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Sample records for monocytogenes based vaccines

  1. Adenovirus-based vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    2013-01-01

    The use of replication-deficient adenoviruses as vehicles for transfer of foreign genes offers many advantages in a vaccine setting, eliciting strong cellular immune responses involving both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Further improving the immunogenicity, tethering of the inserted target Ag to MHC...... class II-associated invariant chain (Ii) greatly enhances both the presentation of most target Ags, as well as overall protection against viral infection, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The present study extends this vaccination concept to include protection against intracellular...... bacteria, using Listeria monocytogenes as a model organism. Protection in C57BL/6 mice against recombinant L. monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant epitope of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP33) was greatly accelerated, augmented, and prolonged following vaccination with an adenoviral vaccine encoding GP...

  2. Surgical cytoreduction restores the antitumor efficacy of a Listeria monocytogenes vaccine in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gregory T; Judy, Brendan F; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Moon, Edmund K; Fridlender, Zvi G; Albelda, Steven M; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that immunotherapy may offer a promising treatment strategy for early-stage malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), but advanced tumor burden may limit the efficacy of immunotherapy. Therefore, we hypothesized that surgical cytoreduction could restore the efficacy of vaccine-based immunotherapy for MPM. We developed a murine model of MPM through transduction of a mesothelioma cell line with mesothelin. We used this model to evaluate the efficacy of a Listeria monocytogenes vaccine expressing mesothelin. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited at four weeks in animals vaccinated two weeks prior to tumor cell inoculation as compared to those given an empty vector control (1371 ± 420 mm(3) versus 405 ± 139 mm(3); p surgery reduced MDSCs to levels comparable to those in tumor-naïve mice. This study demonstrates that cytoreduction surgery restores the efficacy of cancer vaccines for MPM by reducing tumor-related immunosuppression that impairs immunotherapy.

  3. Tumor immunity within the central nervous system stimulated by recombinant Listeria monocytogenes vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Linda M; Jensen, Eric R; Kremen, Thomas J; Odesa, Sylvia K; Sykes, Steven N; Soung, Michael C; Miller, Jeff F; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2002-04-15

    Tumors arising within the central nervous system (CNS) present the immune system with a challenging target, given the heterogeneous nature of these neoplasms and their location within an "immunologically privileged" site. We used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus nucleoprotein (LCMV-NP) as a pseudotumor antigen to investigate recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a tumor vaccine against s.c. and intracerebral challenges with a NP-expressing glioma, 9L-NP. Using Fischer 344 rats, we demonstrate that vaccination with recombinant L. monocytogenes-NP stimulates protection against s.c., but not intracerebral, 9L-NP tumor challenge in an antigen-specific, CD8(+) T-cell-dependent manner. After s.c. tumor rejection, enhanced antitumor immunity is achieved via epitope spreading that permits complete resistance against lethal intracerebral challenge with 9L-NP and with the untransfected parental 9L tumor. Unlike the CD8(+)-dependent immune responses against s.c. 9L-NP tumors, this expanded intracerebral immunity against endogenous tumor-associated antigens is dependent on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the mechanisms of tumor immunity within the brain are different from those elicited against non-CNS tumors. Furthermore, vaccination approaches exploiting the concept of epitope spreading may enhance the efficacy of antitumor immune responses within the immunologically privileged CNS, potentially mediating tumor cell killing through both CD4(+)- and CD8(+)-dependent effector pathways.

  4. Whole genome sequence-based serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Lennkh, Anna; Murer, Andrea; Springer, Burkhard; Blaschitz, Marion; Indra, Alexander; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner; Sensen, Christoph W

    2016-10-10

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is currently becoming the method of choice for characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in national reference laboratories (NRLs). WGS is superior with regards to accuracy, resolution and analysis speed in comparison to several other methods including serotyping, PCR, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and multivirulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST), which have been used thus far for the characterization of bacterial isolates (and are still important tools in reference laboratories today) to control and prevent listeriosis, one of the major sources of foodborne diseases for humans. Backward compatibility of WGS to former methods can be maintained by extraction of the respective information from WGS data. Serotyping was the first subtyping method for L. monocytogenes capable of differentiating 12 serovars and national reference laboratories still perform serotyping and PCR-based serogrouping as a first level classification method for Listeria monocytogenes surveillance. Whole genome sequence based core genome MLST analysis of a L. monocytogenes collection comprising 172 isolates spanning all 12 serotypes was performed for serogroup determination. These isolates clustered according to their serotypes and it was possible to group them either into the IIa, IIc, IVb or IIb clusters, respectively, which were generated by minimum spanning tree (MST) and neighbor joining (NJ) tree data analysis, demonstrating the power of the new approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  6. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors based on Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus have been widely applied for vaccine development. Naked RNA replicons, recombinant viral particles, and layered DNA vectors have been subjected to immunization in preclinical animal models with antigens for viral targets and tumor antigens. Moreover, a limited number of clinical trials have been conducted in humans. Vaccination with alphavirus vectors has demonstrated efficient immune responses and has showed protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus and tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, vaccines have been developed against alphaviruses causing epidemics such as Chikungunya virus.

  7. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, O; Svane, I M;

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  8. Alphavirus-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2014-06-16

    Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  9. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  10. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2014-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication...

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes to USDA and AOAC Culture Based Methods for the Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joelsson, Adam C; Brown, Ashley S; Puri, Amrita; Keough, Martin P; Gaudioso, Zara E; Siciliano, Nicholas A; Snook, Adam E

    2015-01-01

    Veriflow® Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a molecular based assay for the presumptive detection of Listeria monocytogenes from environmental surfaces, dairy, and ready-to-eat (RTE) food matrixes (hot dogs and deli meat). The assay utilizes a PCR detection method coupled with a rapid, visual, flow-based assay that develops in 3 min post PCR amplification and requires only 24 h of enrichment for maximum sensitivity. The Veriflow LM system eliminates the need for sample purification, gel electrophoresis, or fluorophore-based detection of target amplification, and does not require complex data analysis. This Performance Tested Method(SM) validation study demonstrated the ability of the Veriflow LM method to detect low levels of artificially inoculated L. monocytogenes in seven distinct environmental and food matrixes. In each unpaired reference comparison study, probability of detection analysis indicated no significant difference between the Veriflow LM method and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook 8.08 or AOAC 993.12 reference method. Fifty strains of L. monocytogenes were detected in the inclusivity study, while 39 nonspecific organisms were undetected in the exclusivity study. The study results show that Veriflow LM is a sensitive, selective, and robust assay for the presumptive detection of L. monocytogenes sampled from environmental, dairy, or RTE (hot dogs and deli meat) food matrixes.

  12. Immunotherapeutic Vaccine as an Alternative Treatment to Overcome Drug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    cells by polyvalent Listeria monocytogenes-based vaccines. J Immunother 32:856-69. 6. Karkada M, Weir, G.M., Quinton,T., Sammatur, L., MacDonald, L.D...polyva- lent Listeria monocytogenes-based vaccines. J Immunother 2009; 32:856–69. 6 Karkada M, Weir GM, Quinton T et al. A novel breast/ovarian cancer

  13. Rapid and visual detection of Listeria monocytogenes based on nanoparticle cluster catalyzed signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisha; Huang, Ru; Liu, Weipeng; Liu, Hongxing; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2016-12-15

    Foodborne pathogens pose a significant threat to human health worldwide. The identification of foodborne pathogens needs to be rapid, accurate and convenient. Here, we constructed a nanoparticle cluster (NPC) catalyzed signal amplification biosensor for foodborne pathogens visual detection. In this work, vancomycin (Van), a glycopeptide antibiotic for Gram-positive bacteria, was used as the first molecular recognition agent to capture Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes). Fe3O4 NPC modified aptamer, was used as the signal amplification nanoprobe, specifically recognize to the cell wall of L. monocytogenes. As vancomycin and aptamer recognize L. monocytogenes at different sites, the sandwich recognition showed satisfied specificity. Compared to individual Fe3O4 nanoparticle (NP), NPC exhibit collective effect-enhanced catalytic activity for the color reaction of chromogenic substrate. The change in absorbance or color could represent the concentration of target. Using the Fe3O4 NPC-based signal amplification method, L. monocytogenes whole cells could be directly assayed within a linear range of 5.4×10(3)-10(8) cfu/mL and a visual limit of detection of 5.4×10(3) cfu/mL. Fe3O4 NPC-based method was more sensitive than the Fe3O4 NP-based method. All these attractive characteristics of highly sensitivity, visual and labor-saving, make the biosensor possess a potential application for foodborne pathogenic bacteria detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in cured deli-style Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kathleen A; McDonnell, Lindsey M; Von Tayson, Roxanne; Wanless, Brandon; Badvela, Mani

    2013-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes growth can be controlled on ready-to-eat meats through the incorporation of antimicrobial ingredients into the formulation or by postlethality kill steps. However, alternate approaches are needed to provide options that reduce sodium content but maintain protection against pathogen growth in meats after slicing. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibition of L. monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in high-moisture, cured turkey stored at 4 or 7°C. Six formulations of sliced, cured (120 ppm of NaNO2 ), deli-style turkey were tested, including control without antimicrobials, 3.2% lactate-diacetate blend (LD), 0.4% of a liquid propionate-benzoate-containing ingredient, or 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5% of a liquid propionate-containing ingredient. Products were inoculated with 5 log CFU L. monocytogenes per 100-g package (3 log CFU/ml rinsate), vacuum-sealed, and stored at 4 or 7°C for up to 12 weeks; and populations were enumerated by plating on modified Oxford agar. As expected, the control without antimicrobials supported rapid growth, with >2 log average per ml rinsate increase within 4 weeks of storage at 4°C, whereas growth was observed at 6 weeks for the LD treatment. For both replicate trials, all treatments that contained liquid propionate or propionate-benzoate limited L. monocytogenes growth to an increase of 1-log increase) was observed in individual samples for all propionate-containing treatments at weeks 10, 11, and 12. As expected, L. monocytogenes grew more rapidly when products were stored at 7°C, but trends in relative inhibition were similar to those observed at 4°C. These results verify that propionate-based ingredients inhibit growth of L. monocytogenes on sliced, high-moisture, cured turkey and can be considered as an alternative to reduce sodium-based salts while maintaining food safety.

  15. The challenge of setting risk-based microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Kirk; Nørrung, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    After more than 20 years of work with discussing the setting of microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods, Codex Alimentarius on Food Hygiene has finalised a proposal that was recently adopted by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The effort of developing procedures for making...... the microbiological criteria risk-based to the greatest extent possible has challenged scientists and managers during this long time period. Yet, the establishment of microbiological criteria for L. monocytogenes is still being discussed and several approaches are possible. Setting of microbiological criteria...

  16. Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    The intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.

  17. A Dual Microscopy-Based Assay To Assess Listeria monocytogenes Cellular Entry and Vacuolar Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quereda, Juan J; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Balestrino, Damien; Bobard, Alexandre; Danckaert, Anne; Aulner, Nathalie; Shorte, Spencer; Enninga, Jost; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-10-23

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium and a facultative intracellular pathogen that invades mammalian cells, disrupts its internalization vacuole, and proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm. Here, we describe a novel image-based microscopy assay that allows discrimination between cellular entry and vacuolar escape, enabling high-content screening to identify factors specifically involved in these two steps. We first generated L. monocytogenes and Listeria innocua strains expressing a β-lactamase covalently attached to the bacterial cell wall. These strains were then incubated with HeLa cells containing the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe CCF4 in their cytoplasm. The CCF4 probe was cleaved by the bacterial surface β-lactamase only in cells inoculated with L. monocytogenes but not those inoculated with L. innocua, thereby demonstrating bacterial access to the host cytoplasm. Subsequently, we performed differential immunofluorescence staining to distinguish extracellular versus total bacterial populations in samples that were also analyzed by the FRET-based assay. With this two-step analysis, bacterial entry can be distinguished from vacuolar rupture in a single experiment. Our novel approach represents a powerful tool for identifying factors that determine the intracellular niche of L. monocytogenes.

  18. In vitro Selection of DNA Aptamers and Fluorescence-Based Recognition for Rapid Detection Listeria monocytogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-qing; LIAN Ying-qi; GAO Chao; YU Xiao-feng; ZHU Ming; ZONG Kai; CHEN Xue-jiao; YAN Yi

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are speciifc nucleic acid sequences that can bind to a wide range of nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid targets with high afifnity and speciifcity. Nucleic acid aptamers are selected in vitro from single stranded DNA or RNA ligands containing random sequences of up to a few hundred nucleotides. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was used to select and PCR amplify DNA sequences (aptamers) capable of binding to and detecting Listeria monocytogenes, one of the major food-borne pathogens. A simpliifed afifnity separation approach was employed, in which L. monocytogenes in exponential (log) phase of growth was used as the separation target. A lfuorescently-labeled aptamer assay scheme was devised for detecting L. monocytogenes. This report described a novel approach to the detection of L. monocytogenes using DNA aptamers. Aptamers were developed by nine rounds of SELEX. A high afifnity aptamer was successfully selected from the initial random DNA pool, and its secondary structure was also investigated. One of aptamers named e01 with the highest afifnity was further tested in aptamer-peroxidase and aptamer-lfuorescence staining protocols. This study has proved the principle that the whole-cell SELEX could be a promising technique to design aptamer-based molecular probes for dectection of pathogenic microorganisms without tedious isolation and puriifcation of complex markers or targets.

  19. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  20. Control of Listeria monocytogenes on cold-smoked salmon using chitosan-based antimicrobial coatings and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng; Neetoo, Hudaa; Chen, Haiqiang

    2011-01-01

    The relatively high incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) products such as cold-smoked salmon is of serious concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-based edible coatings and films incorporating 3 generally recognized as safe (GRAS) antimicrobials, sodium lactate (SL), sodium diacetate (SD), and potassium sorbate (PS), against L. monocytogenes on cold-smoked salmon. Salmon samples were surface-inoculated with a 5-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes to a final concentration of 4.4 log CFU/cm(2) and then either coated with chitosan solutions or wrapped with chitosan films with or without the 3 antimicrobials. The samples were then vacuum packaged and stored at 4 °C for 30 d. The chitosan coatings with or without the antimicrobials consistently showed higher efficacy against L. monocytogenes than chitosan films having the same compositions. The most effective film treatments, chitosan films containing 1.2% SL/0.25% SD or 2.4% SL, achieved ≥ 1.3 log reductions of L. monocytogenes during the 30 d of refrigerated storage, while the most effective coating treatments, chitosan coatings containing 1.2% SL/0.25% SD or 0.15% PS/0.125% SD, achieved ≥ 2.8 log reductions. Practical Application: This study shows that chitosan-based edible coatings and films hold promise and can potentially assist fishery industries in their efforts to control L. monocytogenes.

  1. Real-time PCR detection of Listeria monocytogenes in infant formula and lettuce following macrophage-based isolation and enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J B; Basavanna, U

    2015-01-01

    To develop a rapid detection procedure for Listeria monocytogenes in infant formula and lettuce using a macrophage-based enrichment protocol and real-time PCR. A macrophage cell culture system was employed for the isolation and enrichment of L. monocytogenes from infant formula and lettuce for subsequent identification using real-time PCR. Macrophage monolayers were exposed to infant formula and lettuce contaminated with a serial dilution series of L. monocytogenes. As few as approx. 10 CFU ml(-1) or g(-1) of L. monocytogenes were detected in infant formula and lettuce after 16 h postinfection by real-time PCR. Internal positive PCR controls were utilized to eliminate the possibility of false-negative results. Co-inoculation with Listeria innocua did not reduce the L. monocytogenes detection sensitivity. Intracellular L. monocytogenes could also be isolated on Listeria selective media from infected macrophage lysates for subsequent confirmation. The detection method is highly sensitive and specific for L. monocytogenes in infant formula and lettuce and establishes a rapid identification time of 20 and 48 h for presumptive and confirmatory identification, respectively. The method is a promising alternative to many currently used q-PCR detection methods which employ traditional selective media for enrichment of contaminated food samples. Macrophage enrichment of L. monocytogenes eliminates PCR inhibitory food elements and contaminating food microflora which produce cleaner samples that increase the rapidity and sensitivity of detection. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes based on sequencing of 16S rRNA and hlyA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Dharmendra Kumar; Dubey, Suresh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    The discrimination between Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria species has been detected. The 16S rRNA and hlyA were PCR amplified with set of oligonucleotide primers with flank 1,500 and 456 bp fragments, respectively. Based on the differences in 16S rRNA and hlyA genes, a total 80 isolates from different environmental, food and clinical samples confirmed it to be L. monocytogenes. The 16S rRNA sequence similarity suggested that the isolates were similar to the previously reported ones from different habitats by others. The phylogenetic interrelationships of the genus Listeria were investigated by sequencing of 16S rRNA and hlyA gene. The 16S rRNA sequence indicated that genus Listeria is comprised of following closely related but distinct lines of descent, one is the L. monocytogenes species group (including L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri and L. welshimeri) and other, the species L. grayi, L. rocourtiae and L. fleischmannii. The phylogenetic tree based on hlyA gene sequence clearly differentiates between the L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri. In the present study, we identified 80 isolates of L. monocytogenes originating from different clinical, food and environmental samples based on 16S rRNA and hlyA gene sequence similarity.

  3. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and psychrotolerant lactic acid bacteria in processed seafood and mayonnaise-based seafood salads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Dalgaard, Paw

    2015-01-01

    A new combined model for Listeria monocytogenes and psychrotolerant Lactobacillus spp. was constructed and evaluated for processed seafood and mayonnaise-based seafood salads. The new model was constructed by combining existing cardinal parameter models for L. monocytogenes and Lactobacillus spp...

  4. Identification of Surface Protein Biomarkers of Listeria monocytogenes via Bioinformatics and Antibody-Based Protein Detection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cathy X. Y.; Brooks, Brian W.; Huang, Hongsheng; Pagotto, Franco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causes a significant percentage of the fatalities among foodborne illnesses in humans. Surface proteins specifically expressed in a wide range of L. monocytogenes serotypes under selective enrichment culture conditions could serve as potential biomarkers for detection and isolation of this pathogen via antibody-based methods. Our study aimed to identify such biomarkers. Interrogation of the L. monocytogenes serotype 4b strain F2365 genome identified 130 putative or known surface proteins. The homologues of four surface proteins, LMOf2365_0578, LMOf2365_0581, LMOf2365_0639, and LMOf2365_2117, were assessed as biomarkers due to the presence of conserved regions among strains of L. monocytogenes which are variable among other Listeria species. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the four recombinant proteins revealed the expression of only LMOf2365_0639 on the surface of serotype 4b strain LI0521 cells despite PCR detection of mRNA transcripts for all four proteins in the organism. Three of 35 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to LMOf2365_0639, MAbs M3643, M3644, and M3651, specifically recognized 42 (91.3%) of 46 L. monocytogenes lineage I and II isolates grown in nonselective brain heart infusion medium. While M3644 and M3651 reacted with 14 to 15 (82.4 to 88.2%) of 17 L. monocytogenes lineage I and II isolates, M3643 reacted with 22 (91.7%) of 24 lineage I, II, and III isolates grown in selective enrichment media (UVM1, modified Fraser, Palcam, and UVM2 media). The three MAbs exhibited only weak reactivities (the optical densities at 414 nm were close to the cutoff value) to some other Listeria species grown in selective enrichment media. Collectively, the data indicate the potential of LMOf2365_0639 as a surface biomarker of L. monocytogenes, with the aid of specific MAbs, for pathogen detection, identification, and isolation in clinical, environmental, and food samples. IMPORTANCE L. monocytogenes is

  5. B Cell Epitope-Based Vaccination Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Kametani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many peptide vaccines are undergoing clinical studies. Most of these vaccines were developed to activate cytotoxic T cells; however, the response is not robust. Unlike vaccines, anti-cancer antibodies based on passive immunity have been approved as a standard treatment. Since passive immunity is more effective in tumor treatment, the evidence suggests that limited B cell epitope-based peptide vaccines may have similar activity. Nevertheless, such peptide vaccines have not been intensively developed primarily because humoral immunity is thought to be preferable to cancer progression. B cells secrete cytokines, which suppress immune functions. This review discusses the possibility of therapeutic antibody induction by a peptide vaccine and the role of active and passive B cell immunity in cancer patients. We also discuss the use of humanized mice as a pre-clinical model. The necessity of a better understanding of the activity of B cells in cancer is also discussed.

  6. Adolescent Attitudes toward Influenza Vaccination and Vaccine Uptake in a School-Based Influenza Vaccination Intervention: A Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Pazol, Karen; Wingood, Gina M.; Windle, Michael; Orenstein, Walter A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: School-based vaccination programs may provide an effective strategy to immunize adolescents against influenza. This study examined whether adolescent attitudes toward influenza vaccination mediated the relationship between receipt of a school-based influenza vaccination intervention and vaccine uptake. Methods: Participants were…

  7. A dynamical systems approach to actin-based motility in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotton, S.

    2010-11-01

    A simple kinematic model for the trajectories of Listeria monocytogenes is generalized to a dynamical system rich enough to exhibit the resonant Hopf bifurcation structure of excitable media and simple enough to be studied geometrically. It is shown how L. monocytogenes trajectories and meandering spiral waves are organized by the same type of attracting set.

  8. Bacteria detection based on the evolution of enzyme-generated volatile organic compounds: determination of Listeria monocytogenes in milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Emma; Perry, John D; Stanforth, Stephen P; Dean, John R

    2014-10-27

    The rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in food is essential to prevent food-borne illness in humans. The aim of this study was to differentiate non-contaminated milk from milk contaminated with L. monocytogenes using enzyme substrates coupled with the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The method is based on the activity of β-glucosidase and hippuricase enzymes and the detection of a specific VOC i.e. 2-nitrophenol and 3-fluoroaniline, respectively. VOCs were extracted, separated and detected by headspace-solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME GC-MS). This approach required the inclusion of the selective agent's cycloheximide, nalidixic acid and acriflavine HCl in the growth medium to inhibit interfering bacteria. The VOCs were liberated by L. monocytogenes provided that samples contained at least 1-1.5×10(2) CFU ml(-1) of milk prior to overnight incubation. This approach shows potential for future development as a rapid method for the detection of L. monocytogenes contaminated milk.

  9. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity.

  10. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Specht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for molecular pharming in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes: diagnostic problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.; Hazeleger, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    The first isolation methods for the detection of Listeria spp. were generally based on the direct culture of samples on simple agar media, but isolation of the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes was difficult. In time, new techniques were developed, based on a variety of selective and elective agents

  12. Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to promote a tumor-specific immune response while concurrently removing the brakes from a portion of the immune system...1S. SUBJECT TERMS T Cells, Listeria monocytogenes, cancer vaccines 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF...12 FINAL REPORT PI: Bahjat, Keith INTRODUCTION We have been working with live-­‐‑attenuated Listeria (L

  13. Plant-Based Vaccines: Production and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Laere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-based vaccine technologies involve the integration of the desired genes encoding the antigen protein for specific disease into the genome of plant tissues by various methods. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer and transformation via genetically modified plant virus are the common methods that have been used to produce effective vaccines. Nevertheless, with the advancement of science and technology, new approaches have been developed to increase the efficiency of former methods such as biolistic, electroporation, agroinfiltration, sonication, and polyethylene glycol treatment. Even though plant-based vaccines provide many benefits to the vaccine industry, there are still challenges that limit the rate of successful production of these third-generation vaccines. Even with all the limitations, continuous efforts are still ongoing in order to produce efficient vaccine for many human and animals related diseases owing to its great potentials. This paper reviews the existing conventional methods as well as the development efforts by researchers in order to improve the production of plant-based vaccines. Several challenges encountered during and after the production process were also discussed.

  14. Reliable and Rapid Identification of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria Species by Artificial Neural Network-Based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffo, Cecilia A.; Schmitt, Jürgen; Wenning, Mareike; von Stetten, Felix; Scherer, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation of the species within the genus Listeria is important for the food industry but only a few reliable methods are available so far. While a number of studies have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify bacteria, the extraction of complex pattern information from the infrared spectra remains difficult. Here, we apply artificial neural network technology (ANN), which is an advanced multivariate data-processing method of pattern analysis, to identify Listeria infrared spectra at the species level. A hierarchical classification system based on ANN analysis for Listeria FTIR spectra was created, based on a comprehensive reference spectral database including 243 well-defined reference strains of Listeria monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri, and L. welshimeri. In parallel, a univariate FTIR identification model was developed. To evaluate the potentials of these models, a set of 277 isolates of diverse geographical origins, but not included in the reference database, were assembled and used as an independent external validation for species discrimination. Univariate FTIR analysis allowed the correct identification of 85.2% of all strains and of 93% of the L. monocytogenes strains. ANN-based analysis enhanced differentiation success to 96% for all Listeria species, including a success rate of 99.2% for correct L. monocytogenes identification. The identity of the 277-strain test set was also determined with the standard phenotypical API Listeria system. This kit was able to identify 88% of the test isolates and 93% of L. monocytogenes strains. These results demonstrate the high reliability and strong potential of ANN-based FTIR spectrum analysis for identification of the five Listeria species under investigation. Starting from a pure culture, this technique allows the cost-efficient and rapid identification of Listeria species within 25 h and is suitable for use in a routine food microbiological laboratory. PMID

  15. Development of multiple cross displacement amplification label-based gold nanoparticles lateral flow biosensor for detection of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yi Wang,1 Hui Li,1,2 Yan Wang,1 Hua Li,1 Lijuan Luo,1 Jianguo Xu,1 Changyun Ye1 1State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing, 2Department of Microbiology, GuiZhou Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Listeria monocytogenes, one of most problematic foodborne pathogens, is responsible for listeriosis in both humans and animals and mainly transmitted through the food chain. In this report, we propose a simple, rapid, and nearly instrument-free molecular technique using multiple cross displacement amplification (MCDA label-based gold nanoparticles lateral flow biosensor (LFB for specific, sensitive, and visual detection of L. monocytogenes. The MCDA-LFB method was carried out at a constant temperature (61°C for only 20 min during the reaction stage, and then the amplification mixtures were directly detected by using LFB, eliminating the use of an electrophoresis instrument, special reagents, or amplicon analysis equipment. The whole procedure, from sample processing to result indicating, was finished within 1 h. The analytical specificity of MCDA-LFB method was successfully determined by distinguishing the target bacterium from other pathogens. The analytical sensitivity of the MCDA-LFB assay was 10 fg of genomic templates per reaction in pure culture, which was in complete accordance with MCDA by gel electrophoresis, real-time turbidity, and colorimetric indicator. The assay was also successfully applied to detecting L. monocytogenes in pork samples. Therefore, the rapidity, simplicity, and nearly equipment-free platform of the MCDA-LFB technique make it possible for food control, clinical diagnosis, and more. The proof-of-concept assay can be reconfigured to detect

  16. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and psychrotolerant lactic acid bacteria in processed seafood and mayonnaise-based seafood salads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Dalgaard, Paw

    2015-04-01

    A new combined model for Listeria monocytogenes and psychrotolerant Lactobacillus spp. was constructed and evaluated for processed seafood and mayonnaise-based seafood salads. The new model was constructed by combining existing cardinal parameter models for L. monocytogenes and Lactobacillus spp. using the classical Jameson effect to model microbial interaction. Maximum population density (MPD) values of L. monocytogenes were accurately predicted in processed seafood with a known initial cell concentration of Lactobacillus spp. For these experiments, average MPD values of 4.5 and 4.3 log (cfu/g) were observed and predicted, respectively for L. monocytogenes. In seafood salads, growth of L. monocytogenes continued at a reduced growth rate after Lactobacillus sakei had reached their MPD. This growth pattern was successfully described by an expanded version of the classical Jameson effect model, but only for products with pH of 6.0 or higher. For seafood salads with pH below 6.0 the performance of the new model was unacceptable, primarily due to prediction of no-growth by L. monocytogenes when growth was actually observed. Within its range of applicability the new model can be valuable for risk assessment and risk management of processed seafood as well as for evaluating the compliance of products with the EU regulation for ready-to-eat foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of multiple cross displacement amplification label-based gold nanoparticles lateral flow biosensor for detection of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Hui; Wang, Yan; Li, Hua; Luo, Lijuan; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, one of most problematic foodborne pathogens, is responsible for listeriosis in both humans and animals and mainly transmitted through the food chain. In this report, we propose a simple, rapid, and nearly instrument-free molecular technique using multiple cross displacement amplification (MCDA) label-based gold nanoparticles lateral flow biosensor (LFB) for specific, sensitive, and visual detection of L. monocytogenes. The MCDA-LFB method was carried out at a constant temperature (61°C) for only 20 min during the reaction stage, and then the amplification mixtures were directly detected by using LFB, eliminating the use of an electrophoresis instrument, special reagents, or amplicon analysis equipment. The whole procedure, from sample processing to result indicating, was finished within 1 h. The analytical specificity of MCDA-LFB method was successfully determined by distinguishing the target bacterium from other pathogens. The analytical sensitivity of the MCDA-LFB assay was 10 fg of genomic templates per reaction in pure culture, which was in complete accordance with MCDA by gel electrophoresis, real-time turbidity, and colorimetric indicator. The assay was also successfully applied to detecting L. monocytogenes in pork samples. Therefore, the rapidity, simplicity, and nearly equipment-free platform of the MCDA-LFB technique make it possible for food control, clinical diagnosis, and more. The proof-of-concept assay can be reconfigured to detect various target sequences by redesigning the specific MCDA primers. PMID:28138243

  18. Biotechnology-based allergy diagnosis and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Prem L; Singh, Mohan B

    2008-03-01

    The diagnosis and immunotherapy currently applied to allergic diseases involve the use of crude extracts of the allergen source without defining the allergy-eliciting molecule(s). Advances in recombinant DNA technology have made identification, cloning, expression and epitope mapping of clinically significant allergens possible. Recombinant allergens that retain the immunological features of natural allergens form the basis of accurate protein-chip-based methods for diagnosing allergic conditions. The ability to produce rationally designed hypoallergenic forms of allergens is leading to the development of novel and safe forms of allergy vaccines with improved efficacy. The initial clinical tests on recombinant-allergen-based vaccine preparations have provided positive results, and ongoing developments in areas such as alternative routes of vaccine delivery will enhance patient compliance.

  19. A history of adolescent school based vaccination in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kirsten; Quinn, Helen; Menzies, Robert; McIntyre, Peter

    2013-06-30

    As adolescents have become an increasingly prominent target group for vaccination, school-based vaccination has emerged as an efficient and effective method of delivering nationally recommended vaccines to this often hard to reach group. School-based delivery of vaccines has occurred in Australia for over 80 years and has demonstrated advantages over primary care delivery for this part of the population. In the last decade school-based vaccination programs have become routine practice across all Australian states and territories. Using existing records and the recollection of experts we have compiled a history of school-based vaccination in Australia, primarily focusing on adolescents.

  20. DNA-Based Vaccine Protects Against Zika in Animal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161959.html DNA-Based Vaccine Protects Against Zika in Animal Study ... In animals infected with Zika virus, the synthetic DNA-based vaccine was 100 percent effective in protecting ...

  1. DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Against Zika in Monkey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161106.html DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Against Zika in Monkey Study ... THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental DNA-based vaccine protected monkeys from infection with the ...

  2. Cell-Based Screen Identifies Human Interferon-Stimulated Regulators of Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitson, Jennifer L.; Chen, Didi; Jimenez, Alyssa; Mettlen, Marcel; Schoggins, John W.; Alto, Neal M.

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) activated transcriptional response is a critical antiviral defense mechanism, yet its role in bacterial pathogenesis remains less well characterized. Using an intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) as a model bacterial pathogen, we sought to identify the roles of individual interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in context of bacterial infection. Previously, IFN has been implicated in both restricting and promoting Lm growth and immune stimulatory functions in vivo. Here we adapted a gain-of-function flow cytometry based approach to screen a library of more than 350 human ISGs for inhibitors and enhancers of Lm infection. We identify 6 genes, including UNC93B1, MYD88, AQP9, and TRIM14 that potently inhibit Lm infection. These inhibitors act through both transcription-mediated (MYD88) and non-transcriptional mechanisms (TRIM14). Further, we identify and characterize the human high affinity immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIa as an enhancer of Lm internalization. Our results reveal that FcγRIa promotes Lm uptake in the absence of known host Lm internalization receptors (E-cadherin and c-Met) as well as bacterial surface internalins (InlA and InlB). Additionally, FcγRIa-mediated uptake occurs independently of Lm opsonization or canonical FcγRIa signaling. Finally, we established the contribution of FcγRIa to Lm infection in phagocytic cells, thus potentially linking the IFN response to a novel bacterial uptake pathway. Together, these studies provide an experimental and conceptual basis for deciphering the role of IFN in bacterial defense and virulence at single-gene resolution. PMID:28002492

  3. Application Progress of Recombinant Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes in Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Xiaojiao; Bai Lin; Yang Xu

    2015-01-01

    Much progress of application of bacterial vaccine in treatment and prevention of tumor was acquired,which showed broad prospect in clinical study of animals and humans. Listeria monocytogenes( L. monocytogenes) was considered much important by virtue of its special characteristic of biology and immunology.L. monocytogenes was ingested by professional or part-time phagocytes,survived and proliferated in the phagocytes under synergism of toxic factor secreted by itself,meanwhile,the cellular and humoral immune response was induced. Antigenic gene of specific tumor was loaded in the attenuated L. monocytogenes,which can enhance immune response of host cells. Effective cell targeted to enter tumor tissue and acted on tumor cells to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Tumor degenerated not easy to reappear. Therefore,recombinant attenuated L. monocytogenes was a safe and effective anti-cancer vaccine vector. Now the work of researchers mainly focuses on solving practical problem in clinical application. Biological characteristics of L. monocytogenes,feasibility and superiority of L. monocytogenes as targeted vaccine vector,problem and prospect of L. monocytogenes in clinical application of anti-tumor were reviewed in this paper.

  4. Inactivation of several strains of Listeria monocytogenes attached to the surface of packaging material by Na-Chlorophyllin-based photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksiene, Zivile; Buchovec, Irina; Paskeviciute, Egle

    2010-12-02

    This study was focused on the possibility to inactivate thermosensitive Listeria monocytogenes ATC(L3)C 7644 and thermoresistant 56 Ly strain by Na-Chlorophyllin (Na-Chl)-based photosensitization in vitro and on the surface of packaging. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial efficiency of photosensitization with conventional surface cleaning was performed. Data indicate that both Listeria strains, after incubation with Na-Chl and following illumination (λ=400nm, 20mWcm(-2)), were inactivated by 7 log in vitro. This treatment cleaned both Listeria strains from packaging surfaces. Comparative analysis indicates that washing with water diminishes pathogens by less than 1 log, 200ppm Na-hypochlorite by 1.7 log, Na-Chl-based photosensitization by 4.5 log. Listeria biofilms were totally removed from the surface by photosensitization at higher photosensitizer concentrations and longer incubation times. In conclusion, both strains of L. monocytogenes can be effectively inactivated by photosensitization in vitro and on the surface of packaging. Listeria biofilms are susceptible to this treatment as well. Comparison of different surface decontamination treatments reveals that photosensitization is much more effective against both Listeria strains than washing with water or 200ppm Na-hypochlorite. Our data support the idea that Na-Chl-based photosensitization is an effective antimicrobial tool which may serve in the future for the development of human and environmentally friendly surface decontamination techniques.

  5. A novel Listeria monocytogenes-based DNA delivery system for cancer gene therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    van Pijkeren, Jan Peter

    2012-01-31

    Bacteria-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA to mammalian cells (bactofection) has been shown to have significant potential as an approach to express heterologous proteins in various cell types. This is achieved through entry of the entire bacterium into cells, followed by release of plasmid DNA. In a murine model, we show that Listeria monocytogenes can invade and spread in tumors, and establish the use of Listeria to deliver genes to tumors in vivo. A novel approach to vector lysis and release of plasmid DNA through antibiotic administration was developed. Ampicillin administration facilitated both plasmid transfer and safety control of vector. To further improve on the gene delivery system, we selected a Listeria monocytogenes derivative that is more sensitive to ampicillin, and less pathogenic than the wild-type strain. Incorporation of a eukaryotic-transcribed lysin cassette in the plasmid further increased bacterial lysis. Successful gene delivery of firefly luciferase to growing tumors in murine models and to patient breast tumor samples ex vivo was achieved. The model described encompasses a three-phase treatment regimen, involving (1) intratumoral administration of vector followed by a period of vector spread, (2) systemic ampicillin administration to induce vector lysis and plasmid transfer, and (3) systemic administration of combined moxifloxacin and ampicillin to eliminate systemic vector. For the first time, our results reveal the potential of Listeria monocytogenes for in vivo gene delivery.

  6. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines

  7. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines enc

  8. Canadian school-based HPV vaccine programs and policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Gilla K; Guichon, Juliet; Kelaher, Margaret

    2017-09-08

    The National Advisory Committee on Immunization in Canada recommends human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for females and males (ages 9-26). In Canada, the HPV vaccine is predominantly administered through publicly funded school-based programs in provinces and territories. This research provides an overview of Canadian provincial and territorial school-based HPV vaccination program administration and vaccination rates, and identifies foreseeable policy considerations. We searched the academic and grey literature and contacted administrators of provincial and territorial vaccination programs to compile information regarding HPV vaccine program administration and vaccination rates in Canada's 13 provincial and territorial jurisdictions. As of October 2016, all 13 Canadian jurisdictions vaccinate girls, and six jurisdictions include boys in school-based publicly funded HPV vaccination programs. Eleven jurisdictions administer the HPV vaccine in a two-dose schedule. The quadrivalent vaccine (HPV4) has been the vaccine predominantly used in Canada; however, the majority of provinces will likely adopt the nonavalent vaccine in the future. According to available data, vaccination uptake among females ranged between 46.7% and 93.9%, while vaccination uptake among males (in programs with available data to date) ranged between 75.0% and 87.4%. Future research and innovation will beneficially inform Canadian jurisdictions when considering whether to administer the nonavalent vaccine, whether to implement a two or one-dose vaccination schedule, and how to improve uptake and rates of completion. The usefulness of standardizing methodologies for collecting and reporting HPV vaccination coverage and implementing a national registry were identified as important priorities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Listeria monocytogenes inhibition by defatted mustard meal-based edible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hahn-Bit; Noh, Bong Soo; Min, Sea C

    2012-02-01

    An antimicrobial edible film was developed from defatted mustard meal (Sinapis alba) (DMM), a byproduct from the bio-fuel industry, without incorporating external antimicrobials and its antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes and physical properties were investigated. The DMM colloidal solution consisting of 184 g water, 14 g DMM, and 2g glycerol was homogenized and incubated at 37°C for 0.2, 0.5, 24 or 48 h to prepare a film-forming solution. The pH of a portion of the film-forming solution (pH 5.5) was adjusted to 2.0 or 4.0. Films were formed by drying the film-forming solutions at 23°C for 48 h. The film-forming solution incubated for 48 h inhibited L. monocytogenes in broth and on agar media. Antimicrobial effects of the film prepared from the 48 h-incubated solution increased with decrease in pH of the solution from 5.5 to 2.0. The film from the film forming solution incubated for 48 h (pH 2.0) initially inhibited more than 4.0 log CFU/g of L. monocytogenes inoculated on film-coated salmon. The film-coating retarded the growth of L. monocytogenes in smoked salmon at 5, 10, and 15°C and the antimicrobial effect during storage was more noticeable when the coating was applied before inoculation than when it was applied after inoculation. The tensile strength, percentage elongation, solubility in watercxu, and water vapor permeability of the anti microbial film were 2.44 ± 0.19 MPa, 6.40 ± 1.13%, 3.19 ± 0.90%, and 3.18 ± 0.63 gmm/kPa hm(2), respectively. The antimicrobial DMM films have demonstrated a potential to be applied to foods as wraps or coatings to control the growth of L. monocytogenes.

  10. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Lind

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. PURPOSE: We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. FINDINGS: Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV, Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support, families (e.g. convenience, the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities, the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles. Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized, families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions and the education sector (loss of instructional time. Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. CONCLUSIONS: Parents perceived

  11. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Sayers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bioinformatics scripts are developed and used to link vaccine adjuvants to different adjuvanted vaccines stored in the general VIOLIN vaccine database. Presently, 103 vaccine adjuvants have been curated in Vaxjo. Among these adjuvants, 98 have been used in 384 vaccines stored in VIOLIN against over 81 pathogens, cancers, or allergies. All these vaccine adjuvants are categorized and analyzed based on adjuvant types, pathogens used, and vaccine types. As a use case study of vaccine adjuvants in infectious disease vaccines, the adjuvants used in Brucella vaccines are specifically analyzed. A user-friendly web query and visualization interface is developed for interactive vaccine adjuvant search. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine adjuvants is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO in the Web Ontology Language (OWL format.

  12. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Sayers; Guerlain Ulysse; Zuoshuang Xiang; Yongqun He

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bi...

  13. Rhabdovirus-Based Vaccine Platforms against Henipaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Drishya; Wirblich, Christoph; Feldmann, Heinz; Marzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    domestic animals. A recent escalation in the frequency of outbreaks has increased the need for a vaccine that prevents HeV and NiV infections. In this study, we performed an extensive comparison of live and killed particles of two recombinant rhabdoviral vectors, rabies virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), expressing wild-type or codon-optimized HeV glycoprotein, with the goal of developing a candidate vaccine against HeV. Based on our data from the presented mouse immunogenicity studies, we conclude that a killed RABV vaccine would be highly effective against HeV infections and would make an excellent vaccine candidate in areas where both RABV and henipaviruses pose a threat to human health. PMID:25320306

  14. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  15. Prevalence and challenge tests of Listeria monocytogenes in Belgian produced and retailed mayonnaise-based deli-salads, cooked meat products and smoked fish between 2005 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttendaele, M; Busschaert, P; Valero, A; Geeraerd, A H; Vermeulen, A; Jacxsens, L; Goh, K K; De Loy, A; Van Impe, J F; Devlieghere, F

    2009-07-31

    Processed ready-to-eat (RTE) foods with a prolonged shelf-life under refrigeration are at risk products for listeriosis. This manuscript provides an overview of prevalence data (n=1974) and challenge tests (n=299) related to Listeria monocytogenes for three categories of RTE food i) mayonnaise-based deli-salads (1187 presence/absence tests and 182 challenge tests), ii) cooked meat products (639 presence/absence tests and 92 challenge tests), and iii) smoked fish (90 presence/absence tests and 25 challenge tests), based on data records obtained from various food business operators in Belgium in the frame of the validation and verification of their HACCP plans over the period 2005-2007. Overall, the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in these RTE foods in the present study was lower compared to former studies in Belgium. For mayonnaise-based deli-salads, in 80 out of 1187 samples (6.7%) the pathogen was detected in 25 g. L. monocytogenes positive samples were often associated with smoked fish deli-salads. Cooked meat products showed a 1.1% (n=639) prevalence of the pathogen. For both food categories, numbers per gram never exceeded 100 CFU. L. monocytogenes was detected in 27.8% (25/90) smoked fish samples, while 4/25 positive samples failed to comply to the 100 CFU/g limit set out in EU Regulation 2073/2005. Challenge testing showed growth potential in 18/182 (9.9%) deli-salads and 61/92 (66%) cooked meat products. Nevertheless, both for deli-salads and cooked meat products, appropriate product formulation and storage conditions based upon hurdle technology could guarantee no growth of L. monocytogenes throughout the shelf-life as specified by the food business operator. Challenge testing of smoked fish showed growth of L. monocytogenes in 12/25 samples stored for 3-4 weeks at 4 degrees C. Of 45 (non-inoculated) smoked fish samples (13 of which were initially positive in 25 g) which were subjected to shelf-life testing, numbers exceeded 100 CFU/g in only one sample

  16. An Internalin A Probe-Based Genosensor for Listeria monocytogenes Detection and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bifulco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Internalin A (InlA, a protein required for Listeria monocytogenes virulence, is encoded by the inlA gene, which is only found in pathogenic strains of this genus. One of the best ways to detect and confirm the pathogenicity of the strain is the detection of one of the virulence factors produced by the microorganism. This paper focuses on the design of an electrochemical genosensor used to detect the inlA gene in Listeria strains without labelling the target DNA. The electrochemical sensor was obtained by immobilising an inlA gene probe (single-stranded oligonucleotide on the surfaces of screen-printed gold electrodes (Au-SPEs by means of a mercaptan-activated self-assembled monolayer (SAM. The hybridisation reaction occurring on the electrode surface was electrochemically transduced by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV using methylene blue (MB as an indicator. The covalently immobilised single-stranded DNA was able to selectively hybridise to its complementary DNA sequences in solution to form double-stranded DNA on the gold surface. A significant decrease of the peak current of the voltammogram (DPV upon hybridisation of immobilised ssDNA was recorded. Whole DNA samples of L. monocytogenes strains could be discriminated from other nonpathogenic Listeria species DNA with the inlA gene DNA probe genosensor.

  17. Defining and Evaluating a Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for Whole-Genome Sequence-Based Typing of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppitsch, Werner; Pietzka, Ariane; Prior, Karola; Bletz, Stefan; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Allerberger, Franz; Harmsen, Dag; Mellmann, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has emerged today as an ultimate typing tool to characterize Listeria monocytogenes outbreaks. However, data analysis and interlaboratory comparability of WGS data are still challenging for most public health laboratories. Therefore, we have developed and evaluated a new L. monocytogenes typing scheme based on genome-wide gene-by-gene comparisons (core genome multilocus the sequence typing [cgMLST]) to allow for a unique typing nomenclature. Initially, we determined the breadth of the L. monocytogenes population based on MLST data with a Bayesian approach. Based on the genome sequence data of representative isolates for the whole population, cgMLST target genes were defined and reappraised with 67 L. monocytogenes isolates from two outbreaks and serotype reference strains. The Bayesian population analysis generated five L. monocytogenes groups. Using all available NCBI RefSeq genomes (n = 36) and six additionally sequenced strains, all genetic groups were covered. Pairwise comparisons of these 42 genome sequences resulted in 1,701 cgMLST targets present in all 42 genomes with 100% overlap and ≥90% sequence similarity. Overall, ≥99.1% of the cgMLST targets were present in 67 outbreak and serotype reference strains, underlining the representativeness of the cgMLST scheme. Moreover, cgMLST enabled clustering of outbreak isolates with ≤10 alleles difference and unambiguous separation from unrelated outgroup isolates. In conclusion, the novel cgMLST scheme not only improves outbreak investigations but also enables, due to the availability of the automatically curated cgMLST nomenclature, interlaboratory exchange of data that are crucial, especially for rapid responses during transsectorial outbreaks.

  18. Magnetic bead based immuno-detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables using the Bio-Plex suspension array system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J B; Basavanna, U

    2015-04-01

    Listeriosis, a disease contracted via the consumption of foods contaminated with pathogenic Listeria species, can produce severe symptoms and high mortality in susceptible people and animals. The development of molecular methods and immuno-based techniques for detection of pathogenic Listeria in foods has been challenging due to the presence of assay inhibiting food components. In this study, we utilize a macrophage cell culture system for the isolation and enrichment of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables for subsequent identification using the Luminex xMAP technique. Macrophage monolayers were exposed to infant formula, lettuce and celery contaminated with L. monocytogenes or L. ivanovii. Magnetic microspheres conjugated to Listeria specific antibody were used to capture Listeria from infected macrophages and then analyzed using the Bio-Plex 200 analyzer. As few as 10 CFU/mL or g of L. monocytogenes was detected in all foods tested. The detection limit for L. ivanovii was 10 CFU/mL in infant formula and 100 CFU/g in leafy greens. Microsphere bound Listeria obtained from infected macrophage lysates could also be isolated on selective media for subsequent confirmatory identification. This method presumptively identifies L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii from infant formula, lettuce and celery in less than 28 h with confirmatory identifications completed in less than 48 h.

  19. Evaluation of aqueous and alcohol-based quaternary ammonium sanitizers for inactivating Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes on peanut and pistachio shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEgan, Rachel; Danyluk, Michelle D

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of aqueous (aQUAT) and isopropyl alcohol-based quaternary ammonium (ipQUAT) sanitizers for reducing Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli O157:H7, or Listeria monocytogenes populations on peanut and pistachio shell pieces. Inoculated nutshells were mixed with QUAT sanitizers, water, or 70% ethanol and enumerated immediately or after incubation at 30 °C for 48 h. None of the treatments had any immediate effect on Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7 populations on the peanut or pistachio shells. L. monocytogenes populations declined immediately on the peanut and pistachio shells treated with aQUAT or ipQUAT. After incubation, Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 populations increased significantly on the water- or aQUAT-treated peanut and pistachio shells. L. monocytogenes populations also increased significantly on the water- or aQUAT-treated peanut shells, but levels did not change on the water-treated pistachio shells and levels were just above the limit of detection on the aQUAT-treated pistachio shells. After treatment with ipQUAT and 48-h incubation, Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 populations decreased to or below the limit of detection on both shell types; L. monocytogenes populations remained at or below the limit of detection on both shell types.

  20. Cellular Immune Response to an Engineered Cell-Based Tumor Vaccine at the Vaccination Site

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou,Qiang; Johnson, Bryon D.; Rimas J Orentas

    2007-01-01

    The engineered expression of the immune co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD137L on the surface of a neuroblastoma cell line converts this tumor into a cell-based cancer vaccine. The mechanism by which this vaccine activates the immune system was investigated by capturing and analyzing immune cells responding to the vaccine cell line embedded in a collagen matrix and injected subcutaneously. The vaccine induced a significant increase in the number of activated CD62L− CCR7− CD49b+ CD8 effector...

  1. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. Results The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner) was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91%) and precision (99%) from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella vaccines and genes were

  2. Tracking Listeria monocytogenes contamination and virulence-associated characteristics in the ready-to-eat meat-based food products industry according to the hygiene level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, A R; Gama, L T; Fraqueza, M J

    2017-02-02

    Listeria monocytogenes isolates collected from final products and food contact surfaces of 10 ready-to-eat meat-based food products (RTEMP) producing industries were analyzed to relate their virulence-associated characteristics and genetic profiles with the hygiene assessment of those industries. Together with sample collection, an audit was performed to evaluate the implemented food safety management system and to investigate the specific audit requisites more associated to the occurrence of those L. monocytogenes serogroups frequently related with human disease. L. monocytogenes was present in 18% of the samples. The isolates (n=62) were serogrouped and detection of virulence-associated genes inlA, inlB, inlC and inlJ, and also plcA, hlyA, actA and iap was done by multiplex PCR. After this initial characterization, selected isolates (n=31) were submitted to antibiotic resistance testing by the disk diffusion method for the currently most used human and veterinary antibiotics and resistance was low. These isolates were also subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Genotyping and serogrouping of L. monocytogenes isolates revealed a genetically diverse population. Our data indicate that contamination of final products does not seem to be uniquely related to the sampled food surfaces. The occurrence of those L. monocytogenes serogroups more commonly associated with human disease in industries with a high hygienic audit classification could be the result of a previous identification of the pathogen, with an enforcement of the hygiene program without recognizing the real source of contamination. This reinforces the importance of a conjoined diagnosis using audit data and microbiological testing. Food safety management systems of those industries need improvement, particularly in cleaning and sanitizing operations, analytical control, preventive maintenance, personal hygiene and root cause analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Plant Viruses as Nanoparticle-Based Vaccines and Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Ève Lebel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines are considered one of the greatest medical achievements in the battle against infectious diseases. However, the intractability of various diseases such as hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and cancer poses persistent hurdles given that traditional vaccine-development methods have proven to be ineffective; as such, these challenges have driven the emergence of novel vaccine design approaches. In this regard, much effort has been put into the development of new safe adjuvants and vaccine platforms. Of particular interest, the utilization of plant virus-like nanoparticles and recombinant plant viruses has gained increasing significance as an effective tool in the development of novel vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. The present review summarizes recent advances in the use of plant viruses as nanoparticle-based vaccines and adjuvants and their mechanism of action. Harnessing plant-virus immunogenic properties will enable the design of novel, safe, and efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against disease.

  4. A rapid typing method for Listeria monocytogenes based on high-throughput multilocus sequence typing (Hi-MLST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hajime; Iwakawa, Ai; Ohshima, Chihiro; Kyoui, Daisuke; Kumano, Shiori; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2017-02-21

    Listeria monocytogenes infects humans via food products, causing listeriosis. Consequently, food companies pay meticulous attention to the risk of contamination of their products by this bacterium. While fragment analysis methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are used to trace the sources of contamination for this bacterium, some drawbacks have been identified, namely the complexity of the methods and the difficulty of making data comparisons. As an alternative, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is now seeing widespread use; however, owing to its cost, time, and labor requirements, its diffusion into the food industry has been slow. Thus, in the present study, a High-throughput MLST (Hi-MLST) method, which can rapidly, simply, and cheaply perform MLST analyses using a next-generation sequencer (NGS) that can analyze a large volume of base sequences at once was developed. Firstly, a multiplex PCR method designed to amplify seven genes for use in MLST was developed. The discriminatory potential of the developed method was confirmed in silico, and was verified that it has the same discriminatory potential as conventional methods. Next, MLST analysis using multiplex PCR and NGS was performed for 48 strains of L. monocytogenes. The sequences obtained from this analysis have sufficiently reliable quality for all of the genes from of all the strains. Thus, this method could classify the 48 strains into 39 sequence types (ST) with a Diversity index (DI) of 0.989. In summary, using the Hi-MLST method developed in the present study, which combined multiplex PCR and NGS, cut the costs to 1/6th and the time to 1/20th that of conventional MLST methods.

  5. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  6. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes Controls Virus Load after Vaginal Challenge with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E.; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and del...

  7. Identification of putative drug targets of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 by subtractive genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Musharaf Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prolonged and uncontrolled use of antibiotics in treatment against many pathogens causes the multiple drug resistance. The drug resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 has been evolved, which cause a major disease listeriosis. The drug dose limit against that pathogen was also increased for currently prescribed antibiotics and more often combinational therapy was preferred. Therefore, identification of an extensive novel drug target, unique and essential to the microorganism and subjected to its validation and drug development is imperative. Availability of the total proteome of L. monocytogenes F2365 enabled in silico identification of putative common drug targets and their subcellular localization by subtractive genomics approach. In the present work subtractive genomics approach is used to identify vaccine and drug targets of L. monocytogenes F2365 to speed up the rational drug and vaccine design. It has revealed that out of 2821 reference sequences of the pathogen, 744 represent essential proteins and among them 274 are human non-homolog proteins. Besides, all predicted human non-homologs were then analyzed by subcellular localization servers, in which 46 proteins were identified as surface exposed proteins and can be considered as potential drug and vaccine targets for the pathogen. The 3D structure of two human non-homolog putative drug targets, pantothenate kinase (LmPK and holliday junction resolvase-like protein (LmHJR of L. monocytogenes F2365 were generated by homology modeling program Easymodeller 4.0; a GUI version of modeller. Generated structures were also validated by several online servers. The overall stereochemical quality of the model was assessed by Ramachandran plot analysis that was provided by PROCHECK. ProQ, ERRAT, Pro-SA web and VERIFY 3D of SAVES programs were also used to compute several validation parameters during the evaluation of the model. This protein structure information is important in structure-based

  8. Production of Rice Seed-Based Allergy Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hidenori; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant hypoallergenic derivative is the next generation of tolerogen replacing the natural allergen extract to increase safety and efficacy. Japanese cedar pollinosis is the predominant seasonal allergy disease in Japan. A rice seed-based oral vaccine containing the recombinant hypoallergens derived from these allergens was developed. Efficacy of this rice-based allergy vaccine was evaluated by oral administration in animal models.

  9. Strategies to vaccinate against cancer of the cervix: feasibility of a school-based HPV vaccination program in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Mary; Bartolini, Rosario; Mosqueira, N Rocio; LaMontagne, D Scott; Mendoza, Maria Ana; Ramos, Irma; Winkler, Jennifer L; Villafana, Jose; Janmohamed, Amynah; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2011-07-12

    Operational research using a mixed method, cross-sectional, case-study approach assessed the feasibility and health system impact of large-scale implementation of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into routine vaccine delivery by the Ministry of Health in Peru. The strategy was school-based vaccination of fifth grade girls in 527 primary schools in Piura region. Our evaluation showed that school-based HPV vaccination is feasible without major changes in existing health systems. This was reflected in the opinions of health personnel, the lack of impact on other vaccine coverage, and the high HPV vaccine coverage documented in routine records and by an independent community-based survey.

