanding of the premises for individual mobility, and opens up for a conceptual analysis of mobility management policies....

  15. Bacterial motility in the sea and its ecological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Riemann, Lasse; Azam, F.

    2001-01-01

    colonization of living and dead algal cells by bacteria. Filtering seawater through a 1 µm filter reduced % motile, again suggesting the importance of particulate loci. Enrichment with dissolved organic nutrients enhanced % motile only after 6 h but it rapidly (=1 h) increased the time individual bacteria were...

  16. Enhancement of flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Sha, Sha; Pelcovits, Robert; Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the swimming speed of many species of flagellated bacteria in polymer solutions have shown that with the addition of high molecular weight polymers, the speed initially increases as a function of the kinematic viscosity. It peaks at around 1.5-2 cP with typically 10-30% higher values than in cell media without added polymers (~ 1 cP). Past the peak, the average speed gradually decreases as the solution becomes more viscous. Swimming motility persists until solution viscosity reaches 5-10 cP. Models have been proposed to account for this behavior, and the magnitude of the peak becomes a crucial test of theoretical predictions. The status of the field is complicated in light of a recent report (Martinez et al., PNAS, 2014), stressing that low-molecular weight impurities account for the peaked speed-viscosity curves in some cases. We measured the swimming speed of a uni-flagellated bacterium, caulobacter crescentus, in solutions of a number of polymers of several different sizes. Our findings confirm the peaked speed-viscosity curve, only as the molecular weight of the flexible polymers used surpassed ~ 50,000 da. The threshold molecular weight required to augment swimming speed varies somewhat with the polymer species, but it generally corresponds to radius of gyration over tens of nanometers. This general feature is consistent with the model of Powers et al. (Physics of Fluid, 2009), predicting that nonlinear viscoelasticity of the fluid enhances swimming motility. Work Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  17. Detection and genomic characterization of motility in Lactobacillus curvatus: confirmation of motility in a species outside the Lactobacillus salivarius clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Fabien J; Lynch, Shónagh M; Harris, Hugh M B; McCann, Angela; Lynch, Denise B; Neville, B Anne; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Okada, Sanae; Endo, Akihito; O'Toole, Paul W

    2015-02-01

    Lactobacillus is the largest genus within the lactic acid bacteria (LAB), with almost 180 species currently identified. Motility has been reported for at least 13 Lactobacillus species, all belonging to the Lactobacillus salivarius clade. Motility in lactobacilli is poorly characterized. It probably confers competitive advantages, such as superior nutrient acquisition and niche colonization, but it could also play an important role in innate immune system activation through flagellin–Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) interaction. We now report strong evidence of motility in a species outside the L. salivarius clade, Lactobacillus curvatus (strain NRIC0822). The motility of L. curvatus NRIC 0822 was revealed by phase-contrast microscopy and soft-agar motility assays. Strain NRIC 0822 was motile at temperatures between 15 °C and 37 °C, with a range of different carbohydrates, and under varying atmospheric conditions. We sequenced the L. curvatus NRIC 0822 genome, which revealed that the motility genes are organized in a single operon and that the products are very similar (>98.5% amino acid similarity over >11,000 amino acids) to those encoded by the motility operon of Lactobacillus acidipiscis KCTC 13900 (shown for the first time to be motile also). Moreover, the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements within and flanking the motility operon of L. curvatus suggests recent horizontal transfer between members of two distinct Lactobacillus clades: L. acidipiscis in the L. salivarius clade and L. curvatus inthe L. sakei clade. This study provides novel phenotypic, genetic, and phylogenetic insights into flagellum-mediated motility in lactobacilli.

  18. Microbial changes and growth of Listeria monocytogenes during chilled storage of brined shrimp ( Pandalus borealis )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Kjeldgaard, J.; Modberg, A.

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen storage trials and ten challenge tests were carried out to examine microbial changes, spoilage and the potential growth of Listeria monocytogenes in brined shrimp (Pandalus borealis). Shrimp in brine as well as brined and drained shrimp in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) were produced...... and lactic acids were studied. Furthermore, the effect of adding diacetate to brined shrimp was evaluated. A single batch of cooked and peeled shrimp was used to study both industrially and manually processed brined shrimp with respect to the effect of process hygiene on microbial changes and the shelf life...... of products. Concentrations of microorganisms on newly produced brined shrimp from an industrial scale processing line were 1.0-2.3 log (CFU g(-1)) higher than comparable concentrations in manually processed samples. This resulted in a substantially shorter shelf life and a more diverse spoilage microflora...

