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Sample records for monocytes dendritic cells

  1. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijff, EM; Ruwhof, C; de Wit, HJ; Kupka, RW; Vonk, R; Akkerhuis, GW; Nolen, WA; Drexhage, HA

    2006-01-01

    Background: Dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of the immune system, which is compromised in patients with bipolar disorder. We sought to study monocyte-derived DC in bipolar disorder. Methods: Monocytes purified from blood collected from DSM-IV bipolar disorder outpatients (n = 53, 12 without

  2. Nomenclature of monocytes and dendritic cells in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ziegler-Heitbrock (Loems); P. Ancuta (Petronela); S. Crowe (Suzanne); M. Dalod (Marc); V. Grau (Veronika); D.N. Hart (Derek); P.J. Leenen (Pieter); Y.J. Liu; G. MacPherson (Gordon); G.J. Randolph (Gwendalyn); J. Scherberich (Juergen); J. Schmitz (Juergen); K. Shortman (Ken); S. Sozzani (Silvano); H. Strobl (Herbert); M. Zembala (Marek); J.M. Austyn (Jonathan); M.B. Lutz (Manfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonocytes and cells of the dendritic cell lineage circulate in blood and eventually migrate into tissue where they further mature and serve various functions, most notably in immune defense. Over recent years these cells have been characterized in detail with the use of cell surface mark

  3. Monocyte cell surface glycosaminoglycans positively modulate IL-4-induced differentiation toward dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, E. den; Grefte, S.; Huijs, T.; Dam, G.B. ten; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Berk, L.C.J. van den; Bladergroen, B.A.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.

    2008-01-01

    IL-4 induces the differentiation of monocytes toward dendritic cells (DCs). The activity of many cytokines is modulated by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In this study, we explored the effect of GAGs on the IL-4-induced differentiation of monocytes toward DCs. IL-4 dose-dependently up-regulated the expr

  4. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine stimulates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell chemotaxis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-young LEE; Eun-ha SHIN; Yoe-sik BAE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) chemotaxis. Methods: Human DC were generated from peripheral blood monocytes by culturing them with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The effect of SPC on the DC chemotactic migration was measured by chemotaxis assay. Intracellular signaling event involved in the SPC-induced DC chemotaxis was investigated with several inhibitors for specific kinase. The expression of the SPC receptors was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that SPC induced chemotactic migration in immature DC (iDC) and mature DC (mDC). In terms of SPC-induced signaling events, mitogen activated protein kinase activation and Akt activation in iDC and mDC were stimulated. SPC-induced chemotaxis was mediated by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and phosphoino-sitide-3-kinase, but not by calcium in both iDC and mDC. Although mDC express ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1, but not G protein-coupled receptor 4, iDC do not express any of these receptors. To examine the involvement of sphin-gosine-1-phosphate (SIP) receptors, we checked the effect of an SIP receptor antagonist (VPC23019) on SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. VPC23019 did not affect SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. Conclusion: The results suggest that SPC may play a role in regulating DC trafficking during phagocytosis and the T cell-stimulating phase, and the unique SPC receptor, which is different from SIP receptors, is involved in SPC-induced chemotaxis.

  5. DYSFUNCTION OF MONOCYTES AND DENDRITIC CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH PREMATURE OVARIAN FAILURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEK, A; VAN KASTEREN, Y; DE HAAN-MEULMAN, M; SCHOEMAKER, J; DREXHAGE, HA

    1993-01-01

    PROBLEM: Due to the presence of ovarian antibodies it has been suggested that premature ovarian failure (POF) belongs to the autoimmune endocrinopathies. Monocytes and the monocyte-derived dendritic cells play a prominent role in the initial stages of endocrine autoimmune reactions: the accumulation

  6. Comparative analysis of signature genes in PRRSV-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these c...

  7. Inducing Maturation of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells on Human Epithelial Cell Feeder Layer

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    Delirezh N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, dendritic cells (DCs have a special place in cancer treatment strategies and they have been used for tumor immunotherapy as they can induce immune response against tumor cells. Researchers have been trying to generate efficient dendritic cells in vitro; therefore, this research was done to generate them for use in research and tumor immunotherapy. Methods: This study took place at Urmia University in 2010-2011 years. In this study plastic adherent monocytes were incubated with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 for five days. Finally, fully matured and stable DCs were generated by 48 hours of incubation in a monocyte conditioned medium (MCM containing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and epithelial cells. Phenotypic and functional analysis were carried out by using anti-CD14, anti-CD80, anti-CD86, and anti-CD83 monoclonal antibodies, and by determining their phagocytic activity, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR and cytokine production, respectively. Results: Dendritic cells were produced with high levels of surface molecule, i.e. of CD80, CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, expression and low levels of CD14 expression. Dendritic cells showed efficient phagocytosis and ability to stimulate T-lymphocytes. Moreover, dendritic cells could secrete high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12 cytokine which was depictive of their full maturation. Measurement of the produced cytokines showed the generation of type-1 dendritic cells (DC1. Conclusion: Our study showed that skin epithelial cells could induce maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs. This feeder layer led to the production of efficient dendritic cells with the ability to be used for tumor immunotherapy.

  8. Viral infection triggers rapid differentiation of human blood monocytes into dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wanqiu; Gibbs, James S; Lu, Xiuju; Brooke, Christopher B; Roy, Devika; Modlin, Robert L; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2012-03-29

    Surprisingly little is known about the interaction of human blood mononuclear cells with viruses. Here, we show that monocytes are the predominant cell type infected when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are exposed to viruses ex vivo. Remarkably, infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, and a variety of influenza A viruses (including circulating swine-origin virus) induces monocytes to differentiate within 18 hours into CD16(-)CD83(+) mature dendritic cells with enhanced capacity to activate T cells. Differentiation into dendritic cells does not require cell division and occurs despite the synthesis of viral proteins, which demonstrates that monocytes counteract the capacity of these highly lytic viruses to hijack host cell biosynthetic capacity. Indeed, differentiation requires infectious virus and viral protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that monocytes are uniquely susceptible to viral infection among blood mononuclear cells, with the likely purpose of generating cells with enhanced capacity to activate innate and acquired antiviral immunity.

  9. In-Vitro differentiation of mature dendritic cells from human blood monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Gieseler; Dirk Heise; Afsaneh Soruri; Peter Schwartz; J. Hinrich Peters

    1998-01-01

    Representing the most potent antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DC) can now be generated from human blood monocytes. We recently presented a novel protocol employing GM-CSF, IL-4, and IFN-γ to differentiate monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Here, such cells are characterized in detail. Cells in culture exhibited both dendritic and veiled morphologies, the former being adherent and the latter suspended. Phenotypically, they were CD1a-/dim, CD11a+, CD11b++, CD11c+, CD14dim/-, CD16a-/dim, CD...

  10. Enhanced lentiviral transduction of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the presence of conditioned medium from dying monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurier, C; Boutin, S; Veron, P; Bernard, J; Danos, O; Davoust, J

    2007-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are attractive vehicles for the transduction of human dendritic cells (DCs) in order to mobilize their endogenous antigen presentation pathways. We analyzed here how to improve the efficiency of LV transduction, which we performed at the initial stages of the differentiation of purified monocytes into dendritic cells (Mo-DCs). Using LVs pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope G glycoprotein (VSV-G), we found that a conditioned medium derived from dying monocytes (MCM) improved by 2- to 10- fold the proportion of transduced Mo-DCs. This enhanced transduction efficiency requires the presence of MCM during the initial stage of LV transduction and does not affect the phenotype and antigen presentation function of terminally differentiated Mo-DCs. Importantly, we found that MCM derived from a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1, was equally effective. The MCM activity was heat stable (56 degrees C) and was present in the soluble fraction after high-speed centrifugation. Altogether our results show that a soluble factor present in dying monocyte cultures can replace advantageously facilitating agents such as Polybrene, to achieve high LV transductions levels. This protocol can be performed with autologous monocytes and is therefore applicable in clinical settings.

  11. Inhibition of the differentiation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells by human gingival fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Séguier

    Full Text Available We investigated whether gingival fibroblasts (GFs can modulate the differentiation and/or maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs and analyzed soluble factors that may be involved in this immune modulation. Experiments were performed using human monocytes in co-culture with human GFs in Transwell® chambers or using monocyte cultures treated with conditioned media (CM from GFs of four donors. The four CM and supernatants from cell culture were assayed by ELISA for cytokines involved in the differentiation of dendritic cells, such as IL-6, VEGF, TGFβ1, IL-13 and IL-10. The maturation of monocyte-derived DCs induced by LPS in presence of CM was also studied. Cell surface phenotype markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. In co-cultures, GFs inhibited the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs and the strength of this blockade correlated with the GF/monocyte ratio. Conditioned media from GFs showed similar effects, suggesting the involvement of soluble factors produced by GFs. This inhibition was associated with a lower stimulatory activity in MLR of DCs generated with GFs or its CM. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and VEGF significantly (P<0.05 inhibited the inhibitory effect of CM on the differentiation of monocytes-derived DCs and in a dose dependent manner. Our data suggest that IL-6 is the main factor responsible for the inhibition of DCs differentiation mediated by GFs but that VEGF is also involved and constitutes an additional mechanism.

  12. Mature dendritic cells derived from human monocytes within 48 hours: a novel strategy for dendritic cell differentiation from blood precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Obermaier, Bianca; Herten, Jan; Haerle, Carola; Pohl, Katrin; Rothenfusser, Simon; Schnurr, Max; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2003-04-15

    It is widely believed that generation of mature dendritic cells (DCs) with full T cell stimulatory capacity from human monocytes in vitro requires 5-7 days of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by 2-3 days of activation. Here, we report a new strategy for differentiation and maturation of monocyte-derived DCs within only 48 h of in vitro culture. Monocytes acquire immature DC characteristics by day 2 of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4; they down-regulate CD14, increase dextran uptake, and respond to the inflammatory chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. To accelerate DC development and maturation, monocytes were incubated for 24 h with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by activation with proinflammatory mediators for another 24 h (FastDC). FastDC expressed mature DC surface markers as well as chemokine receptor 7 and secreted IL-12 (p70) upon CD40 ligation in the presence of IFN-gamma. The increase in intracellular calcium in response to 6Ckine showed that chemokine receptor 7 expression was functional. When FastDC were compared with mature monocyte-derived DCs generated by a standard 7-day protocol, they were equally potent in inducing Ag-specific T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production as well as in priming autologous naive T cells using tetanus toxoid as a model Ag. These findings indicate that FastDC are as effective as monocyte-derived DCs in stimulating primary, Ag-specific, Th 1-type immune responses. Generation of FastDC not only reduces labor, cost, and time required for in vitro DC development, but may also represent a model more closely resembling DC differentiation from monocytes in vivo.

  13. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

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    Alexander Puck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  14. Methamphetamine Enhances HIV-1 Infectivity in Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The US is currently experiencing an epidemic of methamphetamine (Meth) use as a recreational drug. Recent studies also show a high prevalence of HIV-1 infection among Meth users. We report that Meth enhances HIV-1 infectivity of dendritic cells as measured by multinuclear activation of a galactosidase indicator (MAGI) cell assay, p24 assay, and LTR-RU5 amplification. Meth induces increased HIV-1 infection in association with an increase in the HIV-1 coreceptors, CXCR4 and CCR5, and infection ...

  15. Ly6Clow Monocytes Differentiate into Dendritic Cells and Cross-Tolerize T Cells through PDL-11

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, YuFeng; Latchman, Yvette; Elkon, Keith B.

    2009-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells are active participants during the immune response against infection, but whether they play a role in maintaining self-tolerance under steady-state conditions is not known. Here we investigated the differentiation of monocytes, their ability to ingest apoptotic cells, and their potential functionality in vivo. We observed that Ly6C (Gr-1)low mature monocytes up-regulate their MHC II level in the spleen, express high levels of PDL-1 (programmed death ligand 1),...

  16. Monocyte differentiation in localized juvenile periodontitis is skewed toward the dendritic cell phenotype.

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    Barbour, Suzanne E; Ishihara, Yuichi; Fakher, Mohammed; Al-Darmaki, Salma; Caven, Timothy H; Shelburne, C P; Best, Al M; Schenkein, Harvey A; Tew, John G

    2002-06-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the monocytes of subjects with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) are functionally distinct from cells of age- and race-matched nonperiodontitis (NP) subjects. Among the abnormalities are the propensity to secrete large amounts of prostaglandin E(2) and the induction of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) antibodies. The experiments described here were performed to further characterize the LJP monocytes and to determine if these cells mature differently than NP monocytes. When adherent monocytes from LJP subjects were cultured in the presence of human serum, both macrophages and cells with the morphology of immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) were observed. Within 4 days the prevalence of the immature MDDC was approximately twofold higher in LJP cultures than in NP cultures. In addition to their dendritic morphology, these cells were CD11c(+) and CD14(-) or CD14(low) and stimulated potent autologous mixed leukocyte reactions, consistent with differentiation to the MDDC phenotype. Like LJP monocytes, cultures of MDDC generated with interleukin-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor selectively induced IgG2 in cultures of pokeweed mitogen-stimulated NP leukocytes. Together, these data suggest that the monocytes of LJP subjects have a propensity to differentiate into MDDC and that this differentiation may be related to the high levels of IgG2 that are observed in the sera of LJP subjects. As high levels of circulating IgG2 are correlated with less severe disease, the propensity of LJP monocytes to differentiate into MDDC may have important implications for both the host response against oral pathogens and the progression of LJP.

  17. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Kelsall, Brian L; Clausen, Bjorn E; Farber, Joshua M

    2016-12-16

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6C(hi) blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells.

  18. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H.; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N.; Singh, Satya P.; Kelsall, Brian L.; Clausen, Bjorn E.; Farber, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6Chi blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells. PMID:27982014

  19. SMAC Mimetic BV6 Induces Cell Death in Monocytes and Maturation of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Philipp; Kapp, Markus; Grigoleit, Götz Ulrich; Schmuck, Carsten; Wajant, Harald; Siegmund, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Background Compounds mimicking the inhibitory effect of SMAC / DIABLO on X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) have been developed with the aim to achieve sensitization for apoptosis of tumor cells resistant due to deregulated XIAP expression. It turned out that SMAC mimetics also have complex effects on the NFκB system and TNF signaling. In view of the overwhelming importance of the NFκB transcription factors in the immune system, we analyzed here the effects of the SMAC mimetic BV6 on immune cells. Principal Findings BV6 induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death in monocytes while T-cells, dendritic cells and macrophages were largely protected against BV6-induced cell death. In immature dendritic cells BV6 treatment resulted in moderate activation of the classical NFκB pathway, but it also diminished the stronger NFκB-inducing effect of TNF and CD40L. Despite its inhibitory effect on TNF- and CD40L signaling, BV6 was able to trigger maturation of immature DCs as indicated by upregulation of CD83, CD86 and IL12. Significance The demonstrated effects of SMAC mimetics on immune cells may complicate the development of tumor therapeutic concepts based on these compounds but also arise the possibility to exploit them for the development of immune stimulatory therapies. PMID:21738708

  20. SMAC mimetic BV6 induces cell death in monocytes and maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Müller-Sienerth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Compounds mimicking the inhibitory effect of SMAC/DIABLO on X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP have been developed with the aim to achieve sensitization for apoptosis of tumor cells resistant due to deregulated XIAP expression. It turned out that SMAC mimetics also have complex effects on the NFκB system and TNF signaling. In view of the overwhelming importance of the NFκB transcription factors in the immune system, we analyzed here the effects of the SMAC mimetic BV6 on immune cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BV6 induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death in monocytes while T-cells, dendritic cells and macrophages were largely protected against BV6-induced cell death. In immature dendritic cells BV6 treatment resulted in moderate activation of the classical NFκB pathway, but it also diminished the stronger NFκB-inducing effect of TNF and CD40L. Despite its inhibitory effect on TNF- and CD40L signaling, BV6 was able to trigger maturation of immature DCs as indicated by upregulation of CD83, CD86 and IL12. SIGNIFICANCE: The demonstrated effects of SMAC mimetics on immune cells may complicate the development of tumor therapeutic concepts based on these compounds but also arise the possibility to exploit them for the development of immune stimulatory therapies.

  1. Comparative analysis of canine monocyte- and bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ricklin Gutzwiller, Meret Elisabeth; Moulin, Hervé Raphaël; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Roosje, Petra; Summerfield, Artur

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Dendritic cells (DC) represent a heterogeneous cell family of major importance for innate immune responses against pathogens and antigen presentation during infection, cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. The aim of the present study was to characterize canine DC generated in vitro with respect to their phenotype, responsiveness to toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and T-cell stimulatory capacity. DC were derived from monocytes (MoDC) and from bone marrow hematopoietic cel...

  2. Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage lines model inflammatory monocytic cells with important similarity to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Marcela; Osorio, Fabiola; Robinson, Matthew J; Davies, Luke C; Dierkes, Nicola; Jones, Simon A; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Taylor, Philip R

    2011-02-01

    We have examined the potential to generate bona fide macrophages (MØ) from conditionally immortalised murine bone marrow precursors. MØ can be derived from Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage precursor cell lines (MØP) using either M-CSF or GM-CSF. When differentiated in GM-CSF (GM-MØP) the resultant cells resemble GM-CSF bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) in morphological phenotype, antigen phenotype and functional responses to microbial stimuli. In spite of this high similarity between the two cell types and the ability of GM-MØP to effectively present antigen to a T-cell hybridoma, these cells are comparatively poor at priming the expansion of IFN-γ responses from naïve CD4(+) T cells. The generation of MØP from transgenic or genetically aberrant mice provides an excellent opportunity to study the inflammatory role of GM-MØP, and reduces the need for mouse colonies in many studies. Hence differentiation of conditionally immortalised MØPs in GM-CSF represents a unique in vitro model of inflammatory monocyte-like cells, with important differences from bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, which will facilitate functional studies relating to the many 'sub-phenotypes' of inflammatory monocytes.

  3. Chemoresistance of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells is regulated by IL-17A.

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    Selma Olsson Åkefeldt

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells initiate adaptive immune responses, leading either to control cancer by effector T cells or to exacerbate cancer by regulatory T cells that inhibit IFN-γ-mediated Th1-type response. Dendritic cells can also induce Th17-type immunity, mediated by IL-17A. However, the controversial role of this cytokine in cancer requires further investigations. We generated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes to investigate lifespan, phenotype and chemoresistance of dendritic cells, treated with IL-17A with or without IFN-γ. Studying the expression of Bcl-2 family members, we demonstrated that dendritic cells constitutively express one pro-survival Bcl-2 member: MCL1. Immature dendritic cells were CD40(lowHLADR(low CD1a(+ MCL1(+, did not express CD14, CD68 or BCL2A1, and displayed a short 2-day lifespan. IL-17A-treated DC exhibited a semi-mature (CD40(high HLADR(low pre-M2 (CCL22(+ CD206(+ CD163(+ IL1RN(+ IL-10(- CXCL10(- IL-12(- mixed (CD1a(+ CD14+ CD68(+ macrophage-dendritic cell phenotype. They efficiently exerted mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis and did not produce superoxide anions, in the absence of TLR engagement. Interestingly, IL-17A promoted a long-term survival of dendritic cells, beyond 12 days, that correlated to BCL2A1 induction, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member. BCL2A1 transcription was activated by NF-κB, downstream of IL-17A transduction. Thus, immature dendritic cells only express MCL1, whereas IL-17A-treated dendritic cells concomitantly expressed two pro-survival Bcl-2 family members: MCL1 and BCL2A1. These latter developed chemoresistance to 11 of the 17 chemotherapy agents tested. However, high doses of either vinblastine or cytarabine decreased MCL1 expression and induced dendritic cell death. When IL-17A is produced in vivo, administration of anti-IL-17A biotherapy may impair dendritic cell survival by targeting BCL2A1 expression. Consequently, depending on the effector or regulatory role of dendritic

  4. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  5. Human XCR1+ Dendritic Cells Derived In Vitro from CD34+ Progenitors Closely Resemble Blood Dendritic Cells, Including Their Adjuvant Responsiveness, Contrary to Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    S. Balan; Ollion, V.; Colletti, N.; Chelbi, R.; Montanana-Sanchis, F.; LIU, H.; Vu Manh, T.-P.; Sanchez, C.; Savoret, J.; Perrot, I.; Doffin, A.-C.; Fossum, E.; Bechlian, D.; Chabannon, C.; Bogen, B

    2014-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1+ DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1+ human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1+ human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1+ and XCR1− human DC in CD3...

  6. β2-Agonist clenbuterol hinders human monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells.

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    Giordani, Luciana; Cuzziol, Noemi; Del Pinto, Tamara; Sanchez, Massimo; Maccari, Sonia; Massimi, Alessia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Viora, Marina

    2015-12-10

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is a beta2-adrenergic agonist commonly used in asthma therapy, but is also a non-steroidal anabolic drug often abused in sport doping practices. Here we evaluated the in vitro impact of CLB on the physiology and function of human monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), instrumental in the development of immune responses. We demonstrate that CLB inhibits the differentiation of monocytes into DCs and this effect is specific and dependent on β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation. We found that CLB treatment reduced the percentage of CD1a(+) immature DCs, while increasing the frequency of monocytes retaining CD14 surface expression. Moreover, CLB inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) enhanced IL-(interleukin)-10 and IL-6 production. In contrast, CLB did not modulate the phenotypic and functional properties of monocytes and DCs, such as the surface expression of HLA-DR, CD83, CD80 and CD86 molecules, cytokine production, immunostimulatory activity and phagocytic activity. Moreover, we found that CLB did not modulate the activation of NF-kB in DCs. Moreover, we found that the differentiation of monocytes into DCs was associated with a significant decrease of β2-ARs mRNA expression. These results provide new insights on the effect of CLB on monocyte differentiation into DCs. Considering the frequent illegal use of CLB in doping, our work suggests that this drug is potentially harmful to immune responses decreasing the supply of DCs, thus subverting immune surveillance.

  7. Impact of individual intravenous iron preparations on the differentiation of monocytes towards macrophages and dendritic cells

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    Fell, Lisa H.; Seiler-Mußler, Sarah; Sellier, Alexander B.; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Sester, Martina; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H.; Zawada, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of iron deficiency with intravenous (i.v.) iron is a first-line strategy to improve anaemia of chronic kidney disease. Previous in vitro experiments demonstrated that different i.v. iron preparations inhibit differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells to monocytes, but their effect on monocyte differentiation to macrophages and mature dendritic cells (mDCs) has not been assessed. We investigated substance-specific effects of iron sucrose (IS), sodium ferric gluconate (SFG), ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) and iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) on monocytic differentiation to M1/M2 macrophages and mDCs. Methods Via flow cytometry and microRNA (miRNA) expression analysis, we morphologically and functionally characterized monocyte differentiation to M1/M2 macrophages and mDCs after monocyte stimulation with IS, SFG, FCM and IIM (0.133, 0.266 and 0.533 mg/mL, respectively). To assess potential clinical implications, we compared monocytic phagocytosis capacity in dialysis patients who received either 500 mg IS or IIM. Results Phenotypically, IS and SFG dysregulated the expression of macrophage (e.g. CD40, CD163) and mDC (e.g. CD1c, CD141) surface markers. Functionally, IS and SFG impaired macrophage phagocytosis capacity. Phenotypic and functional alterations were less pronounced with FCM, and virtually absent with IIM. In miRNA expression analysis of mDCs, IS dysregulated miRNAs such as miR-146b-5p and miR-155-5p, which are linked to Toll-like receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways. In vivo, IS reduced monocytic phagocytosis capacity within 1 h after infusion, while IIM did not. Conclusions This study demonstrates that less stable i.v. iron preparations specifically affect monocyte differentiation towards macrophages and mDCs. PMID:27190361

  8. [Inflammatory dendritic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a rare and heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells. Several murine dendritic cell subpopulations have been identified that differ in their phenotype and functional properties. In the steady state, committed dendritic cell precursors differentiate into lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells and migratory tissue dendritic cells. During inflammation appears an additional dendritic cell subpopulation that has been termed « inflammatory dendritic cells ». Inflammatory dendritic cells differentiate in situ from monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation. Here, we discuss how mouse inflammatory dendritic cells differ from macrophages and from other dendritic cell populations. Finally, we review recent work on human inflammatory dendritic cells.

  9. Characterization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells maturated with IFN-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Walter, M R;

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. These cells can be generated from peripheral blood monocytes cultured with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). In order to obtain full functional capacity, maturation is required......, maturation with IFN-alpha has only a small effect on induction of autologous T-cell stimulatory capacity of the DC. However, an increase in DC allogeneic T-cell stimulatory capacity was observed. These data suggest that IFN-alpha has a potential as a maturation agent used in DC-based cancer vaccine trials...

  10. Phenotype and Function of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells from Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Houjun Xia; Hongliang Liu; Gaohong Zhang; Yongtang Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in linking the innate immunity and acquired immunity in responses to pathogen. Non-human primates such as Chinese Rhesus Macaque (CRM) are the favorable models for preclinical study of potential therapeutic drugs, vaccines and mechanisms of human diseases. However, the phenotypicai characterization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from CRM has not been elucidated. Monocytes from CRM were cultured with GM-CSF and IL-4 in RPMI-1640. Six days later, these cells were differentiated with typical dendritical morphology. CDllc and DC-SIGN were highly expressed. The immature MDDCs expressed the low levels of CD25, CD80, CD83, moderate CD40, CD86, and high MHC. After stimulation, the mature MDDCs increased expression of mature molecules CD25 and CD83, co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80, CD86 and CD40, and kept a high level of MHC. The capacity of endocytosis decreased with maturation. The mature MDDCs have strong ability of inducing allogeneic T cell proliferation and producing IL-12. In conclusion, we have characterized the phenotype and ultimate function of MDDCs from CRM for the first time. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(3):159-165.

  11. Characterization of canine monocyte-derived dendritic cells with phenotypic and functional differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Liu, Cheng-Chi; Cheng, Chiao-Lei; Lin, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Chiung-Hsiang; Chu, Rea-Min

    2007-07-01

    For therapeutic purposes, large numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) are essential. In this study, we used 2% autologous canine plasma, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in generating monocyte-derived DCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of dogs. The plasma enriched the population of CD14-positive monocytes by greatly enhancing the efficiency of monocyte adherence, the proportion of adherent cells increasing from 6.6% with 10% fetal bovine serum to 15.3% with 2% autologous canine plasma. Culturing the adherent monocytes for 6 d with human GM-CSF, canine IL-4, and human Flt3L significantly increased the yield of DCs, more than 90% of which were CD14-negative. Because, in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), monocytes that were CD14-positive expressed tumor necrosis factor ac much more than DCs with low levels of CD14, it is important to decrease the numbers of CD14-positive cells in generating monocyte-derived DCs. With flow cytometry and real-time reverse-transcriptase-mediated polymerase chain reaction assays, we found that in canine immature DCs (iDCs) the expression of DLA class II molecules, CD1a, CD11c, CD40, and CD86 was high and the expression of CD80, CD83, and CD14 either low or negative. During maturation (stimulated by LPS), the expression of CDla, CD40, CD83, and CD80 was upregulated. However, the expression of DLA class II molecules, CD11c, and CD86 was not increased in mature DCs. Incubating the iDCs with LPS decreased antigen uptake and increased the cells' immunostimulatory capacity (assessed by the allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte reaction), indicating that LPS accelerates the functional maturation of DCs. This protocol may facilitate the use of DCs in cellular immunotherapy.

  12. [Induction of monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation by asthmatic serum in a transendothelial trafficking model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin-fu; Wang, Wen-lu; Li, Hong-yan; Zhang, Ming-shun; Ji, Xiao-hui; He, Shao-heng; Huang, Mao; Yin, Kai-sheng

    2011-03-01

    To explore the effect of asthmatic and healthy serum on differentiation and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) in a transendothelial trafficking model. The sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated from 12 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy volunteers, and monocytes were selected from PBMC using magnetic beads. The trypsin-digested human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) at passage 2 from 5 healthy lying-in women were used to construct the transendothelial trafficking model under asthmatic or healthy serum, wherein MDDC were identified by silver nitrate staining and scanning electron microscopy. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Flow cytometry, ELISA and mixed leukocyte reaction were relevantly utilized to detect the phenotype, cytokine and T cell proliferation. (1) Monocytes traversed through HUVEC monolayer after 2 h, and reverse-transmigrated to develop into DC 48 h later. (2) The healthy serum stimulated monocytes into immature MDDC with lower CD(14) [(20 ± 5)%] (F = 49.01, P 0.05), higher CD(80) and CD(83) [(49.7 ± 10.2)% and (30.2 ± 6.8)%] (F = 4.01 and 20.68, all P trafficking model, which provides a promising experimental platform for both investigation of immunological mechanisms in asthma and screening of novel anti-asthma drugs in vitro.

  13. Development of a new protocol for 2-day generation of mature dendritic cells from human monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Obermaier Bianca; Dauer Marc; Herten Jan; Schad Katharina; Endres Stefan; Eigler Andreas

    2003-01-01

    We developed a new 2-day protocol for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs) from human monocytes in vitro. First, we demonstrated that 24 hours of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 are sufficient to generate immature DCs capable of antigen uptake. We then compared two different strategies for DC maturation: proinflammatory mediators were either added together with GM-CSF and IL-4 from the beginning of cell culture or added after 24 hours of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4. After 48 hours of...

  14. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ling-ling; ZHANG Zhe; ZHENG Jie-sheng; SHENG Ji-fang; LIU Ke-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed at developing a simple and easy way to generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in vitro. Methods: PBMCs were isolated directly from white blood cell rather than whole blood and purified by patching methods (collecting the attached cell and removing the suspension cell). DCs were then generated by culturing PBMCs for six days with 30 ng/ml recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and 20 ng/ml recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) in vitro. On the sixth day, TNF-alpha (TNFα) 30 ng/ml was added into some DC cultures, which were then incubated for two additional days. The morphology was monitored by light microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy, and the phenotypes were determined by flow cytometry. Autologous mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR) were used to characterize DC function after TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations for 24 h. Results: After six days of culture, the monocytes developed significant dendritic morphology and a portion of cells expressed CD 1 a, CD80 and CD86, features of DCs. TNFα treatment induced DCs maturation and up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD83. Autologous MLR demonstrated that these DCs possess potent T-cell stimulatory capacity. Conclusion: This study developed a simple and easy way to generate DCs from PBMCs exposed to rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. The DCs produced by this method acquired morphologic and antigenic characteristics of DCs.

  15. CHI3L1 nuclear localization in monocyte derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosa, Michelino; Tibullo, Daniele; Saccone, Salvatore; Distefano, Gisella; Basile, Maria Sofia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Malaguarnera, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    Chitinase-3-like-1 protein (CHI3L1) is a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) highly expressed in a variety of inflammatory diseases at infectious and non-infectious etiology. CHI3L1 is produced by a wide variety of cells including monocyte-derived macrophages cell lines such as polarized M1 and M2 type macrophages, osteoclasts and Kupffer cells. In this study we have examined the expression of CHI3L1 during the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells. Magnetically-isolated peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated toward immature DCs (iDC) and mature DCs (mDCs) through a combination of factors and cytokines. Our result showed, for the first time, that CHI3L1 is expressed during the process of differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells in time dependent manner. Furthermore, the CHI3L1 is evenly distributed in cytoplasm and in the nucleus of both the iDCs and mDCs. These results suggest that CHI3L1 may play crucial role in the DCs immunoresponse.

  16. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  17. Differentiation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells under the influence of leflunomide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić-Vukanić Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leflunomide is an immunosuppressive drug effective in experimental models of transplantation and autoimmune diseases and in the treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Having in mind that it has been shown that some other immunosuppressive drugs (glucocorticoids, mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus etc. impair dendritic cell (DC phenotype and function, we investigated the effect of A77 1726, an active metabolite of leflunomide, on the differentiation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC in vitro. Immature MDDC were generated by cultivating monocytes in medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4. To induce maturation, immature MDDC were cultured for 2 additional days with LPS. A77 1726 (100 μM was added at the beginning of cultivation. Flow cytometric analysis showed that MDDC differentiated in the presence of A77 1726 exhibited an altered phenotype, with a down-regulated surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD54 and CD40 molecules. Furthermore, the continuous presence of A77 1726 during differentiation and maturation prevented successful maturation, judging by the decreased expression of maturation marker CD83, costimulatory and adhesive molecules on A77 1726-treated mature MDDC. In addition, A77 1726-pretreated MDDC exhibited a poor stimulatory capacity of the allogeneic T cells and a low production of IL-10 and IL-18. These data suggest that leflunomide impairs the differentiation, maturation and function of human MDDC in vitro, which is an additional mechanism of its immunosuppressive effect.

  18. Evaluating the Effects of Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B on the Maturation and Function of Monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsson shariat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Interaction of cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B with toll-like receptors of dendritic cells leads to early signaling and innate immune responses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B on the maturation and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in treated groups in comparison with control groups. Materials & Methods: Blood samples were taken from 5 healthy volunteers. Following the generation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells on the fifth day of cell culture, half of the immature dendritic cells were treated with cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B, and the rest of them were induced to mature dendritic untreated cells and were used as the control group. The maturation and function of dendritic cells were evaluated in these two groups. Results: The gene expression level of toll-like receptor-4 significantly increased in the group treated with glycoprotein B (p < 0.05, whereas there were no significant differences in the expression rates of CD83, CD86, CD1a, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-23 from monocyte-derived dendritic cells between the treated groups and the controls. Conclusion: The increase in the gene expression of toll-like receptor-4 in monocyte-derived dendritic cells treated with cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B showed that cell contact is required to elicit cellular antiviral response and toll-like receptor activation. Thus, it is critical to recognize the viral and cellular determinants of the immune system in order to develop new therapeutic strategies against cytomegalovirus.

  19. HIV/SIV infection primes monocytes and dendritic cells for apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Laforge

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Subversion or exacerbation of antigen-presenting cells (APC death modulates host/pathogen equilibrium. We demonstrated during in vitro differentiation of monocyte-derived macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs that HIV sensitizes the cells to undergo apoptosis in response to TRAIL and FasL, respectively. In addition, we found that HIV-1 increased the levels of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak molecules and decreased the levels of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and FLIP proteins. To assess the relevance of these observations in the context of an experimental model of HIV infection, we investigated the death of APC during pathogenic SIV-infection in rhesus macaques (RMs. We demonstrated increased apoptosis, during the acute phase, of both peripheral blood DCs and monocytes (CD14(+ from SIV(+RMs, associated with a dysregulation in the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic molecules. Caspase-inhibitor and death receptors antagonists prevented apoptosis of APCs from SIV(+RMs. Furthermore, increased levels of FasL in the sera of pathogenic SIV(+RMs were detected, compared to non-pathogenic SIV infection of African green monkey. We suggest that inappropriate apoptosis of antigen-presenting cells may contribute to dysregulation of cellular immunity early in the process of HIV/SIV infection.

  20. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides can induce human monocytic leukemia cells into dendritic cells with immuno-stimulatory function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Yu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies demonstrated Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GL-PS, a form of bioactive β-glucan can stimulate the maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. The question of how leukemic cells especially in monocytic lineage respond to GL-PS stimuli remains unclear. Results In this study, we used in vitro culture model with leukemic monocytic cell-lines THP-1 and U937 as monocytic effectors cells for proliferation responses and DCs induction. We treated the THP-1 and U937 cells with purified GL-PS (100 μg/mL or GL-PS with GM-CSF/IL-4. GL-PS alone induced proliferative response on both THP-1 and U937 cells but only THP-1 transformed into typical DC morphology when stimulated with GL-PS plus GM-CSF/IL-4. The transformed THP-1 DCs had significant increase expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86 though not as high as the extent of normal monocyte-derived DCs. They had similar antigen-uptake ability as the normal monocyte-derived DCs positive control. However, their potency in inducing allogeneic T cell proliferation was also less than that of normal monocyte-derived DCs. Conclusion Our findings suggested that GL-PS could induce selected monocytic leukemic cell differentiation into DCs with immuno-stimulatory function. The possible clinical impact of using this commonly used medicinal mushroom in patients with monocytic leukemia (AML-M4 and M5 deserved further investigation.

  1. Development of a new protocol for 2-day generation of mature dendritic cells from human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermaier, Bianca; Dauer, Marc; Herten, Jan; Schad, Katharina; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    We developed a new 2-day protocol for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs) from human monocytes in vitro. First, we demonstrated that 24 hours of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 are sufficient to generate immature DCs capable of antigen uptake. We then compared two different strategies for DC maturation: proinflammatory mediators were either added together with GM-CSF and IL-4 from the beginning of cell culture or added after 24 hours of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4. After 48 hours of total culture period, expression of activation markers was more pronounced in cells generated by the 2-step differentiation and activation method. Our new protocol for 2-day DC differentiation reduces labor, cost and time and also reliably renders high numbers of mature and viable DCs.

  2. Development of a new protocol for 2-day generation of mature dendritic cells from human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obermaier Bianca

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a new 2-day protocol for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs from human monocytes in vitro. First, we demonstrated that 24 hours of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 are sufficient to generate immature DCs capable of antigen uptake. We then compared two different strategies for DC maturation: proinflammatory mediators were either added together with GM-CSF and IL-4 from the beginning of cell culture or added after 24 hours of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4. After 48 hours of total culture period, expression of activation markers was more pronounced in cells generated by the 2-step differentiation and activation method. Our new protocol for 2-day DC differentiation reduces labor, cost and time and also reliably renders high numbers of mature and viable DCs.

  3. Comparative analysis of canine monocyte- and bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin Gutzwiller, Meret Elisabeth; Moulin, Hervé Raphaël; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Roosje, Petra; Summerfield, Artur

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) represent a heterogeneous cell family of major importance for innate immune responses against pathogens and antigen presentation during infection, cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. The aim of the present study was to characterize canine DC generated in vitro with respect to their phenotype, responsiveness to toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and T-cell stimulatory capacity. DC were derived from monocytes (MoDC) and from bone marrow hematopoietic cells cultured with either Flt3-ligand (FL-BMDC) or with GM-CSF (GM-BMDC). All three methods generated cells with typical DC morphology that expressed CD1c, CD11c and CD14, similar to macrophages. However, CD40 was only found on DC, CD206 on MPhi and BMDC, but not on monocytes and MoDC. CD1c was not found on monocytes but on all in vitro differentiated cells. FL-BMDC and GM-BMDC were partially positive for CD4 and CD8. CD45RA was expressed on a subset of FL-BMDC but not on MoDC and GM-BMDC. MoDC and FL-DC responded well to TLR ligands including poly-IC (TLR2), Pam3Cys (TLR3), LPS (TLR4) and imiquimod (TLR7) by up-regulating MHC II and CD86. The generated DC and MPhi showed a stimulatory capacity for lymphocytes, which increased upon maturation with LPS. Taken together, our results are the basis for further characterization of canine DC subsets with respect to their role in inflammation and immune responses.

  4. An improved protocol for generation of immuno-potent dendritic cells through direct electroporation of CD14+monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milano, Francesca; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Rygiel, Agnieszka M.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Van Deventer, Sander J. H.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2007-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate a novel protocol showing that electroporation of CD14+ monocytes directly isolated from blood with green fluorescent protein (GFP) RNA results in a 3-fold higher yield of antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) when compared to conventional methods employing immature DC

  5. Increased frequency of CD16+monocytes and the presence of activated dendritic cells in salivary glands in primary Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, M. E.; Welzen-Coppens, J. M. C.; van Helden-Meeuwsen, C. G.; Bootsma, H.; Vissink, A.; van Rooijen, N.; de Merwe, J. P. van; Drexhage, H. A.; Versnel, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: In the salivary glands of patients with primary Sjogren Syndrome (pSjS) an accumulation of dendritic cells (DCs) is seen, which is thought to play a role in stimulating local inflammation. Aberrancies in subsets of monocytes, generally considered the blood precursors for DCs, may play a

  6. Isolation of IL-12p70-competent human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2012-01-01

    that moDCs generated under standard conditions develop into two subsets based on CD1a-expression with the CD1a+ moDCs being the main IL-12p70 producers. This has however not been generally accepted, which we show here because the subset described as CD1a-negative does express CD1a, but at a lower level......Diverse methodologies ranging from experimental immunological studies to immunotherapy involve the application of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). Considerable donor-dependent variations in the moDC production of IL-12p70 affect the outcome of these methodologies. It has been shown...

  7. In vitro interaction of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eRoscetto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is increasingly identified as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised, cancer and cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Knowledge on innate immune responses to S. maltophilia and its potential modulation is poor. The present work investigated the ability of 12 clinical S. maltophilia strains (5 from CF patients, 7 from non-CF patients and one environmental strain to survive inside human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs. The effects of the bacteria on maturation of and cytokine secretion by DCs were also measured. S. maltophilia strains presented a high degree of heterogeneity in internalization and intracellular replication efficiencies as well as in the ability of S. maltophilia to interfere with normal DCs maturation. By contrast, all S. maltophilia strains were able to activate DCs, as measured by increase in the expression of surface maturation markers and proinflammatory cytokines secretion.

  8. HIV-1-triggered release of type I IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells induces BAFF production in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Alejandro M; Ouellet, Michel; Tremblay, Michel J

    2015-03-01

    HIV-1 infection leads to numerous B cell abnormalities, including hypergammaglobulinemia, nonspecific B cell activation, nonspecific class switching, increased cell turnover, breakage of tolerance, increased immature/transitional B cells, B cell malignancies, as well as a loss of capacity to generate and maintain memory, all of which contribute to a global impairment of the immune humoral compartment. Several cytokines and soluble factors, which are increased in sera of HIV-1-infected individuals, have been suggested to directly or indirectly contribute to these B cell dysfunctions, and one of these is the B cell-activating factor (BAFF). We report in this study that HIV-1 (X4- and R5-tropic) upregulates BAFF expression and secretion by human monocytes. Moreover, we show that the virus-mediated production of BAFF by monocytes relies on a type I IFN response by a small percentage of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) present in the monocyte cultures. HIV-1-induced type I IFN by pDCs triggers BAFF production in both classical and intermediate monocytes, but not in nonclassical monocytes, which nonetheless display a very strong basal BAFF production. We report also that basal BAFF secretion was higher in monocytes obtained from females compared with those from male donors. This study provides a novel mechanistic explanation for the increased BAFF levels observed during HIV-1 infection and highlights the importance of pDC/monocyte crosstalk to drive BAFF secretion. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin on dendritic cells generated from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li; Zhi-Hua Feng; Guang-Yu Li; Dan-Lei Mou; Qing-He Nie

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood and to detect the expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN; CD209) for the further study of DC-SIGN in hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission.METHODS: Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from blood of healthy individuals by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation and cultured in complete medium containing rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. Cells were cultured for seven days, with cytokine addition every two days to obtain immature DCs. Characteristics of the cultured cells were observed under light and scanning microscope, and the expression of DC-SIGN was detected by immunofluorescence staining.RESULTS: After seven-day culture, a large number of cells with typical characteristics of DCs appeared. Their characteristics were observed under light and scanning electron microscope. These cells had a variety of cell shapes such as those of bipolar elongate cells, elaborate stellate cells and DCs. DC-SIGN was detected by immunofluorescence staining and its expression level on cultivated dendritic cells was high.CONCLUSION: DCs with a high expression of DC-SIGN can be generated from human peripheral blood monocytes in complete medium containing rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4.

  10. Human XCR1+ dendritic cells derived in vitro from CD34+ progenitors closely resemble blood dendritic cells, including their adjuvant responsiveness, contrary to monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sreekumar; Ollion, Vincent; Colletti, Nicholas; Chelbi, Rabie; Montanana-Sanchis, Frédéric; Liu, Hong; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Sanchez, Cindy; Savoret, Juliette; Perrot, Ivan; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Fossum, Even; Bechlian, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Bogen, Bjarne; Asselin-Paturel, Carine; Shaw, Michael; Soos, Timothy; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny; Dalod, Marc

    2014-08-15

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1(+) DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1(+) human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1(+) human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1(+) and XCR1(-) human DC in CD34(+) progenitor cultures (CD34-DC). Gene expression profiling, phenotypic characterization, and functional studies demonstrated that XCR1(-) CD34-DC are similar to canonical MoDC, whereas XCR1(+) CD34-DC resemble XCR1(+) blood DC (bDC). XCR1(+) DC were strongly activated by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid but not LPS, and conversely for MoDC. XCR1(+) DC and MoDC expressed strikingly different patterns of molecules involved in inflammation and in cross-talk with NK or T cells. XCR1(+) CD34-DC but not MoDC efficiently cross-presented a cell-associated Ag upon stimulation by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or R848, likewise to what was reported for XCR1(+) bDC. Hence, it is feasible to generate high numbers of bona fide XCR1(+) human DC in vitro as a model to decipher the functions of XCR1(+) bDC and as a potential source of XCR1(+) DC for clinical use.

  11. The methodological approach for the generation of human dendritic cells from monocytes affects the maturation state of the resultant dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucci, Ilaria; Legitimo, Annalisa; Compagnino, Marta; Consolini, Rita; Migliaccio, Pasquale; Metelli, Maria Rita; Scatena, Fabrizio

    2009-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are effective as antigen-presenting cells in the immune system and are present at two functional stages depending on their maturation state. For experimental investigation of this concept, CD14(+) monocytes from blood are isolated and cultured to generate in vitro the DCs needed for functional analysis. For positive selection of CD14(+) monocytes we compared two immunomagnetic bead technologies: MACS Separation, created by Miltenyi Biotec, and EasySep Selection, created by StemCell Technologies. The monocytes provided dendritic cells for their functional analysis. Lipopolysaccharide was added to cultured DCs to induce maturation. Although both systems generated DCs from the positively selected CD14(+) cells, there were certain differences between them. Morphological, phenotypic, and functional analysis showed that MACS-selection provided DCs that have typical features corresponding to day 6 or 7 of maturation. EasySep-DCs exist in a partially-mature state from day 6 onward, even without the addition of a maturation stimulus. The reason behind this partial maturation is possibly based on the dextran-coated beads that are associated with the EasySep product. Both methods provide pure and viable DCs, but we would recommend using the MACS system for obtaining DCs suitable for functional studies.

  12. Environmentally relevant dose of arsenic interferes in functions of human monocytes derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Abbas; Salmani, Vahid

    2017-06-05

    Arsenic is a major environmental pollutant and highly hazardous toxin to human health, which well established as carcinogen and immune deregulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) have a pivotal role in cell-mediated immunity for T-cell activation and antigen presentation. In this study, T cell activation, some key functional genes expression, cell stability and phagocytosis capacity of human monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs) were analyzed after in vitro exposure to very low dose of arsenic for 12 and 24h. Arsenic decreased continually phagocytosis capacity of MDDCs. Furthermore, down-regulation of the cell-surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD40 after 24h post treatment with arsenic, confirmed arsenic interferers in the phagocytosis process. Pro inflammatory cytokines, IL1β and TNFα were more expressed in arsenic-treated MDDCs while IL6 transiently was down regulated. In general, our novel findings here strongly suggest that low level of arsenic dysregulates four fundamental immune processes of DCs. Mechanistically; this could explain the observed immunodeficiency activity of Arsenic, and give direction for comprehension the pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Maturation of human dendritic cells by monocyte-conditioned medium is dependent upon trace amounts of lipopolysaccharide inducing tumour necrosis factor alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nersting, Jacob; Svenson, Morten; Andersen, Vagn

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM), generated by monocytes cultured on plastic-immobilised immunoglobulin, to stimulate maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). Earlier reports suggest that MCM is a strong inducer of irreversible DC maturation......-stimulatory potency of LPS. Maturation by this procedure is mediated mainly by tumour necrosis factor alpha secreted from monocytes during the medium-conditioning period....

  14. Phenotype and function of myeloid dendritic cells derived from African green monkey blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortara, Lorenzo; Ploquin, Mickaël J-Y; Faye, Abdourahmane; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Vaslin, Bruno; Butor, Cécile; Hosmalin, Anne; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Diop, Ousmane M; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C

    2006-01-20

    Myeloid dendritic cells probably play an important role in the immune response against HIV and SIV, and in the enhancement of CD4+ T cell infection. Here, we have investigated phenotypic and functional features of myeloid monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) from African green monkeys (AGMs). AGMs are natural hosts of SIV and exhibit no signs of abnormal T cell activation despite high SIV plasma viremia. We identified mAbs that cross-react specifically with homologous molecules expressed on AGM DC. We adapted a protocol to derive AGM MDDC by culture in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. The differentiated cells possessed a typical dendritic morphology and the majority were CD11c+ DC-SIGN+. AGM MDDC displayed a high expression of typical maturation markers, such as CD83, CD86 and DC-LAMP, and moderate immunostimulatory capacity, suggesting that the cells were in a semi-mature state. Stimulation resulted in further maturation, as shown by up-regulation of CD80 and decrease of endocytosis ability. However, neither increase of HLA-DR or CD40 expression nor enhanced immunostimulatory capacity was observed. The latter was associated with a low pro-inflammatory cytokine production during mixed lymphocyte reactions and a cytokine balance in favour of IL-10 in contrast to human MDDC. This is the first characterization of AGM MDDC. The tools described here are a crucial step for future studies in vivo or in vitro on the function of myeloid DC using the AGM animal model.