  10. Applications of nanoparticles for DNA based rabies vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Ali A; Khan, Sajid Umar; Ali, Zeeshan; Yang, Haowen; Liu, Keke; Mao, Lanlan

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal encephalomyelitis. Most cases occur in developing countries and are transmitted by dogs. The cell culture vaccines as associated with high cost; therefore, have not replaced the unsafe brain-derived vaccines. In the developing countries these brain-derived rabies vaccines still can be seen in action. Moreover, there will be a need for vaccines against rabies-related viruses against which classical vaccines are not always effective. The worldwide incidence of rabies and the inability of currently used vaccination strategies to provide highly potent and cost-effective therapy indicate the need for alternate control strategies. DNA vaccines have emerged as the safest vaccines and best remedy for complicated diseases like hepatitis, HIV, and rabies. A number of recombinant DNA vaccines are now being developed against several diseases such as AIDS and malaria. Therefore, it can be a valuable alternative for the production of cheaper rabies vaccines against its larger spectrum of viruses. In this review we report published data on DNA-based immunization with sequences encoding rabies with special reference to nanotechnology.

  11. Pregnancy Vaccination with Gold Glyco-Nanoparticles Carrying Listeria monocytogenes Peptides Protects against Listeriosis and Brain- and Cutaneous-Associated Morbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Calderón-Gonzalez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeriosis is a fatal infection for fetuses and newborns with two clinical main morbidities in the neonatal period, meningitis and diffused cutaneous lesions. In this study, we vaccinated pregnant females with two gold glyconanoparticles (GNP loaded with two peptides, listeriolysin peptide 91–99 (LLO91–99 or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1–22 peptide (GAPDH1–22. Neonates born to vaccinated mothers were free of bacteria and healthy, while non-vaccinated mice presented clear brain affections and cutaneous diminishment of melanocytes. Therefore, these nanoparticle vaccines are effective measures to offer pregnant mothers at high risk of listeriosis interesting therapies that cross the placenta.

  12. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  13. Seasonal Flu Vaccine Safety and Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  14. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  15. M2e-Based Universal Influenza A Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Deng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The successful isolation of a human influenza virus in 1933 was soon followed by the first attempts to develop an influenza vaccine. Nowadays, vaccination is still the most effective method to prevent human influenza disease. However, licensed influenza vaccines offer protection against antigenically matching viruses, and the composition of these vaccines needs to be updated nearly every year. Vaccines that target conserved epitopes of influenza viruses would in principle not require such updating and would probably have a considerable positive impact on global human health in case of a pandemic outbreak. The extracellular domain of Matrix 2 (M2e protein is an evolutionarily conserved region in influenza A viruses and a promising epitope for designing a universal influenza vaccine. Here we review the seminal and recent studies that focused on M2e as a vaccine antigen. We address the mechanism of action and the clinical development of M2e-vaccines. Finally, we try to foresee how M2e-based vaccines could be implemented clinically in the future.

  16. Natural Antibacterial Activity of Thai Red Curry Paste in Coconut Milk based Curry; Kang-Kati, Model on Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuchod SAPABGUY

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2006, Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes outbreaks have occurred frequently in a variety food types all over the world. Thai red curry paste is composed of 7 herbs which have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity in different independent laboratories. The investigation aimed to study the antibacterial activity of Thai red curry paste in a coconut milk based curry; Kang-Kati, as a real food model against S. enteric Enteritidis (human and L. monocytogenes 10403S. The standard plate count method as CFU/ml was used to evaluate the Thai red curry paste’s in vitro antibacterial activity every hour for 6 h at room temperature. The Thai red curry paste was extracted according to the traditional Thai home cooking as Kang-Kati. The log CFU/ml of S. enteric Enteritidis (human level was significantly lower (P < 0.05 in the Kang-Kati model than in nutrient broth (NB as control at only 3rd and 4th h; 3rd h; 5.53±0.027 and 5.65±0.019, and at 4th h; 5.62±0.07 and 5.80±0.03 log CFU/ml, respectively. While the log CFU/ml of the L. monocytogenes level was also significantly lower (P < 0.05 in Kang-Kati than in NB at 3rd and 4th h; 3rd h; 5.49±0.01 and 5.61±0.02, and at 4th h 5.63±0.02 and 5.70±0.04 for log CFU/ml, respectively. The Thai red curry paste in Kang-Kati as a real food model showed promising natural antibacterial activity against the food borne pathogens, enteric Enteritidis (human and L. monocytogenes 104003S.

  17. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes on Ready-to-Eat Meats Using Bacteriocin Mixtures Based on Mode-of-Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Priyesh Vijayakumar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocin-producing (Bac+ lactic acid bacteria (LAB comprising selected strains of Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactococcus lactis, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Enterococcus faecium and thailandicus were examined for inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes during hotdog challenge studies. The Bac+ strains, or their cell-free supernatants (CFS, were grouped according to mode-of-action (MOA as determined from prior studies. Making a mixture of as many MOAs as possible is a practical way to obtain a potent natural antimicrobial mixture to address L. monocytogenes contamination of RTE meat products (i.e., hotdogs. The heat resistance of the bacteriocins allowed the use of pasteurization to eliminate residual producer cells for use as post-process surface application or their inclusion into hotdog meat emulsion during cooking. The use of Bac+ LAB comprising 3× MOAs directly as co-inoculants on hotdogs was not effective at inhibiting L. monocytogenes. However, the use of multiple MOA Bac+ CFS mixtures in a variety of trials demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach by showing a >2-log decrease of L. monocytogenes in treatment samples and 6–7 log difference vs. controls. These data suggest that surface application of multiple mode-of-action bacteriocin mixtures can provide for an Alternative 2, and possibly Alternative 1, process category as specified by USDA-FSIS for control of L. monocytogenes on RTE meat products.

  18. Chikungunya Virus Vaccines: Viral Vector-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsauer, Katrin; Tangy, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    In 2013, a major chikungunya virus (CHIKV) epidemic reached the Americas. In the past 2 years, >1.7 million people have been infected. In light of the current epidemic, with millions of people in North and South America at risk, efforts to rapidly develop effective vaccines have increased. Here, we focus on CHIKV vaccines that use viral-vector technologies. This group of vaccine candidates shares an ability to potently induce humoral and cellular immune responses by use of highly attenuated and safe vaccine backbones. So far, well-described vectors such as modified vaccinia virus Ankara, complex adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, alphavirus-based chimeras, and measles vaccine Schwarz strain (MV/Schw) have been described as potential vaccines. We summarize here the recent data on these experimental vaccines, with a focus on the preclinical and clinical activities on the MV/Schw-based candidate, which is the first CHIKV-vectored vaccine that has completed a clinical trial. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Development and validation of an antigen capture ELISA based on monoclonal antibodies specific for Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Lelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the identification of Listeria monocytogenes in food was standardised and validated. The assay was refined by analysing samples of meat, seafood, dairy products, pasta and flour. The method was found to be 100% specific for Listeria spp. tested, with a limit of sensitivity of 6.6 × 10(3 colony-forming units (cfu/ml. Comparison of L. monocytogenes capture ELISA against the official International Organization for Standardization (ISO method 11290-1:1996 for the isolation and identification of L. monocytogenes in food matrices produced a significant concordance index. The assay was validated on food matrices including meat, seafood and dairy products in line with ISO 16140:2003 concerning qualitative analytical methods. The assay was found to be accurate, specific, sensitive, selective, reproducible and fast, resulting in lower costs and faster turnaround in microbiological screening of foods.

  20. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draper, Simon J; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito...... vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard...... to target antigen discovery, protein expression platforms, adjuvant testing, and development of soluble and virus-like particle (VLP) delivery platforms. The breadth of approaches to protein-based vaccines is continuing to expand as innovative new concepts in next-generation subunit design are explored...

  1. Prospects of HA-Based Universal Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar M. Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines afford substantial protection in humans by inducing strain-specific neutralizing antibodies (Abs. Most of these Abs target highly variable immunodominant epitopes in the globular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (HA. Therefore, current vaccines may not be able to induce heterosubtypic immunity against the divergent influenza subtypes. The identification of broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs against influenza HA using recent technological advancements in antibody libraries, hybridoma, and isolation of single Ab-secreting plasma cells has increased the interest in developing a universal influenza vaccine as it could provide life-long protection. While these BnAbs can serve as a source for passive immunotherapy, their identification represents an important step towards the design of such a universal vaccine. This review describes the recent advances and approaches used in the development of universal influenza vaccine based on highly conserved HA regions identified by BnAbs.

  2. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  3. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Megan A; Nair, Smita K; Holl, Eda K

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Incidence and control of Listeria monocytogenes in foods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk; Schlundt, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The Danish regulatory policy on Listeria monocytogenes in foods is based on the principles of HACCP and was developed using a health risk assessment approach. The Danish policy focuses examinations and criteria for L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods and is based on a combination of inspection...

  5. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Simon J; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro; Miller, Louis H; Srinivasan, Prakash; Theisen, Michael; Biswas, Sumi

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard to target antigen discovery, protein expression platforms, adjuvant testing, and development of soluble and virus-like particle (VLP) delivery platforms. The breadth of approaches to protein-based vaccines is continuing to expand as innovative new concepts in next-generation subunit design are explored, with the prospects for the development of a highly effective multi-component/multi-stage/multi-antigen formulation seeming ever more likely. This review will focus on recent progress in protein vaccine design, development and/or clinical testing for a number of leading malaria antigens from the sporozoite-, merozoite- and sexual-stages of the parasite's lifecycle-including PfCelTOS, PfMSP1, PfAMA1, PfRH5, PfSERA5, PfGLURP, PfMSP3, Pfs48/45 and Pfs25. Future prospects and challenges for the development, production, human delivery and assessment of protein-based malaria vaccines are discussed.

  6. Development of an epitope-based HIV-1 vaccine strategy from HIV-1 lipopeptide to dendritic-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surenaud, Mathieu; Lacabaratz, Christine; Zurawski, Gérard; Lévy, Yves; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Development of a safe, effective and globally affordable Human Immunodeficiency Virus strain 1 (HIV-1) vaccine offers the best hope for future control of the HIV-1 pandemic. However, with the exception of the recent RV144 trial, which elicited a modest level of protection against infection, no vaccine candidate has shown efficacy in preventing HIV-1 infection or in controlling virus replication in humans. There is also a great need for a successful immunotherapeutic vaccine since combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) does not eliminate the reservoir of HIV-infected cells. But to date, no vaccine candidate has proven to significantly alter the natural history of an individual with HIV-1 infection. Areas covered: For over 25 years, the ANRS (France Recherche Nord&Sud Sida-HIV hépatites) has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research developing an epitope-based vaccine strategy to induce a multiepitopic cellular response against HIV-1. This review describes the evolution of concepts, based on strategies using HIV-1 lipopeptides towards the use of dendritic cell (DC) manipulation. Expert commentary: Understanding the crucial role of DCs in immune responses allowed moving from the non-specific administration of HIV-1 sequences with lipopeptides to DC-based vaccines. These DC-targeting strategies should improve HIV-1 vaccine efficacy.

  7. Development of a new hydrogen peroxide–based vaccine platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanna, Ian J; Raué, Hans-Peter; Slifka, Mark K

    2012-06-01

    Safe and effective vaccines are crucial for maintaining public health and reducing the global burden of infectious disease. Here we introduce a new vaccine platform that uses hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) to inactivate viruses for vaccine production. H(2)O(2) rapidly inactivates both RNA and DNA viruses with minimal damage to antigenic structure or immunogenicity and is a highly effective method when compared with conventional vaccine inactivation approaches such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. Mice immunized with H(2)O(2)-inactivated lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) generated cytolytic, multifunctional virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that conferred protection against chronic LCMV infection. Likewise, mice vaccinated with H(2)O(2)-inactivated vaccinia virus or H(2)O(2)-inactivated West Nile virus showed high virus-specific neutralizing antibody titers and were fully protected against lethal challenge. Together, these studies demonstrate that H(2)O(2)-based vaccines are highly immunogenic, provide protection against a range of viral pathogens in mice and represent a promising new approach to future vaccine development.

  8. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Yu

    Full Text Available To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious šC recovered model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V, which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics.

  9. Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) and Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  10. Vaxign: The First Web-Based Vaccine Design Program for Reverse Vaccinology and Applications for Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Yongqun He; Zuoshuang Xiang; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaxign is the first web-based vaccine design system that predicts vaccine targets based on genome sequences using the strategy of reverse vaccinology. Predicted features in the Vaxign pipeline include protein subcellular location, transmembrane helices, adhesin probability, conservation to human and/or mouse proteins, sequence exclusion from genome(s) of nonpathogenic strain(s), and epitope binding to MHC class I and class II. The precomputed Vaxign database contains prediction of vaccine tar...

  11. Vaccines based on structure-based design provide protection against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sunil; Luxon, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Vaccines elicit immune responses, provide protection against microorganisms and are considered as one of the most successful medical interventions against infectious diseases. Vaccines can be produced using attenuated virus or bacteria, recombinant proteins, bacterial polysaccharides, carbohydrates or plasmid DNA. Conventional vaccines rely on the induction of immune responses against antigenic proteins to be effective. The genetic diversity of microorganisms, coupled with the high degree of sequence variability in antigenic proteins, presents a challenge to developing broadly effective conventional vaccines. The observation that whole protein antigens are not necessarily essential for inducing immunity has led to the emergence of a new branch of vaccine design termed 'structural vaccinology'. Structure-based vaccines are designed on the rationale that protective epitopes should be sufficient to induce immune responses and provide protection against pathogens. Recent studies demonstrated that designing structure-based vaccine candidates with multiple epitopes induce a higher immune response. As yet there are no commercial vaccines available based on structure-based design and most of the structure-based vaccine candidates are in the preclinical stages of development. This review focuses on recent advances in structure-based vaccine candidates and their application in providing protection against infectious diseases.

  12. Stevia-based sweeteners as a promising alternative to table sugar: The effect on Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium growth dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobete, María M; Baka, Maria; Noriega, Estefanía; Jooken, Etienne; Monballiu, Annick; de Beurme, Sam; Meesschaert, Boudewijn; Van Impe, Jan F

    2017-03-20

    Sugar is commonly substituted with stevia-based products in food industry and in our daily-life. This substitution results in a change in food product characteristic formula and properties that may affect the growth dynamics of food pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. This work studies the effect of table sugar (TS), laboratory sucrose (LS), commercial stevia (St) and steviol glycosides (SG) on the growth dynamics of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Experiments were carried out in general and minimal culture media at 3 equivalent concentration levels in terms of sweetness intensity (TS and LS at 3, 9 and 15% (w/v); St at 0.3, 0.9 and 1.5% (w/v); and SG at 0.01, 0.03 and 0.05% (w/v)). Incubation temperatures were: 4, 8 and 20°C for general media, and for minimal media 20°C. To decipher the role of these sweeteners, their concentration evolution in minimal media was determined via HPLC analysis. The results revealed slow maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of S. Typhimurium in general media with increasing concentrations of TS and LS at 20°C; and reduced maximum cell population (Nmax) at 8°C. The growth of L. monocytogenes in general culture media remains invariable independently of the sweetener added, except at 4°C. At this critical temperature, the presence of TS, LS and St seems to facilitate the growth of L. monocytogenes, presenting higher μmax values in comparison to SG and the control. Varying bacterial response to changes in media formulation suggests that further research is required, focusing on revealing the microbial dynamics in structured media, as well as in real food products. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. New vaccine design based on defective genomes that combines features of attenuated and inactivated vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Rodríguez-Calvo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New vaccine designs are needed to control diseases associated with antigenically variable RNA viruses. Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious disease of livestock that inflicts severe economic losses. Although the current whole-virus chemically inactivated vaccine has proven effective, it has led to new outbreaks of FMD because of incomplete inactivation of the virus or the escape of infectious virus from vaccine production premises. We have previously shown that serial passages of FMD virus (FMDV C-S8c1 at high multiplicity of infection in cell culture resulted in virus populations consisting of defective genomes that are infectious by complementation (termed C-S8p260. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we evaluate the immunogenicity of C-S8p260, first in a mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and second, in swine, the natural host of FMDV C-S8c1. Mice were completely protected against a lethal challenge with FMDV C-S8c1, after vaccination with a single dose of C-S8p260. Pigs immunized with different C-S8p260 doses and challenged with FMDV C-S8c1 either did not develop any clinical signs or showed delayed and mild disease symptoms. C-S8p260 induced high titers of both FMDV-specific, neutralizing antibodies and activated FMDV-specific T cells in swine, that correlated with solid protection against FMDV. CONCLUSIONS: The defective virus-based vaccine did not produce detectable levels of transmissible FMDV. Therefore, a segmented, replication-competent form of a virus, such as FMDV C-S8p260, can provide the basis of a new generation of attenuated antiviral vaccines with two safety barriers. The design can be extended to any viral pathogen that encodes trans-acting gene products, allowing complementation between replication-competent, defective forms.

  14. New vaccine design based on defective genomes that combines features of attenuated and inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calvo, Teresa; Ojosnegros, Samuel; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; García-Arriaza, Juan; Escarmís, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban; Sevilla, Noemí

    2010-04-29

    New vaccine designs are needed to control diseases associated with antigenically variable RNA viruses. Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of livestock that inflicts severe economic losses. Although the current whole-virus chemically inactivated vaccine has proven effective, it has led to new outbreaks of FMD because of incomplete inactivation of the virus or the escape of infectious virus from vaccine production premises. We have previously shown that serial passages of FMD virus (FMDV) C-S8c1 at high multiplicity of infection in cell culture resulted in virus populations consisting of defective genomes that are infectious by complementation (termed C-S8p260). Here we evaluate the immunogenicity of C-S8p260, first in a mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and second, in swine, the natural host of FMDV C-S8c1. Mice were completely protected against a lethal challenge with FMDV C-S8c1, after vaccination with a single dose of C-S8p260. Pigs immunized with different C-S8p260 doses and challenged with FMDV C-S8c1 either did not develop any clinical signs or showed delayed and mild disease symptoms. C-S8p260 induced high titers of both FMDV-specific, neutralizing antibodies and activated FMDV-specific T cells in swine, that correlated with solid protection against FMDV. The defective virus-based vaccine did not produce detectable levels of transmissible FMDV. Therefore, a segmented, replication-competent form of a virus, such as FMDV C-S8p260, can provide the basis of a new generation of attenuated antiviral vaccines with two safety barriers. The design can be extended to any viral pathogen that encodes trans-acting gene products, allowing complementation between replication-competent, defective forms.

  15. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Against Fungal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Keigo; Urai, Makoto; Ohkouchi, Kayo; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Kinjo, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Several pathogenic fungi, including Cryptococcus gattii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Penicillium marneffei, cause serious infectious diseases in immunocompetent humans. However, currently, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines are not clinically used. In particular, C. gattii is an emerging pathogen and thus far protective immunity against this pathogen has not been well characterized. Experimental vaccines such as component and attenuated live vaccines have been used as tools to study protective immunity against fungal infection. Recently, we developed a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine to study protective immunity against pulmonary infection by highly virulent C. gattii strain R265 that was clinically isolated from bronchial washings of infected patients during the Vancouver Island outbreak. In this approach, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) are pulsed with heat-killed C. gattii and then transferred into mice prior to intratracheal infection. This DC vaccine significantly increases interleukin 17A (IL-17A)-, interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing T cells in the lungs and spleen and ameliorates the pathology, fungal burden, and mortality following C. gattii infection. This approach may result in the development of a new means of controlling lethal fungal infections. In this chapter, we describe the procedures of DC vaccine preparation and murine pulmonary infection model for analysis of immune response against C. gattii.

  16. Efficacy of activated alginate-based nanocomposite films to control Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage flora in rainbow trout slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboofetileh, Mehdi; Rezaei, Masoud; Hosseini, Hedayat; Abdollahi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils of clove, coriander, caraway, marjoram, cinnamon, and cumin were tested for their antilisterial activity by application of agar diffusion assay (experiment 1). Marjoram essential oil (MEO) showed the highest inhibitory effect, followed by clove and cinnamon. Subsequently, these essential oils were incorporated to alginate/clay nanocomposite films and antilisterial effectiveness of the films was studied in a model solid food system during 12 days at 10 °C (experiment 2). The results revealed that the films with MEO were more effective against Listeria monocytogenes in the model step. Finally, alginate-clay film incorporating 1 % MEO was applied to inoculated trout slices during refrigerated storage (4 °C) for 15 days (experiment 3). The control and the wrapped fish samples were analyzed periodically for microbiological (L. monocytogenes, total viable count, psychrotrophic count) and chemical (TVB-N) properties. The results demonstrated that alginate-clay films enriched with 1 % MEO significantly delayed the growth of L. monocytogenes during the 15-day storage with final counts reaching 6.23 log CFU/g while the counts in control samples were significantly higher reaching 7.38 log CFU/g (p < 0.05). Furthermore, active films efficiently reduced total viable count and psychrotrophic count as well as TVB-N in the fish slice during refrigerated storage.

  17. Improved NYVAC-based vaccine vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen V Kibler

    Full Text Available While as yet there is no vaccine against HIV/AIDS, the results of the phase III Thai trial (RV144 have been encouraging and suggest that further improvements of the prime/boost vaccine combination of a poxvirus and protein are needed. With this aim, in this investigation we have generated derivatives of the candidate vaccinia virus vaccine vector NYVAC with potentially improved functions. This has been achieved by the re-incorporation into the virus genome of two host range genes, K1L and C7L, in conjunction with the removal of the immunomodulatory viral molecule B19, an antagonist of type I interferon action. These novel virus vectors, referred to as NYVAC-C-KC and NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R, have acquired relevant biological characteristics, giving higher levels of antigen expression in infected cells, replication-competency in human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts, activation of selective host cell signal transduction pathways, and limited virus spread in tissues. Importantly, these replication-competent viruses have been demonstrated to maintain a highly attenuated phenotype.

  18. Vaxvec: The first web-based recombinant vaccine vector database and its data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shunzhou; Martin, Carly; Patil, Rasika; Zhu, Felix; Zhao, Bin; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-11-27

    A recombinant vector vaccine uses an attenuated virus, bacterium, or parasite as the carrier to express a heterologous antigen(s). Many recombinant vaccine vectors and related vaccines have been developed and extensively investigated. To compare and better understand recombinant vectors and vaccines, we have generated Vaxvec (http://www.violinet.org/vaxvec), the first web-based database that stores various recombinant vaccine vectors and those experimentally verified vaccines that use these vectors. Vaxvec has now included 59 vaccine vectors that have been used in 196 recombinant vector vaccines against 66 pathogens and cancers. These vectors are classified to 41 viral vectors, 15 bacterial vectors, 1 parasitic vector, and 1 fungal vector. The most commonly used viral vaccine vectors are double-stranded DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, adenoviruses, and poxviruses. For example, Vaxvec includes 63 poxvirus-based recombinant vaccines for over 20 pathogens and cancers. Vaxvec collects 30 recombinant vector influenza vaccines that use 17 recombinant vectors and were experimentally tested in 7 animal models. In addition, over 60 protective antigens used in recombinant vector vaccines are annotated and analyzed. User-friendly web-interfaces are available for querying various data in Vaxvec. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine vectors, vaccines, and related information is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). Vaxvec is a timely and vital source of vaccine vector database and facilitates efficient vaccine vector research and development.

  19. Introducing the ESAT-6 free IGRA, a companion diagnostic for TB vaccines based on ESAT-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhwald, Morten; de Thurah, Lena; Kuchaka, Davis

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for an improved vaccine for tuberculosis. ESAT-6 is a cardinal vaccine antigen with unique properties and is included in several vaccine candidates in development. ESAT-6 is also the core antigen in the IFN-γ release assays (IGRA) used to diagnose latent infection, rendering IGRA...... tests unspecific after vaccination. This challenge has prompted the development of a companion diagnostic for ESAT-6 based vaccines, an ESAT-6 free IGRA. We screened a panel of seven potential new diagnostic antigens not recognized in BCG vaccinated individuals. Three highly recognized antigens Esp...... containing vaccines and as adjunct test for latent infection....

  20. Performance of a growth-no growth model for Listeria monocytogenes developed for mayonnaise-based salads: influence of strain variability, food matrix, inoculation level, and presence of sorbic and benzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, A; Smigic, N; Rajkovic, A; Gysemans, K; Bernaerts, K; Geeraerd, A; Van Impe, J; Debevere, J; Devlieghere, F

    2007-09-01

    A previously developed growth-no growth model for Listeria monocytogenes, based on nutrient broth data and describing the influence of water activity (a(w)), pH, and acetic acid concentrations, was validated (i) for a variety of L. monocytogenes strains and (ii) in a laboratory-made, mayonnaise-based surimi salad (as an example of a mayonnaise-based salad). In these challenge tests, the influence of the inoculation level was tested as well. Also, the influence of chemical preservatives on the growth probability of L. monocytogenes in mayonnaise-based salads was determined. To evaluate the growth-no growth model performance on the validation data, four quantitative criteria are determined: concordance index, % correct predictions, % fail-dangerous, and % fail-safe. First, the growth probability of 11 L. monocytogenes strains, not used for model development, was assessed in nutrient broth under conditions within the interpolation region. Experimental results were compared with model predictions. Second, the growth-no growth model was assessed in a laboratory-made, sterile, mayonnaise-based surimi salad to identify a possible model completeness error related to the food matrix, making use of the above-mentioned validation criteria. Finally, the effect on L. monocytogenes of common chemical preservatives (sorbic and benzoic acid) at different concentrations under conditions typical of mayonnaise-based salads was determined. The study showed that the growth-no growth zone was properly predicted and consistent for all L. monocytogenes strains. A larger prediction error was observed under conditions within the transition zone between growth-no growth. However, in all cases, the classification between no growth (P = 0) and any growth (P > 0) occurred properly, which is most important for the food industry, where outgrowth needs to be prevented in all instances. The results in the sterile mayonnaise-based salad showed again that the growth-no growth zone was well predicted

  1. Virus-like particle-based human vaccines: quality assessment based on structural and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinjian; Li, Shaowei; Yu, Hai; Xia, Ningshao; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-11-01

    Human vaccines against three viruses use recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) as the antigen: hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis E virus. VLPs are excellent prophylactic vaccine antigens because they are self-assembling bionanoparticles (20 to 60 nm in diameter) that expose multiple epitopes on their surface and faithfully mimic the native virions. Here we summarize the long journey of these vaccines from bench to patients. The physical properties and structural features of each recombinant VLP vaccine are described. With the recent licensure of Hecolin against hepatitis E virus adding a third disease indication to prophylactic VLP-based vaccines, we review how the crucial quality attributes of VLP-based human vaccines against all three disease indications were assessed, controlled, and improved during bioprocessing through an array of structural and functional analyses.

  2. A potential disruptive technology in vaccine development: gene-based vaccines and their application to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, David C

    2004-10-01

    Vaccine development requires an amalgamation of disparate disciplines and has unique economic and regulatory drivers. Non-viral gene-based delivery systems, such as formulated plasmid DNA, are new and potentially disruptive technologies capable of providing 'cheaper, simpler, and more convenient-to-use' vaccines. Typically and somewhat ironically, disruptive technologies have poorer product performance, at least in the near-term, compared with the existing conventional technologies. Because successful product development requires that the product's performance must meet or exceed the efficacy threshold for a desired application, the appropriate selection of the initial product applications for a disruptive technology is critical for its successful evolution. In this regard, the near-term successes of gene-based vaccines will likely be for protection against bacterial toxins and acute viral and bacterial infections. Recent breakthroughs, however, herald increasing rather than languishing performance improvements in the efficacy of gene-based vaccines. Whether gene-based vaccines ultimately succeed in eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed, remains to be determined. A success against any one of the persistent intracellular pathogens would be sufficient proof that gene-based vaccines represent a disruptive technology against which future vaccine technologies will be measured.

  3. Host defense mechanism-based rational design of live vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Han Jang

    Full Text Available Live attenuated vaccine (LAV, mimicking natural infection, provides an excellent protection against microbial infection. The development of LAV, however, still remains highly empirical and the rational design of clinically useful LAV is scarcely available. Apoptosis and caspase activation are general host antiviral responses in virus-infected cells. Utilizing these tightly regulated host defense mechanisms, we present a novel apoptosis-triggered attenuation of viral virulence as a rational design of live attenuated vaccine with desired levels of safety, efficacy, and productivity. Mutant influenza viruses carrying caspase recognition motifs in viral NP and the interferon-antagonist NS1 proteins were highly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo by caspase-mediated cleavage of those proteins in infected cells. Both viral replication and interferon-resistance were substantially reduced, resulting in a marked attenuation of virulence of the virus. Despite pronounced attenuation, the viruses demonstrated high growth phenotype in embryonated eggs at lower temperature, ensuring its productivity. A single dose vaccination with the mutant virus elicited high levels of systemic and mucosal antibody responses and provided complete protection against both homologous and heterologous lethal challenges in mouse model. While providing a practical means to generate seasonal or pandemic influenza live vaccines, the sensitization of viral proteins to pathogen-triggered apoptotic signals presents a potentially universal, mechanism-based rational design of live vaccines against many viral infections.

  4. Host defense mechanism-based rational design of live vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yo Han; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Park, Eun-Sook; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Yoon-Jae; Lee, Jinhee; Kim, Kyun-Hwan; Seong, Baik Lin

    2013-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccine (LAV), mimicking natural infection, provides an excellent protection against microbial infection. The development of LAV, however, still remains highly empirical and the rational design of clinically useful LAV is scarcely available. Apoptosis and caspase activation are general host antiviral responses in virus-infected cells. Utilizing these tightly regulated host defense mechanisms, we present a novel apoptosis-triggered attenuation of viral virulence as a rational design of live attenuated vaccine with desired levels of safety, efficacy, and productivity. Mutant influenza viruses carrying caspase recognition motifs in viral NP and the interferon-antagonist NS1 proteins were highly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo by caspase-mediated cleavage of those proteins in infected cells. Both viral replication and interferon-resistance were substantially reduced, resulting in a marked attenuation of virulence of the virus. Despite pronounced attenuation, the viruses demonstrated high growth phenotype in embryonated eggs at lower temperature, ensuring its productivity. A single dose vaccination with the mutant virus elicited high levels of systemic and mucosal antibody responses and provided complete protection against both homologous and heterologous lethal challenges in mouse model. While providing a practical means to generate seasonal or pandemic influenza live vaccines, the sensitization of viral proteins to pathogen-triggered apoptotic signals presents a potentially universal, mechanism-based rational design of live vaccines against many viral infections.

  5. Upstream sample processing facilitates PCR detection of Listeria monocytogenes in mayonnaise-based ready-to-eat (RTE) salads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isonhood, Jamie; Drake, MaryAnne; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2006-09-01

    Sample pretreatment to reduce volume and concentrate cells of the target organism(s) prior to molecular detection offers a useful supplement or alternative to cultural enrichment. The purpose of this study was to develop an upstream processing method to facilitate the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) salads by PCR. Potato salad, a model RTE commodity, was seeded with L. monocytogenes and processed by two alternative upstream sample processing methods (designated one-step and two-step centrifugation), followed by DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and Southern hybridization. The two-step method resulted in 1,000-fold improvements in the PCR detection limit, from 10(6) Cfu/g (no sample processing) to 10(3) Cfu/g. The two-step method was applied for upstream sample processing of four representative deli salad items artificially inoculated with L. monocytogenes at levels ranging from 10(1)-10(6) Cfu/g. Following DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and Southern hybridization, detection was achieved at input levels of 10(5) Cfu/g for chicken salad, 10(4) Cfu/g for macaroni salad, and 10(3) Cfu/g for potato and seafood salads. The two-step method reported here facilitates the production of a final sample concentrate of reduced volume and improved purity which was compatible with PCR amplification. This approach offers further progress in our efforts to reduce or eliminate cultural enrichment in an effort to speed time to results when applying molecular methods to the detection of pathogens in foods.

  6. Virus-based nanoparticles as platform technologies for modern vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karin L; Twyman, Richard M; Fiering, Steven; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-07-01

    Nanoscale engineering is revolutionizing the development of vaccines and immunotherapies. Viruses have played a key role in this field because they can function as prefabricated nanoscaffolds with unique properties that are easy to modify. Viruses are immunogenic via multiple pathways, and antigens displayed naturally or by engineering on the surface can be used to create vaccines against the cognate virus, other pathogens, specific molecules or cellular targets such as tumors. This review focuses on the development of virus-based nanoparticle systems as vaccines indicated for the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases, chronic diseases, cancer, and addiction. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:554-578. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1383 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  7. Recombinant and epitope-based vaccines on the road to the market and implications for vaccine design and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Patricio; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-03-03

    Novel vaccination approaches based on rational design of B- and T-cell epitopes - epitope-based vaccines - are making progress in the clinical trial pipeline. The epitope-focused recombinant protein-based malaria vaccine (termed RTS,S) is a next-generation approach that successfully reached phase-III trials, and will potentially become the first commercial vaccine against a human parasitic disease. Progress made on methods such as recombinant DNA technology, advanced cell-culture techniques, immunoinformatics and rational design of immunogens are driving the development of these novel concepts. Synthetic recombinant proteins comprising both B- and T-cell epitopes can be efficiently produced through modern biotechnology and bioprocessing methods, and can enable the induction of large repertoires of immune specificities. In particular, the inclusion of appropriate CD4+ T-cell epitopes is increasingly considered a key vaccine component to elicit robust immune responses, as suggested by results coming from HIV-1 clinical trials. In silico strategies for vaccine design are under active development to address genetic variation in pathogens and several broadly protective "universal" influenza and HIV-1 vaccines are currently at different stages of clinical trials. Other methods focus on improving population coverage in target populations by rationally considering specificity and prevalence of the HLA proteins, though a proof-of-concept in humans has not been demonstrated yet. Overall, we expect immunoinformatics and bioprocessing methods to become a central part of the next-generation epitope-based vaccine development and production process.

  8. Are Clade Specific HIV Vaccines a Necessity? An Analysis Based on Mathematical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobromir Dimitrov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As HIV-1 envelope immune responses are critical to vaccine related protection, most candidate HIV vaccines entering efficacy trials are based upon a clade specific design. This need for clade specific vaccine prototypes markedly reduces the implementation of potentially effective HIV vaccines. We utilized a mathematical model to determine the effectiveness of immediate roll-out of a non-clade matched vaccine with reduced efficacy compared to constructing clade specific vaccines, which would take considerable time to manufacture and test in safety and efficacy trials. We simulated the HIV epidemic in San Francisco (SF and South Africa (SA and projected effectiveness of three vaccination strategies: i immediate intervention with a 20–40% vaccine efficacy (VE non-matched vaccine, ii delayed intervention by developing a 50% VE clade-specific vaccine, and iii immediate intervention with a non-matched vaccine replaced by a clade-specific vaccine when developed. Immediate vaccination with a non-clade matched vaccine, even with reduced efficacy, would prevent thousands of new infections in SF and millions in SA over 30 years. Vaccination with 50% VE delayed for five years needs six and 12 years in SA to break-even with immediate 20 and 30% VE vaccination, respectively, while not able to surpass the impact of immediate 40% VE vaccination over 30 years. Replacing a 30% VE with a 50% VE vaccine after 5 years reduces the HIV acquisition by 5% compared to delayed vaccination. The immediate use of an HIV vaccine with reduced VE in high risk communities appears desirable over a short time line but higher VE should be the pursued to achieve strong long-term impact. Our analysis illustrates the importance of developing surrogate markers (correlates of protection to allow bridging types of immunogenicity studies to support more rapid assessment of clade specific vaccines.

  9. Development of lactococcal GEM-based pneumococcal vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audouy, S.A.; Selm, S. van; Roosmalen, M.L. van; Post, E.; Kanninga, R.; Neef, J.; Estevao, S.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.; Adrian, P.V.; Leenhouts, K.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a novel protein-based nasal vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which three pneumococcal proteins were displayed on the surface of a non-recombinant, killed Lactococcus lactis-derived delivery system, called Gram-positive Enhancer Matrix (GEM). The GEM particles

  10. Development of lactococcal GEM-based pneumococcal vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audouy, Sandrine A. L.; van Selm, Saskia; van Roosmalen, Maarten L.; Post, Eduard; Kanninga, Rolf; Neef, Jolanda; Estevao, Silvia; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Adrian, Peter V.; Leenhouts, Kees; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a novel protein-based nasal vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which three pneumococcal proteins were displayed on the surface of a non-recombinant, killed Lactococcus lactis-derived delivery system, called Gram-positive Enhancer Matrix (GEM). The GEM particles

  11. Migration of dendritic cell based cancer vaccines: in vivo veritas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, G.J.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Punt, C.J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Ex vivo generated cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) are currently applied in the clinic. The migration of DCs from the tissues to the lymph nodes is tightly controlled and involves many different mediators and their receptors. A recent study demonstrated that the rate of migration of

  12. Seed-based oral vaccines as allergen-specific immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2011-03-01

    Plant-based vaccines have advantages over conventional vaccines in terms of scalability, lack of requirement for cold chain logistics, stability, safety, cost-effectiveness and needle-free administration. In particular, when antigen is expressed in seeds, high production is possible and immunogenicity is not lost even if stocked at ambient temperature for several years. Induction of immune tolerance (desensitization) to allergen is a principle strategy for controlling allergic diseases, and is generally carried out by subcutaneous injection. Seed-based oral administration offers a straightforward and inexpensive alternative approach to deliver vaccines effectively to the GALT without loss of activity. Consumption of transgenic seeds containing modified hypo-allergenic tolerogen or T-cell epitope peptides derived from allergens has no or very few severe side effects and can induce immune tolerance leading to reduction of allergen-specific IgE production, T-cell proliferation and release of histamine. Suppression of allergen-specific clinical symptoms results. Thus, seed-based allergy vaccines offer an innovative and convenient allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approach as an alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  13. Lactococcus lactis-based vaccines from laboratory bench to human use: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahey-El-Din, Mohammed

    2012-01-17

    Developing effective vaccines is an important weapon in the battle against potential pathogens and their evolving antibiotic resistance trends. Several vaccine delivery vectors have been investigated among which the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) Lactococcus lactis has a distinguished position. In this review, different factors affecting the efficacy of L. lactis-based vaccines are discussed. In addition, the issues of biological containment and pharmaceutical quality assurance of L. lactis vaccines are highlighted. These issues are critical for the success of medical translation of L. lactis-based vaccines from research laboratories to clinical use by ensuring consistent manufacturing of safe and efficacious vaccines.

  14. Comparison of Current Regulatory Status for Gene-Based Vaccines in the U.S., Europe and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikazu Nakayama; Atsushi Aruga

    2015-01-01

    Gene-based vaccines as typified by plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant viral-vectored vaccines are expected as promising solutions against infectious diseases for which no effective prophylactic vaccines exist such as HIV, dengue virus, Ebola virus and malaria, and for which more improved vaccines are needed such as tuberculosis and influenza virus. Although many preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted to date, no DNA vaccines or recombinant viral-vectored vaccines expressing he...

  15. Dendritic cell-based vaccine for pancreatic cancer in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masato Okamoto; Masanori Kobayashi; Yoshikazu Yonemitsu; Shigeo Koido; Sadamu Homma

    2016-01-01

    "Vaccell" is a dendritic cell(DC)-based cancer vaccine which has been established in Japan. The DCs play central roles in deciding the direction of host immune reactions as well as antigen presentation. We have demonstrated that DCs treated with a streptococcal immune adjuvant OK-432, produce interleukin-12, induce Th1-dominant state, and elicit anti-tumor effects, more powerful than those treated with the known DCmaturating factors. We therefore decided to mature DCs by the OK-432 for making an effective DC vaccine, Vaccell. The 255 patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer who received standard chemotherapy combined with DC vaccines, were analyzed retrospectively. Survival time of the patients with positive delayed type hypersensitivity(DTH) skin reaction was significantly prolonged as compared with that of the patients with negative DTH. The findings strongly suggest that there may be "Responders" for the DC vaccine in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. We next conducted a smallscale prospective clinical study. In this trial, we pulsed HLA class Ⅱ-restricted WT1 peptide(WT1-Ⅱ) in addition to HLA class Ⅰ-restricted peptide(WT1-Ⅰ) into the DCs. Survival of the patients received WT1-Ⅰ and-Ⅱ pulsed DC vaccine was significantly extended as compared to that of the patients received DCs pulsed with WT1-Ⅰ or WT1-Ⅱ alone. Furthermore, WT1-specific DTH positive patients showed significantly improved the overall survival as well as progressionfree survival as compared to the DTH negative patients. The activation of antigen-specific immune responses by DC vaccine in combination with standard chemotherapy may be associated with a good clinical outcome in advanced pancreatic cancer. We are now planning a pivotal study of the Vaccell in appropriate protocols in Japan.

  16. A validated PCR-based method to detect Listeria monocytogenes using raw milk as a food model - Towards an international standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, M.; Wagner, M.; Vazquez-Boland, J.A.;

    2004-01-01

    A PCR assay with an internal amplification control was developed for Listeria monocytogenes. The assay has a 99% detection probability of seven cells per reaction. When tested against 38 L. monocytogenes strains and 52 nontarget strains, the PCR assay was 100% inclusive (positive signal from target...... be appropriate for international standardization....

  17. Listeria monocytogenes endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, B D; Evans, T; Sage, R

    1985-01-01

    A fatal case of endocarditis due to Listeria monocytogenes is reported. Case reports of endocarditis due to this organism are rare but indicate a higher mortality than with many other causes of bacterial endocarditis. The size of the problem may be underestimated because the organism has a "diphtheroid' appearance and may be incorrectly dismissed as a contaminant.

  18. Incorporation of Listeria monocytogenes strains in raw milk biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Christiane; Ifland, Andrea; Naumann, Annette; Kleta, Sylvia; Noll, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms develop successively on devices of milk production without sufficient cleaning and originate from the microbial community of raw milk. The established biofilm matrices enable incorporation of pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause a continuous contamination of food processing plants. L. monocytogenes is frequently found in raw milk and non-pasteurized raw milk products and as part of a biofilm community in milk meters and bulk milk tanks. The aim of this study was to analyze whether different L. monocytogenes strains are interacting with the microbial community of raw milk in terms of biofilm formation in the same manner, and to identify at which stage of biofilm formation a selected L. monocytogenes strain settles best. Bacterial community structure and composition of biofilms were analyzed by a cloning and sequencing approach and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The chemical composition of biofilms was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while settled L. monocytogenes cells were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Addition of individual L. monocytogenes strains to raw milk caused significant shifts in the biofilm biomass, in the chemical as well as in the bacterial community composition. Biofilm formation and attachment of L. monocytogenes cells were not serotype but strain specific. However, the added L. monocytogenes strains were not abundant since mainly members of the genera Citrobacter and Lactococcus dominated the bacterial biofilm community. Overall, added L. monocytogenes strains led to a highly competitive interaction with the raw milk community and triggered alterations in biofilm formation.

  19. Novel Vaccine Against Mycoplasma Hyosynoviae: The Immunogenic Effect of Iscom-Based Vaccines in Swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll; Vinther Heydenreich, Annette; Riber, Ulla

    Arthritis in swine is frequently caused by Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (Mhs). For the development of an effective vaccine we investigated the immunogenic effect of three vaccine preparations with the ISCOM adjuvant Posintro™ from Nordic Vaccine. A: formalin fixed whole-cells Mhs (300 µg/dose) mixed...... with Posintro, B: Deoxycholate extracted lipoproteins from Mhs organisms (DOC-antigen, 300 μg/dose) in Posintro and C: DOC-antigen (50 μg/dose) in Posintro. Each vaccine-group contained three pigs. Vaccinations (i.m.) were performed at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The development of specific IgG and secretion...... of IFNγ were measured. Three weeks after the second vaccination, pigs were euthanised and autopsied. Vaccine B induced a high level of specific serum IgG in all pigs a week after boost. Vaccine C gave a variable response after boost, with two pigs seroconverting, while no response was seen by vaccine A...

  20. Novel Vaccine Against Mycoplasma Hyosynoviae: The Immunogenic Effect of Iscom-Based Vaccines in Swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll; Vinther Heydenreich, Annette; Riber, Ulla;

    Arthritis in swine is frequently caused by Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (Mhs). For the development of an effective vaccine we investigated the immunogenic effect of three vaccine preparations with the ISCOM adjuvant Posintro™ from Nordic Vaccine. A: formalin fixed whole-cells Mhs (300 µg/dose) mixed...... with Posintro, B: Deoxycholate extracted lipoproteins from Mhs organisms (DOC-antigen, 300 μg/dose) in Posintro and C: DOC-antigen (50 μg/dose) in Posintro. Each vaccine-group contained three pigs. Vaccinations (i.m.) were performed at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The development of specific IgG and secretion...... of IFNγ were measured. Three weeks after the second vaccination, pigs were euthanised and autopsied. Vaccine B induced a high level of specific serum IgG in all pigs a week after boost. Vaccine C gave a variable response after boost, with two pigs seroconverting, while no response was seen by vaccine A...

  1. Preventing rheumatic fever: M-protein based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GAS), the organism which initiates rheumatic fever (RF) continues to be sensitive to penicillin. However, penicillin cannot prevent RF if the preceding sore throat is asymptomatic in more than 70 percent children. Prevention of rheumatic fever (RF) may be possible only with the use of a vaccine. Efforts to design a vaccine based on emm gene identification of GAS, M-protein going on for more than 40 years, is unlikely to succeed. M-protein is strain specific. Infection with one strain does not provide immunity from infection with another strain. Based on the emm gene identification, of 250 or more identified strains of GAS, the distribution is heterogenous and keeps changing. The M-protein gene sequence of the organism tends to mutate. A vaccine prepared from available strains may not be effective against a strain following mutation. Lethal toxic shock syndrome due to GAS infection has been described with organisms without identifiable or functional M-protein. M-protein has been excluded as the antigen responsible for acute glomerulonephritis (GN). Therefore M-protein plays no role in one suppurative (toxic shock syndrome) and one non-suppurative (acute GN) manifestation due to GAS infection. Lastly there is no direct evidence to indicate that M-protein is involved in inducing RF. The role of M-protein and the GAS component resulting in the suppurative manifestations of GAS infections like pyoderma, septic arthritis or necrotizing fasciitis etc is unknown. For a vaccine to be effective, an epitope of the streptococcus which is stable and uniformly present in all strains, needs to be identified and tested for its safety and efficacy. The vaccine if and when available is expected to prevent GAS infection. Preventing GAS infection will prevent all the suppurative as well as non-suppurative manifestations including RF.

  2. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in poultry meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ELMALI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objectives of this study were i to isolate Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in broiler wing meat samples, ii to confirm the isolates by PCR, based on prs and hly A gene sequences, iii to determine the seasonal and monthly distribution of the isolates. A total of 120 broiler wing meat samples (60 packaged pieces wrapped using strech film in styrofoam plates and 60 unpackaged pieces bought from different markets in Hatay province were analysed. Listeria spp. was isolated from 57 (47.5% out of 120 samples. Fifty-four, out of 57 Listeria spp. isolates were identified as L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes was isolated from the samples collected during the spring, winter, summer, and autumn at the levels of 26.6%, 40%, 53.3%, 60%, respectively. In this study, the isolation rates were found to be the highest in autumn, while the isolation rates were found to be the lowest in spring. As a consequence, high prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in poultry wing meat samples may pose a risk for human health. We consider that with obeying the rules of good hygiene practices (GHP, good manufacturing practices (GMP and HACCP can minimize the contamination with Listeria spp.

  3. Elucidation of Listeria monocytogenes contamination routes in cold-smoked salmon processing plants detected by DNA-based typing methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Huss, Hans Henrik; Ojeniyi, B.;

    2001-01-01

    and environment could not be excluded. Contamination of the product occurred in specific areas (the brining and slicing areas). In plant I, the same RAPD type (RAPD type 12) was found over a 4-year period, indicating that an established in-house flora persisted and was not eliminated by routine hygienic...... to the ubiquitous nature of the organism, sporadic contamination occurred. A subset of strains was also typed by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and amplified fragment length polymorphism profiling, and these methods confirmed the type division obtained by RAPD profiling.......The contamination routes of Listeria monocytogenes in cold- smoked salmon processing plants were investigated by analyzing 3,585 samples from products (produced in 1995, 1996, 1998, and 1999) and processing environments (samples obtained in 1998 and 1999) of two Danish smokehouses. The level...

  4. Co-administration of the Campylobacter jejuni N-glycan based vaccine with probiotics improves vaccine performance in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothaft, H; Perez-Muñoz, M E; Gouveia, G J; Duar, R M; Wanford, J J; Lango-Scholey, L; Panagos, C G; Srithayakumar, V; Plastow, G S; Coros, C; Bayliss, C D; Edison, A S; Walter, J; Szymanski, C M

    2017-09-22

    Source attribution studies report that consumption of contaminated poultry is the primary source for acquiring human campylobacteriosis. Oral administration of an engineered Escherichia coli strain expressing the Campylobacter jejuni N-glycan reduces bacterial colonization in specific-pathogen-free leghorn chickens, but only a fraction of birds respond to vaccination. Optimizing the vaccine for commercial broiler chickens has great potential to prevent pathogen entry into the food chain. Here, we tested the same vaccination approach in broilers and observed similar efficacy in pathogen load reduction, stimulation of host IgY response, lack of C. jejuni resistance development, uniformity in microbial gut composition, and bimodal response to treatment. Gut microbiota analysis of leghorn and broiler vaccine responders identified one member of the Clostridiales XIVa cluster, Anaerosporobacter mobilis, significantly more abundant in responder birds. In broilers, co-administration of the live vaccine with A. mobilis or Lactobacillus reuteri, a commonly used probiotic, resulted in increased vaccine efficacy, antibody response, and weight gain. To investigate whether the responder/non-responder effect was due to selection of a C. jejuni 'super colonizer mutant' with altered phase-variable genes, we analysed all polyG-containing loci of the input strain compared to non-responder colony isolates and found no evidence of phase state selection. However, untargeted NMR-based metabolomics identified a potential biomarker negatively correlated with C. jejuni colonization levels possibly linked to the increased microbial diversity in this subgroup. The comprehensive methods used to examine the vaccine response bimodality provide several opportunities to improve the C. jejuni vaccine and the efficacy of any vaccination strategy.ImportanceCampylobacter jejuni is a common cause of human diarrheal disease worldwide and listed by the World Health Organization as a high priority

  5. Strengthening vaccination policies in Latin America: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Betancourt-Cravioto, Miguel; Saucedo-Martínez, Rodrigo; Motta-Murguía, Lourdes; Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor

    2013-08-20

    Despite many successes in the region, Latin American vaccination policies have significant shortcomings, and further work is needed to maintain progress and prepare for the introduction of newly available vaccines. In order to address the challenges facing Latin America, the Commission for the Future of Vaccines in Latin America (COFVAL) has made recommendations for strengthening evidence-based policy-making and reducing regional inequalities in immunisation. We have conducted a comprehensive literature review to assess the feasibility of these recommendations. Standardisation of performance indicators for disease burden, vaccine coverage, epidemiological surveillance and national health resourcing can ensure comparability of the data used to assess vaccination programmes, allowing deeper analysis of how best to provide services. Regional vaccination reference schemes, as used in Europe, can be used to develop best practice models for vaccine introduction and scheduling. Successful models exist for the continuous training of vaccination providers and decision-makers, with a new Latin American diploma aiming to contribute to the successful implementation of vaccination programmes. Permanent, independent vaccine advisory committees, based on the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), could facilitate the uptake of new vaccines and support evidence-based decision-making in the administration of national immunisation programmes. Innovative financing mechanisms for the purchase of new vaccines, such as advance market commitments and cost front-loading, have shown potential for improving vaccine coverage. A common regulatory framework for vaccine approval is needed to accelerate delivery and pool human, technological and scientific resources in the region. Finally, public-private partnerships between industry, government, academia and non-profit sectors could provide new investment to stimulate vaccine development in the region, reducing prices in the

  6. Immune modulation by dendritic-cell-based cancer vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHAITANYA KUMAR; SAKSHI KOHLI; POONAMALLE PARTHASARATHY BAPSY; ASHOK KUMAR VAID; MINISH JAIN; VENKATA SATHYA SURESH ATTILI; BANDANA SHARAN

    2017-03-01

    The interplay between host immunity and tumour cells has opened the possibility of targeting tumour cells bymodulation of the human immune system. Cancer immunotherapy involves the treatment of a tumour by utilizing therecombinant human immune system components to target the pro-tumour microenvironment or by revitalizing theimmune system with the ability to kill tumour cells by priming the immune cells with tumour antigens. In this review,current immunotherapy approaches to cancer with special focus on dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines arediscussed. Some of the DC-based vaccines under clinical trials for various cancer types are highlighted. Establishingtumour immunity involves a plethora of immune components and pathways; hence, combining chemotherapy,radiation therapy and various arms of immunotherapy, after analysing the benefits of individual therapeutic agents,might be beneficial to the patient.

  7. Home-based child vaccination records--a reflection on form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David W; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Young, Stacy L

    2014-04-01

    Home-based child vaccination records play an important role in documenting immunization services received by children. We report some of the results of a review of home-based vaccination records from 55 countries. In doing so, we categorize records into three groups (vaccination only cards, vaccination plus cards, child health books) and describe differences in characteristics related to the quality of data recorded on immunization. Moreover, we highlight areas of potential concern and areas in need of further research and investigation to improve our understanding of the home-based vaccination record form related to improved data quality from immunization service delivery.

  8. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  9. A population-based evaluation of a publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada: parental factors associated with HPV vaccine receipt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ogilvie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Information on factors that influence parental decisions for actual human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine receipt in publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine programs for girls is limited. We report on the level of uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine, and determine parental factors associated with receipt of the HPV vaccine, in a publicly funded school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All parents of girls enrolled in grade 6 during the academic year of September 2008-June 2009 in the province of British Columbia were eligible to participate. Eligible households identified through the provincial public health information system were randomly selected and those who consented completed a validated survey exploring factors associated with HPV vaccine uptake. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to calculate adjusted odds ratios to identify the factors that were associated with parents' decision to vaccinate their daughter(s against HPV. 2,025 parents agreed to complete the survey, and 65.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.1-67.1 of parents in the survey reported that their daughters received the first dose of the HPV vaccine. In the same school-based vaccine program, 88.4% (95% CI 87.1-89.7 consented to the hepatitis B vaccine, and 86.5% (95% CI 85.1-87.9 consented to the meningococcal C vaccine. The main reasons for having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were the effectiveness of the vaccine (47.9%, advice from a physician (8.7%, and concerns about daughter's health (8.4%. The main reasons for not having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were concerns about HPV vaccine safety (29.2%, preference to wait until the daughter is older (15.6%, and not enough information to make an informed decision (12.6%. In multivariate analysis, overall attitudes to vaccines, the impact of the HPV vaccine on sexual practices, and childhood vaccine history were predictive of parents having

  10. Typhoid vaccine introduction: An evidence-based pilot implementation project in Nepal and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Imran; Pach, Alfred; Khan, Ghulam Mustafa; Bajracharya, Deepak; Sahastrabuddhe, Sushant; Bhutta, Waqaas; Tahir, Rehman; Soofi, Sajid; Thapa, Chandra B; Joshi, Nilesh; Puri, Mahesh K; Shrestha, Parisha; Upreti, Shyam Raj; Clemens, John D; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Ochiai, R Leon

    2015-06-19

    The World Health Organization (WHO) in 2008 recommended the use of currently licensed typhoid vaccines using a high risk or targeted approach. The epidemiology of disease and the vaccine characteristics make school-based vaccination most feasible in reducing typhoid disease burden in many settings. To assess feasibility of school-based typhoid vaccination, two districts in Kathmandu, Nepal and two towns in Karachi, Pakistan were selected for pilot program. Vaccination campaigns were conducted through the departments of health and in partnerships with not-for-profit organizations. In total 257,015 doses of Vi polysaccharide vaccine were given to students in grades 1-10 of participating schools. The vaccination coverage ranged from 39 percent (38,389/99,503) in Gulshan town in Karachi, to 81 percent (62,615/77,341) in Bhaktapur in Kathmandu valley. No serious adverse event was reported post vaccination. The coverage increased for vaccination of the second district in Pakistan as well as in Nepal. There was an initial concern of vaccine safety. However, as the campaign progressed, parents were more comfortable with vaccinating their children in schools. Supported and conducted by departments of health in Pakistan and Nepal, a school-based typhoid vaccination was found to be safe and feasible.

  11. Pre-vaccination care-seeking in females reporting severe adverse reactions to HPV vaccine. A registry based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, Kåre; Hansen, Niels Dalum; Valentiner-Branth, Palle

    2016-01-01

    to the DMA of suspected severe adverse reactions.We selected controls without reports of adverse reactions from the Danish vaccination registry and matched by year of vaccination, age of vaccination, and municipality, and obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry and The National Health Insurance...... Service Register the history of health care usage two years prior to the first vaccine. We analysed the data by logistic regression while adjusting for the matching variables. Results The study included 316 cases who received first HPV vaccine between 2006 and 2014. Age range of cases was 11 to 52 years...... vaccination programme has declined. The aim of the present study was to determine health care-seeking prior to the first HPV vaccination among females who suspected adverse reactions to HPV vaccine. Methods In this registry-based case-control study, we included as cases vaccinated females with reports...