  19. Inducers and autoinducers on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium motility, growth and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia dos Santos da Conceição

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genus Salmonella bacteria are among the major pathogenic microorganisms in food. This bacterium pathogenicity is related to a number of virulence factors, among which its flagella. Flagellum expression is one of the virulence factors modulated by Quorum Sensing. Epinephrine produced by mammals uses the same signaling pathway of the 3 bacteria autoinducer. This study evaluated the effect of molecules inducer (epinephrine and autoinducers (autoinducer 2 and autoinducer 3 and their association with the motility, growth and expression genes flhC, fliA, fliY, motA, motB e fliC of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST. Initially, ST was inoculated in BHI. Then, motility assays, growth curves and gene expression were performed by testing different concentrations of epinephrine (50, 125, 250, 500µM, conditioned medium (10 and 50% and a combination of these. ST was exposed to different concentrations of epinephrine, conditioned medium and an association of both. Following, motility assays, bacterial growth and gene expression were performed. The results obtained showed that the combination of 500uM epinephrine with 50% conditioned medium increased ST bacterial motility by increasing the expression of genes involved in flagellum assembly.

  20. Bladder cancer cell growth and motility implicate cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated modifications of sphingolipids metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettiga, Arianna; Aureli, Massimo; Colciago, Giorgia; Murdica, Valentina; Moschini, Marco; Lucianò, Roberta; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf; Hedlund, Petter; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Colombo, Renzo; Bassi, Rosaria; Samarani, Maura; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Benigni, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory effects demonstrated by activation of cannabinoid receptors (CB) on cancer proliferation and migration may also play critical roles in controlling bladder cancer (BC). CB expression on human normal and BC specimens was tested by immunohistochemistry. Human BC cells RT4 and RT112 were challenged with CB agonists and assessed for proliferation, apoptosis, and motility. Cellular sphingolipids (SL) constitution and metabolism were evaluated after metabolic labelling. CB1-2 were detected in BC specimens, but only CB2 was more expressed in the tumour. Both cell lines expressed similar CB2. Exposure to CB2 agonists inhibited BC growth, down-modulated Akt, induced caspase 3-activation and modified SL metabolism. Baseline SL analysis in cell lines showed differences linked to unique migratory behaviours and cytoskeletal re-arrangements. CB2 activation changed the SL composition of more aggressive RT112 cells by reducing (p < 0.01) Gb3 ganglioside (−50 ± 3%) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, −40 ± 4%), which ended up to reduction in cell motility (−46 ± 5%) with inhibition of p-SRC. CB2-selective antagonists, gene silencing and an inhibitor of SL biosynthesis partially prevented CB2 agonist-induced effects on cell viability and motility. CB2 activation led to ceramide-mediated BC cell apoptosis independently of SL constitutive composition, which instead was modulated by CB2 agonists to reduce cell motility. PMID:28191815

  1. Laryngeal motility alteration: A missing link between sleep apnea and vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrelli, Elena; Saibene, Alberto M; Furia, Francesca; Chiesa, Valentina; Vignoli, Aglaia; Pipolo, Carlotta; Felisati, Giovanni; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and the relationship of sleep breathing disorders (SBDs) and laryngeal motility alterations in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy after vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation. Twenty-three consecutive patients with medically refractory epilepsy underwent out-of-center sleep testing before and after VNS implantation. Eighteen eligible subjects underwent endoscopic laryngeal examination post-VNS implantation. Statistical analysis was carried out to assess an association between laryngeal motility alterations and the onset/worsening of SBDs. After VNS implantation, 11 patients showed a new-onset mild/moderate SBD. Half of the patients already affected by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) showed worsening of SBD. All of the patients with a new-onset OSA had a laryngeal pattern with left vocal cord adduction (LVCA) during VNS stimulation. The association between VNS-induced LVCA and SBD was statistically significant. This study suggests an association between VNS and SBD, hinting to a pivotal role of laryngeal motility alterations. The relationship between SBD and VNS-induced LVCA supports the need to routinely investigate sleep respiratory and laryngeal motility patterns before and after VNS implantation.