  15. CD1c-Expression by Monocytes - Implications for the Use of Commercial CD1c+ Dendritic Cell Isolation Kits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Schrøder

    Full Text Available Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs comprise a heterogeneous population of cells that are important regulators of immunity and homeostasis. CD1c+ cDCs are present in human blood and tissues, and found to efficiently activate naïve CD4+ T cells. While CD1c is thought to specifically identify this subset of human cDCs, we show here that also classical and intermediate monocytes express CD1c. Accordingly, the commercial CD1c (BDCA-1+ Dendritic Cell Isolation Kit isolates two distinct cell populations from blood: CD1c+CD14- cDCs and CD1c+CD14+ monocytes. CD1c+ cDCs and CD1c+ monocytes exhibited strikingly different properties, including their differential regulation of surface marker expression, their levels of cytokine production, and their ability to stimulate naïve CD4+ T cells. These results demonstrate that a commercial CD1c (BDCA-1+ Dendritic Cell Isolation Kit isolates two functionally different cell populations, which has important implications for the interpretation of previously generated data using this kit to characterize CD1c+ cDCs.

  16. PGE2 confers survivin-dependent apoptosis resistance in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratelli, Felicita; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Zhu, Li; Escuadro, Brian; Sharma, Sherven; Reckamp, Karen; Dohadwala, Mariam; Dubinett, Steven M

    2005-08-01

    Control of apoptosis is fundamental for dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis. Numerous factors maintain DC viability throughout their lifespan, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. Among them, survivin is overexpressed in many human malignancies, but its physiological function in normal cells has not been fully delineated. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), also overproduced in several malignancies, has shown to induce proapoptotic and antiapoptotic effects in different cell types, including immune cells. In DC, PGE2 predominantly affects maturation and modulates immune functions. Here, we show that exposure of monocyte-derived DC to PGE2 (10(-5) M) for 72 h significantly increased DC survivin mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, DC, matured with lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha, did not reveal survivin induction in response to PGE2. Following exposure to apoptotic stimuli, DC treated with PGE2 exhibited an overall increased viability compared with control DC, and this effect was correlated inversely with caspase-3 activation. Moreover, PGE2-treated, survivin-deficient DC demonstrated reduced viability in response to apoptotic stimuli. Further analysis indicated that PGE2 induced DC survivin expression in an E prostanoid (EP)2/EP4 receptor and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent manner. These findings suggest that PGE2-dependent regulation of survivin is important in modulating apoptosis resistance in human DC.

  17. Generation of feline dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood monocytes for in vivo use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella; Mazzetti, Paola; Bozzacco, Leonia; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2005-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that can prime T cells and polarize the cellular immune response. Because Th1-type immune responses have been connected to success in combating viral infection, a promising therapeutic application of DCs would be their differentiation in vitro and injection back into the host to boost an immune response in infected animals. This study was aimed both at developing a protocol to cultivate feline DCs in the absence of exogenous proteins for their use in vivo and at investigating what might be the most appropriate stimulus to induce their maturation in vitro and finding correlates of maturation. We generated DCs from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of feline interleukin-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, and after 5 days their maturation was induced with either lipopolysaccharide, human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha, poly(I:C), or activated feline platelets. After 48 h, their CD14, CD1a, major histocompatibility complex class II, and B7.1 surface expression was analyzed in parallel with their ability to uptake antigen or prime a mixed leukocyte reaction. The results presented show that feline DCs cultured in autologous plasma differentiate and are able to mature in the presence of stimuli similar to the ones currently used for other species. The present work sets the grounds for future use of DCs obtained by the protocol described for in vivo vaccination and immunotherapy of feline immunodeficiency virus-infected cats.

  18. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    WIJEWARDANA, Viskam; SUGIURA, Kikuya; WIJESEKERA, Daluthgamage Patsy H.; HATOYA, Shingo; NISHIMURA, Toshiya; KANEGI, Ryoji; USHIGUSA, Takahiro; INABA, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  19. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  20. Salvianolic acid B suppresses maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by activating PPARγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aijun; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Shijun; Shi, Dazhuo; Xu, Lei; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Keqiang; Chen, Keji; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a water-soluble antioxidant derived from a Chinese medicinal herb, is known to be effective in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-atherosclerotic effect of Sal B might be mediated by suppressing maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (h-monDC). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH h-monDC were derived by incubating purified human monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4. h-monDC were pre-incubated with or without Sal B and stimulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in the presence or absence of PPARγ siRNA. Expression of h-monDC membrane molecules (CD40, CD86, CD1a, HLA-DR) were analysed by FACS, cytokines were measured by elisa and the TLR4-associated signalling pathway was determined by Western blotting. KEY RESULTS Ox-LDL promoted h-monDC maturation, stimulated CD40, CD86, CD1a, HLA-DR expression and IL-12, IL-10, TNF-α production; and up-regulated TLR4 signalling. These effects were inhibited by Sal B. Sal B also triggered PPARγ activation and promoted PPARγ nuclear translocation, attenuated ox-LDL-induced up-regulation of TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 and inhibited the downstream p38-MAPK signalling cascade. Knocking down PPARγ with the corresponding siRNA blocked these effects of Sal B. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data suggested that Sal B effectively suppressed maturation of h-monDC induced by ox-LDL through PPARγ activation. PMID:21649636

  1. Immature monocyte derived dendritic cells gene expression profile in response to Virus-Like Particles stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have recently developed a candidate HIV-1 vaccine model based on HIV-1 Pr55gag Virus-Like Particles (HIV-VLPs, produced in a baculovirus expression system and presenting a gp120 molecule from an Ugandan HIV-1 isolate of the clade A (HIV-VLPAs. The HIV-VLPAs induce in Balb/c mice systemic and mucosal neutralizing Antibodies as well as cytotoxic T lymphocytes, by intra-peritoneal as well as intra-nasal administration. Moreover, we have recently shown that the baculovirus-expressed HIV-VLPs induce maturation and activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs which, in turn, produce Th1- and Th2-specific cytokines and stimulate in vitro a primary and secondary response in autologous CD4+ T cells. In the present manuscript, the effects of the baculovirus-expressed HIV-VLPAs on the genomic transcriptional profile of MDDCs obtained from normal healthy donors have been evaluated. The HIV-VLPA stimulation, compared to both PBS and LPS treatment, modulate the expression of genes involved in the morphological and functional changes characterizing the MDDCs activation and maturation. The results of gene profiling analysis here presented are highly informative on the global pattern of gene expression alteration underlying the activation of MDDCs by HIV-VLPAs at the early stages of the immune response and may be extremely helpful for the identification of exclusive activation markers.

  2. Development of a standardized protocol for reproducible generation of matured monocyte-derived dendritic cells suitable for clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Bohnenkamp, H.R.; Noll, T.

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the generation of dendritic cells (DC) for cancer immunotherapy. In order to utilize DC in clinical trials it is necessary to have standardized, reproducible and easy to use protocols. We describe here the process development for the generation of DC as the result of investigation of culture conditions as well as consumption rates of medium and cytokines. Our studies demonstrate that highly viable DC (93 ± 2%) can be produced from CD14+ enriched monocytes via i...

  3. Large-scale monocyte enrichment coupled with a closed culture system for the generation of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Lau, Roy; Lee, Sun-Min; Bender, James G; Weber, Jeffrey S

    2002-09-15

    Conventional methods for generating monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) for clinical trials utilize the property of plastic adherence to select monocytes from leukapheresis samples. This method is labor-intensive and has the potential for contamination at various steps. We evaluated a large-scale monocyte enrichment procedure using a cell selector (Isolex 300i(R)) followed by culture in a sterile bag system (Stericell(R)) for generation of DC. DC generated in tissue culture flasks after monocyte selection by plastic adherence were compared to those generated in Stericell(R) bags after monocyte enrichment by negative selection with the Isolex(R) 300i. DC were matured with lipopolysaccharide and pulsed with a peptide derived from the melanoma antigen gp100. Peptide-pulsed DC cultured by the two techniques were evaluated for phenotype, viability, ability to induce allogeneic and peptide-specific autologous proliferative responses as well as peptide-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. The mean monocyte yield from leukapheresis collections was 17+/-2.4%, which increased to 52+/-11% after Isolex(R) selection. The DC yield of plated mononuclear cells from flasks or bags was 2.7+/-0.96% and 4.84+/-2.65%, respectively. DC cultured by both methods expressed high levels of CD86, CD80, CD40, CD83, CD44, CD11c and CD58, and was comparable in their ability to induce allogeneic and peptide-specific autologous proliferative responses as well as gp100 peptide-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. These results indicate that potent monocyte-derived DC can be generated in a closed culture bag system after monocyte enrichment by immunomagnetic negative selection. Due to the closed nature of the enrichment and culture systems, the potential for contamination is minimized. This protocol is well suited for culturing large numbers of DC for clinical immunotherapy trials.

  4. Monocyte derived dendritic cells generated by IFN-α acquire mature dendritic and natural killer cell properties as shown by gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Czibere Akos; Winter Meike; Diaz Blanco Elena; Papewalis Claudia; Schott Matthias; Maihöfer Dagmar; Kronenwett Ralf; Safaian Nancy; Korthals Mark; Haas Rainer; Kobbe Guido; Fenk Roland

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines can induce antitumor immune responses in patients with malignant diseases, while the most suitable DC culture conditions have not been established yet. In this study we compared monocyte derived human DC from conventional cultures containing GM-CSF and IL-4/TNF-α (IL-4/TNF-DC) with DC generated by the novel protocol using GM-CSF and IFN-α (IFN-DC). Methods To characterise the molecular differences of both DC preparations, gene expression profil...

  5. Establishing porcine monocyte-derived macrophage and dendritic cell systems for studying the interaction with PRRSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eSingleton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC are two model systems well established in human and rodent systems that can be used to study the interaction of pathogens with host cells. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is known to infect myeloid cells, such as macrophages (MØ and dendritic cells (DC. Therefore, this study aimed to establish systems for the differentiation and characterization of MoMØ and MoDC for subsequent infection with PRRSV-1. M-CSF differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ were stimulated with activators for classical (M1 or alternative (M2 activation. GM-CSF and IL-4 generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC were activated with the well established maturation cocktail containing PAMPs and cytokines. In addition, MoMØ and MoDC were treated with dexamethasone and IL-10, which are known immuno-suppressive reagents. Cells were characterized by morphology, phenotype and function and porcine MØ subsets highlighted some divergence from described human counterparts, while MoDC, appeared more similar to mouse and human DCs. The infection with PRRSV-1 strain Lena demonstrated different replication kinetics between MoMØ and MoDC and within subsets of each cell type. While MoMØ susceptibility was significantly increased by dexamethasone and IL-10 with an accompanying increase in CD163/CD169 expression, MoDC supported only a minimal replication of PRRSV These findings underline the high variability in the susceptibility of porcine myeloid cells towards PRRSV-1 infection.

  6. Development of Type 1 Diabetes: Monocytes and dendritic cells in the pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C. Welzen-Coppens (Jojanneke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the presence of precursors for dendritic cells and the characterization of dendritic cell subsets in the normal pancreas in mice and humans as well as in the pancreas of the NOD mouse, a type 1 diabetes mouse model. Therefore, we give a short introduction to

  7. Development of Type 1 Diabetes: Monocytes and dendritic cells in the pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C. Welzen-Coppens (Jojanneke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the presence of precursors for dendritic cells and the characterization of dendritic cell subsets in the normal pancreas in mice and humans as well as in the pancreas of the NOD mouse, a type 1 diabetes mouse model. Therefore, we give a short introduction to dendri

  8. Gene expression profiling of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells - Searching for molecular regulators of tolerogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katina eSchinnerling

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells (DCs to initiate and modulate antigen-specific immune responses has made them attractive targets for immunotherapy. Since DC research in humans is limited by the scarcity of DC populations in the blood circulation, most of our knowledge about DC biology and function has been obtained in vitro from monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs, which can be readily generated in sufficient numbers and are able to differentiate into distinct functional subsets depending on the nature of stimulus. In particular, moDCs with tolerogenic properties (tolDCs possess great therapeutic potential for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Several protocols have been developed to generate tolDCs in vitro, able to reinstruct auto-reactive T cells and to promote regulatory cells. While ligands and soluble mediators, by which DCs shape immune responses, have been vastly studied, the intracellular pathways and transcriptional regulators that govern tolDC differentiation and function are poorly understood. Whole-genome microarrays and proteomics provide useful strategies to dissect the complex molecular processes that promote tolerogenicity. Only few attempts have been made to understand tolDC biology through a global view on ‘omics’ profiles. So far, the identification of a common regulator of tolerogenicity has been hampered by the fact that each protocol, used for tolDC generation, targets distinct signaling pathways. Here we review the progress in understanding the transcriptional regulation of moDC differentiation, with a special focus on tolDCs, and highlight candidate molecules that might be associated with DC tolerogenicity.

  9. Neutrophil extracellular traps downregulate lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Lorena; Bignon, Alexandre; Gueguen, Claire; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Gorges, Roseline; Sandré, Catherine; Mascarell, Laurent; Balabanian, Karl; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) play a central role in inflammation and participate in its control, notably by modulating dendritic cell (DC) functions via soluble mediators or cell-cell contacts. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released by PMN could play a role in this context. To evaluate NET effects on DC maturation, we developed a model based on monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and calibrated NETs isolated from fresh human PMN. We found that isolated NETs alone had no discernable effect on moDC. In contrast, they downregulated LPS-induced moDC maturation, as shown by decreased surface expression of HLA-DR, CD80, CD83, and CD86, and by downregulated cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23), with no increase in the expression of tolerogenic DC genes. Moreover, the presence of NETs during moDC maturation diminished the capacity of these moDC to induce T lymphocyte proliferation in both autologous and allogeneic conditions, and modulated CD4(+) T lymphocyte polarization by promoting the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) and reducing that of Th1 and Th17 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17). Interestingly, the expression and activities of the lymphoid chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4 on moDC were not altered when moDC matured in the presence of NETs. Together, these findings reveal a new role for NETs in adaptive immune responses, modulating some moDC functions and thereby participating in the control of inflammation.

  10. Comparison of alpha-Type-1 polarizing and standard dendritic cell cytokine cocktail for maturation of therapeutic monocyte-derived dendritic cell preparations from cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Met, Ozcan

    2008-01-01

    polarized dendritic cells (alphaDC1) in serum-free medium was published based on maturation of monocyte-derived DCs with TNF-alpha/IL-1-beta/polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly-I:C)/interferon (IFN)-alpha and IFN-gamma. This DC maturation cocktail was described to fulfill the criteria for optimal DC......The current "gold standard" for generation of dendritic cell (DC) used in DC-based cancer vaccine studies is maturation of monocyte-derived DCs with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)/IL-1beta/IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Recently, a protocol for producing so-called alpha-Type-1...... of alphaDC1 maturation cocktail to a protocol for clinical grade DC generation from cancer patients performed in X-VIVO 15 medium. We showed that alphaDC1 in this protocol induce lower up-regulation of CD83 and several other maturation markers, co-stimulatory molecules and CCR7 together with higher up...

  11. Human monocytes undergo excessive apoptosis following temozolomide activating the ATM/ATR pathway while dendritic cells and macrophages are resistant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bauer

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is a severe therapy-limiting side effect of anticancer chemotherapy resulting from sensitivity of immunocompetent cells to DNA damaging agents. A central role in the immune system is played by monocytes that differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. In this study we compared human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood and cytokine matured macrophages and DCs derived from them and assessed the mechanism of toxicity of the DNA methylating anticancer drug temozolomide (TMZ in these cell populations. We observed that monocytes, but not DCs and macrophages, were highly sensitive to the killing effect of TMZ. Studies on DNA damage and repair revealed that the initial DNA incision was efficient in monocytes while the re-ligation step of base excision repair (BER can not be accomplished, resulting in an accumulation of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs. Furthermore, monocytes accumulated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs following TMZ treatment, while DCs and macrophages were able to repair DSBs. Monocytes lack the DNA repair proteins XRCC1, ligase IIIα and PARP-1 whose expression is restored during differentiation into macrophages and DCs following treatment with GM-CSF and GM-CSF plus IL-4, respectively. These proteins play a key role both in BER and DSB repair by B-NHEJ, which explains the accumulation of DNA breaks in monocytes following TMZ treatment. Although TMZ provoked an upregulation of XRCC1 and ligase IIIα, BER was not enhanced likely because PARP-1 was not upregulated. Accordingly, inhibition of PARP-1 did not sensitize monocytes, but monocyte-derived DCs in which strong PARP activation was observed. TMZ induced in monocytes the DNA damage response pathways ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 resulting in p53 activation. Finally, upon activation of the Fas-receptor and the mitochondrial pathway apoptosis was executed in a caspase-dependent manner. The downregulation of DNA repair in monocytes, resulting in their selective

  12. Effects of inactivated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells and intestinal dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Zhao, Shanshan; Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a serious infection in neonatal piglets. As the causative agent of PED, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) results in acute diarrhea and dehydration with high mortality rates in swine. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly effective antigen-presenting cells to uptake and present viral antigens to T cells, which then initiate a distinct immune response. In this study, our results show that the expression of Mo-DCs surface markers such as SWC3a(+)CD1a(+), SWC3a(+)CD80/86(+) and SWC3a(+)SLA-II-DR(+) is increased after incubation with UV-PEDV for 24h. Mo-DCs incubated with UV-PEDV produce higher levels of IL-12 and INF-γ compared to mock-infected Mo-DCs. Interactions between Mo-DCs and UV-PEDV significantly stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. Consistent with these results, there is an enhancement in the ability of porcine intestinal DCs to activate T-cell proliferation in vivo. We conclude that UV-PEDV may be a useful and safe vaccine to trigger adaptive immunity.

  13. HIV infection of monocytes-derived dendritic cells inhibits Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Sacchi

    Full Text Available DCs act as sentinel cells against incoming pathogens and represent the most potent antigen presenting cells, having the unique capability to prime naïve T cells. In addition to their role in induction of adaptive immune responses, DC are also able to activate innate cells as γδ T cells; in particular, a reciprocal crosstalk between DC and γδ T cells was demonstrated. However, whether HIV infection may alter DC-Vγ9Vδ2 T cells cross-talk was not yet described. To clarify this issue, we cultured activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with HIV infected monocyte derived DC (MoDC. After 5 days we evaluated MoDC phenotype, and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells activation and proliferation. In our model, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were not able to proliferate in response to HIV-infected MoDC, although an up-regulation of CD69 was observed. Upon phosphoantigens stimulation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells proliferation and cytokine production were inhibited when cultured with HIV-infected MoDC in a cell-contact dependent way. Moreover, HIV-infected MoDC are not able to up-regulate CD86 molecules when cultured with activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, compared with uninfected MoDC. Further, activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are not able to induce HLA DR up-regulation and CCR5 down-regulation on HIV-infected MoDC. These data indicate that HIV-infected DC alter the capacity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to respond to their antigens, pointing out a new mechanisms of induction of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells anergy carried out by HIV, that could contribute to immune evasion.

  14. HIV infection of monocytes-derived dendritic cells inhibits Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Tumino, Nicola; Casetti, Rita; Agrati, Chiara; Turchi, Federica; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Martini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    DCs act as sentinel cells against incoming pathogens and represent the most potent antigen presenting cells, having the unique capability to prime naïve T cells. In addition to their role in induction of adaptive immune responses, DC are also able to activate innate cells as γδ T cells; in particular, a reciprocal crosstalk between DC and γδ T cells was demonstrated. However, whether HIV infection may alter DC-Vγ9Vδ2 T cells cross-talk was not yet described. To clarify this issue, we cultured activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with HIV infected monocyte derived DC (MoDC). After 5 days we evaluated MoDC phenotype, and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells activation and proliferation. In our model, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were not able to proliferate in response to HIV-infected MoDC, although an up-regulation of CD69 was observed. Upon phosphoantigens stimulation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells proliferation and cytokine production were inhibited when cultured with HIV-infected MoDC in a cell-contact dependent way. Moreover, HIV-infected MoDC are not able to up-regulate CD86 molecules when cultured with activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, compared with uninfected MoDC. Further, activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are not able to induce HLA DR up-regulation and CCR5 down-regulation on HIV-infected MoDC. These data indicate that HIV-infected DC alter the capacity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to respond to their antigens, pointing out a new mechanisms of induction of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells anergy carried out by HIV, that could contribute to immune evasion.

  15. A novel, rapid strategy to form dendritomas from human dendritic cells and hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HCCLM3 cells using mature dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood CD14+ monocytes within 48 hours of in vitro culture

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Xin; Peng, Ji-Run; Yuan, Lan; Wang, Hui; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Dendritomas formed by fusing cancer cells to dendritic cells have already been applied to clinical treatment trial of several types of cancers. Dendritic cells for the fusion in most trials and experiments were from blood monocytes in standard 7-d protocol culture, which requires 5-7 d of culture with granulocyte-macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), followed by 2-3 d of activation with a combination of proinflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis fa...

  16. Activation and Genetic Modification of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells using Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Michael

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Live attenuated bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella typhimurium, have shown promise as delivery vehicles for DNA. We have examined two new strains of S. typhimurium and their impact on dendritic cell maturation (CD12-sifA/aroC mutant and WT05-ssaV/aroC, both in TML background. Strain WT05 matured dendritic cells in a more efficient way; caused higher release of cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, IL-1β; and was efficient for gene transfer. These findings suggest that the genetic background of the attenuation can influence the pattern of inflammatory immune response to Salmonella infection.

  17. In vitro interactions of Candida parapsilosis wild type and lipase deficient mutants with human monocyte derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vágvölgyi Csaba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida parapsilosis typically is a commensal of human skin. However, when host immune defense is compromised or the normal microflora balance is disrupted, C. parapsilosis transforms itself into an opportunistic pathogen. Candida-derived lipase has been identified as potential virulence factor. Even though cellular components of the innate immune response, such as dendritic cells, represent the first line of defense against invading pathogens, little is known about the interaction of these cells with invading C. parapsilosis. Thus, the aim of our study was to assess the function of dendritic cells in fighting C. parapsilosis and to determine the role that C. parapsilosis-derived lipase plays in the interaction with dendritic cells. Results Monocyte-derived immature and mature dendritic cells (iDCs and mDCs, respectively co-cultured with live wild type or lipase deficient C. parapsilosis strains were studied to determine the phagocytic capacity and killing efficiency of host cells. We determined that both iDCs and mDCs efficiently phagocytosed and killed C. parapsilosis, furthermore our results show that the phagocytic and fungicidal activities of both iDCs and mDCs are more potent for lipase deficient compared to wild type yeast cells. In addition, the lipase deficient C. parapsilosis cells induce higher gene expression and protein secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in both DC types relative to the effect of co-culture with wild type yeast cells. Conclusions Our results show that DCs are activated by exposure to C. parapsilosis, as shown by increased phagocytosis, killing and proinflammatory protein secretion. Moreover, these data strongly suggest that C. parapsilosis derived lipase has a protective role during yeast:DC interactions, since lipase production in wt yeast cells decreased the phagocytic capacity and killing efficiency of host cells and downregulated the expression of host effector molecules.

  18. A novel approach for the generation of human dendritic cells from blood monocytes in the absence of exogenous factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanen, Brian C; Drake, Donald R

    2008-06-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) for research and clinical applications are typically derived from purified blood monocytes that are cultured in a cocktail of cytokines for a week or more. Because it has been suggested that these cytokine-derived DCs may be deficient in some important immunological functions and might not accurately represent antigen presenting cell (APC) populations found under normal conditions in vivo, there is an interest in developing methods that permit the derivation of DCs in a more physiologically relevant manner in vitro. Here, we describe a simple and reliable technique for generating large numbers of highly purified DCs that is based on a one-way migration of blood monocytes through a layer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that are cultured to confluency in the upper chamber of a Transwell device. The resultant APCs, harvested from the lower Transwell chamber, resemble other cultured DC populations in their expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) and costimulatory molecules, ability to phagocytose protein antigens and capacity to trigger primary antigen-specific T cell responses. This technique offers several advantages over the standard method of in vitro cytokine-driven DC development, including: (1) the rapidity of this approach, as DC differentiation occurs in only 2 days, (2) the differentiation process itself, which is more akin to the development of DCs under physiologic conditions and (3) the cost-effectiveness of the system, since no monocyte pre-selection is required and DC development occurs in the absence of expensive recombinant cytokines.

  19. Comparison The Effects of Two Monocyte Isolation Methods,Plastic Adherence and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting Methods,on Phagocytic Activity of Generated Dendritic Cells

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    Behnaz Asadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is believed that monocyte isolation methods and maturation factors affect the phenotypic and functional characteristics of resultant dendritic cells (DC. In the present study, we compared two monocyte isolation methods, including plastic adherence-dendritic cells (Adh-DC and magnetic activated cell sorting- dendritic cells (MACS-DC, and their effects on phagocytic activity of differentiated immature DCs (immDCs.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, immDCs were generated from plastic adherence and MACS isolated monocytes in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin 4 (IL-4 in five days. The phagocytic activity of immDCs was analyzed by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-conjugated latex bead using flow cytometry. One way ANOVA test was used for statistical analysis of differences among experimental groups, including Adh-DC and MACS-DC groups.Results: We found that phagocytic activity of Adh-DC was higher than MACS-DC, whereas the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of phagocytic cells was higher in MACS-DC (p<0.05.Conclusion: We concluded that it would be important to consider phagocytosis parameters of generated DCs before making any decision about monocyte isolation methods to have fully functional DCs.

  20. Rapid detection of dendritic cell and monocyte disorders using CD4 as a lineage marker of the human peripheral blood antigen presenting cell compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eJardine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs and monocytes are critical regulators and effectors of innate and adaptive immune responses. Monocyte expansion has been described in many pathological states while monocyte and DC deficiency syndromes are relatively recent additions to the catalogue of human primary immunodeficiency disorders. Clinically applicable screening tests to diagnose and monitor these conditions are lacking. Conventional strategies for identifying human DCs and monocytes have been based on the use of a lineage gate to exclude lymphocytes, thus preventing simultaneous detection of DCs, monocytes and lymphocyte subsets. Here we demonstrate that CD4 is a reliable lineage marker for the human peripheral blood antigen presenting cell compartment that can be used to identify DCs and monocytes in parallel with lymphocytes. Based on this principle, simple modification of a standard lymphocyte phenotyping assay permits simultaneous enumeration of four lymphocyte and five DC/monocyte populations from a single sample. This approach is applicable to clinical samples and facilitates the diagnosis of DC and monocyte disorders in a wide range of clinical settings, including genetic deficiency, neoplasia and inflammation.

  1. Immunomodulatory effects of adult Haemonchus contortus excretory/secretory products on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Z U; Knight, J S; Koolaard, J; Simpson, H V; Pernthaner, A

    2015-12-01

    The levels of expression of surface molecules and release of cytokines and chemokines of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells were determined after their exposure to adult H. contortus excretory/secretory (ES) products or a combination of ES products and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Worm products provoked a weak response and only partial maturation of the dendritic cells, consistent with the hyporesponsiveness and more tolerogenic immune environment present in parasitized animals and humans. Co-stimulation with LPS demonstrated that H. contortus secretions, like those of other helminths, contain immunomodulators capable of reducing some aspects of the strong T(H)1/T(H)2 response evoked by bacterial LPS. There were significant reductions in the release of some cytokine/chemokines by LPS-stimulated mdDCs and a trend (although not significant at P < 0.05) for reduced expression levels of CD40, CD80 and HLA-DR. A prominent feature was the variability in responses of dendritic cells from the four donors, even on different days in repeat experiments, suggesting that generalized conclusions may be difficult to make, except in genetically related animals. Such observations may therefore be applicable only to restricted populations. In addition, previous exposure to parasites in a target population for immunomodulatory therapy may be an important factor in assessing the likelihood of adverse reactions or failures in the treatment to worm therapy.

  2. Leukoreduction system chambers are an efficient, valid, and economic source of functional monocyte-derived dendritic cells and lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Isabell A; Zinser, Elisabeth; Strasser, Erwin; Stein, Marcello F; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Knippertz, Ilka

    2013-11-01

    The demand for human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), as well as for primary human B and T lymphocytes for immunological research purposes has been increased in recent years. Classically, these monocytes are isolated from blood, leukapheresis products or buffy coats of healthy donors by plastic adherence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), followed by stimulation with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-4, while lymphocytes are usually isolated from the non-adherent fraction (NAF) by magnetic cell sorting. However, donor-blood is a limited resource and not every blood bank offers leukapheresis products or buffy coats for laboratory use. Additionally, a leukapheresis is very expensive and also the generation/isolation of cells is time- and cost-intensive. To overcome some of these obstacles, we evaluated if low-cost leukoreduction system chambers (LRSCs), which arise after routine donor plateletpheresis procedures, and are usually discarded, would be an alternative and appropriate source of PBMCs to generate moDCs and to isolate lymphocytes. By analyzing the number and phenotype of immature and mature dendritic cells (DCs), as well as of B and T lymphocytes derived from LRSCs, we found all cells to be of high quantity and quality. Further investigations on DCs comprising transwell migration assays, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR), cytokine secretion assays, and cytotoxic T cell induction assays revealed high migratory, as well as stimulatory capacity of these cells. In addition, DCs and T cells were efficiently electroporated with mRNA and showed characteristic cytokine production after co-culture, demonstrating LRSCs as an efficient, valid, and economic source for generation of moDCs and lymphocytes for research purposes.

  3. Dendritic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sevda Söker

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells, a member of family of antigen presenting cells, are most effective cells in the primary immune response. Dendritic cells originated from dendron, in mean of tree in the Greek, because of their long and elaborate cytoplasmic branching processes. Dendritic cells constitute approximately 0.1 to 1 percent of the blood’s mononuclear cell. Dendritic cells are widely distributed, and specialized for antigen capture and T cell stimulation. In this article, structures and functions of...

  4. A protocol for generation of clinical grade mRNA-transfected monocyte-derived dendritic cells for cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, L J; Gaudernack, G; Saebøe-Larssen, S; Hammerstad, H; Tierens, A; Kvalheim, G

    2003-11-01

    With the aim of producing large quantities of mRNA-transfected monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to be used as cancer vaccines, a new clinical grade procedure has been developed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained by leukapheresis were enriched for monocytes by immunomagnetic depletion of CD19+ B cells and CD2+ T cells employing the ISOLEX 300i device. After 5 days of culture of enriched monocytes in gas permeable Teflon bags, using serum-free medium supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4 (IL-4), immature DCs were generated. Following transfection with mRNA from three human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, LNCaP and PC-3), employing a newly developed square wave electroporation procedure, the immature DCs were immediately transferred to Teflon bags and matured for 48 h, using serum-free medium supplemented with IL-1alpha, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and PGE2. The electroporation procedure efficiently transferred mRNA into the DCs with minor effect on the viability of the cells. The generated matured transfected DCs show high expression of the antigens CD83, CD80, CD86 and human leucocyte antigen-DR. Freezing and thawing of the transfected matured DCs had minor effect on cell viability and the phenotype. From 4 x 109 PBMCs, about 1 x 108 transfected matured DCs are produced. The thawed transfected DCs were able to elicit primary T-cell responses in vitro against antigens encoded by the prostate cancer mRNA as shown by enzyme-linked immunospot assay using mock-transfected DCs as control. Based on these results, clinical trials in cancer patients have been initiated.

  5. Levamisole enhances immune response by affecting the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L-Y; Lin, Y-L; Chiang, B-L

    2008-01-01

    Levamisole is a synthetic phenylimidazolthiazole that was first introduced in 1966 as an anti-helmintic agent. Current studies have been focused upon its effect on immune response and on cancer treatment. We examined the molecular mechanisms of levamisole in the activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) and human T cells. Treatment of DC with levamisole increased the presentation of CD80, CD86, CD83 and human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR) molecules on the cell membrane, as well as the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and IL-10. Levamisole-treated human DC also enhanced T cell activation towards type 1 T helper immune response by inducing interferon-γ secretion. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 inhibited levamisole-induced production of IL-12 p40 and IL-10, suggesting a vital role for TLR-2 in signalling DC upon incubation with levamisole. The inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 or c-Jun N-terminal kinases pathways also prevented the effects of levamisole on DC in producing IL-12 p40 or IL-10. Taken together, levamisole could enhance immune response towards T helper 1 development through the activation of dendritic cells or T cell aspects. PMID:18005262

  6. Testosterone replacement therapy in hypogonadal men is associated with increased expression of LAMP-2 (CD107b) by circulating monocytes and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, J J; Almeida, M; Martín-Martín, L; Miralles, J M; Orfao, A

    2014-04-01

    Accumulated experimental data indicates that androgen therapy has effects on inflammation and protects from autoimmune disorders. Despite this, the in vivo effects of testosterone replacement therapy on human antigen-presenting cells-for example, monocytes and dendritic cells- remain unknown. We monitored the effects of testosterone replacement therapy on the number and the functionality -as assessed by the expression of CD107b (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2, LAMP-2)- of resting and in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood (classical and nonclassical) monocytes and dendritic cells (myeloid and plasmacytoid) from hypogonadal men. Our results show that testosterone replacement therapy induces overexpression of CD107b by circulating monocytes and dendritic cells from hypogonadal men, both under resting (i.e. nonstimulated) conditions and after in vitro stimulation. CD107b overexpression mostly involved monocytes and in vitro stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Of note, a strong correlation was found between CD107b expression on monocytes and serum gonadotrophins levels. These results support the existence of an effect of testosterone therapy, and potentially also of gonadotrophins, on circulating antigen-presenting cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Differential Activation of Human Monocyte-Derived and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by West Nile Virus Generated in Different Host Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria Carlan; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta; Gilfoy, Felicia D.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Mason, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in innate immunity and antiviral responses. In this study, we investigated the production of alpha interferon (IFN-α) and inducible chemokines by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) infected with West Nile virus (WNV), an emergent pathogen whose infection can lead to severe cases of encephalitis in the elderly, children, and immunocompromised individuals. Our experiments demonstrated that WNV grown in mammalian cells (WNVVero) was a potent inducer of IFN-α secretion in pDCs and, to a lesser degree, in mDCs. The ability of WNVVero to induce IFN-α in pDCs did not require viral replication and was prevented by the treatment of cells with bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, suggesting that it was dependent on endosomal Toll-like receptor recognition. On the other hand, IFN-α production in mDCs required viral replication and was associated with the nuclear translocation of IRF3 and viral antigen expression. Strikingly, pDCs failed to produce IFN-α when stimulated with WNV grown in mosquito cells (WNVC7/10), while mDCs responded similarly to WNVVero or WNVC7/10. Moreover, the IFN-dependent chemokine IP-10 was produced in substantial amounts by pDCs in response to WNVVero but not WNVC7/10, while interleukin-8 was produced in greater amounts by mDCs infected with WNVC7/10 than in those infected with WNVVero. These findings suggest that cell-specific mechanisms of WNV recognition leading to the production of type I IFN and inflammatory chemokines by DCs may contribute to both the innate immune response and disease pathogenesis in human infections. PMID:17913823

  8. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, K.F.; Aarntzen, E.H.J.G.; Pots, J.M.; Olde Nordkamp, M.A.M.; Rakt, M.W.M.M. van de; Scharenborg, N.M.; Boer, A.J. de; Oorschot, T.G.M. van; Croockewit, S.; Blokx, W.A.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.; Mus, R.D.M.; Rossum, M.M. van; Graaf, C.A.A. van der; Punt, C.J.; Adema, G.J.; Figdor, C.G.; Vries, I.J. de; Schreibelt, G.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that

  9. Monocyte recruitment to the dermis and differentiation to dendritic cells increases the targets for dengue virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael A; Harris, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans. Although Aedes mosquitoes transmit DENV when probing for blood in the skin, no information exists on DENV infection and immune response in the dermis, where the blood vessels are found. DENV suppresses the interferon response, replicates, and causes disease in humans but not wild-type mice. Here, we used mice lacking the interferon-α/β receptor (Ifnar(-/-)), which had normal cell populations in the skin and were susceptible to intradermal DENV infection, to investigate the dynamics of early DENV infection of immune cells in the skin. CD103(+) classical dendritic cells (cDCs), Ly6C(-) CD11b(+) cDCs, and macrophages in the steady-state dermis were initial targets of DENV infection 12-24 hours post-inoculation but then decreased in frequency. We demonstrated recruitment of adoptively-transferred Ly6C(high) monocytes from wild-type and Ifnar(-/-) origin to the DENV-infected dermis and differentiation to Ly6C(+) CD11b(+) monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs), which became DENV-infected after 48 hours, and were then the major targets for virus replication. Ly6C(high) monocytes that entered the DENV-infected dermis expressed chemokine receptor CCR2, likely mediating recruitment. Further, we show that ∼ 100-fold more hematopoietic cells in the dermis were DENV-infected compared to Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Overall, these results identify the dermis as the main site of early DENV replication and show that DENV infection in the skin occurs in two waves: initial infection of resident cDCs and macrophages, followed by infection of monocytes and moDCs that are recruited to the dermis. Our study reveals a novel viral strategy of exploiting monocyte recruitment to increase the number of targets for infection at the site of invasion in the skin and highlights the skin as a potential site for therapeutic action or intradermal vaccination.

  10. Monocyte recruitment to the dermis and differentiation to dendritic cells increases the targets for dengue virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Schmid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans. Although Aedes mosquitoes transmit DENV when probing for blood in the skin, no information exists on DENV infection and immune response in the dermis, where the blood vessels are found. DENV suppresses the interferon response, replicates, and causes disease in humans but not wild-type mice. Here, we used mice lacking the interferon-α/β receptor (Ifnar(-/-, which had normal cell populations in the skin and were susceptible to intradermal DENV infection, to investigate the dynamics of early DENV infection of immune cells in the skin. CD103(+ classical dendritic cells (cDCs, Ly6C(- CD11b(+ cDCs, and macrophages in the steady-state dermis were initial targets of DENV infection 12-24 hours post-inoculation but then decreased in frequency. We demonstrated recruitment of adoptively-transferred Ly6C(high monocytes from wild-type and Ifnar(-/- origin to the DENV-infected dermis and differentiation to Ly6C(+ CD11b(+ monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs, which became DENV-infected after 48 hours, and were then the major targets for virus replication. Ly6C(high monocytes that entered the DENV-infected dermis expressed chemokine receptor CCR2, likely mediating recruitment. Further, we show that ∼ 100-fold more hematopoietic cells in the dermis were DENV-infected compared to Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Overall, these results identify the dermis as the main site of early DENV replication and show that DENV infection in the skin occurs in two waves: initial infection of resident cDCs and macrophages, followed by infection of monocytes and moDCs that are recruited to the dermis. Our study reveals a novel viral strategy of exploiting monocyte recruitment to increase the number of targets for infection at the site of invasion in the skin and highlights the skin as a potential site for therapeutic action or intradermal vaccination.

  11. Cytotoxicity and Proliferation Studies with Arsenic in Established Human Cell Lines: Keratinocytes, Melanocytes, Dendritic Cells, Dermal Fibroblasts, Microvascular Endothelial Cells, Monocytes and T-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari H. P. Cohly

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Based on the hypothesis that arsenic exposure results in toxicity and mitogenecity, this study examined the dose-response of arsenic in established human cell lines of keratinocytes (HaCaT, melanocytes (1675, dendritic cells (THP-1/A23187, dermal fibroblasts (CRL1904, microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC, monocytes (THP-1, and T cells (Jurkat. Cytotoxicity was determined by incubating THP-1, THP-1+ A23187 and JKT cells in RPMI 1640, 1675 in Vitacell, HMEC in EBM, and dermal fibroblasts and HaCaT in DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% streptomycin and penicillin for 72 hrs in 96-well microtiter plates, at 37oC in a 5% CO2 incubator with different concentrations of arsenic using fluorescein diacetate (FDA. Cell proliferation in 96-well plates was determined in cultured cells starved by prior incubation for 24 hrs in 1% FBS and exposed for 72 hours, using the 96 cell titer proliferation solution (Promega assay. Cytotoxicity assays yielded LD50s of 9 μg/mL for HaCaT, 1.5 μg/mL for CRL 1675, 1.5 μg/mL for dendritic cells, 37 μg/mL for dermal fibroblasts, 0.48 μg/mL for HMEC, 50 μg/mL for THP-1 cells and 50 μg/mL for JKT-T cells. The peak proliferation was observed at 6 μg/mL for HaCaT and THP-1 cells, 0.19 μg/mL for CRL 1675, dendritic cells, and HMEC, and 1.5 μg/mL for dermal fibroblasts and Jurkat T cells. These results show that arsenic is toxic at high doses to keratinocytes, fibroblasts, monocytes and T cells, and toxic at lower doses to melanocytes, microvascular endothelial cells and dendritic cells. Proliferation studies showed sub-lethal doses of arsenic to be mitogenic.

  12. Indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane enhances house dust mite-induced activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbaz, Derya; Lebre, M Cristina; Logiantara, Adrian; van Ree, Ronald; van Rijt, Leonie S

    2016-11-01

    The indoor pollutant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has been added as flame retardant to many consumer products but detaches and accumulates in house dust. Inhalation of house dust leads to exposure to house dust mite (HDM) allergens in the presence of HBCD. Activation of dendritic cells is crucial in the sensitization to HDM allergens. The current study examined whether exposure to HBCD affected activation/maturation of HDM-exposed human dendritic cells (DC). Human monocyte-derived DC (moDC) were exposed simultaneously to HDM and a concentration range of HBCD (0.1-20 μM) in vitro. HDM exposure of moDC induced expression of co-stimulatory molecule CD80 and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, simultaneous exposure of moDC to HBCD and HDM enhanced the expression of antigen presenting molecule HLA-DR, co-stimulatory molecule CD86 and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 depending on the dose of HBCD. Our results indicate that simultaneous exposure of HDM and HBCD can enhance the antigen presentation and maturation/activation of DC.

  13. Immature dendritic cells generated from cryopreserved human monocytes show impaired ability to respond to LPS and to induce allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Ferreira Silveira

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells play a key role in the immune system, in the sensing of foreign antigens and triggering of an adaptive immune response. Cryopreservation of human monocytes was investigated to understand its effect on differentiation into immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (imdDCs, the response to inflammatory stimuli and the ability to induce allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation. Cryopreserved (crp-monocytes were able to differentiate into imdDCs, albeit to a lesser extent than freshly (frh-obtained monocytes. Furthermore, crp-imdDCs had lower rates of maturation and cytokine/chemokine secretion in response to LPS than frh-imdDCs. Lower expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (at 24 and 48 h and higher susceptibility to apoptosis in crp-imdDCs than in fresh cells would account for the impaired maturation and cytokine/chemokine secretion observed. A mixed leukocyte reaction showed that lymphocyte proliferation was lower with crp-imdDCs than with frh-imdDCs. These findings suggested that the source of monocytes used to generate human imdDCs could influence the accuracy of results observed in studies of the immune response to pathogens, lymphocyte activation, vaccination and antigen sensing. It is not always possible to work with freshly isolated monocytes but the possible effects of freezing/thawing on the biology and responsiveness of imdDCs should be taken into account.

  14. SLAM/SLAM interactions inhibit CD40-induced production of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réthi, Bence; Gogolák, Péter; Szatmari, Istvan; Veres, Agota; Erdôs, Erika; Nagy, Laszlo; Rajnavölgyi, Eva; Terhorst, Cox; Lányi, Arpád

    2006-04-01

    Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, CD150, or SLAMF1) is a self-ligand receptor on the surface of activated T- and B-lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs). Here we examine the effect of SLAM/SLAM interactions on CD40L-induced CD40 signaling pathways in human DCs. CD40L-expressing L929 cells induced DCs to produce interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and IL-12, which was strongly inhibited by coexpression of SLAM on the surface of the L929 cells. Similarly, transfection of DCs with SLAM strongly reduced CD40L-induced IL-12 production. Furthermore, the negative effect of SLAM/SLAM interactions on CD40L-induced DC activation was also detected in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS-induced IL-12 secretion, however, was not inhibited by SLAM engagement. CD40L-activated DCs affected by exposure to SLAM/SLAM engagement were impaired in their ability to induce differentiation of naive T lymphocytes into interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-producing T-helper 1 (Th1) effector cells. These inhibitory effects were not the result of a general unresponsiveness of DCs to CD40L, as SLAM/SLAM interactions did not prevent CD40L-induced up-regulation of CD83, CD86, or human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ on the surface of DCs. Taken together, the results indicate that SLAM/SLAM interactions inhibit CD40-induced signal transduction in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, an effect that was not detectable in earlier studies using anti-SLAM monoclonal antibodies.

  15. Monocyte derived dendritic cells generated by IFN-α acquire mature dendritic and natural killer cell properties as shown by gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czibere Akos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cell (DC vaccines can induce antitumor immune responses in patients with malignant diseases, while the most suitable DC culture conditions have not been established yet. In this study we compared monocyte derived human DC from conventional cultures containing GM-CSF and IL-4/TNF-α (IL-4/TNF-DC with DC generated by the novel protocol using GM-CSF and IFN-α (IFN-DC. Methods To characterise the molecular differences of both DC preparations, gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix microarrays. The data were conformed on a protein level by immunophenotyping, and functional tests for T cell stimulation, migration and cytolytic activity were performed. Results Both methods resulted in CD11c+ CD86+ HLA-DR+ cells with a typical DC morphology that could efficiently stimulate T cells. But gene expression profiling revealed two distinct DC populations. Whereas IL-4/TNF-DC showed a higher expression of genes envolved in phagocytosis IFN-DC had higher RNA levels for markers of DC maturity and migration to the lymph nodes like DCLAMP, CCR7 and CD49d. This different orientation of both DC populations was confined by a 2.3 fold greater migration in transwell experiments (p = 0.01. Most interestingly, IFN-DC also showed higher RNA levels for markers of NK cells such as TRAIL, granzymes, KLRs and other NK cell receptors. On a protein level, intracytoplasmatic TRAIL and granzyme B were observed in 90% of IFN-DC. This translated into a cytolytic activity against K562 cells with a median specific lysis of 26% at high effector cell numbers as determined by propidium iodide uptake, whereas IL-4/TNF-DC did not induce any tumor cell lysis (p = 0.006. Thus, IFN-DC combined characteristics of mature DC and natural killer cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that IFN-DC not only stimulate adaptive but also mediate innate antitumor immune responses. Therefore, IFN-DC should be evaluated in clinical vaccination trials. In

  16. Live cell imaging to understand monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell function in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Ley, Klaus

    2016-06-27

    Intravital imaging is an invaluable tool for understanding the function of cells in healthy and diseased tissues. It provides a window into dynamic processes that cannot be studied by other techniques. This review will cover the benefits and limitations of various techniques for labeling and imaging myeloid cells, with a special focus on imaging cells in atherosclerotic arteries. Although intravital imaging is a powerful tool for understanding cell function, it alone does not provide a complete picture of the cell. Other techniques, such as flow cytometry and transcriptomics, must be combined with intravital imaging to fully understand a cell's phenotype, lineage, and function.

  17. Alcohol and cannabinoids differentially affect HIV infection and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela eAgudelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC. However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%, THC (5 and 10 uM, or JWH-015 (5 and 10 uM for 4-7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV+EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV+JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV+THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection.

  18. In vitro detection of contact allergens: development of an optimized protocol using human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Hendrik; Spieker, Jochem; Gerlach, Silke; Engels, Ursula; Pape, Wolfgang; Kolbe, Ludger; Schmucker, Robert; Wenck, Horst; Diembeck, Walter; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Reisinger, Kerstin; Schepky, Andreas G

    2011-02-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a delayed T-cell mediated allergic response associated with relevant social and economic impacts. Animal experiments (e.g. the local lymph node assay) are still supplying most of the data used to assess the sensitization potential of new chemicals. However, the 7th amendment to the EU Cosmetic Directive will introduce a testing ban for cosmetic ingredients after 2013. In vitro alternative methods are thus being actively developed. Although promising results have been obtained with cell lines, their reduced functionality and inherent genomic instability led us to reinvestigate the use of peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs) for the establishment of a reliable in vitro sensitization test. To solve the issues associated with the use of primary cells, the culture and exposure conditions (cytokine concentrations, incubation time, readout, pooled vs. single donors and cytotoxicity) were re-assessed and optimized. Here we propose a stable and reproducible protocol based on PBMDCs. This should allow a wider acceptance of PBMDCs as a reliable test system for the detection of human skin sensitizers and the inclusion of this protocol in an integrated testing strategy.