  12. Side-by-side comparison of gene-based smallpox vaccine with MVA in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W Golden

    Full Text Available Orthopoxviruses remain a threat as biological weapons and zoonoses. The licensed live-virus vaccine is associated with serious health risks, making its general usage unacceptable. Attenuated vaccines are being developed as alternatives, the most advanced of which is modified-vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA. We previously developed a gene-based vaccine, termed 4pox, which targets four orthopoxvirus antigens, A33, B5, A27 and L1. This vaccine protects mice and non-human primates from lethal orthopoxvirus disease. Here, we investigated the capacity of the molecular adjuvants GM-CSF and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT to enhance the efficacy of the 4pox gene-based vaccine. Both adjuvants significantly increased protective antibody responses in mice. We directly compared the 4pox plus LT vaccine against MVA in a monkeypox virus (MPXV nonhuman primate (NHP challenge model. NHPs were vaccinated twice with MVA by intramuscular injection or the 4pox/LT vaccine delivered using a disposable gene gun device. As a positive control, one NHP was vaccinated with ACAM2000. NHPs vaccinated with each vaccine developed anti-orthopoxvirus antibody responses, including those against the 4pox antigens. After MPXV intravenous challenge, all control NHPs developed severe disease, while the ACAM2000 vaccinated animal was well protected. All NHPs vaccinated with MVA were protected from lethality, but three of five developed severe disease and all animals shed virus. All five NHPs vaccinated with 4pox/LT survived and only one developed severe disease. None of the 4pox/LT-vaccinated animals shed virus. Our findings show, for the first time, that a subunit orthopoxvirus vaccine delivered by the same schedule can provide a degree of protection at least as high as that of MVA.

  13. Side-by-Side Comparison of Gene-Based Smallpox Vaccine with MVA in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Joseph W.; Josleyn, Matthew; Mucker, Eric M.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Loudon, Peter T.; Wu, T. C.; Hooper, Jay W.

    2012-01-01

    Orthopoxviruses remain a threat as biological weapons and zoonoses. The licensed live-virus vaccine is associated with serious health risks, making its general usage unacceptable. Attenuated vaccines are being developed as alternatives, the most advanced of which is modified-vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). We previously developed a gene-based vaccine, termed 4pox, which targets four orthopoxvirus antigens, A33, B5, A27 and L1. This vaccine protects mice and non-human primates from lethal orthopoxvirus disease. Here, we investigated the capacity of the molecular adjuvants GM-CSF and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) to enhance the efficacy of the 4pox gene-based vaccine. Both adjuvants significantly increased protective antibody responses in mice. We directly compared the 4pox plus LT vaccine against MVA in a monkeypox virus (MPXV) nonhuman primate (NHP) challenge model. NHPs were vaccinated twice with MVA by intramuscular injection or the 4pox/LT vaccine delivered using a disposable gene gun device. As a positive control, one NHP was vaccinated with ACAM2000. NHPs vaccinated with each vaccine developed anti-orthopoxvirus antibody responses, including those against the 4pox antigens. After MPXV intravenous challenge, all control NHPs developed severe disease, while the ACAM2000 vaccinated animal was well protected. All NHPs vaccinated with MVA were protected from lethality, but three of five developed severe disease and all animals shed virus. All five NHPs vaccinated with 4pox/LT survived and only one developed severe disease. None of the 4pox/LT-vaccinated animals shed virus. Our findings show, for the first time, that a subunit orthopoxvirus vaccine delivered by the same schedule can provide a degree of protection at least as high as that of MVA. PMID:22860117

  14. Recent advances in the development of subunit-based RSV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberolansar, Noushin; Toth, Istvan; Young, Paul R; Skwarczynski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections causing pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants. RSV also causes serious illness in elderly populations, immunocompromised patients and individuals with pulmonary or cardiac problems. The significant morbidity and mortality associated with RSV infection have prompted interest in RSV vaccine development. In the 1960s, a formalin-inactivated vaccine trial failed to protect children, and indeed enhanced pathology when naturally infected later with RSV. Hence, an alternative approach to traditional killed virus vaccines, which can induce protective immunity without serious adverse events, is desired. Several strategies have been explored in attempts to produce effective vaccine candidates including gene-based and subunit vaccines. Subunit-based vaccine approaches have shown promising efficacy in animal studies and several have reached clinical trials. The current stage of development of subunit-based vaccines against RSV is reviewed in this article.

  15. Microbiological criteria for Listeria monocytogenes in foods under special consideration of risk assessment approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    This paper shortly summarizes data related to risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes. From available data on risk assessment, it is concluded that the levels of L. monocytogenes consumed is an important factor affecting the incidence of listeriosis. Foods that do not support the growth of L....... monocytogenes are unlikely to be a source of listeriosis, whereas foods that support the growth to high levels, should be the target of risk management efforts. Based on current epidemiological information from several countries, a concentration of L. monocytogenes not exceeding 100/g of food at the time...

  16. Adjuvants for peptide-based cancer vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Khong, Hiep; Overwijk, Willem W

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapies based on T cells have shown impressive clinical benefit. In particular, immune checkpoint blockade therapies with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 are causing dramatic tumor shrinkage and prolonged patient survival in a variety of cancers. However, many patients do not benefit, possibly due to insufficient spontaneous T cell reactivity against their tumors and/or lacking immune cell infiltration to tumor site. Such tumor-specific T cell responses could be induced through anti-...

  17. The antimicrobial action of resveratrol against Listeria monocytogenes in food-based models and its antibiofilm properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Domingues, Fernanda

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a natural phytoalexin synthesized by plants in response to stress. This compound has several beneficial documented properties, namely anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective and antimicrobial activities. In this study the antimicrobial activity of resveratrol against Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua was investigated. Resveratrol had a minimum inhibitory concentration of 200 µg mL(-1) for the tested strains, with time-kill curves demonstrating bacteriostatic activity. Inhibition of biofilm formation was also assessed, with resveratrol strongly inhibiting biofilm formation by both species even at subinhibitory concentrations. Overall, resveratrol showed antimicrobial properties on planktonic cells and on biofilm formation ability. Considering the potential use of resveratrol as a food preservative, the antimicrobial efficacy of resveratrol in food was studied in milk, lettuce leaf model and chicken juice. Resveratrol retained greater efficacy in both lettuce leaf model and chicken juice, but milk had a negative impact on its antilisterial activity, indicating a possible reduction of resveratrol availability in milk. This study reinforces resveratrol as an antimicrobial agent, pointing out its antibiofilm activity and its potential use as preservative in some food matrices. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against Bundibugyo ebolavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics for human use. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV-based vaccine vectors, which encode an EBOV glycoprotein in place of the VSV glycoprotein, have shown 100% efficacy against homologous Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV or Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV challenge in NHPs. In addition, a single injection of a blend of three rVSV vectors completely protected NHPs against challenge with SEBOV, ZEBOV, the former Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus, and Marburg virus. However, recent studies suggest that complete protection against the newly discovered Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BEBOV using several different heterologous filovirus vaccines is more difficult and presents a new challenge. As BEBOV caused nearly 50% mortality in a recent outbreak any filovirus vaccine advanced for human use must be able to protect against this new species. Here, we evaluated several different strategies against BEBOV using rVSV-based vaccines. Groups of cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with a single injection of a homologous BEBOV vaccine, a single injection of a blended heterologous vaccine (SEBOV/ZEBOV, or a prime-boost using heterologous SEBOV and ZEBOV vectors. Animals were challenged with BEBOV 29-36 days after initial vaccination. Macaques vaccinated with the homologous BEBOV vaccine or the prime-boost showed no overt signs of illness and survived challenge. In contrast, animals vaccinated with the heterologous blended vaccine and unvaccinated control animals developed severe clinical symptoms consistent with BEBOV infection with 2 of 3 animals in each group succumbing. These data show that complete protection against BEBOV will likely require incorporation of BEBOV glycoprotein into the vaccine or employment of a prime-boost regimen. Fortunately, our results demonstrate that heterologous rVSV-based filovirus vaccine

  19. Development of cross-protective influenza A vaccines based on cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Christiaan Soema

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza strains has spurred the vaccine development community to look for other influenza vaccine concepts, which have the ability to elicit cross-protective immune responses.One of the concepts that is currently been worked on are influenza vaccines inducing influenza-specific T cell responses. T cells are able to lyse infected host cells, thereby clearing the virus. More interestingly, these T cells can recognize highly conserved epitopes of internal influenza proteins, making cellular responses less vulnerable to antigenic variability. T cells are therefore cross-reactive against many influenza strains, and thus are a promising concept for future influenza vaccines. Despite their potential, there are currently no T cell based IAV vaccines on the market. Selection of the proper antigen, appropriate vaccine formulation and evaluation of the efficacy of T cell vaccines remains challenging, both in preclinical and clinical settings.In this review, we will discuss the current developments in influenza T cell vaccines, focusing on existing protein-based and novel peptide-based vaccine formulations. Furthermore, we will discuss the feasibility of influenza T cell vaccines and their possible use in the future.

  20. Potent tetravalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Guo, Jin-Peng; An, Huai-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-05-07

    Human botulism is commonly associated with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B, E and F. This suggests that the greatest need is for a tetravalent vaccine that provides protection against all four of these serotypes. In current study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several tetravalent vaccines that protected mice against the four serotypes. Firstly, monovalent replicon vaccine against BoNT induced better antibody response and protection than that of corresponding conventional DNA vaccine. Secondly, dual-expression DNA replicon pSCARSE/FHc or replicon particle VRP-E/FHc vaccine was well resistant to the challenge of BoNT/E and BoNT/F mixture as a combination vaccine composed of two monovalent replicon vaccines. Finally, the dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle tetravalent vaccine could simultaneously and effectively neutralize and protect the four BoNT serotypes. Protection correlated directly with serum ELISA titers and neutralization antibody levels to BoNTs. Therefore, replicon-based DNA or particle might be effective vector to develop BoNT vaccines, which might be more desirable for use in clinical application than the conventional DNA vaccines. Our studies demonstrate the utility of combining dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle vaccines into multi-agent formulations as potent tetravalent vaccines for eliciting protective responses to four serotypes of BoNTs.

  1. Anti-Lyme Subunit Vaccines: Design and Development of Peptide-Based Vaccine Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Christina M; Mwangi, Waithaka; Esteve-Gassent, Maria D

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinology today has been presented with several avenues to improve protection against infectious disease. The recent employment of the reverse vaccinology technique has changed the face of vaccine development against many pathogens, including Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Using this technique, genomics and in silico analyses come together to identify potentially antigenic epitopes in a high-throughput fashion. The forward methodology of vaccine development was used previously to generate the only licensed human vaccine for Lyme disease, which is no longer on the market. Using reverse vaccinology to identify new antigens and isolate specific epitopes to protect against B. burgdorferi, subunit vaccines will be generated that lack reactogenic and nonspecific epitopes, yielding more effective vaccine candidates. Additionally, novel epitopes are being utilized and are presently in the commercialization pipeline both for B. burgdorferi and other spirochaetal pathogens. The versatility and methodology of the subunit protein vaccine are described as it pertains to Lyme disease from conception to performance evaluation.

  2. Risk-Based Approach for Microbiological Food Safety Management in the Dairy Industry: The Case of Listeria monocytogenes in Soft Cheese Made from Pasteurized Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny; Daudin, Jean-Jacques; Maffre, Alexandre; Sanaa, Moez

    2014-01-01

    According to Codex Alimentarius Commission recommendations, management options applied at the process production level should be based on good hygiene practices, HACCP system, and new risk management metrics such as the food safety objective. To follow this last recommendation, the use of quantitative microbiological risk assessment is an appealing approach to link new risk-based metrics to management options that may be applied by food operators. Through a specific case study, Listeria monocytogenes in soft cheese made from pasteurized milk, the objective of the present article is to practically show how quantitative risk assessment could be used to direct potential intervention strategies at different food processing steps. Based on many assumptions, the model developed estimates the risk of listeriosis at the moment of consumption taking into account the entire manufacturing process and potential sources of contamination. From pasteurization to consumption, the amplification of a primo-contamination event of the milk, the fresh cheese or the process environment is simulated, over time, space, and between products, accounting for the impact of management options, such as hygienic operations and sampling plans. A sensitivity analysis of the model will help orientating data to be collected prioritarily for the improvement and the validation of the model. What-if scenarios were simulated and allowed for the identification of major parameters contributing to the risk of listeriosis and the optimization of preventive and corrective measures.

  3. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Rate for Medical Staff: Influence of Hospital-Based Vaccination Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, T M; Szymańczak, M; Jakubiak, J; Nitsch-Osuch, A; Życińska, K

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive recommendations, influenza vaccination rate in medical staff in Poland ranges from about 20 % in physicians to 10 % in nurses. The objective of this work was to assess the influence of hospital influenza vaccination campaign directed toward health care workers, combined with dispensing free of charge vaccine, on vaccination rate. The campaign was conducted by the Hospital Infection Control Team of the Czerniakowski Hospital in Warsaw, Poland, separately for physicians, nurses, and physiotherapists. Overall, 37 % of medical staff were vaccinated, including 55 % of physicians and 21 % of nurses. Concerning physicians, the greatest vaccination rate was in the orthopedic (80 %) and ophthalmology units (73 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the intensive care (22 %) and neurology units (20 %). Concerning nurses, the greatest vaccination rate was in those working in the outpatient (40 %) and emergency units (29 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the ophthalmology (6 %) and surgery units (11 %). We conclude that the professional knowledge campaign combined with the incentive of free of charge vaccine substantially raises the vaccination rate among medical staff.

  4. [Listeria monocytogenes in food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mícková, V

    1992-12-01

    As in recent years laboratory diagnostics of listeria has become part of food microbiology, the frequency of occurrence of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes has been followed in various kinds of foods for a year. A total of 51 strains of L. monocytogenes (7.2%) was isolated from 700 kinds of samples (raw milk, pasteurized milk, meat surface, poultry, cheeses, thermally not treated meat products, food--industry machinery). As can be seen in Tab. I, the highest number of strains was isolated from meat surfaces (13.5%), followed by meat--industry machinery (12.72%), poultry (10%) and cheeses (5%). The lower numbers of strains were found out in thermally not treated meat products (3.8%) and in raw milk (3.3%). Pasteurized milk did not contain any strains. Our findings in raw milk (3.3%) and in pasteurized milk (0) are in agreement with the data cited e. g. by authors from the USA (Lovett et al., 1987), who mention the value of 4.2% in raw milk and the zero value in pasteurized milk. The percentage of strains monitored in cheeses (5%) can be evaluated as low as the assortment of investigated cheeses was small (all strains were isolated from soft ripening cheeses). German authors (Tham et al., 1988) speak about the 2.5% percentage of L. monocytogenes strains; this is in keeping with our findings. The findings in thermally not treated meat products (3.8%) can be evaluated as low although the number of strains found in raw meat was high.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Multiple Approaches for Increasing the Immunogenicity of an Epitope-Based Anti-HIV Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Fonseca, Simone Gonçalves; Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Santana, Vinicius Canato; Apostólico, Juliana de Souza; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-11-01

    The development of a highly effective vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will likely be based on rational vaccine design, since traditional vaccine approaches have failed so far. In recent years, an understanding of what type of immune response is protective against infection and/or disease facilitated vaccine design. T cell-based vaccines against HIV have the goal of limiting both transmission and disease progression by inducing broad and functionally relevant T cell responses. In this context, CD4(+) T cells play a direct cytotoxic role and are also important for the generation and maintenance of functional CD8(+) T and B cell responses. The use of MHC-binding algorithms has allowed the identification of novel CD4(+) T cell epitopes that could be used in vaccine design, the so-called epitope-driven vaccine design. Epitope-based vaccines have the ability to focus the immune response on highly antigenic, conserved epitopes that are fully recognized by the target population. We have recently mapped a set of conserved multiple HLA-DR-binding HIV-1 CD4 epitopes and observed interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells when we tested these peptides in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals. We then designed multiepitopic DNA vaccines that induced broad and polyfunctional T cell responses in immunized mice. In this review we will focus on alternative strategies to increase the immunogenicity of an epitope-based vaccine against HIV infection.

  6. Infrared sensor-based aerosol sanitization system for controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes on fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Oh; Ha, Jae-Won; Park, Ki-Hwan; Chung, Myung-Sub; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    An economical aerosol sanitization system was developed based on sensor technology for minimizing sanitizer usage, while maintaining bactericidal efficacy. Aerosol intensity in a system chamber was controlled by a position-sensitive device and its infrared value range. The effectiveness of the infrared sensor-based aerosolization (ISA) system to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes on spinach leaf surfaces was compared with conventional aerosolization (full-time aerosol treated), and the amount of sanitizer consumed was determined after operation. Three pathogens artificially inoculated onto spinach leaf surfaces were treated with aerosolized peracetic acid (400 ppm) for 15, 30, 45, and 60 min at room temperature (22 ± 2°C). Using the ISA system, inactivation levels of the three pathogens were equal or better than treatment with conventional full-time aerosolization. However, the amount of sanitizer consumed was reduced by ca. 40% using the ISA system. The results of this study suggest that an aerosol sanitization system combined with infrared sensor technology could be used for transportation and storage of fresh produce efficiently and economically as a practical commercial intervention.

  7. Plant-based vaccines: novel and low-cost possible route for Mediterranean innovative vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Ata, Aboul-Ata E; Vitti, Antonella; Nuzzaci, Maria; El-Attar, Ahmad K; Piazzolla, Giuseppina; Tortorella, Cosimo; Harandi, Ali M; Olson, Olof; Wright, Sandra A; Piazzolla, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    A plant bioreactor has enormous capability as a system that supports many biological activities, that is, production of plant bodies, virus-like particles (VLPs), and vaccines. Foreign gene expression is an efficient mechanism for getting protein vaccines against different human viral and nonviral diseases. Plants make it easy to deal with safe, inexpensive, and provide trouble-free storage. The broad spectrum of safe gene promoters is being used to avoid risk assessments. Engineered virus-based vectors have no side effect. The process can be manipulated as follows: (a) retrieve and select gene encoding, use an antigenic protein from GenBank and/or from a viral-genome sequence, (b) design and construct hybrid-virus vectors (viral vector with a gene of interest) eventually flanked by plant-specific genetic regulatory elements for constitutive expression for obtaining chimeric virus, (c) gene transformation and/or transfection, for transient expression, into a plant-host model, that is, tobacco, to get protocols processed positively, and then moving into edible host plants, (d) confirmation of protein expression by bioassay, PCR-associated tests (RT-PCR), Northern and Western blotting analysis, and serological assay (ELISA), (e) expression for adjuvant recombinant protein seeking better antigenicity, (f) extraction and purification of expressed protein for identification and dosing, (g) antigenicity capability evaluated using parental or oral delivery in animal models (mice and/or rabbit immunization), and (h) growing of construct-treated edible crops in protective green houses. Some successful cases of heterologous gene-expressed protein, as edible vaccine, are being discussed, that is, hepatitis C virus (HCV). R9 mimotope, also named hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), was derived from the HVR1 of HCV. It was used as a potential neutralizing epitope of HCV. The mimotope was expressed using cucumber mosaic virus coat protein (CP), alfalfa mosaic virus CP P3/RNA3, and

  8. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith;

    2016-01-01

    for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce......The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens...... been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly...

  9. Print News Coverage of School-Based HPV Vaccine Mandate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Dana; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based HPV vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding these legislative activities. Messages communicated through the media are an important influence on adolescent and parent understanding of school-based vaccine mandates. METHODS We conducted structured text analysis of newspaper coverage, including quantitative analysis of 169 articles published in mandate jurisdictions from 2005-2009, and qualitative analysis of 63 articles from 2007. Our structured analysis identified topics, key stakeholders and sources, tone, and the presence of conflict. Qualitative thematic analysis identified key messages and issues. RESULTS Media coverage was often incomplete, providing little context about cervical cancer or screening. Skepticism and autonomy concerns were common. Messages reflected conflict and distrust of government activities, which could negatively impact this and other youth-focused public health initiatives. CONCLUSIONS If school health professionals are aware of the potential issues raised in media coverage of school-based health mandates, they will be more able to convey appropriate health education messages, and promote informed decision-making by parents and students. PMID:25099421

  10. Magnetic nano-beads based separation combined with propidium monoazide treatment and multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of viable Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youjun; Xu, Feng; Xu, Hengyi; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Niu, Ruijiang; Yuan, Yong; Sun, Jichang; You, Xingyong; Lai, Weihua; Xiong, Yonghua; Wan, Cuixiang; Wei, Hua

    2013-06-01

    We developed a rapid and reliable technique for simultaneous detection of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes that can be used in food products. Magnetic nano-beads (MNBs) based immunomagnetic separation (IMS) was used to separate the target bacterial cells while multiplex PCR (mPCR) was used to amplify the target genes. To detect only the viable bacteria, propidium monoazide (PMA) was applied to selectively suppress the DNA detection from dead cells. The results showed the detection limit of IMS-PMA-mPCR assay was about 10(2) CFU/ml (1.2 × 10(2) CFU/ml for S. Typhimurium, 4.0 × 10(2) CFU/ml for E. coli O157:H7 and 5.4 × 10(2) CFU/ml for L. monocytogenes) in pure culture and 10(3) CFU/g (5.1 × 10(3) CFU/g for S. Typhimurium, 7.5 × 10(3) CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and 8.4 × 10(3) CFU/g for L. monocytogenes) in spiking food products samples (lettuce, tomato and ground beef). This report has demonstrated for the first time, the effective use of rapid and reliable IMS combined with PMA treatment and mPCR assay for simultaneous detection of viable S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes in spiked food samples. It is anticipated that the present approach will be applicable to simultaneous detection of the three target microorganisms for practical use.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes protein fraction induces dendritic cells maturation and T helper 1 immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Saei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fully mature dendritic cells (DCs play pivotal role in inducing immune responses and converting naïve T lymphocytes into functional Th1 cells. We aimed to evaluate Listeria Monocytogenes-derived protein fractions to induce DC maturation and stimulating T helper (Th1 immune responses.In the present study, we fractionated Listeria Monocytogenes-derived proteins by adding of ammonium sulfate in a stepwise manner. DCs were also generated from C57BL/6 mice bone marrow precursor cells. Then, the effects of protein fractions on bone marrow derived DC (BMDC maturation were evaluated. In addition, we assessed the capacity of activated DCs to induce cytokine production and proliferation of lymphocytes.Listeria-derived protein fractions induced fully mature DCs expressing high costimulatory molecules such as CD80, CD86 and CD40. DCs that were activated by selected F3 fraction had low capacity to uptake exogenous antigens while secreted high levels of Interleukine (IL-12. Moreover, lymphocytes cultured with activated BMDCs produced high amounts of IFN-γ and showed higher proliferation than control. Listeria derived protein fractions differently influenced DC maturation.In conclusion, Listeria protein activated-BMDCs can be used as a cell based vaccine to induce anti-tumor immune responses.

  12. Highest Vaccine Uptake after School-Based Delivery - A County-Level Evaluation of the Implementation Strategies for HPV Catch-Up Vaccination in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moa Rehn

    Full Text Available The Swedish school-based vaccination programme offers HPV vaccine to girls born ≥1999 in 5-6th grade. In 2012, all counties introduced free-of-charge catch-up vaccination campaigns targeting girls born 1993-1998. Varying vaccine uptake in the catch-up group by December 2012 suggested that some implementation strategies were more successful than others. In order to inform future vaccination campaigns, we assessed the impact of different implementation strategies on the county-level catch-up vaccine uptake.We conducted an ecological study including all Swedish counties (n = 21, asking regional health offices about the information channels they used and where vaccination of the catch-up target group took place in their counties. The uptake of ≥1 dose by 30 September 2014 was estimated using data from the voluntary national vaccination register. We investigated associations between counties' catch-up vaccine uptake, information channels and vaccination settings by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, using negative binomial regression models.County level catch-up vaccine uptake varied between 49-84%. All counties offered vaccination through primary health care settings. Apart from this eight (34% also offered the vaccine in some of their schools, four (19% in all their schools, and two (10% in other health care centres. The information channels most frequently used were: information at the national on-line health care consulting web-page (100%, letter/invitations (90%, and advertisement (81%. Counties offering vaccination to girls in all schools and counties offering vaccination in some of their schools, reached higher vaccine uptake compared to counties not offering vaccination in any of their schools (all schools adjusted IRR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, some schools adjusted IRR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3.Counties offering HPV vaccination to catch-up groups in schools reached the highest vaccine uptake. No information

  13. Automated production of plant-based vaccines and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Holger; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F; Briggs, John; Sharpe, Aaron; Shu, Sudong; Sharon, Andre

    2012-12-01

    A fully automated "factory" was developed that uses tobacco plants to produce large quantities of vaccines and other therapeutic biologics within weeks. This first-of-a-kind factory takes advantage of a plant viral vector technology to produce specific proteins within the leaves of rapidly growing plant biomass. The factory's custom-designed robotic machines plant seeds, nurture the growing plants, introduce a viral vector that directs the plant to produce a target protein, and harvest the biomass once the target protein has accumulated in the plants-all in compliance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines (e.g., current Good Manufacturing Practices). The factory was designed to be time, cost, and space efficient. The plants are grown in custom multiplant trays. Robots ride up and down a track, servicing the plants and delivering the trays from the lighted, irrigated growth modules to each processing station as needed. Using preprogrammed robots and processing equipment eliminates the need for human contact, preventing potential contamination of the process and economizing the operation. To quickly produce large quantities of protein-based medicines, we transformed a laboratory-based biological process and scaled it into an industrial process. This enables quick, safe, and cost-effective vaccine production that would be required in case of a pandemic.

  14. In silico-based vaccine design against Ebola virus glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash R

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Raju Dash,1 Rasel Das,2 Md Junaid,3 Md Forhad Chowdhury Akash,4 Ashekul Islam,5 SM Zahid Hosen1 1Molecular Modeling and Drug Design Laboratory (MMDDL, Pharmacology Research Division, Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (BCSIR, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 2Nanotechnology and Catalysis Research Center, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 4Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Bangladesh Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV is one of the lethal viruses, causing more than 24 epidemic outbreaks to date. Despite having available molecular knowledge of this virus, no definite vaccine or other remedial agents have been developed yet for the management and avoidance of EBOV infections in humans. Disclosing this, the present study described an epitope-based peptide vaccine against EBOV, using a combination of B-cell and T-cell epitope predictions, followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach. Here, protein sequences of all glycoproteins of EBOV were collected and examined via in silico methods to determine the most immunogenic protein. From the identified antigenic protein, the peptide region ranging from 186 to 220 and the sequence HKEGAFFLY from the positions of 154–162 were considered the most potential B-cell and T-cell epitopes, correspondingly. Moreover, this peptide (HKEGAFFLY interacted with HLA-A*32:15 with the highest binding energy and stability, and also a good conservancy of 83.85% with maximum population coverage. The results imply that the designed epitopes could manifest vigorous enduring defensive immunity against EBOV. Keywords: Ebola virus, epitope, glycoprotein, vaccine design

  15. Assessment of Listeria sp. Interference Using a Molecular Assay To Detect Listeria monocytogenes in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittermann, Sandra I; Stanghini, Brenda; See, Ryan Soo; Melano, Roberto G; Boleszczuk, Peter; Murphy, Allana; Maki, Anne; Mallo, Gustavo V

    2016-01-01

    Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food is currently based on enrichment methods. When L. monocytogenes is present with other Listeria species in food, the species compete during the enrichment process. Overgrowth competition of the nonpathogenic Listeria species might result in false-negative results obtained with the current reference methods. This potential issue was noted when 50 food samples artificially spiked with L. monocytogenes were tested with a real-time PCR assay and Canada's current reference method, MFHPB-30. Eleven of the samples studied were from foods naturally contaminated with Listeria species other than those used for spiking. The real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes in all 11 of these samples; however, only 6 of these samples were positive by the MFHPB-30 method. To determine whether L. monocytogenes detection can be affected by other species of the same genus due to competition, an L. monocytogenes strain and a Listeria innocua strain with a faster rate of growth in the enrichment broth were artificially coinoculated at different ratios into ground pork meat samples and cultured according to the MFHPB-30 method. L. monocytogenes was detected only by the MFHPB-30 method when L. monocytogenes/L. innocua ratios were 6.0 or higher. In contrast, using the same enrichments, the real-time PCR assay detected L. monocytogenes at ratios as low as 0.6. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that L. monocytogenes can be outcompeted by L. innocua during the MFHPB-30 enrichment phase. However, more reliable detection of L. monocytogenes in this situation can be achieved by a PCR-based method mainly because of its sensitivity.

  16. Vaccination-challenge studies with a Port Chalmers/73 (H3N2)-based swine influenza virus vaccine: Reflections on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Qiu, Yu; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-05-11

    The human A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2) influenza virus strain, the supposed ancestor of European H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs), was used in most commercial SIV vaccines in Europe until recently. If manufacturers want to update vaccine strains, they have to perform laborious intratracheal (IT) challenge experiments and demonstrate reduced virus titres in the lungs of vaccinated pigs. We aimed to examine (a) the ability of a Port Chalmers/73-based commercial vaccine to induce cross-protection against a contemporary European H3N2 SIV and serologic cross-reaction against H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America and (b) the validity of intranasal (IN) challenge and virus titrations of nasal swabs as alternatives for IT challenge and titrations of lung tissue in vaccine potency tests. Pigs were vaccinated with Suvaxyn Flu(®) and challenged by the IT or IN route with sw/Gent/172/08. Post-vaccination sera were examined in haemagglutination-inhibition assays against vaccine and challenge strains and additional H3N2 SIVs from Europe and North America, including an H3N2 variant virus. Tissues of the respiratory tract and nasal swabs were collected 3 days post challenge (DPCh) and from 0-7 DPCh, respectively, and examined by virus titration. Two vaccinations consistently induced cross-reactive antibodies against European H3N2 SIVs from 1998-2012, but minimal or undetectable antibody titres against North American viruses. Challenge virus titres in the lungs, trachea and nasal mucosa of the vaccinated pigs were significantly reduced after both IT and IN challenge. Yet the reduction of virus titres and nasal shedding was greater after IT challenge. The Port Chalmers/73-based vaccine still offered protection against a European H3N2 SIV isolated 35 years later and with only 86.9% amino acid homology in its HA1, but it is unlikely to protect against H3N2 SIVs that are endemic in North America. We use our data to reflect on vaccine strain updates and on the vaccine potency test.

  17. A Novel Therapy for Melanoma Developed in Mice: Transformation of Melanoma into Dendritic Cells with Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchalo-Vicente, Lucia; Rodriguez-Del Rio, Estela; Freire, Javier; Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Gomez-Roman, Jose Javier; Fernández-Llaca, Hector; Yañez-Diaz, Sonsoles; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive bacteria and human pathogen widely used in cancer immunotherapy because of its capacity to induce a specific cytotoxic T cell response in tumours. This bacterial pathogen strongly induces innate and specific immunity with the potential to overcome tumour induced tolerance and weak immunogenicity. Here, we propose a Listeria based vaccination for melanoma based in its tropism for these tumour cells and its ability to transform in vitro and in vivo melanoma cells into matured and activated dendritic cells with competent microbicidal and antigen processing abilities. This Listeria based vaccination using low doses of the pathogen caused melanoma regression by apoptosis as well as bacterial clearance. Vaccination efficacy is LLO dependent and implies the reduction of LLO-specific CD4+ T cell responses, strong stimulation of innate pro-inflammatory immune cells and a prevalence of LLO-specific CD8+ T cells involved in tumour regression and Listeria elimination. These results support the use of low doses of pathogenic Listeria as safe melanoma therapeutic vaccines that do not require antibiotics for bacterial removal. PMID:25760947

  18. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  19. Epitope-based recombinant diagnostic antigen to distinguish natural infection from vaccination with hepatitis A virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qiudong; Guo, Minzhuo; Jia, Zhiyuan; Qiu, Feng; Lu, Xuexin; Gao, Yan; Meng, Qingling; Tian, Ruiguang; Bi, Shengli; Yi, Yao

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection can stimulate the production of antibodies to structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. However, vaccination with an inactivated or attenuated HAV vaccine produces antibodies mainly against structural proteins, whereas no or very limited antibodies are produced against the non-structural proteins. Current diagnostic assays to determine exposure to HAV, such as the Abbott HAV AB test, detect antibodies only to the structural proteins and so are not able to distinguish a natural infection from vaccination with an inactivated or attenuated virus. Here, we constructed a recombinant tandem multi-epitope diagnostic antigen (designated 'H1') based on the immune-dominant epitopes of the non-structural proteins of HAV to distinguish the two situations. H1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity and anion exchange chromatography was applied in a double-antigen sandwich ELISA for the detection of anti-non-structural HAV proteins, which was confirmed to distinguish a natural infection from vaccination with an inactivated or attenuated HAV vaccine.

  20. In silico-based vaccine design against Ebola virus glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Raju; Das, Rasel; Junaid, Md; Akash, Md Forhad Chowdhury; Islam, Ashekul; Hosen, SM Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is one of the lethal viruses, causing more than 24 epidemic outbreaks to date. Despite having available molecular knowledge of this virus, no definite vaccine or other remedial agents have been developed yet for the management and avoidance of EBOV infections in humans. Disclosing this, the present study described an epitope-based peptide vaccine against EBOV, using a combination of B-cell and T-cell epitope predictions, followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach. Here, protein sequences of all glycoproteins of EBOV were collected and examined via in silico methods to determine the most immunogenic protein. From the identified antigenic protein, the peptide region ranging from 186 to 220 and the sequence HKEGAFFLY from the positions of 154–162 were considered the most potential B-cell and T-cell epitopes, correspondingly. Moreover, this peptide (HKEGAFFLY) interacted with HLA-A*32:15 with the highest binding energy and stability, and also a good conservancy of 83.85% with maximum population coverage. The results imply that the designed epitopes could manifest vigorous enduring defensive immunity against EBOV. PMID:28356762

  1. Recombinant Probiotic Expressing Listeria Adhesion Protein Attenuates Listeria monocytogenes Virulence In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ok Kyung; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular foodborne pathogen, infects immunocompromised hosts. The primary route of transmission is through contaminated food. In the gastrointestinal tract, it traverses the epithelial barrier through intracellular or paracellular routes. Strategies to prevent L. monocytogenes entry can potentially minimize infection in high-risk populations. Listeria adhesion protein (LAP) aids L. monocytogenes in crossing epithelial barriers via the paracellular route. The use of recombinant probiotic bacteria expressing LAP would aid targeted clearance of Listeria from the gut and protect high-risk populations from infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The objective was to investigate the ability of probiotic bacteria or LAP-expressing recombinant probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei (LbpLAP) to prevent L. monocytogenes adhesion, invasion, and transwell-based transepithelial translocation in a Caco-2 cell culture model. Several wild type probiotic bacteria showed strong adhesion to Caco-2 cells but none effectively prevented L. monocytogenes infection. Pre-exposure to LbpLAP for 1, 4, 15, or 24 h significantly (Pmonocytogenes in Caco-2 cells, whereas pre-exposure to parental Lb. paracasei had no significant effect. Similarly, LbpLAP pre-exposure reduced L. monocytogenes translocation by as much as 46% after 24 h. LbpLAP also prevented L. monocytogenes-mediated cell damage and compromise of tight junction integrity. Furthermore, LbpLAP cells reduced L. monocytogenes-mediated cell cytotoxicity by 99.8% after 1 h and 79% after 24 h. Conclusions/Significance Wild type probiotic bacteria were unable to prevent L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. In contrast, LbpLAP blocked adhesion, invasion, and translocation of L. monocytogenes by interacting with host cell receptor Hsp60, thereby protecting cells from infection. These data show promise for the use of recombinant probiotics in preventing L. monocytogenes infection in high

  2. An experimental and computational study of the effect of ActA polarity on the speed of Listeria monocytogenes actin-based motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne M Rafelski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium that moves within infected cells and spreads directly between cells by harnessing the cell's dendritic actin machinery. This motility is dependent on expression of a single bacterial surface protein, ActA, a constitutively active Arp2,3 activator, and has been widely studied as a biochemical and biophysical model system for actin-based motility. Dendritic actin network dynamics are important for cell processes including eukaryotic cell motility, cytokinesis, and endocytosis. Here we experimentally altered the degree of ActA polarity on a population of bacteria and made use of an ActA-RFP fusion to determine the relationship between ActA distribution and speed of bacterial motion. We found a positive linear relationship for both ActA intensity and polarity with speed. We explored the underlying mechanisms of this dependence with two distinctly different quantitative models: a detailed agent-based model in which each actin filament and branched network is explicitly simulated, and a three-state continuum model that describes a simplified relationship between bacterial speed and barbed-end actin populations. In silico bacterial motility required a cooperative restraining mechanism to reconstitute our observed speed-polarity relationship, suggesting that kinetic friction between actin filaments and the bacterial surface, a restraining force previously neglected in motility models, is important in determining the effect of ActA polarity on bacterial motility. The continuum model was less restrictive, requiring only a filament number-dependent restraining mechanism to reproduce our experimental observations. However, seemingly rational assumptions in the continuum model, e.g. an average propulsive force per filament, were invalidated by further analysis with the agent-based model. We found that the average contribution to motility from side-interacting filaments was actually a function of the Act

  3. DENGUE VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    The uniqueness of the dengue viruses (DENVs) and the spectrum of disease resulting from infection have made dengue vaccine development difficult. Several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. The candidate currently at the most advanced clinical development stage, a live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on the chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV), has progressed to Phase 3 efficacy studies. Several other live-attenuated vaccines, as well as subunit, DNA, and purified inactivated vaccine candidates are at earlier stages of clinical development. Additional technological approaches, such as virus-vectored and Virus-Like Particles (VLP)-based vaccines are under evaluation in preclinical studies.

  4. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Ebola and Marburg virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-11-01

    The filoviruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the most-promising filovirus vaccines under development is a system based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) that expresses a single filovirus glycoprotein (GP) in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G). Importantly, a single injection of blended rVSV-based filovirus vaccines was shown to completely protect nonhuman primates against Marburg virus and 3 different species of Ebola virus. These rVSV-based vaccines have also shown utility when administered as a postexposure treatment against filovirus infections, and a rVSV-based Ebola virus vaccine was recently used to treat a potential laboratory exposure. Here, we review the history of rVSV-based vaccines and pivotal animal studies showing their utility in combating Ebola and Marburg virus infections.

  5. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on cut cantaloupe, honeydew and watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyluk, Michelle D; Friedrich, Loretta M; Schaffner, Donald W

    2014-04-01

    A recent outbreak linked to whole cantaloupes underscores the importance of understanding growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes in cut melons at different temperatures. Whole cantaloupe, watermelon, and honeydew purchased from a local supermarket were cut into 10 ± 1 g cubes. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes from food related outbreaks was used to inoculate fruit, resulting in ~10(3) CFU/10 g. Samples were stored at 4, 10, 15, 20, or 25 °C and L. monocytogenes were enumerated at appropriate time intervals. The square root model was used to describe L. monocytogenes growth rate as a function of temperature. The model was compared to prior models for Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 growth on cut melon, as well as models for L. monocytogenes on cantaloupe and L. monocytogenes ComBase models. The current model predicts faster growth of L. monocytogenes vs. Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 at temperatures below 20 °C, and agrees with estimates from ComBase Predictor, and a corrected published model for L. monocytogenes on cut cantaloupe. The model predicts ~4 log CFU increase following 15 days at 5 °C, and ∼1 log CFU increase following 6 days at 4 °C. The model can also be used in subsequent quantitative microbial risk assessments.

  6. Characterization nanoparticles-based vaccines and vaccine candidates: a Transmission Electron Microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Menéndez I

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM is a valuable tool for the biotech industry. This paper summarizes some of the contributions of MET in the characterization of the recombinant antigens are part of vaccines or vaccine candidates obtained in the CIGB. It mentions the use of complementary techniques MET (Negative staining, and immunoelectron that enhance visualization and ultrastructural characterization of the recombinant proteins obtained by Genetic Engineering.

  7. [Hematometra & Listeria monocytogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Arzapalo, E; Pérez Mendizábal, A; Herrera Avalos, I; Gorozpe Calvillo, J I

    2001-05-01

    The hematometra is a nosological entity that may not always be attributed to an embryonic defect of the paramesonefros; cervical-vaginal infections such as etiological possibilities due to Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), cervix malignant neoplasias, iatrogenias due to endometrial ablation with Lasser, traumatic bloody uterine curetage and because of cervical cryocoagulation or electrocoagulation are also mentioned. The case to be reported is from a woman in reproductive stage, who is 32 years old, and had menarca at the age of 13, starting her sexual life at 31, not using any method to control her fertility. When having an eight-week amenorrhea after 8 months of marriage, she visited the doctor for assumed pregnancy, within the prenatal analysis a pelvic echographic study was requested, finding out images that we concluded as hematometra, having been drained and demonstrated the presence of LM by anti-Lm antibodies, being administered Azitromicina and Espiramicina.

  8. Timeliness of childhood vaccinations in Kampala Uganda: a community-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babirye, Juliet N; Engebretsen, Ingunn M S; Makumbi, Frederick; Fadnes, Lars T; Wamani, Henry; Tylleskar, Thorkild; Nuwaha, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Child survival is dependent on several factors including high vaccination coverage. Timely receipt of vaccines ensures optimal immune response to the vaccines. Yet timeliness is not usually emphasized in estimating population immunity. In addition to examining timeliness of the recommended Expanded Programme for Immunisation (EPI) vaccines, this paper identifies predictors of untimely vaccination among children aged 10 to 23 months in Kampala. In addition to the household survey interview questions, additional data sources for variables included data collection of child's weight and length. Vaccination dates were obtained from child health cards. Timeliness of vaccinations were assessed with Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis for each vaccine based on the following time ranges (lowest-highest target age): BCG (birth-8 weeks), polio 0 (birth-4 weeks), three polio and three pentavalent vaccines (4 weeks-2 months; 8 weeks-4 months; 12 weeks-6 months) and measles vaccine (38 weeks-12 months). Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with vaccination timeliness. About half of 821 children received all vaccines within the recommended time ranges (45.6%; 95% CI 39.8-51.2). Timely receipt of vaccinations was lowest for measles (67.5%; 95% CI 60.5-73.8) and highest for BCG vaccine (92.7%: 95% CI 88.1-95.6). For measles, 10.7% (95% CI 6.8-16.4) of the vaccinations were administered earlier than the recommended time. Vaccinations that were not received within the recommended age ranges were associated with increasing number of children per woman (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR); 1.84, 95% CI 1.29-2.64), non-delivery at health facilities (AHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.02-2.46), being unmarried (AHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.15-1.94) or being in the lowest wealth quintile (AHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11-1.72). Strategies to improve vaccination practices among the poorest, single, multiparous women and among mothers who do not deliver at health facilities are necessary to improve

  9. Timeliness of childhood vaccinations in Kampala Uganda: a community-based cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet N Babirye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Child survival is dependent on several factors including high vaccination coverage. Timely receipt of vaccines ensures optimal immune response to the vaccines. Yet timeliness is not usually emphasized in estimating population immunity. In addition to examining timeliness of the recommended Expanded Programme for Immunisation (EPI vaccines, this paper identifies predictors of untimely vaccination among children aged 10 to 23 months in Kampala. METHODS: In addition to the household survey interview questions, additional data sources for variables included data collection of child's weight and length. Vaccination dates were obtained from child health cards. Timeliness of vaccinations were assessed with Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis for each vaccine based on the following time ranges (lowest-highest target age: BCG (birth-8 weeks, polio 0 (birth-4 weeks, three polio and three pentavalent vaccines (4 weeks-2 months; 8 weeks-4 months; 12 weeks-6 months and measles vaccine (38 weeks-12 months. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with vaccination timeliness. RESULTS: About half of 821 children received all vaccines within the recommended time ranges (45.6%; 95% CI 39.8-51.2. Timely receipt of vaccinations was lowest for measles (67.5%; 95% CI 60.5-73.8 and highest for BCG vaccine (92.7%: 95% CI 88.1-95.6. For measles, 10.7% (95% CI 6.8-16.4 of the vaccinations were administered earlier than the recommended time. Vaccinations that were not received within the recommended age ranges were associated with increasing number of children per woman (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR; 1.84, 95% CI 1.29-2.64, non-delivery at health facilities (AHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.02-2.46, being unmarried (AHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.15-1.94 or being in the lowest wealth quintile (AHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11-1.72. CONCLUSIONS: Strategies to improve vaccination practices among the poorest, single, multiparous women and among mothers who do not deliver at

  10. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Giles

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  11. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  12. Design of nanomaterial based systems for novel vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Kirberger, Michael; Liao, Wenzhen; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2016-05-26

    With lower cell toxicity and higher specificity, novel vaccines have been greatly developed and applied to emerging infectious and chronic diseases. However, due to problems associated with low immunogenicity and complicated processing steps, the development of novel vaccines has been limited. With the rapid development of bio-technologies and material sciences, nanomaterials are playing essential roles in novel vaccine design. Incorporation of nanomaterials is expected to improve delivery efficiency, to increase immunogenicity, and to reduce the administration dosage. The purpose of this review is to discuss the employment of nanomaterials, including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, virus-like particles, peptide amphiphiles micelles, peptide nanofibers and microneedle arrays, in vaccine design. Compared to traditional methods, vaccines made from nanomaterials display many appealing benefits, including precise stimulation of immune responses, effective targeting to certain tissue or cells, and desirable biocompatibility. Current research suggests that nanomaterials may improve our approach to the design and delivery of novel vaccines.

  13. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens....... Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation...

  14. [The vaccines based on the replicon of the venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus against viral hemorrhagic fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A A; Plekhanova, T M; Sidorova, O N; Borisevich, S V; Makhlay, A A

    2015-01-01

    The status of the various recombinant DNA and RNA-derived candidate vaccines, as well as the Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV) replicon vaccine system against extremely hazardous viral hemorrhagic fevers, were reviewed. The VEEV-based replication-incompetent vectors offer attractive features in terms of safety, high expression levels of the heterologous viral antigen, tropism to dendritic cells, robust immune responses, protection efficacy, low potential for pre-existing anti-vector immunity and possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines were tested. These features of the VEEV replicon system hold much promise for the development of new generation vaccine candidates against viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  15. Malaria vaccine based on Self-Assembling Protein Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard, Peter; David E Lanar

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK’s RTS’S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials ...

  16. Plant Viruses as Nanoparticle-Based Vaccines and Adjuvants.

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Ève Lebel; Karine Chartrand; Denis Leclerc; Alain Lamarre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Vaccines are considered one of the greatest medical achievements in the battle against infectious diseases. However, the intractability of various diseases such as hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and cancer poses persistent hurdles given that traditional vaccine-development methods have proven to be ineffective; as such, these challenges have driven the emergence of novel vaccine design approaches. In this regard, much effort has been put into the develop...

  17. Malaria vaccine based on Self-Assembling Protein Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK’s RTS’S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials ...

  18. Durability of a vesicular stomatitis virus-based marburg virus vaccine in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. A promising filovirus vaccine under development is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses individual filovirus glycoproteins (GPs in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. These vaccines have shown 100% efficacy against filovirus infection in nonhuman primates when challenge occurs 28-35 days after a single injection immunization. Here, we examined the ability of a rVSV MARV-GP vaccine to provide protection when challenge occurs more than a year after vaccination. Cynomolgus macaques were immunized with rVSV-MARV-GP and challenged with MARV approximately 14 months after vaccination. Immunization resulted in the vaccine cohort of six animals having anti-MARV GP IgG throughout the pre-challenge period. Following MARV challenge none of the vaccinated animals showed any signs of clinical disease or viremia and all were completely protected from MARV infection. Two unvaccinated control animals exhibited signs consistent with MARV infection and both succumbed. Importantly, these data are the first to show 100% protective efficacy against any high dose filovirus challenge beyond 8 weeks after final vaccination. These findings demonstrate the durability of VSV-based filovirus vaccines.

  19. Durability of a vesicular stomatitis virus-based marburg virus vaccine in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mire, Chad E; Geisbert, Joan B; Agans, Krystle N; Satterfield, Benjamin A; Versteeg, Krista M; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Feldmann, Heinz; Hensley, Lisa E; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    The filoviruses, Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. A promising filovirus vaccine under development is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) that expresses individual filovirus glycoproteins (GPs) in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G). These vaccines have shown 100% efficacy against filovirus infection in nonhuman primates when challenge occurs 28-35 days after a single injection immunization. Here, we examined the ability of a rVSV MARV-GP vaccine to provide protection when challenge occurs more than a year after vaccination. Cynomolgus macaques were immunized with rVSV-MARV-GP and challenged with MARV approximately 14 months after vaccination. Immunization resulted in the vaccine cohort of six animals having anti-MARV GP IgG throughout the pre-challenge period. Following MARV challenge none of the vaccinated animals showed any signs of clinical disease or viremia and all were completely protected from MARV infection. Two unvaccinated control animals exhibited signs consistent with MARV infection and both succumbed. Importantly, these data are the first to show 100% protective efficacy against any high dose filovirus challenge beyond 8 weeks after final vaccination. These findings demonstrate the durability of VSV-based filovirus vaccines.

  20. Effective inactivation of food pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica by combined treatment of hypericin-based photosensitization and high power pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairyte, K; Lapinskas, S; Gudelis, V; Luksiene, Z

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of Listeria monocytogenes ATC(L3) C 7644 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain DS88 by combined treatment of hypericin (Hyp)-based photosensitization and high power pulsed light (HPPL). Cells were incubated with Hyp (1 × 10(-5) or 1 × 10(-7) mol l(-1)) in PBS and illuminated with a light λ = 585 nm. For the combined treatment, bacteria were, after photosensitization, exposed to 350 pulses of HPPL (UV light dose = 0·023 J cm(-2)). Fluorescence measurements were performed to evaluate optimal time for cell-Hyp interaction. Results indicate that Hyp tends to bind both Listeria and Salmonella. After photosensitization treatment, Listeria population was reduced 7 log, whereas Salmonella was inactivated just 1 log. Electron photomicrograps of Salmonella and Listeria confirmed that photosensitization induced total collapse of the Listeria cell wall, but not that of Salmonella. After combined photosensitization-HPPL treatment, the population of Listeria was diminished by 7 log and Salmonella by 6·7 log. Listeria can be effectively inactivated by Hyp-based photosensitization (7 log), whereas Salmonella is more resistant to photosensitization and can be inactivated just by 1 log in vitro. Combined treatment of photosensitization and pulsed light inactivates effectively (6·7-7 log) both the Gram-positive and the more resistant to photosensitization Gram-negative bacteria. A new approach to combat Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is proposed, combining photosensitization with high power pulsed light. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Malaria vaccine based on self-assembling protein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress with GSK's RTS,S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials with our most developed vaccine candidate will show good protection in a controlled human malaria infection trial.

  2. [Real-time monitoring of anti-influenza vaccination in the 65 and over population in France based on vaccine sales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivette, M; Auvigne, V; Guérin, P; Mueller, J E

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a tool based on vaccine sales to estimate vaccination coverage against seasonal influenza in near real-time in the French population aged 65 and over. Vaccine sales data available on sale-day +1 came from a stratified sample of 3004 pharmacies in metropolitan France. Vaccination coverage rates were estimated between 2009 and 2014 and compared with those obtained based on vaccination refund data from the general health insurance scheme. The seasonal vaccination coverage estimates were highly correlated with those obtained from refund data. They were also slightly higher, which can be explained by the inclusion of non-reimbursed vaccines and the consideration of all individuals aged 65 and over. We have developed an online tool that provides estimates of daily vaccination coverage during each vaccination campaign. The developed tool provides a reliable and near real-time estimation of vaccination coverage among people aged 65 and over. It can be used to evaluate and adjust public health messages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Fødevarebetinget listeria monocytogenes endokarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Bundgaard, Henning; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Listeria monocytogenes is rare and mainly seen in immunosuppressed patients. Infection with L. monocytogenes has a mortality rate of 30%. We present a case report of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and endocarditis in a 70-year-old man with several co-morbidities and following four...... major surgical procedures. This illustrates the findings and characteristics in one of the 16 patients who died in 2013 and 2014 this summer due to sausage-related L. monocytogenes infection....

  4. Baculovirus-Based Nasal Drop Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Malaria by Natural Boosting of Vaccine-Induced Antibodies in Mice▿ † ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Araki, Hitomi; Yokomine, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Blood-stage malaria parasites ablate memory B cells generated by vaccination in mice, resulting in diminishing natural boosting of vaccine-induced antibody responses to infection. Here we show the development of a new vaccine comprising a baculovirus-based Plasmodium yoelii 19-kDa carboxyl terminus of merozoite surface protein 1 (PyMSP119) capable of circumventing the tactics of parasites in a murine model. The baculovirus-based vaccine displayed PyMSP119 on the surface of the virus envelope ...

  5. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines.

  6. Antigen design enhances the immunogenicity of Semliki Forest virus-based therapeutic human papillomavirus vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, P. P.; Boerma, A.; Walczak, M.; Oosterhuis, K.; Haanen, J. B.; Schumacher, T. N.; Nijman, H. W.; Daemen, T.

    Cellular immunity against cancer can be achieved with viral vector-and DNA-based immunizations. In preclinical studies, cancer vaccines are very potent, but in clinical trials these potencies are not achieved yet. Thus, a rational approach to improve cancer vaccines is warranted. We previously

  7. A novel sequence-based antigenic distance measure for H1N1, with application to vaccine effectiveness and the selection of vaccine strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Subieta, Krystina C.; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    H1N1 influenza causes substantial seasonal illness and was the subtype of the 2009 influenza pandemic. Precise measures of antigenic distance between the vaccine and circulating virus strains help researchers design influenza vaccines with high vaccine effectiveness. We here introduce a sequence-based method to predict vaccine effectiveness in humans. Historical epidemiological data show that this sequence-based method is as predictive of vaccine effectiveness as hemagglutination inhibition assay data from ferret animal model studies. Interestingly, the expected vaccine effectiveness is greater against H1N1 than H3N2, suggesting a stronger immune response against H1N1 than H3N2. The evolution rate of hemagglutinin in H1N1 is also shown to be greater than that in H3N2, presumably due to greater immune selection pressure. PMID:21123189

  8. Comparison of Current Regulatory Status for Gene-Based Vaccines in the U.S., Europe and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Nakayama

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccines as typified by plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant viral-vectored vaccines are expected as promising solutions against infectious diseases for which no effective prophylactic vaccines exist such as HIV, dengue virus, Ebola virus and malaria, and for which more improved vaccines are needed such as tuberculosis and influenza virus. Although many preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted to date, no DNA vaccines or recombinant viral-vectored vaccines expressing heterologous antigens for human use have yet been licensed in the U.S., Europe or Japan. In this research, we describe the current regulatory context for gene-based prophylactic vaccines against infectious disease in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. We identify the important considerations, in particular, on the preclinical assessments that would allow these vaccines to proceed to clinical trials, and the differences on the regulatory pathway for the marketing authorization in each region.