  2. L-carnitine Supplemented Extender Improves Cryopreserved-thawed Cat Epididymal Sperm Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manee-in

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation of epididymal sperm is an effective technique to preserve genetic materials of domestic cats and wild felids when they unexpectedly die. However, this technique inevitably causes detrimental changes of cryopreserved-thawed spermatozoa, for example, by physical damage and excessive oxidative stress. L-carnitine is an antioxidant that has been used to improve sperm motility in humans and domestic animals. This study aimed to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on cat epididymal sperm quality following cryopreservation and thawing. After routine castration, cauda epididymides were collected from 60 cat testes. The epididymal spermatozoa from 3 cauda epididymides were pooled as 1 replicate. Spermatozoa samples (16 replicates were examined for spermatozoa quality and then randomly divided into 4 groups: 0 mM L-carnitine (control, 12.5 mM, 25 mM and 50 mM L-carnitine. The sperm aliquots were then equilibrated and conventionally frozen. After thawing, sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, DNA integrity and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The 25 mM L-carnitine significantly improved sperm motility compared with a control group (p<0.05, although this was not significantly different among other concentrations. In conclusion, supplementation of 25 mM L-carnitine in freezing extender improves cauda epididymal spermatozoa motility. The effects of L-carnitine on the levels of oxidative stress during freezing and thawing remains to be examined.

  3. Cryoprotective effect of L-carnitine on motility, vitality and DNA oxidation of human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihani, S; Agarwal, A; Sharma, R; Bayachou, M

    2014-08-01

    Successful cryopreservation for human spermatozoa markedly influences the reproductive outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies. But in spite of its usefulness, cryopreservation significantly decreases sperm quality. l-carnitine has been found to improve the quality of spermatozoa in selected cases with male infertility. Here, we examined the efficacy of l-carnitine in improving sperm motility and vitality and reducing sperm DNA oxidation during cryopreservation. Semen samples from infertile patients (n = 22) were collected and analysed. Cryopreservation medium supplemented with l-carnitine was mixed with the semen at a ratio of 1 : 1 (v/v). The final l-carnitine concentration in each cryovial was 0.5 mg ml(-1) per 5 × 10(6) cell ml(-1) . Controls were cryopreserved without addition of l-carnitine. After 24 h of cryopreservation, thawed sperm samples were analysed for motility, vitality and DNA oxidation. Sperm vitality was assessed by the eosin-nigrosin test, while sperm DNA oxidation was measured by flow cytometry. Addition of l-carnitine significantly improved sperm motility and vitality (P 0.05) in the levels of DNA oxidation between samples and controls. In conclusion, l-carnitine improves human sperm motility and vitality, but has no effect on sperm DNA oxidation after cryopreservation.

  4. Treating Woman with Myo-Inositol Vaginal Suppositories Improves Partner’s Sperm Motility and Fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Montanino Oliva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motility is the feature that allows spermatozoa to actively reach and penetrate the female gamete during fertilization. When this function is altered, and especially decreased, troubles in conceiving may occur. In this study, we demonstrated that treating fertile women with myo-inositol (MI vaginal suppositories ameliorated their partners’ sperm motility and also positively affected their conceiving capacity, without changes in cervical mucus structural and biochemical characteristics. Indeed, by means of the postcoital test on female cervical mucus, a significant improvement especially in progressive sperm motility was recorded after MI suppository use. Concomitantly, after MI treatment, a reduction of immotile spermatozoa percentage was observed. Importantly, MI vaginal supplementation positively correlated with a pregnancy for 5 of the 50 couples enrolled in the study, leading us to speculate that this substance may substantially contribute to create in the cervical mucus an ideal milieu that makes spermatozoa more motile and functionally able to fertilize. Even though the detailed mechanism is still unclear, these results should encourage MI vaginal use for the clinical improvement of male infertility, through their partners.