  19. Generation of functional monocyte-derived fast dendritic cells suitable for clinical application in the absence of interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Gamal

    2011-10-01

    To develop dendritic cells (DCs)-based immunotherapy for cancer patients, it is necessary to have a standardized, reproducible, fast, and easy to use protocol for in vitro generation of fully functional DCs. Recently, a new strategy was described for differentiation and maturation of human monocyte (Mo)-derived fast-DCs with full T cell stimulatory capacity within only 48-72 h of in vitro culture. Interleukin (IL)-6 plus tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, and prostaglandin (PG)-E(2) were used in this strategy to induce maturation of the generated DCs. The present study further modifies this strategy by excluding IL-6 from the cytokines cocktail used for DCs maturation. The results showed that maturation of fast-DCs without IL-6 did not significantly alter the morphology, phenotype and the yield of mature DCs (P > 0.05, compared with those generated with IL-6). Moreover, fast-DCs generated without IL-6 are functional antigen presenting cells, have the ability to induce tetanus toxoid-specific autologous T cell proliferation, and are suitable for gene delivery through adenoviral vector transduction as those generated with IL-6 (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study proves that fully mature and functional Mo-derived fast-DCs can be generated in vitro without adding IL-6, which not only reduces the number of required recombinant cytokines, but may also resemble DCs development in vivo more closely.

  20. A three-dimensional coculture of enterocytes, monocytes and dendritic cells to model inflamed intestinal mucosa in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Fransisca; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2010-12-06

    While epithelial cell culture models (e.g., Caco-2 cell line) are widely used to assess the absorption of drug molecules across healthy intestinal mucosa, there are no suitable in vitro models of the intestinal barrier in the state of inflammation. Thus development of novel drugs and formulations for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is largely bound to animal models. We here report on the development of a complex in vitro model of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, starting with the selection of suitable enterocyte cell line and proinflammatory stimulus and progressing to the setup and characterization of a three-dimensional coculture of human intestinal epithelial cells and immunocompetent macrophages and dendritic cells. In the 3D setup, controlled inflammation can be induced allowing the mimicking of pathophysiological changes occurring in vivo in the inflamed intestine. Different combinations of proinflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, interleukin-1β, interferon-γ) and intestinal epithelial cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, T84) were evaluated, and only Caco-2 cells were responsive to stimulation, with interleukin-1β being the strongest stimulator. Caco-2 cells responded to the proinflammatory stimulus with a moderate upregulation of proinflammatory markers and a slight, but significant, decrease (20%) of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) indicating changes in the epithelial barrier properties. Setting up the coculture model, macrophages and dendritic cells derived from periphery blood monocytes were embedded in a collagen layer on a Transwell filter insert and Caco-2 cells were seeded atop. Even in the presence of immunocompetent cells Caco-2 cells formed a tight monolayer. Addition of IL-1β increased inflammatory cytokine response more strongly compared to Caco-2 single culture and stimulated immunocompetent cells proved to be highly active in sampling apically applied nanoparticles. Thus

  1. Effects of titanium(iv) ions on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Erwin Ph; Mhawi, Amir; Clode, Peta; Saunders, Martin; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-03-01

    Orthopaedic metal implants composed of titanium are routinely used in bone fracture repair and for joint replacement therapies. A considerable fraction of implant recipients are unable to benefit due to implant failure resulting from aseptic loosening, while others may experience cutaneous sensitivity to titanium after implantation. An adaptive immune reactivity towards titanium ions, originating from the biocorrosion of the implants, could play a role. As an initiator of the adaptive immune response, dendritic cells (DC) were studied for uptake and characteristics after titanium exposure. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy showed uptake of titanium(iv) (Ti(iv)) ions by DCs in vitro and co-localisation with phosphorus-rich cell structures of the DC membranes (phospholipids), cytoplasm (ribosomes and phosphorylated proteins) and the nucleus (DNA). DC maturation and function were investigated by measuring cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry. After exposure, DCs showed a decrease in MHC class II (HLA-DR), co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 & CD86) and chemokine receptors (CCR) 6 and CCR7 but an increase in CCR4 after Ti(iv) treatment. However, Ti(iv) treated DCs had an increased stimulatory capacity towards allogenic lymphocytes. A Ti(iv) concentration dependant increase of IL-12p70 was observed amidst decrease of the other measured cytokines (TGF-β1 and TGF-β2). Hence, Ti(iv) alters DC properties, resulting in an enhanced T lymphocyte reactivity and deviation towards a Th1 type immune response. This effect may be responsible for the inflammatory side effects of titanium implants seen in patients.

  2. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing both chemotactic cytokines IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their receptors,and their selective migration to these chemokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To characterize the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine IL-8, CC chemokine monocyte chemothractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated on activation,normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and a newly defined DC chemokine DC- CK1 as well as the expression of IL-8 receptor, MCP-1 receptor and RANTES receptor in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDCs).The migratory responsiveness of MoDC to IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES was alsso studied. Methods In vitro generated MoDCs were obtained by differentiating monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 5 days. The time course of RNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and migratoly ability was assessed by a micromultiwell chemotaxis chamber assay. Results IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their corres ponding receptors were consistently expressed in MoDCs. DC-CK-1 expression was detectable efter 48 hours of differentiation. MoDC selectively migrated in response to MCP-1 and RANTES but not to IL-8 though transcripts of IL-8 receptor were present. Conclusion Because the capacity of dendritic cells to initiate immune responses depends on their specialized migratory and tissue homing properties, the expression of chemokines and their receptors along with the migratory responsiveness to chemokines of MoDC in our study suggests a potential role of chemokines in the interaction between dendritic cells and T cells and the induction of immune responses.

  3. The effect of short-chain fatty acids on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastasi, Claudia; Candela, Marco; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné

    2015-01-01

    negligible effects, while both butyrate and propionate strongly modulated gene expression in both immature and mature human monocyte-derived DC. An Ingenuity pathway analysis based on the differentially expressed genes suggested that propionate and butyrate modulate leukocyte trafficking, as SCFA strongly......The gut microbiota is essential for human health and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are end-products of microbial fermentation of macronutrients that distribute systemically via the blood....... The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional response of immature and LPS-matured human monocyte-derived DC to SCFA. Our data revealed distinct effects exerted by each individual SCFA on gene expression in human monocyte-derived DC, especially in the mature ones. Acetate only exerted...

  4. Development of a standardized protocol for reproducible generation of matured monocyte-derived dendritic cells suitable for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, H R; Noll, T

    2003-09-01

    There is increasing interest in the generation of dendritic cells (DC) for cancer immunotherapy. In order to utilize DC in clinical trials it is necessary to have standardized, reproducible and easy to use protocols. We describe here the process development for the generation of DC as the result of investigation of culture conditions as well as consumption rates of medium and cytokines. Our studies demonstrate that highly viable DC (93 +/- 2%) can be produced from CD14(+) enriched monocytes via immunomagnetic beads in a high yield (31 +/- 6%) with X-VIVO 15, 400 U ml(-1) GM-CSF and 2000 U ml(-1) IL-4 without serum and feeding. For the maturation of DC different cocktails (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, PGE(2) and TNF-alpha, PGE(2)) were compared. In both cases cells expressed typical surface molecules of mature DC and induced high proliferative responses in mixed lymphocyte reactions which led to IFN-gamma producing T-lymphocytes. The data suggest that the use of this optimized, easy to use protocol results in highly mature DC.

  5. Design of phosphorylated dendritic architectures to promote human monocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupot, Mary; Griffe, Laurent; Marchand, Patrice; Maraval, Alexandrine; Rolland, Olivier; Martinet, Ludovic; L'Faqihi-Olive, Fatima-Ezzahra; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Poupot, Rémy

    2006-11-01

    As first defensive line, monocytes are a pivotal cell population of innate immunity. Monocyte activation can be relevant to a range of immune conditions and responses. Here we present new insights into the activation of monocytes by a series of phosphonic acid-terminated, phosphorus-containing dendrimers. Various dendritic or subdendritic structures were synthesized and tested, revealing the basic structural requirements for monocyte activation. We showed that multivalent character and phosphonic acid capping of dendrimers are crucial for monocyte targeting and activation. Confocal videomicroscopy showed that a fluorescein-tagged dendrimer binds to isolated monocytes and gets internalized within a few seconds. We also found that dendrimers follow the phagolysosomial route during internalization by monocytes. Finally, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments between a specifically designed fluorescent dendrimer and phycoerythrin-coupled antibodies. We showed that the typical innate Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 is clearly involved, but not alone, in the sensing of dendrimers by monocytes. In conclusion, phosphorus-containing dendrimers appear as precisely tunable nanobiotools able to target and activate human innate immunity and thus prove to be good candidates to develop new drugs for immunotherapies.

  6. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Bol, Kalijn F.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Pots, Jeanette M.; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A. M.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Croockewit, Sandra A. J.; Blokx, Willeke A. M.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Mus, Roel D. M.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; van der Graaf, Chantal A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combi...

  7. Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta, Franklin R; Bernal, Paula J; Fresnay, Stephanie; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2015-06-01

    A new human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) was recently developed. In this model, ingestion of 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of subjects developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD-) 5-10 days post-challenge. TD criteria included meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12 h) and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia) endpoints. One of the first lines of defense against pathogens are the cells of the innate immune system (e.g., monocytes, dendritic cells -DCs-). Various changes in circulating monocytes and DCs have been described in the murine S. Typhimurium model; however, whether similar changes are present in humans remains to be explored. To address these questions, a subset of volunteers (5 TD and 3 who did not develop typhoid despite oral challenge -NoTD-) were evaluated for changes in circulating monocytes and DCs. Expression of CD38 and CD40 were upregulated in monocytes and DCs in TD volunteers during the disease days (TD-0h to TD-96h). Moreover, integrin α4β7, a gut homing molecule, was upregulated on monocytes but not DCs. CD21 upregulation was only identified in DCs. These changes were not observed among NoTD volunteers despite the same oral challenge. Moreover, monocytes and DCs from NoTD volunteers showed increased binding to S. Typhi one day after challenge. These monocytes showed phosphorylation of p38MAPK, NFkB and Erk1/2 upon stimulation with S. Typhi-LPS-QDot micelles. In contrast, monocytes from TD volunteers showed only a moderate increase in S. Typhi binding 48 h and 96 h post-TD, and only Erk1/2 phosphorylation. This is the first study to describe different activation and migration profiles, as well as differential signaling patterns, in monocytes and DCs which relate directly to the clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild type S. Typhi.

  8. Electroporated Antigen-Encoding mRNA Is Not a Danger Signal to Human Mature Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hoyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For therapeutic cancer vaccination, the adoptive transfer of mRNA-electroporated dendritic cells (DCs is frequently performed, usually with monocyte-derived, cytokine-matured DCs (moDCs. However, DCs are rich in danger-sensing receptors which could recognize the exogenously delivered mRNA and induce DC activation, hence influencing the DCs’ immunogenicity. Therefore, we examined whether electroporation of mRNA with a proper cap and a poly-A tail of at least 64 adenosines had any influence on cocktail-matured moDCs. We used 16 different RNAs, encoding tumor antigens (MelanA, NRAS, BRAF, GNAQ, GNA11, and WT1, and variants thereof. None of those RNAs induced changes in the expression of CD25, CD40, CD83, CD86, and CD70 or the secretion of the cytokines IL-8, IL-6, and TNFα of more than 1.5-fold compared to the control condition, while an mRNA encoding an NF-κB-activation protein as positive control induced massive secretion of the cytokines. To determine whether mRNA electroporation had any effect on the whole transcriptome of the DCs, we performed microarray analyses of DCs of 6 different donors. None of 60,000 probes was significantly different between mock-electroporated DCs and MelanA-transfected DCs. Hence, we conclude that no transcriptional programs were induced within cocktail-matured DCs by electroporation of single tumor-antigen-encoding mRNAs.

  9. The effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on the functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wen-Mein

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propolis, an ancient herbal medicine, has been reported the beneficial effect both in asthma patients and murine model of asthma, but the mechanism was not clearly understood. In this study, the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE, the most extensively studied components in propolis, on the functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs was investigated. Results CAPE significantly inhibited IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, IL-10 protein expression in mature healthy human MoDCs stimulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS and IL-12 p40, IL-10, IP-10 stimulated by crude mite extract. CAPE significantly inhibited IL-10 and IP-10 but not IL-12 expression in allergic patients' MoDCs stimulated by crude mite extract. In contrast, the upregulation of costimulatory molecules in mature MoDCs was not suppressed by CAPE. Further, the antigen presenting ability of DCs was not inhibited by CAPE. CAPE inhibited IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB activation but not mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK family phosphorylation in human MoDCs. Conclusion These results indicated that CAPE inhibited cytokine and chemokine production by MoDCs which might be related to the NF-κB signaling pathway. This study provided a new insight into the mechanism of CAPE in immune response and the rationale for propolis in the treatment of asthma and other allergic disorders.

  10. Differential interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-23 production by human blood monocytes and dendritic cells in response to commensal enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuzak, Jennifer; Dillon, Stephanie; Wilson, Cara

    2012-08-01

    Human peripheral blood contains antigen-presenting cells (APC), including dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, that may encounter microbes that have translocated from the intestine to the periphery in disease states like HIV-1 infection and inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated the response of DC and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to a panel of representative commensal enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Bacteroides fragilis. All three bacteria induced significant upregulation of the maturation and activation markers CD40 and CD83 on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). However, only mDC produced cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12p40/70, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in response to bacterial stimulation. Cytokine profiles in whole PBMC differed depending on the stimulating bacterial species: B. fragilis induced production of IL-23, IL-12p70, and IL-10, whereas E. coli and Enterococcus induced an IL-10-predominant response. mDC and monocyte depletion experiments indicated that these cell types differentially produced IL-10 and IL-23 in response to E. coli and B. fragilis. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron did not induce levels of IL-23 similar to those of B. fragilis, suggesting that B. fragilis may have unique proinflammatory properties among Bacteroides species. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to PBMC cultures stimulated with commensal bacteria abrogated the IL-23 response, whereas blocking IL-10 significantly enhanced IL-23 production, suggesting that IL-10 controls the levels of IL-23 produced. These results indicate that blood mDC and monocytes respond differentially to innate stimulation with whole commensal bacteria and that IL-10 may play a role in controlling the proinflammatory response to translocated microbes.

  11. In vitro generation of dendritic cells from human blood monocytes in experimental conditions compatible for in vivo cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H; Vergé, V; Baron, C; Martinache, C; Leon, A; Scholl, S; Gorin, N C; Salamero, J; Assari, S; Bernard, J; Lopez, M

    2000-04-01

    DC are professional APC that are promising adjuvants for clinical immunotherapy. Methods to generate in vitro large numbers of functional human DC using either peripheral blood monocytes or CD34+ pluripotent HPC have been developed recently. However, the various steps of their in vitro production for further clinical use need to fit good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. Our study focused on setting up such a full procedure, including collection of mononuclear cells (MNC) by apheresis, separation of monocytes by elutriation, and culture of monocytes with GM-CSF + IL-13 + autologous serum (SAuto) in sterile Teflon bags. The procedure was first developed with apheresis products from 7 healthy donors. Its clinical feasibility was then tested on 7 patients with breast cancer. The characteristics of monocyte-derived DC grown with SAuto (or in some instances with a pooled AB serum) were compared with those obtained in the presence of FBS by evaluation of their phenotype, their morphology in confocal microscopy, and their capacity to phagocytize latex particles and to stimulate allogeneic (MLR) or autologous lymphocytes (antigen-presentation tests). The results obtained demonstrate that the experimental conditions we set up are easily applicable in clinical trials and lead to large numbers of well-defined SAuto-derived DC as efficient as those derived with FBS.

  12. A novel,rapid strategy to form dendritomas from human dendritic cells and hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HCCLM3 cells using mature dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood CD14+monocytes within 48 hours of in vitro culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Guan; Ji-Run Peng; Lan Yuan; Hui Wang; Yu-Hua Wei; Xi-Sheng Leng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Dendritomas formed by fusing cancer cells to dendritic cells have already been applied to clinical treatment trial of several types of cancers. Dendritic cells for the fusion in most trials and experiments were from blood monocytes in standard 7-d protocol culture, which requires 5-7 d of culture with granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), followed by 2-3 d of activation with a combination of proinflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factorα (TNFα), interleukin1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6)and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2).One study showed that mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells could be obtained within 48 h ofin vitro culture with the same protocol as standard 7-d culture and referred to as FastDCs. Here we aimed to fuse human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HCCLM3 cells with mature monocytederived dendritic cells within 48 h ofin vitro culture (FastDC).METHODS: HCCLMl3 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 with 150 mL/L fetal calf serum (FCS). CD14+monocytes from healthy human peripheral blood were purified with MACS CD14 isolation kit and cultured in six-well plates in fresh complete DC medium containing RPMI-1640, 20 mL/Lheat inactivated human AB serum, 2 mmol/L L-glutamine,100 μg/mL gentamicin, 1000 U/mL GM-CSF and 500 U/mL IL-4 for 24 h, then proinflammatory mediators such as TNFα(1000 U/mL), IL-1β (10 ng/mL), IL-6 (10 ng/mL) and PGE2(1μg/mL) were supplemented for another 24 h, and thus mature FastDCs were generated. HCCLM3 cells and FastDCs were labeled with red fluorescent dye PKH26-GL and green fluorescent dye PKH67-GL respectively. After the red fluorescent-stained HCCLM3 cells were irradiated with 50 Gy, FastDCs and irradiated HCCLM3 cells were fused in 500 mL/L polyethylene glycol(PEG)+100 mL/L dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to generate novel dendritomas. The FastDCs and novel dendritomas were immunostained with antiCD80, anti-CD86, anti-CD83, anti-HLA-DR mAbs and analyzed by fluorescence

  13. PGE2 differentially regulates monocyte-derived dendritic cell cytokine responses depending on receptor usage (EP2/EP4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloso, Neil J; Urquhart, Paula; Nicolaou, Anna; Wang, Jenny; Woodward, David F

    2013-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central players in coordinating immune responses, both innate and adaptive. While the role of lipid mediators in the immune response has been the subject of many investigations, the precise role of prostaglandins has often been plagued by contradictory studies. In this study, we examined the role of PGE(2) on human DC function. Although studies have suggested that PGE(2) specifically plays a role in DC motility and cytokine release profile, the precise receptor usage and signaling pathways involved remain unclear. In this report we found that irrespective of the human donor, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) express three of the four PGE(2) receptor subtypes (EP(2-4)), although only EP(2) and EP(4) were active with respect to cytokine production. Using selective EP receptor antagonists and agonists, we demonstrate that PGE(2) coordinates control of IL-23 release (a promoter of Th17, an autoimmune associated T cell subset) in a dose-dependent manner by differential use of EP(2) and EP(4) receptors in LPS-activated MoDCs. This is in contrast to IL-12, which is dose dependently inhibited by PGE(2) through both receptor subtypes. Low concentrations (∼1-10nM) of PGE(2) promoted IL-23 production via EP(4) receptors, while at higher (>50 nM), but still physiologically relevant concentrations, IL-23 is suppressed by an EP(2) dependent mechanism. These results can be explained by differential regulation of the common subunit, IL-12p40, and IL-23p19, by EP(2) and EP(4). By these means, PGE(2) can act as a regulatory switch of immune responses depending on its concentration in the microenvironment. In addition, we believe these results may also explain why seemingly conflicting biological functions assigned to PGE(2) have been reported in the literature, as the concentration of ligand (PGE(2)) fundamentally alters the nature of the response. This finding also highlights the potential of designing therapeutics which differentially target

  14. The effect of cytosolic extract of Alternaria aternata fungus on Monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation and T-lymphocyte polarization in the presence of myelin basic protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loghmanni A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease with impairment in function of central nervous system. Macrophages and dendritic cells play important roles in alleviating or progression of the disease. These cells can cause inflammation and damage to the myelin of nerve cells by realizing of harmful substances when these cells get matured. We studied the effect of Alternaria alternata extract on maturation of monocyte- derived dendritic cell (modc and T-cell responses in the presence of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP as a laboratory model of multiple sclerosis (MS. The purpose of this study is suitable dendritic cells production for usage in MS immunotherapy.Methods: For this study plastic adherent monocytes were cultured with granulocyte/ macrophage- colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin -4 for converting these cells to modc and pulsed with MBP and matured in the presence of monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM in control group and MCM + Alternaria alternata extract in treatment groups. Anti-CD14, anti-CD83, anti-human leukocyte antigen-DR (anti HLA-DR monoclonal antibody were carried out for phenotyping. Autologos T cell responses and cytokine production were evaluated.Results: The results showed that the expression of CD14 decreased and CD83, HLA-DR increased in treatment groups in comparison with control groups. The production amount of IL-10 overcame IL-12 and in T cell the production of cytokines, IL-17 and Interferon-γ (IFN-γ decreased and IL-4 was increased (P<0.05. These effects escalated with increasing of dosage from 50 to 100 (mg/ml (P<0.001.Conclusion: Alternaria alternata extract can cause maturation of MBP-pulsed modc and skewing of T- lymphocyte toward Th2 and thereby can evolve into a new strategy in immunotherapy of MS.

  15. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor affects activation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Ye, Z; Kijlstra, A; Zhou, Y; Yang, P

    2014-08-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known for mediating the toxic effects of dioxin-containing pollutants, but has also been shown to be involved in the natural regulation of the immune response. In this study, we investigated the effect of AhR activation by its endogenous ligands 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) on the differentiation, maturation and function of monocyte-derived DCs in Behçet's disease (BD) patients. In this study, we showed that AhR activation by FICZ and ITE down-regulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules including human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR), CD80 and CD86, while it had no effect on the expression of CD83 and CD40 on DCs derived from BD patients and normal controls. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated dendritic cells (DCs) from active BD patients showed a higher level of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production. FICZ or ITE significantly inhibited the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and TNF-α, but induced IL-10 production by DCs derived from active BD patients and normal controls. FICZ or ITE-treated DCs significantly inhibited the T helper type 17 (Th17) and Th1 cell response. Activation of AhR either by FICZ or ITE inhibits DC differentiation, maturation and function. Further studies are needed to investigate whether manipulation of the AhR pathway may be used to treat BD or other autoimmune diseases.

  16. iNKT Cell Emigration out of the Lung Vasculature Requires Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanabalasuriar, A; Neupane, A.S; Wang, J; Krummel, M.F; Kubes, P

    2017-01-01

    iNKT cells are a subset of innate T cells that recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d molecules and protect against a variety of bacterial infections including S. pneumoniae. Using lung intravital imaging, we examined the behavior and mechanism of pulmonary iNKT cell activation in response to the potent iNKT cell ligand α-galactosylceramide or during S. pneumoniae infection. In untreated mice the major fraction of iNKT cells resided in the vasculature, but a small critical population resided in the extravascular space in proximity to monocyte-derived DCs. Administration of either α-GalCer or S. pneumoniae, induced CD1d dependent rapid recruitment of neutrophils out of the vasculature. This neutrophil exodus paved the way for extravasation of iNKT cells from the lung vasculature via CCL17. Depletion of monocyte-derived DCs abrogated both the neutrophil and subsequent iNKT cell extravasation. Moreover, impairing iNKT cell migration out of the lung vasculature by blocking CCL17 greatly increased susceptibility to S. pneumoniae infection, suggesting a critical role for the secondary wave of iNKT cells in host defense. PMID:27653688

  17. IFN-alpha promotes definitive maturation of dendritic cells generated by short-term culture of monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Schad, Katharina; Junkmann, Jana; Bauer, Christian; Herten, Jan; Kiefl, Rosemarie; Schnurr, Max; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2006-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) generated in vitro have to be viable and phenotypically mature to be capable of inducing T cell-mediated immunity after in vivo administration. To facilitate optimization of DC-based vaccination protocols, we investigated whether the cytokine environment and the mode of activation affect maturation and survival of DC derived from monocytes by a short-term protocol. Monocytes cultured for 24 h with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4 were stimulated with proinflammatory mediators for another 36 h to generate mature DC. Additional activation with CD40 ligand and interferon (IFN)-gamma increased viability of DC and promoted definitive maturation as defined by maintenance of a mature phenotype after withdrawal of cytokines. Addition of IFN-alpha to DC cultures prior to stimulation further enhanced definitive maturation: IFN-alpha-primed DC expressed high levels of costimulatory molecules and CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) up to 5 days after cytokine withdrawal. Compared with unprimed DC, IFN-alpha-primed DC displayed equal capacity to migrate upon CCR7 ligation and to prime antigen-specific T helper cell as well as cytolytic T cell responses. In conclusion, we show that optimal maturation and survival of monocyte-derived DC require multiple activation signals. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for IFN-alpha in DC development: IFN-alpha priming of monocytes promotes definitive maturation of DC upon activation.

  18. Central memory Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes primed and expanded by bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected dendritic cells kill mycobacterial-infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Angelo; Casetti, Rita; Sacchi, Alessandra; Poccia, Fabrizio

    2007-09-01

    In humans, innate immune recognition of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is a feature of cells as dendritic cells (DC) and gammadelta T cells. In this study, we show that BCG infection of human monocyte-derived DC induces a rapid activation of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells (the major subset of gammadelta T cell pool in human peripheral blood). Indeed, in the presence of BCG-infected DC, Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells increase both their expression of CD69 and CD25 and the production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, in contrast to DC treated with Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell-specific Ags. Without further exogenous stimuli, BCG-infected DC expand a functionally cytotoxic central memory Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell population. This subset does not display lymph node homing receptors, but express a high amount of perforin. They are highly efficient in the killing of mycobacterial-infected primary monocytes or human monocytic THP-1 cells preserving the viability of cocultured, infected DC. This study provides further evidences about the complex relationship between important players of innate immunity and suggests an immunoregulatory role of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in the control of mycobacterial infection.

  19. Effect of Polarization on Airway Epithelial Conditioning of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazian, Dick; Chhoden, Tashi; Arge, Maria

    2015-01-01

    to sample allergens administered to the apical side. Allergen uptake depended on both polarization and the nature of the allergen. AEC conditioning led to decreased birch allergen-specific proliferation of autologous T cells and a trend toward decreased secretion of the Th2-specific cytokines IL-5 and IL-13...

  20. Effective clinical-scale production of dendritic cell vaccines by monocyte elutriation directly in medium, subsequent culture in bags and final antigen loading using peptides or RNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Michael; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Strasser, Erwin; Hendelmeier, Martin; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Schuler, Gerold; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination approaches are advancing fast into the clinic. The major obstacle for further improvement is the current lack of a simple functionally "closed" system to generate standardized monocyte-derived (mo) DC vaccines. Here, we significantly optimized the use of the Elutra counterflow elutriation system to enrich monocytic DC precursors by (1) developing an algorithm to avoid red blood cell debulking and associated monocyte loss before elutriation, and (2) by elutriation directly in culture medium rather than phosphate-buffered saline. Upon elutriation the bags containing the collected monocytes are simply transferred into the incubator to generate DC progeny as the final "open" washing step is no longer required. Elutriation resulted in significantly more (> or = 2-fold) and purer DC than the standard gradient centrifugation/adherence-based monocyte enrichment, whereas morphology, maturation markers, viability, migratory capacity, and T cell stimulatory capacity were identical. Subsequently, we compared RNA transfection, as this is an increasingly used approach to load DC with antigen. Elutra-derived and adherence-derived DC could be electroporated with similar, high efficiency (on average >85% green fluorescence protein positive), and appeared also equal in antigen expression kinetics. Both Elutra-derived and adherence-derived DC, when loaded with the MelanA peptide or electroporated with MelanA RNA, showed a high T cell stimulation capacity, that is, priming of MelanA-specific CD8+ T cells. Our optimized Elutra-based procedure is straightforward, clearly superior to the standard gradient centrifugation/plastic adherence protocol, and now allows the generation of large numbers of peptide-loaded or RNA-transfected DC in a functionally closed system.

  1. Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin R Toapanta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi was recently developed. In this model, ingestion of 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of subjects developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD- 5-10 days post-challenge. TD criteria included meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12 h and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia endpoints. One of the first lines of defense against pathogens are the cells of the innate immune system (e.g., monocytes, dendritic cells -DCs-. Various changes in circulating monocytes and DCs have been described in the murine S. Typhimurium model; however, whether similar changes are present in humans remains to be explored. To address these questions, a subset of volunteers (5 TD and 3 who did not develop typhoid despite oral challenge -NoTD- were evaluated for changes in circulating monocytes and DCs. Expression of CD38 and CD40 were upregulated in monocytes and DCs in TD volunteers during the disease days (TD-0h to TD-96h. Moreover, integrin α4β7, a gut homing molecule, was upregulated on monocytes but not DCs. CD21 upregulation was only identified in DCs. These changes were not observed among NoTD volunteers despite the same oral challenge. Moreover, monocytes and DCs from NoTD volunteers showed increased binding to S. Typhi one day after challenge. These monocytes showed phosphorylation of p38MAPK, NFkB and Erk1/2 upon stimulation with S. Typhi-LPS-QDot micelles. In contrast, monocytes from TD volunteers showed only a moderate increase in S. Typhi binding 48 h and 96 h post-TD, and only Erk1/2 phosphorylation. This is the first study to describe different activation and migration profiles, as well as differential signaling patterns, in monocytes and DCs which relate directly to the clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild type S. Typhi.

  2. Accessory cells with a veiled morphology and movement pattern generated from monocytes after avoidance of plastic adherence and of NADPH oxidase activation. A comparison with GM-CSF/IL-4-induced monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwhof, Cindy; Canning, Martha O; Grotenhuis, Kristel; de Wit, Harm J; Florencia, Zenovia Z; de Haan-Meulman, Meeny; Drexhage, Hemmo A

    2002-07-01

    Veiled cells (VC) present in afferent lymph transport antigen from the periphery to the draining lymph nodes. Although VC in lymph form a heterogeneous population, some of the cells clearly belong on morphological grounds to the Langerhans cell (LC)/ dendritic cell (DC) series. Here we show that culturing monocytes for 24 hrs while avoiding plastic adherence (polypropylene tubes) and avoiding the activation of NADPH oxidase (blocking agents) results in the generation of a population of veiled accessory cells. The generated VC were actively moving cells like lymph-borne VC in vivo. The monocyte (mo)-derived VC population existed of CD14(dim/-) and CD14(brighT) cells. Of these the CD14(dim/-) VC were as good in stimulating allogeneic T cell proliferation as immature DC (iDC) obtained after one week of adherent culture of monocytes in granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interleukin (IL)-4. This underscores the accessory cell function of the mo-derived CD14(dim/-) VC. Although the CD14(dim/-)VC had a modest expression of the DC-specific marker CD83 and were positive for S100, expression of the DC-specific markers CD1a, Langerin, DC-SIGN, and DC-LAMP were absent. This indicates that the here generated CD14(dim/-) VC can not be considered as classical LC/DC. It was also impossible to turn the CD14(dim/-) mo-derived VC population into typical DC by culture for one week in GM-CSF/IL-4 or LPS. In fact the cells died tinder such circumstances, gaining some macrophage characteristics before dying. The IL-12 production from mo-derived CD14(dim/-) VC was lower, whereas the production of IL-10 was higher as compared to iDC. Consequently the T cells that were stimulated by these mo-derived VC produced less IFN-gamma as compared with T cells stimulated by iDC. Our data indicate that it is possible to rapidly generate a population of CD14(dim/-) veiled accessory cells from monocytes. The marker pattern and cytokine production of these VC indicate that this

  3. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Bruun Hartmann

    Full Text Available In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured in materials other than polystyrene and applying three-dimensional structures more similar to the in vivo environment. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS is an often used polymer for lab-on-a-chip devices but not much is known about the effect of changing the culture surface material from polystyrene to PDMS. In the present study the differentiation of porcine monocytes to monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs was investigated using CD172apos pig blood monocytes stimulated with GM-CSF and IL-4. Monocytes were cultured on surfaces made of two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material and architecture. Distinct clustering of cells, based on similar expression patterns of 46 genes of interest, was seen for cells isolated from two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS. Changing the material from polystyrene to PDMS resulted in cells with expression patterns usually associated with macrophage expression (upregulation of CD163 and downregulation of CD1a, FLT3, LAMP3 and BATF3. However, this was purely based on gene expression level, and no functional assays were included in this study which would be necessary in order to classify the cells as being macrophages. When changing to three-dimensional culture the cells became increasingly activated in terms of IL6, IL8, IL10 and CCR5 gene expression. Further stimulation

  4. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Brogaard, Louise; Flagstad, Frederikke Bjergvang; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Summerfield, Artur; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    In vitro generation of dendritic-like cells through differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes is typically done using two-dimensional polystyrene culture plates. In the process of optimising cell culture techniques, engineers have developed fluidic micro-devises usually manufactured in materials other than polystyrene and applying three-dimensional structures more similar to the in vivo environment. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is an often used polymer for lab-on-a-chip devices but not much is known about the effect of changing the culture surface material from polystyrene to PDMS. In the present study the differentiation of porcine monocytes to monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) was investigated using CD172apos pig blood monocytes stimulated with GM-CSF and IL-4. Monocytes were cultured on surfaces made of two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene) differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material and architecture. Distinct clustering of cells, based on similar expression patterns of 46 genes of interest, was seen for cells isolated from two- and three-dimensional polystyrene as well as two- and three-dimensional PDMS. Changing the material from polystyrene to PDMS resulted in cells with expression patterns usually associated with macrophage expression (upregulation of CD163 and downregulation of CD1a, FLT3, LAMP3 and BATF3). However, this was purely based on gene expression level, and no functional assays were included in this study which would be necessary in order to classify the cells as being macrophages. When changing to three-dimensional culture the cells became increasingly activated in terms of IL6, IL8, IL10 and CCR5 gene expression. Further stimulation with LPS resulted

  5. Leishmania mexicana promastigotes down regulate JNK and p-38 MAPK activation: Role in the inhibition of camptothecin-induced apoptosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Jorge; Wilkins-Rodríguez, Arturo; Argueta-Donohué, Jesús; Aguirre-García, Magdalena; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, Laila

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are one of the principal host cells of the obligate intracellular parasite Leishmania. Inhibition of host cell apoptosis is a strategy employed by multiple pathogens to ensure their survival in the infected cell. We have previously shown that the infection of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) with Leishmania mexicana inhibits campthotecin-induced apoptosis. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in the inhibition of apoptosis of dendritic cells by Leishmania have not been established. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are key participants in the process of apoptosis and different species of Leishmania have been shown to regulate these kinases. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of L. mexicana promastigotes in the activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase and their participation in the inhibition of apoptosis. The infection of moDC with L. mexicana promastigotes diminished significantly the phosphorylation of the MAP kinases JNK and p38. The inhibition of both kinases diminished DNA fragmentation, but in a major extent was the reduction of DNA fragmentation when JNK was inhibited. The capacity of L. mexicana promastigotes to diminish MAP kinases activation is probably one of the strategies employed to delay apoptosis induction in the infected moDC and may have implications for Leishmania pathogenesis by favoring the invasion of its host and the persistence of the parasite in the infected cells.

  6. Commonly used prophylactic vaccines as an alternative for synthetically produced TLR ligands to mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreibelt, G.; Benitez-Ribas, D.; Schuurhuis, D.; Lambeck, A.J.A.; Hout-Kuijer, M.A. van; Schaft, N.; Punt, C.J.A.; Figdor, C.G.; Adema, G.J.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2010-01-01

    Currently dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are explored in clinical trials, predominantly in cancer patients. Murine studies showed that only maturation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands generates mature DCs that produce interleukin-12 and promote optimal T-cell help. Unfortunately, the limite

  7. HIV-1 gp120 activates the STAT3/interleukin-6 axis in primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Donninelli, Gloria; Varano, Barbara; Da Sacco, Letizia; Masotti, Andrea; Gessani, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are fundamental for the initiation of immune responses and are important players in AIDS immunopathogenesis. The modulation of DC functional activities represents a strategic mechanism for HIV-1 to evade immune surveillance. Impairment of DC function may result from bystander effects of HIV-1 envelope proteins independently of direct HIV-1 infection. In this study, we report that exposure of immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to HIV-1 R5 gp120 resulted in the CCR5-dependent production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/NF-κB pathways. IL-6 in turn activated STAT3 by an autocrine loop. Concomitantly, gp120 promoted an early activation of STAT3 that further contributed to IL-6 induction. This activation paralleled a concomitant upregulation of the STAT3 inhibitor PIAS3. Notably, STAT3/IL-6 pathway activation was not affected by the CCR5-specific ligand CCL4. These results identify STAT3 as a key signaling intermediate activated by gp120 in MDDCs and highlight the existence of a virus-induced dysregulation of the IL-6/STAT3 axis. HIV-1 gp120 signaling through STAT3 may provide an explanation for the impairment of DC function observed upon HIV exposure. This study provides new evidence for the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggered by HIV-1 gp120 in human DCs in the absence of productive infection, emphasizing a role of aberrant signaling in early virus-host interaction, contributing to viral pathogenesis. We identified STAT3 as a key component in the gp120-mediated signaling cascade involving MAPK and NF-κB components and ultimately leading to IL-6 secretion. STAT3 now is recognized as a key regulator of DC functions. Thus, the identification of this transcription factor as a signaling molecule mediating some of gp120's biological effects unveils a new mechanism by which HIV-1 may deregulate DC functions and contribute to AIDS pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology

  8. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  9. Gallic Acid Is the Major Active Component of Cortex Moutan in Inhibiting Immune Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ben Chung Lap; Li, Long Fei; Hu, Shui Qing; Wat, Elaine; Wong, Eric Chun Wai; Zhang, Vanilla Xin; Lau, Clara Bik San; Wong, Chun Kwok; Hon, Kam Lun Ellis; Hui, Patrick Chi Leung; Leung, Ping Chung

    2015-09-10

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a widely prevalent and chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Penta Herbs Formula (PHF) is efficacious in improving the quality of life and reducing topical corticosteroid used in children with AD and one of the active herbs it contains is Cortex Moutan. Recent studies showed that altered functions of dendritic cells (DC) were observed in atopic individuals, suggesting that DC might play a major role in the generation and maintenance of inflammation by their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Hence, the aims of the present study were to identify the major active component(s) of Cortex Moutan, which might inhibit DC functions and to investigate their possible interactions with conventional corticosteroid on inhibiting the development of DC from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) culture model coupled with the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) analyses were used. Gallic acid was the major active component from Cortex Moutan which could dose dependently inhibit interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and the functional cluster of differentiation (CD) surface markers CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression from cytokine cocktail-activated moDC. Gallic acid could also lower the concentration of hydrocortisone required to inhibit the activation of DC.

  10. Gallic Acid Is the Major Active Component of Cortex Moutan in Inhibiting Immune Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Chung Lap Chan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a widely prevalent and chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Penta Herbs Formula (PHF is efficacious in improving the quality of life and reducing topical corticosteroid used in children with AD and one of the active herbs it contains is Cortex Moutan. Recent studies showed that altered functions of dendritic cells (DC were observed in atopic individuals, suggesting that DC might play a major role in the generation and maintenance of inflammation by their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Hence, the aims of the present study were to identify the major active component(s of Cortex Moutan, which might inhibit DC functions and to investigate their possible interactions with conventional corticosteroid on inhibiting the development of DC from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC culture model coupled with the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS analyses were used. Gallic acid was the major active component from Cortex Moutan which could dose dependently inhibit interleukin (IL-12 p40 and the functional cluster of differentiation (CD surface markers CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression from cytokine cocktail-activated moDC. Gallic acid could also lower the concentration of hydrocortisone required to inhibit the activation of DC.

  11. Messenger RNA electroporation of human monocytes, followed by rapid in vitro differentiation, leads to highly stimulatory antigen-loaded mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsaerts, Peter; Van den Bosch, Glenn; Cools, Nathalie; Van Driessche, Ann; Nijs, Griet; Lenjou, Marc; Lardon, Filip; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2002-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional Ag-capturing and -presenting cells of the immune system. Because of their exceptional capability of activating tumor-specific T cells, cancer vaccination research is now shifting toward the formulation of a clinical human DC vaccine. We developed a short term and serum-free culture protocol for rapid generation of fully mature, viable, and highly stimulatory CD83(+) DC. Human monocytes were cultured for 24 h in serum-free AIM-V medium, followed by 24-h maturation by polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (polyI:C). Short term cultured, polyI:C-maturated DC, far more than immature DC, showed typical mature DC markers and high allogeneic stimulatory capacity and had high autologous stimulatory capacity in an influenza model system using peptide-pulsed DC. Electroporation of mRNA as an Ag-loading strategy in these cells was optimized using mRNA encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Monocytes electroporated with EGFP mRNA, followed by short term, serum-free differentiation to mature DC, had a phenotype of DC, and all showed positive EGFP fluorescence. Influenza matrix protein mRNA-electroporated monocytes cultured serum-free and maturated with polyI:C showed high stimulatory capacity in autologous T cell activation experiments. In conclusion, the present short term and serum-free ex vivo DC culture protocol in combination with mRNA electroporation at the monocyte stage imply an important reduction in time and consumables for preparation of Ag-loaded mature DC compared with classical DC culture protocols and might find application in clinical immunotherapy settings.

  12. Candida albicans Yeast and Germ Tube Forms Interfere Differently with Human Monocyte Differentiation into Dendritic Cells: a Novel Dimorphism-Dependent Mechanism To Escape the Host's Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosantucci, Antonella; Romagnoli, Giulia; Chiani, Paola; Stringaro, Annarita; Crateri, Pasqualina; Mariotti, Sabrina; Teloni, Raffaela; Arancia, Giuseppe; Cassone, Antonio; Nisini, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to convert from the yeast (Y) form to mycelial forms through germ tube (GT) formation is considered a key feature of the transition of the organism from commensalism to virulence. We show here that human monocytes cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 (IL-4) after phagocytosis of Y forms did not differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs); they retained CD14, did not acquire CD1a, and were unable to express the maturation markers CD83 and CCR7. Moreover, they did not produce IL-12p70 but secreted IL-10. In addition, they spontaneously expressed high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-8 mRNA transcripts and were able to induce proliferation of alloreactive memory but not naïve T lymphocytes. Conversely, monocytes that had phagocytosed GT forms differentiated into mature CD83+ and CCR7+ DCs; however, there was no up-regulation of CD40, CD80, and major histocompatibility complex class II, irrespective of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. In addition, these cells were unable to produce IL-12 even after LPS stimulation, but they were not functionally exhausted, as shown by their capacity to express TNF-α and IL-8 mRNA transcripts. These cells were able to prime naïve T cells but not to induce their functional polarization into effector cells. These data indicate that phagocytosis of Y and GT forms has profound and distinct effects on the differentiation pathway of monocytes. Thus, the differentiation of human monocytes into DCs appears to be tunable and exploitable by C. albicans to elude immune surveillance. PMID:14742527

  13. Generation of functionally mature dendritic cells from elutriated monocytes using polyinosinic : polycytidylic acid and soluble CD40 ligand for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Kim, H O; Kim, H J; Lee, K; Kim, H-S

    2008-12-01

    Despite the increasing use of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in clinical trials, optimal conditions for the generation of functionally mature DCs remain to be established. The current standard DC maturation protocol for clinical trials has been used as an inflammatory cytokine cocktail [tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2)], but this cocktail induced insufficient maturation of DCs derived from elutriated monocytes when cultured in X-VIVO 15. The aim of this study was to define effective combinations of stimulators for generating functionally mature DCs from elutriated monocytes under current good manufacturing practice conditions. We compared the functional capacity of DCs in response to all possible pairwise combinations of four different classes of stimuli: TNF-alpha, peptidoglycan, polyinosinic : polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] and soluble CD40 ligand (CD40L). Maturation status of DCs stimulated with combination of four stimuli was similar to that of the cytokine cocktail as assessed by the cell surface phenotype. However, only the combination of poly(I:C) + CD40L induced complete functional activation of the whole DC population, assessing IL-12p70 production, allostimulatory activity, migratory response to CCL19 and T helper 1-polarizing capacity. Thus, the protocol based on the combination of poly(I:C) and CD40L is more effective for the induction of clinical-grade DCs from elutriated monocytes than the standard cytokine cocktail.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs induce immune modulatory profile in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Sá Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells have prominent immune modulatory properties, which may have clinical applications; however their major source, bone marrow, is of limited availability. On the other hand, mesenchymal stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs are readily accessible, but their immune regulatory properties have not been completely investigated. This study was designed, therefore, to evaluate the SHEDs influence on DCs differentiation, maturation, ability to activate T cells and to expand CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experiments were based in cellular co-culture during differentiation and maturation of monocyte derived-DCs (moDCs, with, or not, presence of SHEDs. After co-culture with SHEDs, (moDCs presented lower expression of BDCA-1 and CD11c, in comparison to DC cultivated without SHEDs. CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 levels were also decreased in mature DCs (mDCs after co-cultivation with SHEDs. To assess the ability of SHEDs-exposed moDCs to modulate T cell responses, the former were separated from SHEDs, and co-cultured with peripheral blood lymphocytes. After 5 days, the proliferation of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells was evaluated and found to be lower than that induced by moDCs cultivated without SHEDs. In addition, an increase in the proportion of CD4(+Foxp3(+IL-10(+ T cells was observed among cells stimulated by mature moDCs that were previously cultivated with SHEDs. Soluble factors released during co-cultures also showed a reduction in the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ, and an increase in the anti-inflammatory molecule IL-10. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows that SHEDs induce an immune regulatory phenotype in moDCs cells, evidenced by changes in maturation and differentiation rates, inhibition of lymphocyte stimulation and ability to expand CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells. Further characterization and validation of this phenomenon could support the use of SHEDs

  15. Mature dendritic cells generated from patient-derived peripheral blood monocytes in one-step culture using streptococcal preparation OK-432 exert an enhanced antigen-presenting capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kei; Ueda, Yuji; Itoh, Tsuyoshi; Fuji, Nobuaki; Shimizu, Keiji; Yano, Yutaro; Yamamoto, Yoshiki; Imura, Kenichiro; Kohara, Junji; Iwamoto, Arihiro; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Tamai, Hidemasa; Shimizu, Takeshi; Mazda, Osam; Yamagishi, Hisakazu

    2006-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to be potent in inducing cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response leading to the efficient anti-tumor effect in active immunotherapy. Myeloid DCs are conventionally generated from human peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Streptococcal preparation OK-432, which is known to be a multiple cytokine inducer, has been extensively studied as to its maturation effects on immature DCs using an in vitro culture system. The purpose of this study was to examine whether it could be possible to generate mature DCs directly from peripheral monocytes using OK-432. We specifically focused on the possibility that recombinant cytokines, which are considered to be essential for in vitro DC generation, could be substituted by OK-432. Human peripheral monocytes, which were obtained from patients with advanced cancer, were cultured with IL-4 and OK-432 for 7 days. Cultured cells were compared with DCs generated in the presence of IL-4 and GM-CSF with or without OK-432 with regard to the surface phenotype as well as the antigen-presenting capacity. As a result, the culture of monocytes in the presence of IL-4 followed by the addition of OK-432 on day 4 (IL-4/OK-DC) induced cells with a fully mature DC phenotype. Functional assays also demonstrated that IL-4/OK-DCs had a strong antigen-presenting capacity determined by their enhanced antigen-specific CTL response and exerted a Th1-type T cell response which is critical for the induction of anti-tumor response. In conclusion, human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in the presence of IL-4 and OK-432 without exogenous GM-CSF demonstrated a fully mature DC phenotype and strong antigen-presenting capacity. This one-step culture protocol allows us to generate fully mature DCs directly from monocytes in 7 days and thus, this protocol can be applicable for DC-based anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  16. A unique anti-CD115 monoclonal antibody which inhibits osteolysis and skews human monocyte differentiation from M2-polarized macrophages toward dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegel, Hélène; Thioudellet, Christine; Hallet, Rémy; Geist, Michel; Menguy, Thierry; Le Pogam, Fabrice; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Toh, Myew-Ling; Duong, Vanessa; Calcei, Alexandre; Settelen, Nathalie; Preville, Xavier; Hennequi, Marie; Grellier, Benoit; Ancian, Philippe; Rissanen, Jukka; Clayette, Pascal; Guillen, Christine; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Cancer progression has been associated with the presence of tumor-associated M2-macrophages (M2-TAMs) able to inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. It is also often associated with metastasis-induced bone destruction mediated by osteoclasts. Both cell types are controlled by the CD115 (CSF-1R)/colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1, M-CSF) pathway, making CD115 a promising target for cancer therapy. Anti-human CD115 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that inhibit the receptor function have been generated in a number of laboratories. These mAbs compete with CSF-1 binding to CD115, dramatically affecting monocyte survival and preventing osteoclast and macrophage differentiation, but they also block CD115/CSF-1 internalization and degradation, which could lead to potent rebound CSF-1 effects in patients after mAb treatment has ended. We thus generated and selected a non-ligand competitive anti-CD115 mAb that exerts only partial inhibitory effects on CD115 signaling without blocking the internalization or the degradation of the CD115/CSF-1 complex. This mAb, H27K15, affects monocyte survival only minimally, but downregulates osteoclast differentiation and activity. Importantly, it inhibits monocyte differentiation to CD163(+)CD64(+) M2-polarized suppressor macrophages, skewing their differentiation toward CD14(-)CD1a(+) dendritic cells (DCs). In line with this observation, H27K15 also drastically inhibits monocyte chemotactic protein-1 secretion and reduces interleukin-6 production; these two molecules are known to be involved in M2-macrophage recruitment. Thus, the non-depleting mAb H27K15 is a promising anti-tumor candidate, able to inhibit osteoclast differentiation, likely decreasing metastasis-induced osteolysis, and able to prevent M2 polarization of TAMs while inducing DCs, hence contributing to the creation of more efficient anti-tumor immune responses.