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a central role in attenuated Listeria monocytogenes-based immunotherapy against metastatic breast cancer in young and old mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, D; Jahangir, A; Quispe-Tintaya, W; Einstein, M H; Gravekamp, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are present in large numbers in blood of mice and humans with cancer, and they strongly inhibit T-cell and natural killer (NK) cell responses, at young and old age. We found that a highly attenuated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat)-infected MDSC and altered the immune-suppressing function of MDSC. Methods: Young (3 months) and old (18 months) BALB/cByJ mice with metastatic breast cancer (4T1 model) were immunised with Listeriaat semi-therapeutically (once before and twice after tumour development), and analysed for growth of metastases and primary tumour, in relation to MDSC-, CD8 T-cell and NK cell responses. Results: We found that Listeriaat-infected MDSC, which delivered Listeriaat predominantly to the microenvironment of metastases and primary tumours, where they spread from MDSC into tumour cells (infected tumour cells will ultimately become a target for Listeria-activated immune cells). Immunotherapy with Listeriaat significantly reduced the population of MDSC in blood and primary tumours, and converted a remaining subpopulation of MDSC into an immune-stimulating phenotype producing IL-12, in correlation with significantly improved T-cell and NK cell responses to Listeriaat at both ages. This was accompanied with a dramatic reduction in the number of metastases and tumour growth at young and old age. Conclusions: Although preclinical studies show that immunotherapy is less effective at old than at young age, our study demonstrates that Listeriaat-based immunotherapy can be equally effective against metastatic breast cancer at both young and old age by targeting MDSC. PMID:23640395

  10. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis onset: evaluation based on vaccine adverse events reporting systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pellegrino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate epidemiological features of post vaccine acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM by considering data from different pharmacovigilance surveillance systems. METHODS: The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS database and the EudraVigilance post-authorisation module (EVPM were searched to identify post vaccine ADEM cases. Epidemiological features including sex and related vaccines were analysed. RESULTS: We retrieved 205 and 236 ADEM cases from the EVPM and VAERS databases, respectively, of which 404 were considered for epidemiological analysis following verification and causality assessment. Half of the patients had less than 18 years and with a slight male predominance. The time interval from vaccination to ADEM onset was 2-30 days in 61% of the cases. Vaccine against seasonal flu and human papilloma virus vaccine were those most frequently associated with ADEM, accounting for almost 30% of the total cases. Mean number of reports per year between 2005 and 2012 in VAERS database was 40±21.7, decreasing after 2010 mainly because of a reduction of reports associated with human papilloma virus and Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio and Haemophilus Influentiae type B vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: This study has a high epidemiological power as it is based on information on adverse events having occurred in over one billion people. It suffers from lack of rigorous case verification due to the weakness intrinsic to the surveillance databases used. At variance with previous reports on a prevalence of ADEM in childhood we demonstrate that it may occur at any age when post vaccination. This study also shows that the diminishing trend in post vaccine ADEM reporting related to Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio and Haemophilus Influentiae type B and human papilloma virus vaccine groups is most likely not [corrected] due to a decline in vaccine coverage indicative of a reduced attention to this adverse drug reaction.

  11. Cell culture based production of avian influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielink, van R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination of poultry can be used as a tool to control outbreaks of avian influenza, including that of highly pathogenic H5 and H7 strains. Influenza vaccines are traditionally produced in embryonated chicken eggs. Continuous cell lines have been suggested as an alternative substrate to produce inf

  12. Cell culture based production of avian influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielink, van R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination of poultry can be used as a tool to control outbreaks of avian influenza, including that of highly pathogenic H5 and H7 strains. Influenza vaccines are traditionally produced in embryonated chicken eggs. Continuous cell lines have been suggested as an alternative substrate to produce

  13. Antigenic specificity of a monovalent versus polyvalent MOMP based Chlamydia pecorum vaccine in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Avinash; Wan, Charles; Rawlinson, Galit; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2013-02-06

    Chlamydia continues to be a major pathogen of koalas. The bacterium is associated with ocular, respiratory and urogenital tract infections and a vaccine is considered the best option to limit the decline of mainland koala populations. Over the last 20 years, efforts to develop a chlamydial vaccine in humans have focussed on the use of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Potential problems with the use of MOMP-based vaccines relate to the wide range of genetic diversity in its four variable domains. In the present study, we evaluated the immune response of koalas vaccinated with a MOMP-based C. pecorum vaccine formulated with genetically and serologically diverse MOMPs. Animals immunised with individual MOMPs developed strong antibody and lymphocyte proliferation responses to both homologous as well as heterologous MOMP proteins. Importantly, we also showed that vaccine induced antibodies which effectively neutralised various heterologous strains of koala C. pecorum in an in vitro assay. Finally, we also demonstrated that the immune responses in monovalent as well as polyvalent MOMP vaccine groups were able to recognise whole chlamydial elementary bodies, illustrating the feasibility of developing an effective MOMP based C. pecorum vaccine that could protect against a range of strains. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vaccines based on the cell surface carbohydrates of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugate vaccines, in which a cell surface carbohydrate from a micro-organism is covalently attached to an appropriate carrier protein are proving to be the most effective means to generate protective immune responses to prevent a wide range of diseases. The technology appears to be generic and applicable to a wide range of pathogens, as long as antibodies against surface carbohydrates help protect against infection. Three such vaccines, against Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis Group C and seven serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae, have already been licensed and many others are in development. This article discusses the rationale for the development and use of glycoconjugate vaccines, the mechanisms by which they elicit T cell-dependent immune responses and the implications of this for vaccine development, the role of physicochemical methods in the characterisation and quality control of these vaccines, and the novel products which are under development.

  15. Comparison of sodium hypochlorite-based foam and peroxyacetic acid-based fog sanitizing procedures in a salmon smokehouse: Survival of the general microflora and Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Gardshodn, K.; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    sample, and a total of 288 bacterial strains were randomly isolated and tentatively identified to genus level by physiological and biochemical tests. The microflora was dominated by Neisseriaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and lactic acid bacteria during production. Foam sanitization caused a change......The effects of fog sanitization with peroxyacetic acid (hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, and acetic acid in combination) on general hygiene (aerobic plate count) and on Listeria monocytogenes were assessed in a slicing area at a salmon smokehouse and compared with the effects of foam sanitization...... in the composition of the flora, with Pseudomonas spp. and Alcaligenes spp. being the dominant gram- negative bacteria and Kurthia spp. and Bacillus spp. being the surviving gram-positive bacteria. Bacteria were very sensitive to fog sanitization, and yeasts accounted for almost half of the surviving flora...

  16. Zika virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boigard, Hélène; Alimova, Alexandra; Martin, George R.; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The newly emerged mosquito-borne Zika virus poses a major public challenge due to its ability to cause significant birth defects and neurological disorders. The impact of sexual transmission is unclear but raises further concerns about virus dissemination. No specific treatment or vaccine is currently available, thus the development of a safe and effective vaccine is paramount. Here we describe a novel strategy to assemble Zika virus-like particles (VLPs) by co-expressing the structural (CprME) and non-structural (NS2B/NS3) proteins, and demonstrate their effectiveness as vaccines. VLPs are produced in a suspension culture of mammalian cells and self-assembled into particles closely resembling Zika viruses as shown by electron microscopy studies. We tested various VLP vaccines and compared them to analogous compositions of an inactivated Zika virus (In-ZIKV) used as a reference. VLP immunizations elicited high titers of antibodies, as did the In-ZIKV controls. However, in mice the VLP vaccine stimulated significantly higher virus neutralizing antibody titers than comparable formulations of the In-ZIKV vaccine. The serum neutralizing activity elicited by the VLP vaccine was enhanced using a higher VLP dose and with the addition of an adjuvant, reaching neutralizing titers greater than those detected in the serum of a patient who recovered from a Zika infection in Brazil in 2015. Discrepancies in neutralization levels between the VLP vaccine and the In-ZIKV suggest that chemical inactivation has deleterious effects on neutralizing epitopes within the E protein. This along with the inability of a VLP vaccine to cause infection makes it a preferable candidate for vaccine development. PMID:28481898

  17. Zika virus-like particle (VLP based vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Boigard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The newly emerged mosquito-borne Zika virus poses a major public challenge due to its ability to cause significant birth defects and neurological disorders. The impact of sexual transmission is unclear but raises further concerns about virus dissemination. No specific treatment or vaccine is currently available, thus the development of a safe and effective vaccine is paramount. Here we describe a novel strategy to assemble Zika virus-like particles (VLPs by co-expressing the structural (CprME and non-structural (NS2B/NS3 proteins, and demonstrate their effectiveness as vaccines. VLPs are produced in a suspension culture of mammalian cells and self-assembled into particles closely resembling Zika viruses as shown by electron microscopy studies. We tested various VLP vaccines and compared them to analogous compositions of an inactivated Zika virus (In-ZIKV used as a reference. VLP immunizations elicited high titers of antibodies, as did the In-ZIKV controls. However, in mice the VLP vaccine stimulated significantly higher virus neutralizing antibody titers than comparable formulations of the In-ZIKV vaccine. The serum neutralizing activity elicited by the VLP vaccine was enhanced using a higher VLP dose and with the addition of an adjuvant, reaching neutralizing titers greater than those detected in the serum of a patient who recovered from a Zika infection in Brazil in 2015. Discrepancies in neutralization levels between the VLP vaccine and the In-ZIKV suggest that chemical inactivation has deleterious effects on neutralizing epitopes within the E protein. This along with the inability of a VLP vaccine to cause infection makes it a preferable candidate for vaccine development.

  18. Saponins from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus are efficient adjuvants for protein-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Díaz, Nathaly; Salaun, Bruno; Perret, Rachel; Sierro, Sophie; Romero, Jackeline F; Fernández, Jose-Antonio; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Romero, Pedro

    2012-01-05

    Protein and peptide-based vaccines provide rigorously formulated antigens. However, these purified products are only weakly immunogenic by themselves and therefore require the addition of immunostimulatory components or adjuvants in the vaccine formulation. Various compounds derived from pathogens, minerals or plants, possess pro-inflammatory properties which allow them to act as adjuvants and contribute to the induction of an effective immune response. The results presented here demonstrate the adjuvant properties of novel saponins derived from the Spanish saffron Crocus sativus. In vivo immunization studies and tumor protection experiments unambiguously establish the value of saffron saponins as candidate adjuvants. These saponins were indeed able to increase both humoral and cellular immune responses to protein-based vaccines, ultimately providing a significant degree of protection against tumor challenge when administered in combination with a tumor antigen. This preclinical study provides an in depth immunological characterization of a new saponin as a vaccine adjuvant, and encourages its further development for use in vaccine formulations.

  19. Synthetic biology devices and circuits for RNA-based 'smart vaccines': a propositional review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, Oliwia; Kitada, Tasuku; Bodner, Katie; Sanders, Niek N; Weiss, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines have been gaining attention as an alternative to the standard attenuated pathogen or protein based vaccine. However, an unrealized advantage of using such DNA or RNA based vaccination modalities is the ability to program within these nucleic acids regulatory devices that would provide an immunologist with the power to control the production of antigens and adjuvants in a desirable manner by administering small molecule drugs as chemical triggers. Advances in synthetic biology have resulted in the creation of highly predictable and modular genetic parts and devices that can be composed into synthetic gene circuits with complex behaviors. With the recent advent of modified RNA gene delivery methods and developments in the RNA replicon platform, we foresee a future in which mammalian synthetic biologists will create genetic circuits encoded exclusively on RNA. Here, we review the current repertoire of devices used in RNA synthetic biology and propose how programmable 'smart vaccines' will revolutionize the field of RNA vaccination.

  20. Analytical bioconjugates, aptamers, enable specific quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Ah; Um, Hyun-Ju; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Sun Park, Tae; Min, Jiho; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2015-06-15

    As a major human pathogen in the Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes causes the bacterial disease listeriosis, which is a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacteria. We have developed an aptamer-based sandwich assay (ABSA) platform that demonstrates a promising potential for use in pathogen detection using aptamers as analytical bioconjugates. The whole-bacteria SELEX (WB-SELEX) strategy was adopted to generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity against live L. monocytogenes. Of the 35 aptamer candidates tested, LMCA2 and LMCA26 reacted to L. monocytogenes with high binding, and were consequently chosen as sensing probes. The ABSA platform can significantly enhance the sensitivity by employing a very specific aptamer pair for the sandwich complex. The ABSA platform exhibited a linear response over a wide concentration range of L. monocytogenes from 20 to 2×10(6) CFU per mL and was closely correlated with the following relationship: y=9533.3x+1542.3 (R(2)=0.99). Our proposed ABSA platform also provided excellent specificity for the tests to distinguish L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species and other bacterial genera (3 Listeria spp., 4 Salmonella spp., 2 Vibrio spp., 3 Escherichia coli and 3 Shigella spp.). Improvements in the sensitivity and specificity have not only facilitated the reliable detection of L. monocytogenes at extremely low concentrations, but also allowed for the development of a 96-well plate-based routine assay platform for multivalent diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of fever and vaccine-associated gene interaction networks using ontology-based literature mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Ozgür, Arzucan; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2012-12-20

    Fever is one of the most common adverse events of vaccines. The detailed mechanisms of fever and vaccine-associated gene interaction networks are not fully understood. In the present study, we employed a genome-wide, Centrality and Ontology-based Network Discovery using Literature data (CONDL) approach to analyse the genes and gene interaction networks associated with fever or vaccine-related fever responses. Over 170,000 fever-related articles from PubMed abstracts and titles were retrieved and analysed at the sentence level using natural language processing techniques to identify genes and vaccines (including 186 Vaccine Ontology terms) as well as their interactions. This resulted in a generic fever network consisting of 403 genes and 577 gene interactions. A vaccine-specific fever sub-network consisting of 29 genes and 28 gene interactions was extracted from articles that are related to both fever and vaccines. In addition, gene-vaccine interactions were identified. Vaccines (including 4 specific vaccine names) were found to directly interact with 26 genes. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed using the genes in the generated interaction networks. Moreover, the genes in these networks were prioritized using network centrality metrics. Making scientific discoveries and generating new hypotheses were possible by using network centrality and gene set enrichment analyses. For example, our study found that the genes in the generic fever network were more enriched in cell death and responses to wounding, and the vaccine sub-network had more gene enrichment in leukocyte activation and phosphorylation regulation. The most central genes in the vaccine-specific fever network are predicted to be highly relevant to vaccine-induced fever, whereas genes that are central only in the generic fever network are likely to be highly relevant to generic fever responses. Interestingly, no Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were found in the gene-vaccine interaction network. Since

  2. Analysis of hepatitis B vaccination behavior and vaccination willingness among migrant workers from rural China based on protection motivation theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Rugang; Li, Youwei; Wangen, Knut R; Maitland, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Stephen; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    ...: Using protection motivation theory (PMT), we developed and measured HB cognitive variables and analyze the factors affecting HB vaccination behavior and willingness to vaccinate by migrant workers...

  3. Development of a mariner-Based Transposon and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes Determinants, Including the Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase PrsA2, That Contribute to Its Hemolytic Phenotype▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, Jason; Kline, Benjamin C.; Woodward, Joshua J.; Leber, Jess H.; Marquis, Hélène; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a pore-forming toxin that mediates phagosomal escape and cell-to-cell spread of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to identify factors that control the production, activity, or secretion of this essential virulence factor, we constructed a Himar1 mariner transposon delivery system and screened 50,000 mutants for a hypohemolytic phenotype on blood agar plates. Approximately 200 hypohemolytic mutants were identified, and the 51 most prominent mutants were screened ex vivo for intracellular growth defects. Eight mutants with a phenotype were identified, and they contained insertions in the following genes: lmo0964 (similar to yjbH), lmo1268 (clpX), lmo1401 (similar to ymdB), lmo1575 (similar to ytqI), lmo1695 (mprF), lmo1821 (similar to prpC), lmo2219 (prsA2), and lmo2460 (similar to cggR). Some of these genes are involved in previously unexplored areas of research with L. monocytogenes: the genes yjbH and clpX regulate the disulfide stress response in Bacillus subtilis, and the prpC phosphatase has been implicated in virulence in other gram-positive pathogens. Here we demonstrate that prsA2, an extracytoplasmic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, is critical for virulence and contributes to the folding of LLO and to the activity of another virulence factor, the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). Furthermore, although it has been shown that prsA2 expression is linked to PrfA, the master virulence transcription factor in L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, we demonstrate that prsA2 is not directly controlled by PrfA. Finally, we show that PrsA2 is involved in flagellum-based motility, indicating that this factor likely serves a broad physiological role. PMID:19376879

  4. Development of a mariner-based transposon and identification of Listeria monocytogenes determinants, including the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase PrsA2, that contribute to its hemolytic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, Jason; Kline, Benjamin C; Woodward, Joshua J; Leber, Jess H; Marquis, Hélène; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2009-06-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a pore-forming toxin that mediates phagosomal escape and cell-to-cell spread of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to identify factors that control the production, activity, or secretion of this essential virulence factor, we constructed a Himar1 mariner transposon delivery system and screened 50,000 mutants for a hypohemolytic phenotype on blood agar plates. Approximately 200 hypohemolytic mutants were identified, and the 51 most prominent mutants were screened ex vivo for intracellular growth defects. Eight mutants with a phenotype were identified, and they contained insertions in the following genes: lmo0964 (similar to yjbH), lmo1268 (clpX), lmo1401 (similar to ymdB), lmo1575 (similar to ytqI), lmo1695 (mprF), lmo1821 (similar to prpC), lmo2219 (prsA2), and lmo2460 (similar to cggR). Some of these genes are involved in previously unexplored areas of research with L. monocytogenes: the genes yjbH and clpX regulate the disulfide stress response in Bacillus subtilis, and the prpC phosphatase has been implicated in virulence in other gram-positive pathogens. Here we demonstrate that prsA2, an extracytoplasmic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, is critical for virulence and contributes to the folding of LLO and to the activity of another virulence factor, the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). Furthermore, although it has been shown that prsA2 expression is linked to PrfA, the master virulence transcription factor in L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, we demonstrate that prsA2 is not directly controlled by PrfA. Finally, we show that PrsA2 is involved in flagellum-based motility, indicating that this factor likely serves a broad physiological role.

  5. What you always needed to know about electroporation based DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Anita Birgitte; Gehl, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinations are increasingly used to fight infectious disease, and DNA vaccines offer considerable advantages, including broader possibilities for vaccination and lack of need for cold storage. It has been amply demonstrated, that electroporation augments uptake of DNA in both skin and muscle......, and it is foreseen that future DNA vaccination may to a large extent be coupled with and dependent upon electroporation based delivery. Understanding the basic science of electroporation and exploiting knowledge obtained on optimization of DNA electrotransfer to muscle and skin, may greatly augment efforts...... on vaccine development. The purpose of this review is to give a succinct but comprehensive overview of electroporation as a delivery modality including electrotransfer to skin and muscle. As well, this review will speculate and discuss future uses for this powerful electrotransfer technology....

  6. Targeting immune response induction with cochleate and liposome-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino; Canki; Feketeova; Scolpino; Wang; Zhang; Kheiri; Gould-Fogerite

    1998-07-06

    The immune response generated by infection with a pathogenic organism, or by vaccination with a live attenuated or whole killed pathogen, often does not stimulate optimal protection against that organism. Lipid matrix-based subunit vaccines can be used to produce custom-designed vaccines, that elicit desired immune responses targeted to specific parts of the pathogen that are relevant to protection. Harmful or competitive responses can be minimized or avoided. Earlier work with liposomes has allowed the development of a new class of subunit vaccines called cochleate delivery vehicles, whose structure and properties are very different from liposomes. Protein and DNA cochleates are highly effective vaccines when given via mucosal or parenteral routes, including oral, intranasal, intramuscular, or subcutaneous. Strong, long-lasting, mucosal and circulating, antibody and cell-mediated responses are generated. Protection from challenge with live viruses following oral or intramuscular administration has been achieved.

  7. Evaluation of goat based 'indigenous vaccine' against bovine Johne's disease in endemically infected native cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shoor Vir; Singh, Pravin Kumar; Kumar, Naveen; Gupta, Saurabh; Chaubey, Kundan Kumar; Singh, Brajesh; Srivastav, Abhishek; Yadav, Sharad; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2015-01-01

    'Indigenous vaccine' prepared from 'Indian Bison Type' a native bio-type of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strain 'S5' of goat origin (goat based) was evaluated in indigenous cattle herds located in gaushalas (cow shelters), endemic for Bovine Johne's disease. Cows (893) were randomly divided into vaccinated (702 = 626 adults + 76 calves) and control (191 = 173 adults + 18 calves) groups. Response to vaccination was evaluated on the basis of health (mortality, morbidity), productivity (growth rate, reproductive performance, total milk yield), immunological parameters (LTT, ELISA titer), survivability of animals naturally infected with MAP, bacterimia (by specific blood PCR), seroconversion (by indigenous ELISA) and status of shedding of MAP in feces (by microscopy) in the two groups before and after vaccination. Reduction in MAP shedding [to the extent of 100% in Herd A; and from 82.1% (0 DPV) to 10.7% (270 DPV) in Herd C] was the major finding in vaccinated cows. Whereas, the control group cows have shown no improvement. As the first indicator of vaccine efficacy, MAP bacilli disappeared from the blood circulation as early as 15 days post vaccination, however, peak titers were achieved around 90 DPV. Peak titers initially declined slightly but were maintained later throughout the study period. Control animals did not show any pattern in antibody titers. Mortality was low in vaccinated as compared to the control groups. Vaccination of endemically infected native cattle herds with inactivated whole-cell bacterin of novel 'Indian Bison Type' bio-type of goat origin strain 'S5' effectively restored health and productivity and reduced clinical BJD. Application of goat based 'indigenous vaccine' for therapeutic management of BJD in native cattle herds (gaushalas) is the first of its kind.

  8. Risk-based control of food-borne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica in the Italian fermented sausages Cacciatore and Felino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataragas, M; Bellio, A; Rovetto, F; Astegiano, S; Decastelli, L; Cocolin, L

    2015-05-01

    Fermentation is the most important killing step during production of fermented meats to eliminate food-borne pathogens. The objective was to evaluate whether the food-borne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica may survive during the production of two Italian fermented sausages. Sausage batter was inoculated with five strains of L. monocytogenes or S. enterica (ca. 10(5)-10(6) cfu/g) and their kinetic behavior was monitored during production. Both pathogens survived relatively well (in Cacciatore L. monocytogenes and S. enterica inactivation was ca. 0.38±0.23 and 1.10±0.24 log cfu/g, respectively; in Felino was ca. 0.39±0.25 and 1.62±0.38 log cfu/g, respectively) due to the conditions prevailing during production (slow dehydration rate, small reduction of water activity and fermentation temperature mainly below 20 °C during the first 48 h of fermentation). Quantitative analysis of data originating from challenge tests provide critical information on which combinations of the process parameters would potentially lead to better control of the pathogens.

  9. Parents' views of including young boys in the Swedish national school-based HPV vaccination programme: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottvall, Maria; Stenhammar, Christina; Grandahl, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore parents' views of extending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme to also include boys. Design Explorative qualitative design using individual, face-to-face, interviews and inductive thematic analysis. Setting 11 strategically chosen municipalities in central Sweden. Participants Parents (n=42) who were offered HPV vaccination for their 11–12 years old daughter in the national school-based vaccination programme. Results The key themes were: equality from a public health perspective and perception of risk for disease. Parents expressed low knowledge and awareness about the health benefits of male HPV vaccination, and they perceived low risk for boys to get HPV. Some parents could not see any reason for vaccinating boys. However, many parents preferred gender-neutral vaccination, and some of the parents who had not accepted HPV vaccination for their daughter expressed that they would be willing to accept vaccination for their son, if it was offered. It was evident that there was both trust and distrust in authorities' decision to only vaccinate girls. Parents expressed a preference for increased sexual and reproductive health promotion such as more information about condom use. Some parents shared that it was more important to vaccinate girls than boys since they believed girls face a higher risk of deadly diseases associated with HPV, but some also believed girls might be more vulnerable to side effects of the vaccine. Conclusions A vaccine offered only to girls may cause parents to be hesitant to vaccinate, while also including boys in the national vaccination programme might improve parents' trust in the vaccine. More information about the health benefits of HPV vaccination for males is necessary to increase HPV vaccination among boys. This may eventually lead to increased HPV vaccine coverage among both girls and boys. PMID:28246143

  10. Parental education and text messaging reminders as effective community based tools to increase HPV vaccination rates among Mexican American children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Aragones

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Parental text messaging plus education, implemented in a community based setting, was strongly associated with vaccine completion rates among vaccine-eligible Mexican American children. Although pilot in nature, the study achieved an 88% series completion rate in the children of those who received the text messages, significantly higher than current vaccination levels.

  11. Controlling chitosan-based encapsulation for protein and vaccine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Smith, Sean G.; Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Kumar, Thallapuranam K.S.; Zaharoff, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan-based nano/microencapsulation is under increasing investigation for the delivery of drugs, biologics and vaccines. Despite widespread interest, the literature lacks a defined methodology to control chitosan particle size and drug/protein release kinetics. In this study, the effects of precipitation-coacervation formulation parameters on chitosan particle size, protein encapsulation efficiency and protein release were investigated. Chitosan particle sizes, which ranged from 300 nm to 3 μm, were influenced by chitosan concentration, chitosan molecular weight and addition rate of precipitant salt. The composition of precipitant salt played a significant role in particle formation with upper Hofmeister series salts containing strongly hydrated anions yielding particles with a low polydispersity index (PDI) while weaker anions resulted in aggregated particles with high PDIs. Sonication power had minimal effect on mean particle size, however, it significantly reduced polydispersity. Protein loading efficiencies in chitosan nano/microparticles, which ranged from 14.3% to 99.2%, was inversely related to the hydration strength of precipitant salts, protein molecular weight and directly related to the concentration and molecular weight of chitosan. Protein release rates increased with particle size and were generally inversely related to protein molecular weight. This study demonstrates that chitosan nano/microparticles with high protein loading efficiencies can be engineered with well-defined sizes and controllable release kinetics through manipulation of specific formulation parameters. PMID:24560459

  12. Human Papillomavirus vaccination in general practice in France, three years after the implementation of a targeted vaccine recommendation based on age and sexual history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Pascale; Lasserre, Andrea; Rossignol, Louise; Kernéis, Solen; Blaizeau, Fanette; Stheneur, Chantal; Blanchon, Thierry; Levy-Bruhl, Daniel; Hanslik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In France, vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) was recommended in 2007 for all 14-year-old girls as well as "catch-up" vaccination for girls between 15-23 y of age either before or within one year of becoming sexually active. We evaluated the vaccine coverage according to the eligibility for vaccination in a sample of young girls aged 14 to 23 years, who were seen in general practices. A survey was proposed to 706 general practitioners (GPs) and carried out from July to September 2010. GPs, also called "family doctor," are physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of medicine but instead covers a variety of medical problems in patients of all ages. Each participating GP included, retrospectively, the last female patient aged 14-17 y and the last female patient aged 18-23 y whom he had seen. A questionnaire collected information regarding the GP and the patients' characteristics. The vaccine coverage was determined according to the eligibility for vaccination, i.e. the coverage among younger women (14-17) and among those sexually active in the second age range (18-23). Sexual activity status was assessed by GP, according to information stated in the medical record. The 363 participating physicians (response rate 51.4%) included 712 patients (357 in the 14- to 17-year-old group and 355 in the 15- to 23-year-old group) in their responses. The rate of the vaccination coverage in the 14- to 17-year-old group was 55%. Among the girls in the 18- to 23-year-old group, 126 were eligible, and their vaccination coverage rate was 82%. The evaluation of the eligibility by the GPs was incorrect in 36% of the cases. Of the 712 patients, 6% of the girls had been vaccinated without a need for the vaccination, and 26% of the girls had not been vaccinated, although they needed to be vaccinated. Regarding the vaccine uptake, vaccination at the age of 14 was not as effective as vaccinating the older population for which vaccination was indicated as a

  13. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  14. A novel M2e based flu vaccine formulation for dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Leclerc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The USA 2004 influenza virus outbreak H3N8 in dogs heralded the emergence of a new disease in this species. A new inactivated H3N8 vaccine was developed to control the spread of the disease but, as in humans and swine, it is anticipated that the virus will mutate shift and drift in the dog population. Therefore, there is a need for a vaccine that can trigger a broad protection to prevent the spread of the virus and the emergence of new strains. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The universal M2e peptide is identical in almost all the H3N8 influenza strains sequenced to date and known to infect dogs. This epitope is therefore a good choice for development of a vaccine to provide broad protection. Malva mosaic virus (MaMV nanoparticles were chosen as a vaccine platform to improve the stability of the M2e peptide and increase its immunogenicity in animals. The addition of an adjuvant (OmpC purified from Salmonella typhi membrane in the vaccine formulation increased the immune response directed to the M2e peptide significantly and enlarged the protection to include the heterosubtypic strain of influenza in a mouse model. An optimal vaccine formulation was also shown to be immunogenic in dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The MaMV vaccine platform triggered an improved immune response directed towards the universal M2e peptide. The adjuvant OmpC increased the immune response to the M2e peptide and protection to a heterosubtypic influenza strain that harbors a different M2e peptide in a mouse model. Antibodies generated by the vaccine formulation showed cross-reactivity with M2e peptides derived from influenza strains H9N2, H5N1 and H1N1. The vaccine formulation shows a potential for commercialization of a new M2e based vaccine in dogs.

  15. HPV vaccination syndrome. A questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lavín, Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Laura-Aline; Reyes-Loyola, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Isolated cases and small series have described the development of complex regional pain syndrome, postural orthostatic tachycardia, and fibromyalgia after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. These illnesses are difficult to diagnose and have overlapping clinical features. Small fiber neuropathy and dysautonomia may play a major role in the pathogenesis of these entities. We used the following validated questionnaires to appraise the chronic illness that might appear after HPV vaccination: The 2010 American College of Rheumatology Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Criteria, COMPASS 31 dysautonomia questionnaire, and S-LANSS neuropathic pain form. These questionnaires and a "present illness" survey were e-mailed to persons who had the onset of a chronic ailment soon after HPV vaccination. Forty-five filled questionnaires from individuals living in 13 different countries were collected in a month's period. Mean (±SD) age at vaccination time was 14 ± 5 years. Twenty-nine percent of the cases had immediate (within 24 h) post-vaccination illness onset. The most common presenting complaints were musculoskeletal pain (66%), fatigue (57%), headache (57%), dizziness/vertigo (43%), and paresthesias/allodynia (36%). Fifty-three percent of affected individuals fulfill the fibromyalgia criteria. COMPASS-31 score was 43 ± 21, implying advanced autonomic dysfunction. Eighty-three percent of the patients who had ongoing pain displayed S-LANSS values >12, suggesting a neuropathic component in their pain experience. After a mean period of 4.2 ± 2.5 years post-vaccination, 93% of patients continue to have incapacitating symptoms and remain unable to attend school or work. In conclusion, a disabling syndrome of chronic neuropathic pain, fatigue, and autonomic dysfunction may appear after HPV vaccination.

  16. Microneedle arrays delivery of the conventional vaccines based on nonvirulent viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Ning; Wang, Xueting; Zhen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ting

    2016-11-01

    Recently, microneedle arrays (MAs) have been developed for painless inoculation of vaccines and possess many prominent advantages, including convenience for inoculation, and exact delivery of vaccine to the exact epidermal and dermal or mucosal compartments which teem with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Among different types of MAs, while the micro-environmental stimulus-responsive MAs represent one of the developmental trends in the field, the MAs combined with the conventional vaccines that are based on nonvirulent viruses, such as live attenuated or whole inactivated viruses, and antigen-encoding DNA viral vectors, have developed rapidly into the advanced stages, with certain products already on clinical trials. The pre- and clinical research outcomes showed that the painless MA delivery of the conventional vaccines through mammalian skin or mucosa can not only elicit robust systemic and even mucosal immunity to pathogens but also, in certain circumstances, redirect the immune response toward a specific Th1 pathway, resulting in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to erase the cell-hidden pathogens, thanks to the robust adjuvant function of MAs exerted through damaging the contacted cells to release dangerous signals. This paper focuses on reviewing the latest research and advancements in MA delivery of the conventional vaccines that are based on nonvirulent viruses, underlining MA enhancement of the overall vaccine performance and the most advanced MA vaccine products that are relatively close to markets.

  17. Early childhood measles vaccinations are not associated with paediatric IBD: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Souradet Y; Blanchard, James F; Bernstein, Charles N

    2015-04-01

    Early childhood vaccinations have been hypothesized to contribute to the emergence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] in developed countries. Using linked population-based administrative databases, we aimed to explore the association between vaccination with measles-containing vaccines and the risk for IBD. This was a case-control study using the University of Manitoba IBD Epidemiology Database [UMIBDED]. The UMIBDED was linked to the Manitoba Immunization Monitoring System [MIMS], a population-based database of immunizations administered in Manitoba. All paediatric IBD cases in Manitoba, born after 1989 and diagnosed before March 31, 2008, were included. Controls were matched to cases on the basis of age, sex, and region of residence at time of diagnosis. Measles-containing vaccinations received in the first 2 years of life were documented, with vaccinations categorized as 'None' or 'Complete', with completeness defined according to Manitoba's vaccination schedule. Conditional logistic regression models were fitted to the data, with models adjusted for physician visits in the first 2 years of life and area-level socioeconomic status at case date. A total of 951 individuals [117 cases and 834 controls] met eligibility criteria, with average age of diagnosis among cases at 11 years. The proportion of IBD cases with completed vaccinations was 97%, compared with 94% of controls. In models adjusted for physician visits and area-level socioeconomic status, no statistically significant association was detected between completed measles vaccinations and the risk of IBD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5-4.4; p = 0.419]. No significant association between completed measles-containing vaccination in the first 2 years of life and paediatric IBD could be demonstrated in this population-based study. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  18. Neuroinfections due to Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streharova, A; Babjakova, A; Moravcikova, A; Harnicarova, A; Holeckova, K; Lesnakova, A; Sladeckova, V; Seckova, S; Kisac, P; Beno, P

    2007-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is not a rare pathogen causing meningitis, mainly in small children and in close contacts to livestock. The pathogen is naturally resistant to cephalosporins and some glycopeptides as well, therefore despite of syndromologic diagnosis of meningitis and initial therapy with 3rd generation cephalosporins according to the guidelines therapeutic failures with clinical consequences may occur.

  19. Listeria monocytogenes in poultry and poultry products: Epidemiological investigations in seven Danish abattoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojeniyi, B.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Jensen, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    abattoirs including poultry processing line samples, and final products were also examined for L. monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated in 0 . 3% to 18 . 7% of the samples collected in the different abattoirs. Epidemiological typing of 247 L. monocytogenes isolates, including serotyping, phage...... typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping revealed 62 different clones. Based upon typability and discriminatory power, DNA typing methods used were found equally suitable as epidemiological markers. Serotyping and phage typing were not found useful as epidemiological markers for poultry...

  20. Relationship between Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in seafood processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Walid Q; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes as an outcome and Listeria spp. as an explanatory variable by food products, food contact surfaces, and nonfood contact surfaces in seafood processing plants by using peer-reviewed published data. Nine sets of prevalence data of L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. were collected from published studies and used for the analyses. Based on our analysis, the relationship between L. monocytogenes prevalence and Listeria spp. prevalence in food products (incoming raw materials and finish products) was significant (P = 0.04) with (low) R² = 0.36. Furthermore, Listeria spp. were not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes when testing food contact surfaces (R² = 0.10). Listeria spp. were a good indicator for L. monocytogenes only on nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.90). On the other hand, the presence of Listeria spp. on food contact surfaces (R² = 0.002) and nonfood contact surfaces (R² = 0.03) was not a good indicator for L. monocytogenes presence in food products. In general, prevalence of Listeria spp. does not seem to be a good indicator for L. monocytogenes prevalence in seafood processing plants.

  1. Messenger RNA vaccine based on recombinant MS2 virus-like particles against prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinming; Sun, Yanli; Jia, Tingting; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Lunan

    2014-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most diagnosed cancer in the western male population with high mortality. Recently, alternative approaches based on immunotherapy including mRNA vaccines for PCa have shown therapeutic promise. However, for mRNA vaccine, several disadvantages such as the instability of mRNA, the high cost of gold particles, the limited production scale for mRNA-transfected dendritic cells in vitro, limit their development. Herein, recombinant bacteriophage MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs), which based on the interaction of a 19-nucleotide RNA aptamer and the coat protein of bacteriophage MS2, successfully addressed these questions, in which target mRNA was packaged by MS2 capsid. MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines were easily prepared by recombinant protein technology, nontoxic and RNase-resistant. We show the packaged mRNA was translated into protein as early as 12 hr after phagocytosed by macrophages. Moreover, MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses, especially antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) and balanced Th1/Th2 responses without upregulation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells, and protected C57BL/6 mice against PCa completely. As a therapeutic vaccine, MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccines delayed tumor growth. Our results provide proof of concept on the efficacy and safety of MS2 VLP-based mRNA vaccine, which provides a new delivery approach for mRNA vaccine and implies important clinical value for the prevention and therapy of PCa.

  2. [The public health importance of vaccinations in the elderly: an evidence-based guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhdari, Parvanè; Zorzoli, Ermanno; D'Alò, Gian Loreto; Brosio, Federica; Bonanni, Paolo; Valente, Stefano; Gabutti, Giovanni; Franco, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Ageing represents an extremely current issue globally, and involves especially European populations. It is estimated that in Europe by the year 2025, about a third of the population will be over 60 years of age, hence the imperative for "healthy ageing". Vaccinations in seniors, in contrast with paediatric vaccinations, are very often neglected even by health care workers. This article aims to provide an evidence-based guide to establish vaccinations in seniors as one of the pillars of Public Health in the future.

  3. Progress and challenges in the vaccine-based treatment of head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venuti Aldo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Head and neck (HN cancer represents one of the most challenging diseases because the mortality remains high despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment. Although vaccine-based approaches for the treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have achieved limited clinical success, advances in cancer immunology provide a strong foundation and powerful new tools to guide current attempts to develop effective cancer vaccines. This article reviews what has to be rather what has been done in the field for the development of future vaccines in HN tumours.

  4. Designing Peptide-Based HIV Vaccine for Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi Shu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells are central to the induction and maintenance of CD8+ T cell and antibody-producing B cell responses, and the latter are essential for the protection against disease in subjects with HIV infection. How to elicit HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses in a given population using vaccines is one of the major areas of current HIV vaccine research. To design vaccine that targets specifically Chinese, we assembled a database that is comprised of sequences from 821 Chinese HIV isolates and 46 human leukocyte antigen (HLA DR alleles identified in Chinese population. We then predicted 20 potential HIV epitopes using bioinformatics approaches. The combination of these 20 epitopes has a theoretical coverage of 98.1% of the population for both the prevalent HIV genotypes and also Chinese HLA-DR types. We suggest that testing this vaccine experimentally will facilitate the development of a CD4+ T cell vaccine especially catered for Chinese.

  5. Adenovirus vector-based vaccines for human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch, Dan H; Nabel, Gary J

    2005-02-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vectors have received considerable attention for gene therapy because of their high transduction efficiency. However, recombinant gene expression from rAd vectors elicits rapid and potent immune responses to foreign transgene products. Such immunogenicity limits the duration of transgene expression and poses a major challenge to the use of rAd vectors for gene therapy. In contrast, the inherent immunogenicity of these vectors is a desirable feature for vaccine development. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rAd vector-based vaccines have now been demonstrated in a number of animal models, and rAd vaccines for a variety of pathogens are currently being explored in early-phase clinical trials. In this review, we describe progress in the development of rAd vector-based vaccines with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

  6. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  7. Bioreactor concepts for cell culture-based viral vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Ramírez, Lilí Esmeralda; Nikolay, Alexander; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine manufacturing processes are designed to meet present and upcoming challenges associated with a growing vaccine market and to include multi-use facilities offering a broad portfolio and faster reaction times in case of pandemics and emerging diseases. The final products, from whole viruses to recombinant viral proteins, are very diverse, making standard process strategies hardly universally applicable. Numerous factors such as cell substrate, virus strain or expression system, medium, cultivation system, cultivation method, and scale need consideration. Reviewing options for efficient and economical production of human vaccines, this paper discusses basic factors relevant for viral antigen production in mammalian cells, avian cells and insect cells. In addition, bioreactor concepts, including static systems, single-use systems, stirred tanks and packed-beds are addressed. On this basis, methods towards process intensification, in particular operational strategies, the use of perfusion systems for high product yields, and steps to establish continuous processes are introduced.

  8. Major findings and recent advances in virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Mona O; Zha, Lisha; Cabral-Miranda, Gustavo; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-09-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have made giant strides in the field of vaccinology over the last three decades. VLPs constitute versatile tools in vaccine development due to their favourable immunological characteristics such as their size, repetitive surface geometry, ability to induce both innate and adaptive immune responses as well as being safe templates with favourable economics. Several VLP-based vaccines are commercially available including vaccines against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) such as Cervarix(®), Gardasil(®) & Gardasil9(®) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) including the 3rd generation Sci-B-Vac™. In addition, the first licensed malaria-VLP-based vaccine Mosquirix™ has been recently approved by the European regulators. Several other VLP-based vaccines are currently undergoing preclinical and clinical development. This review summarizes some of the major findings and recent advances in VLP-based vaccine development and technologies and outlines general principles that may be harnessed for induction of targeted immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Provider dismissal policies and clustering of vaccine-hesitant families: an agent-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenheim, Alison M; Cherng, Sarah T; Asch, David A

    2013-08-01

    Many pediatric practices have adopted vaccine policies that require parents who refuse to vaccinate according to the ACIP schedule to find another health care provider. Such policies may inadvertently cluster unvaccinated patients into practices that tolerate non vaccination or alternative schedules, turning them into risky pockets of low herd immunity. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of provider zero-tolerance vaccination policies on the clustering of intentionally unvaccinated children. We developed an agent-based model of parental vaccine hesitancy, provider non-vaccination tolerance, and selection of patients into pediatric practices. We ran 84 experiments across a range of parental hesitancy and provider tolerance scenarios. When the model is initialized, all providers accommodate refusals and intentionally unvaccinated children are evenly distributed across providers. As provider tolerance decreases, hesitant children become more clustered in a smaller number of practices and eventually are not able to find a practice that will accept them. Each of these effects becomes more pronounced as the level of hesitancy in the population rises. Heterogeneity in practice tolerance to vaccine-hesitant parents has the unintended result of concentrating susceptible individuals within a small number of tolerant practices, while providing little if any compensatory protection to adherent individuals. These externalities suggest an agenda for stricter policy regulation of individual practice decisions.

  10. Towards functional antibody-based vaccines to prevent pre-erythrocytic malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Brandon; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-05-01

    An effective malaria vaccine would be considered a milestone of modern medicine, yet has so far eluded research and development efforts. This can be attributed to the extreme complexity of the malaria parasites, presenting with a multi-stage life cycle, high genome complexity and the parasite's sophisticated immune evasion measures, particularly antigenic variation during pathogenic blood stage infection. However, the pre-erythrocytic (PE) early infection forms of the parasite exhibit relatively invariant proteomes, and are attractive vaccine targets as they offer multiple points of immune system attack. Areas covered: We cover the current state of and roadblocks to the development of an effective, antibody-based PE vaccine, including current vaccine candidates, limited biological knowledge, genetic heterogeneity, parasite complexity, and suboptimal preclinical models as well as the power of early stage clinical models. Expert commentary: PE vaccines will need to elicit broad and durable immunity to prevent infection. This could be achievable if recent innovations in studying the parasites' infection biology, rational vaccine selection and design as well as adjuvant formulation are combined in a synergistic and multipronged approach. Improved preclinical assays as well as the iterative testing of vaccine candidates in controlled human malaria infection trials will further accelerate this effort.

  11. Next-generation outer membrane vesicle vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis based on nontoxic LPS mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ley, Peter; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie

    2011-08-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been used extensively as experimental vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis. Classical meningococcal OMV vaccines contain wildtype lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a hexa-acylated lipid A moiety, which is a very potent activator of the TLR4 receptor. While this may make the LPS an effective "internal" adjuvant, it also contributes to vaccine reactogenicity. Reduction of endotoxic activity has therefore been essential for the application of meningococcal OMV vaccines in humans. Classical OMV vaccines have a reduced LPS content as a result of detergent extraction, mostly with deoxycholate. An alternative method is the use of meningococcal strains with genetically detoxified LPS, in particular where mutation in the lpxL1 gene has resulted in penta-acylated lipid A with strongly attenuated endotoxic activity. This allows the use of native OMVs without any need for LPS removal by detergent extraction, making it a much easier to produce and more versatile vaccine platform. Several groups have now started the development of native OMV vaccines based on non-toxic LPS mutants, and this Commentary provides an overview of the various approaches and results thus far.

  12. The case for a rational genome-based vaccine against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eProietti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, vaccines have been designed to mimic the immunity induced by natural exposure to the target pathogen, but this approach has not been effective for any parasitic pathogens of humans or complex pathogens that cause chronic disease in humans, such as Plasmodium. Despite intense efforts by many laboratories around the world on different aspects of Plasmodium spp. molecular and cell biology, epidemiology and immunology, progress towards the goal of an effective malaria vaccine has been disappointing. The premise of rational vaccine design is to induce the desired immune response against the key pathogen antigens or epitopes targeted by protective immune responses. We advocate that development of an optimally efficacious malaria vaccine will need to improve on nature, and that this can be accomplished by rational vaccine design facilitated by mining genomic, proteomic and transcriptomic datasets in the context of relevant biological function. In our opinion, modern genome-based rational vaccine design offers enormous potential above and beyond that of whole-organism vaccines approaches established over 200 years ago where immunity is likely suboptimal due to the many genetic and immunological host-parasite adaptations evolved to allow the Plasmodium parasite to coexist in the human host, and which are associated with logistic and regulatory hurdles for production and delivery.

  13. Rotavirus vaccination and herd immunity: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seybolt LM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorna M Seybolt, Rodolfo E BéguéDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Until recently, rotavirus was the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and young children with over 100 million cases and 400,000 deaths every year worldwide. Yet, its epidemiology is changing rapidly with the introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in the mid 2000s. Both vaccines were shown to be highly efficacious in prelicensure studies to reduce severe rotavirus disease; the efficacy being more pronounced in high- and middle-income countries than in low-income countries. Herd immunity – the indirect protection of unimmunized individuals as a result of others being immunized – was not expected to be a benefit of rotavirus vaccination programs since the vaccines were thought to reduce severe disease but not to decrease virus transmission significantly. Postlicensure studies, however, have suggested that this assumption may need reassessment. Studies in a variety of settings have shown evidence of greater than expected declines in rotavirus disease. While these studies were not designed specifically to detect herd immunity – and few failed to detect this phenomenon – the consistency of the evidence is compelling. These studies are reviewed and described here. While further work is needed, clarifying the presence of herd immunity is not just an academic exercise but an important issue for rotavirus control, especially in lower income countries where the incidence of the disease is highest and the direct protection of the vaccines is lower.Keywords: rotavirus, vaccine, herd immunity, efficacy

  14. Immunostimulation by Synthetic Lipopeptide-Based Vaccine Candidates: Structure-Activity Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Mehfuz; Toth, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Peptide-based vaccines offer several advantages over conventional whole organism or protein approaches by offering improved purity and specificity in inducing immune response. However, peptides alone are generally non-immunogenic. Concerns remain about the toxicity of adjuvants which are critical for immunogenicity of synthetic peptides. The use of lipopeptides in peptide vaccines is currently under intensive investigation because potent immune responses can be generated without the use of ad...

  15. Characterization of the immune response induced by pertussis OMVs-based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottero, D; Gaillard, M E; Zurita, E; Moreno, G; Martinez, D Sabater; Bartel, E; Bravo, S; Carriquiriborde, F; Errea, A; Castuma, C; Rumbo, M; Hozbor, D

    2016-06-14

    For the development of a third generation of pertussis vaccine that could improve the control of the disease, it was proposed that the immune responses induced by the classic whole cell vaccine (wP) or after infection should be used as a reference point. We have recently identified a vaccine candidate based on outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from the disease etiologic agent that have been shown to be safe and protective in mice model of infection. Here we characterized OMVs-mediated immunity and the safety of our new candidate. We also deepen the knowledge of the induced humoral response contribution in pertussis protection. Regarding the safety of the OMVs based vaccine (TdapOMVsBp,) the in vitro whole blood human assay here performed, showed that the low toxicity of OMVs-based vaccine previously detected in mice could be extended to human samples. Stimulation of splenocytes from immunized mice evidenced the presence of IFN-γ and IL-17-producing cells, indicated that OMVs induces both Th1 and Th17 response. Interestingly TdapOMVsBp-raised antibodies such as those induced by wP and commercial acellular vaccines (aP) which contribute to induce protection against Bordetella pertussis infection. As occurs with wP-induced antibodies, the TdapOMVsBp-induced serum antibodies efficiently opsonized B. pertussis. All the data here obtained shows that OMVs based vaccine is able to induce Th1/Th17 and Th2 mixed profile with robust humoral response involved in protection, positioning this candidate among the different possibilities to constitute the third generation of anti-pertussis vaccines.

  16. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Ebola Vaccine Is Well-Tolerated and Protects Immunocompromised Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Geisbert, Thomas W.; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M.; Lewis, Mark G.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Allen Grolla; Anders Leung; Jason Paragas; Lennox Matthias; Smith, Mark A.; Jones, Steven M.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Heinz Feldmann; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatmen...

  17. [Immunological safety and sensitizing effect of an MB-7-based vaccine against hepatitis A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerdova, M A; Usova, S V; Smolina, M P; Netesov, S V; Maĭdaniuk, A G; Muntianova, M A; Nemtsov, Iu V; Kriuk, N I; Iashin, V V; Karpovich, L G; Kalashnikova, T V

    2004-01-01

    The influence of a vaccine based on the MB-7 strain of hepatitis A virus (VP-MB-7) designed at the "Vector" Center of Virology and Biotechnology was studied. VP-MB-7 was found to provoke no allergic response and to have an activating effect on the specific and non-specific responses of cell and humoral immunity similar to those evoked by hepatitis A vaccine "Hep-A-in Vac".

  18. A sensitive impedance biosensor based on immunomagnetic separation and urease catalysis for rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes using an immobilization-free interdigitated array microelectrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Lin, Jianhan; Gan, Chengqi; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Dan; Xiong, Yonghua; Lai, Weihua; Li, Yuntao; Wang, Maohua

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we described a novel impedance biosensor combining immunomagnetic separation with urease catalysis for sensitive detection of foodborne bacteria using Listeria monocytogenes as model and an immobilization-free microelectrode as detector. The monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were immobilized on the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with the diameter of 180 nm by biotin-streptavidin system for specifically and efficiently separating Listeria cells from sample background. The polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) and the urease were modified onto the surface of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the diameter of 20 nm and the modified AuNPs were used to react with Listera to form the MNP-MAb-Listeria-PAb-AuNP-urease sandwich complexes. The urease in the complexes could catalyze the hydrolysis of the urea into ammonium carbonate and this led to an increase in the ionic strength of the media, which could be detected by the microelectrode. The magnetic separation efficiencies for L. monocytogenes at the concentrations ranging from 3.0×10(1) to 3.0×10(4) CFU/mL were over 95% for the pure cultures and over 85% for the spiked lettuce samples. The lower detection limit of this biosensor for L. monocytogenes was found to be 300 CFU/mL in both the pure cultures and the spiked lettuce samples. The microelectrode was demonstrated to be reusable for over 50 times with thorough cleaning by deionized water. This biosensor showed its potential to provide a simple, low-cost and sensitive method for rapid screening of foodborne pathogens and could be extended for detection of other biological or chemical targets.

  19. Immunogenicity and protection efficacy of subunit-based smallpox vaccines using variola major antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chou, Te-Hui; Kishko, Michael; Lu, Shan

    2008-02-05

    The viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the identification of VACV protective antigens. It also offers the possibility of using antigens from VARV to formulate the next generation subunit-based smallpox vaccines. Here, we show that codon-optimized DNA vaccines expressing three VARV antigens (A30, B7 and F8) and their recombinant protein counterparts elicited high-titer, cross-reactive, VACV neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Vaccinated mice were protected from intraperitoneal and intranasal challenges with VACV. These results suggest the feasibility of a subunit smallpox vaccine based on VARV antigen sequences to induce immunity against poxvirus infection.

  20. Plant-based oral vaccines against zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Naila; Daniell, Henry

    2016-11-01

    The shared diseases between animals and humans are known as zoonotic diseases and spread infectious diseases among humans. Zoonotic diseases are not only a major burden to livestock industry but also threaten humans accounting for >60% cases of human illness. About 75% of emerging infectious diseases in humans have been reported to originate from zoonotic pathogens. Because antibiotics are frequently used to protect livestock from bacterial diseases, the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of epidemic and zoonotic pathogens is now a major concern. Live attenuated and killed vaccines are the only option to control these infectious diseases and this approach has been used since 1890. However, major problems with this approach include high cost and injectable vaccines is impractical for >20 billion poultry animals or fish in aquaculture. Plants offer an attractive and affordable platform for vaccines against animal diseases because of their low cost, and they are free of attenuated pathogens and cold chain requirement. Therefore, several plant-based vaccines against human and animals diseases have been developed recently that undergo clinical and regulatory approval. Plant-based vaccines serve as ideal booster vaccines that could eliminate multiple boosters of attenuated bacteria or viruses, but requirement of injectable priming with adjuvant is a current limitation. So, new approaches like oral vaccines are needed to overcome this challenge. In this review, we discuss the progress made in plant-based vaccines against zoonotic or other animal diseases and future challenges in advancing this field. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sublingual immunization with M2-based vaccine induces broad protective immunity against influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Shik Shim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e of influenza A virus is a rationale target antigen candidate for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza as M2e undergoes little sequence variation amongst human influenza A strains. Vaccine-induced M2e-specific antibodies (Abs have been shown to display significant cross-protective activity in animal models. M2e-based vaccine constructs have been shown to be more protective when administered by the intranasal (i.n. route than after parenteral injection. However, i.n. administration of vaccines poses rare but serious safety issues associated with retrograde passage of inhaled antigens and adjuvants through the olfactory epithelium. In this study, we examined whether the sublingual (s.l. route could serve as a safe and effective alternative mucosal delivery route for administering a prototype M2e-based vaccine. The mechanism whereby s.l. immunization with M2e vaccine candidate induces broad protection against infection with different influenza virus subtypes was explored. METHODS AND RESULTS: A recombinant M2 protein with three tandem copies of the M2e (3M2eC was expressed in Escherichia coli. Parenteral immunizations of mice with 3M2eC induced high levels of M2e-specific serum Abs but failed to provide complete protection against lethal challenge with influenza virus. In contrast, s.l. immunization with 3M2eC was superior for inducing protection in mice. In the latter animals, protection was associated with specific Ab responses in the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that s.l. immunization with 3M2eC vaccine induced airway mucosal immune responses along with broad cross-protective immunity to influenza. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the M2-based vaccine approach to control epidemic and pandemic influenza infections.

  2. Feasibilty of oral immunisation with LTB-based edible vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauterslager, Tosca Genevieve Maria

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes the research to explore the feasibility of plants for oral vaccination. The research focussed on a model of LTB produced in potato tubers or ovalbumin (OVA) as antigen and tested in mice. A general introduction into the backgrounds of oral immunisation is given in Chapter 1. Th

  3. Vaccine-based clinical trials in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Daemen, Toos; Boezen, H. Marike; Melief, Kees J. M.; Nijman, Hans W.

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer vaccines are one of the new treatment strategies under investigation in epithelial ovarian cancer. This article discusses the results of different immunization strategies, points out potential pitfalls in study designs and provides possible solutions for augmentation of clinical effic

  4. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Subramanian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging 'universal' vaccines-targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus-offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in

  5. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ki Tsoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates.