  5. Dietary probiotic supplement positively affects sperm motility in obese murine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Alipour, Hiva; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Obesity in adult men in recent years has inconsistently been associated with low semen quality and sub-fecundity. Probiotics have gained high interest as alternatives to pharmacological compounds. However, their possible effect on male fertility has been less investigated. This study aimed...... at assessing the use of L.Rhamnusus on obese male fertility characteristics. We proposed that this probiotic can not only reduce the weight but in parallel would enhance sperm motility in obese male mice. Diet-induced obese C57BL/6NTac mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups and treated with a single daily...... whereas the DIO mice in the test group did not gain significant weight after the start of probiotic test. The test group showed a significantly higher progressive motility compared to the control group after 4 weeks of receiving the probiotic treatment. L.Rhamnusus supplementation demonstrated a higher...

  6. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01

    The IX International Conference on Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST IX) was held from 14 to 19 January 2007 in Laughlin, NV, a town in the Mojave Desert on the Nevada-Arizona border near old Route 66 and along the banks of the Colorado River. This area is a home to rattlesnakes, sagebrush, abandoned gold mines, and compulsive gamblers. What better venue could scientists possibly dream of for a professional meeting? So there they were, about 190 scientists gathered in the Aquarius Casino Resort, the largest hotel and casino in Laughlin, discussing the latest advances in the field. Aside from a brief excursion to an abandoned gold mine and a dinner cruise on the Colorado River, the scientists focused on nothing but their data and hypotheses, in spirited arguments and rebuttals, and outlined their visions and future plans in a friendly and open environment. The BLAST IX program was dense, with nearly 50 talks and over 90 posters. For that reason, this meeting report will not attempt to be comprehensive; instead it will first provide general background information on the central topics of the meeting and then highlight only a few talks that were of special interest to us and hopefully to the wider scientific community. We will also attempt to articulate some of the future directions or perspectives to the best of our abilities. The best known and understood bacterial motility mechanism is swimming powered by flagella. The rotation of bacterial flagella drives this form of bacterial movement in an aqueous environment. A bacterial flagellum consists of a helical filament attached to the cell body through a complex structure known as the hook-basal body, which drives flagellar rotation. The essential components of the basal body are the MotA-MotB motor-stator proteins bound to the cytoplasmic membrane. These stator proteins interact with proteins that comprise the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings, which are components of the motor imbedded in the

  7. THE EFFECT OF DEOXYNIVALENOL ON RABBIT SPERMATOZOA MOTILITY IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marína Medveďová

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this in vitro study the effects of mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON on the motility parameters of rabbit spermatozoa were investigated. The spermatozoa motility was evaluated using CASA assay. Different concentrations of DON in the ejaculate was divided into four experimental group: 0 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL and 1000 ng/mL. Significant differences have not been detected between control group and experimental groups after the detailed analysis of certain motility parameters – total motile spermatozoa (%, progressively motile spermatozoa (%, average path distance (DAP, µm, average path velocity (VAP, µm/s and amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH, µm. Observed data suggested that further experiments are needed to be done because of a lack of the evidence toxinogenic effects of mycotoxin DON during its constant detection in feed and food.

  8. Motility of copepod nauplii and implications for food encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titelman, Josefin; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Velocity differences drive all encounter processes. Therefore, knowledge of both prey and predator motility are essential in order to understand feeding behavior and predict food acquisition rates. Here, we describe and quantify the motility behavior of young and old naupliar stages of 6 copepods...... of tracks, speeds, durations and frequencies of events as well as time budgets. Motility mode often changes drastically during naupliar ontogeny. Crudely, nauplii can be divided into those moving with a jump-sink type of motility of various frequencies (1 min(-1) to 3 s(-1)) and those swimming...... with a smoother glide of varying continuity. We apply observed time budgets and behavior-specific speeds in simple models to examine mechanisms of food encounter. The motility of all nauplii may account for clearance rates reported in the literature, but through different mechanisms. Smoothly swimming nauphi...

  9. Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-07-01

    Substrate-based crawling motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many biological functions, both in developing and mature organisms. Motility dysfunctions are involved in several life-threatening pathologies such as cancer and metastasis. Motile cells are also a natural realisation of active, self-propelled 'particles', a popular research topic in nonequilibrium physics. Finally, from the materials perspective, assemblies of motile cells and evolving tissues constitute a class of adaptive self-healing materials that respond to the topography, elasticity and surface chemistry of the environment and react to external stimuli. Although a comprehensive understanding of substrate-based cell motility remains elusive, progress has been achieved recently in its modelling on the whole-cell level. Here we survey the most recent advances in computational approaches to cell movement and demonstrate how these models improve our understanding of complex self-organised systems such as living cells.