  17. Induction of Th17 Lymphocytes and Treg Cells by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Hernández-Castro, Berenice; Monsiváis-Urenda, Adriana; Alvarez-Quiroga, Crisol; Layseca-Espinosa, Esther; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Baranda, Lourdes; Urzainqui, Ana; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have a key role in the regulation of immune response. We herein explored, in patients with inflammatory diseases, the role of monocyte derived DC's (mo-DCs) on the generation of Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Peripheral blood was obtained from thirty-five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), twelve with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and twenty healthy subjects. Mo-DCs were generated under standard (IL-4/GM-CSF) or tolerogenic (IL-4/GM-CSF plus recombinant P-selectin or PD-1 or IL-10) conditions, and their ability to induce Th17 and Treg lymphocytes was tested. We detected that mo-DCs from patients with RA showed an enhanced release of IL-6 and IL-23 as well as an increased capability to induce Th17 cells. Although mo-DCs from SLE patients also released high levels of IL-6/IL-23, it did not show an increased ability to induce Th17 lymphocytes. In addition, mo-DCs, from patients with RA and SLE generated under the engagement of PSGL-1, showed a defective capability to induce Foxp3+ Treg cells. A similar phenomenon was observed in SLE, when DC's cells were generated under PDL-1 engagement. Our data indicate that DCs from patients with rheumatic inflammatory disease show an aberrant function that may have an important role in the pathogenesis of these conditions. PMID:24288552

  18. Induction of Th17 Lymphocytes and Treg Cells by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth Estrada-Capetillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs have a key role in the regulation of immune response. We herein explored, in patients with inflammatory diseases, the role of monocyte derived DC’s (mo-DCs on the generation of Th17 and T regulatory (Treg lymphocytes. Peripheral blood was obtained from thirty-five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, twelve with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and twenty healthy subjects. Mo-DCs were generated under standard (IL-4/GM-CSF or tolerogenic (IL-4/GM-CSF plus recombinant P-selectin or PD-1 or IL-10 conditions, and their ability to induce Th17 and Treg lymphocytes was tested. We detected that mo-DCs from patients with RA showed an enhanced release of IL-6 and IL-23 as well as an increased capability to induce Th17 cells. Although mo-DCs from SLE patients also released high levels of IL-6/IL-23, it did not show an increased ability to induce Th17 lymphocytes. In addition, mo-DCs, from patients with RA and SLE generated under the engagement of PSGL-1, showed a defective capability to induce Foxp3+ Treg cells. A similar phenomenon was observed in SLE, when DC’s cells were generated under PDL-1 engagement. Our data indicate that DCs from patients with rheumatic inflammatory disease show an aberrant function that may have an important role in the pathogenesis of these conditions.

  19. Treatment with dexamethasone and monophosphoryl lipid A removes disease-associated transcriptional signatures in monocyte-derived dendritic cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients and confers tolerogenic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Andrea García-González

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDCs are promising tools for therapy of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Here we characterise monocyte-derived TolDCs from RA patients modulated with dexamethasone and activated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA, referred to as MPLA-tDCs, in terms of gene expression, phenotype, cytokine profile, migratory properties and T cell-stimulatory capacity, in order to explore their suitability for cellular therapy. MPLA-tDCs derived from RA patients displayed an anti-inflammatory profile with reduced expression of costimulatory molecules and high IL-10/IL-12 ratio, but were capable of migrating towards the lymphoid chemokines CXCL12 and CCL19. These MPLA-tDCs induced hyporesponsiveness of autologous CD4+ T cells specific for synovial antigens in vitro. Global transcriptome analysis confirmed a unique transcriptional profile of MPLA-tDCs and revealed that RA-associated genes, which were upregulated in untreated DCs from RA patients, returned to expression levels of healthy donor-derived DCs after treatment with dexamethasone and MPLA. Thus, monocyte-derived DCs from RA patients have the capacity to develop tolerogenic features at transcriptional as well as at translational level, when modulated with dexamethasone and MPLA, overcoming disease-related effects. Furthermore, the ability of MPLA-tDCs to impair T cell responses to synovial antigens validates their potential as cellular treatment for RA.

  20. Lentiviral-mediated gene delivery in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells: optimized design and procedures for highly efficient transduction compatible with clinical constraints.

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    Rouas, Redouane; Uch, Rathviro; Cleuter, Yvette; Jordier, François; Bagnis, Claude; Mannoni, Patrice; Lewalle, Philippe; Martiat, Philippe; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2002-09-01

    Gene delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) could represent a powerful method of inducing potent, long-lasting immunity. Although recent studies underline the intense interest in lentiviral vector-mediated monocyte-derived DC transduction, efficient gene transfer methods currently require high multiplicities of infection and are not compatible with clinical constraints. We have designed a strategy to optimize the efficiency and clinical relevance of this approach. Initially, using a third generation lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that modifying the vector design, the DC precursor cell type, and the DC differentiation stage for transduction results in sustained transgene expression in 75-85% of immature DCs (transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 8). This high efficiency was reproducible among different donors irrespective of whether DCs were expanded from fresh or cryopreserved CD14(+) precursors. We then developed procedures that bypass the need for highly concentrated lentiviral preparations and the addition of polybrene to achieve efficient transduction. DCs transduced under these conditions retain their immature phenotype and immunostimulatory potential in both autologous and allogeneic settings. Furthermore, genetically modified DCs maintain their ability to respond to maturation signals and secrete bioactive IL-12, indicating that they are fully functional. Finally, the level of transgene expression is preserved in the therapeutically relevant mature DCs, demonstrating that there is neither promoter-silencing nor loss of transduced cells during maturation. The novel approach described should advance lentiviral-mediated monocyte-derived DC transduction towards a clinical reality.

  1. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells enhance cell proliferation and porcine circovirus type 2 replication in concanavalin A-stimulated swine peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro.

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    Lin, Chun-Ming; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Hsiao, Shih-Hsuan; Lee, Yao; Tsai, Yi-Chieh; Chia, Mi-Yuan; Pang, Victor Fei

    2012-01-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells cooperating with other immune cells for the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The objective of the present study was to investigate the replication activity of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in DCs and/or lymphocytes during their cross talk and its possible mechanism. Two models were set, herein. Swine blood monocyte (Mo)-derived DCs (MoDCs) or peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were inoculated with PCV2 prior to their co-cultivation. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and concanavalin A (Con A) were used to stimulate MoDCs and PBLs, respectively. During 6 days of cultivation, a high PCV2 antigen-containing rate without detectable intranuclear signals and a slight but significant increase in the copy number of PCV2 genome were detected in PCV2-inoculated MoDCs. The presence of LPS alone or PCV2-free PBLs, however, had no effect on the location of PCV2 antigens or copy number of PCV2 genome in PCV2-inoculated MoDCs. On the contrary, active PCV2 replication occurred in Con A-stimulated PCV2-inoculated PBLs. When compared with blood Mos, MoDCs induced significantly higher cell proliferation and intensified PCV2 replication in Con A-stimulated PCV2-inoculated PBLs, for which direct contact between MoDCs and lymphocytes was required. Among the cytokines secreted by Con A-activated PBLs, interleukin (IL)-2, but not IL-4 or interferon-γ, could induce cell proliferation and PCV2 replication in PCV2-inoculated PBLs. The findings suggest that although MoDCs support only limited PCV2 replication in themselves, their accessory cell function is required for cell proliferation and PCV2 replication in PCV2-infected lymphocytes.

  2. Downregulation of long noncoding RNA HOTAIRM1 promotes monocyte/dendritic cell differentiation through competitively binding to endogenous miR-3960

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jiaxuan; Li, Jing; Feng, Yue; Wang, Liyang; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Rongcun

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation is controlled by a multilayered regulatory circuitry consisting of various elements, including histone modifications, transcription factors, and posttranscriptional regulators such as miRNAs, long noncoding RNAs, and circular RNAs. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this biological process remains unclear. In this study, through epigenetic profiling analysis using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), we identified an lncRNA, HOTAIRM1, with a critical role in myeloid development. Further ChIP-chip analysis showed obvious H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 histone modification peak changes in the promoter region of HOTAIRM1 during the process of monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation. In line with this observation, HOTAIRM1 RNA expression was downregulated when monocytes differentiated into DCs. Moreover, we found that HOTAIRM1 RNA was regulated by epigenetic factors such as RBBP4 and RBBP7. Mechanistically, we found that the silencing of HOTAIRM1 caused changes in the expression of several monocyte differentiation markers such as CD14 and B7H2. In addition, based on the “competing endogenous RNA” hypothesis, we discovered miR-3960 targeting both HOTAIRM1 and the DC differentiation repression gene, HOXA1, by most possibly constructing a potential competing endogenous RNA network. Increased miR-3960 expression could downregulate both of these two long RNAs and finally lead peripheral blood cells to differentiate into DCs. In summary, our study demonstrates that HOTAIRM1 competitively binds to miR-3960 and finally regulates the process of hematopoiesis, which reveals a novel regulatory mechanism of lncRNA function. PMID:28280365

  3. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells from leukoreduction system chambers after plateletpheresis are functional in an in vitro co-culture assay with intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscornia, Inés; Sánchez-Martins, Viviana; Hernández, Ana; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela

    2012-10-31

    The dendritic cells (DC) found in the intestine are involved both in the maintenance of tolerance towards commensal microbiota, and in the generation of protective immune responses against pathogens, thus contributing to gut immune homeostasis. There is an increasing interest in the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics; among their beneficial effects we highlight the modulation of the immune system which is one of their fundamental properties. As these effects are strain-dependent, it is important to have in vitro systems that include DC and intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), which are crucial for intestinal homeostasis, to identify candidates by means of bacterial screening. Obtaining enough human cells, necessary to simultaneously test several bacteria, is a major challenge for researchers. In this study we analyzed the usefulness of the cellular fraction retained in leukoreduction system chambers following plateletpheresis (PP) as a source of DC. We compared the capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from buffy coats (BC) or PP to generate DC using a short differentiation protocol. The functionality of the DC obtained was analyzed in co-cultures together with intestinal epithelial HT-29 cells, stimulating with LPS alone or with two LAB commonly used in the food industry, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. DC surface markers CD86, HLA-DR and cytokine production were measured. The behavior of DC derived from PP was similar to the behavior observed for DC derived from BC. When we tested the response of DC to bacteria, we found significant differences in cytokine secretion, especially for IL-10, suggesting that the system has the ability to discriminate LAB with different immunomodulatory properties. We also found that DC derived from both sources displayed a similar ability to phagocyte bacteria. In conclusion, we hereby propose a modification of the two-day protocol for obtaining human DC previously described, using

  4. Advanced glycation end products inhibit both infection and transmission in trans of HIV-1 from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells.

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    Nasreddine, Nadine; Borde, Chloé; Gozlan, Joël; Bélec, Laurent; Maréchal, Vincent; Hocini, Hakim

    2011-05-15

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with carbohydrate metabolic alterations that may lead to diabetes. One consequence of hyperglycemia is the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that are involved in diabetes complications. We investigated the impact of AGEs on the infection of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) by HIV-1 and the ability of MDDCs to transmit the virus to T cells. We showed that AGEs could inhibit infection of MDDCs with primary R5-tropic HIV-1(Ba-L) by up to 85 ± 9.2% and with primary X4-tropic HIV-1(VN44) by up to 60 ± 8.5%. This inhibitory effect of AGEs was not prevented by a neutralizing anti-receptor for advanced glycation end products (anti-RAGE) Ab, demonstrating a RAGE-independent mechanism. Moreover, AGEs inhibited by 70-80% the transmission in trans of the virus to CD4 T cells. Despite the inhibitory effect of AGEs on both MDDC infection and virus transmission in trans, no inhibition of virus attachment to cell membrane was observed, confirming that attachment and transmission of the virus involve independent mechanisms. The inhibitory effect of AGEs on infection was associated with a RAGE-independent downregulation of CD4 at the cell membrane and by a RAGE-dependent repression of the CXCR4 and CCR5 HIV-1 receptors. AGEs induce the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12, but not RANTES or MIP-1α, and did not lead to MDDC maturation as demonstrated by the lack of expression of the CD83 molecule. Taken together, our results suggest that AGEs can play an inhibiting role in HIV-1 infection in patients who accumulate circulating AGEs, including patients treated with protease inhibitors that developed diabetes.

  5. Evaluation of the sensitizing potential of antibiotics in vitro using the human cell lines THP-1 and MUTZ-LC and primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Katrin; Ott, Hagen; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele; Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens Malte

    2012-08-01

    Since the 7th amendment to the EU cosmetics directive foresees a complete ban on animal testing, alternative in vitro methods have been established to evaluate the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight compounds. To find out whether these novel in vitro assays are also capable to predict the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs, model compounds such as beta-lactams and sulfonamides - which are the most frequent cause of adverse drug reactions - were co-incubated with THP-1, MUTZ-LC, or primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells for 48 h and subsequent expression of selected marker genes (IL-8, IL-1β, CES1, NQO1, GCLM, PIR and TRIM16) was studied by real time PCR. Benzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were recognized as sensitizing compounds because they are capable to induce the mRNA expression of these genes in moDCs and, except for IL-8, in THP-1 cells but not in MUTZ-LC. Ampicillin stimulated the expression of some marker genes in moDCs and THP-1 cells. SMX did not affect the expression of these genes in THP-1, however, in moDCs, at least PIR was enhanced and there was an increase of the release of IL-8. These data reveal that novel in vitro DC based assays might play a role in the evaluation of the allergenic potential of novel drug compounds, but these systems seem to lack the ability to detect the sensitizing potential of prohaptens that require metabolic activation prior to sensitization and moDCs seem to be superior with regard to the sensitivity compared with THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cell lines.

  6. Broad antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against the four serotypes of dengue virus in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

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    Marijke M F Alen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC, present in the skin, are the first target cells of dengue virus (DENV. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN is present on DC and recognizes N-glycosylation sites on the E-glycoprotein of DENV. Thus, the DC-SIGN/E-glycoprotein interaction can be considered as an important target for inhibitors of viral replication. We evaluated various carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs against all four described serotypes of DENV replication in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in monocyte-derived DC (MDDC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dose-dependent anti-DENV activity of the CBAs Hippeastrum hybrid (HHA, Galanthus nivalis (GNA and Urtica dioica (UDA, but not actinohivin (AH was observed against all four DENV serotypes as analyzed by flow cytometry making use of anti-DENV antibodies. Remarkably, the potency of the CBAs against DENV in MDDC cultures was significantly higher (up to 100-fold than in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. Pradimicin-S (PRM-S, a small-size non-peptidic CBA, exerted antiviral activity in MDDC but not in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. The CBAs act at an early step of DENV infection as they bind to the viral envelope of DENV and subsequently prevent virus attachment. Only weak antiviral activity of the CBAs was detected when administered after the virus attachment step. The CBAs were also able to completely prevent the cellular activation and differentiation process of MDDC induced upon DENV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CBAs exerted broad spectrum antiviral activity against the four DENV serotypes, laboratory-adapted viruses and low passage clinical isolates, evaluated in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in primary MDDC.

  7. Cloning of two members of the SIRP alpha family of protein tyrosine phosphatase binding proteins in cattle that are expressed on monocytes and a subpopulation of dendritic cells and which mediate binding to CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, G P; Parsons, K R; Howard, C J

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have greatly clarified the function of cell surface molecules in the induction and modulation of T cell responses by antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, the differences in ability to stimulate T cells evident for different types and subpopulations of the same APC, such as dendritic cell subsets, is less well understood. This report details an investigation of an antigen expressed on monocytes that is also expressed on a subset of cattle afferent lymph veiled cells (ALVC). A cDNA library derived from cattle monocytes was screened with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for expression in COS-7 cells. Using separate mAb for screening, two cDNA were cloned, the sequences of which showed a single long open reading frame encoding a predicted type I glycoprotein of 506 amino acids that contained three immunoglobulin superfamily domains and a long 112-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. We have termed this antigen MyD-1, reflecting its myeloid and dendritic cell distribution. Analysis of the EMBL database revealed that the molecule is a member of the recently described family of signal regulatory proteins (SIRP). The outeremost Ig domain was of the adhesion/receptor I-type, suggesting that MyD-1 might bind to a ligand on another cell. Evidence for this was subsequently obtained by demonstrating that COS-7 cells transfected with MyD-1 cDNA bound CD4 T cells and this binding was blocked by specific mAb. The potential importance of this interaction was supported by the finding that the proliferation of resting memory CD4 T cells to ovalbumin-pulsed monocytes was significantly reduced in the presence of mAb to MyD-1. A role for the molecule in the modulation of the monocyte/dendritic APC response is also predicted from the existence of multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain, including the presence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and the observation that the SIRP alpha family members have been

  8. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells induce a house dust mite-specific Th2 allergic inflammation in the lung of humanized SCID mice: involvement of CCR7.

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    Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N; Pochard, Pierre; Gosset, Philippe; Marquillies, Philippe; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2002-08-01

    In rodents, airway dendritic cells (DCs) capture inhaled Ag, undergo maturation, and migrate to the draining mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) to initiate the Ag-specific T cell response. However, the role of human DCs in the pathogenesis of the Th2 cell-mediated disease asthma remains to be clarified. Here, by using SCID mice engrafted with T cells from either house dust mite (HDM)-allergic patients or healthy donors, we show that DCs pulsed with Der p 1, one of the major allergens of HDM, and injected intratracheally into naive animals migrated into the MLN. In the MLN, Der p 1-pulsed DCs from allergic patients induced the proliferation of IL-4-producing CD4(+) T cells, whereas those from healthy donors induced IFN-gamma-secreting cells. In reconstituted human PBMC-reconstituted SCID mice primed with pulsed DCs from allergic patients, repeated exposure to aerosols of HDM induced 1) a strong pulmonary inflammatory reaction rich in T cells and eosinophils, 2) an increase in IL-4 and IL-5 production in the lung lavage fluid, and 3) increased IgE production compared with that in mice primed with unpulsed DCs. All these effects were reduced following in vivo neutralization of the CCR7 ligand secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine. These data in human PBMC-reconstituted SCID mice show that monocyte-derived DCs might play a key role in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary allergic response by inducing Th2 effector function following migration to the MLN.

  9. Commonly used prophylactic vaccines as an alternative for synthetically produced TLR ligands to mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreibelt, Gerty; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Schuurhuis, Danita; Lambeck, Annechien J A; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike; Schaft, Niels; Punt, Cornelis J A; Figdor, Carl G; Adema, Gosse J; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2010-07-29

    Currently dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are explored in clinical trials, predominantly in cancer patients. Murine studies showed that only maturation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands generates mature DCs that produce interleukin-12 and promote optimal T-cell help. Unfortunately, the limited availability of clinical-grade TLR ligands significantly hampers the translation of these findings into DC-based vaccines. Therefore, we explored 15 commonly used preventive vaccines as a possible source of TLR ligands. We have identified a cocktail of the vaccines BCG-SSI, Influvac, and Typhim that contains TLR ligands and is capable of optimally maturing DCs. These DCs (vaccine DCs) showed high expression of CD80, CD86, and CD83 and secreted interleukin-12. Although vaccine DCs exhibited an impaired migratory capacity, this could be restored by addition of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2); vaccine PGE(2) DCs). Vaccine PGE(2) DCs are potent inducers of T-cell proliferation and induce Th1 polarization. In addition, vaccine PGE(2) DCs are potent inducers of tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) effector T cells. Finally, vaccine PGE(2)-induced DC maturation is compatible with different antigen-loading strategies, including RNA electroporation. These data thus identify a new clinical application for a mixture of commonly used preventive vaccines in the generation of Th1-inducing clinical-grade mature DCs.

  10. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from HLA-B27+ axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients display altered functional capacity and deregulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpin, Alice; Costantino, Félicie; Bonilla, Nelly; Leboime, Ariane; Letourneur, Franck; Jacques, Sébastien; Dumont, Florent; Amraoui, Sonia; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Breban, Maxime; Chiocchia, Gilles

    2014-08-21

    This study aimed to compare the functional capacity and gene expression profile of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs) in HLA-B27+ axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients and healthy controls. MD-DCs were differentiated with interleukin 4 (IL-4) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for seven days, starting from purified CD14+ monocytes and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for six and twenty four hours. Their capacity to stimulate allogeneic CD4+ T cells from unrelated healthy donor was tested. Transcriptomic study was performed with Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST microarrays. Gene expression levels were compared between patients and controls using a multivariate design under a linear model (LIMMA). Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed for validation of the most striking gene expression differences. The stimulatory capacity of allogeneic CD4+ T cells by MD-DCs from SpA patients was decreased. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 81 genes differentially expressed in MD-DCs between SpA patients and controls (P 1.5). Four selected genes were validated by q ADAMTS15, CITED2, F13A1 and SELL. Expression levels of ADAMTS15 and CITED2, encoding a metallopeptidase and a transcription factor, respectively, were inversely correlated with each other (R = 0.75, P = 0.0003). Furthermore, in silico analysis identified several genes of the Wnt signaling pathway having expression co-regulated with CITED2. This study revealed altered function and gene expression pattern in MD-DCs from HLA-B27+ axial SpA. Co-expression study showed an inverse correlation between ADAMTS15 and CITED2. Moreover, the Wnt signaling pathway appeared as deregulated in SpA MD-DCs, a finding which may be connected to Th17-driven inflammatory responses.

  11. Bole of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the differentiation and expansion of monocytes and dendritic cells from CD34(+) progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, AWA; Smit, JW; Vellenga, E

    1999-01-01

    The present study focused on whether it is possible to expand monocytic cells from CD34(+) progenitor cells by using macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the absence and presence of mast cell growth factor (MGF) and IL-6. It was demonstrated that CD34(+) cells differentiate without expans

  12. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Kalijn F; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Pots, Jeanette M; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; de Boer, Annemiek J; van Oorschot, Tom G M; Croockewit, Sandra A J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Mus, Roel D M; van Rossum, Michelle M; van der Graaf, Chantal A A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Adema, Gosse J; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combined intradermal/intravenous injection (16 patients) with VAC-DC loaded with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mRNA encoding tumor antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Tumor antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored in blood and skin-test infiltrating-lymphocyte cultures. Almost all patients mounted prophylactic vaccine- or KLH-specific immune responses. Both after intranodal injection and after intradermal/intravenous injection, tumor antigen-specific immune responses were detected, which coincide with longer overall survival in stage IV melanoma patients. VAC-DC induce local and systemic CTC grade 2 and 3 toxicity, which is most likely caused by BCG in the maturation cocktail. The side effects were self-limiting or resolved upon a short period of systemic steroid therapy. We conclude that VAC-DC can induce functional tumor-specific responses. Unfortunately, toxicity observed after vaccination precludes the general application of VAC-DC, since in DC maturated with prophylactic vaccines BCG appears to be essential in the maturation cocktail.

  13. Potentially probiotic bacteria induce efficient maturation but differential cytokine production in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sinikka Latvala; Taija E Pietil(a); Ville Veckman; Riina A Kekkonen; Soile Tynkkynen; Riitta Korpela; Ilkka Julkunen

    2008-01-01

    MM: To analyze the ability of nine different potentially probiotic bacteria to induce maturation and cytokine production in human monocyLe-derived dendritic cells (moDCs).METHODS: Cytokine production and maturation of moDCs in response to bacterial stimulation was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometric analysis (FACS),respectively.The kinetics of mRNA expression of cytokine genes was determined by Northern blotting.The involvement of different signaling pathways in cytokine gene expression was studied using specific pharmacological signaling inhibitors.RESULTS: All studied bacteria induced the maturation of moDCs in a dose-dependent manner.More detailed analysis with S.thermophilus THS,B.breve Bb99,and L.lactis subsp,cremoris ARH74 indicated that these bacteria induced the expression of moDC maturation markers HLA class II and CD86 as efficiently as pathogenic bacteria.However,these bacteria differed in their ability to induce moDC cytokine gene expression.S.therrnophilus induced the expression of pro-inflammatory (TNF-a,IL-12,IL-6,and CCL20)and Th1 type (IL-12 and IFN-y) cytokines,while B.breve and L.lactis were also potent inducers of antiinflammatory IL-10.Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38,phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase,and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways were shown to be involved in bacteria-induced cytokine production.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that potentially probiotic bacteria are able to induce moDC maturation,but their ability to induce cytokine gene expression varies significantly from one bacterial strain to another.

  14. Engineering monocyte-derived dendritic cells to secrete interferon-α enhances their ability to promote adaptive and innate anti-tumor immune effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemen, Yannick; Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Lion, Eva; Anguille, Sébastien; Roelandts, Vicky A E; Van Acker, Heleen H; Heynderickx, Steven D I; Stein, Barbara M H; Peeters, Marc; Figdor, Carl G; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; de Vries, I Jolanda; Adema, Gosse J; Berneman, Zwi N; Smits, Evelien L J

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination has demonstrated potential in clinical trials as a new effective cancer treatment, but objective and durable clinical responses are confined to a minority of patients. Interferon (IFN)-α, a type-I IFN, can bolster anti-tumor immunity by restoring or increasing the function of DCs, T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. Moreover, type-I IFN signaling on DCs was found to be essential in mice for tumor rejection by the innate and adaptive immune system. Targeted delivery of IFN-α by DCs to immune cells could boost the generation of anti-tumor immunity, while avoiding the side effects frequently associated with systemic administration. Naturally circulating plasmacytoid DCs, major producers of type-I IFN, were already shown capable of inducing tumor antigen-specific T cell responses in cancer patients without severe toxicity, but their limited number complicates their use in cancer vaccination. In the present work, we hypothesized that engineering easily generated human monocyte-derived mature DCs to secrete IFN-α using mRNA electroporation enhances their ability to promote adaptive and innate anti-tumor immunity. Our results show that IFN-α mRNA electroporation of DCs significantly increases the stimulation of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell as well as anti-tumor NK cell effector functions in vitro through high levels of IFN-α secretion. Altogether, our findings mark IFN-α mRNA-electroporated DCs as potent inducers of both adaptive and innate anti-tumor immunity and pave the way for clinical trial evaluation in cancer patients.

  15. Different Transcriptional Profiles of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Infected with Distinct Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzia Sanarico

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze dendritic cells (DCs activation following infection with different mycobacterial strains, we studied the expression profiles of 165 genes of human monocyte-derived DCs infected with H37Rv, a virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB laboratory strain, CMT97, a clinical MTB isolate, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG, Aventis Pasteur, and BCG Japan, both employed as vaccine against tuberculosis. The analysis of the gene expression reveals that, despite a set of genes similarly modulated, DCs response resulted strain dependent. In particular, H37Rv significantly upregulated EBI3 expression compared with BCG Japan, while it was the only strain that failed to release a significant IL-10 amount. Of note, BCG Japan showed a marked increase in CCR7 and TNF-α expression regarding both MTB strains and it resulted the only strain failing in exponential intracellular growth. Our results suggest that DCs display the ability to elicit a tailored strain-specific immune response.

  16. A novel method to generate monocyte-derived dendritic cells during coculture with HaCaT facilitates detection of weak contact allergens in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frombach, Janna; Sonnenburg, Anna; Krapohl, Björn-Dirk; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf; Schreiner, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    The in vitro sensitization assay LCSA (Loose-fit Coculture-based Sensitization Assay) has proved reliable for the detection of contact sensitizers in the past. However, the coculture of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) with primary human keratinocytes (KCs) in serum-free medium is relatively complex compared to other sensitization assays which use continuous cell lines. To facilitate high-throughput screening of chemicals, we replaced KCs with the HaCaT cell line under various culture conditions. Coculture of HaCaT with peripheral blood mononuclear cells in serum-supplemented medium leads to generation of CD1a(+)/CD1c(+) DCs after addition of GM-CSF, IL-4, and TGF-β1 (as opposed to CD1a(-)/CD1c(-) DCs which arise in the "classic" LCSA coculture). These cells resemble monocyte-derived DCs generated in monoculture, but, unlike those, they show a marked upregulation CD86 after treatment with contact allergens. All of the nine sensitizers in this study were correctly identified by CD1a(+)/CD1c(+) DCs in coculture with HaCaT. Among the substances were weak contact allergens such as propylparaben (which is false negative in the local lymph node assay in mice) and resorcinol (which was not detected by CD1a(-)/CD1c(-) DCs in the "classic" LCSA). The level of CD86 upregulation on CD1a(+)/CD1c(+) DCs was higher for most allergens compared to CD1a(-)/CD1c(-) DCs, thus improving the assay's discriminatory power. Three out of four non-sensitizers were also correctly assessed by the coculture assay. A false-positive reaction to caprylic (octanoic) acid confirms earlier results that some fatty acids are able to induce CD86 on DC in vitro. In conclusion, change of the LCSA protocol led to reduction of time and cost while even increasing the assay's sensitivity and discriminatory power.

  17. Th2 polarization by Der p 1--pulsed monocyte-derived dendritic cells is due to the allergic status of the donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, H; Charbonnier, A S; Duez, C; Jacquet, A; Stewart, G A; Tonnel, A B; Pestel, J

    2001-08-15

    The polarization of the immune response toward a Th2 or a Th1 profile can be mediated by dendritic cells (DCs) following antigen presentation and interaction with T cells. Costimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86 expressed by DCs, the polarizing cytokine environment during DC--T-cell interaction, and also the nature of the antigen are critical in the orientation of the immune response. In this study, the effect of the cysteine protease Der p 1, one of the major allergens of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, on these different parameters was evaluated comparatively on monocyte-derived DCs obtained from healthy donors, from pollen-sensitive patients, or from patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Results showed that Der p 1 induced an increase in CD86 expression only on DCs from house dust mite--sensitive patients. This was also associated with a higher capacity to induce T-cell proliferation, a rapid increase in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor--alpha and interleukin (IL)-1 beta, and the type 2 cytokine IL-10. No changes in the release of IL-12 p70 were induced by Der p 1. Finally, purified T cells from house dust mite-sensitive patients stimulated by autologous Der p 1--pulsed DCs preferentially produced IL-4 rather than interferon-gamma. These effects were abolished in the presence of the inactive precursor of Der p 1 (ProDer p 1). Taken together, these data suggest that DCs from house dust mite--sensitive patients, in contrast to DCs from healthy donors and from pollen-sensitive patients, exposed to Der p 1 play a pivotal role in the enhancement of the Th2 response associated with the allergic reaction developed in response to house dust mite exposure. (Blood. 2001;98:1135-1141)

  18. Differential intracellular fate of Burkholderia pseudomallei 844 and Burkholderia thailandensis UE5 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engering Anneke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp is a category B biothreat organism that causes a potentially fatal disease in humans and animals, namely melioidosis. Burkholderia thailandensis (Bt is another naturally occurring species that is very closely related to Bp. However, despite this closely related genotype, Bt is considered avirulent as it does not cause the disease. In the present study, we compared the growth kinetics of B. pseudomallei strain 844 (Bp-844 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs and macrophages (Mφs, as well as its ability to stimulate host cell responses with those of B. thailandensis strain UE5 (Bt-UE5. Results Primary human MoDCs and Mφs were infected with Bp-844 and its intracellular growth kinetics and ability to induce host cell responses were evaluated. The results were compared with those obtained using the Bt-UE5. In human MoDCs, both bacteria were similar in respect to their ability to survive and replicate intracellularly, induce upregulation of costimulatory molecules and cytokines and bias T helper cell differentiation toward a Th1 phenotype. By contrast, the two bacteria exhibited different growth kinetics in human Mφs, where the intracellular growth of Bt-UE5, but not Bp-844, was significantly suppressed. Moreover, the ability of Mφs to kill Bp-844 was markedly enhanced following stimulation with IFN-γ. Conclusion The data presented showed that while both strains were similar in their ability to survive and replicate in human MoDCs, only Bp-844 could readily replicate in human Mφs. Both bacteria induced similar host cellular responses, particularly with regard to their ability to bias T cell differentiation toward a Th1 phenotype.

  19. Interleukin-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived dendritic cells via a type I interferon-independent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    Full Text Available IL-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, plays an important and diverse role in the function of the immune system. Whilst generally recognized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in addition IL-27 has been found to have broad anti-viral effects. Recently, IL-27 has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The main objective of this study was to see whether IL-27 has a similar inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs. Monocytes were differentiated into immature DCs (iDCs and mature DCs (mDCs with standard techniques using a combination of GM-CSF, IL-4 and LPS. Following differentiation, iDCs were infected with HIV-1 and co-cultured in the presence or absence of IL-27. IL-27 treated DCs were shown to be highly potent inhibitors of cis HIV-1, particularly of CCR5 tropic strains. Of note, other IL-12 family members (IL-12, IL-23 and IL-35 had no effect on HIV-1 replication. Microarray studies of IL-27 treated DCs showed no up-regulation of Type I (IFN gene expression. Neutralization of the Type-I IFN receptor had no impact on the HIV inhibition. Lastly, IL-27 mediated inhibition was shown to act post-viral entry and prior to completion of reverse transcription. These results show for the first time that IL-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 infection in DCs by a Type I IFN independent mechanism. IL-27 has previously been reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells and macrophages, thus taken together, this cytokine is a potent anti-HIV agent against all major cell types targeted by the HIV-1 virus and may have a therapeutic role in the future.

  20. The MacBlue binary transgene (csf1r-gal4VP16/UAS-ECFP provides a novel marker for visualisation of subsets of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells and responsiveness to CSF1 administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A Sauter

    Full Text Available The MacBlue transgenic mouse uses the Csf1r promoter and first intron to drive expression of gal4-VP16, which in turn drives a cointegrated gal4-responsive UAS-ECFP cassette. The Csf1r promoter region used contains a deletion of a 150 bp conserved region covering trophoblast and osteoclast-specific transcription start sites. In this study, we examined expression of the transgene in embryos and adult mice. In embryos, ECFP was expressed in the large majority of macrophages derived from the yolk sac, and as the liver became a major site of monocytopoiesis. In adults, ECFP was detected at high levels in both Ly6C+ and Ly6C- monocytes and distinguished them from Ly6C+, F4/80+, CSF1R+ immature myeloid cells in peripheral blood. ECFP was also detected in the large majority of microglia and Langerhans cells. However, expression was lost from the majority of tissue macrophages, including Kupffer cells in the liver and F4/80+ macrophages of the lung, kidney, spleen and intestine. The small numbers of positive cells isolated from the liver resembled blood monocytes. In the gut, ECFP+ cells were identified primarily as classical dendritic cells or blood monocytes in disaggregated cell preparations. Immunohistochemistry showed large numbers of ECFP+ cells in the Peyer's patch and isolated lymphoid follicles. The MacBlue transgene was used to investigate the effect of treatment with CSF1-Fc, a form of the growth factor with longer half-life and efficacy. CSF1-Fc massively expanded both the immature myeloid cell (ECFP- and Ly6C+ monocyte populations, but had a smaller effect on Ly6C- monocytes. There were proportional increases in ECFP+ cells detected in lung and liver, consistent with monocyte infiltration, but no generation of ECFP+ Kupffer cells. In the gut, there was selective infiltration of large numbers of cells into the lamina propria and Peyer's patches. We discuss the use of the MacBlue transgene as a marker of monocyte/macrophage/dendritic cell

  1. Identification of genes differentially expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 using cDNA arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈倩云; 郑树森

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells,experiments were performed using Atlas cDNA expression arrays from Clonetech to identify the differentially expressed genes of dendritic cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Analysis ofcDNA arrays revealed changes in the expression of 9 genes,including those involved in DNA binding and transcription, extracellular cell signaling and communication, intracellular transducers, as well as cell adhesions. The results indicated that a multiple molecular network is involved in the inhibitory role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells. The Atlas Array technology may facilitate the elucidation of complex pharmacological process of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on dendritic cells.

  2. Impairment of in vitro generation of monocyte-derived human dendritic cells by inactivated human immunodeficiency virus-1: Involvement of type I interferon produced from plasmacytoid dendritc cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Akira; Tanaka, Reiko; Zhang, Li Feng; Adachi, Tetsuya; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2010-06-01

    In an attempt to simplify the protocol of DC generation in vitro, studies conducted herein show that functional DCs could be generated from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in media containing GM-CSF and IL-4. Interestingly, when PBMCs, but not purified monocytes, were exposed to either CCR5- or CXCR4-tropic inactivated HIV-1 isolates (iHIV-1) at the initiation of the culture, DC yields were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner because of monocyte apoptosis. Similar impairment of DC generation was noted using type I IFNs and poly IC not only in cultures of PBMCs but also using highly enriched monocytes. This effect was reversed by antihuman type I IFN receptor, but not by anti-FasL, anti-TRAIL, anti-TNF, or a mixture of these antibodies. iHIV-1-exposed PBMCs, but not monocytes, produced high levels of IFN-alpha but not IFN-beta. PBMCs depleted of CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs produced low levels of IFN-alpha and were resistant to iHIV-1-mediated DC impairment. Interestingly, exogenously added TNF reversed the impairment by iHIV-1 in the PBMC cultures. In conclusion, the present results indicate that iHIV-1 impairs the in vitro generation of functional DCs from PBMCs through the induction of IFN-alpha from plasmacytoid DCs in a CD4-dependent fashion in the absence of TNF.

  3. Histamine Regulates Actin Cytoskeleton in Human Toll-like Receptor 4-activated Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells Tuning CD4+ T Lymphocyte Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Manuelli, Cinzia; Nosi, Daniele; Masini, Emanuela; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Ballerini, Clara

    2016-07-08

    Histamine, a major mediator in allergic diseases, differentially regulates the polarizing ability of dendritic cells after Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation, by not completely explained mechanisms. In this study we investigated the effects of histamine on innate immune reaction during the response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs) to different TLR stimuli: LPS, specific for TLR4, and Pam3Cys, specific for heterodimer molecule TLR1/TLR2. We investigated actin remodeling induced by histamine together with mDCs phenotype, cytokine production, and the stimulatory and polarizing ability of Th0. By confocal microscopy and RT-PCR expression of Rac1/CdC42 Rho GTPases, responsible for actin remodeling, we show that histamine selectively modifies actin cytoskeleton organization induced by TLR4, but not TLR2 and this correlates with increased IL4 production and decreased IFNγ by primed T cells. We also demonstrate that histamine-induced cytoskeleton organization is at least in part mediated by down-regulation of small Rho GTPase CdC42 and the protein target PAK1, but not by down-regulation of Rac1. The presence and relative expression of histamine receptors HR1-4 and TLRs were determined as well. Independently of actin remodeling, histamine down-regulates IL12p70 and CXCL10 production in mDCs after TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation. We also observed a trend of IL10 up-regulation that, despite previous reports, did not reach statistical significance.

  4. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2006-01-01

    CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important for interna......CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important...... for internalization of CD91-targeted antigens to be presented on the dendritic cell surface for T-cell stimulation. Despite their overlap in functionality, the expression of CD91 and CD163 has never been compared and the expression of CD163 in the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage is not yet characterized. CD163...

  5. Low CCR7-mediated migration of human monocyte derived dendritic cells in response to human respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV and, to a lesser extent, human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, can re-infect symptomatically throughout life without significant antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete or short-lived immunity. In contrast, re-infection by influenza A virus (IAV largely depends on antigenic change, suggestive of more complete immunity. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DC is critical in initiating the adaptive immune response. Antigen uptake by DC induces maturational changes that include decreased expression of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 that maintain DC residence in peripheral tissues, and increased expression of CCR7 that mediates the migration of antigen-bearing DC to lymphatic tissue. We stimulated human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC with virus and found that, in contrast to HPIV3 and IAV, HMPV and HRSV did not efficiently decrease CCR1, 2, and 5 expression, and did not efficiently increase CCR7 expression. Consistent with the differences in CCR7 mRNA and protein expression, MDDC stimulated with HRSV or HMPV migrated less efficiently to the CCR7 ligand CCL19 than did IAV-stimulated MDDC. Using GFP-expressing recombinant virus, we showed that the subpopulation of MDDC that was robustly infected with HRSV was particularly inefficient in chemokine receptor modulation. HMPV- or HRSV-stimulated MDDC responded to secondary stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide or with a cocktail of proinflammatory cytokines by increasing CCR7 and decreasing CCR1, 2 and 5 expression, and by more efficient migration to CCL19, suggesting that HMPV and HRSV suboptimally stimulate rather than irreversibly inhibit MDDC migration. This also suggests that the low concentration of proinflammatory cytokines released from HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated MDDC is partly responsible for the low CCR7-mediated migration. We propose that inefficient migration of HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated DC to

  6. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells from leukoreduction system chambers after plateletpheresis are functional in an in vitro co-culture assay with intestinal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Tiscornia, Inés; Sánchez-Martins, Viviana; Hernández, Ana; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The dendritic cells (DC) found in the intestine are involved both in the maintenance of tolerance towards commensal microbiota, and in the generation of protective immune responses against pathogens, thus contributing to gut immune homeostasis. There is an increasing interest in the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics; among their beneficial effects we highlight the modulation of the immune system which is one of their fundamental properties. As these effec...

  7. Dendritic cells and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2007-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a biological response to simple chemicals in the skin. Although it is well known that allergic contact dermatitis is mediated by the immune system, it is still uncertain whether it is a kind of protective response or it is simply an unnecessary response. We have demonstrated the following: (1) haptens activate Langerhans cells in the initiation phase of murine allergic contact dermatitis in vivo, (2) haptens activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, (3) the activation of dendritic cells by haptens is primarily mediated by the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and (4) the activation of p38 MAPK is mediated by stimulation related to an imbalance of intracellular redox. Based on these observations, we will discuss the biological significance of contact dermatitis. In addition, we will review some up-to-date findings on Langerhans cell biology.

  8. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  9. Increased immunopotency of monocyte derived dendritic cells from patients with optic neuritis is inhibited in vitro by simvastatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakiri, Anna; Tsiantoulas, Dimitris; Frederiksen, Jette;

    2010-01-01

    properties of simvastatin influence the function of both T cells and APCs and could thus be a potential therapy for MS. The phenotype of myeloid DC in untreated patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) was determined by flow cytometry and the impact of simvastatin on the function of myeloid DC...

  10. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  11. Engineering monocyte-derived dendritic cells to secrete interferon-alpha enhances their ability to promote adaptive and innate anti-tumor immune effector functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemen, Y.; Bergh, J.M. Van den; Lion, E.; Anguille, S.; Roelandts, V.A.; Acker, H.H. Van; Heynderickx, S.D.; Stein, B.M.; Peeters, M.; Figdor, C.G.; Tendeloo, V.F. Van; Vries, I.J.M. de; Adema, G.J.; Berneman, Z.N.; Smits, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination has demonstrated potential in clinical trials as a new effective cancer treatment, but objective and durable clinical responses are confined to a minority of patients. Interferon (IFN)-alpha, a type-I IFN, can bolster anti-tumor immunity by restoring or increasing the

  12. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit IL-10 production and T cell regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Golebiowska, Angelika; Trumpfheller, Christine; Siegal, Frederick P.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation during virus infection and thereby become potent stimulators of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 replicates in immature DCs, but we now find that infection is not accompanied by many components of maturation in either infected cells or uninfected bystanders. The infected cultures do not develop potent stimulating activity for the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), and the DCs producing HIV-1 gag p24 do not express CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein maturation markers. If different maturation stimuli are applied to DCs infected with HIV-1, the infected cells selectively fail to mature. When DCs from HIV-1-infected patients are infected and cultured with autologous T cells, IL-10 was produced in 6 of 10 patients. These DC-T cell cocultures could suppress another immune response, the MLR. The regulation was partially IL-10-dependent and correlated in extent with the level of IL-10 produced. Suppressor cells only developed from infected patients, rather than healthy controls, and the DCs had to be exposed to live virus rather than HIV-1 gag peptides or protein. These results indicate that HIV-1-infected DCs have two previously unrecognized means to evade immune responses: maturation can be blocked reducing the efficacy of antigen presentation from infected cells, and T cell-dependent suppression can be induced.

  13. Comparison of monocyte-derived dendritic cells from colorectal cancer patients, non-small-cell-lung-cancer patients and healthy donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bechmann, C M; Pedersen, A W;

    2009-01-01

    7, and the optimal expression pattern is considered as CD14(low), CD1a, CD83(high), CD86(high), MHC class II(high) and CCR7(high). In accordance with data from other studies including other types of cancer patients, especially breast cancer patients, we found that the maturation status of the DC...... blood monocytes loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysate rich in cancer/testis antigens. This vaccine has at present been tested for activity in three phase II clinical trials including two cohorts of patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) and one cohort of patients with advanced non...... were analyzed by flow cytometry and the obtained data were used as a basis to set guideline values for our quality control of GMP produced DC vaccines. Each vaccine batch was analyzed for the expression of the surface maturation and differentiation molecules CD14, CD1a, CD83, CD86, MHC class II and CCR...

  14. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  15. Effect of in vitro digested cod liver oil of different quality on oxidative, proteomic and inflammatory responses in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Karin; Istenič, Katja; Wulff, Tune

    2015-01-01

    digested fresh and oxidised cod liver oils in vitro, monitored the levels of lipid peroxidation products and evaluated oxidative, proteomic and inflammatory responses to the two types of digests in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. RESULTS: Digests of cod liver......BACKGROUND: Upon oxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil, either before ingestion or, as recently shown, during the gastro-intestinal passage, a cascade of potentially cytotoxic peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, can form. In this study, we...... oil with 22–53 µmol L−1 malondialdehyde and 0.26–3.7 µmol L−1 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal increased intracellular oxidation and cell energy metabolic activity compared to a digested blank in yeast cells and the influence of digests on mitochondrial protein expression was more pronounced for oxidised cod liver...

  16. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cells, Gr1+ inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, or TNF production were induced to develop chronic pancreatitis in the context of DC overexpansion...Z. Yao, W. Cao, and Y.J. Liu. 2005. TSLP-activated dendritic cells induce an inflammatory T helper type 2 cell response through OX40 ligand. J. Exp...Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions

  17. Improvement of human dendritic cell culture for immunotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-07-01

    A toxic injury such as a decrease in the number of immature dendritic cells caused by a cytotoxic effect or a disturbance in their maturation process can be responsible for immunodepression. There is a need to improve in vitro assays on human dendritic cells used to detect and evaluate adverse effects of xenobiotics. Two aspects were explored in this work: cytotoxic effects of xenobiotics on immature dendritic cells, and the interference of xenobiotics with dendritic cell maturation. Dendritic cells of two different origins were tested. Dendritic cells obtained either from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells or, for the first time, from umbilical cord blood monocytes. The cytotoxicity assay on immature dendritic cells has been improved. For the study of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on the maturation process of dendritic cells, several parameters were selected such as expression of markers (CD86, CD83, HLA-DR), secretion of interleukins 10 and 12, and proliferation of autologous lymphocytes. The relevance and the efficiency of the protocol applied were tested using two mycotoxins, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalence, DON, which are known to be immunosuppressive, and one phycotoxin, domoic acid, which is known not to have any immunotoxic effect. Assays using umbilical cord monocyte dendritic cell cultures with the protocol defined in this work, which involves a cytotoxicity study followed by evaluation of several markers of adverse effects on the dendritic cell maturation process, revealed their usefulness for investigating xenobiotic immunotoxicity toward immune primary reactions.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist attenuates oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced immune maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hong-yu; CAO Xue-tao; GE Jun-bo; FANG Wei-yi; YAO Kang; SUN Ai-jun; HUANG Rong-chong; JIA Qing-zhe; WANG Ke-qiang; ZOU Yun-zeng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Accumulating evidence suggests that the Th1 immune response induced by various antigens such as oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a key role in the process of atherosclerosis.1 Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the body with the unique ability to initiate a primary immune response to certain antigens by the activation of "naive" T cells.2 The maturation of DC with the upregulation of costimulatory molecules such as CD83,CD40,CD86,and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class molecules such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR,is required for DC to activate T cells.