  6. Ontology-based literature mining of E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; He, Yongqun

    2017-03-14

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli infections cause various diseases in humans and many animal species. However, with extensive E. coli vaccine research, we are still unable to fully protect ourselves against E. coli infections. To more rational development of effective and safe E. coli vaccine, it is important to better understand E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks. In this study, we first extended the Vaccine Ontology (VO) to semantically represent various E. coli vaccines and genes used in the vaccine development. We also normalized E. coli gene names compiled from the annotations of various E. coli strains using a pan-genome-based annotation strategy. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) includes a hierarchy of various interaction-related keywords useful for literature mining. Using VO, INO, and normalized E. coli gene names, we applied an ontology-based SciMiner literature mining strategy to mine all PubMed abstracts and retrieve E. coli vaccine-associated E. coli gene interactions. Four centrality metrics (i.e., degree, eigenvector, closeness, and betweenness) were calculated for identifying highly ranked genes and interaction types. Using vaccine-related PubMed abstracts, our study identified 11,350 sentences that contain 88 unique INO interactions types and 1,781 unique E. coli genes. Each sentence contained at least one interaction type and two unique E. coli genes. An E. coli gene interaction network of genes and INO interaction types was created. From this big network, a sub-network consisting of 5 E. coli vaccine genes, including carA, carB, fimH, fepA, and vat, and 62 other E. coli genes, and 25 INO interaction types was identified. While many interaction types represent direct interactions between two indicated genes, our study has also shown that many of these retrieved interaction types are indirect in that the two genes participated in the specified interaction process in a required but indirect process. Our centrality analysis of

  7. Antibody Persistence in Young Children 5 Years after Vaccination with a Combined Haemophilus influenzae Type b-Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccine Coadministered with Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis-Based and Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Juan Carlos; Brzostek, Jerzy; Konior, Ryszard; Grunert, Detlef; Kolhe, Devayani; Baine, Yaela; Van Der Wielen, Marie

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated antibody persistence in children up to 5 years after administration of a combined Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (MenC)-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine coadministered with a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. This is the follow-up study of a randomized trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT00334334/00463437) in which healthy children were vaccinated (primary vaccinations at 2, 4, and 6 months of age and booster vaccination at 11 to 18 months of age) with Hib-MenC-TT or a control MenC conjugate vaccine, coadministered with diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa)-based combination vaccines (DTPa/Hib for control groups) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine [PHiD-CV] or 7-valent cross-reacting material 197 [CRM197] conjugate vaccine [7vCRM]). MenC antibody titers were measured with a serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit SBA [rSBA]), and antibodies against Hib polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody persistence up to 5 years after booster vaccination is reported for 530 children ∼6 years of age. The percentages of children with seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers were between 24.2% and 40.1% in all groups approximately 5 years after booster vaccination. More than 98.5% of children in each group retained seroprotective anti-PRP concentrations. No vaccine-related serious adverse events and no events related to a lack of vaccine efficacy were reported. Approximately 5 years after booster vaccination, the majority of children retained seroprotective anti-PRP antibody concentrations. The percentage of children retaining seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers was low (≤40%), suggesting that a significant proportion of children may be unprotected against MenC disease. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under

  8. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  9. Development of a Multivalent Subunit Vaccine against Tularemia Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) Based Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Sukalyani; Mansour, Ahd Ahmed; Suresh, Ragavan Varadharajan; Wykoff-Clary, Sherri; Malik, Meenakshi; McCormick, Alison A; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, and is the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia. F. tularensis is classified as a Category A Biothreat agent by the CDC based on its use in bioweapon programs by several countries in the past and its potential to be used as an agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia. In this study, we used a novel approach for development of a multivalent subunit vaccine against tularemia by using an efficient tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based delivery platform. The multivalent subunit vaccine was formulated to contain a combination of F. tularensis protective antigens: OmpA-like protein (OmpA), chaperone protein DnaK and lipoprotein Tul4 from the highly virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 strain. Two different vaccine formulations and immunization schedules were used. The immunized mice were challenged with lethal (10xLD100) doses of F. tularensis LVS on day 28 of the primary immunization and observed daily for morbidity and mortality. Results from this study demonstrate that TMV can be used as a carrier for effective delivery of multiple F. tularensis antigens. TMV-conjugate vaccine formulations are safe and multiple doses can be administered without causing any adverse reactions in immunized mice. Immunization with TMV-conjugated F. tularensis proteins induced a strong humoral immune response and protected mice against respiratory challenges with very high doses of F. tularensis LVS. This study provides a proof-of-concept that TMV can serve as a suitable platform for simultaneous delivery of multiple protective antigens of F. tularensis. Refinement of vaccine formulations coupled with TMV-targeting strategies developed in this study will provide a platform for development of an effective tularemia subunit vaccine as well as a vaccination approach that may broadly be applicable to many other bacterial pathogens.

  10. Development of a Multivalent Subunit Vaccine against Tularemia Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV Based Delivery System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukalyani Banik

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, and is the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia. F. tularensis is classified as a Category A Biothreat agent by the CDC based on its use in bioweapon programs by several countries in the past and its potential to be used as an agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia. In this study, we used a novel approach for development of a multivalent subunit vaccine against tularemia by using an efficient tobacco mosaic virus (TMV based delivery platform. The multivalent subunit vaccine was formulated to contain a combination of F. tularensis protective antigens: OmpA-like protein (OmpA, chaperone protein DnaK and lipoprotein Tul4 from the highly virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 strain. Two different vaccine formulations and immunization schedules were used. The immunized mice were challenged with lethal (10xLD100 doses of F. tularensis LVS on day 28 of the primary immunization and observed daily for morbidity and mortality. Results from this study demonstrate that TMV can be used as a carrier for effective delivery of multiple F. tularensis antigens. TMV-conjugate vaccine formulations are safe and multiple doses can be administered without causing any adverse reactions in immunized mice. Immunization with TMV-conjugated F. tularensis proteins induced a strong humoral immune response and protected mice against respiratory challenges with very high doses of F. tularensis LVS. This study provides a proof-of-concept that TMV can serve as a suitable platform for simultaneous delivery of multiple protective antigens of F. tularensis. Refinement of vaccine formulations coupled with TMV-targeting strategies developed in this study will provide a platform for development of an effective tularemia subunit vaccine as well as a vaccination approach that may broadly be applicable to many other bacterial pathogens.

  11. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas Darwin

    There are two ways in which bacteria survive killing by antibiotics. The most well-known, is antibiotic resistance, which results from the acquisition of a resistance gene or mutation that allows bacteria to grow and divide in the presence of antibiotic concentrations that would normally kill other...... that are completely refractory to antibiotics due to the inactivity of cellular processes. Persister cells have been linked to treatment failures in several bacterial infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Preceding the start of this Ph......D project, Listeria monocytogenes was observed to form these antibiotic tolerant persister cells. L. monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, a rare, but often lethal disease, even with antibiotic treatment. It typically affects pregnant women, neonates, the elderly...

  12. Acceptability and uptake of HPV vaccine in Argentina before its inclusion in the immunization program: a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrossi, Silvina; Maceira, Veronica; Paolino, Melisa; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2012-03-23

    In Argentina, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was approved in 2006, but not included in the National Immunization Program. In 2008 a mass media campaign was carried out by a cancer Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), but it was stopped due to criticisms about the publicity. In October 2011 the Ministry of Health (MoH) has introduced HPV vaccination in the National Immunization Program. In this context, to assure high HPV vaccine coverage, evidence is needed on factors both associated to vaccine acceptability and uptake. In 2009-2010 we carried out a population-based survey among a representative sample of 1200 women aged 18-49 years from the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires. The objective was twofold: first to analyze socio-demographic determinants of women's knowledge on HPV vaccine and secondly, determinants of actual HPV vaccine uptake and acceptability in Argentina after the above-mentioned vaccine advertising shown in mass media in the year 2008. We analyzed vaccine uptake/acceptability separately for women and for their daughters aged 9-15, and willingness to vaccinate one's daughter younger than 9 to receive future HPV vaccination. Results of the 1200 women interviewed, 438 women (36.5%) knew the HPV vaccine and 303 (25%) remembered the mass media advertisement about HPV vaccination. When asked whether she would get vaccinated after having seen/heard the advertisement, around 75% (n=226) of women answered surely/probably yes. No significant differences in socio-demographic characteristics were found among women who would or not get vaccinated. When surveyed, 6 women had been vaccinated. Main reasons for non-vaccination were: "Doctor did not mention/recommend it" (34.1%) and "Vaccine is too expensive" (15.7%). No woman had had their 9-15 year-old daughter vaccinated. Among women who only had at least one daughter under 9 (n=278), 74% answered that they would get their daughter vaccinated if they were pre-adolescents. The conclusion is that, in

  13. Validation of the ANSR(®) Listeria monocytogenes Method for Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in Selected Food and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Oscar; Alles, Susan; Le, Quynh-Nhi; Gray, R Lucas; Hosking, Edan; Pinkava, Lisa; Norton, Paul; Tolan, Jerry; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer; Chen, Yi; Ryser, Elliot; Odumeru, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Work was conducted to validate performance of the ANSR(®) for Listeria monocytogenes method in selected food and environmental matrixes. This DNA-based assay involves amplification of nucleic acid via an isothermal reaction based on nicking enzyme amplification technology. Following single-step sample enrichment for 16-24 h for most matrixes, the assay is completed in 40 min using only simple instrumentation. When 50 distinct strains of L. monocytogenes were tested for inclusivity, 48 produced positive results, the exceptions being two strains confirmed by PCR to lack the assay target gene. Forty-seven nontarget strains (30 species), including multiple non-monocytogenes Listeria species as well as non-Listeria, Gram-positive bacteria, were tested, and all generated negative ANSR assay results. Performance of the ANSR method was compared with that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedure for detection of L. monocytogenes in hot dogs, pasteurized liquid egg, and sponge samples taken from an inoculated stainless steel surface. In addition, ANSR performance was measured against the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference method for detection of L. monocytogenes in Mexican-style cheese, cantaloupe, sprout irrigation water, and guacamole. With the single exception of pasteurized liquid egg at 16 h, ANSR method performance as quantified by the number of positives obtained was not statistically different from that of the reference methods. Robustness trials demonstrated that deliberate introduction of small deviations to the normal assay parameters did not affect ANSR method performance. Results of accelerated stability testing conducted using two manufactured lots of reagents predicts stability at the specified storage temperature of 4°C of more than 1 year.

  14. Vaccination in adult patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases : A systematic literature review for the European League Against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, S.; Elkayam, O.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Cervera, R.; Doran, M. F.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Geborek, P.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Jayne, D. R. W.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Mueller-Ladner, U.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Stojanovich, L.; Valesini, G.; Wulffraat, N. M.; Bijl, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To present the systematic literature review (SLR), which formed the basis for the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) evidence-based recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD). Methods: AIIRD, vaccines and immunomodula

  15. 基于重组溶血素单抗的单核李斯特菌ELISA检测法的建立%A recombinant listeriolysin O monoclonal antibody based ELISA for detection of Listeria monocytogenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建巍; 马骢; 王珍光; 郝秀红; 钱扬会; 刘敏; 张雅芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To establish a recombinant listeriolysin O Monoclonal antibody Based ELISA for detection of Listeria monocytogenes.Methods: Five strains of Monoclonal Antibodies were obtained by traditional methods and purified with protein A column, identificated By Western Blot, labed with HRP.Couple of Monoclonal antibodies for coating and labing separately was selected from 5 Strains of hybridoma cells.Results: A sandwich ELISA for detection of rLLO and Listeria rnonocytogenes was established with a concentration limit of 1.95 ng/ml rLLO and 5.2 × 108/L Listeria monocytogenes respectively.This method had a high specificity and had no cross reaction with other bacteria.Conclusion: rLLO monoclonal antibody based sandwich ELISA for Listeria monocytogenes.Detection would have practical importance for specific diagnosis and research in future.%目的:建立基于重组溶血素单抗的单核李斯菌ELISA检测方法.方法:从5株抗单核增生性李斯特菌的杂交瘤细胞中,筛选亲和力较高的单克隆抗体,用Western-blot鉴定、Protein A纯化、HRP标记,经交叉配伍筛选出最佳的抗体组合.结果:建立了单核李斯特菌的ELISA检测方法,对单核增生性李斯特菌的最低检出浓度为5.2×108/L,本检测方法特异性强,与常见细菌没有交叉反应.结论:基于重组蛋白单抗的单核李斯菌ELISA检测方法的建立为单核李斯特菌的特异性诊断提供了有效手段.

  16. Sensitive enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in various naturally contaminated matrices using a membrane filtration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Léna; Brasseur, Emilie; Doux, Camille; Lombard, Bertrand; Besse, Nathalie Gnanou

    2015-06-01

    For the enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) in food, a sensitive enumeration method has been recently developed. This method is based on a membrane filtration of the food suspension followed by transfer of the filter on a selective medium to enumerate L. monocytogenes. An evaluation of this method was performed with several categories of foods naturally contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The results obtained with this technique were compared with those obtained from the modified reference EN ISO 11290-2 method for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in food, and are found to provide more precise results. In most cases, the filtration method enabled to examine a greater quantity of food thus greatly improving the sensitivity of the enumeration. However, it was hardly applicable to some food categories because of filtration problems and background microbiota interference.

  17. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody able to detect live Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølve, Marianne; Boel, Jeppe; Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal Listeria antibody, designated B4, was evaluated. The ability of the antibody to bind to viable bacteria belonging to Listeria spp, compared to bacteria of the same species killed by beat treatment, acid or base treatment, sanitizers, and irradiation was examined. The antibody was found...... to react with viable L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, but not with heat-killed (72 degrees C, 5 min) strains of these organisms. When L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were killed by methods other than heat treatment, it was ambiguous whether the antibody detected the organism or not. It was concluded...... that the B4 antibody has potential to be used in an immune capture step to capture live L, monocytogenes and L. innocua from foods prior to identification of L. monocytogenes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)....

  18. Modeling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in soft blue-white cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosshaug, Per Sand; Detmer, Ann; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model simulating growth over time of the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in a soft blue-white cheese. The physicochemical properties in a matrix such as cheese are essential controlling factors influencing the growth of L. monocytogenes....... We developed a predictive tertiary model of the bacterial growth of L. monocytogenes as a function of temperature, pH, NaCl, and lactic acid. We measured the variations over time of the physicochemical properties in the cheese. Our predictive model was developed based on broth data produced...... production and retail conditions showed that the number of L. monocytogenes cells increases 3 to 3.5 log within the shelf life of the cheese....

  19. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine effectiveness against high-grade cervical lesions by age at vaccination: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herweijer, Eva; Sundström, Karin; Ploner, Alexander; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Sparén, Pär; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen

    2016-06-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16/18, included in HPV vaccines, contribute to the majority of cervical cancer, and a substantial proportion of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades 2/3 or worse (CIN2+/CIN3+) including adenocarcinoma in situ or worse. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccination on incidence of CIN2+ and CIN3+. A nationwide cohort of girls and young women resident in Sweden 2006-2013 and aged 13-29 (n = 1,333,691) was followed for vaccination and histologically confirmed high-grade cervical lesions. Data were collected using the Swedish nationwide healthcare registers. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and vaccine effectiveness [(1-IRR)x100%] comparing fully vaccinated with unvaccinated individuals. IRRs were adjusted for attained age and parental education, and stratified on vaccination initiation age. Effectiveness against CIN2+ was 75% (IRR = 0.25, 95%CI = 0.18-0.35) for those initiating vaccination before age 17, and 46% (IRR = 0.54, 95%CI = 0.46-0.64) and 22% (IRR = 0.78, 95%CI = 0.65-0.93) for those initiating vaccination at ages 17-19, and at ages 20-29, respectively. Vaccine effectiveness against CIN3+ was similar to vaccine effectiveness against CIN2+. Results were robust for both women participating to the organized screening program and for women at prescreening ages. We show high effectiveness of qHPV vaccination on CIN2+ and CIN3+ lesions, with greater effectiveness observed in girls younger at vaccination initiation. Continued monitoring of impact of HPV vaccination in the population is needed in order to evaluate both long-term vaccine effectiveness and to evaluate whether the vaccination program achieves anticipated effects in prevention of invasive cervical cancer.

  20. Efficacy of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5)-based tuberculosis vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhai; Gupta, Tuhina; Xu, Pei; Phan, Shannon; Pickar, Adrian; Yau, Wilson; Karls, Russell K; Quinn, Frederick D; Sakamoto, Kaori; He, Biao

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), is an important human pathogen. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), a live, attenuated variant of Mycobacterium bovis, is currently the only available TB vaccine despite its low efficacy against the infectious pulmonary form of the disease in adults. Thus, a more-effective TB vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), a paramyxovirus, has several characteristics that make it an attractive vaccine vector. It is safe, inexpensive to produce, and has been previously shown to be efficacious as the backbone of vaccines for influenza, rabies, and respiratory syncytial virus. In this work, recombinant PIV5 expressing M. tuberculosis antigens 85A (PIV5-85A) and 85B (PIV5-85B) have been generated and their immunogenicity and protective efficacy evaluated in a mouse aerosol infection model. In a long-term protection study, a single dose of PIV5-85A was found to be most effective in reducing M. tuberculosis colony forming units (CFU) in lungs when compared to unvaccinated, whereas the BCG vaccinated animals had similar numbers of CFUs to unvaccinated animals. BCG-prime followed by a PIV5-85A or PIV5-85B boost produced better outcomes highlighted by close to three-log units lower lung CFUs compared to PBS. The results indicate that PIV5-based M. tuberculosis vaccines are promising candidates for further development.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF VACCINES BASED ON ADENOVIRAL VECTORS: A REVIEW OF FOREIGN CLINICAL STUDIES (PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Cherenova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many human infectious diseases do not developed effective methods of treatment and prevention. One of the latest successes of biotechnology is the use of adenoviral vectors carrying immunodominant antigens  of various pathogens as genetically engineered vaccines  both  preventive and therapeutic. The use of genetic  engineering technologies allows not  to use in the  manufacture of vaccines  live viruses and  bacteria, reduces  the  time  needed for vaccine  creation and  production of new vaccines.  Adenoviral vectors  naturally penetrate into human cells, causing a rather  long and significant  both humoral and cellular immune response. In the second  part of review, we provide  information about  the ongoing  worldwide  clinical  trials of adenoviral vector-based vaccines against various infectious diseases such as influenza, malaria, Ebola haemorrhagic fever, tuberculosis, hepatitis and  several others, like as to consider selection parameters of volunteers, vaccination schedule, doses of drug administration, results of completed experiments, and preliminary data  on currently ongoing  research.

  2. Using magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Ferguson

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy.

  3. Novel Injectable Pentablock Copolymer Based Thermoresponsive Hydrogels for Sustained Release Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbala, Sharan; Tamboli, Viral; McDowell, Arlene; Mitra, Ashim K; Hook, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The need for multiple vaccinations to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines may be reduced by delivering the vaccine over an extended period of time. Here, we report two novel injectable pentablock copolymer based thermoresponsive hydrogels made of polyethyleneglycol-polycaprolactone-polylactide-polycaprolactone-polyethyleneglycol (PEG-PCL-PLA-PCL-PEG) with varying ratios of polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactide (PLA), as single shot sustained release vaccines. Pentablock copolymer hydrogels were loaded with vaccine-encapsulated poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA-NP) or with the soluble vaccine components. Incorporation of PLGA-NP into the thermoresponsive hydrogels increased the complex viscosity of the gels, lowered the gelation temperature, and minimized the burst release of antigen and adjuvants. The two pentablock hydrogels stimulated both cellular and humoral responses. The addition of PLGA-NP to the hydrogels sustained immune responses for up to 49 days. The polymer with a higher ratio of PCL to PLA formed a more rigid gel, induced stronger immune responses, and stimulated effective anti-tumor responses in a prophylactic melanoma tumor model.

  4. TAA Polyepitope DNA-Based Vaccines: A Potential Tool for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-based cancer vaccines represent an attractive strategy for inducing immunity to tumor associated antigens (TAAs in cancer patients. The demonstration that the delivery of a recombinant plasmid encoding epitopes can lead to epitope production, processing, and presentation to CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and the advantage of using a single DNA construct encoding multiple epitopes of one or more TAAs to elicit a broad spectrum of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes has encouraged the development of a variety of strategies aimed at increasing immunogenicity of TAA polyepitope DNA-based vaccines. The polyepitope DNA-based cancer vaccine approach can (a circumvent the variability of peptide presentation by tumor cells, (b allow the introduction in the plasmid construct of multiple immunogenic epitopes including heteroclitic epitope versions, and (c permit to enroll patients with different major histocompatibility complex (MHC haplotypes. This review will discuss the rationale for using the TAA polyepitope DNA-based vaccination strategy and recent results corroborating the usefulness of DNA encoding polyepitope vaccines as a potential tool for cancer therapy.

  5. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  6. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications Emerging from Murine Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Keon, Soledad; Ruiz, María Sol; Gazzaniga, Silvina; Wainstok, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel-T), there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts toward an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26042126

  7. PELÍCULA ANTIMICROBIANA A BASE DE PROTEÍNA DE SUERO LÁCTEO, INCORPORADA CON BACTERIAS LÁCTICAS COMO CONTROLADOR DE Listeria monocytogenes, APLICADA SOBRE SALMÓN AHUMADO FILM ANTIMICROBIAL BASED WHEY PROTEIN, LACTIC ACID BACTERIA INCORPORATED AS CONTROLLER Listeria monocytogenes APPLIED TO SMOKED SALMON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEYCI RODRÍGUEZ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El concentrado de proteína de suero lácteo (CPS posee propiedades funcionales apropiadas para la elaboración de películas biopreservantes, siendo factible la incorporación de bacterias ácido lácticas (BAL productoras de sustancias tipo bacteriocina (STB y así, lograr un efecto controlador sobre Listeria monocytogenes al ser utilizada como cobertura sobre salmón ahumado. Las condiciones para la formación de la película fueron: CPS 12% p/v, glicerol 18% v/v, pH en solución formadora de película 7,0 y 8,0, y secado a 30°C por 16 horas. La actividad inhibitoria de la película incorporada con las cepas lácticas fue evaluada usando el método de difusión frente a un césped de L. monocytogenes y mediante el recuento en placa, obteniendo: la combinación de dos cepas BAL aumentó la actividad controladora sobre L. monocytogenes logrando reducir hasta 2,1 ciclos logarítmicos el crecimiento de este patógeno, bajo condiciones de refrigeración durante 15 días.The Whey protein concentrated (WPC has functional properties suitable for developing films biopreservantes. Thanks to the functional properties of its components, was feasible the incorporation of lactic acid bacteria (LAB producing substances type bacteriocins (STB and thus achieve and effective control Listeria monocytogenes to be applied on smoked salmon. The conditions for the formation of the film were: CPS 12% w/v, glycerol 18% v/v, pH of film-forming solution 7.0 and 8.0, and dried at 30°C for 16 hours. The study of inhibitory activity of the film incorporated with lactic strains was evaluated using the diffusion method against a lawn of L. monocytogenes and by plate counting, getting the combination BAL-A + B, increases the activity of controlling L. monocytogenes achieving 2.1 log units to reduce the growth of this pathogen under refrigeration for 15 days.

  8. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, B.; Reuter, S.; Taverna, M.; Fischer, M. R.; Schelling, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options. Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM). Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic. Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives. Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in regular teaching

  9. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel, B.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options.Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM. Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic.Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives.Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in

  10. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocins Activity Against Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Paula, Otávio Almeida Lino; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the activity of cell-free supernatant (CFS) containing bacteriocins on the formation and maintenance of biofilms developed by Listeria monocytogenes, and the associated effect of bacteriocins and ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on the formed biofilm. CFS from 9 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was tested for inhibitory activity against 85 L. monocytogenes isolates and 21 LAB strains. Then, 12 L. monocytogenes strains were selected based on genetic profiles and sensitivity to CFS and were subjected to an in vitro assay to assess biofilm formation in microtiter plates, considering different culture media and incubation conditions. Based on these results, 6 L. monocytogenes strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure to assess biofilm formation, being co-inoculated with CFS. In addition, these strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure, modified by adding the CFS after biofilm formation. Relevant decrease in biofilm formation was observed in the first experiment, but CFS added after biofilm formation did not eliminate them. CFS from Lactobacillus curvatus ET31 were selected due to its anti-biofilm activity, being associated to EDTA at different concentrations and tested for biofilm control of three strains of L. monocytogenes, using the same in vitro procedure described previously. Concentrated bacteriocin presented poor performance in eliminating formed biofilms, and EDTA concentration presented no evident interference on biofilm elimination. Twelve selected L. monocytogenes strains were positive for investigated virulence makers and negative for luxS gene, recognized as being involved in biofilm formation. Selected L. monocytogenes strains were able to produce biofilms under different conditions. CFSs have the potential to prevent biofilm formation, but they were not able to destroy already formed biofilms. Nevertheless, low concentrations of CFS combined with EDTA caused a relevant reduction in

  11. Oral immunization with recombinant listeria monocytogenes controls virus load after vaginal challenge with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-08-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and delivers an FIV Env-expressing DNA vaccine (LMgag/pND14-Lc-env). Control cats were either sham immunized or immunized with wild-type L. monocytogenes (LM-wt). At 1 year after vaginal challenge, provirus could not be detected in any of the nine tissues evaluated from cats immunized with the recombinant bacteria but was detected in at least one tissue in 8 of 10 control animals. Virus was isolated from bone marrow of four of five LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats by use of a stringent coculture system but required CD8(+) T-cell depletion, indicating CD8(+) T-cell suppression of virus replication. Control animals had an inverted CD4:CD8 ratio in mesenteric lymph node and were depleted of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) intestinal epithelial T cells, while LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized animals showed no such abnormalities. Vaginal FIV-specific immunoglobulin A was present at high titer in three LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats before challenge and in all five at 1 year postchallenge. This study demonstrates that recombinant L. monocytogenes conferred some control of viral load after vaginal challenge with FIV.

  12. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newman Mark J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at http://epitope.liai.org:8080/tools/population. Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine, and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups.

  13. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Construction and Application of Newcastle Disease Virus-Based Vector Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are able to stably express a wide-variety of heterologous antigens at relatively high levels in various species and are consequently considered as potent gene delivery vehicles. A single vaccination is frequently sufficient for the induction of robust humoral and cellular immune responses. Here we provide detailed methods for the construction and application of Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-based vector vaccines. The in silico design and in vitro rescue as well as the in vivo evaluation of NDV based vectors are described in this chapter.

  15. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  16. An insight into the isolation, enumeration and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Woan-Fei Law

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria Enrichment Broth (BLEB, Fraser broth and University of Vermont Medium (UVM Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as FDA-BAM, USDA-FSIS and ISO. Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, PALCAM, Oxford and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. MPN technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, DNA microarray and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labour-saving. In future, there are chances for the development of new techniques for the detection and identification of foodborne with improved features.

  17. An insight into the isolation, enumeration, and molecular detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen that can cause listeriosis through the consumption of food contaminated with this pathogen. The ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in extreme conditions and cause food contaminations have become a major concern. Hence, routine microbiological food testing is necessary to prevent food contamination and outbreaks of foodborne illness. This review provides insight into the methods for cultural detection, enumeration, and molecular identification of L. monocytogenes in various food samples. There are a number of enrichment and plating media that can be used for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from food samples. Enrichment media such as buffered Listeria enrichment broth, Fraser broth, and University of Vermont Medium (UVM) Listeria enrichment broth are recommended by regulatory agencies such as Food and Drug Administration-bacteriological and analytical method (FDA-BAM), US Department of Agriculture-Food and Safety (USDA-FSIS), and International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Many plating media are available for the isolation of L. monocytogenes, for instance, polymyxin acriflavin lithium-chloride ceftazidime aesculin mannitol, Oxford, and other chromogenic media. Besides, reference methods like FDA-BAM, ISO 11290 method, and USDA-FSIS method are usually applied for the cultural detection or enumeration of L. monocytogenes. most probable number technique is applied for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in the case of low level contamination. Molecular methods including polymerase chain reaction, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, real-time/quantitative polymerase chain reaction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, DNA microarray, and next generation sequencing technology for the detection and identification of L. monocytogenes are discussed in this review. Overall, molecular methods are rapid, sensitive, specific, time- and labor-saving. In future, there are

  18. Introducing Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to primary school children in North Jakarta, Indonesia, via an existent school-based vaccination platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agtini, M D; Ochiai, R L; Soeharno, R; Lee, H J; Sundoro, J; Hadinegoro, S R; Han, O P; Tana, L; Halim, F X S; Ghani, L; Delima; Lestari, W; Sintawati, F X; Kusumawardani, N; Malik, R; Santoso, T S; Nadjib, M; Soeroso, S; Wangsasaputra, F; Ali, M; Ivanoff, B; Galindo, C M; Pang, T; Clemens, J D; Suwandono, A; Acosta, C J

    2006-11-01

    To report results on coverage, safety and logistics of a large-scale, school-based Vi polysaccharide immunization campaign in North Jakarta. Of 443 primary schools in North Jakarta, Indonesia, 18 public schools were randomly selected for this study. Exclusion criteria were fever 37.5 degrees C or higher at the time of vaccination or a known history of hypersensitivity to any vaccine. Adverse events were monitored and recorded for 1 month after immunization. Because this was a pilot programme, resource use was tracked in detail. During the February 2004 vaccination campaign, 4828 students were immunized (91% of the target population); another 394 students (7%) were vaccinated during mop-up programmes. Informed consent was obtained for 98% of the target population. In all, 34 adverse events were reported, corresponding to seven events per 1000 doses injected; none was serious. The manufacturer recommended cold chain was maintained throughout the programme. This demonstration project in two sub-districts of North Jakarta shows that a large-scale, school-based typhoid fever Vi polysaccharide vaccination campaign is logistically feasible, safe and minimally disruptive to regular school activities, when used in the context of an existing successful immunization platform. The project had high parental acceptance. Nonetheless, policy-relevant questions still need to be answered before implementing a widespread Vi polysaccharide vaccine programme in Indonesia.

  19. Peptide-based subunit vaccine against hookworm infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Skwarczynski

    Full Text Available Hookworms infect more people than HIV and malaria combined, predominantly in third world countries. Treatment of infection with chemotherapy can have limited efficacy and re-infections after treatment are common. Heavy infection often leads to debilitating diseases. All these factors suggest an urgent need for development of vaccine. In an attempt to develop a vaccine targeting the major human hookworm, Necator americanus, a B-cell peptide epitope was chosen from the apical enzyme in the hemoglobin digestion cascade, the aspartic protease Na-APR-1. The A(291Y alpha helical epitope is known to induce neutralizing antibodies that inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1, thus reducing the capacity for hookworms to digest hemoglobin and obtain nutrients. A(291Y was engineered such that it was flanked on both termini by a coil-promoting sequence to maintain native conformation, and subsequently incorporated into a Lipid Core Peptide (LCP self-adjuvanting system. While A(291Y alone or the chimeric epitope with or without Freund's adjuvants induced negligible IgG responses, the LCP construct incorporating the chimeric peptide induced a strong IgG response in mice. Antibodies produced were able to bind to and completely inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1. The results presented show that the new chimeric LCP construct can induce effective enzyme-neutralising antibodies in mice, without the help of any additional toxic adjuvants. This approach offers promise for the development of vaccines against helminth parasites of humans and their livestock and companion animals.

  20. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan; Claesson, Mogens; Nielsen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction...... of responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....

  1. Listeriosis outbreak in dairy cattle caused by an unusual Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundrant, Brittany N; Hutchins, Tony; den Bakker, Henk C; Fortes, Esther; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A listeriosis outbreak, in dairy cattle, with a high case mortality and acute death after onset of symptoms was investigated using gross pathology and bacteriologic approaches, including molecular characterization of a clinical Listeria monocytogenes isolate. In a herd of 315 animals, 9 animals showed clinical symptoms consistent with listeriosis, including 3 animals that died within 2-4 days after acute onset of clinical signs, 4 animals that were euthanized, and 2 that survived. Initial EcoRI ribotyping and serotyping indicated that this outbreak was caused by an unusual L. monocytogenes serotype 4b strain, which was classified into lineage III. Further characterization of this isolate by DNA sequencing-based subtyping methods indicated that the strain responsible for this outbreak represented a unique genotype as supported by its classification into a new sigB allelic type, which has not been identified previously among >290 isolates, and by compelling phylogenetic evidence. While lineage III isolates are generally rare, they seem to be more common among L. monocytogenes isolates from animals with clinical signs of listeriosis. This is the first report of a particularly severe clinical course of disease associated with infection by a lineage III strain. The high prevalence of Listeria spp., including L. monocytogenes, in the farm environments may favor emergence and evolution of novel, and possibly more virulent, L. monocytogenes strains. Continued monitoring of animal listeriosis cases and outbreaks may not only improve animal health but also aid in the early discovery of newly emerging L. monocytogenes strains.

  2. Effect of honokiol on exotoxin proteins listeriolysin O and p60 secreted by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rizeng; Zhao, Ziwen; Guo, Na; Liu, Zonghui; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Wenli; Li, Xiaoxu; Shi, Ce; Nie, Dandan; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Tao; Ma, Wenchen; Yu, Lu; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is considered one of the most important foodborne pathogens. The virulence-related proteins listeriolysin O (LLO) and p60 are critical factors involved in Listeria pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of honokiol on LLO and p60 secreted from L. monocytogenes. A listeriolysin assay was used to investigate the haemolytic activities of L. monocytogenes exposed to honokiol, and the secretion of LLO and p60 was detected by immunoblot analysis. Additionally, the influence of honokiol on the transcription of LLO and p60 genes (hly and iap, respectively) was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR. TNF-α release assays were performed to elucidate the biological relevance of changes in LLO and p60 secretion induced by honokiol. According to the data, honokiol showed good anti-L. monocytogenes activity, with MICs of 8-16 μg ml(-1), and the secretion of LLO and p60 was decreased by honokiol. In addition, the transcription of hly and iap was inhibited by honokiol. Our results indicate that TNF-α production by RAW264.7 cells stimulated with L. monocytogenes supernatants was inhibited by honokiol. Based on these data, we propose that honokiol could be used as a promising natural compound against L. monocytogenes and its virulence factors.

  3. [PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF LIVE RECOMBINANT ANTHRAX VACCINES BASED ON OPPORTUNISTIC AND APATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, P Yu; Mikshis, N I

    2016-01-01

    Live genetic engineering anthrax vaccines on the platform of avirulent and probiotic micro-organisms are a safe and adequate alternative to preparations based on attenuated Bacillus anthracis strains. Mucosal application results in a direct contact of the vaccine preparations with mucous membranes in those organs arid tissues of the macro-organisms, that are exposed to the pathogen in the first place, resulting in a development of local and systemic immune response. Live recombinant anthrax vaccines could be used both separately as well as in a prime-boost immunization scheme. The review focuses on immunogenic and protective properties of experimental live genetic engineering prearations, created based on members of geni of Salmonella, Lactobacillus and adenoviruses.

  4. Enhanced protection against Ebola virus mediated by an improved adenovirus-based vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Richardson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ebola virus is transmitted by direct contact with bodily fluids of infected individuals, eliciting death rates as high as 90% among infected humans. Currently, replication defective adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine is being studied in a phase I clinical trial. Another Ebola vaccine, based on an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus has shown efficacy in post-exposure treatment of nonhuman primates to Ebola infection. In this report, we modified the common recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based Ebola vaccine expressing the wild-type ZEBOV glycoprotein sequence from a CMV promoter (Ad-CMVZGP. The immune response elicited by this improved expression cassette vector (Ad-CAGoptZGP and its ability to afford protection against lethal ZEBOV challenge in mice was compared to the standard Ad-CMVZGP vector. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ad-CMVZGP was previously shown to protect mice, guinea pigs and nonhuman primates from an otherwise lethal challenge of Zaire ebolavirus. The antigenic expression cassette of this vector was improved through codon optimization, inclusion of a consensus Kozak sequence and reconfiguration of a CAG promoter (Ad-CAGoptZGP. Expression of GP from Ad-CAGoptZGP was substantially higher than from Ad-CMVZGP. Ad-CAGoptZGP significantly improved T and B cell responses at doses 10 to 100-fold lower than that needed with Ad-CMVZGP. Additionally, Ad-CAGoptZGP afforded full protections in mice against lethal challenge at a dose 100 times lower than the dose required for Ad-CMVZGP. Finally, Ad-CAGoptZGP induced full protection to mice when given 30 minutes post-challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We describe an improved adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine capable of affording post-exposure protection against lethal challenge in mice. The molecular modifications of the new improved vaccine also translated in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses and complete protection at a dose 100 times lower than with the

  5. Liposome-based intranasal delivery of lipopeptide vaccine candidates against group A streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffar, Khairunnisa Abdul; Marasini, Nirmal; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Batzloff, Michael R; Good, Michael F; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-09-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), an exclusively human pathogen, causes a wide range of diseases ranging from trivial to life threatening. Treatment of infection is often ineffective following entry of bacteria into the bloodstream. To date, there is no vaccine available against GAS. In this study, cationic liposomes encapsulating lipopeptide-based vaccine candidates against GAS have been employed for intranasal vaccine delivery. Cationic liposomes were prepared with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) using the film hydration method. Female Swiss mice were immunized intranasally with the liposomes. In contrast to unmodified peptides, lipopeptides entrapped by liposomes induced both mucosal and systemic immunity, IgA and IgG (IgG1 and IgG2a) production in mice, respectively. High levels of antibody (IgA and IgG) titres were detected even five months post immunization. Thus, the combination of lipopeptides and liposomes generates a very promising delivery system for intranasal vaccines. Group A streptococcus, causing rheumatic heart diseases, kills approximately half a million people annually. There is no vaccine available against the infection. Mucosal immunity is vital in ensuring an individual is protected as this gram positive bacteria initially colonizes at the throat. Herein, we demonstrated that lipopeptides entrapped by liposomes induced both mucosal and systemic immunity. High levels of antibody (IgA and IgG) titres were detected even five months post immunization and lead vaccine candidate was able to induce humoral immune responses even after single immunization. Thus, the combination of lipopeptides and liposomes generates a very promising delivery system for intranasal vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based ebola vaccine is well-tolerated and protects immunocompromised nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Geisbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. A concern that has been raised regarding the replication-competent VSV vectors that express EBOV glycoproteins is how these vectors would be tolerated by individuals with altered or compromised immune systems such as patients infected with HIV. This is especially important as all EBOV outbreaks to date have occurred in areas of Central and Western Africa with high HIV incidence rates in the population. In order to address this concern, we evaluated the safety of the recombinant VSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP in six rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV. All six animals showed no evidence of illness associated with the VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP vaccine, suggesting that this vaccine may be safe in immunocompromised populations. While one goal of the study was to evaluate the safety of the candidate vaccine platform, it was also of interest to determine if altered immune status would affect vaccine efficacy. The vaccine protected 4 of 6 SHIV-infected macaques from death following ZEBOV challenge. Evaluation of CD4+ T cells in all animals showed that the animals that succumbed to lethal ZEBOV challenge had the lowest CD4+ counts, suggesting that CD4+ T cells may play a role in mediating protection against ZEBOV.

  7. Strain Selection for Generation of O-Antigen-Based Glycoconjugate Vaccines against Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lanzilao

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, are a major cause of invasive bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa with no vaccine currently available. Conjugation of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to a carrier protein constitutes a promising vaccination strategy. Here we describe a rational process to select the most appropriate isolates of Salmonella as source of O-antigen for developing a bivalent glycoconjugate vaccine. We screened a library of 30 S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis in order to identify the most suitable strains for large scale O-antigen production and generation of conjugate vaccines. Initial screening was based on growth characteristics, safety profile of the isolates, O-antigen production, and O-antigen characteristics in terms of molecular size, O-acetylation and glucosylation level and position, as determined by phenol sulfuric assay, NMR, HPLC-SEC and HPAEC-PAD. Three animal isolates for each serovar were identified and used to synthesize candidate glycoconjugate vaccines, using CRM197 as carrier protein. The immunogenicity of these conjugates and the functional activity of the induced antibodies was investigated by ELISA, serum bactericidal assay and flow cytometry. S. Typhimurium O-antigen showed high structural diversity, including O-acetylation of rhamnose in a Malawian invasive strain generating a specific immunodominant epitope. S. Typhimurium conjugates provoked an anti-O-antigen response primarily against the O:5 determinant. O-antigen from S. Enteritidis was structurally more homogeneous than from S. Typhimurium, and no idiosyncratic antibody responses were detected for the S. Enteritidis conjugates. Of the three initially selected isolates, two S. Typhimurium (1418 and 2189 and two S. Enteritidis (502 and 618 strains generated glycoconjugates able to induce high specific antibody levels with high breadth of serovar-specific strain coverage, and were selected for use in vaccine

  8. Statistical methods for down-selection of treatment regimens based on multiple endpoints, with application to HIV vaccine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Gilbert, Peter B; Fu, Rong; Janes, Holly

    2016-09-20

    SummaryBiomarker endpoints measuring vaccine-induced immune responses are essential to HIV vaccine development because of their potential to predict the effect of a vaccine in preventing HIV infection. A vaccine's immune response profile observed in phase I immunogenicity studies is a key factor in determining whether it is advanced for further study in phase II and III efficacy trials. The multiplicity of immune variables and scientific uncertainty in their relative importance, however, pose great challenges to the development of formal algorithms for selecting vaccines to study further. Motivated by the practical need to identify a set of promising vaccines from a pool of candidate regimens for inclusion in an upcoming HIV vaccine efficacy trial, we propose a new statistical framework for the selection of vaccine regimens based on their immune response profile. In particular, we propose superiority and non-redundancy criteria to be achieved in down-selection, and develop novel statistical algorithms that integrate hypothesis testing and ranking for selecting vaccine regimens satisfying these criteria. Performance of the proposed selection algorithms are evaluated through extensive numerical studies. We demonstrate the application of the proposed methods through the comparison of immune responses between several HIV vaccine regimens. The methods are applicable to general down-selection applications in clinical trials.

  9. In vitro innate immune cell based models to assess whole cell Bordetella pertussis vaccine quality: a proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonakker, M E; Verhagen, L M; Hendriksen, C F M; van Els, C A C M; Vandebriel, R J; Sloots, A; Han, W G H

    2015-03-01

    Lot release testing of vaccines is primarily based on animal models that are costly, time-consuming and sometimes of questionable relevance. In order to reduce animal use, functional in vitro assays are being explored as an alternative approach for the current lot release testing paradigm. In this study, we present an evaluation of APC platforms assessing innate immune activation by whole cell Bordetella pertussis (wP) vaccines. Primary monocytes, monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and human monocyte/DC cell lines (MonoMac6 and MUTZ-3) were compared for their capacity to respond to wP vaccines of varying quality. To produce such vaccines, the production process of wP was manipulated, resulting in wP vaccines covering a range of in vivo potencies. The responses of MUTZ-3 cells and primary monocytes to these vaccines were marginal and these models were therefore considered inappropriate. Importantly, moDC and MonoMac6 cells responded to the wP vaccines and discriminated between vaccines of varying quality, although slight variations in the responses to wP vaccines of similar quality were also observed. This study provides a proof of principle for the use of in vitro APC platforms as part of a new strategy to assess wP vaccine lot consistency, though careful standardisation of assay conditions is necessary.

  10. Targeting of the central nervous system by Listeria monocytogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Among bacteria that reach the central nervous system (CNS), Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is one of deadliest, in human and ruminant. This facultative intracellular bacterium has the particularity to induce meningitis, meningoencephalitis and rhombencephalitis. Mechanisms by which Lm accesses the CNS remain poorly understood, but two major routes of infection have been proposed, based on clinical, in vitro and in vivo observations. A retrograde neural route is likely to occur in ruminants upon ...

  11. Gene-based vaccines and immunotherapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases: Potential utility and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrna, Jeremy J; Ugen, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent expansion of vaccination and immunotherapeutic strategies from controlling infectious diseases to the targeting of non-infectious conditions including neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to conventional vaccine and immunotherapeutic modalities, gene-based methods that express antigens for presentation to the immune system by either live viral vectors or non-viral naked DNA plasmids have been developed and evaluated. This mini-review/commentary summarizes the advantages and disadvantages, as well as the research findings to date, of both of these gene-based vaccination approaches in terms of how they can be targeted against appropriate antigens within the Alzheimer and Parkinson disease pathogenesis processes as well as potentially against targets in other neurodegenerative diseases. Most recently, the novel utilization of these viral vector and naked DNA gene-based technologies includes the delivery of immunoglobulin genes from established biologically active monoclonal antibodies. This modified passive immunotherapeutic strategy has recently been applied to deliver passive antibody immunotherapy against the pathologically relevant amyloid β protein in Alzheimer disease. The advantages and disadvantages of this technological application of gene-based immune interventions, as well as research findings to date are also summarized. In sum, it is suggested that further evaluation of gene based vaccines and immunotherapies against neurodegenerative diseases are warranted to determine their potential clinical utility.

  12. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  13. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Hamada F; Dai, Guixiang; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad) vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC). DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  14. A school-based human papillomavirus vaccination program in barretos, Brazil: final results of a demonstrative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro Fregnani

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The implementation of a public HPV vaccination program in several developing countries, especially in Latin America, is a great challenge for health care specialists. AIM: To evaluate the uptake and the three-dose completion rates of a school-based HPV vaccination program in Barretos (Brazil. METHODS: THE STUDY INCLUDED GIRLS WHO WERE ENROLLED IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS AND WHO REGULARLY ATTENDED THE SIXTH AND SEVENTH GRADES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (MEAN AGE: 11.9 years. A meeting with the parents or guardians occurred approximately one week before the vaccination in order to explain the project and clarify the doubts. The quadrivalent vaccine was administered using the same schedule as in the product package (0-2-6 months. The school visits for regular vaccination occurred on previously scheduled dates. The vaccine was also made available at Barretos Cancer Hospital for the girls who could not be vaccinated on the day when the team visited the school. RESULTS: Among the potential candidates for vaccination (n = 1,574, the parents or guardians of 1,513 girls (96.1% responded to the invitation to participate in the study. A total of 1,389 parents or guardians agreed to participate in the program (acceptance rate = 91.8%. The main reason for refusing to participate in the vaccination program was fear of adverse events. The vaccine uptake rates for the first, second, and third doses were 87.5%, 86.3% and 85.0%, respectively. The three-dose completion rate was 97.2%. CONCLUSIONS: This demonstrative study achieved high rates of vaccination uptake and completion of three vaccine doses in children 10-16 years old from Brazil. The feasibility and success of an HPV vaccination program for adolescents in a developing country may depend on the integration between the public health and schooling systems.

  15. Toolbox for non-intrusive structural and functional analysis of recombinant VLP based vaccines: a case study with hepatitis B vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke M Mulder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fundamental to vaccine development, manufacturing consistency, and product stability is an understanding of the vaccine structure-activity relationship. With the virus-like particle (VLP approach for recombinant vaccines gaining popularity, there is growing demand for tools that define their key characteristics. We assessed a suite of non-intrusive VLP epitope structure and function characterization tools by application to the Hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg VLP-based vaccine. METHODOLOGY: The epitope-specific immune reactivity of rHBsAg epitopes to a given monoclonal antibody was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR and quantitatively analyzed on rHBsAg VLPs in-solution or bound to adjuvant with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The structure of recombinant rHBsAg particles was examined by cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM and in-solution atomic force microscopy (AFM. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SPR and competitive ELISA determined relative antigenicity in solution, in real time, with rapid turn-around, and without the need of dissolving the particulate aluminum based adjuvant. These methods demonstrated the nature of the clinically relevant epitopes of HBsAg as being responsive to heat and/or redox treatment. In-solution AFM and cryoTEM determined vaccine particle size distribution, shape, and morphology. Redox-treated rHBsAg enabled 3D reconstruction from CryoTEM images--confirming the previously proposed octahedral structure and the established lipid-to-protein ratio of HBsAg particles. Results from these non-intrusive biophysical and immunochemical analyses coalesced into a comprehensive understanding of rHBsAg vaccine epitope structure and function that was important for assuring the desired epitope formation, determinants for vaccine potency, and particle stability during vaccine design, development, and manufacturing. SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the methods presented here comprise a novel

  16. Structure-based vaccines provide protection in a mouse model of ehrlichiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Thomas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent advances in bioinformatics have made it possible to predict the B cell and T cell epitopes of antigenic proteins. This has led to design of peptide based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. The obligately intracellular gram negative bacteria Ehrlichia cause ehrlichioses in humans and animals. As yet there are no vaccines to protect against Ehrlichia infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied the principle of structural vaccinology to design peptides to the epitopes of Ehrlichia muris outer membrane P28-19 (OMP-1/P28 and Ehrlichia Heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60/GroEL antigenic proteins. Both P28-19 and Ehrlichia Hsp60 peptides reacted with polyclonal antibodies against E. canis and E. chaffeensis and could be used as a diagnostic tool for ehrlichiosis. In addition, we demonstrated that mice vaccinated with Ehrlichia P28-19 and Hsp60 peptides and later challenged with E. muris were protected against the pathogen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the power of structural vaccines and could be a new strategy in the development of vaccines to provide protection against pathogenic microorganisms.

  17. Immunostimulation by synthetic lipopeptide based vaccine candidates: structure-activity relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehfuz eZaman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptide based vaccines offer several advantages over conventional whole organism or protein approaches by offering improved purity and specificity in inducing immune response. However, peptides alone are generally non-immunogenic. Concerns remain about the toxicity of adjuvants which are critical for immunogenicity of synthetic peptides. The use of lipopeptides in peptide vaccines is currently under intensive investigation because potent immune responses can be generated without the use of adjuvant (thus are self-adjuvanting. Several lipopeptides derived from microbial origin, and their synthetic versions or simpler fatty acid moieties impart this self-adjuvanting activity by signalling via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Engagement of this innate immune receptor on antigen-presenting cell leads to the initiation and development of potent immune responses. Therefore optimization of lipopeptides to enhance TLR2-mediated activation is a promising strategy for vaccine development. Considerable structure-activity relationships that determine TLR2 binding and consequent stimulation of innate immune responses have been investigated for a range of lipopeptides. In this review we address the development of lipopeptide vaccines, mechanism of TLR2 recognition, and immune activation. An overview is provided of the best studied lipopeptide vaccine systems.

  18. Hospital-based influenza vaccination of children: an opportunity to prevent subsequent hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Danielle M; Englund, Janet A; Robertson, Andrea S; Marcuse, Edgar K; Garrison, Michelle M; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2008-02-01

    We performed this study to determine the frequency of previous hospitalization among children hospitalized with influenza. The Pediatric Health Information System database (discharges that occurred between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2006) was used to determine the proportion of children hospitalized with influenza or respiratory illness who had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Subjects included pediatric patients (through 18 years of age). The index hospitalization was defined as the first influenza or respiratory illness hospitalization for a child that occurred during the study period and between November 1 and April 30. A previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season was defined as a hospitalization for any reason in the 0.5 to 6 months before the index hospitalization but not before September 1 or on or after March 1. Overall, 16% of children hospitalized with influenza and 12% of children hospitalized with influenza or a respiratory illness had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Approximately 23% of the children hospitalized with influenza and a comorbidity had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Hospital-based programs for influenza vaccination have the potential to reach children at highest risk of influenza complications and to reduce the rates of pediatric hospitalization for treatment of influenza-related illness.

  19. Comparison of serological and sequence-based methods for typing feline calcivirus isolates from vaccine failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, A D; Dawson, S; Wharmby, C; Ryvar, R; Gaskell, R M

    2000-01-29

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) can be typed by exploiting antigenic differences between isolates or, more recently, by the sequence analysis of a hypervariable region of the virus's capsid gene. These two methods were used to characterise FCV isolates from 20 vaccine failures which occurred after the use of a commercial, live-attenuated vaccine. Using virus neutralisation, the isolates showed a spectrum of relatedness to the vaccine; depending on the criterion adopted for identity, 10 to 40 per cent of them appeared to be similar to the vaccine virus. Using sequence analysis, the isolates fell into one of two categories; 20 per cent had a similar sequence to the vaccine (0-67 to 2-67 per cent distant), and the remainder had a dissimilar sequence (21-3 to 36-0 per cent distant). Sequence analysis identified one cat that appeared to be infected with two distinct FCVs. The serological and sequence-based typing methods gave the same result in 80 to 95 per cent of individual cases, depending on the criterion adopted for serological identity. It is suggested that molecular typing is a more definitive method for characterising the relatedness of FCV isolates.

  20. Using Community Engagement to Develop a Web-Based Intervention for Latinos about the HPV Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, Julie A; Jimenez-Zambrano, Andrea M; Albright, Karen; Dempsey, Amanda F

    2017-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is pervasive among sexually active women and men, and Hispanic women are at particularly high risk as they have higher rates of invasive cervical cancer compared to other racial or ethnic groups in the United States. There is a need for interventions to increase HPV vaccination among this high-risk population. This study investigated how to modify a previously developed web-based intervention that provided individually tailored information about HPV to improve its use among the Latino population. A community-oriented modification approach incorporated feedback from a community advisory committee, and focus groups among the Latino population, to modify the intervention. Several themes emerged including a need for basic information about HPV and HPV vaccination, changes to make the intervention appear less clinical, and incorporation of information addressing barriers specific to the Latino community. This work was done in preparation for a randomized trial to assess the impact of this modified intervention on HPV vaccination attitudes and uptake among Latino young adults and parents of adolescents. If effective, our intervention could be a resource for reducing HPV vaccination concerns, improving immunization rates, and educating Latinos about HPV and the HPV vaccine outside of the time boundaries of the traditional clinical encounter.

  1. How HIV-1 entry mechanism and broadly neutralizing antibodies guide structure-based vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancera, Marie; Changela, Anita; Kwong, Peter D

    2017-05-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) remains to be developed. Here, we review how knowledge of bNAbs and HIV-1 entry mechanism is guiding the structure-based design of vaccine immunogens and immunization regimens. Isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected donors has led to an unprecedented understanding of the sites of vulnerability that these antibodies target on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) as well as of the immunological pathways that these antibody lineages follow to develop broad and potent neutralization. Sites of vulnerability, however, reside in the context of diverse Env conformations required for HIV-1 entry, including a prefusion-closed state, a single-CD4-bound intermediate, a three-CD4-bound intermediate, a prehairpin intermediate and postfusion states, and it is not always clear which structural state optimally presents a particular site of vulnerability in the vaccine context. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of immunological pathways has led to debate among vaccine developers as to how much of the natural antibody-developmental pathway immunogens should mimic, ranging from only the recognized epitope to multiple antigens from the antibody-virus coevolution process. A plethora of information on bNAbs is guiding HIV-1-vaccine development. We highlight consideration of the appropriate structural context from the HIV-1-entry mechanism and extraordinary progress with replicating template B-cell ontogenies.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes en comidas preparadas

    OpenAIRE

    Vila Brugalla, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Tradicionalmente Listeria monocytogenes no era considerado como un importante patógeno transmitido a través de los alimentos y, en consecuencia, no había recibido mucha atención por parte de la industria alimentaria. Los índices de listeriosis en la población humana siempre habían estado enormemente ensombrecidos por otras enfermedades transmitidas por los alimentos como la salmonelosis o la campilobacterosis, y la confirmación de brotes era poco frecuente. Sin embargo, los brotes de listerio...

  3. Anti-tumor effects of a human VEGFR-2-based DNA vaccine in mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    XIE, KE; Bai, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Yang; Liu, Quan; Liu,Kang; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor, VEGFR-2 (Flk-1/KDR), play a key role in tumor angiogenesis. Blocking the VEGF-VEGFR-2 pathway may inhibit tumor growth. Here, we used human VEGFR-2 as a model antigen to explore the feasibility of immunotherapy with a plasmid DNA vaccine based on a xenogeneic homologue of this receptor. Methods The protective effects and therapeutic anti-tumor immunity mediated by the DNA vaccine were investigated in mouse models. Anti-ang...

  4. Cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein protects nonhuman primates from Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Murphy, Aisling A; Feldmann, Friederike; Parkins, Christopher J; Haddock, Elaine; Hanley, Patrick W; Emery, Matthew J; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A

    2016-02-15

    Ebolaviruses pose significant public health problems due to their high lethality, unpredictable emergence, and localization to the poorest areas of the world. In addition to implementation of standard public health control procedures, a number of experimental human vaccines are being explored as a further means for outbreak control. Recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors are a novel vaccine platform that have been shown to induce substantial levels of durable, but primarily T-cell-biased responses against the encoded heterologous target antigen. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of rhesus CMV (RhCMV) expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) to provide protective immunity to rhesus macaques against lethal EBOV challenge. Surprisingly, vaccination was associated with high levels of GP-specific antibodies, but with no detectable GP-directed cellular immunity.

  5. A history of fish vaccination: science-based disease prevention in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudding, Roar; Van Muiswinkel, Willem B

    2013-12-01

    Disease prevention and control are crucial in order to maintain a sustainable aquaculture, both economically and environmentally. Prophylactic measures based on stimulation of the immune system of the fish have been an effective measure for achieving this goal. Immunoprophylaxis has become an important part in the successful development of the fish-farming industry. The first vaccine for aquaculture, a vaccine for prevention of yersiniosis in salmonid fish, was licensed in USA in 1976. Since then the use of vaccines has expanded to new countries and new species simultaneous with the growth of the aquaculture industry. This paper gives an overview of the achievements in fish vaccinology with particular emphasis on immunoprophylaxis as a practical tool for a successful development of bioproduction of aquatic animals.

  6. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine provides long-lasting protection against lethal Ebola virus challenge after a single dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yoshimi; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Feldmann, Friederike; Botto, Sara; Ball, Susan; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Ebola virus (Zaire ebolavirus; EBOV) is a highly lethal hemorrhagic disease virus that most recently was responsible for two independent 2014 outbreaks in multiple countries in Western Africa, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, respectively. Herein, we show that a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine provides durable protective immunity from Ebola virus following a single vaccine dose. This study has implications for human vaccination against ebolaviruses, as well as for development of a 'disseminating' vaccine to target these viruses in wild African great apes.