  10. Evolutionary aspects of collective motility in pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogenic bacteria that can use its single polar flagellum to swim through liquids. It can move collectively over semisolid surfaces, a behavior called swarming. It can also settle and form surface-attached communities called biofilms that protect them from antibiotics. The transition from single motility (swimming) to collective motility (swarming) is biologically relevant as it enables exploring environments that a single bacterium cannot explore on its own. It is also clinically relevant since swarming and biofilm formation are thought to be antagonistic. We investigate the mechanisms of bacterial collective motility using a multidisciplinary approach that combines mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and microbial genetics. We aim to identify how these mechanisms may evolve under the selective pressure of population expansion, and consequently reinforce or hinder collective motility. In particular, we clarify the role of growth rate and motility in invasive populations.

  11. Efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride for reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes on cattle hides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Upadhyaya, Indu; Bhattaram, Varunkumar; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2012-06-01

    The efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH; 0.025, 0.15, and 0.25%) for inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes on cattle hides was investigated at 23°C in the presence and absence of bovine feces. All tested concentrations of OH were effective in decreasing more than 5.0 log CFU of bacteria/cm(2) in 5 min (P < 0.01). The results suggest that OH could be used to decontaminate cattle hides; however, further studies under commercial settings are necessary to validate these results.

  12. Changes in growth, rRNA content, and cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenes induced by CO2 up- and downshift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jydegaard-Axelsen, A.M.; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Koch, A.G.;

    2005-01-01

    Cell morphology, rRNA content, and growth were examined for Listeria monocytogenes LO28 and EGD, respectively, grown in brain-heart infusion (BHI) and on slices of sausage at 10degreesC in 100% CO2, 100% N-2, and air. In CO2, filamentous cells were formed by both strains on sausage slices and by L...... unchanged. On sausage slices, the number of colony forming units also increased rapidly for both strains in response to CO2 downshift. Large variations in rRNA content of individual cells were observed in the tested scenarios. The results demonstrate the risk of underestimating the number of infectious...

  13. Changes in growth, rRNA content, and cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenes induced by CO2 up- and downshift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jydegaard-Axelsen, A.M.; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Koch, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Cell morphology, rRNA content, and growth were examined for Listeria monocytogenes LO28 and EGD, respectively, grown in brain-heart infusion (BHI) and on slices of sausage at 10degreesC in 100% CO2, 100% N-2, and air. In CO2, filamentous cells were formed by both strains on sausage slices and by L...... unchanged. On sausage slices, the number of colony forming units also increased rapidly for both strains in response to CO2 downshift. Large variations in rRNA content of individual cells were observed in the tested scenarios. The results demonstrate the risk of underestimating the number of infectious...

  14. Listeria monocytogenes and the inflammasome: from cytosolic bacteriolysis to tumor immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Erin; Sauer, John-Demian

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic innate immune surveillance systems that recognize a variety of danger signals, including those from pathogens. Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular bacterium evolved to live within the harsh environment of the host cytosol. Further, L. monocytogenes can activate a robust cell-mediated immune response that is being harnessed as an immunotherapeutic platform. Access to the cytosol is critical for both causing disease and for inducing a protective immune response, and it is hypothesized that the cytosolic innate immune system, including the inflammasome, is critical for both host protection and induction of long term immunity. L. monocytogenes can activate a variety of inflammasomes via its pore-forming toxin Listeriolysin-O, flagellin, or DNA released through bacteriolysis; however, inflammasome activation attenuates L. monocytogenes, and as such, L. monocytogenes has evolved a variety of ways to limit inflammasome activation. Surprisingly, inflammasome activation also impairs the host cell-mediated immune response. Thus understanding how L. monocytogenes activates or avoids detection by the inflammasome is critical to understand the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes and improve the cell-mediated immune response generated to L. monocytogenes for more effective immunotherapies. PMID:27460808

  15. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptaion and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced...

  16. Influence of temperature on acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several factors play critical roles in controlling the induction of acid-stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes. Our findings show that temperature plays a significant role in the induction of acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and two distinct patterns were observed: (I) Presence of su...