  19. Concomitant detection of IFNα signature and activated monocyte/dendritic cell precursors in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated subjects at early times after repeated local cytokine treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza Paola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons alpha (IFNα are the cytokines most widely used in clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Among the immunomodulatory activities possibly involved in their therapeutic efficacy, the importance of IFNα effects on dendritic cells (DC differentiation and activation has been considered. Despite several studies exploiting microarray technology to characterize IFNα mechanisms of action, there is currently no consensus on the core signature of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated individuals, as well as on the existence of blood genomic and proteomic markers of low-dose IFNα administered as a vaccine adjuvant. Methods Gene profiling analysis with microarray was performed on PBMC isolated from melanoma patients and healthy individuals 24 hours after each repeated injection of low-dose IFNα, administered as vaccine adjuvant in two separate clinical trials. At the same time points, cytofluorimetric analysis was performed on CD14+ monocytes, to detect the phenotypic modifications exerted by IFNα on antigen presenting cells precursors. Results An IFNα signature was consistently observed in both clinical settings 24 hours after each repeated administration of the cytokine. The observed modulation was transient, and did not reach a steady state level refractory to further stimulations. The molecular signature observed ex vivo largely matched the one detected in CD14+ monocytes exposed in vitro to IFNα, including the induction of CXCL10 at the transcriptional and protein level. Interestingly, IFNα ex vivo signature was paralleled by an increase in the percentage and expression of costimulatory molecules by circulating CD14+/CD16+ monocytes, indicated as natural precursors of DC in response to danger signals. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the identification of a well defined molecular signature as biomarker of IFNα administered as immune adjuvants, and

  20. Dexamethasone Suppresses Oxysterol-Induced Differentiation of Monocytic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghae Son

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxysterol like 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHChol has been reported to induce differentiation of monocytic cells into a mature dendritic cell phenotype. We examined whether dexamethasone (Dx affects 27OHChol-induced differentiation using THP-1 cells. Treatment of monocytic cells with Dx resulted in almost complete inhibition of transcription and surface expression of CD80, CD83, and CD88 induced by 27OHChol. Elevated surface levels of MHC class I and II molecules induced by 27OHChol were reduced to basal levels by treatment with Dx. A decreased endocytosis ability caused by 27OHChol was recovered by Dx. We also examined effects of Dx on expression of CD molecules involved in atherosclerosis. Increased levels of surface protein and transcription of CD105, CD137, and CD166 by treatment with 27OHChol were significantly inhibited by cotreatment with Dx. These results indicate that Dx inhibits 27OHChol-induced differentiation of monocytic cells into a mature dendritic cell phenotype and expression of CD molecules whose levels are associated with atherosclerosis. In addition, we examined phosphorylation of AKT induced by 27OHChol and effect of Dx, where cotreatment with Dx inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT. The current study reports that Dx regulates oxysterol-mediated dendritic cell differentiation of monocytic cells.

  1. PRRSV-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells express high levels of SLA-DR and CD80/86 but do not stimulate PRRSV-naïve regulatory T cells to proliferate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M; Käser, Tobias; Gómez-Laguna, Jaime; Lamp, Benjamin; Sinn, Leonie; Rümenapf, Till; Carrasco, Librado; Saalmüller, Armin; Gerner, Wilhelm

    2015-05-20

    In vitro generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) have frequently been used to study the influence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection on antigen presenting cells. However, obtained results have often been conflicting in regard to expression of co-stimulatory molecules and interaction with T cells. In this study we performed a detailed phenotypic characterisation of PRRSV-infected moDCs and non-infected moDCs. For CD163 and CD169, which are involved in PRRSV-entry into host cells, our results show that prior to infection porcine moDCs express high levels of CD163 but only very low levels for CD169. Following infection with either PRRSV-1 or PRRSV-2 strains after 24 h, PRRSV-nucleoprotein (N-protein)(+) and N-protein(-) moDCs derived from the same microculture were analyzed for expression of swine leukocyte antigen-DR (SLA-DR) and CD80/86. N-protein(+) moDCs consistently expressed higher levels of SLA-DR and CD80/86 compared to N-protein(-) moDCs. We also investigated the influence of PRRSV-infected moDCs on proliferation and frequency of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells present within CD4(+) T cells in in vitro co-cultures. Neither CD3-stimulated nor unstimulated CD4(+) T cells showed differences in regard to proliferation and frequency of Foxp3(+) T cells following co-cultivation with either PRRSV-1 or PRRSV-2 infected moDCs. Our results suggest that a more detailed characterisation of PRRSV-infected moDCs will lead to more consistent results across different laboratories and PRRSV strains as indicated by the major differences in SLA-DR and CD80/86 expression between PRRSV-infected and non-infected moDCs present in the same microculture.

  2. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to Der p 1 allergen enhance the recruitment of Th2 cells: major involvement of the chemokines TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Hamida; Smits, Hermelijn H; Ratajczak, Céline; Nithiananthan, Asokananthan; Wierenga, Eddy A; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Jacquet, Alain; Tonnel, Andre-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen - presenting cells that can orientate the immune response towards a Th1 or a Th2 type. DC produce chemokines that are involved in the recruitment of either Th1 cells, such as IP10 (CXCL10), Th2 cells such as TARC (CCL17) and MDC (CCL22), or non-polarized T cells such as RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-lalpha (CCL3). We investigated whether monocyte-derived DC (MD-DC) generated from healthy donors or from patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) and exposed to the cysteine-protease Der p 1(allergen of Dpt), could upregulate the expression of chemokines involved in type 1 or type 2 T cell recruitment. MD-DC were pulsed with either Der p 1 or with LPS as the control and the chemokines produced were evaluated using ELISA and chemotaxis assays. Der p 1-pulsed DC from allergic patients showed increased TARC (CCL17) and MDC (CCL22) production without modifying IP-10 (CXCL10) release. Der p 1-pulsed DC from healthy donors showed only increased IP-10 (CXCL10) secretion. RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-lalpha (CCL3) production were similarly increased when DC were from healthy or allergic donors. The selective Th2 clone recruitment activity of supernatants from Der p 1-pulsed DC of allergic patients was inhibited by anti-TARC (CCL17) and anti-MDC (CCL22) neutralizing Abs. By using anti-IP10 (CXCL10) blocking Abs, supernatants of Der p 1-pulsed DC from healthy donors were shown to be involved in the recruitment of Th1 cells. These results suggest that in allergic patients exposed to house dust mites, DC may favour the exacerbation of the Th2 response via the increase in type 2 chemokine production. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.

  3. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, A; Everett, H.; Hamza, E; Garbani, M; Gerber, V.; Marti, E; Steinbach, F

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including horses. ...

  4. Reactivity of chemical sensitizers toward amino acids in cellulo plays a role in the activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in human monocyte dendritic cells and the THP-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdal, Camille; Botton, Jérémie; El Ali, Zeina; Azoury, Marie-Eliane; Guldemann, Joan; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis resulting from skin sensitization is an inflammatory skin disease linked to the use of chemicals termed haptens. Chemical reactivity is necessary for a chemical to be a sensitizer, allowing both covalent binding to proteins and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) by mimicking "danger signals." The aim of this study was to evaluate how the reactivity of chemical sensitizers toward amino acids translates into a biological response using the activation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway, which was assessed by the induction of three Nrf2 target genes (ho-1, nqo1, and il-8) and Nrf2 protein accumulation. Nrf2 activation is known to play a role in numerous detoxification mechanisms that could regulate danger signal outcomes in myeloid cells. Monocyte-derived DCs and THP-1 cells were exposed to (a) haptens with cysteine, lysine, or cysteine/lysine reactivity, (b) pro-/prehaptens, and (c) nonsensitizing molecules with reducing or oxidative properties (17 molecules in total). Chemicals were classified as "Nrf2 pathway activators" when at least two Nrf2 target genes associated with Nrf2 protein expression were induced. Results showed that most chemical sensitizers having cysteine and cysteine/lysine affinities were inducers of the Nrf2 pathway in both cell models, whereas lysine-reactive chemicals were less efficient. In THP-1 cells, the Nrf2 pathway was also activated by pro-/prehaptens. Regression analysis revealed that ho-1 and nqo1 expressions were found to be associated with chemical sensitizer reactivity to cysteine, providing evidence of the importance of chemical reactivity, as a part of danger signals, in DC biology.

  5. Human Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Wild-field name="type" p53 Protein Efficiently Induce Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes against p53 overexpressing Human Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    德永, 尚之

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells for initiating cellular immune responses. Dendritic cells are attractive immunoregulatory cells for cancer immunotherapy, and their efficacy has been investigated in clinical trials. The tumor suppressor gene p53 is pivotal in the regulation of apoptosis, and p53-based immunization is an attractive approach to cancer immunotherapy because of the accumulation of p53 protein in malignant but not in normal cells. It has been s...

  6. An efficient protocol for the generation of monocyte derived dendritic cells using serum-free media for clinical applications in post remission AML patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Simoneti, Gisele; Saad, Sara Teresinha Olalla; Gilli, Simone Cristina Olenscki

    2014-01-01

    Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs) using serum as a supplementation of culture media leads to reactions due to animal proteins and disease transmissions. Several types of serum-free media (SFM), based on "good manufacture practices" (GMP), have recently been used and seem to be a viable option. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the differentiation, maturation, and function of DCs from Acute Myeloid Leukemia patients (AML), generated in SFM and medium supplemented with autologous serum (AS). DCs were analyzed by phenotype characteristics, viability, and functionality. The results showed the possibility of generating viable DCs in all the conditions tested. In patients, the X-VIVO 15 medium was more efficient than the other media tested in the generation of DCs producing IL-12p70 (p=0.05). Moreover, the presence of AS led to a significant increase of IL-10 by DCs as compared with CellGro (p=0.05) and X-Vivo15 (p=0.05) media, both in patients and donors. We concluded that SFM was efficient in the production of DCs for immunotherapy in AML patients. However, the use of AS appears to interfere with the functional capacity of the generated DCs.

  7. Activation and cytokine profile of monocyte derived dendritic cells in leprosy: in vitro stimulation by sonicated Mycobacterium leprae induces decreased level of IL-12p70 in lepromatous leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Flores Braga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the connection of innate and adaptive immunity of hosts to mycobacterial infection. Studies on the interaction of monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs using Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients are rare. The present study demonstrated that the differentiation of MOs to DCs was similar in all forms of leprosy compared to normal healthy individuals. In vitro stimulation of immature MO-DCs with sonicated M. leprae induced variable degrees of DC maturation as determined by the increased expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86, but not CD83, in all studied groups. The production of different cytokines by the MO-DCs appeared similar in all of the studied groups under similar conditions. However, the production of interleukin (IL-12p70 by MO-DCs from lepromatous (LL leprosy patients after in vitro stimulation with M. lepraewas lower than tuberculoid leprosy patients and healthy individuals, even after CD40 ligation with CD40 ligand-transfected cells. The present cumulative findings suggest that the MO-DCs of LL patients are generally a weak producer of IL-12p70 despite the moderate activating properties ofM. leprae. These results may explain the poor M. leprae-specific cell-mediated immunity in the LL type of leprosy.

  8. Activation and cytokine profile of monocyte derived dendritic cells in leprosy: in vitro stimulation by sonicated Mycobacterium leprae induces decreased level of IL-12p70 in lepromatous leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, André Flores; Moretto, Daniela Ferraz; Gigliotti, Patrícia; Peruchi, Mariela; Vilani-Moreno, Fátima Regina; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira; Iyer, Anand; Das, Pranab Kumar; de Souza, Vânia Nieto Brito

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the connection of innate and adaptive immunity of hosts to mycobacterial infection. Studies on the interaction of monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs) using Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients are rare. The present study demonstrated that the differentiation of MOs to DCs was similar in all forms of leprosy compared to normal healthy individuals. In vitro stimulation of immature MO-DCs with sonicated M. leprae induced variable degrees of DC maturation as determined by the increased expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86, but not CD83, in all studied groups. The production of different cytokines by the MO-DCs appeared similar in all of the studied groups under similar conditions. However, the production of interleukin (IL)-12p70 by MO-DCs from lepromatous (LL) leprosy patients after in vitro stimulation with M. leprae was lower than tuberculoid leprosy patients and healthy individuals, even after CD40 ligation with CD40 ligand-transfected cells. The present cumulative findings suggest that the MO-DCs of LL patients are generally a weak producer of IL-12p70 despite the moderate activating properties ofM. leprae. These results may explain the poor M. leprae-specific cell-mediated immunity in the LL type of leprosy. PMID:26222022

  9. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from late gestation cows have an impaired ability to mature in response to E. coli stimulation in a receptor and cytokine-mediated fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Brianna; Sipka, Anja; Klaessig, Suzanne; Schukken, Ynte

    2015-09-15

    During late gestation the bovine immune system is less capable of eliciting inflammatory responses and eliminating invading pathogens. The maternal immune system is directed toward tolerance in order to prevent fetal rejection due to recognition of paternal antigens. In humans and mice, dendritic cell (DC) populations maintain a tolerogenic phenotype essential in the generation and preservation of maternal immune tolerance throughout pregnancy. However, the primary mechanisms which facilitate maternal immune tolerance involved in bovine gestation remain poorly understood. In order to determine if DC phenotype and function were regulated toward tolerance during bovine gestation, we compared in vitro generated monocyte-derived DC (mo-DC) from monocytes isolated from cows in late gestation (LG) to those from non-pregnant (NP) cows in their ability to mature following stimulation with UV irradiated Escherichia coli. Our results show mo-DC from LG cows have an impaired ability to mature in response to E. coli stimulation in a receptor and cytokine-mediated fashion in comparison to those from NP cows. Specifically, mo-DC from LG cows were unable to upregulate MHC II and maintained high expression of CD14, both indicative of an immature phenotype following E. coli-stimulation. Only mo-DC from LG showed significant increase in IL-10 production and had a significantly lower ratio of production of the Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12 to regulatory cytokine IL-10 following E. coli stimulation compared to mo-DC from NP cows. Our findings demonstrate mo-DC from LG cows have a stifled capacity to develop a mature phenotype and drive pro-inflammatory Th1-type responses to E. coli stimulation. Results from this study provide insight into DC immune modulation in bovine pregnancy and elucidate host factors which may contribute to the heightened susceptibility to infection in late gestation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by ANDES Hantavirus enhances pro-inflammatory state, the secretion of active MMP-9 and indirectly enhances endothelial permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Lastra Marcelo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Andes virus (ANDV, a rodent-borne Hantavirus, is the major etiological agent of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in South America, which is mainly characterized by a vascular leakage with high rate of fatal outcomes for infected patients. Currently, neither specific therapy nor vaccines are available against this pathogen. ANDV infects both dendritic and epithelial cells, but in despite that the severity of the disease directly correlates with the viral RNA load, considerable evidence suggests that immune mechanisms rather than direct viral cytopathology are responsible for plasma leakage in HCPS. Here, we assessed the possible effect of soluble factors, induced in viral-activated DCs, on endothelial permeability. Activated immune cells, including DC, secrete gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteases (gMMP-2 and -9 that modulate the vascular permeability for their trafficking. Methods A clinical ANDES isolate was used to infect DC derived from primary PBMC. Maturation and pro-inflammatory phenotypes of ANDES-infected DC were assessed by studying the expression of receptors, cytokines and active gMMP-9, as well as some of their functional status. The ANDES-infected DC supernatants were assessed for their capacity to enhance a monolayer endothelial permeability using primary human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC. Results Here, we show that in vitro primary DCs infected by a clinical isolate of ANDV shed virus RNA and proteins, suggesting a competent viral replication in these cells. Moreover, this infection induces an enhanced expression of soluble pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α and the active gMMP-9, as well as a decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These viral activated cells are less sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, supernatants from ANDV-infected DCs were able to indirectly enhance the permeability of a monolayer of primary HUVEC. Conclusions Primary human DCs

  11. Canine Distemper Virus Infection Leads to an Inhibitory Phenotype of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells In Vitro with Reduced Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules and Increased Interleukin-10 Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M.; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper. PMID:24769532

  12. Canine distemper virus infection leads to an inhibitory phenotype of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro with reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased interleukin-10 transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visar Qeska

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs, responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper.

  13. Delivery of TLR7 agonist to monocytes and dendritic cells by DCIR targeted liposomes induces robust production of anti-cancer cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauber, Thomas Christopher Bogh; Laursen, Janne Marie; Zucker, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    could be a way to improve cancer treatment either in the form of a vaccine with co-formulated antigen or as an immunotherapeutic vector to boost monocyte and DC activity in combination with other treatment protocols such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Cancer immunotherapy is a powerful new tool...

  14. Irf4-dependent CD103+CD11b+ dendritic cells and the intestinal microbiome regulate monocyte and macrophage activation and intestinal peristalsis in postoperative ileus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, Judith Mira; Gutweiler, Sebastian; Thiebes, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    and large intestinal POI suggested a potential role of the intestinal microbiota. Indeed, antibiotic treatment reduced iNOS levels and ameliorated POI. Conclusions: Our findings reveal that CD103+CD11b+ DCs and the intestinal microbiome are a prerequisite for the activation of intestinal monocytes...

  15. Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochando, Jordi; Conde, Patricia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

  16. In vitro effects of trichothecenes on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the in vitro effects of trichothecenes on human dendritic cells. Trichothecenes are mycotoxins produced by fungi such as Fusarium, Myrothecium, and Stachybotrys. Two aspects have been explored in this work: the cytotoxicity of trichothecenes on immature dendritic cells to determine IC 50 (inhibition concentration), and the effects of trichothecenes on dendritic cell maturation process. Two mycotoxins (T-2 and DON) known to be immunotoxic have been tested on a model of monocyte-derived dendritic cells culture. Cytotoxic effects of T-2 toxin and DON on immature dendritic cells showed that DON is less potent than T-2 toxin. The exposure to trichothecenes during dendritic cell maturation upon addition of LPS or TNF-alpha markedly inhibited the up-regulation of maturation markers such as CD-86, HLA-DR and CCR7. Features of LPS or TNF-alpha -mediated maturation of dendritic cells, such as IL-10 and IL-12 secretions and endocytosis, were also impaired in response to trichothecenes treatment. These results suggest trichothecenes have adverse effects on dendritic cells and dendritic cell maturation process.

  17. Cryopreservation of Dendritic Cells Grown in Vitro from Monocytes for Their Future Clinical Use%从单核细胞分化的树突状细胞的低温保存及其临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹华; VERG Véronique; MARTINACHE Chantal; LEON Anne; GORIN Norbert-Claude; BERNARD Jacky; LOPEZ Manuel

    2000-01-01

    树突状细胞(dendritic cells,DCs)作为专职的抗原递呈细胞,已被广泛地应用于临床的肿瘤疫苗治疗.目前的临床方案大多为分次给病人注射>10 6个细胞/次,不同批次培养的DCs,连续4-6周.为了提高疗效,简化治疗程序及规范疗程,有必要将DCs低温保存,使患者在治疗过程中得到同批次的培养的DCs.本实验从患者外周血采取单个核细胞,经细胞淘洗分离单核细胞,在800 U/ml GM-CSF+100 ng/ml IL-13的培养条件下,将单核细胞于Teflon疏水袋中诱导产生DCs.将DCs以-1℃梯度降温及不控温两种方式将DCs冻存于-80℃及液氮中.1个月后,42℃快速复温.检测其免疫表型(CD1a,CD14,CD40,CD80,CD83,CD86,CD54,CD58,CD16,CD32,CD64,HLA-DR)及其对自体及异体淋巴细胞的刺激作用.结果表明,2种方式的低温保存及复温过程不改变DCs的免疫表型及对淋巴细胞的刺激功能.结论:应用Teflon袋,能够从外周血单核细胞中诱导出大批量的DCs,这些DCs可被低温保存而不改变其功能,为其l临床应用奠定了基础.%Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells which are being used as adjuvants in tumor vaccination trials. Most clinical protocols currently include 4 to 10 weekly infusions of doses > 10 6 cells, each inoculum coming from a simple culture of blood monocytes. In the present study, several millions of dendritic cells from a single leukapheresis were produced; monocytes were isolated by elutriation and then cultured in Teflon bags in presence of 800 U/ml GM-CSF+ 100 μg/ml IL-13 + 10% fetal calf serum (FCS). The dendritic cells from this single batch were aliquoted in many doses for potential multiple infusions and cryopreserved in 10% DMSO + 2% human albumin in Teflon- kapton Fresenius bags either at - 1℃/min using a controlled rate freezer, or putting the bags directly in a - 80℃ mechanical freezer without controlling the temperature rate. Six experiments were carried out. After

  18. Psychedelic N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine modulate innate and adaptive inflammatory responses through the sigma-1 receptor of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Kovacs, Attila; Frecska, Ede; Rajnavolgyi, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The orphan receptor sigma-1 (sigmar-1) is a transmembrane chaperone protein expressed in both the central nervous system and in immune cells. It has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cell survival, and mediates anti-inflammatory responses and immunosuppression in murine in vivo models. Since the details of these findings have not been elucidated so far, we studied the effects of the endogenous sigmar-1 ligands N,N-dimethyltryptamine (NN-DMT), its derivative 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and the synthetic high affinity sigmar-1 agonist PRE-084 hydrochloride on human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDCs) activation provoked by LPS, polyI:C or pathogen-derived stimuli to induce inflammatory responses. Co-treatment of moDC with these activators and sigma-1 receptor ligands inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα and the chemokine IL-8, while increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The T-cell activating capacity of moDCs was also inhibited, and dimethyltryptamines used in combination with E. coli or influenza virus as stimulators decreased the differentiation of moDC-induced Th1 and Th17 inflammatory effector T-cells in a sigmar-1 specific manner as confirmed by gene silencing. Here we demonstrate for the first time the immunomodulatory potential of NN-DMT and 5-MeO-DMT on human moDC functions via sigmar-1 that could be harnessed for the pharmacological treatment of autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory conditions of the CNS or peripheral tissues. Our findings also point out a new biological role for dimethyltryptamines, which may act as systemic endogenous regulators of inflammation and immune homeostasis through the sigma-1 receptor.

  19. Psychedelic N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine modulate innate and adaptive inflammatory responses through the sigma-1 receptor of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szabo

    Full Text Available The orphan receptor sigma-1 (sigmar-1 is a transmembrane chaperone protein expressed in both the central nervous system and in immune cells. It has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cell survival, and mediates anti-inflammatory responses and immunosuppression in murine in vivo models. Since the details of these findings have not been elucidated so far, we studied the effects of the endogenous sigmar-1 ligands N,N-dimethyltryptamine (NN-DMT, its derivative 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT and the synthetic high affinity sigmar-1 agonist PRE-084 hydrochloride on human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDCs activation provoked by LPS, polyI:C or pathogen-derived stimuli to induce inflammatory responses. Co-treatment of moDC with these activators and sigma-1 receptor ligands inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα and the chemokine IL-8, while increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The T-cell activating capacity of moDCs was also inhibited, and dimethyltryptamines used in combination with E. coli or influenza virus as stimulators decreased the differentiation of moDC-induced Th1 and Th17 inflammatory effector T-cells in a sigmar-1 specific manner as confirmed by gene silencing. Here we demonstrate for the first time the immunomodulatory potential of NN-DMT and 5-MeO-DMT on human moDC functions via sigmar-1 that could be harnessed for the pharmacological treatment of autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory conditions of the CNS or peripheral tissues. Our findings also point out a new biological role for dimethyltryptamines, which may act as systemic endogenous regulators of inflammation and immune homeostasis through the sigma-1 receptor.

  20. Combined TLR2 and TLR4 ligation in the context of bacterial or helminth extracts in human monocyte derived dendritic cells: Molecular correlates for Th1/Th2 polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, E. van; Everts, B.; Retra, K.; Phylipsen, M.; Hellemond, J.J. van; Tielens, A.G.M.; Kleij, D. van der; Hartgers, F.C.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recognition of pathogens by dendritic cells (DCs) through interaction with pattern recognition receptors, including Toll like receptors (TLR), is crucial for the initiation of appropriate polarized T helper (Th) cell responses. Yet, the characteristics and differences in molecular profil

  1. Bovine Peripheral Blood Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cell Culture and Identification in Vitro%奶牛外周血树突状细胞体外诱导培养与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹康; 赵倩明; 隋雁南; 封飞飞; 占今舜; 赵国琦

    2016-01-01

    通过粒-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子( GM⁃CSF)和白细胞介素-4( IL⁃4)体外诱导外周血单核细胞为树突状细胞,为利用树突状细胞免疫疗法治疗奶牛乳房炎奠定基础和提供细胞模型。利用淋巴细胞分离液分离获得奶牛外周血单核细胞,在6孔板内培养2h后,弃掉含有大量的T细胞和B细胞上清液,贴壁的基本上是单核细胞,磷酸盐缓冲液清洗5次,加入含有GM⁃CSF和IL⁃4的2 mL培养基进行3 d诱导。之后,从培养基顶部小心吸弃1.4 mL的培养基,然后再补加含有GM⁃CSF和IL⁃4的1.8 mL培养基继续诱导3 d。每天通过显微镜观察细胞形态。第7天经流式检测细胞表面抗原 CD11c、CD14、主要组织相容性复合体Ⅱ( MHCⅡ)、CD40、CD80、CD86的表达。结果表明:1)第2天,一些细胞表面可以生长出刺突并伴随着伪足的生长。第3天,细胞表面的刺突和伪足越来越多。第4、5天,一些带有刺突和伪足的细胞开始聚集和融合。第6天,单核细胞基本被诱导为树突状细胞,细胞表面含有大量清晰可见的刺突和伪足。2)经流式检测,CD14、CD11c、MHCⅡ阳性表达细胞分别占诱导细胞的6.8%、65.0%、75.9%,CD80和CD86阳性表达细胞分别占诱导细胞的2.0%和1.2%。综上所述,采用奶牛外周血单核细胞经体外诱导能够获得一定纯度的奶牛树突状细胞。%This study aimed to induce bovine peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic cell by granulocyte⁃macrophage colony stimulating factor ( GM⁃CSF) and interleukin⁃4 ( IL⁃4) cytokines, which could lay founda⁃tion and provide cell model for dairy cow mastitis treatment using cell immunotherapy. The bovine peripheral blood monocyte was acquired by lymphocyte separation medium and seeded in 6⁃proe plate to culture for 2 h. Then, suspended cells containing an amount of B and T cells were discarded, and

  2. Cell culture plastics with immobilized interleukin-4 for monocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Met, Özcan;

    2011-01-01

    Standard cell culture plastic was surface modified by passive adsorption or covalent attachment of interleukin (IL)-4 and investigated for its ability to induce differentiation of human monocytes into mature dendritic cells, a process dose-dependently regulated by IL-4. Covalent attachment of IL-4...... proceeded via anthraquinone photochemistry to introduce amine functionalities at the surface followed by coupling of IL-4 through a bifunctional amine-reactive linker. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that undesirable multilayer formation of the photoactive compound could be avoided by reaction...... in water instead of phosphate-buffered saline. Passively adsorbed IL-4 was observed to induce differentiation to dendritic cells, but analysis of cell culture supernatants revealed that leakage of IL-4 into solution could account for the differentiation observed. Covalent attachment resulted in bound IL-4...

  3. Evaluation of two different dendritic cell preparations with BCG reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fol Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key-role in the immune response against intracellular bacterial pathogens, including mycobacteria. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs are considered to behave as inflammatory cell populations. Different immunomagnetic methods (positive and negative can be used to purify monocytes before their in vitro differentiation and their culture behavior can be expected to be different. In this study we evaluated the reactivity of two dendritic cell populations towards the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG antigen. Monocytes were obtained from the blood of healthy donors, using positive and negative immunomagnetic separation methods. The expression of DC-SIGN, CD86, CD80, HLA-DR and CD40 on MoDCs was estimated by flow cytometry. The level of IL-12p70, IL-10 and TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Neither of the tested methods affected the surface marker expression of DCs. No significant alteration in immunological response, measured by cytokine production, was noted either. After BCG stimulation, the absence of IL-12, but the IL-23 production was observed in both cell preparations. Positive and negative magnetic separation methods are effective techniques to optimize the preparation of monocytes as the source of MoDCs for potential clinical application.

  4. Purification of human peripheral blood monocytes on gelatin-coated surface and stimulation into dendritic cells%明胶法富集外周血单核细胞并刺激其成熟为树突状细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明瑛; 靳志平; 王伟; 郭智; 吴彬; 谭晓华

    2012-01-01

    背景:如何简易高效分离纯化人外周血单核细胞并刺激成熟为树突状细胞,未见标准化操作流程.目的:观察明胶法分离外周血单核细胞的效率以及将分离出的单核细胞刺激成熟为树突状细胞的表型特征,并与普通塑料黏附法对比.方法:使用人淋巴细胞分离液分离人外周血得到单个核细胞,根据培养瓶是否进行明胶包被分为明胶包被组和普通塑料组.均分单个核细胞,按组别分离获得单核细胞并诱导刺激成熟为树突状细胞.计数各组所得单核细胞数,使用流式细胞仪检测2 组单核细胞的CD14 阳性率、T、B 淋巴细胞污染率、树突状细胞非成熟期和成熟期CD1a,CD83 的表达情况,锥虫蓝拒染法计算细胞活率,观察对比2 组血小板污染情况.结果与结论:明胶包被组单核细胞数及CD14 阳性率显著高于普通塑料组(P 0.05).明胶包被组血小板污染率低于普通塑料组.提示明胶法可以简单高效分离出单核细胞并成功刺激成熟为树突状细胞.%BACKGROUND: There have been no standard procedures regarding how to simply and efficiently separate and purify human peripheral blood monocytes and stimulate them into dendritic cells. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of purification of human peripheral blood monocytes on gelatin-coated surfaces, analyze the phenotype of dendritic cells generated by these monocytes, and make a comparison with conventional plastic adhesion method. METHODS: Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were harvested by Ficoll-Hypaque gradient centrifugation. Gelatin group and common plastic group were designated according to coating flasks with or without gelatin. Monocytes were harvested from each group and then were stimulated into dendritic cells. The number of monoctyes, CD14 positive rate of monocytes, contaminated T, B lymphocytes, the expression of CD1a, CD83 on immature and mature dendritic cells were determined. Cell viability was

  5. Novel insights in the regulation of CCL18 secretion by monocytes and dendritic cells via cytokines, Toll-like receptors and rheumatoid synovial fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, A.W.T. van; Voort, R. van der; Blanc, L.M.P. le; Roelofs, M.F.; Schreurs, W.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Adema, G.J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The T cell attracting chemokine CCL18 is produced by antigen presenting cells and a role for CCL18 has been suggested in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of these conditions, in which abundant CCL18 production is present. Although Th2 cytokines

  6. Novel insights in the regulation of CCL18 secretion by monocytes and dendritic cells via cytokines, toll-like receptors and rheumatoid synovial fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, A.W.T. van; Voort, R. van der; Blanc, L.M.P. le; Roelofs, M.F.; Schreurs, B.W.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Adema, G.J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The T cell attracting chemokine CCL18 is produced by antigen presenting cells and a role for CCL18 has been suggested in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of these conditions, in which abundant CCL18 production is present. Although Th2 cytokines

  7. Effects of beauvericin, enniatin b and moniliformin on human dendritic cells and macrophages: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficheux, A S; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of emerging mycotoxins beauvericin, enniatin B and moniliformin on human dendritic cells and macrophages. Beauvericin and enniatin B were cytotoxic on these cells. IC50 were equal to 1.0 μM, 2.9 μM and 2.5 μM beauvericin for immature dendritic cells, mature dendritic cells and macrophages, respectively. IC50 were equal to 1.6 μM, 2.6 μM and 2.5 μM for immature dendritic cells, mature dendritic cells and macrophages exposed to enniatin B, respectively. Effects on the differentiation process of monocytes into macrophages or into immature dendritic cells as well as effects on dendritic cells maturation have been studied. The differentiation process of monocytes into immature dendritic cells was not disturbed in the presence of beauvericin. Dendritic cells exposed to beauvericin during the maturation process presented a decrease of CCR7 expression and an increase of IL-10 secretion. Monocytes exposed to beauvericin during the differentiation process into macrophages presented a decrease of endocytosis ability. The differentiation process of monocytes into immature dendritic cells was not disturbed in the presence of enniatin B. Dendritic cells exposed to enniatin B during the maturation process presented a decrease of expression of the maturation makers CD80, CD86 and CCR7 and an increase of IL-10 secretion. Monocytes exposed to enniatin B during the differentiation process into macrophages presented a decrease of endocytosis ability and an increase of CD71. CD1a expression and endocytosis capacity were decreased on immature dendritic cells exposed to moniliformin. Monocytes-derived macrophages exposed to moniliformin during the differentiation process presented a decrease of endocytosis ability, and a decrease of CD71 and HLA-DR expression. According to these results, immunological disorders could be observed on human after ingestion of these alimentary toxins.

  8. Investigating the Role of Surface Materials and Three Dimensional Architecture on In Vitro Differentiation of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional PDMS and carbonised three-dimensional PDMS. Cells cultured conventionally (on two-dimensional polystyrene) differentiated into moDCs as expected. Interestingly, gene expression of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, and pattern recognition receptors was influenced by culture surface material...

  9. Antigen loading on dendritic cells affects the lell function in stimulating T cells.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of antigen loading on dendritic cells (DC). Methods: DCs collected from peripheral blood monocytes were loaded with a tumor antigen from XG-7 cell line. These DCs were then co-cultured with allogeneic T cells and were compared with those DCs without antigen exposure.

  10. Dengue tropism for macrophages and dendritic cells : the host cell effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipse, Jacky; Torres, Silvia; Diosa-Toro, Mayra; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Herrera-Rodriguez, Jose; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Huckriede, Anke; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus infects immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC). We compared virus infectivity in macrophages and DC, and found that the virus-origin determined the cell tropism of progeny virus. The highest efficiency of re-infection was seen for macrophage-derived deng

  11. Combined TLR2 and TLR4 ligation in the context of bacterial or helminth extracts in human monocyte derived dendritic cells: Molecular correlates for Th1/Th2 polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Riet (Elly); B. Everts (Bart); K. Retra (Kim); M. Phylipsen (Marion); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); A.G.M. Tielens (Aloysius); D. van der Kleij (Desiree); F.C. Hartgers (Franca); M. Yazdanbakhsh (Maria)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recognition of pathogens by dendritic cells (DCs) through interaction with pattern recognition receptors, including Toll like receptors (TLR), is crucial for the initiation of appropriate polarized T helper (Th) cell responses. Yet, the characteristics and differences in mole

  12. The role of monocyte-lineage cells in human immuno-deficiency virus persistence: mechanisms and progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Li

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) persistence is a major barrier to the successful treatment and eradication of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In addition to resting CD4+ T cells, a significant long-lived compartment of HIV-1 infection in vivo includes blood monocytes and tissue macrophages. Studying HIV-1 persistence in monocyte-lineage cells is critical because these cells are important HIV-1 target cells in vivo. Monocyte-lineage cells, including monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, play a significant role in HIV-1 infection and transmission. These cells have been implicated as viral reservoirs that facilitate HIV-1 latency and persistence. A better understanding of HIV-1 interactions with monocyte-lineage cells can potentially aid in the development of new approaches for intervention. This minireview highlights the latest advances in understanding the role of monocyte-lineage cells in HIV-1 persistence and emphasizes new insights into the mechanisms underlying viral persistence.

  13. Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing within myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2013-12-01

    The pathophysiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection is linked to the ability of the organism to grow within macrophages. Lung myeloid dendritic cells are a newly recognized reservoir of M.tb during infection. Iron (Fe) acquisition is critical for M.tb growth. In vivo, extracellular Fe is chelated to transferrin (TF) and lactoferrin (LF). We previously reported that M.tb replicating in human monocyte-dervied macrophages (MDM) can acquire Fe bound to TF, LF, and citrate, as well as from the MDM cytoplasm. Access of M.tb to Fe may influence its growth in macrophages and dendritic cells. In the present work we confirmed the ability of different strains of M.tb to grow in human myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe acquired by M.tb replicating within dendritic cells from externally added Fe chelates varied with the Fe chelate present in the external media: Fe-citrate > Fe-LF > Fe-TF. Fe acquisition rates from each chelate did not vary over 7 days. M.tb within dendritic cells also acquired Fe from the dendritic cell cytoplasm, with the efficiency of Fe acquisition greater from cytoplasmic Fe sources, regardless of the initial Fe chelate from which that cytoplasmic Fe was derived. Growth and Fe acquisition results with human MDM were similar to those with dendritic cells. M.tb grow and replicate within myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe metabolism of M.tb growing in either MDM or dendritic cells in vitro is influenced by the nature of Fe available and the organism appears to preferentially access cytoplasmic rather than extracellular Fe sources. Whether these in vitro data extend to in vivo conditions should be examined in future studies.

  14. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  15. Activated protein C modulates the proinflammatory activity of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Matsumoto,1,2* Yuki Matsushima,1* Masaaki Toda,1 Ziaurahman Roeen,1 Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza,1,5 Josephine A Hinneh,1 Etsuko Harada,1,3 Taro Yasuma,4 Yutaka Yano,4 Masahito Urawa,1,5 Tetsu Kobayashi,5 Osamu Taguchi,5 Esteban C Gabazza1 1Department of Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, 2BONAC Corporation, BIO Factory 4F, Fukuoka, 3Iwade Research Institute of Mycology, 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial activity of activated protein C in allergic diseases including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, the exact mechanism of action of activated protein C in allergies is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that pharmacological doses of activated protein C can modulate allergic inflammation by inhibiting dendritic cells. Materials and methods: Dendritic cells were prepared using murine bone marrow progenitor cells and human peripheral monocytes. Bronchial asthma was induced in mice that received intratracheal instillation of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. Results: Activated protein C significantly increased the differentiation of tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells and the secretion of type I interferons, but it significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in myeloid dendritic cells. Activated protein C also inhibited maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Activated protein C-treated dendritic cells were less effective when differentiating naïve CD4 T-cells from Th1 or Th2 cells, and the cellular effect of activated protein C was mediated by its receptors. Mice that received adoptive transfer of activated protein C

  16. Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffel, R.; Meshcheryakova, A.; Warszawska, J.; Hennig, A.; Wagner, K.; Jorgl, A.; Gubi, D.; Moser, D.; Hladik, A.; Hoffmann, U.; Fischer, M.B.; Berg, W.B. van den; Koenders, M.I.; Scheinecker, C.; Gesslbauer, B.; Knapp, S.; Strobl, H.

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell s

  17. Dendritic cells star in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Klechevsky, Eynav; Kato, Hiroki; Sponaas, Anne-Marit

    2005-01-01

    The fast-moving field of dendritic cell (DC) biology is hard to keep pace with. Here we report on advances from the recent Keystone Symposium, “Dendritic Cells at the Center of Innate and Adaptive Immunity,” organized in Vancouver, BC on Feb. 1–7, 2005 by Anne O'Garra, Jacques Banchereau, and Alan Sher. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of DC function and their influence on immune regulation, their role in infectious and autoimmune disease, and new clinical applications are highlight...

  18. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  19. Cigarette smoke promotes dendritic cell accumulation in COPD; a Lung Tissue Research Consortium study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eunhee S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal immune responses are believed to be highly relevant in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Dendritic cells provide a critical checkpoint for immunity by their capacity to both induce and suppress immunity. Although evident that cigarette smoke, the primary cause of COPD, significantly influences dendritic cell functions, little is known about the roles of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of COPD. Methods The extent of dendritic cell infiltration in COPD tissue specimens was determined using immunohistochemical localization of CD83+ cells (marker of matured myeloid dendritic cells, and CD1a+ cells (Langerhans cells. The extent of tissue infiltration with Langerhans cells was also determined by the relative expression of the CD207 gene in COPD versus control tissues. To determine mechanisms by which dendritic cells accumulate in COPD, complimentary studies were conducted using monocyte-derived human dendritic cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE, and dendritic cells extracted from mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke. Results In human COPD lung tissue, we detected a significant increase in the total number of CD83+ cells, and significantly higher amounts of CD207 mRNA when compared with control tissue. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to CSE (0.1-2% exhibited enhanced survival in vitro when compared with control dendritic cells. Murine dendritic cells extracted from mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks, also demonstrated enhanced survival compared to dendritic cells extracted from control mice. Acute exposure of human dendritic cells to CSE induced the cellular pro-survival proteins heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and B cell lymphoma leukemia-x(L (Bcl-xL, predominantly through oxidative stress. Although activated human dendritic cells conditioned with CSE expressed diminished migratory CCR7 expression, their migration towards the CCR7 ligand CCL21 was not

  20. CD1c+ blood dendritic cells have Langerhans cell potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Paul; Bigley, Venetia; Gunawan, Merry; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew

    2015-01-15

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are self-renewing in the steady state but repopulated by myeloid precursors after injury. Human monocytes give rise to langerin-positive cells in vitro, suggesting a potential precursor role. However, differentiation experiments with human lineage-negative cells and CD34(+) progenitors suggest that there is an alternative monocyte-independent pathway of LC differentiation. Recent data in mice also show long-term repopulation of the LC compartment with alternative myeloid precursors. Here we show that, although monocytes are able to express langerin, when cultured with soluble ligands granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7), CD1c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) become much more LC-like with high langerin, Birbeck granules, EpCAM, and E-cadherin expression under the same conditions. These data highlight a new potential precursor function of CD1c(+) DCs and demonstrate an alternative pathway of LC differentiation that may have relevance in vivo.

  1. IRF8 Transcription Factor Controls Survival and Function of Terminally Differentiated Conventional and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells, Respectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichien, Dorine; Scott, Charlotte L; Martens, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF8) has been proposed to be essential for development of monocytes, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and type 1 conventional dendritic cells (cDC1s) and remains highly expressed in differentiated DCs. Transcription factors that are required to maintain the ide...

  2. HCMV Displays a Unique Transcriptome of Immunomodulatory Genes in Primary Monocyte-Derived Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Ellen; Thys, Kim; Tuefferd, Marianne; Van Hove, Carl; Aerssens, Jeroen; Van Loock, Marnix

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a betaherpesvirus which rarely presents problems in healthy individuals, yet may result in severe morbidity in immunocompromised patients and in immune-naïve neonates. HCMV has a large 235 kb genome with a coding capacity of at least 165 open reading frames (ORFs). This large genome allows complex gene regulation resulting in different sets of transcripts during lytic and latent infection. While latent virus mainly resides within monocytes and CD34+ progenitor cells, reactivation to lytic infection is driven by differentiation towards terminally differentiated myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages. Consequently, it has been suggested that macrophages and dendritic cells contribute to viral spread in vivo. Thus far only limited knowledge is available on the expression of HCMV genes in terminally differentiated myeloid primary cells and whether or not the virus exhibits a different set of lytic genes in primary cells compared with lytic infection in NHDF fibroblasts. To address these questions, we used Illumina next generation sequencing to determine the HCMV transcriptome in macrophages and dendritic cells during lytic infection and compared it to the transcriptome in NHDF fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate unique expression profiles in macrophages and dendritic cells which significantly differ from the transcriptome in fibroblasts mainly by modulating the expression of viral transcripts involved in immune modulation, cell tropism and viral spread. In a head to head comparison between macrophages and dendritic cells, we observed that factors involved in viral spread and virion composition are differentially regulated suggesting that the plasticity of the virion facilitates the infection of surrounding cells. Taken together, this study provides the full transcript expression analysis of lytic HCMV genes in monocyte-derived type 1 and type 2 macrophages as well as in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Thereby underlining the potential

  3. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  4. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wu; Aleksandar Dakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived cells. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors,some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Flt3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse.

  5. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWu; AleksandarDakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived calls. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors, some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Fit3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):112-118.

  6. Polymorphisms in the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 are associated with invasive aspergillosis after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation and influence CXCL10 expression in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezger, Markus; Steffens, Michael; Beyer, Melanie; Manger, Carolin; Eberle, Johannes; Toliat, Mohammad-Reza; Wienker, Thomas F; Ljungman, Per; Hebart, Holger; Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2008-01-15

    Patients after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) have an increased risk for invasive aspergillosis (IA). Here, recipients of an allograft with IA (n=81) or without IA (n=58) were screened for 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 18 immune relevant genes. We found 3 markers in chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10, 4q21, 11,101 C>T, P=.007; 1642 Cdendritic cells (iDCs) exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus germlings showed markedly higher CXCL10 expression, if carrying the wild type genotype, compared with the "CGAG" high risk haplotype. In addition, serum from patients with proven/probable IA showed increased serum levels of CXCL10, compared with immunocompromised patients without IA. Thus, polymorphisms in CXCL10 determine chemokine secretion by iDCs upon exposure to A fumigatus and most likely thereby genetically determine the risk of IA after alloSCT.

  7. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  8. In Vitro Stimulation of Specific Antileukemia T-cell Response by Dendritic Cells Derived from CD14+ Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells%CD14+单核细胞系白血病细胞来源树突细胞体外刺激特异抗白血病T细胞应答

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛立霞; 谢晓宝; 邱国强; 顾伟英; 王志林; 吴浩清

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Dendritic cells (DCs) or DClike cells had been successfully induced in vitro from leukemia cells, which may provide a promising immunotherapeutic protocol for leukemia. This study was designed to investigate the efficiency of in vitro generation of dendritic cells from CD14+ acute myelomonocytic (M4) or monocytic (M5) leukemia cells and their ability of stimulating specific antileukemia T-cell response.METHODS: Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were isolated from 5M4/M5 leukemia patients with high CD14 expression, and then divided into 3groups: adherent leukemia cells, nonadherent blasts, and total unfractioned blasts. CD14 expression of the 3 groups was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). When cultured with or without granulocyte-macrophage colonystimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) for 7-10 days, monocytic leukemia cell-derived dendritic cells (Mo-LDCs) were identified through morphologic observation and immunophenotype analysis using FCM. The immune function of Mo-LDCs was detected through allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (Allo-MLR) and cytotoxicity assay of antileukemia cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The leukemic origin of Mo-LDCs was confirmed by chromosomal karyotype analysis combined with the aberrant expression of myeloid antigens. RESULTS: The amount of CD14+ cells, which could differentiate into CD83+ mature DCs under induction of the cytokine combination, was higher in adherent leukemia cells than in nonadherent blasts and total unfractioned blasts. Regarding each 3 cell groups of the same patient or the unfractioned blasts of various patients, initial CD14 expression was positively related to the yield of CD83 + DCs after induction (r=0.967, P=0.007). Mo-LDCs exhibited typical morphology and phenotype as mature DCs, induced potent proliferation of homogeneous T cells in Allo-MLR, stimulated the expansion of leukemia-specific CTLs, and continued to possess the

  9. Growth factors induce monocyte binding to vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for monocyte retention in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Natarajan, Rama

    2004-09-01

    Adhesive interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) may contribute to subendothelial monocyte-macrophage retention in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB on VSMC-monocyte interactions. Treatment of human aortic VSMC (HVSMC) with ANG II or PDGF-BB significantly increased binding to human monocytic THP-1 cells and to peripheral blood monocytes. This was inhibited by antibodies to monocyte beta(1)- and beta(2)-integrins. The binding was also attenuated by blocking VSMC arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by inhibitors of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conversely, binding was enhanced by overexpression of 12/15-LO or COX-2. Direct treatment of HVSMC with AA or its metabolites also increased binding. Furthermore, VSMC derived from 12/15-LO knockout mice displayed reduced binding to mouse monocytic cells relative to genetic control mice. Using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we demonstrated the involvement of Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and MAPKs in ANG II- or PDGF-BB-induced binding. Interestingly, after coculture with HVSMC, THP-1 cell surface expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was increased. These results show for the first time that growth factors may play additional roles in atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte binding to VSMC via AA metabolism and key signaling pathways. This can lead to monocyte subendothelial retention, CD36 expression, and foam cell formation.