  7. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine effectiveness against high‐grade cervical lesions by age at vaccination: A population‐based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Karin; Ploner, Alexander; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Sparén, Pär; Arnheim‐Dahlström, Lisen

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16/18, included in HPV vaccines, contribute to the majority of cervical cancer, and a substantial proportion of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades 2/3 or worse (CIN2+/CIN3+) including adenocarcinoma in situ or worse. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccination on incidence of CIN2+ and CIN3+. A nationwide cohort of girls and young women resident in Sweden 2006–2013 and aged 13–29 (n = 1,333,691) was followed for vaccination and histologically confirmed high‐grade cervical lesions. Data were collected using the Swedish nationwide healthcare registers. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and vaccine effectiveness [(1‐IRR)x100%] comparing fully vaccinated with unvaccinated individuals. IRRs were adjusted for attained age and parental education, and stratified on vaccination initiation age. Effectiveness against CIN2+ was 75% (IRR = 0.25, 95%CI = 0.18–0.35) for those initiating vaccination before age 17, and 46% (IRR = 0.54, 95%CI = 0.46–0.64) and 22% (IRR = 0.78, 95%CI = 0.65–0.93) for those initiating vaccination at ages 17–19, and at ages 20–29, respectively. Vaccine effectiveness against CIN3+ was similar to vaccine effectiveness against CIN2+. Results were robust for both women participating to the organized screening program and for women at prescreening ages. We show high effectiveness of qHPV vaccination on CIN2+ and CIN3+ lesions, with greater effectiveness observed in girls younger at vaccination initiation. Continued monitoring of impact of HPV vaccination in the population is needed in order to evaluate both long‐term vaccine effectiveness and to evaluate whether the vaccination program achieves anticipated effects in prevention of invasive cervical cancer. PMID:26856527

  8. Improving therapeutic HPV peptide-based vaccine potency by enhancing CD4+ T help and dendritic cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Chien-Fu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV represents an opportunity to control cervical cancer. Peptide-based vaccines targeting HPV E6 and/or E7 antigens while safe, will most likely require additional strategies to enhance the vaccine potency. Methods We tested the HPV-16 E7 peptide-based vaccine in combination with a strategy to enhance CD4+ T help using a Pan HLA-DR epitope (PADRE peptide and a strategy to enhance dendritic cell activation using the toll-like receptor 3 ligand, poly(I:C. Results We observed that mice vaccinated with E7 peptide-based vaccine in combination with PADRE peptide and poly(I:C generated better E7-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses as well as significantly improved therapeutic anti-tumor effects against TC-1 tumors compared to E7 peptide-based vaccine with either PADRE peptide or poly(I:C alone. Furthermore, we found that intratumoral vaccination with the E7 peptide in conjunction with PADRE peptide and poly(I:C generates a significantly higher frequency of E7-specific CD8+ T cells as well as better survival compared to subcutaneous vaccination with the same regimen in treated mice. Conclusions The combination of PADRE peptide and poly(I:C with antigenic peptide is capable of generating potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses and antitumor effects in vaccinated mice. Our study has significant clinical implications for peptide-based vaccination.

  9. Imitation dynamics of vaccine decision-making behaviours based on the game theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyuan; Martcheva, Maia; Chen, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    Based on game theory, we propose an age-structured model to investigate the imitation dynamics of vaccine uptake. We first obtain the existence and local stability of equilibria. We show that Hopf bifurcation can occur. We also establish the global stability of the boundary equilibria and persistence of the disease. The theoretical results are supported by numerical simulations.

  10. Association of School-Based Influenza Vaccination Clinics and School Absenteeism--Arkansas, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquelais, Rachel E.; Safi, Haytham; Butler, Sandra; Smith, Nathaniel; Haselow, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of seasonal viral respiratory illness among school-aged children. Accordingly, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) coordinates >800 school-based influenza immunization clinics before each influenza season. We quantified the relationship between student influenza vaccination in Arkansas public schools…

  11. History of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  12. Carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines: target cancer with sugar bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2012-08-01

    With the booming development of glycobiology and glycochemistry, more and more structures of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are identified. Their broad expression and high specificity in cancer make them important targets to develop cancer vaccines or immunotherapies. However, most of the TACAs are T cell-independent antigens, they cannot elicit a powerful enough immune response to prevent or treat cancer. Immunotolerance and immunosuppression are more easily induced due to their endogenous properties and the declining immunity of the patients. This review summarizes the recent efforts to overcome these obstacles: coupling the carbohydrate antigens to proper carriers such as proteins or some small molecule carriers, and chemically modifying the structures of the TACAs to enhance the immunogenicity of TACAs and break the immunotolerance.

  13. Population-level impact of the bivalent, quadrivalent, and nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccines: a model-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Nicolas; Boily, Marie-Claude; Drolet, Mélanie; Franco, Eduardo L; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Kliewer, Erich V; Coutlée, François; Laprise, Jean-François; Malagón, Talía; Brisson, Marc

    2012-11-21

    Bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are now licensed in several countries. Furthermore, clinical trials examining the efficacy of a nonavalent vaccine are underway. We aimed to compare the potential population-level effectiveness of the bivalent, quadrivalent, and candidate nonavalent HPV vaccines. We developed an individual-based, transmission-dynamic model of HPV infection and disease in a population stratified by age, gender, sexual activity, and screening behavior. The model was calibrated to highly stratified sexual behavior, HPV epidemiology, and cervical screening data from Canada. Under base case assumptions, vaccinating 12-year-old girls (70% coverage) with the bivalent (quadrivalent) vaccine is predicted to reduce the cumulative incidence of anogenital warts (AGWs) by 0.0% (72.1%), diagnosed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions 2 and 3 (CIN2 and -3) by 51.0% (46.1%), and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by 31.9% (30.5%), over 70 years. Changing from a bivalent (quadrivalent) to a nonavalent vaccine is predicted to reduce the cumulative number of AGW episodes by an additional 66.7% (0.0%), CIN2 and -3 episodes by an additional 9.3% (12.5%), and SCC cases by an additional 4.8% (6.6%) over 70 years. Differences in predicted population-level effectiveness between the vaccines were most sensitive to duration of protection and the time horizon of analysis. The vaccines produced similar effectiveness at preventing noncervical HPV-related cancers. The bivalent vaccine is expected to be slightly more effective at preventing CIN2 and -3 and SCC in the longer term, whereas the quadrivalent vaccine is expected to substantially reduce AGW cases shortly after the start of vaccination programs. Switching to a nonavalent vaccine has the potential to further reduce precancerous lesions and cervical cancer.

  14. Vaccination with experimental feline immunodeficiency virus vaccines, based on autologous infected cells, elicits enhancement of homologous challenge infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Karlas (Jos); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); M.A. van Peer (Maartje); W. Huisman (Willem); A.M. Cuisinier; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCats were vaccinated with fixed autologous feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cells in order to present viral proteins to the immune system of individual cats in an MHC-matched fashion. Upon vaccination, a humoral response against Gag was induced. Furthermore, virus-neutralizin

  15. Vaccination with experimental feline immunodeficiency virus vaccines, based on autologous infected cells, elicits enhancement of homologous challenge infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Karlas (Jos); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); M.A. Peer; W. Huisman (Willem); A.M. Cuisinier; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCats were vaccinated with fixed autologous feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cells in order to present viral proteins to the immune system of individual cats in an MHC-matched fashion. Upon vaccination, a humoral response against Gag was induced. Furthermore,

  16. Architectural insight into inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs) and development of IAV-based vaccines inducing humoral and cellular responses: implications in HIV-1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassapis, Kyriakos A; Stylianou, Dora C; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-12-01

    Inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs) are engineered, non-lytic, filamentous bacteriophages that are assembled primarily from thousands of copies of the major coat protein gp8 and just five copies of each of the four minor coat proteins gp3, gp6, gp7 and gp9. Inovirus display studies have shown that the architecture of inoviruses makes all coat proteins of the inoviral particle accessible to the outside. This particular feature of IAVs allows foreign antigenic peptides to be displayed on the outer surface of the virion fused to its coat proteins and for more than two decades has been exploited in many applications including antibody or peptide display libraries, drug design, and vaccine development against infectious and non-infectious diseases. As vaccine carriers, IAVs have been shown to elicit both a cellular and humoral response against various pathogens through the display of antibody epitopes on their coat proteins. Despite their high immunogenicity, the goal of developing an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has not yet materialized. One possible limitation of previous efforts was the use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which exhibited autoreactivity properties. In the past five years, however, new, more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that do not exhibit autoreactivity properties have been isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, suggesting that vaccination strategies aimed at producing such broadly neutralizing antibodies may confer protection against infection. The utilization of these new, broadly neutralizing antibodies in combination with the architectural traits of IAVs have driven the current developments in the design of an inovirus-based vaccine against HIV-1. This article reviews the applications of IAVs in vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the design of inoviral-based vaccines against HIV-1.

  17. Architectural Insight into Inovirus-Associated Vectors (IAVs and Development of IAV-Based Vaccines Inducing Humoral and Cellular Responses: Implications in HIV-1 Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos A. Hassapis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs are engineered, non-lytic, filamentous bacteriophages that are assembled primarily from thousands of copies of the major coat protein gp8 and just five copies of each of the four minor coat proteins gp3, gp6, gp7 and gp9. Inovirus display studies have shown that the architecture of inoviruses makes all coat proteins of the inoviral particle accessible to the outside. This particular feature of IAVs allows foreign antigenic peptides to be displayed on the outer surface of the virion fused to its coat proteins and for more than two decades has been exploited in many applications including antibody or peptide display libraries, drug design, and vaccine development against infectious and non-infectious diseases. As vaccine carriers, IAVs have been shown to elicit both a cellular and humoral response against various pathogens through the display of antibody epitopes on their coat proteins. Despite their high immunogenicity, the goal of developing an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has not yet materialized. One possible limitation of previous efforts was the use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which exhibited autoreactivity properties. In the past five years, however, new, more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that do not exhibit autoreactivity properties have been isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, suggesting that vaccination strategies aimed at producing such broadly neutralizing antibodies may confer protection against infection. The utilization of these new, broadly neutralizing antibodies in combination with the architectural traits of IAVs have driven the current developments in the design of an inovirus-based vaccine against HIV-1. This article reviews the applications of IAVs in vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the design of inoviral-based vaccines against HIV-1.

  18. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  19. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turriziani, Mario; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Izzi, Valerio; Masuelli, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW 180 kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas. Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy. Experimental results obtained by employing animal models have supported the design of clinical trials using a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of different types of human cancers. This review reports findings from experimental models and clinical evidence on the use of a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of cancer patients. Among the diverse CEA-based cancer vaccines, DCs- and recombinant viruses-based vaccines seem the most valid. However, although vaccination was shown to induce a strong immune response to CEA, resulting in a delay in tumor progression and prolonged survival in some cancer patients, it failed to eradicate the tumor in most cases, owing partly to the negative effect exerted by the tumor microenvironment on immune response. Thus, in order to develop more efficient and effective cancer vaccines, it is necessary to design new clinical trials combining cancer vaccines with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and drugs which target those factors responsible for immunosuppression of immune cells. This review also discusses relevant patents relating to the use of CEA as a cancer vaccine.

  20. Various Ready-to-Eat Products from Retail Stores Linked to Occurrence of Diverse Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Fuangpaiboon, Janejira; Turner, Matthew P; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2016-02-01

    Listeriosis outbreaks have been associated with a variety of foods. This study investigated the prevalence and diversity of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat (RTE) products and evaluated the performance of a rapid detection method, the 3M molecular detection assay for L. monocytogenes (MDA-LM), for detection of L. monocytogenes. Assay results were compared with those obtained using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration standard culture method described in the Bacteriological Analytical Manual. Products (n = 200) were purchased from retail stores: 122 aquatic products, 22 products of animal origin, 18 vegetarian products, 15 deli meat products, 13 salad and vegetable products, 4 desserts, 2 egg-based products, and 4 other products. L. monocytogenes prevalence was comparable with both methods. Overall, 15 (7.5%) of 200 samples were positive for L. monocytogenes: 3% of aquatic products, 1.5% of products of animal origin, 1% of vegetarian products, and 2% of deli meat products. Compared with the standard culture method, the sensitivity, specificity, and the accuracy of the MDA-LM were 86.7% (95% confidence interval, 58.4 to 97.7%), 98.4% (95% confidence interval, 95.0 to 99.6%), and 97.5%, respectively. Using the culture-based method, 18 (9%) of 200 samples were positive for Listeria species other than L. monocytogenes. Listeria isolates from these samples were classified into nine allelic types (ATs). The majority of isolates were classified as ATs 58 and 74, which were identified as L. monocytogenes lineages I and IV, respectively. Listeria innocua and Listeria welshimeri also were represented by isolates of multiple ATs. The MDA-LM is a rapid and reliable technique for detecting L. monocytogenes in various RTE foods. Further study is needed to develop effective control strategies to reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in RTE foods.

  1. PERSPECTIVES OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF MUCOSAL VACCINES AGAINST DANGEROUS INFECTIONS ON THE BASE OF TRANSGENIC PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Tretyakova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccines created on the base of transgenic plants reacting with mucosal layers of the intestines and other organs are considered to be the perspective method of the vaccination. These vaccines induce both mucosal and general humoral immunogenicity after the peroral administration. The folding of antigenic proteins synthesizing in plants occurs via eukaryotic type and has advantages before yeast and prokaryotic platforms. This feature results to more adequate synthesis of antibodies against pathogens and to the interaction with effector molecules of complement. Earlier we together with The State Scientific Center “Vector”, Institute of chemical biology and fundamental medicine SB RAS and Dr R.Hammond from Laboratory of Plant Pathology (Maryland, USA created two candidate vaccines : one of them against AIDS (HIV-1 and hepatitis B on the base of the chimeric gene TBI-HBS, encoding simultaneously 9 antigenic determinants of HIV-1 and the main surface antigen of hepatitis B (HBsAg. The second candidate vaccine was created against hepatitis B on the base of the genetic construct with the gene preS2-S encoding the synthesis of two subunits of the main surface antigen of hepatitis B and the signal peptide HDEL which directed antigens for the accumulation on ER. Both vaccines were tested on mice and confirmed their immunogenicity as the pronounced antibodies response. Twice vaccinated mice maintained the antibodies response during 11 months after there was little tendency to lowering. It was established that transgenic plants – vaccines (tomato kept the capability to the synthesis of antigenic determinants in seven seed generations during 7 years. The results of the development of the mucosal vaccine against cervical carcinoma (carcinoma of uterine cervix evoked by human papillomaviruses of high oncogenic risks were presented in this report. We created the genetic construct consisting of 35S CaMV promoter, Ώ (omega leader of TMV, the

  2. Tolerance to quaternary ammonium compound disinfectants may enhance growth of Listeria monocytogenes in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Schirmer, Bjørn C T; Heir, Even; Fagerlund, Annette; Hjemli, Pernille; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-01-16

    The antibacterial effect of disinfectants is crucial for the control of Listeria monocytogenes in food processing environments. Tolerance of L. monocytogenes to sublethal levels of disinfectants based on quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) is conferred by the resistance determinants qacH and bcrABC. The presence and distribution of these genes have been anticipated to have a role in the survival and growth of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments where QAC based disinfectants are in common use. In this study, a panel of 680 L. monocytogenes from nine Norwegian meat- and salmon processing plants were grouped into 36 MLVA profiles. The presence of qacH and bcrABC was determined in 101 isolates from the 26 most common MLVA profiles. Five MLVA profiles contained qacH and two contained bcrABC. Isolates with qacH and bcrABC showed increased tolerance to the QAC Benzalkonium chloride (BC), with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 5-12, 10-13 and monocytogenes when the sample BC levels were high (>100ppm). A sample with lower BC concentrations (14ppm of chain length C-12 and 2.7ppm of chain length C-14) inhibited growth of L. monocytogenes not containing bcrABC or qacH, compared to strains with these genes. The study has shown that L. monocytogenes harbouring the QAC resistance genes qacH and bcrABC are prevalent in the food industry and that residuals of QAC may be present in concentrations after sanitation in the industry that result in a growth advantage for bacteria with such resistance genes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Design of a heterosubtypic epitope-based peptide vaccine fused with hemokinin-1 against influenza viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahla; Shahsavandi; Mohammad; Majid; Ebrahimi; Kaveh; Sadeghi; Homayoon; Mahravani

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses continue to emerge and re-emerge, posing new threats for public health. Control and treatment of influenza depends mainly on vaccination and chemoprophylaxis with approved antiviral drugs. Identification of specific epitopes derived from influenza viruses has significantly advanced the development of epitope-based vaccines. Here, we explore the idea of using HLA binding data to design an epitope-based vaccine that can elicit heterosubtypic T-cell responses against circulating H7N9, H5N1, and H9N2 subtypes. The hemokinin-1(HK-1) peptide sequence was used to induce immune responses against the influenza viruses. Five conserved high score cytotoxic T lymphocyte(CTL) epitopes restricted to HLA-A*0201-binding peptides within the hemagglutinin(HA) protein of the viruses were chosen, and two HA CTL/HK-1 chimera protein models designed. Using in silico analysis, which involves interferon epitope scanning, protein structure prediction, antigenic epitope determination, and model quality evaluation, chimeric proteins were designed. The applicability of one of these proteins as a heterosubtypic epitopebased vaccine candidate was analyzed.

  4. Evaluation of peptide selection approaches for epitope‐based vaccine design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, B.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in epitope-based vaccine (EV) design stems from the vast genomic variation of pathogens and the diversity of the host cellular immune system. Several computational approaches have been published to assist the selection of potential T cell epitopes for EV design. So far, no thoro......A major challenge in epitope-based vaccine (EV) design stems from the vast genomic variation of pathogens and the diversity of the host cellular immune system. Several computational approaches have been published to assist the selection of potential T cell epitopes for EV design. So far...... in terms of in silico measurements simulating important vaccine properties like the ability of inducing protection against a multivariant pathogen in a population; the predicted immunogenicity; pathogen, allele, and population coverage; as well as the conservation of selected epitopes. Additionally, we...... evaluate the use of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes with regards to their applicability for population-spanning vaccine design. The results showed that in terms of induced protection methods that simultaneously aim to optimize pathogen and HLA coverage significantly outperform methods focusing...

  5. Ontology-based time information representation of vaccine adverse events in VAERS for temporal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. FDA/CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS provides a valuable data source for post-vaccination adverse event analyses. The structured data in the system has been widely used, but the information in the write-up narratives is rarely included in these kinds of analyses. In fact, the unstructured nature of the narratives makes the data embedded in them difficult to be used for any further studies. Results We developed an ontology-based approach to represent the data in the narratives in a “machine-understandable” way, so that it can be easily queried and further analyzed. Our focus is the time aspect in the data for time trending analysis. The Time Event Ontology (TEO, Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE, and Vaccine Ontology (VO are leveraged for the semantic representation of this purpose. A VAERS case report is presented as a use case for the ontological representations. The advantages of using our ontology-based Semantic web representation and data analysis are emphasized. Conclusions We believe that representing both the structured data and the data from write-up narratives in an integrated, unified, and “machine-understandable” way can improve research for vaccine safety analyses, causality assessments, and retrospective studies.

  6. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

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    Sharmeen Nishat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs. Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs, isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses.

  7. Antibiotic therapy for Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C C; Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients, but it has been rarely reported in Taiwan. We reviewed 13 cases of L. monocytogenes bacteremia at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 12-year period. All of the patients had underlying diseases. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and neurologic signs were found in 6 patients. Most of the patients received penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin with an aminoglycoside. Corticosteroids were used in 9 of 13 patients. The overall mortality directly due to L. monocytogenes bacteremia was 31%. However, patients treated with cephalosporins or oxacillin had higher mortality than those treated with penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin (p = 0.05). Given the increasing number of immunosuppressed patients in Taiwan, it is likely that more cases will be encountered. Physicians in Taiwan should be aware of L. monocytogenes bacteremia and its treatment.

  8. Nucleic Acid Vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Shan

    2004-01-01

    @@ Anew method of immunization was discovered in the early 1990s. Several research groups independently demonstrated that direct inoculation of DNA plasmids coding for a specific protein antigen could elicit immune responses against that antigen[1-4].Since in theory the mRNA molecules also have the potential to be translated into the protein antigen, this vaccination approach was officially named by WHO as the nucleic acid vaccination even though the term DNA vaccine has been used more commonly in the literature. This novel approach is considered the fourth generation of vaccines after live attenuated vaccines, killed or inactivated vaccines and recombinant protein based subunit vaccines.

  9. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine...

  10. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

      Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine...

  11. Oral Cholera Vaccination Delivery Cost in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An Analysis Based on Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogasale, Vittal; Ramani, Enusa; Wee, Hyeseung; Kim, Jerome H

    2016-12-01

    Use of the oral cholera vaccine (OCV) is a vital short-term strategy to control cholera in endemic areas with poor water and sanitation infrastructure. Identifying, estimating, and categorizing the delivery costs of OCV campaigns are useful in analyzing cost-effectiveness, understanding vaccine affordability, and in planning and decision making by program managers and policy makers. To review and re-estimate oral cholera vaccination program costs and propose a new standardized categorization that can help in collation, analysis, and comparison of delivery costs across countries. Peer reviewed publications listed in PubMed database, Google Scholar and World Health Organization (WHO) websites and unpublished data from organizations involved in oral cholera vaccination. The publications and reports containing oral cholera vaccination delivery costs, conducted in low- and middle-income countries based on World Bank Classification. Limits are humans and publication date before December 31st, 2014. No participants are involved, only costs are collected. Oral cholera vaccination and cost estimation. A systematic review was conducted using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cost items were categorized into four main cost groups: vaccination program preparation, vaccine administration, adverse events following immunization and vaccine procurement; the first three groups constituting the vaccine delivery costs. The costs were re-estimated in 2014 US dollars (US$) and in international dollar (I$). Ten studies were identified and included in the analysis. The vaccine delivery costs ranged from US$0.36 to US$ 6.32 (in US$2014) which was equivalent to I$ 0.99 to I$ 16.81 (in I$2014). The vaccine procurement costs ranged from US$ 0.29 to US$ 29.70 (in US$2014), which was equivalent to I$ 0.72 to I$ 78.96 (in I$2014). The delivery costs in routine immunization systems were lowest from US$ 0.36 (in US$2014) equivalent to I$ 0.99 (in I$2014). The reported cost categories

  12. Specific Dioscorea Phytoextracts Enhance Potency of TCL-Loaded DC-Based Cancer Vaccines

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    Wei-Ting Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dioscorea tuber phytoextracts can confer immunomodulatory activities ex vivo and improve regeneration of bone marrow cells in vivo. In present study, we evaluated specific Dioscorea phytoextracts for use ex vivo as a bone-marrow-derived dendritic cell- (DC- based vaccine adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy. Fractionated Dioscorea extracts (DsII were assayed for their effect on maturation and functions of DC ex vivo and antimelanoma activity of DC-based vaccine in vivo. The phytoextract from 50–75% ethanol-precipitated fraction of Dioscorea alata var. purpurea Tainung no. 5 tuber, designated as DsII-TN5, showed a strong augmentation of tumor cell lysate- (TCL- loaded DC-mediated activation of T-cell proliferation. DsII-TN5 stimulated the expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and IL-1β in TCL-loaded DCs and downregulated the expression of TGF-β1. DC vaccines prepared by a specific schema (TCL (2 h + LPS (22 h showed the strongest antitumor activity. DsII-TN5 as a DC vaccine adjuvant showed strong antimelanoma activity and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC population in tested mice. DsII-TN5 can also activate DCs to enhance Th1- and Th17-related cytokine expressions. Biochemical analysis showed that DsII-TN5 consists mainly of polysaccharides containing a high level (53% of mannose residues. We suggest that DsII-TN5 may have potential for future application as a potent, cost-effective adjuvant for DC-based cancer vaccines.

  13. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in European cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    2017-01-01

    Both in Europe and worldwide cheese has caused important outbreaks of listeriosis and can be a vehicle for transmission of Listeria monocytogenes to consumers. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using scientific literature and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reports...... understanding of L. monocytogenes prevalence in different types of cheeses and provided results that can be useful as input for quantitative microbiological risk assessment modelling....

  14. Review of clinical studies on dendritic cell-based vaccination of patients with malignant melanoma: assessment of correlation between clinical response and vaccine parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Hansen, Troels Holz; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2009-01-01

    During the past years numerous clinical trials have been carried out to assess the ability of dendritic cell (DC) based immunotherapy to induce clinically relevant immune responses in patients with malignant diseases. A broad range of cancer types have been targeted including malignant melanoma...... which in the disseminated stage have a very poor prognosis and only limited treatment options with moderate effectiveness. Herein we describe the results of a focused search of recently published clinical studies on dendritic cell vaccination in melanoma and review different vaccine parameters which...

  15. A Novel Virus-Like Particle Based Vaccine Platform Displaying the Placental Malaria Antigen VAR2CSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Thrane

    Full Text Available Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Clinical testing of a soluble protein-based vaccine containing the parasite ligand, VAR2CSA, has been initiated. VAR2CSA binds to the human receptor chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and is responsible for sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in the placenta. It is imperative that a vaccine against malaria in pregnancy, if administered to women before they become pregnant, can induce a strong and long lasting immune response. While most soluble protein-based vaccines have failed during clinical testing, virus-like particle (VLP based vaccines (e.g., the licensed human papillomavirus vaccines have demonstrated high efficacy, suggesting that the spatial assembly of the vaccine antigen is a critical parameter for inducing an optimal long-lasting protective immune response. We have developed a VLP vaccine display platform by identifying regions of the HPV16 L1 coat protein where a biotin acceptor site (AviTagTM can be inserted without compromising VLP-assembly. Subsequent biotinylation of Avi-L1 VLPs allow us to anchor monovalent streptavidin (mSA-fused proteins to the biotin, thereby obtaining a dense and repetitive VLP-display of the vaccine antigen. The mSA-VAR2CSA antigen was delivered on the Avi-L1 VLP platform and tested in C57BL/6 mice in comparison to two soluble protein-based vaccines consisting of naked VAR2CSA and mSA-VAR2CSA. The mSA-VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP and soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccines induced higher antibody titers than the soluble naked VAR2CSA vaccine after three immunizations. The VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP vaccine induced statistically significantly higher endpoint titres compared to the soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccine, after 1st and 2nd immunization; however, this difference was not statistically significant after 3rd immunization. Importantly, the VLP-VAR2CSA induced antibodies were functional in inhibiting the binding of

  16. Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes in Whole Avocado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Evans, Peter; Hammack, Thomas S; Brown, Eric W; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, tree fruits have emerged as a new concern for Listeria monocytogenes contamination. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the potential internalization of L. monocytogenes from the surface of avocados into the edible portions of the fruit during certain postharvest practices simulated in a laboratory setting. One set of intact avocados was spot inoculated with L. monocytogenes on the stem scar, and the second set was hydrocooled in water contaminated with L. monocytogenes. Under these experimental conditions, L. monocytogenes internalized into the avocado pulp through the stem or stem scar after both spot inoculation and hydrocooling. In avocados spot inoculated with 50, 130, 500, and 1,300 CFU per fruit, bacteria were detected in the edible portion adjacent to the stem scar within 15 days postinoculation during storage at 4°C. In avocados hydrocooled in water containing L. monocytogenes at 10(6) and 10(8) CFU/ml, bacteria reached the bottom end of the fruit, and the populations in the edible portion adjacent to the stem scar reached up to 5.90 to 7.19 log CFU/g within 10 to 15 days during storage at 4°C. Dye mixed with inoculum was useful for guiding subsequent sampling, but dye penetration patterns were not always consistent with bacterial penetration.

  17. NAPPA-Based Vaccines for a New Proteogenomics Approach for Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Luigi Bragazzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinology was developed for the first time in 1796 when Jenner empirically implemented a vaccine against smallpox using animal-to-human cowpox inoculation. Since then, it has become a very complex science due to the merging of disciplines ranging from structural and functional, cellular and molecular biology and immunology to bioinformatics and nanobiotechnology, as well as systems biology and synthetic biology and engineering. In the frame of evidence-based medicine (EBM, evidence-based vaccinology emerged as an important sub-field: vaccinology has nowadays become more and more predictive and personalized. With the discovery that many patients with cancer develop antibodies against p53 (the so-called oncoantibodies, it was evident that oncoprotein are immunogenic and can be used for immunotherapeutics purposes. In this manuscript, we report Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays (NAPPA-based Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM measurement of p53 immunogenicity and kinetics, in the perspective of developing an effective p53 therapy. NAPPA-based QCM_D can be a useful platform for proving the immunogenicity of oncoprotein-based vaccines. Recently, the field of vaccinology has extended from vaccines for infectious diseases to vaccines not only preventive but also therapeutic for chronic-degenerative diseases such as cancer. Peptide-based immunotherapeutics has been proven to be quite effective for cancer treatment and NAPPA-based QCM_D has the promise of providing clinicians with quick, rapid and cheap measurement of oncoprotein kinetics and bindings with immune cells. Moreover, it can be a precious tool for implementing personalized and predictive vaccinology.

  18. Heat-stable oral alga-based vaccine protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreesen, Imke A J; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2010-02-01

    While 15 million deaths per year are caused by communicable pathogens worldwide, health care authorities emphasize the considerable impact of poverty on the incidence of infectious diseases. The emergence of antigen-expressing plant tissues (e.g. rice, tomato, potato) has indicated the potential of land plants for low-cost vaccines in oral immunization programs. In this study, we engineered the chloroplasts of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for the stable expression of the D2 fibronectin-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus fused with the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), under the control of rbcL UTRs. Analysis of sera and faeces of mice, fed for 5 weeks with transgenic algae grown in confined Wave Bioreactor, revealed the induction of specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Algae-based vaccination significantly reduced the pathogen load in the spleen and the intestine of treated mice and protected 80% of them against lethal doses of S. aureus. Importantly, the alga vaccine was stable for more than 1.5 years at room temperature. These results indicate that C. reinhardtii may play an important role in molecular pharming, as it combines the beneficial features of land plant vaccines, while offering unmatched ease of growth compared to other members of the plant kingdom.

  19. Vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on nano-sized hepatitis B virus core protein particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanasooraj D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dhananjayan Dhanasooraj, R Ajay Kumar, Sathish MundayoorMycobacterium Research Group, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Kerala, IndiaAbstract: Nano-sized hepatitis B virus core virus-like particles (HBc-VLP are suitable for uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10 is an important vaccine candidate against tuberculosis. The purified antigen shows low immune response without adjuvant and tends to have low protective efficacy. The present study is based on the assumption that expression of these proteins on HBc nanoparticles would provide higher protection when compared to the native antigen alone. The cfp-10 gene was expressed as a fusion on the major immunodominant region of HBc-VLP, and the immune response in Balb/c mice was studied and compared to pure proteins, a mixture of antigens, and fusion protein-VLP, all without using any adjuvant. The humoral, cytokine, and splenocyte cell proliferation responses suggested that the HBc-VLP bearing CFP-10 generated an antigen-specific immune response in a Th1-dependent manner. By virtue of its self-adjuvant nature and ability to form nano-sized particles, HBc-VLPs are an excellent vaccine delivery system for use with subunit protein antigens identified in the course of recent vaccine research.Keywords: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, VLP, hepatitis B virus core particle, CFP-10, self-adjuvant, vaccine delivery

  20. Role of TLR3 in the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, S S; Schulz, O; Alexopoulou, L; Leitner, W W; Flavell, R A; Reis e Sousa, C

    2009-03-01

    Replicon plasmids encoding an alphavirus RNA replicase constitute an alternative to conventional DNA plasmids with promise for DNA vaccination in humans. Replicase activity amplifies the levels of transgene mRNA through a copying process involving double-stranded (ds) RNA intermediates, which contribute to vaccine immunogenicity by activating innate antiviral responses. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a dsRNA innate immune receptor expressed by antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we test the hypothesis that TLR3 is necessary for the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based DNA vaccines. We show that mouse CD8 alpha(+) DC phagocytose dying replicon plasmid-transfected cells in vitro and are activated in a TLR3-dependent manner by dsRNA present within those cells. However, we find that cytotoxic T-cell responses to a replicon plasmid intramuscular vaccine are not diminished in the absence of TLR3 in vivo. Our results underscore the potential role of TLR3 in mediating immune activation by dsRNA-bearing replicon plasmid-transfected cells and indicate that other innate sensing pathways can compensate for TLR3 absence in vivo.

  1. Towards clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based transmission blocking malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Michael; Jore, Matthijs M; Sauerwein, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is a devastating vector-borne disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite, resulting in almost 0.5 million casualties per year. The parasite has a complex life-cycle that includes asexual replication in human red blood cells, causing symptomatic malaria, and sexual stages which are essential for the transmission to the mosquito vector. A vaccine targeting the sexual stages of the parasite and thus blocking transmission will be instrumental for the eradication of malaria. One of the leading transmission blocking vaccine candidates is the sexual stage antigen Pfs48/45. Areas covered: PubMed was searched to review the progress and future prospects for clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based subunit vaccine. We will focus on biological function, naturally acquired immunity, functional activity of specific antibodies, sequence diversity, production of recombinant protein and preclinical studies. Expert commentary: Pfs48/45 is one of the lead-candidates for a transmission blocking vaccine and should be further explored in clinical trials.

  2. Novel chikungunya vaccine candidate with an IRES-based attenuation and host range alteration mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Plante

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that has recently caused devastating urban epidemics of severe and sometimes chronic arthralgia. As with most other mosquito-borne viral diseases, control relies on reducing mosquito populations and their contact with people, which has been ineffective in most locations. Therefore, vaccines remain the best strategy to prevent most vector-borne diseases. Ideally, vaccines for diseases of resource-limited countries should combine low cost and single dose efficacy, yet induce rapid and long-lived immunity with negligible risk of serious adverse reactions. To develop such a vaccine to protect against chikungunya fever, we employed a rational attenuation mechanism that also prevents the infection of mosquito vectors. The internal ribosome entry site (IRES from encephalomyocarditis virus replaced the subgenomic promoter in a cDNA CHIKV clone, thus altering the levels and host-specific mechanism of structural protein gene expression. Testing in both normal outbred and interferon response-defective mice indicated that the new vaccine candidate is highly attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious after a single dose. Furthermore, it is incapable of replicating in mosquito cells or infecting mosquitoes in vivo. This IRES-based attenuation platform technology may be useful for the predictable attenuation of any alphavirus.

  3. Literature-Based Discovery of IFN-γ and Vaccine-Mediated Gene Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzucan Özgür

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ regulates various immune responses that are often critical for vaccine-induced protection. In order to annotate the IFN-γ-related gene interaction network from a large amount of IFN-γ research reported in the literature, a literature-based discovery approach was applied with a combination of natural language processing (NLP and network centrality analysis. The interaction network of human IFN-γ (Gene symbol: IFNG and its vaccine-specific subnetwork were automatically extracted using abstracts from all articles in PubMed. Four network centrality metrics were further calculated to rank the genes in the constructed networks. The resulting generic IFNG network contains 1060 genes and 26313 interactions among these genes. The vaccine-specific subnetwork contains 102 genes and 154 interactions. Fifty six genes such as TNF, NFKB1, IL2, IL6, and MAPK8 were ranked among the top 25 by at least one of the centrality methods in one or both networks. Gene enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were classified in various immune mechanisms such as response to extracellular stimulus, lymphocyte activation, and regulation of apoptosis. Literature evidence was manually curated for the IFN-γ relatedness of 56 genes and vaccine development relatedness for 52 genes. This study also generated many new hypotheses worth further experimental studies.

  4. Public acceptance of a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine in Aceh, Indonesia: A hospital-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harapan Harapan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the acceptance towards a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine (EVV and associated factors in a non-affected country, Indonesia. Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in four regencies of Aceh, Indonesia. A set of pre-tested questionnaires was used to obtain information on acceptance towards EVV and a range of explanatory variables. Associations between EVV acceptance and explanatory variables were tested using multi-steps logistic regression analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation. Results: Participants who had knowledge on Ebola virus disease (EVD were 45.3% (192/424 and none of the participants achieved 80% correct answers on the knowledge regarding to EVD. About 73% of participants expressed their willingness to receive the EVV. Education attainment, occupation, monthly income, have heard regarding to EVD previously, socioeconomic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were associated significantly with acceptance towards EVV in univariate analysis (P < 0.05. In the final multivariate model, socio-economic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were the independent explanatory variables for EVV acceptance. Conclusions: The knowledge of EVD was low, but this minimally affected the acceptance towards EVV. However, to facilitate optimal uptake of EVV, dissemination of vaccine-related information prior to its introduction is required.

  5. Shikonin enhances efficacy of a gene-based cancer vaccine via induction of RANTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hui-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shikonin, a phytochemical purified from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been shown to confer diverse pharmacological activities, including accelerating granuloma formation, wound healing, anti-inflammation and others, and is explored for immune-modifier activities for vaccination in this study. Transdermal gene-based vaccine is an attractive approach for delivery of DNA transgenes encoding specific tumor antigens to host skin tissues. Skin dendritic cells (DCs, a potent antigen-presenting cell type, is known to play a critical role in transmitting and orchestrating tumor antigen-specific immunities against cancers. The present study hence employs these various components for experimentation. Method The mRNA and protein expression of RANTES were detected by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The regional expression of RANTES and tissue damage in test skin were evaluated via immunohistochemistry assay. Fluorescein isothiocyanate sensitization assay was performed to trace the trafficking of DCs from the skin vaccination site to draining lymph nodes. Adjuvantic effect of shikonin on gene gun-delivered human gp100 (hgp100 DNA cancer vaccine was studied in a human gp100-transfected B16 (B16/hgp100 tumor model. Results Among various phytochemicals tested, shikonin induced the highest level of expression of RANTES in normal skin tissues. In comparison, mouse RANTES cDNA gene transfection induced a higher level of mRANTES expression for a longer period, but caused more extensive skin damage. Topical application of shikonin onto the immunization site before gene gun-mediated vaccination augmented the population of skin DCs migrating into the draining lymph nodes. A hgp100 cDNA gene vaccination regimen with shikonin pretreatment as an adjuvant in a B16/hgp100 tumor model increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities in splenocytes and lymph node cells on target tumor cells. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that shikonin can

  6. What Vaccines Do You Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics The Adult Vaccine Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are recommended for adults based on age, health ...

  7. Implementation of statistical tools to support identification and management of persistent Listeria monocytogenes contamination in smoked fish processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malley, Thomas J V; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Roof, Sherry; Warchocki, Steven; Nightingale, Kendra; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes persistence in food processing plants is a key source of postprocessing contamination of ready-to-eat foods. Thus, identification and elimination of sites where L. monocytogenes persists (niches) is critical. Two smoked fish processing plants were used as models to develop and implement environmental sampling plans (i) to identify persistent L. monocytogenes subtypes (EcoRI ribotypes) using two statistical approaches and (ii) to identify and eliminate likely L. monocytogenes niches. The first statistic, a binomial test based on ribotype frequencies, was used to evaluate L. monocytogenes ribotype recurrences relative to reference distributions extracted from a public database; the second statistic, a binomial test based on previous positives, was used to measure ribotype occurrences as a risk factor for subsequent isolation of the same ribotype. Both statistics revealed persistent ribotypes in both plants based on data from the initial 4 months of sampling. The statistic based on ribotype frequencies revealed persistence of particular ribotypes at specific sampling sites. Two adaptive sampling strategies guided plant interventions during the study: sampling multiple times before and during processing and vector swabbing (i.e., sampling of additional sites in different directions [vectors] relative to a given site). Among sites sampled for 12 months, a Poisson model regression revealed borderline significant monthly decreases in L. monocytogenes isolates at both plants (P = 0.026 and 0.076). Our data indicate elimination of an L. monocytogenes niche on a food contact surface; niches on nonfood contact surfaces were not eliminated. Although our data illustrate the challenge of identifying and eliminating L. monocytogenes niches, particularly at nonfood contact sites in small and medium plants, the methods for identification of persistence we describe here should broadly facilitate science-based identification of microbial persistence.

  8. HIV-1 vaccines based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia protected Chinese rhesus macaques from simian HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Li, Yue; Luo, Zhenwu; Yang, Guibo; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Sun, Maosheng; Dai, Jiejie; Li, Qihan; Qin, Chuan; Shao, Yiming

    2015-03-27

    To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccines constructed from replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia virus (rTV) alone or combined with DNA in protecting Chinese rhesus macaques from homologous Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV)-CN97001 challenge. The nef, gag, pol, and gp140 genes from strain CRF07_BC HIV-1 CN54 were selected to construct an HIV vaccine using the rTV or rTV/DNA vaccine. After vaccination, the vaccine and control groups were intravenously challenged with SHIV-CN97001 (32 MID50). HIV-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, gp70 V1V2 binding antibodies, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses were measured prospectively after vaccination with an ELISA, a virus infectivity assay in TZM-bl cells, and ELISPOT assays, respectively. Viral RNA was quantified after challenge with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and protection efficacy was determined with an analysis of CD8 lymphocyte depletion in vivo. Both rTV and DNA/rTV vaccine groups developed strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV-1 CN54 antigens, including Gag and Env, and also developed significant and persistent anti-Env antibodies and neutralizing antibodies after immunization. Both the rTV and DNA/rTV groups were significantly protected against SHIV-CN97001 or displayed lower viremia than the controls. After CD8 lymphocyte depletion, no viremia was detectable in the vaccinated monkeys, but rebounded rapidly in the control animals. Protection against infection correlated with vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies specific for homologous HIV-1 viruses. An rTV-based HIV-1 vaccine, with or without a DNA primer, provided protection from SHIV challenge in a macaque model. Replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia is a promising vector and should enable advances in HIV-1 vaccine development.

  9. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in milk using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junping; Xie, Xinfang; Feng, Jinsong; Chen, Jessica C; Du, Xin-jun; Luo, Jiangzhao; Lu, Xiaonan; Wang, Shuo

    2015-07-02

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-positive, rod-shape foodborne bacterium causing invasive infection, listeriosis, in susceptible populations. Rapid and high-throughput detection of this pathogen in dairy products is critical as milk and other dairy products have been implicated as food vehicles in several outbreaks. Here we evaluated confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (785 nm laser) coupled with chemometric analysis to distinguish six closely related Listeria species, including L. monocytogenes, in both liquid media and milk. Raman spectra of different Listeria species and other bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli) were collected to create two independent databases for detection in media and milk, respectively. Unsupervised chemometric models including principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were applied to differentiate L. monocytogenes from Listeria and other bacteria. To further evaluate the performance and reliability of unsupervised chemometric analyses, supervised chemometrics were performed, including two discriminant analyses (DA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA). By analyzing Raman spectra via two DA-based chemometric models, average identification accuracies of 97.78% and 98.33% for L. monocytogenes in media, and 95.28% and 96.11% in milk were obtained, respectively. SIMCA analysis also resulted in satisfied average classification accuracies (over 93% in both media and milk). This Raman spectroscopic-based detection of L. monocytogenes in media and milk can be finished within a few hours and requires no extensive sample preparation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  11. Hepatitis B Vaccination in Bangladesh: a Suggestion Based on Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafquat Mohammed Rafiq

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe hepatitis B virus (HBV causes up to a million deaths worldwide and 16 million health care related infections in the tropics each year(1,2, and over 350 million become chronically infected carriers who have no significant liver disease; approximately three quarters of them are in Asia and the western pacific region(3,4. HBV infection is a potentially life threatening condition as many of the affected individuals progress to chronic hepatitis,cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC(3. In infants and children, acute hepatitis B infection is nearly always asymptomatic, whereas in adults it is usually the opposite. But on the other hand, the risk of becoming chronic carriage is much greater in children than in adults; as many as 90% of infants born to Hepatitis B e Antigen (HBeAg positive mothers become carriers themselves and, therefore, in long term are more likely to developchronic liver disease(5. Currently, though several antiviral drugs are used,there is no reliable curative treatment for HBV once it has been acquired and prevention by universal immunization remains the strategy for reducing the number of acute infections, chronic carriage and the long-term burden from diseases such as HCC(4,6. In 1991, in an attempt to reduce the global impact of HBV infection, WHO recommended that hepatitis B vaccination should be integrated into national immunization programs in all countries(7.Some Asian countries, for instance, Thailand, haveadopted the policy of immunizing children universally against the disease as early as 1992, however many others lagged behind(4.The true prevalence of Hepatitis B in Bangladesh is yet to be ascertained by a reliable study. Data available from different studies show that it ranges between 0.8 and 5.4% depending on the study design, samples and laboratory methods used(8-10.These data were based on detection of HBsAg antigen; the rates would have been higher, had they been based on anti-HBc antibody(11

  12. Exploring the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in Vietnam: insights for evidence-based cervical cancer prevention policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane J; Kobus, Katie E; Diaz, Mireia; O'Shea, Meredith; Van Minh, Hoang; Goldie, Sue J

    2008-07-29

    Using mathematical models of cervical cancer for the northern and southern regions of Vietnam, we assessed the cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer prevention strategies and the tradeoffs between a national and region-based policy in Vietnam. With 70% vaccination and screening coverage, lifetime risk of cancer was reduced by 20.4-76.1% with vaccination of pre-adolescent girls and/or screening of older women. Only when the cost per vaccinated girl was low (i.e., I$100), screening alone was most cost-effective. When optimal policies differed between regions, implementing a national strategy resulted in health and economic inefficiencies. HPV vaccination appears to be an attractive cervical cancer prevention strategy for Vietnam, provided high coverage can be achieved in young pre-adolescent girls, cost per vaccinated girl is

  13. Nasal delivery of an adenovirus-based vaccine bypasses pre-existing immunity to the vaccine carrier and improves the immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Croyle

    Full Text Available Pre-existing immunity to human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 is common in the general population. Bypassing pre-existing immunity could maximize Ad5 vaccine efficacy. Vaccination by the intramuscular (I.M., nasal (I.N. or oral (P.O. route with Ad5 expressing Ebola Zaire glycoprotein (Ad5-ZGP fully protected naïve mice against lethal challenge with Ebola. In the presence of pre-existing immunity, only mice vaccinated I.N. survived. The frequency of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells was reduced by 80% and by 15% in animals vaccinated by the I.M. and P.O. routes respectively. Neutralizing antibodies could not be detected in serum from either treatment group. Pre-existing immunity did not compromise the frequency of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells (3.9+/-1% naïve vs. 3.6+/-1% pre-existing immunity, PEI nor anti-Ebola neutralizing antibody (NAB, 40+/-10 reciprocal dilution, both groups. The number of INF-gamma+ CD8+ cells detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BAL after I.N. immunization was not compromised by pre-existing immunity to Ad5 (146+/-14, naïve vs. 120+/-16 SFC/million MNCs, PEI. However, pre-existing immunity reduced NAB levels in BAL by approximately 25% in this group. To improve the immune response after oral vaccination, the Ad5-based vaccine was PEGylated. Mice given the modified vaccine did not survive challenge and had reduced levels of IFN-gamma+ CD8+ T cells 10 days after administration (0.3+/-0.3% PEG vs. 1.7+/-0.5% unmodified. PEGylation did increase NAB levels 2-fold. These results provide some insight about the degree of T and B cell mediated immunity necessary for protection against Ebola virus and suggest that modification of the virus capsid can influence the type of immune response elicited by an Ad5-based vaccine.

  14. Progress with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ)-based malaria vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Thomas L.; Billingsley, Peter F.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; James, Eric R.; Chakravarty, Sumana; Epstein, Judith E.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Alonso, Pedro; Duffy, Patrick E.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim; Kremsner, Peter G.; Seder, Robert A.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Sanaria Inc. has developed methods to manufacture, purify and cryopreserve aseptic Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (SPZ), and is using this platform technology to develop an injectable PfSPZ-based vaccine that provides high-grade, durable protection against infection with Pf malaria. Several candidate vaccines are being developed and tested, including PfSPZ Vaccine, in which the PfSPZ are attenuated by irradiation, PfSPZ-CVac, in which fully infectious PfSPZ are attenuated in vivo by concomitant administration of an anti-malarial drug, and PfSPZ-GA1, in which the PfSPZ are attenuated by gene knockout. Forty-three research groups in 15 countries, organized as the International PfSPZ Consortium (I-PfSPZ-C), are collaborating to advance this program by providing intellectual, clinical, and financial support. Fourteen clinical trials of these products have been completed in the USA, Europe and Africa, two are underway and at least 12 more are planned for 2015–2016 in the US (four trials), Germany (2 trials), Tanzania, Kenya, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Equatorial Guinea. Sanaria anticipates application to license a first generation product as early as late 2017, initially to protect adults, and a year later to protect all persons >6 months of age for at least six months. Improved vaccine candidates will be advanced as needed until the following requirements have been met: long-term protection against natural transmission, excellent safety and tolerability, and operational feasibility for population-wide administration. Here we describe the three most developed whole PfSPZ vaccine candidates, associated clinical trials, initial plans for licensure and deployment, and long-term objectives for a final product suitable for mass administration to achieve regional malaria elimination and eventual global eradication. PMID:26469720

  15. Progress with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ)-based malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Thomas L; Billingsley, Peter F; Sim, B Kim Lee; James, Eric R; Chakravarty, Sumana; Epstein, Judith E; Lyke, Kirsten E; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Alonso, Pedro; Duffy, Patrick E; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Sauerwein, Robert W; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim; Kremsner, Peter G; Seder, Robert A; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2015-12-22

    Sanaria Inc. has developed methods to manufacture, purify and cryopreserve aseptic Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (SPZ), and is using this platform technology to develop an injectable PfSPZ-based vaccine that provides high-grade, durable protection against infection with Pf malaria. Several candidate vaccines are being developed and tested, including PfSPZ Vaccine, in which the PfSPZ are attenuated by irradiation, PfSPZ-CVac, in which fully infectious PfSPZ are attenuated in vivo by concomitant administration of an anti-malarial drug, and PfSPZ-GA1, in which the PfSPZ are attenuated by gene knockout. Forty-three research groups in 15 countries, organized as the International PfSPZ Consortium (I-PfSPZ-C), are collaborating to advance this program by providing intellectual, clinical, and financial support. Fourteen clinical trials of these products have been completed in the USA, Europe and Africa, two are underway and at least 12 more are planned for 2015-2016 in the US (four trials), Germany (2 trials), Tanzania, Kenya, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Equatorial Guinea. Sanaria anticipates application to license a first generation product as early as late 2017, initially to protect adults, and a year later to protect all persons >6 months of age for at least six months. Improved vaccine candidates will be advanced as needed until the following requirements have been met: long-term protection against natural transmission, excellent safety and tolerability, and operational feasibility for population-wide administration. Here we describe the three most developed whole PfSPZ vaccine candidates, associated clinical trials, initial plans for licensure and deployment, and long-term objectives for a final product suitable for mass administration to achieve regional malaria elimination and eventual global eradication.

  16. A replicating cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding a single Ebola virus nucleoprotein CTL epitope confers protection against Ebola virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV are a serious human health concern in Central Africa. Great apes (gorillas/chimpanzees are an important source of EBOV transmission to humans due to increased hunting of wildlife including the 'bush-meat' trade. Cytomegalovirus (CMV is an highly immunogenic virus that has shown recent utility as a vaccine platform. CMV-based vaccines also have the unique potential to re-infect and disseminate through target populations regardless of prior CMV immunity, which may be ideal for achieving high vaccine coverage in inaccessible populations such as great apes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesize that a vaccine strategy using CMV-based vectors expressing EBOV antigens may be ideally suited for use in inaccessible wildlife populations. To establish a 'proof-of-concept' for CMV-based vaccines against EBOV, we constructed a mouse CMV (MCMV vector expressing a CD8+ T cell epitope from the nucleoprotein (NP of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV (MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL. MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL induced high levels of long-lasting (>8 months CD8+ T cells against ZEBOV NP in mice. Importantly, all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal ZEBOV challenge. Low levels of anti-ZEBOV antibodies were only sporadically detected in vaccinated animals prior to ZEBOV challenge suggesting a role, at least in part, for T cells in protection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the ability of a CMV-based vaccine approach to protect against an highly virulent human pathogen, and supports the potential for 'disseminating' CMV-based EBOV vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission in wildlife populations.

  17. Individual and bivalent vaccines based on alphavirus replicons protect guinea pigs against infection with Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushko, P; Geisbert, J; Parker, M; Jahrling, P; Smith, J

    2001-12-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccines for Lassa and Ebola viruses that are based on an RNA replicon vector derived from an attenuated strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. The Lassa and Ebola virus genes were expressed from recombinant replicon RNAs that also encoded the replicase function and were capable of efficient intracellular self-amplification. For vaccinations, the recombinant replicons were incorporated into virus-like replicon particles. Guinea pigs vaccinated with particles expressing Lassa virus nucleoprotein or glycoprotein genes were protected from lethal challenge with Lassa virus. Vaccination with particles expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein gene also protected the animals from lethal challenge with Ebola virus. In order to evaluate a single vaccine protecting against both Lassa and Ebola viruses, we developed dual-expression particles that expressed glycoprotein genes of both Ebola and Lassa viruses. Vaccination of guinea pigs with either dual-expression particles or with a mixture of particles expressing Ebola and Lassa virus glycoprotein genes protected the animals against challenges with Ebola and Lassa viruses. The results showed that immune responses can be induced against multiple vaccine antigens coexpressed from an alphavirus replicon and suggested the possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines based upon alphavirus vectors for arenaviruses, filoviruses, and possibly other emerging pathogens.

  18. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  19. Pathogen-nematode interaction: Nitrogen supply of Listeria monocytogenes during growth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Tanja; Kutzner, Erika; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2016-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultatively intracellular human pathogen. Due to its saprophytic lifestyle, L. monocytogenes is assumed to infect and proliferate within soil organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. However, little is known about the nutrient usages and metabolite fluxes in this bacterium-nematode interaction. Here, we established a nematode colonization model for L. monocytogenes and a method for the efficient separation of the pathogen from the nematodal gut. Following (15)N labelling of C. elegans and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based (15)N isotopologue analysis, we detected a high basal metabolic rate of the nematode, and observed a significant metabolic flux from nitrogenous compounds of the nematode to listerial proteins during proliferation of the pathogen in the worm's intestine. For comparison, we also measured the N fluxes from the gut content into listerial proteins using completely (15)N-labelled Escherichia coli OP50 as food for C. elegans. In both settings, L. monocytogenes prefers the direct incorporation of histidine, arginine and lysine over their de novo biosynthesis. Our data suggest that colonization of nematodes is a strategy of L. monocytogenes to increase its access to N-rich nutrients.

  20. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms by bacteriocin-producing bacteria isolated from mushroom substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolocan, A S; Pennone, V; O'Connor, P M; Coffey, A; Nicolau, A I; McAuliffe, O; Jordan, K

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the ability of naturally occurring bacteria isolated from mushroom substrate to prevent biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes or to remove existing biofilms in mushroom production facilities. It is generally recognized that L. monocytogenes forms biofilms that can facilitate its survival in food-processing environments. Eleven bacteriocin-producing isolates were identified and the bacteriocins characterized based on heat and enzyme inactivation studies. Further characterization was undertaken by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, PCR and sequencing. Production of nisin Z (by Lactococcus lactis isolates), subtilomycin (by Bacillus subtilis isolates) and lichenicidin (by Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus sonorensis isolates) was detected. In co-culture with L. monocytogenes, the bacteriocin-producing strains could prevent biofilm formation and reduce pre-formed biofilms. Mushroom substrate can be a source of bacteriocin-producing bacteria that can antagonize L. monocytogenes. The results highlight the potential of bacteriocin-producing strains from mushroom substrate to reduce L. monocytogenes biofilm in food production environments, contributing to a reduction in the risk of food contamination from the environment. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Vaccinating healthcare workers: Level of implementation, barriers and proposal for evidence-based policies in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozisik, Lale; Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Altınel, Serdar; Unal, Serhat

    2017-01-06

    The role of healthcare workers in life-long vaccination is very important in the means of 2 sided infection, rising patient awareness and being a role model for the patients. Numerous organizations publish guidelines for vaccination of HCWs, while healthcare facilities develop vaccination policies according to the accreditation standards. Nevertheless, vaccination rates among HCWs are far below targets. The obstacles to getting vaccinated or recommending vaccination may include rather universal factors such as the vaccine paradox, however in the case of HCWs, probably a different set of factors are included. The aims of this article are to gain an overview of vaccination strategies for HCWs, to assess the coverage rates of HCWs and make in-depth analyses of the potential barriers to vaccination and potential factors to motivate HCWs for vaccination in Turkey and to compare them with the global picture to improve implementation of policies concerning vaccination of HCWs.

  2. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal Pap smear - HPV vaccine; Vaccination - HPV vaccine ... and Gynecologists. Committee opinion No. 641: human papillomavirus vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2015;126(3):e38-e43. PMID: ...

  3. Listeria monocytogenes infection in pregnancy and neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pascale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors report a fatal neonatal sepsis caused by Listeria monocytogenes. While the diagnostic procedure aimed to identify the microrganism is described, it is emphasized the importance to recover Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS and L. monocytogenes by means of vaginal-rectal swab culture. The intrapartum screening for L. monocytogenes, by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR providing results in 75 minutes is also evaluated.