  17. Listeria monocytogenes detection and behaviour in food and in the environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterial pathogen was studied, with emphasis on the detection and behaviour in food and environment.Epidemics of foodborne listeriosis have raised concern about the incidence of L. monocytogenes in foods. In the past 10-15 years listeriosis has emerged as a

  18. Diversity assessment of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation: Impact of growth condition, serotype and strain origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, S.R.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Veen, van der S.; Zwietering, M.H.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the ability to produce biofilms in food-processing environments and then contaminate food products, which is a major concern for food safety. The biofilm forming behavior of 143 L. monocytogenes strains was determined in four different media that wer

  19. A novel suicide plasmid for efficient gene mutation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although several plasmids have been used in Listeria monocytogenes for generating mutants by allelic exchange, construction of L. monocytogenes mutants has been inefficient due to lack of effective selection markers for first and second recombination events. To address this problem, we have develope...

  20. Betaine and L-carnitine transport by Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in response to osmotic signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Annette; Glaasker, Erwin; Poolman, Bert; Abee, Tjakko

    1997-01-01

    The naturally occurring compatible solutes betaine and L-carnitine allow the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to adjust to environments of high osmotic strength. Previously, it was demonstrated that L. monocytogenes possesses an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter. The present study reve

  1. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described i...

  2. Determination of thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken meat by isothermal and dynamic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research is to determine the thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken breast meat using both isothermal and dynamic conditions. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes was inoculated to chicken breast meat. Isothermal studies were performed by sub...

  3. Performance of stress resistant variants of Listeria monocytogenes in mixed species biofilms with Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, K.I.; Saa Ibusquiza, P.; Ortiz Camargo, A.R.; Krieg, M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Abee, T.

    2015-01-01

    Population diversity and the ability to adapt to changing environments allow Listeria monocytogenes to grow and survive under a wide range of environmental conditions. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the performance of a set of acid resistant L. monocytogenes variants in mixed-species biofilms w

  4. Surface attachment of Listeria monocytogenes is induced by sublethal concentrations of alcohol at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Anne; Lekkas, Charidimos; Knøchel, Susanne

    2005-09-01

    Sublethal concentrations of ethanol or isopropanol increased attachment of Listeria monocytogenes at 10, 20, or 30 degrees C; no induction occurred at 37 degrees C. The alcohol induction phenotype was retained in sigB and cesRK mutants; however, the degree of induction was affected. These results suggest that alcohol may contribute to the persistence of L. monocytogenes.

  5. Physiology of Listeria monocytogenes in relation to food components and biopreservation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, A.

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen that has been responsible for severe infections in humans. The ubiquitous distribution of L. monocytogenes in the environment and its ability to grow at refrigeration temperature and at high osmolarity are of paramount importance for its haz

  6. A multiplex PCR for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and its lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawool, Deepak B; Doijad, Swapnil P; Poharkar, Krupali V; Negi, Mamta; Kale, Satyajit B; Malik, S V S; Kurkure, Nitin V; Chakraborty, Trinad; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo B

    2016-11-01

    A novel multiplex PCR assay was developed to identify genus Listeria, and discriminate Listeria monocytogenes and its major lineages (LI, LII, LIII). This assay is a rapid and inexpensive subtyping method for screening and characterization of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Betaine and L-carnitine transport by Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in response to osmotic signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Annette; Glaasker, Erwin; Poolman, Bert; Abee, Tjakko

    1997-01-01

    The naturally occurring compatible solutes betaine and L-carnitine allow the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to adjust to environments of high osmotic strength. Previously, it was demonstrated that L. monocytogenes possesses an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter. The present study

  8. The fate of Listeria monocytogenes in brine and on Gouda cheese following artificial contamination during brining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, E.; Beumer, R.R.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The fate of 3 different Listeria monocytogenes strains (Scott A, 2F and 6E) was studied independently in brine and on factory-scale Gouda cheeses that had been submerged in brine that was artificially contaminated with these individual strains. Viable numbers of L. monocytogenes in the brine

  9. Diversity assessment of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation: Impact of growth condition, serotype and strain origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadam, S.R.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Veen, van der S.; Zwietering, M.H.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the ability to produce biofilms in food-processing environments and then contaminate food products, which is a major concern for food safety. The biofilm forming behavior of 143 L. monocytogenes strains was determined in four different media that

  10. Microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods under special consideration of risk assessment approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    This paper shortly summarizes data related to risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes. From available data on risk assessment, it is concluded that the levels of L. monocytogenes consumed is an important factor affecting the incidence of listeriosis. Foods that do not support the growth of L. m...