  10. Type I (CD64) and type II (CD32) Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis by human blood dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Wardwell, K; Shen, L; Tedder, T F; Guyre, P M

    1996-07-15

    Three classes of Fc receptors for IgG, Fc gamma RI (CD64), Fc gamma RII (CD32), and Fc gamma RIII (CD16), are expressed on blood leukocytes. Although Fc gamma R are important phagocytic receptors on phagocytes, most reports suggest that dendritic cells lack Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis and express significant levels of only CD32. We now report that phagocytically active forms of both CD64 and CD32 are expressed significantly on at least one subset of human blood dendritic cells. Countercurrent elutriation and magnetic bead selection were used to rapidly enrich subsets of blood dendritic cells (CD33brightCD14-HLA-DRbrightCD83-) and monocytes (CD33brightCD14brightHLA-DRdimCD83-). Upon culture for 2 days, dendritic cells became CD83-positive and markedly increased HLA-DR expression, whereas monocytes did not express CD83 and exhibited reduced levels of HLA-DR. Constitutive CD64 expression was identified on this circulating dendritic cell population, but at a lower level than on monocytes. CD64 expression by dendritic cells and monocytes did not decrease during 2 days in culture, and was up-regulated on both cell types following incubation with IFN-gamma. Freshly isolated blood dendritic cells performed CD64- and CD32-mediated phagocytosis, although at a lower level than monocytes. Dendritic cells generated by culture of adherent mononuclear cells in granulocyte-macrophage CSF and IL-4 also up-regulated CD64 following IFN-gamma stimulation, and mediated CD64-dependent phagocytosis. These results indicate that both CD64 and CD32 expressed on blood dendritic cells may play a role in uptake of foreign particles and macromolecules through a phagocytic mechanism before trafficking to T cell-reactive areas.

  11. Genetically modified lactococcus lactis for delivery of human interleukin-10 to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Braat (Henri); I.L. Huibregtse (Inge ); S.A.J. Zaat (Sebastiaan); M.L. Kapsenberg (Martien ); M.A. Sartori da Silva; M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); S. van Deventer (Sander)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInterleukin-10 (IL-10) plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs) to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L.lacti s IL-10) on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated wit

  12. Dendritic Cells, New Tools for Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Review Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination Jesus Colino, Clifford M. Snapper * Department of Pathology, Uniformed Services University of the...2003 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vaccines; Immunotherapy; Dendritic cells 1. Introduction During...DATE 2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination 5a

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibit Dendritic Cell Maturation and Their Allosti mulatory Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sophie; PACZESNY; Veronique; LATGER; CANNARD; Luc; MARCHAL; Bernard; FOLLIGUET; Jean-Franéois; STOLTZ; Assia; ELJAAFARI

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionDendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells. They play an important role in both initiation of immunity and maintenance of immune tolerance. In the recent years, they have been used in humans for the treatment of tumors. DCs are very poor in blood; however, they can be generated in vitro from either CD34~+ hematopoietic stem cell precursors or peripheral blood monocytes, by using appropriate cytokines~([1]). However, the microenvironment can influence their differentiatio...

  14. Fate mapping of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ursula Schraml

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification.

  15. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 maintains the membrane potential and regulates the activation and chemokine-induced migration of a monocyte-derived dendritic cell subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Hajdu, Peter; Bacskai, Ildiko; Szilagyi, Orsolya; Papp, Ferenc; Szanto, Attila; Posta, Edit; Gogolak, Peter; Panyi, Gyorgy; Rajnavolgyi, Eva

    2011-08-01

    Expression of CD1a protein defines a human dendritic cell (DC) subset with unique functional activities. We aimed to study the expression of the Nav1.7 sodium channel and the functional consequences of its activity in CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) DC. Single-cell electrophysiology (patch-clamp) and quantitative PCR experiments performed on sorted CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) immature DC (IDC) showed that the frequency of cells expressing Na(+) current, current density, and the relative expression of the SCN9A gene encoding Nav1.7 were significantly higher in CD1a(+) cells than in their CD1a(-) counterparts. The activity of Nav1.7 results in a depolarized resting membrane potential (-8.7 ± 1.5 mV) in CD1a(+) IDC as compared with CD1a(-) cells lacking Nav1.7 (-47 ± 6.2 mV). Stimulation of DC by inflammatory signals or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in reduced Nav1.7 expression. Silencing of the SCN9A gene shifted the membrane potential to a hyperpolarizing direction in CD1a(+) IDC, resulting in decreased cell migration, whereas pharmacological inhibition of Nav1.7 by tetrodotoxin sensitized the cells for activation signals. Fine-tuning of IDC functions by a voltage-gated sodium channel emerges as a new regulatory mechanism modulating the migration and cytokine responses of these DC subsets.

  16. Comparison research of the morphology, phenotypes and functions of the dendritic cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral monocytes%造血干细胞和单核细胞来源的树突状细胞在形态、表型及功能的对照实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Background:As a kind of promising anti-tumor immunotherapy, autologous dendritic cells (DCs) vaccine derived from peripheral blood monocytes faced limitations including deifciency of function and shortage of cell number. CD34+ progenitors are another ideal source of DC generation and different methods were explored and resulted in different cell number, various function of DC.Objective: Present study aimed to explore the differences between DCs derived from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (CD34-DC) of the cord blood and those derived from monocytes (Mo-DC) of the peripheral blood, in their cell morphologies, cell phenotypes, and the function of inducing antigen-specific CTLs, which could specifically induce tumor lyses, and explore different sources DC ultrastructural changes related to its antigen processing and antigen-presenting function of differences , in order to explore more powerful therapeutic DC vaccines. Methods: Monocytes were obtained from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers by using density gradient centrifugation, and the dendritic cells derived from monocytes (Mo-DC) were harvested by adherent assay. CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells were harvested from the cord blood of healthy full-term pregnant women, and puriifed by using magnetic bead separation, and expanded in GM-CSF/SCF medium for 8-10 days. DC progenitors were differentiated continuously in the GM-CSF/IL-4 medium, and CD34+ stem cell derived DCs (CD34-DC) were harvested every 3 days. Take d3, d5, d7 days immature DC (CD34-imDC, Mo-imDC) and d7 harvested CD34-mDC, Mo-mDC (DC vaccine) in the TEM compare their cell processes, nuclear size and endosomal vesicles quantity. Taken after different incubation time (d1, d3, d5, d7) CD34-DC and Mo-DC surface molecules detected by flow cytometry expression, some cells pulsed with FITC-OVA257-264 and continued to culture 24 hours, respectively, detecting the antigen-presenting ability by lfow cytometry. Take culture iftfh day DCs load CEA protein and

  17. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  18. Dendritic web silicon for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidensticker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dendritic web process for growing long thin ribbon crystals of silicon and other semiconductors is described. Growth is initiated from a thin wirelike dendrite seed which is brought into contact with the melt surface. Initially, the seed grows laterally to form a button at the melt surface; when the seed is withdrawn, needlelike dendrites propagate from each end of the button into the melt, and the web portion of the crystal is formed by the solidification of the liquid film supported by the button and the bounding dendrites. Apparatus used for dendritic web growth, material characteristics, and the two distinctly different mechanisms involved in the growth of a single crystal are examined. The performance of solar cells fabricated from dendritic web material is indistinguishable from the performance of cells fabricated from Czochralski grown material.

  19. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  20. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  1. Generation of novel bone forming cells (monoosteophils from the cathelicidin-derived peptide LL-37 treated monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone generation and maintenance involve osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes which originate from unique precursors and rely on key growth factors for differentiation. However, an incomplete understanding of bone forming cells during wound healing has led to an unfilled clinical need such as nonunion of bone fractures. Since circulating monocytes are often recruited to sites of injury and may differentiate into various cell types including osteoclasts, we investigated the possibility that circulating monocytes in the context of tissue injury may also contribute to bone repair. In particular, we hypothesized that LL-37 (produced from hCAP-18, cathelicidin, which recruits circulating monocytes during injury, may play a role in bone repair. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Treatment of monocytes from blood with LL-37 for 6 days resulted in their differentiation to large adherent cells. Growth of LL-37-differentiated monocytes on osteologic discs reveals bone-like nodule formation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In vivo transplantation studies in NOD/SCID mice show that LL-37-differentiated monocytes form bone-like structures similar to endochondral bone formation. Importantly, LL-37-differentiated monocytes are distinct from conventional monocyte-derived osteoclasts, macrophages, and dendritic cells and do not express markers of the mesenchymal stem cells (MSC lineage, distinguishing them from the conventional precursors of osteoblasts. Furthermore, LL-37 differentiated monocytes express intracellular proteins of both the osteoblast and osteoclast lineage including osteocalcin (OC, osteonectin (ON, bone sialoprotein II (BSP II, osteopontin (OP, RANK, RANKL, MMP-9, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, and cathepsin K (CK. CONCLUSION: Blood derived monocytes treated with LL-37 can be differentiated into a novel bone forming cell that functions both in vitro and in vivo. We propose the name monoosteophil to indicate their monocyte

  2. Ebola virus infection induces irregular dendritic cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Vanessa R; Kalina, Warren V; Williams, Priscilla

    2015-02-01

    Filoviruses subvert the human immune system in part by infecting and replicating in dendritic cells (DCs). Using gene arrays, a phenotypic profile of filovirus infection in human monocyte-derived DCs was assessed. Monocytes from human donors were cultured in GM-CSF and IL-4 and were infected with Ebola virus Kikwit variant for up to 48 h. Extracted DC RNA was analyzed on SuperArray's Dendritic and Antigen Presenting Cell Oligo GEArray and compared to uninfected controls. Infected DCs exhibited increased expression of cytokine, chemokine, antiviral, and anti-apoptotic genes not seen in uninfected controls. Significant increases of intracellular antiviral and MHC I and II genes were also noted in EBOV-infected DCs. However, infected DCs failed to show any significant difference in co-stimulatory T-cell gene expression from uninfected DCs. Moreover, several chemokine genes were activated, but there was sparse expression of chemokine receptors that enabled activated DCs to home to lymph nodes. Overall, statistically significant expression of several intracellular antiviral genes was noted, which may limit viral load but fails to stop replication. EBOV gene expression profiling is of vital importance in understanding pathogenesis and devising novel therapeutic treatments such as small-molecule inhibitors.

  3. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the pituitary and the gonads. Evidence for their role in the fine regulation of the reproductive endocrine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, A; Allaerts, W; Leenen, PJM; Schoemaker, J; Drexhage, HA

    1997-01-01

    Blood monocytes are able to mature into macrophages as well as into dendritic cells, Dendritic cells and macrophages have mainly been studied for their function in the immune response, e.g. in the presentation of antigens to lymphocytes and in the phagocytosis/degradation of unwanted material. The c

  4. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM, a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases.

  5. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  6. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  7. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV.

  8. Immature Dengue Virus Is Infectious in Human Immature Dendritic Cells via Interaction with the Receptor Molecule DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Mareike K. S.; Da Silva-Voorham, Júlia M.; Torres Pedraza, Silvia; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dengue Virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. Important target cells during DENV infection are macrophages, monocytes, and immature dendritic cells (imDCs). DENV-infected cells are known to secrete a large number of partially immature and fully immature

  9. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  10. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells mostly resemble classic dendritic cells but comprise additional minor subpopulations, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells resemble monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cells (iNOS-positive monocyte-derived cells).

  11. Uptake of antigen-antibody complexes by human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Guyre, P M; Graziano, R F

    2001-01-01

    Fc receptors specific for IgG (FcγR) potentiate the immune response by facilitating the interaction between myeloid cells and antibody-coated targets (1-3). Monocyte and neutrophil FcyR engagement can lead to the induction of lytic-type mechanisms associated with innate responses. FcyR triggering can also play a key role in adaptive immune responses. For example, FcyR-directed capture and uptake of antigens (Ag) by dendritic cells (DC) results in processing and presentation to naive Ag-specific T cells, leading to their expansion and maturation into effector T-cell populations. This chapter describes methodology currently in use to explore and manipulate antigen-antibody (Ag-Ab) uptake by FcyR expressed on DC.

  12. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Michielsen, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5) could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  13. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  14. Niflumic acid renders dendritic cells tolerogenic and up-regulates inhibitory molecules ILT3 and ILT4

    OpenAIRE

    Vidmar, Alenka; Švajger, Urban; Jeras, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Niflumic acid is a member of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, from which aspirin was recently shown to inhibit maturation of human-monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are crucial regulators of the immune response, capable of inducing immunity as well as tolerance. In our in vitro study we showed a tolerogenic effect of NFA on phenotype and function of LPSmatured monocyte-derived DCs. Different drug concentrations dose-dependently downregulated the expression of co-stimulatory m...

  15. Two-way communication between endometrial stromal cells and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkova, Olga; Hansen, Keith A; Winterton, Emily; Mark, Connie J; Eyster, Kathleen M

    2010-02-01

    Immune system cells and cells of the endometrium have long been proposed to interact in both physiological and pathological processes. The current study was undertaken to examine communication between cultured monocytes and endometrial stromal cells and also to assess responses of endometrial stromal cells for treatment with estradiol (E) in the absence and presence of medroxyprogesterone acetate (P). A telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cell (T-HESC) line and the U937 monocyte cell line were used. Telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cells were treated with E +/- P +/- monocyte conditioned medium; U937 were treated +/- T-HESC conditioned medium. Gene expression in response to treatment was examined by DNA microarray. Bidirectional communication, as demonstrated by changes in gene expression, clearly occurred between U937 monocytes and T-HESC.

  16. Dendritic cells in melanoma - immunohistochemical study and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Roxana Ioana; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Holeab, Cosmin Adrian; Cioplea, Mirela Daniela; Brînzea, Alice; Zurac, Sabina Andrada

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous dendritic cells play multiple physiological roles and are involved in various pathophysiological processes. Research studies of dendritic cells abound in the medical literature. Nevertheless, the role of dendritic cells in melanoma regression phenomenon is not completely understood. We conducted a scientometric analysis in order to highlight the current state on research regarding dendritic cells and melanoma. We also performed an immunohistochemical study, using specific markers for dendritic cells (CD1a, langerin). We evaluated the frequency and distribution of dendritic cells in areas of tumor regression compared to the areas of inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma without regression. The immunohistochemical study we performed revealed that dendritic cells are more frequent in the regressed areas, comparing with non-regressed ones. In regressed areas, dendritic cells have a predominant nodular pattern (19 cases), followed by diffuse isolate pattern (eight cases) and mixed pattern (diffuse and nodular) (three cases). In melanoma without regression, most cases presented a diffuse pattern (27 cases) of dendritic cells distribution. In conclusion, our immunohistochemical study stressed differences between frequency and distribution of dendritic cells located in the melanoma with regression and melanoma without regression. These data suggest that dendritic cells are involved in the regression phenomenon. Following the literature analysis we obtained, we observed that dendritic cells profile in melanoma with regression was poorly studied. Insights into antitumor immune response and dendritic cells may be essential for the understanding of the potential prognostic role of dendritic cells in melanoma and for the development of new promising therapeutic strategies for melanoma.

  17. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  18. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  19. Influence of organophosphate poisoning on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Marina; Koppe, Franziska; Stenger, Bernhard; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmidt, Annette; Steinritz, Dirk; Thiermann, Horst; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Pohl, Christine

    2013-12-05

    Organophosphourus compounds (OPC, including nerve agents and pesticides) exhibit acute toxicity by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Lung affections are frequent complications and a risk factor for death. In addition, epidemiological studies reported immunological alterations after OPC exposure. In our experiments we investigated the effects of organophosphourus pesticides dimethoate and chlorpyrifos on dendritic cells (DC) that are essential for the initial immune response, especially in the pulmonary system. DC, differentiated from the monocyte cell line THP-1 by using various cytokines (IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-α, Ionomycin), were exposed to organophosphourus compounds at different concentrations for a 24h time period. DC were characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence using typical dendritic cell markers (e.g., CD11c, CD209 and CD83). After OPC exposure we investigated cell death, the secretion profile of inflammatory mediators, changes of DC morphology, and the effect on protein kinase signalling pathways. Our results revealed a successful differentiation of THP-1 into DC. OPC exposure caused a significant concentration-dependent influence on DC: Dendrites of the DC were shortened and damaged, DC-specific cell surface markers (i.e., CD83and CD209) decreased dramatically after chlorpyrifos exposure. Interestingly, the effects caused by dimethoate were in general less pronounced. The organophosphourus compounds affected the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-8. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly down regulated. Protein kinases like the Akt family or ERK, which are essential for cell survival and proliferation, were inhibited by both OPC. These findings indicate that the tested organophosphourus compounds induced significant changes in cell morphology, inhibited anti-inflammatory cytokines and influenced important protein signalling pathways which are involved in regulation of apoptosis. Thus our results highlight

  20. Design of tumour-specific immunotherapies using dendritic cells – analyses of IL15-DC

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mahdi, Rania Ali Muhsen

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy of malignancies aims at activating the patient’s own immune system to fight the tumour affecting the patient. Even though the use of dendritic cells (DC) has shown promising results, the DC vaccination strategy needs improvement, as only few relevant clinical responses could be documented so far. Aim: In this study, the standard protocol to generate monocyte derived DC using GM-CSF and IL-4 was compared to the use of GM-CSF and IL-15. Methods: Monocytes were isolated by plastic ...

  1. Mammal-derived respiratory lipocalin allergens do not exhibit dendritic cell-activating capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, S; Kinnunen, T; Rytkönen-Nissinen, M; Nieminen, A; Liukko, A; Virtanen, T

    2013-03-01

    Most mammal-derived respiratory allergens belong to the lipocalin family of proteins. Determinants of their allergenic capacity are still unknown. Innate immune cells, in particular dendritic cells, have been shown to be involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. As recognition by dendritic cells is one of the few plausible mechanisms for the allergenicity of proteins, we wanted to investigate their role in the allergenicity of lipocalin allergens. Therefore, we first incubated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with immunologically functional recombinant allergens mouse Mus m 1, dog Can f 1 and 2, cow Bos d 2, horse Equ c 1 and natural Bos d 2. Then, the surface marker expression and cytokine production of dendritic cells and their capacity to promote T cell proliferation and Th2 immune deviation in naïve CD4(+) T cells were examined in vitro. We found that near to endotoxin-free lipocalin allergens had no effect on the activation, allostimulatory capacity or cytokine production of dendritic cells. The dendritic cells could not induce immune deviation in naïve CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide activated the dendritic cells efficiently. However, lipocalin allergens were not able to modify the lipopolysaccharide-induced responses. We conclude that an important group of mammal-derived respiratory allergens, lipocalins, appear not to be able to activate dendritic cells, a major component involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. It is conceivable that this incapacity of lipocalin allergens to arouse innate immunity may be associated with their poor capacity to induce a strong T cell response, verified in several studies.

  2. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy.

  3. Anti-atherogenic peptide Ep1.B derived from apolipoprotein E induces tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemore, S M; Nikoopour, E; Au, B C Y; Krougly, O; Lee-Chan, E; Haeryfar, S M; Singh, B

    2014-09-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs ), which in turn suppress effector T cell responses. We have previously shown the induction of DCs from human and mouse monocytic cell lines, mouse splenocytes and human peripheral blood monocytes by a novel apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-derived self-peptide termed Ep1.B. We also showed that this C-terminal region 239-252 peptide of ApoE has strong anti-atherogenic activity and reduces neointimal hyperplasia after vascular surgery in rats and wild-type as well as ApoE-deficient mice. In this study, we explored the phenotype of DC subset induced by Ep1.B from monocytic cell lines and from the bone marrow-derived cells. We found Ep1.B treatment induced cells that showed characteristics of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). We explored in-vitro and in-vivo effects of Ep1.B-induced DCs on antigen-specific T cell responses. Upon in-vivo injection of these cells with antigen, the subsequent ex-vivo antigen-specific proliferation of lymph node cells and splenocytes from recipient mice was greatly reduced. Our results suggest that Ep1.B-induced pDCs promote the generation of Treg cells, and these cells contribute to the induction of peripheral tolerance in adaptive immunity and potentially contribute its anti-atherogenic activity.

  4. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, and abstract model of DC behaviour is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm, the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory- based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an 'artificial DC'. Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of p...

  5. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  6. Infection of Dendritic Cells by the Maedi-Visna Lentivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Susanna; Tiley, Laurence; McConnell, Ian; Blacklaws, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    The early stages of lentivirus infection of dendritic cells have been studied in an in vivo model. Maedi-visna virus (MVV) is a natural pathogen of sheep with a tropism for macrophages, but the infection of dendritic cells has not been proven, largely because of the difficulties of definitively distinguishing the two cell types. Afferent lymphatic dendritic cells from sheep have been phenotypically characterized and separated from macrophages. Dendritic cells purified from experimentally infe...

  7. In Situ Observation of Cell-to-Dendrite Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiu-Hong; HONG Yong; JIN Wei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The cell-to-dendrite transition of succinonitrile melt suspended on a loop-shaped Pt heater is observed in real time by a differential interference microscope coupled with Schlieren technique. The transition is divided into two parts: a dendrite coalition process and a subsequent dendrite elimination process. Firstly the dendrites from the same cell are united into a single dendrite. Secondly the competitive growth of dendrites from different cells leads to the elimination of dendrites. The two processes can be understood when involving crystallographic orientation. In addition, the tip velocity and primary spacing of a cell/dendrite are also measured. It turns out that the primary spacing has a significant jump, whereas the growth velocity has no abrupt change during the cell-to-dendrite transition.

  8. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  9. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Kure; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s) from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  10. Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus Anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis1 Katherine C. Brittingham,* Gordon Ruthel,* Rekha G...germination and dissemination of spores. Found in high frequency throughout the respiratory track, dendritic cells (DCs) routinely take up foreign...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells endocytose Bacillus anthracis spores: implications for anthrax pathogenesis, The Journal of

  11. Cell culture plastics with immobilized interleukin-4 for monocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Met, Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    at similar concentrations to the passive adsorption process, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the bound IL-4 did not leak into solution to any measurable extent during cell culture. However, covalently bound IL-4 was incapable of inducing monocyte differentiation. This may be caused...... by IL-4 denaturation or improper epitope presentation induced by the immobilization process, or by biological irresponsiveness of monocytes to IL-4 in immobilized formats....

  12. Induction of monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation by asthmatic serum in a transendothelial trafficking model%支气管哮喘患者血清对内皮穿越模型中单核细胞分化为树突状细胞的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周林福; 王文璐; 李红岩; 张明顺; 季晓辉; 何韶衡; 黄茂; 殷凯生

    2011-01-01

    新的体外实验平台.%Objective To explore the effect of asthmatic and healthy serum on differentiation and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) in a transendothelial trafficking model. Methods The sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated from 12 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy volunteers, and monocytes were selected from PBMC using magnetic beads. The trypsin-digested human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) at passage 2 from 5 healthy lying-in women were used to construct the transendothelial trafficking model under asthmatic or healthy serum, wherein MDDC were identified by silver nitrate staining and scanning electron microscopy. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Flow cytometry, ELISA and mixed leukocyte reaction were relevantly utilized to detect the phenotype, cytokine and T cell proliferation. Results ( 1 ) Monocytes traversed through HUVEC monolayer after 2 h, and reverse-transmigrated to develop into DC 48 h later. ( 2 ) The healthy serum stimulated monocytes into immature MDDC with lower CD14 [ ( 20 ±5)%] (F=49.01, P<0.05), and higher HLA-DR, CD80, CD86 and CD83 [(43 ±4)%, (17.9 ±3.5)%, (43 ± 11)% and (6.7 ± 1.8)%, respectively] (F= 10.35 -40.17, all P<0.05) than monocytes did before transmigration at 0 h [ CD14(81 ±6)%, HLA-DR (24 ±5)%, CD80(2. 8 ±2. 0)%,CD86( 14 ±4)% and CD83(0. 9 ±0. 8)%, respectively]. (3) The asthmatic serum stimulated monocytes into mature MDDC, characteristic of dendrites, with similar HLA-DR and CD86 [ ( 55 ± 6 ) % and ( 59 ±12)%] (F=15.29 and 35.97, all P >0.05), higher CD80 and CD83 [(49.7 ± 10.2)% and (30.2 ±6. 8) % ] ( F = 4. 01 and 20. 68, all P < 0. 05), accompanied by increased levels of NF-κB activity, IL-12 p70 and T cell proliferation [ ( 100 ± 11 )%, (568 ±43) ng/L and (2033 ± 198) cpm, respectively] (F=49. 23 - 350. 84, all P < 0. 05 ) relative to the healthy serum-stimulated immature MDDC [ ( 12 ± 3 ) %,(220 ± 35) ng

  13. “Dermal dendritic cells” comprise two distinct populations: CD1+ dendritic cells and CD209+ macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa,Maria Teresa; Loncaric, Anya; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Becker, Todd C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A key cell type of the resident skin immune system is the dendritic cell, which in normal skin is located in two distinct microanatomical compartments: Langerhans cells (LC) mainly in the epidermis and dermal dendritic cells (DDC) in the dermis. Here, the lineage of dermal dendritic cells was investigated using monoclonal antibodies and immunohistology. We provide evidence that “dermal dendritic cells” comprise at least two major phenotypic populations of dendritic appearing cells: immature D...

  14. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  15. Influence of Skin Epithelial cells and Human Umbilical VEIN CELLS Conditioned Media on Maturation of Type 1 Dendritic Cells(DC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ganjybakhsh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dendritic cells have a high potential in presentation of antigens and can be generated and manipulated in invitro culture conditions. Dendritic cells(DC are therefore used in cancer immunotherapy, in prevention of graft rejection, treatment of allergy, autoimmune diseases and certain infectious diseases. Methods: Dendritic cell was generated in two stages. IN the first stage, monocyte cells were converted to immature DC affected GM-CSF and IL-4 .In the second stage, dendritic cells were maturated in the presence of supernatant skin epithelial cells(A375 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVEC and maturation factors. The ability of phagocytosis, expression phenotype, stimulation of T lymphocytes and cytokines was studied. Results: Mature Dendritic cells decreased their power of phagocytosis and increased expression of their surface markers. The ability of T cells stimulation and cytokine production(IL-12 increased . Conclusion: Mixture condition medium of epithelial cells and human skin umbilical vein endothelium cells induces maturation of monocyte-derived DCs. This condition medium improves their phenotype and their functions. The mentioned condition medium generates DC1 and Th1 in vitro.

  16. Indirect Toll-like receptor 5-mediated activation of conventional dendritic cells promotes the mucosal adjuvant activity of flagellin in the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougeron, Delphine; Van Maele, Laurye; Songhet, Pascal; Cayet, Delphine; Hot, David; Van Rooijen, Nico; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Benecke, Arndt G; Sirard, Jean-Claude

    2015-06-26

    The Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist flagellin is an effective adjuvant for vaccination. Recently, we demonstrated that the adaptive responses stimulated by intranasal administration of flagellin and antigen were linked to TLR5 signaling in the lung epithelium. The present study sought to identify the antigen presenting cells involved in this adjuvant activity. We first found that the lung dendritic cells captured antigen very efficiently in a process independent of TLR5. However, TLR5-mediated signaling specifically enhanced the maturation of lung dendritic cells. Afterward, the number of antigen-bound and activated conventional dendritic cells (both CD11b(+) and CD103(+)) increased in the mediastinal lymph nodes in contrast to monocyte-derived dendritic cells. These data suggested that flagellin-activated lung conventional dendritic cells migrate to the draining lymph nodes. The lymph node dendritic cells, in particular CD11b(+) cells, were essential for induction of CD4 T-cell response. Lastly, neutrophils and monocytes were recruited into the lungs by flagellin administration but did not contribute to the adjuvant activity. The functional activation of conventional dendritic cells was independent of direct TLR5 signaling, thereby supporting the contribution of maturation signals produced by flagellin-stimulated airway epithelium. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that indirect TLR5-dependent stimulation of airway conventional dendritic cells is essential to flagellin's mucosal adjuvant activity.

  17. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  18. The Influence of Ouabain on Human Dendritic Cells Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although known as a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor, several other cellular and systemic actions have been ascribed to the steroid Ouabain (Oua. Particularly in the immune system, our group showed that Ouabain acts on decreasing lymphocyte proliferation, synergizing with glucocorticoids in spontaneous thymocyte apoptosis, and also lessening CD14 expression and blocking CD16 upregulation on human monocytes. However, Ouabain effects on dendritic cells (DCs were not explored so far. Considering the peculiar plasticity and the importance of DCs in immune responses, the aim of our study was to investigate DC maturation under Ouabain influence. To generate immature DCs, human monocytes were cultured with IL-4 and GM-CSF (5 days. To investigate Ouabain role on DC activation, DCs were stimulated with TNF-α for 48 h in the presence or absence of Ouabain. TNF-induced CD83 expression and IL-12 production were abolished in DCs incubated with 100 nM Ouabain, though DC functional capacity concerning lymphocyte activation remained unaltered. Nevertheless, TNF-α-induced antigen capture downregulation, another maturation marker, occurred even in the presence of Ouabain. Besides, Ouabain increased HLA-DR and CD86 expression, whereas CD80 expression was maintained. Collectively, our results suggest that DCs respond to Ouabain maturating into a distinct category, possibly contributing to the balance between immunity and tolerance.

  19. CX3CR1-expressing inflammatory dendritic cells contribute to the progression of steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutti, Salvatore; Locatelli, Irene; Bruzzì, Stefania; Jindal, Aastha; Vacchiano, Marco; Bozzola, Cristina; Albano, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    Liver monocytes play a major role in the development of NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis). In inflamed tissues, monocytes can differentiate in both macrophages and dendritic cells. In the present study, we investigated the role of moDCs (monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cells) in experimental steatohepatitis induced in C57BL/6 mice by feeding on a MCD (methionine/choline-deficient) diet. The evolution of steatohepatitis was characterized by an increase in hepatic CD45+ / CD11b+ myeloid cells displaying the monocyte/macrophage marker F4-80(+). In the early phases (4 weeks of treatment), Ly6C(high)/CD11b(+)/F4-80(+) inflammatory macrophages predominated. However, their frequency did not grow further with the disease progression (8 weeks of treatment), when a 4-fold expansion of CD11b(+)/F4-80(+) cells featuring the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) was evident. These CX3CR1+ cells were also characterized by the combined expression of inflammatory monocyte (Ly6C, CD11b) and dendritic cell (CD11c, MHCII) markers as well as by a sustained TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) production, suggesting monocyte differentiation into inflammatory moDCs. The expansion of TNFα-producing CX3CR1+ moDCs was associated with an elevation in hepatic and circulating TNFα level and with the worsening of parenchymal injury. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been shown to interfere with CX3CR1 up-regulation in monocyte-derived cells exposed to pro-inflammatory stimuli. Treating 4-week-MCD-fed mice with the H2S donor NaHS while continuing on the same diet prevented the accumulation of TNFα-producing CX3CR1+ moDCs without interfering with hepatic macrophage functions. Furthermore, NaHS reduced hepatic and circulating TNFα levels and ameliorated transaminase release and parenchymal injury. Altogether, these results show that inflammatory CX3CR1+ moDCs contributed in sustaining inflammation and liver injury during steatohepatitis progression.

  20. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the healthy and atherosclerosis-prone aorta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Galkina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cell precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and dendritic cells can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic dendritic cells provide novel insights into the biology of aortic dendritic cell subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of dendritic cells and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis.

  1. Residual endotoxin contaminations in recombinant proteins are sufficient to activate human CD1c+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Harald; Schmittner, Maria; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available recombinant proteins are produced in Escherichia coli, and most suppliers guarantee contamination levels of less than 1 endotoxin unit (EU). When we analysed commercially available proteins for their endotoxin content, we found contamination levels in the same range as generally stated in the data sheets, but also some that were higher. To analyse whether these low levels of contamination have an effect on immune cells, we stimulated the monocytic cell line THP-1, primary human monocytes, in vitro differentiated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and primary human CD1c+ dendritic cells (DCs) with very low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; ranging from 0.002-2 ng/ml). We show that CD1c+ DCs especially can be activated by minimal amounts of LPS, equivalent to the levels of endotoxin contamination we detected in some commercially available proteins. Notably, the enhanced endotoxin sensitivity of CD1c+ DCs was closely correlated with high CD14 expression levels observed in CD1c+ DCs that had been maintained in cell culture medium for 24 hours. When working with cells that are particularly sensitive to LPS, even low endotoxin contamination may generate erroneous data. We therefore recommend that recombinant proteins be thoroughly screened for endotoxin contamination using the limulus amebocyte lysate test, fluorescence-based assays, or a luciferase based NF-κB reporter assay involving highly LPS-sensitive cells overexpressing TLR4, MD-2 and CD14.

  2. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates in human monocytes by tumour cells and their role in spontaneous monocyte cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytar, B; Siedlar, M; Woloszyn, M; Ruggiero, I; Pryjma, J; Zembala, M

    1999-01-01

    The present study examined the ability of human monocytes to produce reactive oxygen intermediates after a contact with tumour cells. Monocytes generated oxygen radicals, as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence and superoxide anion production, after stimulation with the tumour, but not with untransformed, cells. The use of specific oxygen radical scavengers and inhibitors, superoxide dismutase, catalase, dimethyl sulphoxide and deferoxamine as well as the myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, indicated that chemiluminescence was dependent on the production of superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical and the presence of myeloperoxidase. The tumour cell-induced chemiluminescent response of monocytes showed different kinetics from that seen after activation of monocytes with phorbol ester. These results indicate that human monocytes can be directly stimulated by tumour cells for reactive oxygen intermediate production. Spontaneous monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity towards cancer cells was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, deferoxamine and hydrazide, implicating the role of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical and hypohalite. We wish to suggest that so-called ‘spontaneous’ tumoricidal capacity of freshly isolated human monocytes may in fact be an inducible event associated with generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and perhaps other toxic mediators, resulting from a contact of monocytes with tumour cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070862

  3. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  4. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  5. Dendritic Cells for SYN Scan Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems have previously been applied to the problem of intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on the function of Dendritic Cells (DCs). DCs are antigen presenting cells and key to activation of the human immune system, behaviour which has been abstracted to form the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion, asynchronously correlating the the fused data signals with a secondary data stream. Aggregate output of a population of cells, is analysed and forms the basis of an anomaly detection system. In this paper the DCA is applied to the detection of outgoing port scans using TCP SYN packets. Results show that detection can be achieved with the DCA, yet some false positives can be encountered when simultaneously scanning and using other network services. Suggestions are made for using adaptive signals to alleviate this uncovered problem.

  6. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitti Pazmandi

    Full Text Available Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(PH oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(PH oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs in the airways and SPPs' NAD(PH oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins.

  7. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Aminopeptidase N (CD13 Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica I. Villaseñor-Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13 is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs. In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages.

  10. Induction of regulatory dendritic cells by dexamethasone and 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Gad, Monika; Walter, Mark R;

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) modulated to induce T cell hyporesponsiveness have promising potential in immunotherapy of autoimmune disorders and for the prevention of allograft rejection. While studying the effect of immunosuppressive agents on the maturation of DC we found that 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin...... D(3) the active form of Vitamin D(3) (D(3)) in combination with dexamethasone (Dex) has a synergistic effect on LPS-induced maturation of DC. Monocyte-derived DCs cultured with D(3) and Dex during LPS-induced maturation have a low stimulatory effect on allogeneic T cells comparable...... immunosuppressive drug combination for the induction of DCs capable of inducing T cell hyporesponsiveness....

  11. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  12. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Roider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon® on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  13. Psychedelic N,N-Dimethyltryptamine and 5-Methoxy-N,N-Dimethyltryptamine Modulate Innate and Adaptive Inflammatory Responses through the Sigma-1 Receptor of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Attila Szabo; Attila Kovacs; Ede Frecska; Eva Rajnavolgyi

    2014-01-01

    The orphan receptor sigma-1 (sigmar-1) is a transmembrane chaperone protein expressed in both the central nervous system and in immune cells. It has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cell survival, and mediates anti-inflammatory responses and immunosuppression in murine in vivo models. Since the details of these findings have not been elucidated so far, we studied the effects of the endogenous sigmar-1 ligands N,N-dimethyltryptamine (NN-DMT), its derivative 5-methoxy-N,N-dim...

  14. Psychedelic N,N-Dimethyltryptamine and 5-Methoxy- N,N-Dimethyltryptamine Modulate Innate and Adaptive Inflammatory Responses through the Sigma-1 Receptor of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Attila Szabo; Attila Kovacs; Ede Frecska; Eva Rajnavolgyi

    2014-01-01

    The orphan receptor sigma-1 (sigmar-1) is a transmembrane chaperone protein expressed in both the central nervous system and in immune cells. It has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cell survival, and mediates anti-inflammatory responses and immunosuppression in murine in vivo models. Since the details of these findings have not been elucidated so far, we studied the effects of the endogenous sigmar-1 ligands N,N-dimethyltryptamine (NN-DMT), its derivative 5-methoxy-N,N-dim...

  15. Crosstalk between dendritic cell subsets and implications for dendritic cell-based anticancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakdash, G.; Schreurs, I.; Schreibelt, G.; Tel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a family of professional antigen-presenting cells that have an indispensable role in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens and tumor cells. The DC family is very heterogeneous. Two main types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in periphe

  16. Dendritic Cells as Danger-Recognizing Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokmann Hong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen presenting cells that are characterized by a potent capacity to initiate immune responses. DCs comprise several subsets with distinct phenotypes. After sensing any danger(s to the host via their innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors, DCs become mature and subsequently present antigens to CD4+ T cells. Since DCs possess the intrinsic capacity to polarize CD4+ helper cells, it is critical to understand the immunological roles of DCs for clinical applications. Here, we review the different DC subsets, their danger-sensing receptors and immunological functions. Furthermore, the cytokine reporter mouse model for studying DC activation is introduced.

  17. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  18. Semiautomated analysis of dendrite morphology in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S; Langhammer, Chris L; Kutzing, Melinda K; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying dendrite morphology is a method for determining the effect of biochemical pathways and extracellular agents on neuronal development and differentiation. Quantification can be performed using Sholl analysis, dendrite counting, and length quantification. These procedures can be performed on dendrite-forming cell lines or primary neurons grown in culture. In this protocol, we describe the use of a set of computer programs to assist in quantifying many aspects of dendrite morphology, including changes in total and localized arbor complexity.

  19. Induction of JAM-A during differentiation of human THP-1 dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Noriko; Kojima, Takashi; Go, Mitsuru; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2009-11-20

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A is not only localized at tight junctions of endothelial and epithelial cells but is also expressed on circulating leukocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). In the present study, to investigate the regulation of JAM-A in DCs, mature DCs were differentiated from the human monocytic cell THP-1 by treatment with IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and ionomycin, and some cells were pretreated with the PPAR-gamma agonists. In the THP-1 monocytes, mRNAs of tight junction molecules, occludin, tricellulin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-4, -7, -8, and -9 were detected by RT-PCR. In mature DCs that had elongated dendrites, mRNA and protein of JAM-A were significantly increased compared to the monocytes. PPAR-gamma agonists prevented the elongation of dentrites but not upregulation of JAM-A in mature DCs. These findings indicated that the induction of JAM-A occurred during differentiation of human THP-1 DCs and was independent of PPAR-gamma and the p38 MAPK pathway.

  20. Remodeling of monoplanar Purkinje cell dendrites during cerebellar circuit formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kaneko

    Full Text Available Dendrite arborization patterns are critical determinants of neuronal connectivity and integration. Planar and highly branched dendrites of the cerebellar Purkinje cell receive specific topographical projections from two major afferent pathways; a single climbing fiber axon from the inferior olive that extend along Purkinje dendrites, and parallel fiber axons of granule cells that contact vertically to the plane of dendrites. It has been believed that murine Purkinje cell dendrites extend in a single parasagittal plane in the molecular layer after the cell polarity is determined during the early postnatal development. By three-dimensional confocal analysis of growing Purkinje cells, we observed that mouse Purkinje cells underwent dynamic dendritic remodeling during circuit maturation in the third postnatal week. After dendrites were polarized and flattened in the early second postnatal week, dendritic arbors gradually expanded in multiple sagittal planes in the molecular layer by intensive growth and branching by the third postnatal week. Dendrites then became confined to a single plane in the fourth postnatal week. Multiplanar Purkinje cells in the third week were often associated by ectopic climbing fibers innervating nearby Purkinje cells in distinct sagittal planes. The mature monoplanar arborization was disrupted in mutant mice with abnormal Purkinje cell connectivity and motor discoordination. The dendrite remodeling was also impaired by pharmacological disruption of normal afferent activity during the second or third postnatal week. Our results suggest that the monoplanar arborization of Purkinje cells is coupled with functional development of the cerebellar circuitry.

  1. Clinical grade of generation of dendritic cells for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Duozhuang; Tao, Si; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Jianfeng; Ma, Ding; Huang, Wei

    2007-06-01

    In order to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immunotherapy, aphereses were performed with the continuous flow cell separator and materials were derived from 10 leukemia patients that had achieved complete remission. Peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in vitro with GM-CSF, IL-4 for 6 days, then TNF-(the TNF-group) or TNF-, IL-1, IL-6, PGE2 (the cytokine mixture group) were added to promote maturation. Cell number was counted by hematology analyzer, and phenotype study (CD1a, CD14, CD83) was carried out by flow cytometry, and the function of DCs was examined by mixed lymphocyte reaction. The results showed that (0.70+/-0.13)x10(7)/mL (the TNF-alpha group) and (0.79+/-0.04)x10(7)/mL (the cytokine mixture group) DCs were generated respectively in peripheral blood obtained by leucapheresis. The phenotypes were as follows: CD1a+ (74.65+/-4.45)%, CD83+ (39.50+/-4.16)%, CD14+ (2.90+/-1.76)% in TNF-alpha group, and CD1a+ (81.86+/-5.87)%, CD83+ (81.65+/-6.36)%, CD14+ (2.46+/-1.68)% in the cytokine mixture group. It was concluded that leucapheresis may be a feasible way to provide large number of peripheral blood monocytes for DC generation, and combined administration of TNF-, IL-1, IL-6, and PGE2 may greatly promote maturity.

  2. Clinical Grade of Gerneration of Dendritic Cells for Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Duozhuang; TAO Si; CAO Yang; ZHOU Jianfeng; MA Ding; HUANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immumotherapy, aphereses were performed with the continuous flow cell separator and materials were derived from 10 leukemia patients that had achieved complete remission. Peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in vitro with GM-CSF, IL-4 for 6 days, then TNF-α (the TNF-α group) or TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2 (the cytokine mixture group) were added to promote maturation. Cell number was counted by hematology analyzer, and phenotype study (CD1a, CD14, CD83) was carried out by flow cytometry, and the function of DCs was examined by mixed lymphocyte reaction. The results showed that (0.70±0.13)×107/mL (the TNF-α group) and (0.79±0.04)×107/mL (the cytokine mixture group) DCs were generated respectively in peripheral blood obtained by leucapheresis. The phenotypes were as follows: CD1a+ (74.65±4.45)%, CD83+(39.50±4.16)%, CD14+(2.90±1.76)% in TNF-α group, and CD1a+ (81.86±5.87)%, CD83+ (81.65±6.36)%, CD14+ (2.46±1.68)% in the cytokine mixture group. It was concluded that leucapheresis may be a feasible way to provide large number of peripheral blood monocytes for DC generation, and combined administration of TNF-α, IL-1β,IL-6, and PGE2 may greatly promote maturity.

  3. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell ...... and the optimal frequency, dose, and route of DC administration to achieve therapeutic effects in humans, adoptive VD3-DC transfer represents one of the most promising approaches to future treatment of autoimmune diseases.......Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell...... costimulatory molecules and hampered IL-12 production. These VD3-modulated DCs induce T cell tolerance in vitro using multiple mechanisms such as rendering T cells anergic, dampening of Th1 responses, and recruiting and differentiating regulatory T cells. Due to their ability to specifically target pathological...

  4. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-12-15

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7-8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of µ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of µ-opioid receptors.

  5. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohuai Yang; Hui Xia; Yong Chen; Xiaofen Liu; Cheng Zhou; Qin Gao; Zhenghong Li

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7–8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [3H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of μ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of μ-opioid receptors.

  6. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    in genetically susceptible individuals and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, which accumulate in the inflamed mucosa, are believed to be key drivers of the disease. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the priming of intestinal adaptive immunity and tolerance their role in the initiation and perpetuation...... of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...... to bacterial derived luminal antigen, localize to the intestinal mucosa and induce colitis. Adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into CD11cCre.IRF4fl/fl.RAG-1-/- mice resulted in reduced monocyte recruitment to the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) compared to Cre- controls. Inflammatory cytokines...

  7. PCP can enhance dendritic cells to present the HBsAg peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shang-hong; Gao, Liu-cun; Zhang, Zhi-yong; Li, Yun-ming; Bi, Qian; Song, Cao-jun; Yang, Gui-tao

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the influence of paraclorophenol (pCP) on dendritic cells loading and presenting HBsAg from peripheral blood monocytes of healthy volunteers identified as hepatitis B vaccine nonresponders. The density gradient centrifugation was performed to isolate mononuclear cells from 10 hepatitis B vaccine nonresponders. The adherent monocytes were incubated with HBsAg adding rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 in the presence of absence of pCP for 7 days. Then the supernatant was collected for ELISA assays. The culture medium system without pCP was used as negative control and without pCP or HBsAG was named blank control. the matured DCs were co-incubated with autologous T lymphocytes for 72h and the supernatant was also collected for ELISA assays. In the presence of pCP, the level of IL-12 in supernate (265.68± 16.21) ng/L was significantly higher than the negative control (168.76±10.01) ng/L (PpCP (773.04±32.73) mg/L was also significantly higher than the negative control (573.59±26.11) mg/L (PpCP can effectively enhance the dendritic cells loading and presenting HBsAg from peripheral blood monocytes of healthy volunteers identified as hepatitis B vaccine nonresponders, which also can dramatically increase te autologous T lymphocytes response.7

  8. Characterization of small, mononuclear blood cells from salmon having high phagocytic capacity and ability to differentiate into dendritic like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyri T Haugland

    Full Text Available Phagocytes are the principal component of the innate immune system, playing a key role in the clearance of foreign particles that include potential pathogens. In vertebrates, both neutrophils and mononuclear cells like monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells are all professional phagocytes. In teleosts, B-lymphocytes also have potent phagocytic ability. We have isolated a population of small (<5 µm, mononuclear blood cells from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. not previously characterized. In order to identify them, we have performed morphological, gene expression, flow cytometry, cytochemical, ultrastructural and functional analyses. Interestingly, they highly express the gene encoding CD83, the most characteristic cell surface marker for dendritic cells in mammals, and MHC class II limited to professional antigen presenting cells. They did not express genes nor did they have cell markers for B-cells, T-cells, monocytes/macrophages or neutrophils as shown by qRT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. A remarkable feature of these cells is their potent phagocytic capacity. Their oxygen-independent killing mechanism, as shown by intense acid phosphatase staining, is supported by lack of respiratory burst and myeloperoxidase activity and the acid phosphatase's sensitivity to tartrate. They show a high level of morphological plasticity, as, upon stimulation with mitogens, they change morphology and obtain branching protrusions similarly to dendritic cells. We suggest, based on our findings, that the small, round cells described here are progenitor cells with potential to differentiate into dendritic like cells, although we can not exclude the possibility that they represent a novel cell type.

  9. Vaginal epithelial dendritic cells renew from bone marrow precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Norifumi; Linehan, Melissa M; Saeland, Sem; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2007-11-27

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent key professional antigen-presenting cells capable of initiating primary immune responses. A specialized subset of DCs, the Langerhans cells (LCs), are located in the stratified squamous epithelial layer of the skin and within the mucosal epithelial lining of the vaginal and oral cavities. The vaginal mucosa undergoes cyclic changes under the control of sex hormones, and the renewal characteristics of the vaginal epithelial DCs (VEDCs) remain unknown. Here, we examined the origin of VEDCs. In contrast to the skin epidermal LCs, the DCs in the epithelium of the vagina were found to be repopulated mainly by nonmonocyte bone-marrow-derived precursors, with a half-life of 13 days under steady-state conditions. Upon infection with HSV-2, the Gr-1(hi) monocytes were found to give rise to VEDCs. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis of the VEDCs revealed the presence of at least three distinct populations, namely, CD11b(+)F4/80(hi), CD11b(+)F4/80(int), and CD11b(-)F4/80(-). Importantly, these VEDC populations expressed CD207 at low levels and had a constitutively more activated phenotype compared with the skin LCs. Collectively, our results revealed mucosa-specific features of the VEDCs with respect to their phenotype, activation status, and homeostatic renewal potential.