  4. Prediction of optimal vaccination timing for infectious bursal disease based on chick weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziry, Asaad; Venne, Daniel; Frenette, Diane; Gingras, Sylvain; Silim, Amer

    2007-12-01

    Growth rate in broiler birds has increased substantially in the last decade due to improvement in genetics, feed formulation, cleaner environment, and vaccine formulations. As a result, it has become necessary to review and revise prediction method for vaccination in chicks. This study was undertaken to determine the possible use of the rate of weight gain rather than age in predicting vaccination time. Two groups of 1-day-old broilers originating from old and young breeders, respectively, and with different levels of maternal antibodies against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were used in this study. The chicks were divided into four groups and subjected to two feed regiments: groups A1 and B1 were fed broiler feed for normal growth rate, and groups A2 and B2 were fed breeder feed for slower growth rate. At 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, 22, 29, and 36 days of age, 22 chicks in each group were weighed, and blood samples were collected. Serum samples were tested for antibodies against IBDV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and virus neutralization test. Maternal antibody decline curves for each group were plotted according to chick age and chick weight. Fast-growing birds in groups A1 and B1 showed a faster rate of antibody decline, whereas slow-growing birds in groups A2 and B2 had a slower rate of antibody decline. Based on the effect of weight gain on maternal antibody decline, a new way of predicting vaccination time for IBDV based on measuring maternal antibody titers at 4 days of age was proposed and tested. The predicted antibody decline was shown to correspond to the real ELISA titers measured in our experiments (R = 0.9889), whereas a lower correlation (R = 0.8355) was detected between real ELISA titers and the titers predicted by the current method using age-based Deventer formula.

  5. Safety of vaccinations in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes: a prospective registry based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Veronika K; Hoffman, Hal M; van der Poll, Tom; Tilson, Hugh; Seibert, Julia; Speziale, Antonio; Junge, Guido; Franke, Kristina; Vritzali, Eleni; Hawkins, Philip N; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Walker, Ulrich A

    2017-09-01

    Pneumococcal, tetanus and influenza vaccinations are recommended for patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) when treated with immunosuppressive medication. The aim of this publication is to report the safety of pneumococcal and other vaccinations in CAPS patients. All CAPS patients followed in the β-CONFIDENT (Clinical Outcomes and Safety Registry study of Ilaris patients) registry were analysed if they had received a vaccination. The β-CONFIDENT registry is a global, long-term, prospective, observational registry, capturing and monitoring patients treated with canakinumab. Sixty-eight CAPS patients had received a total of 159 vaccine injections, 107 injections against influenza, 19 pneumococcal vaccinations, 12 against tetanus/diphtheria antigens and 21 other vaccinations. Fourteen per cent of injections had elicited at least one vaccine reaction. All five vaccine-related serious adverse events were associated with pneumococcal vaccination. Vaccine reactions were observed in 70% of pneumococcal vaccinations, compared with 7% in influenza and 17% in tetanus/diphtheria vaccinations. The odds ratios to react to the pneumococcal vaccines compared with influenza and tetanus/diphtheria vaccines were 31.0 (95% CI: 8, 119) and 10.8 (95% CI: 2, 74). Vaccine reactions after pneumococcal vaccinations were more severe and lasted significantly longer (up to 3 weeks) compared with other vaccinations. In two patients, pneumococcal vaccination also elicited symptoms consistent with systemic inflammation due to CAPS reactivation. Pneumococcal vaccines, unlike other vaccines, frequently trigger severe local and systemic inflammation in CAPS patients. Clinicians must balance potential benefits of pneumococcal immunization against safety concerns. The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine might be favourable over the polysaccharide vaccine in CAPS patients.

  6. Protective-antigen (PA) based anthrax vaccines confer protection against inhalation anthrax by precluding the establishment of a systemic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Tod J; Perera, Pin-Yu; Lee, Gloria M; Verma, Anita; Hiroi, Toyoko; Yokote, Hiroyuki; Waldmann, Thomas A; Perera, Liyanage P

    2013-09-01

    An intense effort has been launched to develop improved anthrax vaccines that confer rapid, long lasting protection preferably with an extended stability profile amenable for stockpiling. Protective antigen (PA)-based vaccines are most favored as immune responses directed against PA are singularly protective, although the actual protective mechanism remains to be unraveled. Herein we show that contrary to the prevailing view, an efficacious PA-based vaccine confers protection against inhalation anthrax by preventing the establishment of a toxin-releasing systemic infection. Equally importantly, antibodies measured by the in vitro lethal toxin neutralization activity assay (TNA) that is considered as a reliable correlate of protection, especially for PA protein-based vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum salts appear to be not absolutely essential for this protective immune response.

  7. A protein-based pneumococcal vaccine protects rhesus macaques from pneumonia after experimental infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoël, Philippe; Philipp, Mario T; Doyle, Lara; Martin, Dale; Carletti, Georges; Poolman, Jan T

    2011-07-26

    Infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae are a major cause of mortality throughout the world. Protein-based pneumococcal vaccines are envisaged to replace or complement the current polysaccharide-based vaccines. In this context, detoxified pneumolysin (dPly) and pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD) are two potential candidates for incorporation into pneumococcal vaccines. In this study, the protective efficacy of a PhtD-dPly vaccine was evaluated in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model of pneumonia. The animals were immunized twice with 10 μg of PhtD and 10 μg of dPly formulated in the Adjuvant System AS02 or with AS02 alone, before they were challenged with a 19F pneumococcal strain. The survival was significantly higher in the protein-vaccinated group and seemed to be linked to the capacity to greatly reduce bacterial load within the first week post-challenge. Vaccination elicited high concentrations of anti-PhtD and anti-Ply antibodies and a link was found between survival and antibody levels. In conclusion, AS02-adjuvanted PhtD-dPly vaccine protects against S. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. It is probable that the protection is at least partially mediated by PhtD- and Ply-specific antibodies.

  8. PD-L1 peptide co-stimulation increases immunogenicity of a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Martinenaite, Evelina; Hansen, Morten; Junker, Niels; Borch, Troels Holz; Met, Özcan; Donia, Marco; Svane, Inge Marie; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2016-08-01

    We recently described naturally occurring PD-L1-specific T cells that recognize PD-L1-expressing immune cells as well as malignant cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the immunogenicity of a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine could be influenced by co-stimulation with a known PD-L1-derived epitope. We incubated a PD-L1-derived peptide epitope (19 amino acids long) or a control peptide (an irrelevant HIV epitope) with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with malignant melanoma who had received a DC-based vaccine. We observed a significantly higher number of T cells that reacted to the vaccine in cultures that had been co-stimulated with the PD-L1 peptide epitope compared to cultures incubated with control peptide. Next, we characterized a novel PD-L1-derived epitope (23 amino acids long) and found that co-stimulation with both PD-L1 epitopes boosted the immune response elicited by the DC vaccine even further. Consequently, we observed a significant increase in the number of vaccine-reacting T cells in vitro. In conclusion, activation of PD-L1-specific T cells may directly modulate immunogenicity of DC vaccines. Addition of PD-L1 epitopes may thus be an easily applicable and attractive option to augment the effectiveness of cancer vaccines and other immunotherapeutic agents.

  9. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and varying concentrations of sodium nitrite from traditional and vegetable-based sources on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat (RTE) sliced ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kevin; Cannon, Jerry; Montoya, Damian; Dickson, James; Lonergan, Steven; Sebranek, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect the source of added nitrite and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) had on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat (RTE) sliced ham. Use of 600MPa HHP for 3min resulted in an immediate 3.9-4.3log CFU/g reduction in L. monocytogenes numbers, while use of 400MPa HHP (3min) provided less than 1log CFU/g reduction. With the 600MPa HHP treatment, sliced ham with a conventional concentration of sodium nitrite (200ppm) was not different in L. monocytogenes growth from use with 50 or 100ppm of sodium nitrite in pre-converted celery powder. Instrumental color values as well as residual nitrite and residual nitrate concentrations for cured (sodium nitrite and nitrite from celery powder) and uncured ham formulations are discussed.

  10. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle-based vaccine increases protection against S. pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, Brittney [University of North Texas Health Science Center, Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology (United States); Thamake, Sanjay [Radio-Isotope Therapy of America Foundation (United States); Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P., E-mail: harlan.jones@unthsc.edu [University of North Texas Health Science Center, Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) technologies are becoming commonplace in the development of vaccine delivery systems to protect against various diseases. The current study determined the efficacy of intranasal delivery of a 234 {+-} 87.5 nm poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticle vaccine construct in establishing protection against experimental respiratory pneumococcal infection. Nanoparticles encapsulating heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae (NP-HKSP) were retained in the lungs 11 days following nasal administration compared to empty NP. Immunization with NP-HKSP produced significant resistance against S. pneumoniae infection compared to administration of HKSP alone. Increased protection correlated with a significant increase in antigen-specific Th1-associated IFN-{gamma} cytokine response by pulmonary lymphocytes. This study establishes the efficacy of NP-based technology as a non-invasive and targeted approach for nasal-pulmonary immunization against pulmonary infections.

  11. Development of live-attenuated arenavirus vaccines based on codon deoptimization of the viral glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Benson Y H; Nogales, Aitor; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2017-01-15

    Several arenaviruses, chiefly Lassa (LASV) in West Africa, cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans and pose important public health problems in their endemic regions. To date, there are no FDA-approved arenavirus vaccines and current anti-arenaviral therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin that has very limited efficacy. In this work we document that a recombinant prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) with a codon deoptimized (CD) surface glycoprotein (GP), rLCMV/CD, exhibited wild type (WT)-like growth properties in cultured cells despite barely detectable GP expression levels in rLCMV/CD-infected cells. Importantly, rLCMV/CD was highly attenuated in vivo but able to induce complete protection against a subsequent lethal challenge with rLCMV/WT. Our findings support the feasibility of implementing an arenavirus GP CD-based approach for the development of safe and effective live-attenuated vaccines (LAVs) to combat diseases caused by human pathogenic arenaviruses.

  12. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle-based vaccine increases protection against S. pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Brittney; Thamake, Sanjay; Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) technologies are becoming commonplace in the development of vaccine delivery systems to protect against various diseases. The current study determined the efficacy of intranasal delivery of a 234 ± 87.5 nm poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticle vaccine construct in establishing protection against experimental respiratory pneumococcal infection. Nanoparticles encapsulating heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae (NP-HKSP) were retained in the lungs 11 days following nasal administration compared to empty NP. Immunization with NP-HKSP produced significant resistance against S. pneumoniae infection compared to administration of HKSP alone. Increased protection correlated with a significant increase in antigen-specific Th1-associated IFN-γ cytokine response by pulmonary lymphocytes. This study establishes the efficacy of NP-based technology as a non-invasive and targeted approach for nasal-pulmonary immunization against pulmonary infections.

  13. Bringing plant-based veterinary vaccines to market: Managing regulatory and commercial hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Doshi, Ketan; Dussault, Marike; Hall, J Christopher; Holbrook, Larry; Jones, Ginny; Kaldis, Angelo; Klima, Cassidy L; Macdonald, Phil; McAllister, Tim; McLean, Michael D; Potter, Andrew; Richman, Alex; Shearer, Heather; Yarosh, Oksana; Yoo, Han Sang; Topp, Edward; Menassa, Rima

    2015-12-01

    The production of recombinant vaccines in plants may help to reduce the burden of veterinary diseases, which cause major economic losses and in some cases can affect human health. While there is abundant research in this area, a knowledge gap exists between the ability to create and evaluate plant-based products in the laboratory, and the ability to take these products on a path to commercialization. The current report, arising from a workshop sponsored by an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Co-operative Research Programme, addresses this gap by providing guidance in planning for the commercialization of plant-made vaccines for animal use. It includes relevant information on developing business plans, assessing market opportunities, manufacturing scale-up, financing, protecting and using intellectual property, and regulatory approval with a focus on Canadian regulations.

  14. Vaccine potential of plasma bead-based dual antigen delivery system against experimental murine candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ejaj; Zia, Qamar; Fatima, Munazza Tamkeen; Owais, Mohammad; Saleemuddin, Mohammed

    2015-11-01

    The development of prophylactic anti-candidal vaccine comprising the Candida albicans cytosolic proteins (Cp) as antigen and plasma beads (PB) prepared from plasma as sustained delivery system, is described. The immune-prophylactic potential of various PBs-based dual antigen delivery systems, co-entrapping Cp pre-entrapped in PLGA microspheres were tested in the murine model. Induction of cell mediated immunity was measured by assaying DTH and NO production as well as in vitro proliferation of lymphocytes derived from the immunized animals. Expression of surface markers on APCs (CD80, CD86) and T-cells (CD4+, CD8+) was also evaluated. Humoral immune response was studied by measuring circulating anti-Cp antibodies and their subclasses. When the prophylactic efficacy of the vaccines was tested in mice challenged with virulent C. albicans, the PB-based formulation (PB-PLGA-Cp vaccine) was found to be most effective in the generation of desirable immune response, in terms of suppression of fungal load and facilitating the survival of the immunized animals.

  15. A virus-like particle-based Epstein-Barr virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiss, Romana; Jochum, Simon; Wanner, Gerhard; Reisbach, Gilbert; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Zeidler, Reinhard

    2011-12-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is an ubiquitous human herpesvirus which can lead to infectious mononucleosis and different cancers. In immunocompromised individuals, this virus is a major cause for morbidity and mortality. Transplant patients who did not encounter EBV prior to immunosuppression frequently develop EBV-associated malignancies, but a prophylactic EBV vaccination might reduce this risk considerably. Virus-like particles (VLPs) mimic the structure of the parental virus but lack the viral genome. Therefore, VLPs are considered safe and efficient vaccine candidates. We engineered a dedicated producer cell line for EBV-derived VLPs. This cell line contains a genetically modified EBV genome which is devoid of all potential viral oncogenes but provides viral proteins essential for the assembly and release of VLPs via the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). Human B cells readily take up EBV-based VLPs and present viral epitopes in association with HLA molecules to T cells. Consequently, EBV-based VLPs are highly immunogenic and elicit humoral and strong CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses in vitro and in a preclinical murine model in vivo. Our findings suggest that VLP formulations might be attractive candidates to develop a safe and effective polyvalent vaccine against EBV.

  16. Polyacrylate-based delivery system for self-adjuvanting anticancer peptide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tzu-Yu; Hussein, Waleed M; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Jia, Zhongfan; Reiman, Jennifer M; Zaman, Mehfuz; McMillan, Nigel A J; Good, Michael F; Monteiro, Michael J; Toth, Istvan; Skwarczynski, Mariusz

    2015-01-22

    Vaccination can provide a safe alternative to chemotherapy by using the body's natural defense mechanisms to create a potent immune response against tumor cells. Peptide-based therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers are usually designed to elicit cytotoxic T cell responses by targeting the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein. However, peptides alone lack immunogenicity, and an additional adjuvant or external delivery system is required. In this study, we developed new polymer-peptide conjugates to create an efficient self-adjuvanting system for peptide-based therapeutic vaccines. These conjugates reduced tumor growth and eradicated E7-positive TC-1 tumors in mice after a "single shot" immunization, without the help from an external adjuvant. The new conjugates had a significantly higher anticancer efficacy than the antigen formulated with a commercial adjuvant. Furthermore, the polymer-peptide conjugates were promptly taken up by antigen presenting cells, including dendritic cells and macrophages, and efficiently activated CD4(+) T-helper cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte cells.

  17. Design of different strategies of multivalent DNA-based vaccination against rabies and canine distemper in mice and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touihri Leila

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the vaccination campaigns, puppies younger than 3 months old are not targeted and remain unvaccinated for at least the first year of their lives. Almost half of the reported rabid dogs are 6 months or younger. Hence, we should recommend the vaccination against rabies of young puppies. Unfortunately, owing to the exposure of puppies to infections with either canine parvovirus (CPV or distemper virus (CDV after the intervention of the vaccinators, owners are reluctant to vaccinate puppies against rabies. Therefore, it is necessary to include the CPV and CDV valences in the vaccine against rabies. Multivalent DNA-based vaccination in dogs, including rabies and distemper valences, could help in raising vaccine coverage. Methods We have designed monovalent and multivalent DNA-based vaccine candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays. These plasmids encode to the rabies virus glycoprotein and/or the canine distemper virus hemagglutinin. The first strategy of multivalent DNA-based vaccination is by mixing plasmids encoding to a single antigen each. The second is by simply fusing the genes of the antigens together. The third is by adding the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV 2A oligopeptide gene into the antigen genes. The last strategy is by the design and use of a bicistronic plasmid with an “Internal Ribosome Entry Site” (IRES domain. Results The monovalent construct against canine distemper was efficiently validated by inducing higher humoral immune responses compared to cell-culture-derived vaccine both in mice and dogs. All multivalent plasmids efficiently expressed both valences after in vitro transfection of BHK-21 cells. In BALB/c mice, the bicistronic IRES-dependant construct was the most efficient inducer of virus-neutralizing antibodies against both valences. It was able to induce better humoral immune responses compared to the administration of either cell-culture-derived vaccines or monovalent plasmids. The

  18. Expected epidemiological impacts of introducing an HIV vaccine in Thailand: a model-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Karen; Kerr, Cliff C; Hoare, Alexander; Wilson, David P

    2011-08-18

    The RV144 trial conducted in Thailand was the first to demonstrate modest protective efficacy of an HIV vaccine. Its estimated initial efficacy was ∼74%, but this waned considerably over time. We developed a mathematical model to reflect historical and current HIV trends across different at-risk populations in Thailand. The model was used to estimate the expected number of infections that would be averted if a vaccine with outcome characteristics similar to the RV144 vaccine was implemented in Thailand at varying levels of coverage. In the absence of a vaccine, we projected roughly 65,000 new HIV infections among adults during the period between 2011 and 2021. Due to the waning efficacy of the vaccine, vaccination campaigns were found to have modest long-term public health benefit unless re-vaccination occurred. We forecast that an RV144-like vaccine with coverage of 30% of the population would lead to a 3% reduction in HIV incidence during the next 10 years. In comparison, 30% coverage of annual or biennial re-vaccination with the vaccine was found to result in 23% and 14% reductions in incidence, respectively. Coverage of 60% without re-vaccination resulted in a 7% reduction. Epidemiological outcomes were found to depend primarily on three factors: vaccination coverage, vaccine efficacy, and the duration of protection the vaccine provided. Due to the short duration of protection the vaccine provides without re-vaccination, our model predicts modest benefit from a vaccination campaign with an RV144-like HIV vaccine in Thailand. Annual or biannual re-vaccination is predicted to greatly increase the long-term public health benefits of a vaccination campaign. The feasibility of vaccine implementation, as well as its economic viability, remains to be determined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The population impact of a large school-based influenza vaccination campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G Grijalva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The optimal vaccination strategy to mitigate the impact of influenza epidemics is unclear. In 2005, a countywide school-based influenza vaccination campaign was launched in Knox County, Tennessee (population 385,899. Approximately 41% and 48% of eligible county children aged 5-17 years were immunized with live attenuated influenza vaccine before the 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 influenza seasons, respectively. We sought to determine the population impact of this campaign. METHODS: Laboratory-confirmed influenza data defined influenza seasons. We calculated the incidence of medically attended acute respiratory illness attributable to influenza in Knox and Knox-surrounding counties (concurrent controls during consecutive seasons (5 precampaign and 2 campaign seasons using negative binomial regression and rate difference methods. Age-stratified analyses compared the incidence of emergency department (ED visits and hospitalizations attributable to influenza. RESULTS: During precampaign seasons, estimated ED visit rates attributable to influenza were 12.39 (95% CI: 10.34-14.44 per 1000 Knox children aged 5-17 years and similar in Knox-surrounding counties. During the campaign seasons, annual Knox influenza-associated ED visit rates declined relative to rates in Knox-surrounding counties: rate ratios 0.55 (95% CI: 0.27-0.83 and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56-0.84 for the first and second campaign seasons, respectively. Overall, there were about 35% or 4.86 per 1000 fewer influenza-associated ED visits among Knox County children aged 5-17 years attributable to the campaign. No significant declines in Knox compared to surrounding counties were detected for influenza associated ED visits in children aged <5 years, all adults combined or selected adult age subgroups, although power for these analyses was limited. Alternate rate-difference analyses yielded consistent results. CONCLUSION: Vaccination of approximately 45% of Knox school-aged children with

  20. An immunogenic and protective alphavirus replicon particle-based dengue vaccine overcomes maternal antibody interference in weanling mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Parsons, Melissa M; Whitmore, Alan C; Williams, Brandon M; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    A candidate pediatric dengue virus (DENV) vaccine based on nonpropagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) was tested for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in weanling mice in the presence and absence of potentially interfering maternal antibodies. A gene cassette encoding envelope proteins prM and E from mouse-adapted DENV type 2 (DENV2) strain NGC was cloned into a VEE replicon vector and packaged into VRP, which programmed proper in vitro expression and processing of DENV2 envelope proteins upon infection of Vero cells. Primary immunization of 3-week-old weanling BALB/c mice in the footpad with DENV2 VRP resulted in high levels of DENV-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and significant titers of neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinates. A booster immunization 12 weeks after the prime immunization resulted in increased neutralizing antibodies that were sustained for at least 30 weeks. Immunization at a range of doses of DENV2 VRP protected mice from an otherwise-lethal intracranial DENV2 challenge. To model vaccination in the presence of maternal antibodies, weanling pups born to DENV2-immune or DENV2-naïve dams were immunized with either DENV2 VRP or live DENV2 given peripherally. The DENV2 VRP vaccine induced neutralizing-antibody responses in young mice regardless of the maternal immune status. In contrast, live-DENV2 vaccination performed poorly in the presence of preexisting anti-DENV2 antibodies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a VRP vaccine approach as an early-life DENV vaccine in populations with high levels of circulating DENV antibodies and suggests the utility of VRP-based vaccines in other instances where maternal antibodies make early vaccination problematic.

  1. EVALUATION OF OIL BASED AVIAN INFLUENZA VACCINE (H5NI PREPARED WITH DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF ADJUVANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. IQBAL, M. NISAR, ANWARUL-HAQ, S. NOOR AND Z. J. GILL

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bird flu vaccine from H5N1 strain of avian influenza virus was prepared with two concentrations of adjuvant (Montanide ISA 70MVG. Two vaccines (I and II were prepared containing 50 and 60% Montanide, respectively. Immune response of both the vaccines as single, as well as booster, dose was evaluated in layer birds through haemagglutination inhibition test. Single dose of both vaccines showed poor immune response, while booster dose gave better response with both the vaccines. However, the vaccine prepared with 60% Montanide provided better immune response compared with the vaccine containing 50% montanide.

  2. Loss of viability of Listeria monocytogenes in contaminated processed cheese during storage at 4, 12 and 22 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidis, Apostolos S; Boutsiouki, Paraskevi; Papageorgiou, Demetrios K

    2010-09-01

    The behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes in a processed cheese product was evaluated over time by inoculating the product with three different L. monocytogenes strains (Scott A, CA and a strain isolated from processed cheese) at three different inoculation levels (ca. 6x10(5), ca. 6x10(3) and 10(2)CFU/g of cheese or less) and after storage of the contaminated products at 4, 12 or 22 degrees C. Growth of L. monocytogenes was not observed in any of the experimental trials (experiments involving different combinations of strain, inoculum level and storage temperature) throughout the storage period. L. monocytogenes populations decreased over time with a rate that was strain- and storage temperature-dependent. Nonetheless, for cheeses that had been inoculated with the higher inoculum and stored at 4 degrees C viable populations of L. monocytogenes could be detected for up to nine months post-inoculation. The L. monocytogenes survival curves obtained from the different trials were characterised by a post-inoculation phase during which the populations remained essentially unchanged (lag phase) followed by a phase of logarithmic decline. The duration of the lag phase and the rate of inactivation of L. monocytogenes in the different trials were estimated based on data from the linear descending portions of the survival curves. In addition, a non-linear Weibull-type equation was fitted to the data from each survival curve with satisfactory results. The results of the present study emphasize that, according to the definition laid down in the European Union Regulation 1441/2007, the processed cheese product tested in this work should be considered and classified as one that does not support the growth of L. monocytogenes under reasonable foreseeable conditions of distribution and storage. However, post-processing contamination of the product should be austerely avoided as the pathogen can survive in the product for extended periods of time, particularly under refrigerated

  3. Diverse Geno- and Phenotypes of Persistent Listeria monocytogenes Isolates from Fermented Meat Sausage Production Facilities in Portugal ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V.; Barbosa, J.; Stasiewicz, M.; Vongkamjan, K.; Moreno Switt, A.; Hogg, T.; Gibbs, P.; Teixeira, P.; Wiedmann, M.

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in food-associated environments represents a key factor in transmission of this pathogen. To identify persistent and transient strains associated with production of fermented meat sausages in northern Portugal, 1,723 L. monocytogenes isolates from raw material and finished products from 11 processors were initially characterized by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), PCR-based molecular serotyping, and epidemic clone characterization, as well as cadmium, arsenic, and tetracycline resistance typing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing of 240 representative isolates provided evidence for persistence of L. monocytogenes for periods of time ranging from 10 to 32 months for all seven processors for which isolates from different production dates were available. Among 50 L. monocytogenes isolates that included one representative for each PFGE pattern obtained from a given sample, 12 isolates showed reduced invasion efficiency in Caco-2 cells, including 8 isolates with premature stop codons in inlA. Among 41 isolates representing sporadic and persistent PFGE types, 22 isolates represented lysogens. Neither strains with reduced invasion nor lysogens were overrepresented among persistent isolates. While the susceptibility of isolates to lysogenic phages also did not correlate with persistence, it appeared to be associated with molecular serotype. Our data show the following. (i) RAPD may not be suitable for analysis of large sets of L. monocytogenes isolates. (ii) While a large diversity of L. monocytogenes subtypes is found in Portuguese fermented meat sausages, persistence of L. monocytogenes in this food chain is common. (iii) Persistent L. monocytogenes strains are diverse and do not appear to be characterized by unique genetic or phenotypic characteristics. PMID:21378045

  4. PCR experion automated electrophoresis system to detect Listeria monocytogenes in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibato, Elisabetta; Gattuso, Antonietta; Minucci, Angelo; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Toti, Laura; Castagnola, Massimo; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gianfranceschi, Monica Virginia

    2009-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is frequently found as a contaminant in raw and ready-to-eat foods. The ability of L. monocytogenes to multiply at refrigeration temperatures and to grow in a wide range of pH values is of particular concern for food safety. According to the European Union regulation on microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, L. monocytogenes must be absent in some categories of ready-to-eat foods. The standard microbiological method for L. monocytogenes detection in foods (ISO 11290-1: 1996 (ISO, International Organization for Standardization)) is cost and time consuming. Developments of rapid, cost-effective and automated diagnostic methods to detect food-borne pathogens in foods continue to be a major concern for the industry and public health. The aim of this study was the development of a rapid, sensitive and specific molecular detection method for L. monocytogenes. To this purpose, we have applied a capillary electrophoresis method to a PCR protocol (PCR-EES (EES, experion automated electrophoresis system)) for detecting L. monocytogenes in food. In particular, a microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system (experion automated electrophoresis system, Bio-Rad Laboratories, USA) was used for the rapid and automatic analysis of the amplicons. Fifty naturally contaminated samples were analysed with this method and the results were compared with those obtained with ISO method. Moreover, the microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system was compared with classical gel electrophoresis (PCR-CGE). The results showed that after 24 h of culture enrichment, the PCR-EES showed a relative accuracy of 100% with ISO, while using PCR-CGE decreased it down to 96%. After 48 h of enrichment, both PCR-EES and PCR-CGE showed an accuracy of 100% with ISO.

  5. A single-dose cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding tetanus toxin fragment C induces sustained levels of protective tetanus toxin antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Rob; Nakai, Toru; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Fairweather, Neil F; Sesardic, Dorothea; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-04-26

    The current commercially available vaccine used to prevent tetanus disease following infection with the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium tetani is safe and effective. However, tetanus remains a major source of mortality in developing countries. In 2008, neonatal tetanus was estimated to have caused >59,000 deaths, accounting for 1% of worldwide infant mortality, primarily in poorer nations. The cost of multiple vaccine doses administered by injection necessary to achieve protective levels of anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies is the primary reason for low vaccine coverage. Herein, we show that a novel vaccine strategy using a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine platform induces protective levels of anti-tetanus antibodies that are durable (lasting >13 months) in mice following only a single dose. This study demonstrates the ability of a 'single-dose' CMV-based vaccine strategy to induce durable protection, and supports the potential for a tetanus vaccine based on CMV to impact the incidence of tetanus in developing countries.

  6. Antibody quality and protection from lethal Ebola virus challenge in nonhuman primates immunized with rabies virus based bivalent vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Blaney

    Full Text Available We have previously described the generation of a novel Ebola virus (EBOV vaccine platform based on (a replication-competent rabies virus (RABV, (b replication-deficient RABV, or (c chemically inactivated RABV expressing EBOV glycoprotein (GP. Mouse studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of these live or inactivated RABV/EBOV vaccines. Here, we evaluated these vaccines in nonhuman primates. Our results indicate that all three vaccines do induce potent immune responses against both RABV and EBOV, while the protection of immunized animals against EBOV was largely dependent on the quality of humoral immune response against EBOV GP. We also determined if the induced antibodies against EBOV GP differ in their target, affinity, or the isotype. Our results show that IgG1-biased humoral responses as well as high levels of GP-specific antibodies were beneficial for the control of EBOV infection after immunization. These results further support the concept that a successful EBOV vaccine needs to induce strong antibodies against EBOV. We also showed that a dual vaccine against RABV and filoviruses is achievable; therefore addressing concerns for the marketability of this urgently needed vaccine.

  7. Airway administration of a highly versatile peptide-based liposomal construct for local and distant antitumoral vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakhi, Zahra; Frisch, Benoît; Bourel-Bonnet, Line; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Pons, Françoise; Heurtault, Béatrice

    2015-12-30

    With the discovery of tumor-associated antigens such as ErbB2, vaccination is considered as a promising strategy to prevent the development of cancer or treat the existing disease. Among routes of immunization, the respiratory route provides the opportunity to develop non-invasive approach for vaccine delivery. In the current study, this administration route was used in order to investigate the potency of a highly versatile di-epitopic liposomal construct to exhibit local or distant antitumoral efficiency after prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination in mice. Well-characterized liposomes, containing the ErbB2 (p63-71) TCD8(+) and HA (p307-319) TCD4(+) peptide epitopes and the Pam2CAG adjuvant, were formulated and administered into the airway of naïve BALB/c mice. The nanoparticle vaccine candidate induced local and specific systemic immune response, as measured by immune cell infiltration and chemokine and cytokine production in BALF or lung tissue, and by spleen T-cell activation ex vivo, respectively. This potent immune response resulted in an efficient antitumor activity against both lung and solid s.c. tumors. Interestingly, the antitumor efficacy was observed after both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations, which are the most judicious ones to fight cancer. Our data showed an undeniable interest of liposomal peptide-based vaccines in antitumor vaccination by the respiratory route, opening new perspectives for cancer treatment.

  8. Prevalence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes contamination of seafood varies with product category. The highest prevalence was found in cold- smoked fish (34-60%), while the lowest was found in heat- treated and cured seafood (4-12%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes differed greatly in cold-smoked salmon between...... production sites, ranging from monocytogenes. The organism showed moderate growth...... in naturally contaminated cold-smoked, and 'gravad', fish while the growth appeared faster in hot smoked fish. Thus L. monocytogenes is not under control in these products. Finally, the prevalence and growth of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon are discussed in relation...

  9. Prevalence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes contamination of seafood varies with product category. The highest prevalence was found in cold- smoked fish (34-60%), while the lowest was found in heat- treated and cured seafood (4-12%). The prevalence of L. monocytogenes differed greatly in cold-smoked salmon between...... production sites, ranging from monocytogenes. The organism showed moderate growth...... in naturally contaminated cold-smoked, and 'gravad', fish while the growth appeared faster in hot smoked fish. Thus L. monocytogenes is not under control in these products. Finally, the prevalence and growth of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon are discussed in relation...

  10. BIOTECON diagnostics foodproof Listeria monocytogenes Detection Kit, 5' nuclease in combination with the foodproof ShortPrep II Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, Benjamin; Grönewald, Cordt; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food. The method is based on real-time PCR using hydrolysis probes (5' Nuclease). This advanced PCR method was designed to reduce the time necessary to achieve results from PCR reactions and to enable the user to monitor the amplification of the PCR product simultaneously, in real-time. After DNA isolation using the BIOTECON foodproof ShortPrep II Kit designed for the rapid preparation of L. monocytogenes DNA for direct use in PCR, the real-time detection of L. monocytogenes DNA is carried out using the foodproof Listeria monocytogenes Detection Kit. The kit provides primers and hydrolysis probes for sequence-specific detection, convenient premixed reagents, and controls for reliable interpretation of results. For the internal comparison study, three different foods (soft cheese, coalfish, and smoked ham) were analyzed, chosen from the 15 food groups recommended by the AOAC Research Institute for detection of L. monocytogenes. From each food, 20 samples were inoculated with a low level (1-10 CFU/25 g) and 20 samples with a high level (10-50 CFU/25 g) of L. monocytogenes. Additionally, five nonspiked samples were prepared from each food. Depending on the matrix, the food samples were examined with the test kits and compared with the cultural methods according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual or the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook.

  11. Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase I (FabI) Is Essential for the Intracellular Growth of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Megan E.; Frank, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase catalyzes the last step in each elongation cycle of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is a key regulatory protein in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Genes of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encode two functional enoyl-acyl carrier protein isoforms based on their ability to complement the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of Escherichia coli strain JP1111 [fabI(Ts)]. The FabI isoform was inactivated by the FabI selective inhibitor AFN-1252, but the FabK isoform was not affected by the drug, as expected. Inhibition of FabI by AFN-1252 decreased endogenous fatty acid synthesis by 80% and lowered the growth rate of L. monocytogenes in laboratory medium. Robust exogenous fatty acid incorporation was not detected in L. monocytogenes unless the pathway was partially inactivated by AFN-1252 treatment. However, supplementation with exogenous fatty acids did not restore normal growth in the presence of AFN-1252. FabI inactivation prevented the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes, showing that neither FabK nor the incorporation of host cellular fatty acids was sufficient to support the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. Our results show that FabI is the primary enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is essential for the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:27736774

  12. Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase I (FabI) Is Essential for the Intracellular Growth of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiangwei; Ericson, Megan E; Frank, Matthew W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-12-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase catalyzes the last step in each elongation cycle of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is a key regulatory protein in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Genes of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encode two functional enoyl-acyl carrier protein isoforms based on their ability to complement the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of Escherichia coli strain JP1111 [fabI(Ts)]. The FabI isoform was inactivated by the FabI selective inhibitor AFN-1252, but the FabK isoform was not affected by the drug, as expected. Inhibition of FabI by AFN-1252 decreased endogenous fatty acid synthesis by 80% and lowered the growth rate of L. monocytogenes in laboratory medium. Robust exogenous fatty acid incorporation was not detected in L. monocytogenes unless the pathway was partially inactivated by AFN-1252 treatment. However, supplementation with exogenous fatty acids did not restore normal growth in the presence of AFN-1252. FabI inactivation prevented the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes, showing that neither FabK nor the incorporation of host cellular fatty acids was sufficient to support the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes Our results show that FabI is the primary enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is essential for the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Vaccination as primary prevention? The effect of anti-pneumococcal vaccination on the outcome of patients suffering traumatic skull base fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Kachel, Alon; Levi, Leon; Zaaroor, Menashe

    2017-06-01

    As many as 360,000 people suffer yearly from skull base fractures (SBF). These may be associated with a dural tear, hemosinus, otorrhea or rhinorrhea. The most common causative agent of post-traumatic meningitis is Streptococcus Pneumonia (Pneumococcus). PNEUMOVAX 23 is a potent vaccine against Pneumococcus, but head trauma involving any skull fractures are not defined indications for its use. Our aim was to identify the effect of PNEUMOVAX on the natural course and incidence of infections and infectious prognosis following SBF. A retrospective review of patients suffering a traumatic SBF who were admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery at a single tertiary hospital referred from the entire north of Israel during 2002-2009 were characterized. Six hundred and two patients patients were included in the study; 99 patients received the PNEUMOVAX in the first few days of hospitalization, while 503 patients did not. Demographic data, presenting symptoms, chronic illnesses and radiologic features were logged. Treatment regimens were logged as well, including the use of PNEUMOVAX vaccine. Outcome parameters including infectious complications and functional state were logged at different set time points after admission. The group receiving the vaccine had a significantly older mean age, higher incidence of obesity, higher rate of headache or confusion on presentation, and a significantly higher incidence of additional cranial injuries. All these factors, known to worsen the outcome of SBF patients did not manifest in the vaccinated group. There was no statistically significant differences between the groups in the outcome parameters measured (fever, meningitis, mortality or length of hospitalization). We suggest that patients with a more severe status upon admission may benefit from a prophylactic treatment with the PNEUMOVAX vaccine.

  14. Limitations of the rabbit pyrogen test for assessing meningococcal OMV based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipond, Caroline; Findlay, Lucy; Feavers, Ian; Care, Rory

    2016-01-01

    The rabbit pyrogen test was developed in the early 1900's to detect contaminating pyrogens in parenteral medicines. Since its conception alternative methods with improved sensitivity, relevancy and which are ethically more acceptable have been developed. However, the test is a current Pharmacopeial method and is used to evaluate the pyrogen content of some vaccines. In this article the limitations and pitfalls of using the test to measure pyrogenicity of vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles are described. The method is unsuitable as a safety test for these products due to the high levels of endotoxin present in the vaccine which generate a pyrogenic response in rabbits when delivered intravenously without any dilution. Its use as a consistency test is also ambiguous as the test gives a qualitative rather than quantitative response and the rabbit models are highly variable. In addition there is evidence that measuring the temperature rise of the animals over three hours does not capture the maximum fever response. Finally the article considers the use of alternative methods and the validity of animal models when applying a consistency based approach for assessing the quality of licensed products.

  15. Influvac: a safe Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell culture-based influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, R; Visser, J; Medema, J; Palache, A M; van Scharrenburg, G J

    1999-01-01

    Influenza vaccine production technology based on large scale cell culture technology has been developed. From the characterization of the continuous cell line MDCK as well as drug safety studies we conclude that this cell line and the cell culture system are suitable for biological production. The Down Stream Process (DSP) of the virus-containing harvest fluids guarantees sufficient inactivation of influenza viruses and adequate removal or inactivation of putative adventitious or endogenous viruses, mycoplasma or bacteria. Our data indicate that the tissue culture-based production technology is feasible.

  16. Listeria monocytogenes survival in refrigerator dill pickles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyung; D'Sa, Elaine M; Harrison, Mark A; Harrison, Judy A; Andress, Elizabeth L

    2005-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can survive and grow in refrigerated foods with pH values of approximately 4.0 to 5.0 and salt concentrations of 3 to 4%. Home-fermented refrigerator dill pickles fit this description. Contamination of this product with L. monocytogenes could cause serious problems because these items are not heated prior to consumption. L. monocytogenes survival and growth patterns were investigated in refrigerator dill pickles at 1.3, 3.8, and 7.6% salt concentrations. Pickling cucumbers were dipped into an inoculum of L. monocytogenes, brine mixtures were added, and cucumbers were held at room temperature for 1 week and then refrigerated for up to 3 months. The pH, NaCl percentage, titratable acidity percentage, and total populations of Listeria and aerobic, psychrotrophic, and lactic acid bacteria were measured at the addition of brine, after 2, 4, and 7 days of storage at room temperature, and then weekly during refrigerated storage. The initial Listeria population was 5.4 to 5.6 log CFU/cm2 on cucumber surfaces and 3.9 to 4.6 log CFU/g internally. There was an approximate 0.3- to 1-log increase during room temperature fermentation followed by a population decline during refrigerator storage, with a greater decrease in the brines with the highest NaCl concentration. Up to 49 days, the internal tissue of pickles with 1.3, 3.8, or 7.6% salt concentrations were presumptively positive for L. monocytogenes by the enrichment method, and at 91 days the surfaces of such pickles were still positive for L. monocytogenes. Populations of total aerobes and lactic acid bacteria increased during room temperature storage and decreased gradually during refrigerated storage.

  17. Plant based oral vaccines for human and animal pathogens – a new era of prophylaxis: current and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Dhama

    Full Text Available Vaccination remains a high priority for animal disease prevention and control especially on account of rising antimicrobial resistant strains of pathogens and frightening increase in new emerging and reemerging pathogens. Traditional vaccines have limitation like residual virulence, need of extensive safety precautions, production difficulty and huge initial investments. Additionally, they are inefficient in producing a protective response at mucosal surfaces such as of lungs and intestinal tract, the actual sites where disease agents enter the body. Recent advances in plant molecular farming has resulted in genetic manipulations in plants to make them bioreactors for production of various recombinant proteins, by using infectious vectors or stable transgenic systems, which formulate the edible/oral vaccines. Such plant-based oral/edible vaccines have several advantages like they are functionally similar to conventional vaccines, demonstrate extended storage period in food grains, are heat-stable and does not require cold storage, eliminate need for expensive purification steps, are free from contaminating pathogens, can be produced in large scale in a time bound fashion and their delivery is easier with practical feasibility for large masses application. Additionally, these are also ideal for vaccination of animals and birds living in the wild areas thereby preventing many zoonoses. However, at this moment there are many practical challenges like degradation of vaccine antigen by enzymes of upper digestive tract, dosage regime, oral tolerance and the issues concerned to the use of genetically modified plant. In the near future the biomedical applications of these vaccines could become a common alternative to conventional vaccines, for which there is a great need to strengthen research and development activities in this promising area for protecting health of animals as well as of humans.

  18. Development of a Time and Cost Benefit Antibody Binding Test-Based Method for Determination of Rabies Vaccine Potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Vahid; Mojtabavi, Nazanin; Janani, Alireza; Mousavi, Tahereh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Khosravy, Mohammad Sadeq; Ahangari Cohan, Reza

    2017-01-24

    This study is an improvement on the antibody binding test, known as ABT method, to develop a simple and fast method in comparison with NIH for determination of rabies vaccine potency. In the current study, several commercial human and veterinary vaccines were tested using both modified ABT and NIH methods. The ED50 was calculated using the probit method and the relative potency of each vaccine was measured based on the reference vaccine. The test was repeated four times to calculate the reproducibility of the method. Statistical analysis indicated that there was no significant difference between the result obtained from NIH and modified ABT method for either human or veterinary vaccines (p > 0.05). In addition, the linearity of the method (R(2)) was calculated as 0.94 by serial dilution of a test vaccine. Coefficient variances were determined as less than and more than 10% for the human and veterinary rabies vaccines, respectively. In conclusion, the findings suggest that the modified method could be considered as an alternative approach for rabies vaccine potency determination in in-process quality control tests at industrial scale. It is a time and cost benefit method and accuracy may further be increased by employing monoclonal antibodies against trimeric form of G glycoprotein. However, the use of serum samples may be useful compared with an artificial mix of antibodies because other components from the serum samples could have a positive impact on cell sensitivity and mimic more the complexity of the immune response. Although the modified test has solved a fundamental problem, it is still not sensitive enough for veterinary vaccine assessment and needs further modifications to obtain the acceptability criteria.

  19. Development of a Sterne-Based Complement Fixation Test to Monitor the Humoral Response Induced by Anthrax Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adone, Rosanna; Sali, Michela; Francia, Massimiliano; Iatarola, Michela; Donatiello, Adelia; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis spore-forming bacterium. Since it is primarily a disease of animals, the control in animals, and humans depend on the prevention in livestock, principally cattle, sheep, and goats. Most veterinary vaccines utilize the toxigenic, uncapsulated (pXO1+/pXO2–) B. anthracis strain 34F2 which affords protection through the production of neutralizing antibodies directed to the toxin components Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal Factor (LF), and Edema Factor (EF). The titration of specific antibodies in sera of vaccinated animals is crucial to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccination and to obtain epidemiological information for an effective anthrax surveillance. In this study, we developed a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test (CFT) to detect specific antibodies induced in animals vaccinated with Sterne 34F2. We assessed its efficacy in laboratory animals and under field conditions by monitoring the humoral response induced by vaccination in cattle. The results indicated that the Sterne-based CFT is able to correctly identify vaccinated animals. It proved to be a very sensitive and specific test. Moreover, the Sterne-based CFT offers many benefits with regard to costs, standardization and reproducibility of the assay procedure. PMID:26858700

  20. Mimotope-based vaccines of Leishmania infantum antigens and their protective efficacy against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourena Emanuele Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of cost-effective prophylactic strategies to prevent leishmaniasis has become a high-priority. The present study has used the phage display technology to identify new immunogens, which were evaluated as vaccines in the murine model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Epitope-based immunogens, represented by phage-fused peptides that mimic Leishmania infantum antigens, were selected according to their affinity to antibodies from asymptomatic and symptomatic VL dogs' sera. METHODOLOGY/MAIN FINDINGS: Twenty phage clones were selected after three selection cycles, and were evaluated by means of in vitro assays of the immune stimulation of spleen cells derived from naive and chronically infected with L. infantum BALB/c mice. Clones that were able to induce specific Th1 immune response, represented by high levels of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4 were selected, and based on their selectivity and specificity, two clones, namely B10 and C01, were further employed in the vaccination protocols. BALB/c mice vaccinated with clones plus saponin showed both a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with individual clones or L. infantum extracts. Additionally, these animals, when compared to control groups (saline, saponin, wild-type phage plus saponin, or non-relevant phage clone plus saponin, showed significant reductions in the parasite burden in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, mainly by CD8+ T cells, against parasite proteins. These animals also presented decreased parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 responses, and increased levels of parasite-specific IgG2a antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes two phage clones that mimic L. infantum antigens, which were directly used as immunogens in vaccines and presented Th1-type immune responses, and that significantly reduced the

  1. Metal based nanoparticles as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage based antitumor vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Mandal, Debasis; Das, Balaram; Tripathy, Satyajit; Dey, Aditi; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2016-02-10

    In the present study, we would like to evaluate the efficacy of modified metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage (MФs) based antitumor vaccine. The cobalt oxide nanoparticles (CoO NPs) were promising tools for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells and have induced an antitumor immune response. Synthesized CoO NPs were modified by N-phosphonomethyliminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), facilitated the conjugation of lysate antigen, i.e. cancer antigen derived from lysis of cancer cells. The cancer cell lysate antigen conjugated PMIDA-CoO NPs (Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs) successfully activated macrophage (MФ) evident by the increasing the serum IFN-γ and TNF-α level. Immunization of mice with the Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs constructed an efficient immunological adjuvant induced anticancer IgG responses, and increased the antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) response than only lysate antigen treated group to combat the cancer cell. The nanocomplexes enhanced the anticancer CD4(+)T cell response in mice. The result showed that Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs can stimulate the immune responses over only lysate antigens, which are the most important findings in this study. These NP-mediated Ag deliveries may significantly improve the anticancer immune response by activating MФs and may act as adjuvant and will balance the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immunoresponse. The crosstalk between the activated MФ with other immune competent cells will be monitored by measuring the cytokines which illustrate the total immunological network setups.

  2. Sex-based differences in immune function and responses to vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sabra L.; Marriott, Ian; Fish, Eleanor N.

    2015-01-01

    Females typically develop higher antibody responses and experience more adverse reactions following vaccination than males. These differences are observed in response to diverse vaccines, including the bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine, the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, the yellow fever virus vaccine and influenza vaccines. Sex differences in the responses to vaccines are observed across diverse age groups, ranging from infants to aged individuals. Biological as well as behavioral differences between the sexes are likely to contribute to differences in the outcome of vaccination between the sexes. Immunological, hormonal, genetic and microbiota differences between males and females may also affect the outcome of vaccination. Identifying ways to reduce adverse reactions in females and increase immune responses in males will be necessary to adequately protect both sexes against infectious diseases. PMID:25573105

  3. Innovative bioinformatic approaches for developing peptide-based vaccines against hypervariable viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirskyj, Danylo; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Golshani, Ashkan; Kumar, Ashok; Azizi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The application of the fields of pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics to vaccine design has been recently labeled 'vaccinomics'. This newly named area of vaccine research, heavily intertwined with bioinformatics, seems to be leading the charge in developing novel vaccines for currently unmet medical needs against hypervariable viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C and emerging avian and swine influenza. Some of the more recent bioinformatic approaches in the area of vaccine research include the use of epitope determination and prediction algorithms for exploring the use of peptide epitopes as vaccine immunogens. This paper briefly discusses and explores some current uses of bioinformatics in vaccine design toward the pursuit of peptide vaccines for hypervariable viruses. The various informatics and vaccine design strategies attempted by other groups toward hypervariable viruses will also be briefly examined, along with the strategy used by our group in the design and synthesis of peptide immunogens for candidate HIV and influenza vaccines.

  4. Novel GMO-Based Vaccines against Tuberculosis: State of the Art and Biosafety Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunda, Amaya; Baldo, Aline; Goossens, Martine; Huygen, Kris; Herman, Philippe; Romano, Marta

    2014-06-16

    Novel efficient vaccines are needed to control tuberculosis (TB), a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several TB vaccine candidates are currently in clinical and preclinical development. They fall into two categories, the one of candidates designed as a replacement of the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) to be administered to infants and the one of sub-unit vaccines designed as booster vaccines. The latter are designed as vaccines that will be administered to individuals already vaccinated with BCG (or in the future with a BCG replacement vaccine). In this review we provide up to date information on novel tuberculosis (TB) vaccines in development focusing on the risk assessment of candidates composed of genetically modified organisms (GMO) which are currently evaluated in clinical trials. Indeed, these vaccines administered to volunteers raise biosafety concerns with respect to human health and the environment that need to be assessed and managed.

  5. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Vaccine Safety Smallpox Vaccine Safety Common Concerns Adjuvants Autism CDC Statement: 2004 Pediatrics Paper on MMR and Autism Fainting (Syncope) Febrile ...

  6. Development of a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test to monitor the humoral response induced by anthrax vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna eAdone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis spore-forming bacterium. Since it is primarily a disease of animals, the control in animals and humans depends on the prevention in livestock, principally cattle, sheep and goats. Most veterinary vaccines utilize the toxigenic, uncapsulated (pXO1+/pXO2– B.anthracis strain 34F2 which affords protection through the production of neutralizing antibodies directed to the toxin components Protective Antigen (PA, Lethal Factor (LF and Edema Factor (EF. The titration of specific antibodies in sera of vaccinated animals is crucial to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccination and to obtain epidemiological information for an effective anthrax surveillance. In this study, we developed a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test to detect specific antibodies induced in animals vaccinated with Sterne 34F2 . We assessed its efficacy in laboratory animals and under field conditions by monitoring the humoral response induced by vaccination in cattle. The results indicated that the Sterne-based CFT is able to identify vaccinated animals with a good sensitivity and specificity offering many benefits especially with regard to costs, standardization and reproducibility of the assay procedure.

  7. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against aerosol challenge with Ebola and Marburg viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Daddario-Dicaprio, Kathleen M; Geisbert, Joan B; Reed, Douglas S; Feldmann, Friederike; Grolla, Allen; Ströher, Ute; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Hensley, Lisa E; Jones, Steven M; Feldmann, Heinz

    2008-12-09

    Considerable progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against Ebola and Marburg viruses. A vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) seems to be particularly robust as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. While filoviruses are not thought to be transmitted by aerosol in nature the inhalation route is among the most likely portals of entry in the setting of a bioterrorist event. At present, all candidate filoviral vaccines have been evaluated against parenteral challenges but none have been tested against an aerosol exposure. Here, we evaluated our recombinant VSV-based Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) vaccines against aerosol challenge in cynomolgus macaques. All monkeys vaccinated with a VSV vector expressing the glycoprotein of ZEBOV were completely protected against an aerosol exposure of ZEBOV. Likewise, all monkeys vaccinated with a VSV vector expressing the glycoprotein of MARV were completely protected against an aerosol exposure of MARV. All control animals challenged by the aerosol route with either ZEBOV or MARV succumbed. Interestingly, disease in control animals appeared to progress slower than previously seen in macaques exposed to comparable doses by intramuscular injection.

  8. Evaluation of an α synuclein sensitized dendritic cell based vaccine in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugen, Kenneth E; Lin, Xiaoyang; Bai, Ge; Liang, Zhanhua; Cai, Jianfeng; Li, Kunyun; Song, Shijie; Cao, Chuanhai; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop a cell-based vaccine against the Parkinson disease (PD) associated protein α-synuclein (α-Syn) 3 peptides were synthesized based upon predicted B cell epitopes within the full length α-Syn protein sequence. These peptide fragments as well as the full length recombinant human α-Syn (rh- α-Syn) protein were used to sensitize mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) ex vivo, followed by intravenous delivery of these sensitized DCs into transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human A53T variant of α-Syn. ELISA analysis and testing of behavioral locomotor function by rotometry were performed on all mice after the 5th vaccination as well as just prior to euthanasia. The results indicated that vaccination with peptide sensitized DCs (PSDC) as well as DCs sensitized by rh-α-Syn induced specific anti-α-Syn antibodies in all immunized mice. In terms of rotometry performance, a measure of locomotor activity correlated to brain dopamine levels, mice vaccinated with PSDC or rh- α-Syn sensitized DCs performed significantly better than non-vaccinated Tg control mice during the final assessment (i.e. at 17 months of age) before euthanasia. As well, measurement of levels of brain IL-1α, a cytokine hypothesized to be associated with neuroinflammation, demonstrated that this proinflammatory molecule was significantly reduced in the PSDC and rh- α-Syn sensitized DC vaccinated mice compared to the non-vaccinated Tg control group. Overall, α-Syn antigen-sensitized DC vaccination was effective in generating specific anti- α-Syn antibodies and improved locomotor function without eliciting an apparent general inflammatory response, indicating that this strategy may be a safe and effective treatment for PD.

  9. ERIC-PCR技术对单增李斯特菌的溯源分析%Biotracing the source of Listeria monocytogenes strains by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海泉; 朱颖; 姜文洁; 孙晓红; 吴启华; 潘迎捷; 赵勇

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence (ERIC )-PCR was used to genotype 17 strains of Listeria monocytogenes,which were isolated from pork samples of the three market,and we investigated the correlation between the genotype,regional distribution and prevalence among L monocytogenes strains. L monocytogenes ATCC 19115 was used as positive control. The result showed that 17 isolates were identified as six special genotypes,and genotype IV was the dominant one as the main pollution group,which were isolated from the third market. The strains isolated from the first and second market were genotype I and genotype IV .respcetively. The result suggested that ERIC-PCR was suitable to investigate the biotracing of L. monocytogenes and it was a more rapid,efficient,and accurate molecular typing method than traditional serotyping methods.%以质控菌株ATCC 19115为对照,采用ERIC-PCR方法对从三个市场猪肉样品分离到的17株单增李斯特菌(Listeria monocytogenes)进行了基因分型,探讨了单增李斯特菌基因型与区域分布及流行性的关联性.结果表明,17株单增李斯特菌菌株可分为六个主要基因类群,其中Ⅳ型菌株最多,为主要污染类群,而这些菌株来自于市场三;市场一和市场二分离到的菌株主要分别为Ⅰ型和Ⅳ型.因此,ERIC-PCR方法适用于对单增李斯特菌的溯源分析和流行病学调查,具有简单、方便、快捷、准确的特点.

  10. Vaccine Design for H5N1 Based on B- and T-cell Epitope Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Sipahutar, Feimmy Ruth Pratiwi; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Kerami, Djati

    2016-01-01

    From 2003 to 2013, Indonesia had the highest number of avian influenza A cases in humans, with 192 cases and 160 fatalities. Avian influenza is caused by influenza virus type A, such as subtype H5N1. This virus has two glycoproteins: hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, which will become the primary target to be neutralized by vaccine. Vaccine is the most effective immunologic intervention. In this study, we use the epitope-based vaccine design from hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H5N1 Indonesian strain virus by using immunoinformatics approach in order to predict the binding of B-cell and T-cell epitopes (class I and class II human leukocyte antigen [HLA]). BCPREDS was used to predict the B-cell epitope. Propred, Propred I, netMHCpan, and netMHCIIpan were used to predict the T-cell epitope. Two B-cell epitopes of hemagglutinin candidates and one B-cell epitope of neuraminidase candidates were obtained to bind T-cell CD4(+) (class II HLA), and also five T-cell epitope hemagglutinin and four T-cell epitope neuraminidase were obtained to bind T-cell CD8(+) (class I HLA). The visualization of epitopes was done using MOE 2008.10. It shows that the binding affinity of epitope-HLA was based on minimum binding free energy (ΔG binding). Based on this result, visualization, and dynamic simulation, four hemagglutinin epitopes (MEKIVLLLA, CPYLGSPSF, KCQTPMGAI, and IGTSTLNQR) and two neuraminidase epitopes (NPNQKIITI and CYPDAGEIT) were computed as having the best binding affinity from HLA ligand. The results mentioned above are from in silico experiments and need to be validated using wet experiment.