  11. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on cut cantaloupe, honeydew and watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyluk, Michelle D; Friedrich, Loretta M; Schaffner, Donald W

    2014-04-01

    A recent outbreak linked to whole cantaloupes underscores the importance of understanding growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in cut melons at different temperatures. Whole cantaloupe, watermelon, and honeydew purchased from a local supermarket were cut into 10 ± 1 g cubes. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes from food related outbreaks was used to inoculate fruit, resulting in ~10(3) CFU/10 g. Samples were stored at 4, 10, 15, 20, or 25 °C and L. monocytogenes were enumerated at appropriate time intervals. The square root model was used to describe L. monocytogenes growth rate as a function of temperature. The model was compared to prior models for Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 growth on cut melon, as well as models for L. monocytogenes on cantaloupe and L. monocytogenes ComBase models. The current model predicts faster growth of L. monocytogenes vs. Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 at temperatures below 20 °C, and agrees with estimates from ComBase Predictor, and a corrected published model for L. monocytogenes on cut cantaloupe. The model predicts ~4 log CFU increase following 15 days at 5 °C, and ∼1 log CFU increase following 6 days at 4 °C. The model can also be used in subsequent quantitative microbial risk assessments.

  12. Effects of female bovine plasma collected at different days of the estrous cycle on epididymal spermatozoa motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Mouloud, M; Ouennoughi, F; Yaiche, L; Kaidi, R; Iguer-Ouada, M

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of female bovine plasma collected at different days of the reproductive cycle on epididymal spermatozoa motility and to test hypothesis that the subpopulations pattern of motile spermatozoa is affected by this treatment. Blood plasma samples were collected from five Holstein Friesian cows at different stages of the estrous cycle (days 0, 5, 10, 12 and 18), one pregnant cow and one adult bull and were diluted 1:9 (V/V) with normal saline. Female charcoal-treated plasma, Bull plasma and saline were used as controls. Semen samples were obtained from cauda epididymidis through retrograde flushing and diluted in saline to approximately 60 × 106 sperm/ml. The extended semen was diluted 1:2 (V/V) with tested media and motility was evaluated at 15 min and then every hour for 6 h using a computer-assisted semen analysis. Multivariate clustering procedure was applied to identify and quantify specific subpopulations within the semen samples. The statistical analysis clustered all the motile spermatozoa into three separate subpopulations with defined patterns of movement: Subpopulation 1 poorly motile and non-progressive spermatozoa (39.3%), subpopulation 2 including the fastest and the most vigorous spermatozoa (46.4%) and subpopulation 3 represented by slow, non-vigorous but linear spermatozoa (14.3%). Initially, sperm samples supplemented with female, male or female charcoal-treated plasma stimulated equally total motility and spermatozoa belonging to subpopulation 2 regardless of the estrous cycle stage. After 1-h incubation, the motility of these both categories of spermatozoa (total motile and those assigned to subpopulation 2) is enhanced and maintained more in day 12, 18 and pregnant cow plasma than in female plasma from earlier stage of the estrous cycle (day 0, 5 and 10), male plasma and female-charcoal treated plasma. In conclusion, the overall results showed that female plasma stimulated significantly sperm

  13. [Microbiological characterisation of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from human cases in Andalusia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepe, José A; Torres, María José; Liró, Julia; Luque, Rafael; Aznar, Javier

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective study by genotyping 154 isolates from human listeriosis cases occurred in the region of Andalusia (southern Spain) in the period 2005-2009. Serotyping was performed for 1 and 4 somatic antigens using commercial Listeria antisera, and by multiplex-PCR serogrouping according to the method described by Doumith et al. (2004). The antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by Epsilon test and interpreted by CLSI criteria. PFGE was performed according to the PulseNet protocol with the ApaI enzyme. The similarity of PFGE profiles was evaluated using the Bionumerics software. The multiplex PCR protocol described by