  10. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wan; Marcel Dupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation,they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo,studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments.

  11. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiWan; MarcelDupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation, they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo, studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):28-35.

  12. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  13. Phenotype and polarization of autologous T cells by biomaterial-treated dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H; Babensee, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T-cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T-cell phenotype was investigated. In this study, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T-cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pretreat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T-cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper (Th) types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels as compared with DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared with that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T-cell responses.

  14. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  15. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  16. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  17. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC...... are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug...... delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC....

  18. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Claesson, M H

    2009-01-01

    we have developed fast DC protocol by comparing two different fast DC protocols with SDDC. DC were evaluated by FACS analysis, and the optimal profile was considered: CD14(low), CD80(high), CD83(high), CD86(high), CCR7(high), HLA class I and II(high). FACS profiles were used as the selection criteria...... together with yield and morphology. Two fast DC protocols fulfilled these criteria and were selected for functional analysis. Our results demonstrate that DC generated within 5days or 48h are comparable with SDDC both phenotypically and functionally. However, we found that 48h DC were more susceptible than...... SDDC to the IL-10 inducing stimulus of TLR ligands (R848 and LPS). Thus to determine the clinical relevance of fast DC protocols in cancer settings, small phase I trials should be conducted monitoring regulatory T cells carefully....

  19. Novel immunomodulatory effects of adiponectin on dendritic cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Julia Yuen Shan; Li, Daxu; Ho, Derek; Peng, Jiao; Xu, Aimin; Lamb, Jonathan; Chen, Yan; Tam, Paul Kwong Hang

    2011-05-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory properties. Although it has been reported that ADN can inhibit the immunostimulatory function of monocytes and macrophages, little is known of its effect on dendritic cells (DC). Recent data suggest that ADN can regulate immune responses. DCs are uniquely specialised antigen presenting cells that play a central role in the initiation of immunity and tolerance. In this study, we have investigated the immuno- modulatory effects of ADN on DC functions. We found that ADN has only moderate effect on the differentiation of murine bone marrow (BM) derived DCs but altered the phenotype of DCs. The expression of major histocompatibilty complex class II (MHCII), CD80 and CD86 on ADN conditioned DCs (ADN-DCs) was lower than that on untreated cells. The production of IL-12p40 was also suppressed in ADN-DCs. Interestingly, ADN treated DCs showed an increase in the expression of the inhibitory molecule, programmed death-1 ligand (PDL-1) compared to untreated cells. In vitro co-culture of ADN-DCs with allogeneic T cells led to a decrease in T cell proliferation and reduction of IL-2 production. Concomitant with that, a higher percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) was detected in co-cultures of T cells and ADN-DCs. Blocking PD-1/PDL-1 pathway could partially restore T cell function. These findings suggest that the immunomodulatory effect of ADN on immune responses could be at least partially be mediated by its ability to alter DC function. The PD-1/PDL-1 pathway and the enhancement of Treg expansion are implicated in the immunomodulatory mechanisms.

  20. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  1. Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkyung; Park, Tae-Ju; Kwon, Namseop; Lee, Dongmyeong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Curran, Tom; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-07-01

    The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

  2. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  3. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Molumby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs, have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron’s dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes.

  4. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Kure Wu

    Full Text Available Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  5. Oncostatin M production by human dendritic cells in response to bacterial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo; Todate, Akihito; Ide, Kyotaro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Kuwata, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2002-03-21

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a pleiomorphic cytokine that belongs to the IL-6 cytokine family. It is produced by activated T cells and monocytes/macrophages and plays an important role in the process of inflammatory responses. Although dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to secrete a variety of cytokines, it is not elucidated whether DCs are able to produce OSM. To clarify this, using human DCs derived from peripheral blood cells, we measured the protein levels of OSM in the supernatants of DC cultures by ELISA and examined the expression of OSM mRNA by RT-PCR after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or fixed Staphylococcus aureus (SACS). Upon stimulation with bacterial products, DCs secreted a large amount of OSM protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the expression of OSM mRNA by DCs was markedly up-regulated. Compared the ability of DCs to produce OSM with that of monocytes, which are major producers of OSM, DCs released significantly higher amounts of OSM protein in the culture supernatants than monocytes. These findings indicate for the first time that human monocyte-derived DCs can synthesize and secrete large amounts of OSM in response to bacterial products, suggesting that OSM produced by DCs at infectious sites may play a role in modulating inflammatory responses.

  6. Phenotypic and functional characterization of clinical grade dendritic cells generated from patients with advanced breast cancer for therapeutic vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Thorn, M; Gad, M;

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. However, it is not known whether in vitro-generated monocyte-derived DC from cancer patients are altered compared with DC from healthy donors. In a clinical phase I/II study, monocyte-derived DC were generated in vitro...... utilizing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and rh-interleukin-4 (IL-4) and used for cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we tested the effect of various maturation cocktails and performed a comparative evaluation of the DC phenotype and functional characteristics. Polyriboinosinic...

  7. Presence and regulation of the endocannabinoid system in human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Isabel; Pochard, Pierre; Orlando, Pierangelo; Salzet, Michel; Pestel, Joel; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2002-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids, have been detected in several blood immune cells, including monocytes/macrophages, basophils and lymphocytes. However, their presence in dendritic cells, which play a key role in the initiation and development of the immune response, has never been investigated. Here we have analyzed human dendritic cells for the presence of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, and one of the enzymes mostly responsible for endocannabinoid hydrolysis, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By using a very sensitive liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometric (LC-APCI-MS) method, lipids extracted from immature dendritic cells were shown to contain 2-AG, anandamide and the anti-inflammatory anandamide congener, N-palmitoylethanolamine (PalEtn) (2.1 +/- 1.0, 0.14 +/- 0.02 and 8.2 +/- 3.9 pmol x 10(-7) cells, respectively). The amounts of 2-AG, but not anandamide or PalEtn, were significantly increased following cell maturation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the allergen Der p 1 (2.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively). By using both RT-PCR and Western immunoblotting, dendritic cells were also found to express measurable amounts of CB1 and CB2 receptors and of FAAH. Cell maturation did not consistently modify the expression of these proteins, although in some cell preparations a decrease of the levels of both CB1 and CB2 mRNA transcripts was observed after LPS stimulation. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the endogenous cannabinoid system is present in human dendritic cells and can be regulated by cell activation.

  8. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  9. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  10. Characterization of Dendritic Cell and Regulatory T Cell Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Morris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH is a tripeptide that regulates intracellular redox and other vital aspects of cellular functions. GSH plays a major role in enhancing the immune system. Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen presenting cells that participate in both innate and acquired immune responses against microbial infections. Regulatory T cells (Tregs play a significant role in immune homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the effects of GSH in enhancing the innate and adaptive immune functions of DCs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb infection. We also characterized the functions of the sub-populations of CD4+T cells such as Tregs and non-Tregs in modulating the ability of monocytes to control the intracellular M. tb infection. Our results indicate that GSH by its direct antimycobacterial activity inhibits the growth of intracellular M. tb inside DCs. GSH also increases the expressions of costimulatory molecules such as HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 on the cell surface of DCs. Furthermore, GSH-enhanced DCs induced a higher level of T-cell proliferation. We also observed that enhancing the levels of GSH in Tregs resulted in downregulation in the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β and reduction in the fold growth of M. tb inside monocytes. Our studies demonstrate novel regulatory mechanisms that favor both innate and adaptive control of M. tb infection.

  11. Dendrimer-like alpha-d-glucan nanoparticles activate dendritic cells and are effective vaccine adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fangjia; Mencia, Alejandra; Bi, Lin; Taylor, Aaron; Yao, Yuan; HogenEsch, Harm

    2015-04-28

    The use of nanoparticles for delivery of vaccine antigens and as vaccine adjuvants is appealing because their size allows efficient uptake by dendritic cells and their biological properties can be tailored to the desired function. Here, we report the effect of chemically modified phytoglycogen, a dendrimer-like α-d-glucan nanoparticle, on dendritic cells in vitro, and the utility of this type of nanoparticle as a vaccine adjuvant in vivo. The modified phytoglycogen nanoparticle, termed Nano-11, has a positive surface charge which enabled electrostatic adsorption of negatively charged protein antigens. The Nano-11-antigen complexes were efficiently phagocytized by dendritic cells. Nano-11 induced increased expression of costimulatory molecules and the secretion of IL-1β and IL-12p40 by dendritic cells. Intramuscular injection of Nano-11-antigen formulations induced a significantly enhanced immune response to two different protein antigens. Examination of the injection site revealed numerous monocytes and relatively few neutrophils at one day after injection. The inflammation had nearly completely disappeared by 2 weeks after injection. These studies indicate that Nano-11 is an effective vaccine delivery vehicle that significantly enhances the immune response. This type of plant based nanoparticle is considered highly cost-effective compared with fully synthetic nanoparticles and appears to have an excellent safety profile making them an attractive adjuvant candidate for prophylactic vaccines.

  12. Myeloid dendritic cells frequencies are increased in children with autism spectrum disorder and associated with amygdala volume and repetitive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breece, Elizabeth; Paciotti, Brian; Nordahl, Christine Wu; Ozonoff, Sally; Van de Water, Judy A; Rogers, Sally J; Amaral, David; Ashwood, Paul

    2013-07-01

    The pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not yet known; however, studies suggest that dysfunction of the immune system affects many children with ASD. Increasing evidence points to dysfunction of the innate immune system including activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages, increases in inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in brain tissue and CSF, and abnormal peripheral monocyte cell function. Dendritic cells are major players in innate immunity and have important functions in the phagocytosis of pathogens or debris, antigen presentation, activation of naïve T cells, induction of tolerance and cytokine/chemokine production. In this study, we assessed circulating frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells (defined as Lin-1(-)BDCA1(+)CD11c(+) and Lin-1(-)BDCA3(+)CD123(-)) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (Lin-1(-)BDCA2(+)CD123(+) or Lin-1(-)BDCA4(+) CD11c(-)) in 57 children with ASD, and 29 typically developing controls of the same age, all of who were enrolled as part of the Autism Phenome Project (APP). The frequencies of dendritic cells and associations with behavioral assessment and MRI measurements of amygdala volume were compared in the same participants. The frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells were significantly increased in children with ASD compared to typically developing controls (pfrequencies of myeloid dendritic cells were positively associated with abnormal right and left amygdala enlargement, severity of gastrointestinal symptoms and increased repetitive behaviors. The frequencies of plasmacytoid dendritic cells were also associated with amygdala volumes as well as developmental regression in children with ASD. Dendritic cells play key roles in modulating immune responses and differences in frequencies or functions of these cells may result in immune dysfunction in children with ASD. These data further implicate innate immune cells in the complex pathophysiology of ASD.

  13. Optimizing parameters for clinical-scale production of high IL-12 secreting dendritic cells pulsed with oxidized whole tumor cell lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang Cheryl L-L; Maier Dawn A; Kandalaft Lana E; Brennan Andrea L; Lanitis Evripidis; Ye Qunrui; Levine Bruce L; Czerniecki Brian J; Powell Jr Daniel J; Coukos George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for activating tumor-specific T cells. Due to the wide range of methods for generating DCs, there is no common protocol or defined set of criteria to validate the immunogenicity and function of DC vaccines. Methods Monocyte-derived DCs were generated during 4 days of culture with recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4, and pulsed with tumor lysate produced b...

  14. 雷公藤红素对 CD1+4单核细胞来源的树突细胞分化及成熟的影响%Effect of celastrol on differentiation and maturation of CD1+4 monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑄; 刘郁莹; 彭美玉; 薛振毅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To Make the differentiation and activation models of dendritic cells ( DCs ) and to investigate the effect of celastrol on the differentiation and maturation of human DCs in vitro .Methods Fresh human buffy coat was obtained , and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated .Purified CDl4+monocytes were analyzed by FACSCalibur to confirm the purity of CD1+4 cells.The purified CD1+4 cells were cultured in complete 1640 medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4 for 5 days and 7 days.For DC maturation, cells were stimulated with 5?g/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at day 5.The control group was not added celastrol , but the celastrol group was added 10 and 20 nM celastrol, respectively. Then immature DCs ( iDC ) and mature DCs ( mDC ) were collected to detect the mean fluorescent intensity ( MFI ) of CD80 , CD83 , CD86 , HLA-DR and the absorb capacity of FITC-dextran by flow cytometry .Results Compared with the control group, the MFI of CD80 , CD83 , CD86 and HLA-DR of iDC and mDC in the celastrol group was lower , and the treat-ment of 20 nM was lower than the treatment of 10 nM, all P<0.05.The MFI of FITC-dextran in the negative control group (10.1 ±2.1) was the lowest, and was the highest in control group (243.7 ±31.3);in addition, the MFI of FITC-dextran in the 20 nM celastrol group (72.4 ±10.2) was lower than that of the 10 nM celastrol group (186.3 ±22.6), all P<0.05.Conclusions Celastrol inhibits CD1+4 monocytes differentiating into DCs , further inhibits phenotypic maturation of LPS-induced DCs , and suppresses the antigen-presenting function of iDC .%目的:制作免疫树突细胞( DC)分化和激活模型,观察雷公藤红素对人DC体外分化和成熟的影响。方法采集浓缩人白细胞,淋巴细胞分离液分离单个核细胞,利用免疫磁珠法分离CD1+4细胞,流式细胞分选仪确认分选纯度。将分选的CD1+4细胞在含IL-4和GM-CSF的完全1640培养基中分别培养5 d(分化)和7 d(5 d

  15. In vivo evidence for dendritic cell lysis by NK cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    By using an experimental model of anticancer vaccination, we have recently lent support to the assumption, so far only sustained by in vitro data, that natural killer cells can restrain less immunogenic, allegedly tolerogenic, dendritic cells (DCs). This in vivo selection of immunogenic DCs appears to depend on perforin and to be associated with a more protective tumor-specific T lymphocyte response.

  16. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  17. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathan, T.S.M.; Figdor, C.G.; Buschow, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presentin

  18. Comparison of clinical grade type 1 polarized and standard matured dendritic cells for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Donia, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) used for immunotherapy e.g. against cancer are commonly matured by pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 although the absence of Toll-like receptor mediated activation prevents secretion of IL-12 from DCs and subsequent efficient......DCs and strikingly had the highest expression of the inhibitory molecules PD-L1 and CD25. Thus, further studies with type 1 polarized DCs are warranted for use in immunotherapy, but when combined with PGE2 as in mpDCs, they seems to be less optimal for maturation of DCs....

  19. Ebola and Marburg Viruses Replicate in Monocyle- Derived Dendritic Cells without Inducing the Production of Cytokines and Full Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    secretion in response to a second IFN-inducing stimulus ( replication -defective alphavirus ) was also potently inhibited by both viruses. From these data...1630 • JID 2003:188 (1 December) • Bosio et al. M A J O R A R T I C L E Ebola and Marburg Viruses Replicate in Monocyte- Derived Dendritic Cells...immune responses. We demonstrate that EBOV and MARV infected and replicated in primary human DCs without inducing cytokine secretion. Infected DC

  20. Autocrine CCL19 blocks dendritic cell migration toward weak gradients of CCL21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, Özcan; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2016-01-01

    the effect of autocrine CCL19 on in vitro migration of human DCs toward CCL21. Results. Using human monocyte-derived DCs in a 3D chemotaxis assay, we are the first to demonstrate that CCL19 more potently induces directed migration of human DCs compared with CCL21. When comparing migration of type 1 DCs......Background aims. Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) induces their homing from peripheral to lymphatic tissues guided by CCL21. However, in vitro matured human monocyte-derived DC cancer vaccines injected intradermally migrate poorly to lymph nodes (LNs). In vitro maturation protocols generate DCs...... and PGE2-DCs, migration of type 1 DCs was strikingly impaired compared with PGE2-DCs, but only toward low concentrations of CCL21. When type 1 DCs were cultured overnight in fresh culture medium (reducing autocrine CCL19 levels), a rescuing effect was observed on migration toward low concentrations of CCL...

  1. Information Fusion for Anomaly Detection with the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Tedesco, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system, providing the initial detection of pathogenic invaders. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform information fusion which directs immune responses. We have derived a Dendritic Cell Algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, by modelling the biological signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present algorithmic details in addition to experimental results, when the algorithm was applied to anomaly detection for the detection of port scans. The results show the Dendritic Cell Algorithm is sucessful at detecting port scans.

  2. Closed system generation of dendritic cells from a single blood volume for clinical application in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, M; van Zanten, J; Hospers, G A P; Setroikromo, A; de Jong, M A; de Leij, L F M H; Mulder, N H

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) used for clinical trials should be processed on a large scale conforming to current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) guidelines. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of immature DC in a closed-system. Aphereses were performed with the Cobe Spectra continuous flow cell separator and material was derived from one volume of blood processed. Optimisation of a 3-phase collection autoPBSC technique significantly improved the quality of the initial mononuclear cell (MNC) product. Monocytes were then enriched from MNC by immunomagnetic depletion of CD19+ B cells and CD2+ T cells and partial depletion of NK cells using the Isolex 300I Magnetic cell selector. The quality of the initial mononuclear cell product was found to determine the outcome of monocyte enrichment. Enriched monocytes were cultured in Opticyte gas-permeable containers using CellGro serum-free medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4 to generate immature DC. A seeding concentration of 1 x 10(6) was found optimal in terms of DC phenotype expression, monocyte percentage in culture, and cell viability. The differentiation pattern favours day 7 for harvest of immature DC. DC recovery, viability, as well as phenotype expression after cryopreservation of immature DC was considered in this study. DC were induced to maturation and evaluated in FACS analysis for phenotype expression and proliferation assays. Mature DC were able to generate an allogeneic T-cell response as well as an anti-CMV response as detected by proliferation assays. These data indicate that the described large-scale GMP-compatible system results in the generation of stable DC derived from one volume of blood processed, which are qualitatively and quantitatively sufficient for clinical application in immunotherapeutic protocols.

  3. Regulation of monocyte cell fate by blood vessels mediated by Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Giagnorio, Roberto; Jussofie, Jasmin; Soehnlein, Oliver; Duchene, Johan; Briseño, Carlos G; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Krishnasamy, Kashyap; Limbourg, Anne; Kapanadze, Tamar; Ishifune, Chieko; Hinkel, Rabea; Radtke, Freddy; Strobl, Lothar J; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Napp, L Christian; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Yasutomo, Koji; Kupatt, Christian; Murphy, Kenneth M; Adams, Ralf H; Weber, Christian; Limbourg, Florian P

    2016-08-31

    A population of monocytes, known as Ly6C(lo) monocytes, patrol blood vessels by crawling along the vascular endothelium. Here we show that endothelial cells control their origin through Notch signalling. Using combinations of conditional genetic deletion strategies and cell-fate tracking experiments we show that Notch2 regulates conversion of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into Ly6C(lo) monocytes in vivo and in vitro, thereby regulating monocyte cell fate under steady-state conditions. This process is controlled by Notch ligand delta-like 1 (Dll1) expressed by a population of endothelial cells that constitute distinct vascular niches in the bone marrow and spleen in vivo, while culture on recombinant DLL1 induces monocyte conversion in vitro. Thus, blood vessels regulate monocyte conversion, a form of committed myeloid cell fate regulation.

  4. Evidence for local dendritic cell activation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Bregje

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease characterized by a seemingly exaggerated immune response against a difficult to discern antigen. Dendritic cells (DCs are pivotal antigen presenting cells thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Paradoxically, decreased DC immune reactivity was reported in blood samples from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients. However, functional data on lung DCs in sarcoidosis are lacking. We hypothesized that at the site of disease DCs are mature, immunocompetent and involved in granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL and blood from newly diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls using 9-color flowcytometry. DCs, isolated from BAL using flowcytometric sorting (mDCs or cultured from monocytes (mo-DCs, were functionally assessed in a mixed leukocyte reaction with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Using Immunohistochemistry, location and activation status of CD11c+DCs was assessed in mucosal airway biopsies. Results mDCs in BAL, but not in blood, from sarcoidosis patients were increased in number when compared with mDCs from healthy controls. mDCs purified from BAL of sarcoidosis patients induced T cell proliferation and differentiation and did not show diminished immune reactivity. Mo-DCs from patients induced increased TNFα release in co-cultures with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses revealed increased numbers of mature CD86+ DCs in granuloma-containing airway mucosal biopsies from sarcoidosis patients. Conclusion Taken together, these finding implicate increased local DC activation in granuloma formation or maintenance in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  5. Modulation of tolerogenic dendritic cells and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2015-05-01

    A key function of dendritic cells (DCs) is to induce either immune tolerance or immune activation. Many new DC subsets are being recognized, and it is now clear that each DC subset has a specialized function. For example, different DC subsets may express different cell surface molecules and respond differently to activation by secretion of a unique cytokine profile. Apart from intrinsic differences among DC subsets, various immune modulators in the microenvironment may influence DC function; inappropriate DC function is closely related to the development of immune disorders. The most exciting recent advance in DC biology is appreciation of human DC subsets. In this review, we discuss functionally different mouse and human DC subsets both in lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid organs, the molecules that regulate DC function, and the emerging understanding of the contribution of DCs to autoimmune diseases.

  6. Flt3+ macrophage precursors commit sequentially to osteoclasts, dendritic cells and microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanau Daniel

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages, osteoclasts, dendritic cells, and microglia are highly specialized cells that belong to the mononuclear phagocyte system. Functional and phenotypic heterogeneity within the mononuclear phagocyte system may reveal differentiation plasticity of a common progenitor, but developmental pathways leading to such diversity are still unclear. Results Mouse bone marrow cells were expanded in vitro in the presence of Flt3-ligand (FL, yielding high numbers of non-adherent cells exhibiting immature monocyte characteristics. Cells expanded for 6 days, 8 days, or 11 days (day 6-FL, day 8-FL, and day 11-FL cells, respectively exhibited constitutive potential towards macrophage differentiation. In contrast, they showed time-dependent potential towards osteoclast, dendritic, and microglia differentiation that was detected in day 6-, day 8-, and day 11-FL cells, in response to M-CSF and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating-factor (GM-CSF and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, and glial cell-conditioned medium (GCCM, respectively. Analysis of cell proliferation using the vital dye CFSE revealed homogenous growth in FL-stimulated cultures of bone marrow cells, demonstrating that changes in differential potential did not result from sequential outgrowth of specific precursors. Conclusions We propose that macrophages, osteoclasts, dendritic cells, and microglia may arise from expansion of common progenitors undergoing sequential differentiation commitment. This study also emphasizes differentiation plasticity within the mononuclear phagocyte system. Furthermore, selective massive cell production, as shown here, would greatly facilitate investigation of the clinical potential of dendritic cells and microglia.

  7. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  8. TRAIL+ monocytes and monocyte-related cells cause lung damage and thereby increase susceptibility to influenza-Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Gregory T; Davidson, Sophia; Crotta, Stefania; Branzk, Nora; Papayannopoulos, Venizelos; Wack, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection is a major cause of influenza-associated mortality; however, the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis or protection remain unclear. Using a clinically relevant mouse model, we identify immune-mediated damage early during coinfection as a new mechanism causing susceptibility. Coinfected CCR2(-/-) mice lacking monocytes and monocyte-derived cells control bacterial invasion better, show reduced epithelial damage and are overall more resistant than wild-type controls. In influenza-infected wild-type lungs, monocytes and monocyte-derived cells are the major cell populations expressing the apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL. Accordingly, anti-TRAIL treatment reduces bacterial load and protects against coinfection if administered during viral infection, but not following bacterial exposure. Post-influenza bacterial outgrowth induces a strong proinflammatory cytokine response and massive inflammatory cell infiltrate. Depletion of neutrophils or blockade of TNF-α facilitate bacterial outgrowth, leading to increased mortality, demonstrating that these factors aid bacterial control. We conclude that inflammatory monocytes recruited early, during the viral phase of coinfection, induce TRAIL-mediated lung damage, which facilitates bacterial invasion, while TNF-α and neutrophil responses help control subsequent bacterial outgrowth. We thus identify novel determinants of protection versus pathology in influenza-Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection.

  9. Triggering of dendritic cell apoptosis by xanthohumol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Gulbins, Erich; Gu, Shuchen; Götz, Friedrich; Lang, Florian

    2010-07-01

    Xanthohumol, a flavonoid from beer with anticancer activity is known to trigger apoptosis in a variety of tumor cells. Xanthohumol further has anti-inflammatory activity. However, little is known about the effect of xanthohumol on survival and function of immune cells. The present study thus addressed the effect of xanthohumol on dendritic cells (DCs), key players in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. To this end, mouse bone marrow-derived DCs were treated with xanthohumol with subsequent assessment of enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase (Asm), ceramide formation determined with anti-ceramide antibodies in FACS and immunohistochemical analysis, caspase activity utilizing FITC conjugated anti-active caspase 8 or caspase 3 antibodies in FACS and by Western blotting, DNA fragmentation by determining the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and cell membrane scrambling by annexin V binding in FACS analysis. As a result, xanthohumol stimulated Asm, enhanced ceramide formation, activated caspases 8 and 3, triggered DNA fragmentation and led to cell membrane scrambling, all effects virtually absent in DCs from gene targeted mice lacking functional Asm or in wild-type cells treated with sphingomyelinase inhibitor amitriptyline. In conclusion, xanthohumol stimulated Asm leading to caspase activation and apoptosis of bone marrow-derived DCs.

  10. Cryptococcus gattii is killed by dendritic cells, but evades adaptive immunity by failing to induce dendritic cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Shaunna M; Li, Shu Shun; Stack, Danuta; Timm-McCann, Martina; Jones, Gareth J; Islam, Anowara; Berenger, Byron M; Xiang, Richard F; Colarusso, Pina; Mody, Christopher H

    2013-07-01

    During adaptive immunity to pathogens, dendritic cells (DCs) capture, kill, process, and present microbial Ags to T cells. Ag presentation is accompanied by DC maturation driven by appropriate costimulatory signals. However, current understanding of the intricate regulation of these processes remains limited. Cryptococcus gattii, an emerging fungal pathogen in the Pacific Northwest of Canada and the United States, fails to stimulate an effective immune response in otherwise healthy hosts leading to morbidity or death. Because immunity to fungal pathogens requires intact cell-mediated immunity initiated by DCs, we asked whether C. gattii causes dysregulation of DC functions. C. gattii was efficiently bound and internalized by human monocyte-derived DCs, trafficked to late phagolysosomes, and killed. Yet, even with this degree of DC activation, the organism evaded pathways leading to DC maturation. Despite the ability to recognize and kill C. gattii, immature DCs failed to mature; there was no increased expression of MHC class II, CD86, CD83, CD80, and CCR7, or decrease of CD11c and CD32, which resulted in suboptimal T cell responses. Remarkably, no increase in TNF-α was observed in the presence of C. gattii. However, addition of recombinant TNF-α or stimulation that led to TNF-α production restored DC maturation and restored T cell responses. Thus, despite early killing, C. gattii evades DC maturation, providing a potential explanation for its ability to infect immunocompetent individuals. We have also established that DCs retain the ability to recognize and kill C. gattii without triggering TNF-α, suggesting independent or divergent activation pathways among essential DC functions.

  11. A novel cell subset:Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports introduce a novel cell subset of DCs with antigenic phenotypes shared by both NK cells and B cells, but without surface markers of pDCs and T cells, appearing to be a chimera of NK cells and DCs, namely interferon-producing killer dendritic cells(IKDCs).IKDCs not only secret type I and type II interferons to recognize and kill tumor cells effectively, but also express MHC-II molecules to present antigens.Thus, IKDCs are considered as important immunosurveilance cells for tumors, providing a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  12. CD56 marks human dendritic cell subsets with cytotoxic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roothans, D.; Smits, E.; Lion, E.; Tel, J.; Anguille, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), when appropriately stimulated, can express the archetypal natural killer (NK)-cell surface marker CD56. In addition to classical DC functions, CD56+ DCs are endowed with an unconventional cytotoxic capacity.

  13. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies.

  14. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  15. Characterization of hematopoietic GATA transcription factor expression in mouse and human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheenstra, Maaike R; Salunkhe, Vishal; De Cuyper, Iris M; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Li, Eveline; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key initiators and regulators of the immune response. The development of the DC lineage and their subsets requires an orchestrated regulation of their transcriptional program. Gata1, a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic cell lineages, has been recently reported to be required for mouse DC development and function. In humans, GATA1 is involved in the lineage separation between monocyte-derived DCs and Langerhans cells (LC) and loss of GATA1 results in differentiation arrest at the monocyte stage. The hematopoietic GATA factors (i.e. Gata1, Gata2, Gata3) are known to regulate each other's expression and to function consecutively throughout lineage commitment (so-called GATA switch). In humans, mutations in GATA2 are causative of MonoMAC disease, a human immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by loss of DCs, monocytes, B and NK cells. However, additional data on the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in the DC lineage is missing. In this study, we have characterized the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in murine and human DCs and their expression dynamics upon TLR stimulation. We found that all hematopoietic GATA factors are expressed in DCs, but identified species-specific differences in the relative expression of each GATA factor, and how their expression fluctuates upon stimulation.

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi partially activates human myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Keith E; Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses to bacteria. How Haemophilus ducreyi, which causes genital ulcers and regional lymphadenitis, interacts with DC is unknown. H. ducreyi evades uptake by polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage-like cell lines by secreting LspA1 and LspA2. Many H. ducreyi strains express cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), and recombinant CDT causes apoptosis of DC in vitro. Here, we examined interactions between DC and H. ducreyi 35000HP, which produces LspA1, LspA2, and CDT. In human volunteers infected with 35000HP, the ratio of myeloid DC to plasmacytoid DC was 2.8:1 in lesions, compared to a ratio of 1:1 in peripheral blood. Using myeloid DC derived from monocytes as surrogates for lesional DC, we found that DC infected with 35000HP remained as viable as uninfected DC for up to 48 h. Gentamicin protection and confocal microscopy assays demonstrated that DC ingested and killed 35000HP, but killing was incomplete at 48 h. The expression of LspA1 and LspA2 did not inhibit the uptake of H. ducreyi, despite inactivating Src kinases. Infection of DC with live 35000HP caused less cell surface marker activation than infection with heat-killed 35000HP and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited maturation by LPS. However, infection of DC with live bacteria caused the secretion of significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha than infection with heat-killed bacteria and LPS. The survival of H. ducreyi in DC may provide a mechanism by which the organism traffics to lymph nodes. Partial activation of DC may abrogate the establishment of a full Th1 response and an environment that promotes phagocytosis.

  17. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ma, Galina V. Shurin, Zhu Peiyuan, Michael R. Shurin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer.

  18. Derivation and Utilization of Functional CD8(+) Dendritic Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigni, Matteo; Ashok, Devika; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2016-01-01

    It is notoriously difficult to obtain large quantities of non-activated dendritic cells ex vivo. For this reason, we produced and characterized a mouse model expressing the large T oncogene under the CD11c promoter (Mushi mice), in which CD8α(+) dendritic cells transform after 4 months. We derived a variety of stable cell lines from these primary lines. These cell lines reproducibly share with freshly isolated dendritic cells most surface markers, mRNA and protein expression, and all tested biological functions. Cell lines can be derived from various strains and knockout mice and can be easily transduced with lentiviruses. In this article, we describe the derivation, culture, and lentiviral transduction of these dendritic cell lines.

  19. Adenosine deaminase enhances the immunogenicity of human dendritic cells from healthy and HIV-infected individuals.

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    Víctor Casanova

    Full Text Available ADA is an enzyme implicated in purine metabolism, and is critical to ensure normal immune function. Its congenital deficit leads to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. ADA binding to adenosine receptors on dendritic cell surface enables T-cell costimulation through CD26 crosslinking, which enhances T-cell activation and proliferation. Despite a large body of work on the actions of the ecto-enzyme ADA on T-cell activation, questions arise on whether ADA can also modulate dendritic cell maturation. To this end we investigated the effects of ADA on human monocyte derived dendritic cell biology. Our results show that both the enzymatic and non-enzymatic activities of ADA are implicated in the enhancement of CD80, CD83, CD86, CD40 and CCR7 expression on immature dendritic cells from healthy and HIV-infected individuals. These ADA-mediated increases in CD83 and costimulatory molecule expression is concomitant to an enhanced IL-12, IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL8(IL-8, CCL3(MIP1-α, CCL4(MIP-1β and CCL5(RANTES cytokine/chemokine secretion both in healthy and HIV-infected individuals and to an altered apoptotic death in cells from HIV-infected individuals. Consistently, ADA-mediated actions on iDCs are able to enhance allogeneic CD4 and CD8-T-cell proliferation, globally yielding increased iDC immunogenicity. Taken together, these findings suggest that ADA would promote enhanced and correctly polarized T-cell responses in strategies targeting asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals.

  20. Deficiency of lymph node-resident dendritic cells (DCs) and dysregulation of DC chemoattractants in a malnourished mouse model of Leishmania donovani infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marwa K; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Osorio, E Yaneth; Anstead, Gregory M; Jimenez, Fabio; Osterholzer, John J; Travi, Bruno L; Ahuja, Seema S; White, A Clinton; Melby, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    Malnutrition is thought to contribute to more than one-third of all childhood deaths via increased susceptibility to infection. Malnutrition is a significant risk factor for the development of visceral leishmaniasis, which results from skin inoculation of the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani. We previously established a murine model of childhood malnutrition and found that malnutrition decreased the lymph node barrier function and increased the early dissemination of L. donovani. In the present study, we found reduced numbers of resident dendritic cells (conventional and monocyte derived) but not migratory dermal dendritic cells in the skin-draining lymph nodes of L. donovani-infected malnourished mice. Expression of chemokines and their receptors involved in trafficking of dendritic cells and their progenitors to the lymph nodes was dysregulated. C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) and its ligands (CCL2 and CCL7) were reduced in the lymph nodes of infected malnourished mice, as were CCR2-bearing monocytes/macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. However, CCR7 and its ligands (CCL19 and CCL21) were increased in the lymph node and CCR7 was increased in lymph node macrophages and dendritic cells. CCR2-deficient mice recapitulated the profound reduction in the number of resident (but not migratory dermal) dendritic cells in the lymph node but showed no alteration in the expression of CCL19 and CCL21. Collectively, these results suggest that the malnutrition-related reduction in the lymph node barrier to dissemination of L. donovani is related to insufficient numbers of lymph node-resident but not migratory dermal dendritic cells. This is likely driven by the altered activity of the CCR2 and CCR7 chemoattractant pathways.

  1. In Vitro Brucella suis Infection Prevents the Programmed Cell Death of Human Monocytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Antoine; Terraza, Annie; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Dornand, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    During the complex interaction between an infectious agent and a host organism, the pathogen can interfere with the host cell's programmed death to its own benefit. Induction or prevention of host cell apoptosis appears to be a critical step for determining the infection outcome. Members of the gram-negative bacterial genus Brucella are intracellular pathogens which preferentially invade monocytic cells and develop within these cells. We investigated the effect of Brucella suis infection on apoptosis of human monocytic phagocytes. The present study provides evidence that Brucella infection inhibited spontaneously occurring apoptosis in human monocytes. Prevention of monocyte apoptosis was not mediated by Brucella lipopolysaccharide and required bacterial survival within infected cells. Both invaded and noninvaded cells were protected, indicating that soluble mediators released during infection were involved in the phenomenon. Analysis of Brucella-infected monocytes revealed specific overexpression of the A1 gene, a member of the bcl-2 family implicated in the survival of hematopoietic cells. Brucella infection also rendered macrophage-like cells resistant to Fas ligand- or gamma interferon-induced apoptosis, suggesting that Brucella infection protected host cells from several cytotoxic processes occurring at different steps of the immune response. The present data clearly show that Brucella suis modulated the monocyte/macrophage's apoptotic response to the advantage of the pathogen, thus preventing host cell elimination. This might represent a strategy for Brucella development in infected hosts. PMID:10603407

  2. Self-glycolipids modulate dendritic cells changing the cytokine profiles of committed autoreactive T cells.

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    Karsten Buschard

    Full Text Available The impact of glycolipids of non-mammalian origin on autoimmune inflammation has become widely recognized. Here we report that the naturally occurring mammalian glycolipids, sulfatide and β-GalCer, affect the differentiation and the quality of antigen presentation by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs. In response to sulfatide and β-GalCer, monocytes develop into immature DCs with higher expression of HLA-DR and CD86 but lower expression of CD80, CD40 and CD1a and lower production of IL-12 compared to non-modulated DCs. Self-glycolipid-modulated DCs responded to lipopolysaccharide (LPS by changing phenotype but preserved low IL-12 production. Sulfatide, in particular, reduced the capacity of DCs to stimulate autoreactive Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD65 - specific T cell response and promoted IL-10 production by the GAD65-specific clone. Since sulfatide and β-GalCer induced toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated signaling, we hypothesize that self-glycolipids deliver a (tolerogenic polarizing signal to differentiating DCs, facilitating the maintenance of self-tolerance under proinflammatory conditions.

  3. Cytotoxic activity of interferon alpha induced dendritic cells as a biomarker of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishinov, S. V.; Stupak, V. V.; Tyrinova, T. V.; Leplina, O. Yu.; Ostanin, A. A.; Chernykh, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells that can play direct role in anti-tumor immune response as killer cells. DC tumoricidal activity can be stimulated greatly by type I IFN (IFNα and IFNβ). In the present study, we examined cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of monocyte-derived IFNα-induced DCs generated from patients with brain glioma and evaluated the potential use of these parameters in diagnostics of high-grade gliomas. Herein, we demonstrated that patient DCs do not possess the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor HEp-2 cell line but low-grade and high-grade glioma patients do not differ significantly in DC cytostatic activity. However, glioma patient DCs are characterized by reduced cytotoxic activity against HEp-2 cells. The impairment of DC cytotoxic function is observed mainly in glioblastoma patients. The cytotoxic activity of DCs against HEp-2 cells below 9% is an informative marker for glioblastomas.

  4. Macrophages are required for dendritic cell uptake of respiratory syncytial virus from an infected epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugonna, Kelechi; Bingle, Colin D; Plant, Karen; Wilson, Kirsty; Everard, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] can productively infect monocyte derived dendritic cells [MoDC] and remain dormant within the same cells for prolonged periods. It is therefore possible that infected dendritic cells act as a reservoir within the airways of individuals between annual epidemics. In the present study we explored the possibility that sub-epithelial DCs can be infected with RSV from differentiated bronchial epithelium and that in turn RSV from DCs can infect the epithelium. A dual co-culture model was established in which a differentiated primary airway epithelium on an Air Liquid Interface (ALI) was cultured on a transwell insert and MoDCs were subsequently added to the basolateral membrane of the insert. Further experiments were undertaken using a triple co-culture model in which in which macrophages were added to the apical surface of the differentiated epithelium. A modified RSV [rr-RSV] expressing a red fluorescent protein marker of replication was used to infect either the MoDCs or the differentiated epithelium and infection of the reciprocal cell type was assessed using confocal microscopy. Our data shows that primary epithelium became infected when rr-RSV infected MoDCs were introduced onto the basal surface of the transwell insert. MoDCs located beneath the epithelium did not become infected with virus from infected epithelial cells in the dual co-culture model. However when macrophages were present on the apical surface of the primary epithelium infection of the basal MoDCs occurred. Our data suggests that RSV infected dendritic cells readily transmit infection to epithelial cells even when they are located beneath the basal layer. However macrophages appear to be necessary for the transmission of infection from epithelial cells to basal dendritic cells.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of dendritic cells matured in different osmolarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Chessa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-specific microenvironments shape the fate of mononuclear phagocytes [1–3]. Interstitial osmolarity is a tissue biophysical parameter which considerably modulates the phenotype and function of dendritic cells [4]. In the present report we provide a detailed description of our experimental workflow and bioinformatic analysis applied to our gene expression dataset (GSE72174, aiming to investigate the influence of different osmolarity conditions on the gene expression signature of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. We established a cell culture system involving murine bone marrow cells, cultured under different NaCl-induced osmolarity conditions in the presence of the dendritic cell growth factor GM-CSF. Gene expression analysis was applied to mature dendritic cells (day 7 developed in different osmolarities, with and without prior stimulation with the TLR2/4 ligand LPS.

  6. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

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    Wen Jing Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential.

  7. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma of the Abdomen: the Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Soon Jin; Song, Hye Jong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from follicular dendritic cells in lymphoid follicles. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and especially the head and neck area. Rarely, extranodal sites may be affected, including tonsil, the oral cavity, liver, spleen and the gastrointestinal tract. We report here on the imaging findings of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen that involved the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and colon. It shows as a well-defined, enhancing homogenous mass with internal necrosis and regional lymphadenopathy.

  8. Dendritic cells and their role in periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilensky, A; Segev, H; Mizraji, G; Shaul, Y; Capucha, T; Shacham, M; Hovav, A-H

    2014-03-01

    T cells, particularly CD4+ T cells, play a central role in both progression and control of periodontal disease, whereas the contribution of the various CD4+ T helper subsets to periodontal destruction remains controversial, the activation, and regulation of these cells is orchestrated by dendritic cells. As sentinels of the oral mucosa, dendritic cells encounter and capture oral microbes, then migrate to the lymph node where they regulate the differentiation of CD4+ T cells. It is thus clear that dendritic cells are of major importance in the course of periodontitis, as they hold the immunological cues delivered by the pathogen and the surrounding environment, allowing them to induce destructive immunity. In recent years, advanced immunological techniques and new mouse models have facilitated in vivo studies that have provided new insights into the developmental and functional aspects of dendritic cells. This progress has also benefited the characterization of oral dendritic cells, as well as to their function in periodontitis. Here, we provide an overview of the various gingival dendritic cell subsets and their distribution, while focusing on their role in periodontal bone loss.

  9. Characterization of small, mononuclear blood cells from salmon having high phagocytic capacity and ability to differentiate into dendritic like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Gyri T; Jordal, Ann-Elise O; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytes are the principal component of the innate immune system, playing a key role in the clearance of foreign particles that include potential pathogens. In vertebrates, both neutrophils and mononuclear cells like monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells are all professional phagocytes. In teleosts, B-lymphocytes also have potent phagocytic ability. We have isolated a population of small (neutrophils as shown by qRT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. A remarkable feature of these cells is their potent phagocytic capacity. Their oxygen-independent killing mechanism, as shown by intense acid phosphatase staining, is supported by lack of respiratory burst and myeloperoxidase activity and the acid phosphatase's sensitivity to tartrate. They show a high level of morphological plasticity, as, upon stimulation with mitogens, they change morphology and obtain branching protrusions similarly to dendritic cells. We suggest, based on our findings, that the small, round cells described here are progenitor cells with potential to differentiate into dendritic like cells, although we can not exclude the possibility that they represent a novel cell type.

  10. Expression of phenotypic markers of mast cells, macrophages and dendritic cells in gallbladder mucosa with calculous cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, A A; Szmyt, M; Malkowski, W; Surdyk-Zasada, J; Przybyszewska, W; Szmeja, J; Helak-Łapaj, C; Seraszek-Jaros, A; Kaczmarek, E

    2013-12-01

    The study aimed at quantitative analysis of expression involving markers of mast cells (tryptase), monocytes/macrophages (CD68 molecule) and dendritic cells (S100 protein) in gallbladder mucosa with acute and chronic calculous cholecystitis. Routinely prepared tissue material from the patients with acute (ACC) (n = 16) and chronic calculous cholecystitis (CCC) (n = 55) was evaluated. Three cellular markers were localized by immunocytochemistry. Their expression was quantified using spatial visualization technique. The expression of tryptase was similar in acute and chronic cholecystitis. CD68 expression in ACC was significantly higher than in the CCC group. Expression of S100 protein was significantly higher in CCC as compared to the ACC group. No significant correlations were disclosed between expression of studied markers and grading in the gallbladder wall. A weak negative correlation was noted between expression of CD68 and number of gallstones in the CCC group. The spatial visualization technique allowed for a credible quantitative evaluation of expression involving markers of mast cells (MCs), monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) and dendritic cells (DCs) in gallbladder mucosa with ACC and CCC. For the first time mucosal expression of S100 protein-positive DCs was evaluated in calculous cholecystitis. The results point to distinct functions of studied cell types in the non-specific immune response in calculous cholecystitis.

  11. Interleukin 18 stimulates HIV type 1 in monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, L; Puren, A J; Barton, H A; Novick, D; Peskind, R L; Shenkar, R; Gu, Y; Su, M S; Dinarello, C A

    1998-10-13

    The cytokine interleukin (IL) 18 (formerly interferon gamma-inducing factor) induces the T helper type 1 response. In the present studies, IL-18 increased HIV type 1 (HIV-1) production from 5- to 30-fold in the chronically infected U1 monocytic cell line. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity by the addition of TNF-binding protein reduced IL-18-stimulated HIV-1 production by 48%. In the same cultures, IL-18-induced IL-8 was inhibited by 96%. Also, a neutralizing anti-IL-6 mAb reduced IL-18-induced HIV-1 by 63%. Stimulation of U1 cells with IL-18 resulted in increased production of IL-6, and exogenous IL-6 added to U1 cells increased HIV-1 production 4-fold over control. A specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase reduced IL-18-induced HIV-1 by 73%, and a 50% inhibition was observed at 0.05 microM. In the same cultures, IL-8 was inhibited by 87%. By gel-shift and supershift analyses, increased binding activity of the transcription factor NF-kappaB was measured in nuclear extracts from U1 cells 1 h after exposure to IL-18. These results demonstrate induction of HIV-1 by IL-18 in a monocyte target associated with an intermediate role for TNF and IL-6, activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  12. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

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    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  13. Tumor's other immune targets: dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esche, C; Lokshin, A; Shurin, G V; Gastman, B R; Rabinowich, H; Watkins, S C; Lotze, M T; Shurin, M R

    1999-08-01

    The induction of apoptosis in T cells is one of several mechanisms by which tumors escape immune recognition. We have investigated whether tumors induce apoptosis in dendritic cells (DC) by co-culture of murine or human DC with different tumor cell lines for 4-48 h. Analysis of DC morphological features, JAM assay, TUNEL, caspase-3-like and transglutaminase activity, Annexin V binding, and DNA fragmentation assays revealed a time- and dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in DC by tumor-derived factors. This finding is both effector and target specific. The mechanism of tumor-induced DC apoptosis involved regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax expression. Double staining of both murine and human tumor tissues confirmed that tumor-associated DC undergo apoptotic death in vivo. DC isolated from tumor tissue showed significantly higher levels of apoptosis as determined by TUNEL assay when compared with DC isolated from spleen. These findings demonstrate that tumors induce apoptosis in DC and suggest a new mechanism of tumor escape from immune recognition. DC protection from apoptosis will lead to improvement of DC-based immunotherapies for cancer and other immune diseases.

  14. Differential Gene Expression in Thrombomodulin (TM; CD141)+ and TM− Dendritic Cell Subsets

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    Masaaki Toda; Zhifei Shao; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Takehiro Takagi; Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza; Osamu Taguchi; Hugh Salamon; Leung, Lawrence L. K.; Gabazza, Esteban C.; John Morser

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown in a mouse model of bronchial asthma that thrombomodulin can convert immunogenic conventional dendritic cells into tolerogenic dendritic cells while inducing its own expression on their cell surface. Thrombomodulin(+) dendritic cells are tolerogenic while thrombomodulin(-) dendritic cells are pro-inflammatory and immunogenic. Here we hypothesized that thrombomodulin treatment of dendritic cells would modulate inflammatory gene expression. Murine bone marrow-derived de...

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells impair the quality of dendritic cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poschke, I; Mao, Y; Adamson, L; Salazar-Onfray, F; Masucci, G; Kiessling, R

    2012-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are important regulators of the immune system and key players in tumor-induced suppression of T-cell responses. CD14+HLA-DR-/low MDSC have been detected in a great number of malignancies, including melanoma. MDSC are known to be impaired in their ability to differentiate along the myeloid lineage, e.g., into dendritic cells (DC). This is a concern for utilization of monocyte-derived DC for vaccination of patients with melanoma or other cancers exhibiting accumulation of CD14+ MDSC. When producing DC according to standard operating procedures of two currently ongoing clinical trials, we found that MDSC co-purified with monocytes isolated by elutriation. MDSC frequencies did not affect yield or viability of the produced DC, but induced a dose-dependent decrease in DC maturation, ability to take up antigen, migrate and induce T-cell IFNγ production. Changes in DC characteristics were most notable when 'pathological' frequencies of >50% CD14+HLA-DR- cells were present in the starting culture. The impaired DC quality could not be explained by altered cytokine production or increased oxidative stress in the cultures. Tracking of HLA-DR- cells throughout the culture period revealed that the observed changes were partially due to the impaired maturation and functionality of the originally HLA-DR- population, but also to their negative effects on HLA-DR+ cells. In conclusion, MDSC could be induced to differentiate into DC but, due to the impairment of overall DC vaccine quality when >50% HLA-DR- cells were present in the starting culture, their removal could be advisable.