  11. Vaccine-criticism on the internet: new insights based on French-speaking websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeremy K; Peretti-Watel, Patrick; Larson, Heidi J; Raude, Jocelyn; Verger, Pierre

    2015-02-18

    The internet is playing an increasingly important part in fueling vaccine related controversies and in generating vaccine hesitant behaviors. English language Antivaccination websites have been thoroughly analyzed, however, little is known of the arguments presented in other languages on the internet. This study presents three types of results: (1) Authors apply a time tested content analysis methodology to describe the information diffused by French language vaccine critical websites in comparison with English speaking websites. The contents of French language vaccine critical websites are very similar to those of English language websites except for the relative absence of moral and religious arguments. (2) Authors evaluate the likelihood that internet users will find those websites through vaccine-related queries on a variety of French-language versions of google. Queries on controversial vaccines generated many more vaccine critical websites than queries on vaccination in general. (3) Authors propose a typology of vaccine critical websites. Authors distinguish between (a) websites that criticize all vaccines ("antivaccine" websites) and websites that criticize only some vaccines ("vaccine-selective" websites), and between (b) websites that focus on vaccines ("vaccine-focused" websites) and those for which vaccines were only a secondary topic of interest ("generalist" websites). The differences in stances by groups and websites affect the likelihood that they will be believed and by whom. This study therefore helps understand the different information landscapes that may contribute to the variety of forms of vaccine hesitancy. Public authorities should have better awareness and understanding of these stances to bring appropriate answers to the different controversies about vaccination.

  12. Control options for Listeria monocytogenes in seafoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik; Jørgensen, Lasse Vigel; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech

    2000-01-01

    At least three outbreaks of listeriosis associated with seafood have been reported. Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in the general environment including fresh water, coastal water and live fish from these areas. Contamination or recontamination of seafood may also take place during...

  13. Listeria monocytogenes : nog steeds een probleem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is net als vele andere bacteriële voedselpathogenen al tientallen jaren bekend. De meeste grondstoffen voor voedingsmiddelen komen uit de akker- en tuinbouw, de veehouderij en de visserij. Besmetting vindt daar plaats met micro-organismen afkomstig uit grond, fecaliën, water,

  14. Listeria monocytogenes : nog steeds een probleem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is net als vele andere bacteriële voedselpathogenen al tientallen jaren bekend. De meeste grondstoffen voor voedingsmiddelen komen uit de akker- en tuinbouw, de veehouderij en de visserij. Besmetting vindt daar plaats met micro-organismen afkomstig uit grond, fecaliën, water,

  15. Bacterial superglue enables easy development of efficient virus-like particle based vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thrane, S.; Janitzek, C.M.; Matondo, S.; Resende, M.; Gustavsson, T.; Jongh, W.A. de; Clemmensen, S.; Roeffen, W.; Vegte-Bolmer, M. van de; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.; Schiller, J.T.; Nielsen, M.A.; Theander, T.G.; Salanti, A.; Sander, A.F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a significant advance in the development of subunit vaccines, combining high safety and efficacy. Their particulate nature and dense repetitive subunit organization makes them ideal scaffolds for display of vaccine antigens. Traditional approaches

  16. Bacterial superglue enables easy development of efficient virus-like particle based vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M; Matondo, Sungwa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a significant advance in the development of subunit vaccines, combining high safety and efficacy. Their particulate nature and dense repetitive subunit organization makes them ideal scaffolds for display of vaccine antigens. Traditional approaches...

  17. Bacterial superglue enables easy development of efficient virus-like particle based vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M; Matondo, Sungwa;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a significant advance in the development of subunit vaccines, combining high safety and efficacy. Their particulate nature and dense repetitive subunit organization makes them ideal scaffolds for display of vaccine antigens. Traditional approaches...

  18. 基于Web的疫苗设计工具%Web-based tools for vaccine design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣波; 杜昭宏; 吴静; 胡东

    2013-01-01

      迄今为止,疫苗是用于预防感染、肿瘤、过敏及免疫失衡等疾病最为有效的工具之一。归功于强大的信息储量及分析能力,网络数据库及分析系统为研究人员提供了更为容易的疫苗设计途径。目前,这些网络工具可以归类为生物大分子的序列信息、结构分析及功能预测。鉴于生物信息学工具的日益增多,本文对其进行分类总结,以方便更多研究者使用。%By now, it has been known that vaccines are one of the most effective preventative health tools available against infectious diseases, cancer, allergy, and immunologic imbalanced diseases. Owning to powerful information quantity and prediction ability, web-based central database and analysis system made vaccine design more easily accessible to researchers. Presently, these web-based tools are categorized based on sequence information, structure analysis and function prediction of bio-macromolecule. In terms of increasing bioinformatics tools emerged, we make a summary to classify these web-resource for more available to researchers.

  19. Novel adenovirus vaccine vectors based on the enteric-tropic serotype 41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiale, Franck; Haddada, Hedi; Nabel, Gary J; Brough, Douglas E; King, C Richter; Gall, Jason G D

    2007-03-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus vectors, primarily developed from serotype 5 (Ad5) viruses, have been widely used for gene transfer and vaccination approaches. Vectors based on other serotypes of adenovirus could be used in conjunction with, or in place of, Ad5 vectors. In this study, Ad41, an enteric adenovirus usually described as 'non-cultivable' or 'fastidious,' has been successfully cloned, rescued and propagated on 293-ORF6 cells. The complementation capabilities of this cell line allow generation of Ad41 vectors at titers comparable to those obtained for Ad5 vectors. Mice immunized with an Ad41 vector containing an HIV envelope (Env) gene mounted anti-Env cellular and humoral immune responses. Ad41-Env vectors appear to be particularly attractive when used in heterologous prime-boost regimens, where they induce significantly higher cellular immune responses to HIV-Env than Ad5-based regimens. Ad41-based constructs are attractive vaccine vectors alone or in combination with Ad5 adenovectors, since each vector type can provide circumvention of pre-existing immunity to the other.

  20. The nature and combination of subunits used in epitope-based Schistosoma japonicum vaccine formulations affect their efficacy

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    Liu Feng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem in endemic countries and is caused by infections with any one of three primary schistosome species. Although there are no vaccines available to date, this strategy appears feasible since natural immunity develops in individuals suffering from repeated infection during a lifetime. Since vaccinations resulting in both Th1- and Th2-type responses have been shown to contribute to protective immunity, a vaccine formulation with the capacity for stimulating multiple arms of the immune response will likely be the most effective. Previously we developed partially protective, single Th- and B cell-epitope-based peptide-DNA dual vaccines (PDDV (T3-PDDV and B3-PDDV, respectively capable of eliciting immune responses against the Schistosoma japonicum 22.6 kDa tegument antigen (Sj22.6 and a 62 kDa fragment of myosin (Sj62, respectively. Results In this study, we developed PDDV cocktails containing multiple epitopes of S. japonicum from Sj22.6, Sj62 and Sj97 antigens by predicting cytotoxic, helper, and B-cell epitopes, and evaluated vaccine potential in vivo. Results showed that mice immunized with a single-epitope PDDV elicited either Tc, Th, or B cell responses, respectively, and mice immunized with either the T3- or B3- single-epitope PDDV formulation were partially protected against infection. However, mice immunized with a multicomponent (3 PDDV components formulation elicited variable immune responses that were less immunoprotective than single-epitope PDDV formulations. Conclusions Our data show that combining these different antigens did not result in a more effective vaccine formulation when compared to each component administered individually, and further suggest that immune interference resulting from immunizations with antigenically distinct vaccine targets may be an important consideration in the development of multicomponent vaccine preparations.

  1. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  2. Protection against Multiple Subtypes of Influenza Viruses by Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Based on a Hemagglutinin Conserved Epitope

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    Shaoheng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We selected the conserved sequence in the stalk region of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA trimmer, the long alpha helix (LAH, as the vaccine candidate sequence, and inserted it into the major immunodominant region (MIR of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc, and, by using the E. coli expression system, we prepared a recombinant protein vaccine LAH-HBc in the form of virus-like particles (VLP. Intranasal immunization of mice with this LAH-HBc VLP plus cholera toxin B subunit with 0.2% of cholera toxin (CTB* adjuvant could effectively elicit humoral and cellular immune responses and protect mice against a lethal challenge of homologous influenza viruses (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8 (H1N1. In addition, passage of the immune sera containing specific antibodies to naïve mice rendered them resistant against a lethal homologous challenge. Immunization with LAH-HBc VLP vaccine plus CTB* adjuvant could also fully protect mice against a lethal challenge of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus or the avian H9N2 virus and could partially protect mice against a lethal challenge of the avian H5N1 influenza virus. This study demonstrated that the LAH-HBc VLP vaccine based on a conserved sequence of the HA trimmer stalk region is a promising candidate vaccine for developing a universal influenza vaccine against multiple influenza viruses infections.

  3. Avian CD154 enhances humoral and cellular immune responses induced by an adenovirus vector-based vaccine in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Ramos, Oliberto; González Pose, Alain; Gómez-Puerta, Silvia; Noda Gomez, Julia; Vega Redondo, Armando; Águila Benites, Julio César; Suárez Amarán, Lester; Parra, Natalie C; Toledo Alonso, Jorge R

    2011-05-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have emerged as an attractive system for veterinary vaccines development. However, for poultry vaccination a very important criterion for an ideal vaccine is its low cost. The objective of this study was to test the ability of chicken CD154 to enhance the immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector-based vaccine against avian influenza virus in order to reduce the amount of antigen required to induce an effective immune response in avian. Chickens were vaccinated with three different doses of adenoviral vectors encoding either HA (AdHA), or HA fused to extracellular domain chicken's CD154 (AdHACD). Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay and relative quantification of IFN-γ showed that the adenoviral vector encoding for the chimeric antigen is able to elicit an improved humoral and cellular immune response, which demonstrated that CD154 can be used as a molecular adjuvant allowing to reduce in about 50-fold the amount of adenoviral vector vaccine required to induce an effective immune response.

  4. Preparation of mucosal nanoparticles and polymer-based inactivated vaccine for Newcastle disease and H9N2 AI viruses

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    Heba M. El Naggar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To develop a mucosal inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease (ND and H9N2 viruses to protect against these viruses at sites of infections through mucosal immunity. Materials and Methods: In this study, we prepared two new formulations for mucosal bivalent inactivated vaccine formulations for Newcastle and Avian Influenza (H9N2 based on the use of nanoparticles and polymer adjuvants. The prepared vaccines were delivered via intranasal and spray routes of administration in specific pathogen-free chickens. Cell-mediated and humoral immune response was measured as well as challenge trial was carried out. In addition, ISA71 water in oil was also evaluated. Results: Our results showed that the use of spray route as vaccination delivery method of polymer and nanoparticles MontanideTM adjuvants revealed that it enhanced the cell mediated immune response as indicated by phagocytic activity, gamma interferon and interleukin 6 responses and induced protection against challenge with Newcastle and Avian Influenza (H9N2 viruses. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate the potentiality of polymer compared to nanoparticles adjuvantes when used via spray route. Mass application of such vaccines will add value to improve the vaccination strategies against ND virus and Avian influenza viruses.

  5. Development of multiple strain competitive index assays for Listeria monocytogenes using pIMC; a new site-specific integrative vector

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    Cronin Michael

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The foodborne, gram-positive pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, is capable of causing lethal infections in compromised individuals. In the post genomic era of L. monocytogenes research, techniques are required to identify and validate genes involved in the pathogenicity and environmental biology of the organism. The aim here was to develop a widely applicable method to tag L. monocytogenes strains, with a particular emphasis on the development of multiple strain competitive index assays. Results We have constructed a new site-specific integrative vector, pIMC, based on pPL2, for the selection of L. monocytogenes from complex samples. The pIMC vector was further modified through the incorporation of IPTG inducible markers (antibiotic and phenotypic to produce a suite of four vectors which allowed the discrimination of multiple strains from a single sample. We were able to perform murine infection studies with up to four EGDe isolates within a single mouse and showed that the tags did not impact upon growth rate or virulence. The system also allowed the identification of subtle differences in virulence between strains of L. monocytogenes commonly used in laboratory studies. Conclusion This study has developed a competitive index assay that can be broadly applied to all L. monocytogenes strains. Improved statistical robustness of the data was observed, resulting in fewer mice being required for virulence assays. The competitive index assays provide a powerful method to analyse the virulence or fitness of L. monocytogenes in complex biological samples.

  6. Comparative analysis of the immune responses induced by native versus recombinant versions of the ASP-based vaccine against the bovine intestinal parasite Cooperia oncophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Ana; Borloo, Jimmy; Peelaers, Iris; Casaert, Stijn; Leclercq, Georges; Claerebout, Edwin; Geldhof, Peter

    2017-08-30

    The protective capacities of a native double-domain activation-associated secreted protein (ndd-ASP)-based vaccine against the cattle intestinal nematode Cooperia oncophora has previously been demonstrated. However, protection analysis upon vaccination with a recombinantly produced antigen has never been performed. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to test the protective potential of a Pichia-produced double-domain ASP (pdd-ASP)-based vaccine against C. oncophora. Additionally, we aimed to compare the cellular and humoral mechanisms underlying the vaccine-induced responses by the native (ndd-ASP) and recombinant vaccines. Immunisation of cattle with the native C. oncophora vaccine conferred significant levels of protection after an experimental challenge infection, whereas the recombinant vaccine did not. Moreover, vaccination with ndd-ASP resulted in a higher proliferation of CD4-T cells both systemically and in the small intestinal mucosa when compared with animals vaccinated with the recombinant antigen. In terms of humoral response, although both native and recombinant vaccines induced similar levels of antibodies, animals vaccinated with the native vaccine were able to raise antibodies with greater specificity towards ndd-ASP in comparison with antibodies raised by vaccination with the recombinant vaccine, suggesting a differential immune recognition towards the ndd-ASP and pdd-ASP. Finally, the observation that animals displaying antibodies with higher percentages of recognition towards ndd-ASP also exhibited the lowest egg counts suggests a potential relationship between antibody specificity and protection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Vaccines for allergy.

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    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-01

    Vaccines aim to establish or strengthen immune responses but are also effective for the treatment of allergy. The latter is surprising because allergy represents a hyper-immune response based on immunoglobulin E production against harmless environmental antigens, i.e., allergens. Nevertheless, vaccination with allergens, termed allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only disease-modifying therapy of allergy with long-lasting effects. New forms of allergy diagnosis and allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergen-derivatives, peptides and allergen genes have emerged through molecular allergen characterization. The molecular allergy vaccines allow sophisticated targeting of the immune system and may eliminate side effects which so far have limited the use of traditional allergen extract-based vaccines. Successful clinical trials performed with the new vaccines indicate that broad allergy vaccination is on the horizon and may help to control the allergy pandemic.

  8. The effects of CpG-ODNs and Chitosan adjuvants on the elicitation of immune responses induced by the HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Samira; Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2017-03-01

    HIV1-Tat-based vaccines could elicit broad, durable and neutralizing immune responses and are considered as potential AIDS vaccines. The present study aims to formulate CpG-ODNs adjuvant and Chitosan with Tat protein to enhance the immunogenicity of HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines and to investigate their efficacies in mice. To this end, we added CpG-ODNs, Chitosan and Alum as adjuvants to the Tat-based candidate vaccine formulations. Then, we compared frequency and magnitude of both humoral and cellular immune responses from mice immunized with the adjuvant-formulated Tat candidate vaccines against those obtained from mice immunized with recombinant Tat protein alone. Mice were subcutaneously immunized three times at 2-week intervals with the candidate vaccines. Measurements of anti-Tat immune responses showed that all vaccinated groups had a good immunity compared to the control groups and developed high levels of both humoral and cellular responses. However, immunized mice with CpG-ODNs, and Chitosan-adjuvanted Tat vaccines elicited stronger T-cell responses (both humoral and cellular immunity) compared to the others. These data suggest that co-administration of recombinant Tat protein with CpG-ODNs and Chitosan may serve as a potential formulation for enhancing of the Tat vaccine-induced immunity and might have effects on shaping Th polarization induced by HIV1-Tat protein vaccines. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes II (LMO2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Mills, John

    2013-01-01

    This AOAC GovVal study compared the VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes II (LMO2) to the Health Products and Food Branch MFHPB-30 reference method for detection of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat (RTE) meats. The VIDAS LMO2 test is an automated enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay for the detection of L. monocytogenes in foods. The LMO2 test, following the enrichment procedure from the MFLP-33 method, also included use of the chromogenic media, chromID Ottaviani Agosti Agar (OAA) and chromID Lmono for confirmation of LMO2 presumptive results. In previous AOAC validation studies comparing the VIDAS LMO2 method to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual and U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service reference methods, LMO2 was approved as AOAC Official Method 2004.02 for the detection of L. monocytogenes in dairy products, vegetables, seafood, raw meats and poultry, and processed meats and poultry. The GovVal comparative study included 20 replicate test portions, each at two contamination levels for each matrix, where fractionally positive results (5-15 positive results/20 replicate portions tested) were obtained by at least one method at one level. Five uncontaminated controls were included. Chi-square analysis of the comparative data in this study indicates no statistical differences between the VIDAS LMO2 and the MFHPB-30 standard methods at the 5% level of significance. Confirmation of presumptive LMO2 results with the chromogenic OAA and Lmono media was shown to be equivalent to the appropriate reference method agars. The data demonstrate that the VIDAS LMO2 method is an acceptable alternative method to the MFHPB-30 standard culture method for the detection of L. monocytogenes in RTE meats, including liver paté, hot dogs, raw fermented sausage, sliced deli turkey, and sliced deli ham.

  10. Validation of a Previously Developed Geospatial Model That Predicts the Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in New York State Produce Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Shiwakoti, Suvash; Bergholz, Peter; Grohn, Yrjo; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Technological advancements, particularly in the field of geographic information systems (GIS), have made it possible to predict the likelihood of foodborne pathogen contamination in produce production environments using geospatial models. Yet, few studies have examined the validity and robustness of such models. This study was performed to test and refine the rules associated with a previously developed geospatial model that predicts the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in produce farms in New York State (NYS). Produce fields for each of four enrolled produce farms were categorized into areas of high or low predicted L. monocytogenes prevalence using rules based on a field's available water storage (AWS) and its proximity to water, impervious cover, and pastures. Drag swabs (n = 1,056) were collected from plots assigned to each risk category. Logistic regression, which tested the ability of each rule to accurately predict the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, validated the rules based on water and pasture. Samples collected near water (odds ratio [OR], 3.0) and pasture (OR, 2.9) showed a significantly increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation compared to that for samples collected far from water and pasture. Generalized linear mixed models identified additional land cover factors associated with an increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation, such as proximity to wetlands. These findings validated a subset of previously developed rules that predict L. monocytogenes prevalence in produce production environments. This suggests that GIS and geospatial models can be used to accurately predict L. monocytogenes prevalence on farms and can be used prospectively to minimize the risk of preharvest contamination of produce. PMID:26590280

  11. Prevention of meningococcal serogroup B infections in children: A protein-based vaccine induces immunologic memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.D. de Kleijn (Ester); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.B. van Gageldonk-Lafeber (Rianne); J. Labadie (J.); C.J.P. van Limpt (C. J P); J. Visser (John); G.A. Berbers; L. van Alphen (Loek); H. Rümke (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractImmunologic memory against meningococci was studied in 177 children (100 children were 10-11 years old and 77 were 5-6 years old) 2.5 years after vaccination with hexavalent meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine or hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine. Children were revaccinated with

  12. Patient reported outcome data following influenza A (H1N1p vaccination in the 2009–2010 season: web-based and telephone evaluation

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    Wade AG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alan G Wade1, Gordon M Crawford1, Neil Pumford1, Alex McConnachie21Patients Direct, 3 Todd Campus, Glasgow, UK; 2Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKBackground: There has been worldwide interest in the safety of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1p vaccines, although limited data are available from the vaccine recipients’ perspective. This evaluation was designed to collect data from people who had received an influenza vaccination during the 2009–2010 season using a web-based data collection tool supplemented by telephone reporting (PROBE.Methods: People scheduled to receive the influenza A (H1N1p or seasonal influenza vaccines were recruited through media advertising and campaigns throughout the West of Scotland. Vaccine recipients participated in the evaluation by answering demographic and side effect questions using PROBE methodology on the day of the immunization, after 3 days, 8 days, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks.Results: A total of 1103 vaccine recipients including 134 young children (0–4 years participated in the evaluation; 694 (63% received H1N1p vaccine only, 135 (12% seasonal vaccine only, 224 (20% both H1N1p and seasonal vaccines, and 50 (5% received H1N1p or seasonal vaccine with a non-influenza vaccine (eg, travel or pneumococcal. Overall, 42% of recipients reported experiencing a side effect after their baseline vaccination; the most commonly reported were general and arm side effects (>20%. Injection site discomfort/pain and flu-like symptoms were reported by 57% and 24% of recipients, respectively. A significantly higher proportion of the 960 H1N1p vaccine recipients experienced a side effect (44% vs 27%, P < 0.001 or injection site discomfort/pain (61% vs 26%, P < 0.001 than those receiving seasonal influenza vaccines. Female sex and H1N1p vaccination were associated with a significantly higher risk of injection site discomfort/pain, whereas the 70+ age group was associated with a

  13. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

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    Maíra Maciel Mattos de Oliveira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4 stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 ºC and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

  14. Gold nanocluster-based vaccines for dual-delivery of antigens and immunostimulatory oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Hui; Ren, Jinsong

    2015-07-01

    We here report a facile one-pot synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) via the peptide biomineralization method, which can elicit specific immunological responses. The as-prepared peptide-protected AuNCs (peptide-AuNCs) display strong red fluorescence, and more importantly, as compared to the peptide alone, the immune stimulatory ability of the resulting peptide-AuNCs can not only be retained, but can also be efficaciously enhanced. Moreover, through a dual-delivery of antigen peptides and cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), the as-prepared peptide-AuNC-CpG conjugates can also act as smart self-vaccines to assist in the generation of high immunostimulatory activity, and be applied as a probe for intracellular imaging. Both in vitro and in vivo studies provide strong evidence that the AuNC-based vaccines may be utilized as safe and efficient immunostimulatory agents that are able to prevent and/or treat a variety of ailments.We here report a facile one-pot synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) via the peptide biomineralization method, which can elicit specific immunological responses. The as-prepared peptide-protected AuNCs (peptide-AuNCs) display strong red fluorescence, and more importantly, as compared to the peptide alone, the immune stimulatory ability of the resulting peptide-AuNCs can not only be retained, but can also be efficaciously enhanced. Moreover, through a dual-delivery of antigen peptides and cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), the as-prepared peptide-AuNC-CpG conjugates can also act as smart self-vaccines to assist in the generation of high immunostimulatory activity, and be applied as a probe for intracellular imaging. Both in vitro and in vivo studies provide strong evidence that the AuNC-based vaccines may be utilized as safe and efficient immunostimulatory agents that are able to prevent and/or treat a variety of ailments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  15. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

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    Iole Macchia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM- based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma.

  16. Papain-Based Vaccination Modulates Schistosoma mansoni Infection-Induced Cytokine Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aziz, N; Tallima, H; Hafez, E A; El Ridi, R

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown that immunization of outbred rodents with cysteine peptidases-based vaccine elicited type 2-biased immune responses associated with consistent and reproducible protection against challenge Schistosoma mansoni. We herein start to elucidate the molecular basis of C57BL/6 mouse resistance to S. mansoni following treatment with the cysteine peptidase, papain. We evaluated the early cytokine signals delivered by epidermal, dermal, and draining lymph node cells of naïve, and S. mansoni -infected mice treated 1 day earlier with 0 or 50 μg papain, or immunized twice with papain only (10 μg/mouse), papain-free recombinant S. mansoni glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin peptide (10 and 15 μg/mouse, respectively = antigen Mix), or papain-adjuvanted antigen Mix. Schistosoma mansoni infection induced epidermal and lymph node cells to release type 1, type 2 and type 17 cytokines, known to counteract each other. Expectedly, humoral immune responses were negligible until patency. Papain pretreatment or papain-based vaccination diminished or shut off S. mansoni infection early induction of type 1, type 17 and type 2 cytokines except for thymic stromal lymphopoietin and programmed the immune system towards a polarized type 2 immune milieu, associated with highly significant (P < 0.005 - <0.0001) resistance to S. mansoni infection.

  17. The role of community pharmacy-based vaccination in the USA: current practice and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach AT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Albert T Bach, Jeffery A Goad School of Pharmacy, Chapman University, Irvine, California, USA Abstract: Community pharmacy-based provision of immunizations in the USA has become commonplace in the last few decades, with success in increasing rates of immunizations. Community pharmacy-based vaccination services are provided by pharmacists educated in the practice of immunization delivery and provide a convenient and accessible option for receiving immunizations. The pharmacist's role in immunization practice has been described as serving in the roles of educator, facilitator, and immunizer. With a majority of pharmacist-provided vaccinations occurring in the community pharmacy setting, there are many examples of community pharmacists serving in these immunization roles with successful outcomes. Different community pharmacies employ a number of different models and workflow practices that usually consist of a year-round in-house service staffed by their own immunizing pharmacist. Challenges that currently exist in this setting are variability in scopes of immunization practice for pharmacists across states, inconsistent reimbursement mechanisms, and barriers in technology. Many of these challenges can be alleviated by continual education; working with legislators, state boards of pharmacy, stakeholders, and payers to standardize laws; and reimbursement design. Other challenges that may need to be addressed are improvements in communication and continuity of care between community pharmacists and the patient centered medical home. Keywords: immunization, pharmacy practice, pharmacists, continuity of care 

  18. Elimination of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies Deaths by 2030: Needs Assessment and Alternatives for Progress Based on Dog Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ryan M; Undurraga, Eduardo A; Blanton, Jesse D; Cleaton, Julie; Franka, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Rabies imposes a substantial burden to about half of the world population. The World Health Organization (WHO), World Organization for Animal Health, and the Food and Agriculture Organization have set the goal of eliminating dog-mediated human rabies deaths by 2030. This could be achieved largely by massive administration of post-exposure prophylaxis-in perpetuity-, through elimination of dog rabies, or combining both. Here, we focused on the resources needed for the elimination of dog rabies virus by 2030. Drawing from multiple datasets, including national dog vaccination campaigns, rabies literature, and expert opinion, we developed a model considering country-specific current dog vaccination capacity to estimate the years and resources required to achieve dog rabies elimination by 2030. Resources were determined based on four factors: (a) country development status, (b) dog vaccination costs, (c) dog rabies vaccine availability, and (d) existing animal health workers. Our calculations were based on the WHO's estimate that vaccinating 70% of the dog population for seven consecutive years would eliminate rabies. If dog rabies vaccine production remains at 2015 levels, we estimate that there will be a cumulative shortage of about 7.5 billion doses to meet expected demand to achieve dog rabies elimination. We estimated a present cost of $6,300 million to eliminate dog rabies in all endemic countries, equivalent to a $3,900 million gap compared to current spending. To eliminate dog rabies, the vaccination workforce may suffice if all public health veterinarians in endemic countries were to dedicate 3 months each year to dog rabies vaccination. We discuss implications of potential technology improvements, including population management, vaccine price reduction, and increases in dog-vaccinating capacities. Our results highlight the resources needed to achieve elimination of dog-mediated human rabies deaths by 2030. As exemplified by multiple successful disease

  19. Evaluation of Mycoplasma inactivation during production of biologics: egg-based viral vaccines as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Selwyn A Wilson; Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Ye, Zhiping; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    viral purification processes used for the manufacture of an inactivated egg-based vaccine.

  20. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Kaduna, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, J.; Olonitola, O. S.; Radu, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Listeria (L.) monocytogenes isolated from milk and milk products in Kaduna, Nigeria, were subjected to a multiplex PCR assay to identify virulence-associated genes (such as prf A, inl A, hly A, act A, and iap). Of the 36 isolates, 9 (25%) were positive for one or two virulence-associated genes. Based on the sample type, 6 (16.9%) of the isolates that possessed virulence-associated genes were obtained from raw milk, 2 (3.2%) from “Manshanu,” and 1 (2.8%) from “Kindrimo.” Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA revealed that Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, NGA 41A, and NGA 38A), when compared with reference L. monocytogenes, were grouped into two distinct clusters, A and B, with sequence (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, and NGA 41A) phylogenetically closer to J1776; N1-011A; R2-502; J1816; and J2-031, whereas L. monocytogenes isolate (NGA 38A) clustered with EDG; J1-220; J1926; J1817; and J2-1091. The separation of the Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates into linage A (responsible for epidemic listeriosis) and lineage B (responsible for sporadic cases of listeriosis) is of public health concern and that local isolates might have potentials for human food borne listeriosis based on the virulence factors so far identified. PMID:27597873

  1. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Kaduna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Usman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Listeria (L. monocytogenes isolated from milk and milk products in Kaduna, Nigeria, were subjected to a multiplex PCR assay to identify virulence-associated genes (such as prf A, inl A, hly A, act A, and iap. Of the 36 isolates, 9 (25% were positive for one or two virulence-associated genes. Based on the sample type, 6 (16.9% of the isolates that possessed virulence-associated genes were obtained from raw milk, 2 (3.2% from “Manshanu,” and 1 (2.8% from “Kindrimo.” Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA revealed that Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, NGA 41A, and NGA 38A, when compared with reference L. monocytogenes, were grouped into two distinct clusters, A and B, with sequence (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, and NGA 41A phylogenetically closer to J1776; N1-011A; R2-502; J1816; and J2-031, whereas L. monocytogenes isolate (NGA 38A clustered with EDG; J1-220; J1926; J1817; and J2-1091. The separation of the Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates into linage A (responsible for epidemic listeriosis and lineage B (responsible for sporadic cases of listeriosis is of public health concern and that local isolates might have potentials for human food borne listeriosis based on the virulence factors so far identified.

  2. Pharmacy management of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, H Eric

    2007-09-01

    Although standard vaccines have traditionally been granted full coverage in managed care, the recent introduction of several novel vaccine products has necessitated the revision of pharmacy management strategies throughout the nation. To review pharmacy management strategies for a number of emerging vaccines, with unique plan perspectives from SelectHealth, an Intermountain Healthcare company serving approximately 500,000 members in Utah. Because several recently introduced vaccines target previously unaddressed diseases and carry higher costs than traditional vaccines, several plans have adapted a novel approach to manage vaccine coverage on an individual product basis. At SelectHealth, recently introduced vaccines for rotavirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus (HPV) have required special attention in terms of pharmacy management. After carefully weighing acquisition and administration costs, anticipated uptake and use, direct and indirect health care costs averted, and quality of life issues, plan leadership decided to cover many of the new vaccines (i.e., rotavirus, RSV, and herpes zoster) under a nonstandard vaccination benefit. However, because substantial cost savings and high use of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was anticipated within SelectHealth, the plan decided to fully cover the product. Although they complicate traditional pharmacy management, novel vaccines provide clinical benefit that managed care organizations cannot ignore. One universal strategy will not suffice in managing all the different vaccines entering the market, and a tailored approach should be employed based on the individual characteristics and use of each product.

  3. Bacterially produced recombinant influenza vaccines based on virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Jegerlehner

    Full Text Available Although current influenza vaccines are effective in general, there is an urgent need for the development of new technologies to improve vaccine production timelines, capacities and immunogenicity. Herein, we describe the development of an influenza vaccine technology which enables recombinant production of highly efficient influenza vaccines in bacterial expression systems. The globular head domain of influenza hemagglutinin, comprising most of the protein's neutralizing epitopes, was expressed in E. coli and covalently conjugated to bacteriophage-derived virus-like particles produced independently in E.coli. Conjugate influenza vaccines produced this way were used to immunize mice and found to elicit immune sera with high antibody titers specific for the native influenza hemagglutinin protein and high hemagglutination-inhibition titers. Moreover vaccination with these vaccines induced full protection against lethal challenges with homologous and highly drifted influenza strains.

  4. Reactogenicity, safety and immunogenicity of a protein-based pneumococcal vaccine in Gambian children aged 2-4 years: A phase II randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutola, A; Ota, M O; Ogundare, E O; Antonio, M; Owiafe, P; Worwui, A; Greenwood, B; Alderson, M; Traskine, M; Verlant, V; Dobbelaere, K; Borys, D

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been successful in preventing invasive pneumococcal disease but effectiveness has been challenged by replacement of vaccine serotypes with non-vaccine serotypes. Vaccines targeting common pneumococcal protein(s) found in most/all pneumococci may overcome this limitation. This phase II study assessed safety and immunogenicity of a new protein-based pneumococcal vaccine containing polysaccharide conjugates of 10 pneumococcal serotypes combined with pneumolysin toxoid(dPly) and pneumococcal histidine triad protein D(PhtD) (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30) in African children. 120 Gambian children (2-4 years, not previously vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae) randomized (1:1) received a single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 or PCV13. Adverse events occurring over 4 d post-vaccination were reported, and blood samples obtained pre- and 1-month post-vaccination. Serious adverse events were reported for 6 months post-vaccination. Solicited local and systemic adverse events were reported at similar frequency in each group. One child (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 group) reported a grade 3 local reaction to vaccination. Haematological and biochemical parameters seemed similar pre- and 1-month post-vaccination in each group. High pre-vaccination Ply and PhtD antibody concentrations were observed in each group, but only increased in PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees one month post-vaccination. One month post-vaccination, for each vaccine serotype ≥96.2% of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees had serotype-specific polysaccharide antibody concentrations ≥0.20µg/mL except serotypes 6B (80.8%) and 23F (65.4%), and ≥94.1% had OPA titres of ≥8 except serotypes 1 (51.9%), 5 (38.5%) and 6B (78.0%), within ranges seen in PCV13-vaccinated children. A single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccine, administered to Gambian children aged 2-4 y not previously vaccinated with a pneumococcal vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic.

  5. Bacteriophage predation promotes serovar diversification in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Marcel R; Morax, Laurent S; Hüls, Vanessa J; Huwiler, Simona G; Leclercq, Alexandre; Lecuit, Marc; Loessner, Martin J

    2015-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen classified into distinct serovars (SVs) based on somatic and flagellar antigens. To correlate phenotype with genetic variation, we analyzed the wall teichoic acid (WTA) glycosylation genes of SV 1/2, 3 and 7 strains, which differ in decoration of the ribitol-phosphate backbone with N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and/or rhamnose. Inactivation of lmo1080 or the dTDP-l-rhamnose biosynthesis genes rmlACBD (lmo1081-1084) resulted in loss of rhamnose, whereas disruption of lmo1079 led to GlcNAc deficiency. We found that all SV 3 and 7 strains actually originate from a SV 1/2 background, as a result of small mutations in WTA rhamnosylation and/or GlcNAcylation genes. Genetic complementation of different SV 3 and 7 isolates using intact alleles fully restored a characteristic SV 1/2 WTA carbohydrate pattern, including antisera reactions and phage adsorption. Intriguingly, phage-resistant L. monocytogenes EGDe (SV 1/2a) isolates featured the same glycosylation gene mutations and were serotyped as SV 3 or 7 respectively. Again, genetic complementation restored both carbohydrate antigens and phage susceptibility. Taken together, our data demonstrate that L. monocytogenes SV 3 and 7 originate from point mutations in glycosylation genes, and we show that phage predation represents a major driving force for serovar diversification and evolution of L. monocytogenes.

  6. REAL-TIME PCR DETECTION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FOOD SAMPLES OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Pochop

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to follow the contamination of food with Listeria monocytogenes by using Step One real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. We used the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit for isolation of DNA and SensiFAST SYBR Hi-ROX Kit for the real-time PCR performance. In 24 samples of food of animal origin without incubation were detected strains of Listeria monocytogenes in 15 samples (swabs. Nine samples were negative. Our results indicated that the real-time PCR assay developed in this study could sensitively detect Listeria monocytogenes in food of animal origin without incubation. This could prevent infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes, and also could benefit food manufacturing companies by extending their product’s shelf-life as well as saving the cost of warehousing their food products while awaiting pathogen testing results. The rapid real-time PCR-based method performed very well compared to the conventional method. It is a fast, simple, specific and sensitive way to detect nucleic acids, which could be used in clinical diagnostic tests in the future.

  7. The evolution and epidemiology of Listeria monocytogenes in Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonaco, Sara; Nucera, Daniele; Filipello, Virginia

    2015-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic food-borne pathogen responsible for listeriosis, a disease associated with high mortality rates. L. monocytogenes causes invasive syndromes and case-fatality can be as high as 30%, in specific high-risk population groups such as the elderly, immuno-compromised individuals, fetuses and newborns. Acquisition of the disease is mainly due to consumption of contaminated (predominantly ready-to-eat) food. We aimed to provide a state-of-the-art collection of different likely evolutionary models, based on recombination and positive selection, and the phylogenetic relationship between lineages of L. monocytogenes and between them and other Listeria species. We described the most recent findings in comparative pan-genomics, considering the core and accessory genome in relation to virulence and adaptation to different environments. Finally, this review illustrates L. monocytogenes epidemiology and transmission in humans, foods and animals, the surveillance systems of the European Union and United States and the application of molecular techniques as a core tool in epidemiological investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in cheese with the magnetic immuno-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluit, A C; Torensma, R; Visser, M J; Aarsman, C J; Poppelier, M J; Keller, B H; Klapwijk, P; Verhoef, J

    1993-05-01

    A new detection system, the magnetic immuno-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (MIPA) has been developed to detect Listeria monocytogenes in food. This method separates Listeria cells from PCR-inhibitory factors present in enrichment broths containing food samples by using magnetic beads coated with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The separated bacteria were lysed, and the supernatant containing the bacterial DNA was subjected to the PCR. Detection of L. monocytogenes in three naturally contaminated cheese samples with two different MAbs and PCR primers specific for the gene encoding the delayed-hypersensitivity factor showed that with MAb 55 all three samples were positive whereas with MAb A two samples were positive. A further improvement of the method was obtained by using a PCR step based on the listeriolysin O gene. A MIPA employing MAb 55 and the listeriolysin O gene primer set detected L. monocytogenes after 24 h of culture in Listeria Enrichment Broth samples from Port Salut artificially contaminated with 40 CFU/25 g. We could detect 1 CFU of L. monocytogenes per g of cheese after a second enrichment for 24 h in Fraser broth. The analysis time including both enrichments is approximately 55 h.

  9. CHALLENGE TESTS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN SALAMI: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mioni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Challenge tests are the preferable methodology to study the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes on ready to eat foods, according to Regulation (EC 2073/2005. Challenge testing using L. monocytogenes in seasoned salami from different food business operators showed, after seasoning of the product, a count reduction of the inoculated organisms without any further growth of the pathogen; however differences of L. monocytogenes behaviour could be observed according to different production protocols.

  10. DNA-based vaccines activate innate and adaptive antitumor immunity by engaging the NKG2D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, He; Luo, Yunping; Lo, Jeng-fan; Kaplan, Charles D; Mizutani, Masato; Mizutani, Noriko; Lee, Jiing-Dwan; Primus, F James; Becker, Jürgen C; Xiang, Rong; Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2005-08-02

    The interaction of NKG2D, a stimulatory receptor expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and activated CD8(+) T cells, and its ligands mediates stimulatory and costimulatory signals to these cells. Here, we demonstrate that DNA-based vaccines, encoding syngeneic or allogeneic NKG2D ligands together with tumor antigens such as survivin or carcinoembryonic antigen, markedly activate both innate and adaptive antitumor immunity. Such vaccines result in highly effective, NK- and CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against either breast or colon carcinoma cells in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Notably, this protection was irrespective of the NKG2D ligand expression level of the tumor cells. Hence, this strategy has the potential to lead to widely applicable and possibly clinically useful DNA-based cancer vaccines.

  11. PD-L1 peptide co-stimulation increases immunogenicity of a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Martinenaite, Evelina; Hansen, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    We recently described naturally occurring PD-L1-specific T cells that recognize PD-L1-expressing immune cells as well as malignant cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the immunogenicity of a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine could be influenced by co-stimulation with a known PD-L1......-derived epitope. We incubated a PD-L1-derived peptide epitope (19 amino acids long) or a control peptide (an irrelevant HIV epitope) with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with malignant melanoma who had received a DC-based vaccine. We observed a significantly higher number of T cells...... and attractive option to augment the effectiveness of cancer vaccines and other immunotherapeutic agents....

  12. Development and preclinical testing of HNVAC, a cell culture-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagendra R; Kumar, Deepak; Rao, P Panduranga; Kumari, P Krishna; Kaushik, Yashpal; Ravikrishnan, R; Prasad, Sai D; Ella, Krishna M

    2014-06-17

    Several limitations of the use of embryonated eggs and the threat of pandemics have highlighted the need for other platforms for the production of influenza vaccines. We report the indigenous development and pre-clinical testing of an MDCK-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine HNVAC from India. The cell bank and virus seed were characterized extensively. The cells were characterized by PCR, electron microscopy, and karyotyping, and found to be of female canine epithelial origin. The virus was confirmed by neutralization, haemagglutination inhibition, neuraminidase inhibition, and PCR and nucleotide sequencing. Adventitious agent testing was performed by both in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro studies included culturing, haemadsorption, haemagglutination, PCR and RT-PCR, whereas in vivo studies included passage in embryonated eggs and in laboratory animals. Both cell bank and virus seed were free of adventitious agents. MDCK cell lysates as well as cellular DNA did not produce tumours in newborn or adult laboratory animals. The bioprocess parameters were standardized to recover antigen with minimal levels of process-related impurities. The vaccine bulk was tested for the presence of specific antigen, and quantified by single radial immunodiffusion. Finally, non-adjuvanted and aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccine formulations were found to be safe in preclinical toxicity studies in mice, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits, and immunogenic in mice and rabbits. This is the first and only cell culture-based influenza vaccine platform developed in any developing country.

  13. Systems Pharmacology-based strategy to screen new adjuvant for hepatitis B vaccine from Traditional Chinese Medicine Ophiocordyceps sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo; Liu, Rui; Liu, Baoxiu; Yang, Yan; Xie, Jun; Zhu, Naishuo

    2017-01-01

    Adjuvants are common component for many vaccines but there are still few licensed for human use due to low efficiency or side effects. The present work adopted Systems Pharmacology analysis as a new strategy to screen adjuvants from traditional Chinese medicine. Ophiocordyceps sinensis has been used for many years in China and other Asian countries with many biological properties, but the pharmacological mechanism has not been fully elucidated. First in this study, 190 putative targets for 17 active compounds in Ophiocordyceps sinensis were retrieved and a systems pharmacology-based approach was applied to provide new insights into the pharmacological actions of the drug. Pathway enrichment analysis found that the targets participated in several immunological processes. Based on this, we selected cordycepin as a target compound to serve as an adjuvant of the hepatitis B vaccine because the existing vaccine often fails to induce an effective immune response in many subjects. Animal and cellular experiments finally validated that the new vaccine simultaneously improves the humoral and cellular immunity of BALB/c mice without side effects. All this results demonstrate that cordycepin could work as adjuvant to hepatitis b vaccine and systems-pharmacology analysis could be used as a new method to select adjuvants. PMID:28317886

  14. Development of a mariner-Based Transposon and Identification of Listeria monocytogenes Determinants, Including the Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase PrsA2, That Contribute to Its Hemolytic Phenotype▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a pore-forming toxin that mediates phagosomal escape and cell-to-cell spread of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to identify factors that control the production, activity, or secretion of this essential virulence factor, we constructed a Himar1 mariner transposon delivery system and screened 50,000 mutants for a hypohemolytic phenotype on blood agar plates. Approximately 200 hypohemolytic mutants were identified, and the 51 most prominent mu...

  15. Delivery route, MyD88 signaling and cross-priming events determine the anti-tumor efficacy of an adenovirus based melanoma vaccine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.; Oosterhoff, D.; Gupta, T.; Groot, J. de; Wijnands, P.G.J.T.B.; Beusechem, V.W. van; Haan, J.; Tuting, T.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Curiel, D.T.; Scheper, R.J.; Gruijl, T.D. de

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based vaccines are considered for cancer immunotherapy, yet, detailed knowledge on their mechanism of action and optimal delivery route for anti-tumor efficacy is lacking. Here, we compared the anti-tumor efficacy of an Ad-based melanoma vaccine after intradermal, intravenous, intran

  16. Exosomes as potent cell-free peptide-based vaccine. II. Exosomes in CpG adjuvants efficiently prime naive Tc1 lymphocytes leading to tumor rejection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaput, N.; Schartz, N.E.; Andre, F.; Taieb, J.; Novault, S.; Bonnaventure, P.; Aubert, N.; Bernard, J.; Lemonnier, F.; Merad, M.; Adema, G.J.; Adams, M.; Ferrantini, M.; Carpentier, A.F.; Escudier, B.; Tursz, T.; Angevin, E.; Zitvogel, L.

    2004-01-01

    Ideal vaccines should be stable, safe, molecularly defined, and out-of-shelf reagents efficient at triggering effector and memory Ag-specific T cell-based immune responses. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes could be considered as novel peptide-based vaccines because exosomes harbor a discrete set of p

  17. Early impact of Ontario's human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program on anogenital warts (AGWs): A population-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fiona M; Rosella, Laura C; Dunn, Sheila; Wilson, Sarah E; Chen, Cynthia; Deeks, Shelley L

    2016-09-07

    This study aimed to evaluate the early population impact of Ontario's school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program, implemented in September 2007 for grade 8 females, by comparing anogenital wart (AGW) health care utilization before and after vaccine program implementation, in program-eligible and program-ineligible cohorts, focusing on 15-26year olds. Using a retrospective longitudinal population-based study design, health administrative data were used to identify incident AGWs and total health service utilization (HSU) for AGWs for Ontario residents 15years and older between April 1 2004 and March 31 2014. The study period was divided into two eras: the pre-vaccine program era and the vaccine program era. Negative binomial models were generated to analyze trends across time by age group and sex. We adjusted female rates for routine Papanicolaou (Pap) testing to address spillover effects of Pap smear policy changes on AGW diagnosis. Between fiscal years 2004 and 2013, AGW incidence decreased 2.6% on average per year in 15-17year old females, and total HSU for AGWs decreased an average of 4.8% and 2.2% per year in 15-17 and 18-20year old females. Comparing the vaccine era to the pre-vaccine era, AGW incidence decreased 6.5% in 18-20year old females, and AGW HSU decreased 13.8%, 11.1%, and 10.0% in 15-17, 18-20, and 21-23year old females respectively. In contrast, male AGW incidence rates increased an average of 4.1%, 2.8%, and 0.9% per year in 15-17, 21-23, and 24-26year old males respectively. AGW incidence rates increased 12.2% in 15-17year old males from the pre-vaccine to vaccine era. The decline in AGW incidence and HSU in program-eligible females suggests the school-based HPV vaccination program has had an early population impact in Ontario. The increasing AGW incidence in males suggests no early evidence of herd effects in males. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A cucumber mosaic virus based expression system for the production of porcine circovirus specific vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akos Gellért

    Full Text Available Potential porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 capsid protein epitopes, suitable for expression on the surface of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV particles were determined by a thorough analysis of the predicted PCV capsid protein structure. The ab initio protein structure prediction was carried out with fold recognition and threading methods. The putative PCV epitopes were selected on the basis of PCV virion models and integrated into the plant virus coat protein, after amino acid position 131. The recombinants were tested for infectivity and stability on different Nicotiana species and stable recombinant virus particles were purified. The particles were tested for their ability to bind to PCV induced porcine antibodies and used for specific antibody induction in mice and pigs. The results showed that PCV epitopes expressed on the CMV surface were recognized by the porcine antibodies and they were also able to induce PCV specific antibody response. Challenge experiment with PCV2 carried out in immunized pigs showed partial protection against the infection. Based on these results it was concluded that specific antiviral vaccine production for the given pathogen was feasible, offering an inexpensive way for the mass production of such vaccines.

  19. Bacterial superglue enables easy development of efficient virus-like particle based vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M; Matondo, Sungwa;

    2016-01-01

    for VLP-based antigen display require labor-intensive trial-and-error optimization, and often fail to generate dense antigen display. Here we utilize the split-intein (SpyTag/SpyCatcher) conjugation system to generate stable isopeptide bound antigen-VLP complexes by simply mixing of the antigen and VLP...... components. RESULTS: Genetic fusion of SpyTag or SpyCatcher to the N-terminus and/or C-terminus of the Acinetobacter phage AP205 capsid protein resulted in formation of stable, nonaggregated VLPs expressing one SpyCatcher, one SpyTag or two SpyTags per capsid protein. Mixing of spy-VLPs with eleven different...... vaccine antigens fused to SpyCatcher or SpyTag resulted in formation of antigen-VLP complexes with coupling efficiencies (% occupancy of total VLP binding sites) ranging from 22-88 %. In mice, spy-VLP vaccines presenting the malaria proteins Pfs25 or VAR2CSA markedly increased antibody titer, affinity...

  20. A Novel Adeno-Associated Virus-Based Genetic Vaccine Encoding the Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4 Protein Exhibits Immunogenic Properties in Mice Superior to Those of an NS3-Protein-Based Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqin Zhu

    Full Text Available More than 170 million individuals worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV, and up to an estimated 30% of chronically infected individuals will go on to develop progressive liver disease. Despite the recent advances in antiviral treatment of HCV infection, it remains a major public health problem. Thus, development of an effective vaccine is urgently required. In this study, we constructed novel adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors expressing the full-length NS3 or NS3/4 protein of HCV genotype 1b. The expression of the NS3 or NS3/4 protein in HepG2 cells was confirmed by western blotting. C57BL/6 mice were intramuscularly immunised with a single injection of AAV vectors, and the resultant immune response was investigated. The AAV2/rh32.33.NS3/4 vaccine induced stronger humoral and cellular responses than did the AAV2/rh32.33.NS3 vaccine. Our results demonstrate that AAV-based vaccines exhibit considerable potential for the development of an effective anti-HCV vaccine.

  1. A detailed view of the intracellular transcriptome of Listeria monocytogenes in murine macrophages using RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Gunter Schultze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen and causative agent for the foodborne infection listeriosis, which is mainly a threat for pregnant, elderly or immunocompromised individuals. Due to its ability to invade and colonize diverse eukaryotic cell types including cells from invertebrates, L. monocytogenes has become a well-established model organism for intracellular growth. Almost ten years ago, we and others presented the first whole-genome microarray-based intracellular transcriptome of L. monocytogenes. With the advent of newer technologies addressing transcriptomes in greater detail, we revisit this work, and analyze the intracellular transcriptome of L. monocytogenes during growth in murine macrophages using a deep sequencing based approach.We detected 656 differentially expressed genes of which 367 were upregulated during intracellular growth in macrophages compared to extracellular growth in BHI. This study confirmed ~64% of all regulated genes previously identified by microarray analysis. Many of the regulated genes that were detected in the current study involve transporters for various metals, ions as well as complex sugars such as mannose. We also report changes in antisense transcription, especially upregulations during intracellular bacterial survival. A notable finding was the detection of regulatory changes for a subset of temperate A118-like prophage genes, thereby shedding light on the transcriptional profile of this bacteriophage during intracellular growth. In total, our study provides an updated genome-wide view of the transcriptional landscape of L. monocytogenes during intracellular growth and represents a rich resource for future detailed analysis.

  2. Probing the pan-genome of Listeria monocytogenes: new insights into intraspecific niche expansion and genomic diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzberg Steven L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial pathogens often show significant intraspecific variations in ecological fitness, host preference and pathogenic potential to cause infectious disease. The species of Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of human listeriosis, consists of at least three distinct genetic lineages. Two of these lineages predominantly cause human sporadic and epidemic infections, whereas the third lineage has never been implicated in human disease outbreaks despite its overall conservation of many known virulence factors. Results Here we compare the genomes of 26 L. monocytogenes strains representing the three lineages based on both in silico comparative genomic analysis and high-density, pan-genomic DNA array hybridizations. We uncover 86 genes and 8 small regulatory RNAs that likely make L. monocytogenes lineages differ in carbohydrate utilization and stress resistance during their residence in natural habitats and passage through the host gastrointestinal tract. We also identify 2,330 to 2,456 core genes that define this species along with an open pan-genome pool that contains more than 4,052 genes. Phylogenomic reconstructions based on 3,560 homologous groups allowed robust estimation of phylogenetic relatedness among L. monocytogenes strains. Conclusions Our pan-genome approach enables accurate co-analysis of DNA sequence and hybridization array data for both core gene estimation and phylogenomics. Application of our method to the pan-genome of L. monocytogenes sheds new insights into the intraspecific niche expansion and evolution of this important foodborne pathogen.

  3. Probing the pan-genome of Listeria monocytogenes: new insights into intraspecific niche expansion and genomic diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiangyu; Phillippy, Adam M; Li, Zengxin; Salzberg, Steven L; Zhang, Wei

    2010-09-16

    Bacterial pathogens often show significant intraspecific variations in ecological fitness, host preference and pathogenic potential to cause infectious disease. The species of Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of human listeriosis, consists of at least three distinct genetic lineages. Two of these lineages predominantly cause human sporadic and epidemic infections, whereas the third lineage has never been implicated in human disease outbreaks despite its overall conservation of many known virulence factors. Here we compare the genomes of 26 L. monocytogenes strains representing the three lineages based on both in silico comparative genomic analysis and high-density, pan-genomic DNA array hybridizations. We uncover 86 genes and 8 small regulatory RNAs that likely make L. monocytogenes lineages differ in carbohydrate utilization and stress resistance during their residence in natural habitats and passage through the host gastrointestinal tract. We also identify 2,330 to 2,456 core genes that define this species along with an open pan-genome pool that contains more than 4,052 genes. Phylogenomic reconstructions based on 3,560 homologous groups allowed robust estimation of phylogenetic relatedness among L. monocytogenes strains. Our pan-genome approach enables accurate co-analysis of DNA sequence and hybridization array data for both core gene estimation and phylogenomics. Application of our method to the pan-genome of L. monocytogenes sheds new insights into the intraspecific niche expansion and evolution of this important foodborne pathogen.

  4. A CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/Lox system-based express vaccine development strategy against re-emerging Pseudorabies virus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Virus evolves rapidly to escape vaccine-induced immunity, posing a desperate demand for efficient vaccine development biotechnologies. Here we present an express vaccine development strategy based on CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/Lox system against re-emerging Pseudorabies virus, which caused the recent devastating swine pseudorabies outbreak in China. By CRISPR/Cas9 system, the virulent genes of the newly isolated strain were simultaneously substituted by marker genes, which were subsequently excised ...

  5. Physician Communication Practices as a Barrier to Risk-Based HPV Vaccine Uptake Among Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheldon, Christopher W; Sutton, Steven K; Fontenot, Holly B; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Giuliano, Anna R; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2017-04-29

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that men who have sex with men (MSM) 26 years of age or younger be routinely vaccinated against HPV. For men outside of this risk-based population, the recommendation is routine vaccination until age 21. Thus, in order for this risk-based recommendation for MSM to be implemented, two distinct actions need to be completed during the clinical visit: (1) discuss recommendations for HPV vaccination with men and (2) assess sexual orientation to determine if a risk-based recommendation should be made. We assessed the degree to which physicians routinely discussed issues of sexual orientation and HPV vaccination with male patients 22-26 years old. We used data from a statewide representative sample of 770 primary care physicians practicing in Florida who were randomly selected from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. The analytic sample consisted of physicians who provided care to men 22-26 years old (N = 220). Response rate was 51%. Data collection took place in 2014 and analyses in 2016. Only 13.6% of physicians were routinely discussing both sexual orientation and HPV vaccination with male patients 22-26 years old, and approximately a quarter (24.5%) were not discussing either. Differences in these behaviors were found based on gender, Hispanic ethnicity, availability of HPV vaccine in clinic, HPV-related knowledge, and specialty. A minority of physicians in this sample reported engaging with these patients in ways that are mostly likely to result in recommendations consistent with current Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices guidelines.

  6. Determination of Listeria monocytogenes Growth during Mushroom Production and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Leong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the EU, food is considered safe with regard to Listeria monocytogenes if its numbers do not exceed 100 CFU/g throughout the shelf-life of the food. Therefore, it is important to determine if a food supports growth of L. monocytogenes. Challenge studies to determine the ability of a food to support growth of L. monocytogenes are essential as predictive modelling often overestimates the growth ability of L. monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to determine if growth of L. monocytogenes was supported during the production and distribution of mushrooms. A three-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated onto three independent batches of whole mushrooms, sliced mushrooms, mushroom casing and mushroom substrate at a concentration of about 100–1000 CFU/g. The batches were incubated at potential abuse temperatures, as a worst case scenario, and at intervals during storage L. monocytogenes numbers, % moisture and pH were determined. The results showed that the sliced and whole mushrooms had the ability to support growth, while mushroom ca