  16. FastDC derived from human monocytes within 48 h effectively prime tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Schad, Katharina; Herten, Jan; Junkmann, Jana; Bauer, Christian; Kiefl, Rosemarie; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2005-07-01

    Previously, we have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) with full T-cell stimulatory capacity can be derived from human monocytes after 48 h of in vitro culture (FastDC). Compared to a standard 7-day protocol, this new strategy not only reduces the time span and the amount of recombinant cytokines required, but may also resemble DC development in vivo more closely. Using a melanoma antigen model, we show here that FastDC prime CTL responses against tumor antigens as effectively as standard monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). FastDC and moDCs derived from monocytes of HLA-A2(+) donors were loaded with the melanoma-associated, HLA-A(*)0201-restricted peptide Melan-A and cocultured with autologous CD3(+) T cells. After two weekly restimulations with freshly prepared, peptide-loaded FastDC or moDCs, binding of CD8(+) T cells to fluorescently labeled MHC-I/Melan-A-peptide complexes and intracellular cytokine staining revealed that the two DC preparations had an equal capacity to prime Melan-A-specific, IFN-gamma producing CD8(+) T cells. CTLs derived from cocultures with FastDC lysed Melan-A-loaded T2 cells even more effectively than CTLs primed by moDCs. Comparative analysis also revealed that FastDC possess an equal capacity to migrate in response to the chemokine receptor CCR-7 ligand 6Ckine. Importantly, DCs can be generated with higher yield and purity using the FastDC-protocol. The reliability and efficacy of this new strategy for DC development from monocytes may facilitate clinical investigation of DC-based tumor immunotherapy.

  17. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  18. Deciphering dendritic cell heterogenity in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël eChopin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These finding open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now set the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of dendritic cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle - identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man - now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  20. Dendritic Cells, Viruses, and the Development of Atopic Disease

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    Jonathan S. Tam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are important residents of the lung environment. They have been associated with asthma and other inflammatory diseases of the airways. In addition to their antigen-presenting functions, dendritic cells have the ability to modulate the lung environment to promote atopic disease. While it has long been known that respiratory viral infections associate with the development and exacerbation of atopic diseases, the exact mechanisms have been unclear. Recent studies have begun to show the critical importance of the dendritic cell in this process. This paper focuses on these data demonstrating how different populations of dendritic cells are capable of bridging the adaptive and innate immune systems, ultimately leading to the translation of viral illness into atopic disease.

  1. Monocyte-induced downregulation of nitric oxide synthase in cultured aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczin, N; Antonov, A; Papapetropoulos, A; Munn, D H; Virmani, R; Kolodgie, F D; Gerrity, R; Catravas, J D

    1996-09-01

    Since endothelium-dependent vasodilation is altered in atherosclerosis and enhanced monocyte/endothelial interactions are implicated in early atherosclerosis, we evaluated the effects of monocytes on the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) pathway by estimating release of biologically active NO from cultured endothelial cells and levels of constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS). NO release was estimated in a short-term bioassay using endothelial cell-induced cGMP accumulation in vascular smooth muscle (SM) cells. Exposure of SM cells to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) produced large increases in SM cGMP content; this increase was prevented by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the inhibitor of endothelial NOS. Confluent monolayers of PAECs and HAECs cocultured with monocytes also stimulated SM cGMP formation; however, NO release from these cultures was attenuated in a coculture time (2 to 48 hours)- and monocyte concentration (20 to 200 x 10(3) per well)-dependent manner. This effect of monocyte adhesion appeared to be selective for NO release since other biochemical pathways, such as atriopeptin-and isoproterenol-induced cyclic nucleotide accumulation within the endothelial cells, were not altered by monocytes. The effects of adherent monocytes on NO release were mimicked by monocyte-derived cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1 alpha. Furthermore, the conditioned medium of monocytes contained significant quantities of these cytokines. Conditioned medium, as well as monocytes physically separated from the endothelial cells, attenuated NO release, suggesting that soluble factors may mediate the effects of monocytes. An IL-1 beta neutralizing antibody fully prevented the NO dysfunction in response to directly adherent monocytes. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid (Tiron), and exogenous L-arginine failed to improve NO release, suggesting that oxidant stress

  2. Monocyte Activation by Necrotic Cells Is Promoted by Mitochondrial Proteins and Formyl Peptide Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouser, Elliott D.; Shao, Guohong; Julian, Mark W.; Macre, Jennifer E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Huang, Qin; Wewers, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Necrotic cells evoke potent innate immune responses through unclear mechanisms. The mitochondrial fraction of the cell retains constituents of its bacterial ancestors, including N-formyl peptides, which are potentially immunogenic. Thus, we hypothesized that the mitochondrial fraction of the cell, particularly N-formyl peptides, contributes significantly to the activation of monocytes by necrotic cells. Design Human peripheral blood monocytes were incubated with necrotic cell fractions and mitochondrial proteins in order to investigate their potential for immune cell activation. Setting University medical center research laboratory. Subjects Healthy human adults served as blood donors. Measurements and Main Results Human blood monocyte activation was measured after treatment with cytosolic, nuclear and mitochondrial fractions of necrotic HepG2 cells or necrotic HepG2 cells depleted of N-formyl peptides [Rho(0) cells]. The specific role of the high affinity formyl peptide receptor (FPR) was then tested using specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing. The capacity of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides to activate monocytes was confirmed using a synthetic peptide conforming to the N-terminus of mitochondrial NADH subunit 6. The results demonstrated that mitochondrial cell fractions most potently activated monocytes, and IL-8 was selectively released at low protein concentrations. Mitochondria from Rho(0) cells induced minimal monocyte IL-8 release, and specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing confirmed that FPR contributes significantly to monocyte IL-8 responses to both necrotic cells and mitochondrial proteins. N-formyl peptides alone did not induce monocyte IL-8 release; whereas, the combination of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) dramatically increased IL-8 release from monocytes. Likewise, HMGB1, the nuclear homologue of TFAM, did not induce monocyte IL-8 release unless combined with

  3. Aeroallergen challenge promotes dendritic cell proliferation in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Tibor Z; Voedisch, Sabrina; Spies, Emma; Valtonen, Joona; Prenzler, Frauke; Braun, Armin

    2013-02-01

    Aeroallergen provocation induces the rapid accumulation of CD11c(+)MHC class II (MHC II)(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in the lungs, which is driven by an increased recruitment of blood-derived DC precursors. Recent data show, however, that well-differentiated DCs proliferate in situ in various tissues. This may also contribute to their allergen-induced expansion; therefore, we studied DC proliferation in the airways of mice in the steady state and after local aeroallergen provocation. Confocal whole-mount microscopy was used to visualize proliferating DCs in different microanatomical compartments of the lung. We demonstrate that in the steady state, CD11c(+)MHC II(+) DCs proliferate in both the epithelial and subepithelial layers of the airway mucosa as well as in the lung parenchyma. A 1-h pulse of the nucleotide 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine was sufficient to label 5% of DCs in both layers of the airway mucosa. On the level of whole-lung tissue, 3-5% of both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) DC populations and 0.3% of CD11c(+)MHC II(low) lung macrophages incorporated 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine. Aeroallergen provocation caused a 3-fold increase in the frequency of locally proliferating DCs in the airway mucosa. This increase in mucosal DC proliferation was later followed by an elevation in the number of DCs. The recruitment of monocyte-derived inflammatory DCs contributed to the increasing number of DCs in the lung parenchyma, but not in the airway mucosa. We conclude that local proliferation significantly contributes to airway DC homeostasis in the steady state and that it is the major mechanism underlying the expansion of the mucosal epithelial/subepithelial DC network in allergic inflammation.

  4. Transmission of pseudorabies virus from immune-masked blood monocytes to endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Walle, Gerlinde; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Pensaert, Maurice

    2003-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) may cause abortion, even in the presence of vaccination-induced immunity. Blood monocytes are essential to transport the virus in these immune animals, including transport to the pregnant uterus. Infected monocytes express viral proteins on their cell surface. Specific antibodies recognize these proteins and should activate antibody-dependent cell lysis. Previous work showed that addition of PRV-specific polyclonal antibodies to PRV-infected monocytes induced internal...

  5. IL7Rα expression and upregulation by IFNβ in dendritic cell subsets is haplotype-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona C McKay

    Full Text Available The IL7Rα gene is unequivocally associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS. Haplotype 2 (Hap 2 confers protection from MS, and T cells and dendritic cells (DCs of Hap 2 exhibit reduced splicing of exon 6, resulting in production of relatively less soluble receptor, and potentially more response to ligand. We have previously shown in CD4 T cells that IL7Rα haplotypes 1 and 2, but not 4, respond to interferon beta (IFNβ, the most commonly used immunomodulatory drug in MS, and that haplotype 4 (Hap 4 homozygotes have the highest risk of developing MS. We now show that IL7R expression increases in myeloid cells in response to IFNβ, but that the response is haplotype-dependent, with cells from homozygotes for Hap 4 again showing no response. This was shown using freshly derived monocytes, in vitro cultured immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and by comparing homozygotes for the common haplotypes, and relative expression of alleles in heterozygotes (Hap 4 vs not Hap 4. As for T cells, in all myeloid cell subsets examined, Hap 2 homozygotes showed a trend for reduced splicing of exon 6 compared to the other haplotypes, significantly so in most conditions. These data are consistent with increased signaling being protective from MS, constitutively and in response to IFNβ. We also demonstrate significant regulation of immune response, chemokine activity and cytokine biosynthesis pathways by IL7Rα signaling in IFNβ -treated myeloid subsets. IFNβ-responsive genes are over-represented amongst genes associated with MS susceptibility. IL7Rα haplotype may contribute to MS susceptibility through reduced capacity for IL7Rα signalling in myeloid cells, especially in the presence of IFNβ, and is currently under investigation as a predictor of therapeutic response.

  6. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  7. Purification of Human Monocytes and Lymphocyte Populations by Counter Current Elutriation– A Short Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Elizabeth V.; Benoit, Marie E.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of the activation processes involved in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells often required large numbers of cells that have not been possibly altered or activated by adherence to surfaces, by binding of antibodies to surface antigens during positive selection, or by release of activators by platelets or other non myeloid cells during isolation or co-culture. Human peripheral blood monocytes as well as lymphocytes from the same blood donor can be...

  8. Cell death induced by application of time-varying magnetic fields on nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos-Campos, I; Torres, T E; Marquina, C; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the capability of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to take Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), keeping their viability. To provoke cell death on these MNPs-loaded DCs using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF). Material & methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from normal blood and platelets removed by centrifugation. Immunoselected CD14+ cells were cultured for 5 days, and the resulting cell phenotype was determined against several markers using flow cytometry. Co-cultures of DCs and MNPs were done overnight. The amount of Fe3O4 nanoparticles incorporated by DCs was quantified by magnetization measurements. MNPs-loaded DCs were exposed to AMF for 30 min and then cell viability was measured using trypan blue and FACS (annexin-propidium iodide) protocols. Morphological changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results: No significant decrease in cell viability of MNP/loaded DCs was observed up to five days, as compared against control sam...

  9. The effects of T-cell conditioned media on the induction of dendritic cell (DC1 maturation for effective tumor immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "n 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Background: Nowadays, dendritic cells (DC are used for tumor immunotherapy as they can induce immune responses against tumor cells. In this research, we comprehensively studied the maturation stimulus addition, PHA-activated T-cell (PHA-TCM conditioned medium, autologous monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM and TNF-α for their ability to promote uniformly mature dendritic cells that elicit T-cell responses."n"nMethods: Plastic adherent monocytes were cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 for five days and two days with monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM, tumor necrotizing factor-α (TNF-α without TCM (PHA-activated T-cell conditioned medium. Phenotypic and functional analyses were carried out using anti-CD14, anti-CD80, anti-CD86, anti-CD83 monoclonal antibodies. Phagocytic activity, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR and cytokine production were also evaluated."n"nResults: The generated dendritic cells had high expression of surface molecules i.e. CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR. Moreover, the cells had low phagocytic and high T-lymphocyte stimulating activities. Measurement of the produced cytokines showed the generation of type-1 dendritic cells (DC1 in the study."n"nConclusion: The findings indicated that more efficient maturation of dendritic cells could be achieved by the use of PHA-activated T-lymphocyte conditioned medium in the culture medium. The aforesaid supernatant can be used as a maturation factor for the production of efficient

  10. Probiotic Bio-Three induces Th1 and anti-inflammatory effects in PBMC and dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man-Chin; Hua; Tzou-Yien; Lin; Chien-Chang; Chen

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the immune response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs)and dendritic cells (DCs)that were stimulated by probiotic preparations. METHODS:PBMCs were isolated,cultured,and stimulated with Bio-Three(a mixture of Bacillus mesentericus, Clostridium butyricum and Enterococcus faecalis;105, 10 6 and 10 7 CFU/mL for 24 h).Cytokine production of (1)circulating PBMCs;(2)PBMCs stimulated by probiotic preparation;(3)monocyte-derived DCs;and(4)DC andT cell co-culture was determined by enzyme-l...

  11. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berk, Lieke C J; Roelofs, Helene; Huijs, Tonnie; Siebers-Vermeulen, Kim G C; Raymakers, Reinier A; Kögler, Gesine; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2009-12-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord blood an immature MSC population was identified. Remarkably, these immature stem cells modulated DCs in a different way. Marker expression was unchanged during the differentiation of monocytes towards immature DCs (iDCs) when cocultured with cord blood MSC [unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs)]. The maturation to mature DCs (mDCs) was enhanced when DCs were co-cultured with USSC, as evidenced by the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules. Endocytosis of dextran by iDCs was hampered in the presence of USSCs, which is indicative for the maturation of iDCs. Despite this maturation, the migration of iDCs cocultured with USSCs appeared to be identical to iDCs cultured alone. However, USSCs increased the migration of mDCs towards CCL21 and boosted interleukin-12 production. So, USSCs mature iDCs, thereby redirecting the antigen-uptake phenotype towards a mature phenotype. Furthermore, DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or USSCs reflects two distinct pathways because migration was unaffected when iDCs were matured by coculture with USSCs, while it was strongly enhanced in the presence of LPS. DCs are able to discriminate the different MSC subtypes, resulting in diverse differentiation programmes.

  12. Dendritic cell-nerve clusters are sites of T cell proliferation in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Tibor Z; Shevchenko, Marina; Krasteva, Gabriela; Spies, Emma; Prenzler, Frauke; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Tschernig, Thomas; Krug, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang; Braun, Armin

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the airway mucosa precede secondary immune responses to inhaled antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical locations where dendritic cell-T cell interactions occur, resulting in T cells activation by dendritic cells. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we applied whole-mount immunohistology and confocal microscopy to visualize dendritic cells and T cells together with nerves, epithelium, and smooth muscle in three dimensions. Proliferating T cells were identified by the detection of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine into the DNA. We developed a novel quantification method that enabled the accurate determination of cell-cell contacts in a semi-automated fashion. Dendritic cell-T cell interactions occurred beneath the smooth muscle layer, but not in the epithelium. Approximately 10% of the dendritic cells were contacted by nerves, and up to 4% of T cells formed clusters with these dendritic cells. T cells that were clustered with nerve-contacting dendritic cells proliferated only in the airways of mice with allergic inflammation but not in the airways of negative controls. Taken together, these results suggest that during the secondary immune response, sensory nerves influence dendritic cell-driven T cell activation in the airway mucosa.

  13. T Cells Capture Bacteria by Transinfection from Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Ramírez-Santiago, Guillermo; Torres-Torresano, Mónica; Garcia-Ferreras, Raquel; Veiga Chacón, Esteban

    2016-01-13

    Recently, we have shown, contrary to what is described, that CD4(+) T cells, the paradigm of adaptive immune cells, capture bacteria from infected dendritic cells (DCs) by a process called transinfection. Here, we describe the analysis of the transinfection process, which occurs during the course of antigen presentation. This process was unveiled by using CD4(+) T cells from transgenic OTII mice, which bear a T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a peptide of ovoalbumin (OVAp), which therefore can form stable immune complexes with infected dendritic cells loaded with this specific OVAp. The dynamics of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing bacteria during DC-T cell transmission can be monitored by live-cell imaging and the quantification of bacterial transinfection can be performed by flow cytometry. In addition, transinfection can be quantified by a more sensitive method based in the use of gentamicin, a non-permeable aminoglycoside antibiotic killing extracellular bacteria but not intracellular ones. This classical method has been used previously in microbiology to study the efficiency of bacterial infections. We hereby explain the protocol of the complete process, from the isolation of the primary cells to the quantification of transinfection.

  14. Organ-derived dendritic cells have differential effects on alloreactive T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Theo D.; Terwey, Theis H.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Suh, David; Kochman, Adam A.; Chen, Megan E.; King, Chris G.; Borsotti, Chiara; Grubin, Jeremy; Smith, Odette M.; Heller, Glenn; Liu, Chen; Murphy, George F.; Alpdogan, Onder; Marcel R. M. van den Brink

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered critical for the induction of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In addition to their priming function, dendritic cells have been shown to induce organ-tropism through induction of specific homing molecules on T cells. Using adoptive transfer of CFSE-labeled cells, we first demonstrated that alloreactive T cells differentially up-regulate specific homing molecules in vivo. Host-type dendritic cells from the GVHD targe...

  15. A full scale comparative study of methods for generation of functional Dendritic cells for use as cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvalheim Gunnar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells with the ability to induce primary T-cell responses and are commonly produced by culturing monocytes in the presence of IL-4 and GM-CSF for 5–7 days (Standard DC. Recently, Dauer and co-workers presented a modified protocol for differentiation of human monocytes into mature DCs within 48 hours (Fast DC. Here we report a functional comparison of the two strategies for generation of DCs from human monocytes with adaptions for large-scale clinical use. Methods The Elutra Cell Selection System was used to isolate monocytes after collection of leukapheresis product. The enriched monocytes were cultured in gas permeable Teflon bags with IL-4 and GM-CSF for 24 hours (Fast DC or 5 days (Standard DC to obtain immature DCs. The cells were then transfected with mRNA from the leukemia cell line Jurkat E6 by electroporation and incubated for additional 24 h or 2 days in the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and PGE2 to obtain mature DCs. Results Mature Fast DC and Standard DC displayed comparable levels of many markers expressed on DC, including HLA-DR, CD83, CD86, CD208 and CCR7. However, compared to Standard DC, mature Fast DC was CD14high CD209low. Fast DC and Standard DC transfected with Jurkat E6-cell mRNA were equally able to elicit T cell specifically recognizing transfected DCs in vitro. IFNγ-secreting T cells were observed in both the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. Conclusion Our results indicate that mature Fast DC are functional antigen presenting cells (APCs capable of inducing primary T-cell responses, and suggest that these cells may be valuable for generation of anti-tumor vaccines.

  16. Chitosan as an adjuvant-like substrate for dendritic cell culture to enhance antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong-Chong; Lou, Pei-Jen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2014-10-01

    To induce monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) is the essential protocol for the DC-mediated cancer immunotherapy. In this study, monocytes isolated from mouse bone marrow were cultured on chitosan substrate to evaluate the effect of the chitosan culture system on the induction and tumor protection of DCs. Compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), the chitosan culture system could enhance monocyte aggregation and detachment with increased MTT reduction activity and expression of DC marker CD11c and LPS co-receptor CD14. Moreover, compared to TCPS, chitosan could enhance lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated DCs to secrete higher amount of IL-12. More importantly, vaccination of tumor lysate-pulsed DCs harvested from chitosan could increase cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and showed significantly enhanced anti-tumor effect than those from TCPS. Therefore, the current study demonstrated that a protocol to culture DCs on a less-adherent chitosan substrate followed by treatment with tumor lysate has the potential in future DC-based vaccine application.

  17. von Willebrand factor binds to the surface of dendritic cells and modulates peptide presentation of factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvillo, Nicoletta; Hartholt, Robin B; Bloem, Esther; Sedek, Magdalena; ten Brinke, Anja; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van Alphen, Floris P; Meijer, Alexander B; Voorberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that von Willebrand factor might affect factor VIII immunogenicity by reducing factor VIII uptake by antigen presenting cells. Here we investigate the interaction of recombinant von Willebrand factor with immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Surprisingly, von Willebrand factor was not internalized by immature dendritic cells, but remained bound to the cell surface. As von Willebrand factor reduces the uptake of factor VIII, we investigated the repertoire of factor VIII presented peptides when in complex with von Willebrand factor. Interestingly, factor VIII-derived peptides were still abundantly presented on major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, even though a reduction of factor VIII uptake by immature dendritic cells was observed. Inspection of peptide profiles from 5 different donors showed that different core factor VIII peptide sequences were presented upon incubation with factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex when compared to factor VIII alone. No von Willebrand factor peptides were detected when immature dendritic cells were pulsed with different concentrations of von Willebrand factor, confirming lack of von Willebrand factor endocytosis. Several von Willebrand factor derived peptides were recovered when cells were pulsed with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII complex, suggesting that factor VIII promotes endocytosis of small amounts of von Willebrand factor by immature dendritic cells. Taken together, our results establish that von Willebrand factor is poorly internalized by immature dendritic cells. We also show that von Willebrand factor modulates the internalization and presentation of factor VIII-derived peptides on major histocompatibility complex class II.

  18. Nonviral and viral gene transfer into different subsets of human dendritic cells yield comparable efficiency of transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Andreas; Noffz, Gabriele; Pavlenko, Maxim; Saebøe-Larssen, Stein; Fong, Timothy; Maitland, Norman; Pisa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Among the many promising cancer immunotherapeutic strategies, dendritic cells (DC) have become of particular interest. This study aims to optimize a clinical grade protocol for culture and transfection of human DC. Monocytes and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from same donor were differentiated under serum-free conditions and analyzed for their susceptibility to several recently described nonviral transfection methods as compared with established virally mediated gene transfer. Nonviral gene transfer methods studied were square-wave electroporation, lipofection, and particle-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed mRNA. We conclude that DNA is not suitable for transduction of DC using nonviral methods. In contrast, mRNA and square-wave electroporation reproducibly yields 60% and 50% transfected monocyte- and CD34(+)-derived DC, respectively, measured at protein level, without affecting the cell viability. Thus, the transfection efficiency of this method is comparable with the 40-90% transgene expression obtained using retroviral (RV) or adenoviral (AdV) vectors in CD34(+)- and monocyte-derived DC, respectively. In monocyte-derived DC, however, the amount of protein expressed per-cell basis was higher after AdV (MOI = 1000) compared with mRNA electroporation-mediated transfer. This is the first study directly demonstrating side-by-side that mRNA electroporation into DC of different origin indeed results in a comparable number of transduced cells as when using virus-mediated gene transfer.

  19. Kicking off adaptive immunity: the discovery of dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katsnelson, Alla

    2006-01-01

    In 1973, Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn discovered an unusual looking population of cells with an unprecedented ability to activate naive T cells. Dubbed “dendritic cells,” these cells are now known as the primary instigators of adaptive immunity.

  20. Physiological Role of TNF in MucosalImmunology: Regulation of Macrophage/Dendritic Cell Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Marsal, J.; Agace, William Winston

    2015-01-01

    to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we discuss the role of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) in regulating multiple aspects of intestinal Mϕ and DC physiology, including their differentiation, migration, maturation, survival and effector functions. In inflammatory bowel disease, TNF...... signaling has been implicated in reprogramming monocyte differentiation from the anti-inflammatory Mϕ lineage towards the pro-inflammatory mononuclear phagocyte lineage.These cells become a major source of TNF and, thus,may contribute to the chronic inflammatory process. Finally,we highlight some......Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes, comprising macrophages(Mϕs) and dendritic cells (DCs), play important roles in the generation and the regulation of immune responses to intestinal antigens, and alterations in the development and/or the function of these cells are thought to contribute...

  1. A Therapeutic Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine for HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, Núria; Assoumou, Lambert; Gil, Cristina; González, Nuria; Alcamí, José; León, Agathe; Romeu, Joan; Dalmau, Judith; Martínez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeff; Autran, Brigitte; Costagliola, Dominique; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gatell, Josep M; Plana, Montserrat; Gallart, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    A double-blinded, controlled study of vaccination of untreated patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with 3 doses of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs) pulsed with heat inactivated autologous HIV-1 was performed. Therapeutic vaccinations were feasible, safe, and well tolerated. At week 24 after first vaccination (primary end point), a modest significant decrease in plasma viral load was observed in vaccine recipients, compared with control subjects (P = .03). In addition, the change in plasma viral load after vaccination tended to be inversely associated with the increase in HIV-specific T cell responses in vaccinated patients but tended to be directly correlated with HIV-specific T cell responses in control subjects. Clinical trial.gov NCT00402142 PMID:21233310

  2. Diabetic conditions promote binding of monocytes to vascular smooth muscle cells and their subsequent differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Park, Jehyun; Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes is associated with significantly accelerated rates of atherosclerosis, key features of which include the presence of excessive macrophage-derived foam cells in the subendothelial space. We examined the hypothesis that enhanced monocyte-vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) interactions leading to subendothelial monocyte retention and differentiation to macrophages under diabetic conditions may be underlying mechanisms. Human aortic VSMCs (HVSMCs) treated with diabetic stimuli high glucose (HG) or S100B, a ligand of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, exhibited significantly increased binding of THP-1 monocytic cells. Diabetic stimuli increased the expression of the adhesive chemokine fractalkine (FKN) in HVSMCs. Pretreatment of HVSMCs with FKN or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) neutralizing antibodies significantly inhibited monocyte-VSMC binding, whereas monocytes treated with FKN showed enhanced binding to VSMC. Mouse aortic VSMCs (MVSMCs) derived from type 2 diabetic db/db mice exhibited significantly increased FKN levels and binding to mouse WEHI78/24 monocytic cells relative to nondiabetic control db/+ cells. The enhanced monocyte binding in db/db cells was abolished by both FKN and MCP-1 antibodies. Endothelium-denuded aortas from db/db mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice also exhibited enhanced FKN expression and monocyte binding, relative to respective controls. Coculture with HVSMCs increased CD36 expression in THP-1 cells, and this was significantly augmented by treatment of HVSMCs with S100B or HG. CD36 mRNA and protein levels were also significantly increased in WEHI78/24 cells after coincubation with db/db MVSMCs relative to control MVSMCs. These results demonstrate that diabetic conditions may accelerate atherosclerosis by inducing key chemokines in the vasculature that promote VSMC-monocyte interactions, subendothelial monocyte retention, and differentiation.

  3. Tolerogenic IDO+ dendritic cells are induced by PD-1-expressing mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Pessoa Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MC are tissue resident cells, rich in inflammatory mediators, involved in allergic reactions, and with an increasingly recognized role in immunomodulation. Dendritic cells (DCs, on the other hand, are central to the determination of immune response patterns, being highly efficient antigen-presenting cells that respond promptly to changes in their microenvironment. Here, we show that direct cell contact between immature monocyte-derived DCs (iDCs and MC bends DCs towards tolerance induction. DCs that had direct contact with MC (MC-iDC decreased HLA-DR but increased PD-L1 expression and stimulated regulatory T lymphocytes, which expresses FoxP3+, secrete TGF-β and IL-10, and suppress the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated naïve T lymphocytes. Furthermore, MC-iDC expressed higher levels of indoleamine-2,3-deoxigenase (IDO, a phenomenon that was blocked by treatment of MC with anti-PD-1 or by the treatment of DCs with anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-L2, but not by blocking of H1 and H2 histamine receptors on DCs. Contact with MC also increased phosphorylated STAT-3 levels in iDCs. When a STAT-3 inhibitor, JSI-124, was added to the DCs before contact with MC, the MC-iDC recovered their ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation and did not increase their IDO expression.

  4. Fluorescent activated cell sorting: an effective approach to study dendritic cell subsets in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Brussel, Ilse; Ammi, Rachid; Rombouts, Miche; Cools, Nathalie; Vercauteren, Sven R; De Roover, Dominique; Hendriks, Jeroen M H; Lauwers, Patrick; Van Schil, Paul E; Schrijvers, Dorien M

    2015-02-01

    Different immune cell types are present within atherosclerotic plaques. Dendritic cells (DC) are of special interest, since they are considered as the 'center of the immuniverse'. Identifying inflammatory DC subtypes within plaques is important for a better understanding of the lesion pathogenesis and pinpoints their contribution to the atherosclerotic process. We have developed a flow cytometry-based method to characterize and isolate different DC subsets (i.e. CD11b(+), Clec9A(+) and CD16(+) conventional (c)DC and CD123(+) plasmacytoid (p)DC) in human atherosclerotic plaques. We revealed a predominance of pro-inflammatory CD11b(+) DC in advanced human lesions, whereas atheroprotective Clec9A(+) DC were almost absent. CD123(+) pDC and CD16(+) DC were also detectable in plaques. Remarkably, plaques from distinct anatomical locations exhibited different cellular compositions: femoral plaques contained less CD11b(+) and Clec9A(+) DC than carotid plaques. Twice as many monocytes/macrophages were observed compared to DC. Moreover, relative amounts of T cells/B cells/NK cells were 6 times as high as DC numbers. For the first time, fluorescent activated cell sorting analysis of DC subsets in human plaques indicated a predominance of CD11b(+) cDC, in comparison with other DC subsets. Isolation of the different subsets will facilitate detailed functional analysis and may have significant implications for tailoring appropriate therapy.

  5. Human natural killer cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived antigens by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deauvieau, Florence; Ollion, Vincent; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Achard, Carole; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Verronese, Estelle; Durand, Isabelle; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Marvel, Jacqueline; Dezutter-Dambuyant, Colette; Walzer, Thierry; Vie, Henri; Perrot, Ivan; Goutagny, Nadège; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) cross-present antigen (Ag) to initiate T-cell immunity against most infections and tumors. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate cytolytic lymphocytes that have emerged as key modulators of multiple DC functions. Here, we show that human NK cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived Ag by DC leading to Ag-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation. Surprisingly, cytotoxic function of NK cells was not required. Instead, we highlight a critical and nonredundant role for IFN-γ and TNF-α production by NK cells to enhance cross-presentation by DC using two different Ag models. Importantly, we observed that NK cells promote cell-associated Ag cross-presentation selectively by monocytes-derived DC (Mo-DC) and CD34-derived CD11b(neg) CD141(high) DC subsets but not by myeloid CD11b(+) DC. Moreover, we demonstrate that triggering NK cell activation by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)-coated tumor cells leads to efficient DC cross-presentation, supporting the concept that NK cells can contribute to therapeutic mAbs efficiency by inducing downstream adaptive immunity. Taken together, our findings point toward a novel role of human NK cells bridging innate and adaptive immunity through selective induction of cell-associated Ag cross-presentation by CD141(high) DC, a process that could be exploited to better harness Ag-specific cellular immunity in immunotherapy. © 2014 UICC.

  6. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein induces monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Cushing, S D; Berliner, J A; Valente, A. J.; Territo, M C; Navab, M; Parhami, F; Gerrity, R; Schwartz, C J; Fogelman, A M

    1990-01-01

    After exposure to low density lipoprotein (LDL) that had been minimally modified by oxidation (MM-LDL), human endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) cultured separately or together produced 2- to 3-fold more monocyte chemotactic activity than did control cells or cells exposed to freshly isolated LDL. This increase in monocyte chemotactic activity was paralleled by increases in mRNA levels for a monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) that is constitutively produced by the human ...

  7. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami eRadunskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual's antigen specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic-cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy.

  8. Differential activation of dendritic cells by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, O; Peiser, M; Altenähr, M; Knieling, H; Wanner, R; Hanf, G; Grosse, R; Suttorp, N

    2007-11-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in inflammatory reactions influencing several cells in health and disease including allergy and asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in the induction of inflammatory processes with an increasing role in allergic diseases as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neurotrophins on DC function. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells were generated from allergic and non-allergic donors. Neurotrophin receptors were demonstrated by western blotting, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Activation of small GTPases was evaluated by pull-down assays. DCs were incubated with nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and supernatants were collected for measurement of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta. Receptor proteins were detectable by western blot, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy. Signalling after neurotrophin stimulation occurred in a ligand-specific pattern. NGF led to decreased RhoA and increased Rac activation, while BDNF affected RhoA and Rac activity in a reciprocal fashion. Cells of allergics released a significantly increased amount of IL-6, while for healthy subjects a significantly higher amount of IL-10 was found. These data indicate that DCs are activated by the neurotrophins NGF and BDNF by different pathways in a receptor-dependant manner. These cells then may initiate inflammatory responses based on allergic sensitization releasing preferred cytokines inducing tolerance or a T-helper type 2 response.

  9. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. AIRE is not essential for the induction of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Katherine L; Abinun, Mario; Arkwright, Peter D; Cheetham, Timothy D; Pearce, Simon H; Hilkens, Catharien M U; Lilic, Desa

    2016-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene results in organ-specific autoimmunity and disease Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy type 1 (APS1)/Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED). The AIRE protein is crucial in the induction of central tolerance, promoting ectopic expression of tissue-specific antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells and enabling removal of self-reactive T-cells. AIRE expression has recently been detected in myeloid dendritic cells (DC), suggesting AIRE may have a significant role in peripheral tolerance. DC stimulation of T-cells is critical in determining the initiation or lack of an immune response, depending on the pattern of costimulation and cytokine production by DCs, defining immunogenic/inflammatory (inflDC) and tolerogenic (tolDC) DC. In AIRE-deficient patients and healthy controls, we validated the role of AIRE in the generation and function of monocyte-derived inflDC and tolDCs by determining mRNA and protein expression of AIRE and comparing activation markers (HLA-DR/DP/DQ,CD83,CD86,CD274(PDL-1),TLR-2), cytokine production (IL-12p70,IL-10,IL-6,TNF-α,IFN-γ) and T-cell stimulatory capacity (mixed lymphocyte reaction) of AIRE+ and AIRE- DCs. We show for the first time that: (1) tolDCs from healthy individuals express AIRE; (2) AIRE expression is not significantly higher in tolDC compared to inflDC; (3) tolDC can be generated from APECED patient monocytes and (4) tolDCs lacking AIRE retain the same phenotype and reduced T-cell stimulatory function. Our findings suggest that AIRE does not have a role in the induction and function of monocyte-derived tolerogenic DC in humans, but these findings do not exclude a role for AIRE in peripheral tolerance mediated by other cell types.

  11. Rapamycin Conditioning of Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human ES Cells Promotes a Tolerogenic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Silk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs may one day facilitate the treatment of degenerative diseases requiring cell replacement therapy, the success of regenerative medicine is predicated on overcoming the rejection of replacement tissues. Given the role played by dendritic cells (DCs in the establishment of immunological tolerance, we have proposed that DC, rendered tolerogenic during their differentiation from hESC, might predispose recipients to accept replacement tissues. As a first step towards this goal, we demonstrate that DC differentiated from H1 hESCs (H1-DCs are particularly responsive to the immunosuppressive agent rapamycin compared to monocyte-derived DC (moDC. While rapamycin had only modest impact on the phenotype and function of moDC, H1-DC failed to upregulate CD40 upon maturation and displayed reduced immunostimulatory capacity. Furthermore, coculture of naïve allogeneic T cells with rapamycin-treated H1-DC promoted an increased appearance of CD25hi Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, compared to moDC. Our findings suggest that conditioning of hESC-derived DC with rapamycin favours a tolerogenic phenotype.

  12. Alpha-defensins 1-3 release by dendritic cells is reduced by estrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperling Rhoda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During pregnancy the immune system of the mother must protect any activation that may negatively affect the fetus. Changes in susceptibility to infection as well as resolution of some autoimmune disorders represent empirical evidence for pregnancy related alterations in immunity. Sex hormones reach extremely high levels during pregnancy and have been shown to have direct effects on many immune functions including the antiviral response of dendritic cells. Among the immunologically active proteins secreted by monocyte derived DCs (MDDC are the alpha-defensins 1-3. This family of cationic antimicrobial peptides has a broad spectrum of microbicidal activity and has also been shown to link innate to adaptive immunity by attracting T cells and immature DCs, which are essential for initiating and polarizing the immune response. Methods We compare culture-generated monocyte derived DCs (MDDCs with directly isolated myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs and measure their alpha-defensins 1-3 secretion by ELISA both, in basal situations and after hormone (E2 or PG treatments. Moreover, using a cohort of pregnant women we isolated mDCs from blood and also measure the levels of these anti-microbial peptides along pregnancy. Results We show that mDCs and pDCs constitutively produce alpha-defensins 1-3 and at much higher levels than MDDCs. Alpha-defensins 1-3 production from mDCs and MDDCs but not pDCs is inhibited by E2. PG does not affect alpha-defensins 1-3 in any of the populations. Moreover, alpha-defensins 1-3 production by mDCs was reduced in the later stages of pregnancy in 40% of the patients. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate that mDCs and pDCs secrete alpha-defensins 1-3 and present a novel effect of E2 on the secretion of alpha-defensins 1-3 by dendritic cells.

  13. Macrophages as APC and the dendritic cell myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells have been considered an immune cell type that is specialized for the presentation of Ag to naive T cells. Considerable effort has been applied to separate their lineage, pathways of differentiation, and effectiveness in Ag presentation from those of macrophages. This review summarizes evidence that dendritic cells are a part of the mononuclear phagocyte system and are derived from a common precursor, responsive to the same growth factors (including CSF-1), express the same surface markers (including CD11c), and have no unique adaptation for Ag presentation that is not shared by other macrophages.

  14. Adipose Tissue Dendritic Cells Are Independent Contributors to Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kae Won; Zamarron, Brian F; Muir, Lindsey A; Singer, Kanakadurga; Porsche, Cara E; DelProposto, Jennifer B; Geletka, Lynn; Meyer, Kevin A; O'Rourke, Robert W; Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic changes of adipose tissue leukocytes, including adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) and adipose tissue dendritic cells (ATDCs), contribute to obesity-induced inflammation and metabolic disease. However, clear discrimination between ATDC and ATM in adipose tissue has limited progress in the field of immunometabolism. In this study, we use CD64 to distinguish ATM and ATDC, and investigated the temporal and functional changes in these myeloid populations during obesity. Flow cytometry and immunostaining demonstrated that the definition of ATM as F4/80(+)CD11b(+) cells overlaps with other leukocytes and that CD45(+)CD64(+) is specific for ATM. The expression of core dendritic cell genes was enriched in CD11c(+)CD64(-) cells (ATDC), whereas core macrophage genes were enriched in CD45(+)CD64(+) cells (ATM). CD11c(+)CD64(-) ATDCs expressed MHC class II and costimulatory receptors, and had similar capacity to stimulate CD4(+) T cell proliferation as ATMs. ATDCs were predominantly CD11b(+) conventional dendritic cells and made up the bulk of CD11c(+) cells in adipose tissue with moderate high-fat diet exposure. Mixed chimeric experiments with Ccr2(-/-) mice demonstrated that high-fat diet-induced ATM accumulation from monocytes was dependent on CCR2, whereas ATDC accumulation was less CCR2 dependent. ATDC accumulation during obesity was attenuated in Ccr7(-/-) mice and was associated with decreased adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. CD45(+)CD64(+) ATM and CD45(+)CD64(-)CD11c(+) ATDCs were identified in human obese adipose tissue and ATDCs were increased in s.c. adipose tissue compared with omental adipose tissue. These results support a revised strategy for unambiguous delineation of ATM and ATDC, and suggest that ATDCs are independent contributors to adipose tissue inflammation during obesity. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Role of DC-SIGN in Lassa virus entry into human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Ana-Rita; Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pasquato, Antonella; Helenius, Ari; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans. Antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs), are early and preferred targets of LASV, and their productive infection contributes to the virus-induced immunosuppression observed in fatal disease. Here, we characterized the role of the C-type lectin DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in LASV entry into primary human DCs using a chimera of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) expressing the LASV glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP). We found that differentiation of human primary monocytes into DCs enhanced virus attachment and entry, concomitant with the upregulation of DC-SIGN. LASV and rLCMV-LASVGP bound to DC-SIGN via mannose sugars located on the N-terminal GP1 subunit of LASVGP. We provide evidence that DC-SIGN serves as an attachment factor for rLCMV-LASVGP in monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (MDDC) and can accelerate the capture of free virus. However, in contrast to the phlebovirus Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), which uses DC-SIGN as an authentic entry receptor, productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP was less dependent on DC-SIGN. In contrast to the DC-SIGN-mediated cell entry of UUKV, entry of rLCMV-LASVGP in MDDC was remarkably slow and depended on actin, indicating the use of different endocytotic pathways. In sum, our data reveal that DC-SIGN can facilitate cell entry of LASV in human MDDC but that its role seems distinct from the function as an authentic entry receptor reported for phleboviruses.

  16. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Miguel; May, Janet S; Sukla, Soumi; Frederico, Bruno; Gill, Michael B; Smith, Christopher M; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  17. Avian dendritic cells: Phenotype and ontogeny in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Nándor; Bódi, Ildikó; Oláh, Imre

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critically important accessory cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Avian DCs were originally identified in primary and secondary lymphoid organs by their typical morphology, displaying long cell processes with cytoplasmic granules. Several subtypes are known. Bursal secretory dendritic cells (BSDC) are elongated cells which express vimentin intermediate filaments, MHC II molecules, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), and produce 74.3+ secretory granules. Avian follicular dendritic cells (FDC) highly resemble BSDC, express the CD83, 74.3 and CSF1R molecules, and present antigen in germinal centers. Thymic dendritic cells (TDC), which express 74.3 and CD83, are concentrated in thymic medulla while interdigitating DC are found in T cell-rich areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Avian Langerhans cells are a specialized 74.3-/MHC II+ cell population found in stratified squamous epithelium and are capable of differentiating into 74.3+ migratory DCs. During organogenesis hematopoietic precursors of DC colonize the developing lymphoid organ primordia prior to immigration of lymphoid precursor cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the ontogeny, cytoarchitecture, and immunophenotype of avian DC, and offers an antibody panel for the in vitro and in vivo identification of these heterogeneous cell types.

  18. Melleolides induce rapid cell death in human primary monocytes and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Markus; Scherer, Olga; Wiechmann, Katja; König, Stefanie; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Werz, Oliver

    2014-08-01

    The melleolides are structurally unique and bioactive natural products of the basidiomycete genus Armillaria. Here, we report on cytotoxic effects of melleolides from Armillaria mellea towards non-transformed human primary monocytes and human cancer cell lines, respectively. In contrast to staurosporine or pretubulysin that are less cytotoxic for monocytes, the cytotoxic potency of the active melleolides in primary monocytes is comparable to that in cancer cells. The onset of the cytotoxic effects of melleolides was rapid (within 5 h, each). Side-by-side comparison with the detergent triton X-100 and staurosporine in microscopic and flow cytometric analysis studies as well as analysis of the viability of mitochondria exclude cell lysis and apoptosis as relevant or primary mechanisms. Our results rather point to necrotic features of cell death mediated by an as yet elusive but rapid mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U.; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  20. Reticuloendothelial cell function in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA: studies on the mechanism of peripheral monocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the activity of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA using an in vitro assay of monocyte-macrophage interaction with erythrocytes and an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC assay. The monocytes of AIHA patients in the hemolyzing period phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells and anti-D coated red cells more avidly than normal control monocytes. There was no significant relationship between phagocytic activity and ADCC activity. The activated monocytes phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells, but had no ADCC activity in a short time 51Cr release assay. Phagocytic activity of the patients' monocytes against autologous erythrocytes rapidly decreased after treatment with prednisolone even though the red cell sensitization with antibody remained almost the same as during the hemolyzing period. We postulated that the activation of monocytes in AIHA was due to the "arming" effect of anti-erythrocyte antibody, but we think that other mechanisms may also be involved in the activation of monocytes.

  1. Intratumoral Dendritic Cells and Chemoradiation for the Treatment of Murine Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Li, Ji; Wei, Shuang; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Chang, Alfred E

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are potent antigen presenting cells that have been shown to have significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. However, the therapeutic efficacy of dendritic cells as an immunotherapeutic treatment has been limited by both immunologic tolerance and active immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. To address this problem, we examined the ability of concurrent systemic chemotherapy and local, fractionated radiation to augment intratumoral dendritic cell injections i...

  2. NF-κB Mediated Transcription in Human Monocytic Cells and Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, G C; Mackman, N

    1998-04-01

    Monocytes and endothelial cells become activated at sites of inflammation and contribute to the pathology of many diseases, including septic shock and atherosclerosis. In these cells, induction of genes expressing various inflammatory mediators, such as adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors, is regulated by NF-κB/Rel transcription factors. Recent studies have identified components of the signal transduction pathways leading to the activation of NF-κB/Rel proteins. Inhibition of these signaling pathways provides a novel therapeutic approach to prevent inducible gene expression in both monocytes and endothelial cells. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1998;8:138-142). © 1998, Elsevier Science Inc.

  3. Dendritic Cells Enhance HIV Infection of Memory CD4(+) T Cells in Human Lymphoid Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodriguez, Angel L; Reuter, Morgan A; McDonald, David

    2016-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in controlling infections by coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses to invading pathogens. Paradoxically, DCs can increase HIV-1 dissemination in vitro by binding and transferring infectious virions to CD4(+) T cells, a process called transinfection. Transinfection has been well characterized in cultured cell lines and circulating primary T cells, but it is unknown whether DCs enhance infection of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. In untreated HIV infection, massive CD4(+) T-cell infection and depletion occur in secondary lymphoid tissues long before decline is evident in the peripheral circulation. To study the role of DCs in HIV infection of lymphoid tissues, we utilized human tonsil tissues, cultured either as tissue blocks or as aggregate suspension cultures, in single-round infection experiments. In these experiments, addition of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to the cultures increased T-cell infection, particularly in CD4(+) T cells expressing lower levels of HLA-DR. Subset analysis demonstrated that MDDCs increased HIV-1 infection of central and effector memory T-cell populations. Depletion of endogenous myeloid DCs (myDCs) from the cultures decreased memory T-cell infection, and readdition of MDDCs restored infection to predepletion levels. Using an HIV-1 fusion assay, we found that MDDCs equally increased HIV delivery into naïve, central, and effector memory T cells in the cultures, whereas predepletion of myDCs reduced fusion into memory T cells. Together, these data suggest that resident myDCs facilitate memory T-cell infection in lymphoid tissues, implicating DC-mediated transinfection in driving HIV dissemination within these tissues in untreated HIV/AIDS.

  4. Dendritic cell populations in patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lied GA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Gülen A Lied1,3,4,*, Petra Vogelsang2,*, Arnold Berstad1,4, Silke Appel2 1Institute of Medicine, 2Broegelmann Research Laboratory, The Gade Institute, University of Bergen, Norway; 3Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine; 4Section of Clinical Allergology, Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Self-reported hypersensitivity to food is a common condition and many of these patients have indications of intestinal immune activation. Dendritic cells (DCs are recognized as the most potent antigen-presenting cells involved in both initiating immune responses and maintaining tolerance. The aims of this study were to evaluate the DC populations with their phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity in patients with food hypersensitivity and to study its relationship with atopic disease. Blood samples from 10 patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity, divided into atopic and nonatopic subgroups, and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy controls were analyzed by flow cytometry using the Miltenyi Blood Dendritic cells kit. Monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs were evaluated concerning their phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity. DC populations and cell surface markers were not significantly different between patients and healthy controls, but moDCs from atopic patients expressed significantly more CD38 compared to moDCs from nonatopic patients. Moreover, lipopolysaccharide stimulated moDCs from atopic patients produced significantly more interleukin-10 compared to nonatopic patients. CD38 expression was correlated to total serum immunoglobulin E levels. These findings support the notion of immune activation in some patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity. They need to be confirmed in a larger cohort.Keywords: food hypersensitivity, atopy, dendritic cells, CD38

  5. Human gastric epithelial cells contribute to gastric immune regulation by providing retinoic acid to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimczok, D; Kao, J Y; Zhang, M; Cochrun, S; Mannon, P; Peter, S; Wilcox, C M; Mönkemüller, K E; Harris, P R; Grams, J M; Stahl, R D; Smith, P D; Smythies, L E

    2015-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule retinol (ROL), and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of ROL synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation.

  6. Aged mice have increased inflammatory monocyte concentration and altered expression of cell-surface functional receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kelley Strohacker; Whitney L Breslin; Katie C Carpenter; Brian K McFarlin

    2012-03-01

    The expression of monocyte cell-surface receptors represents one index of immune dysfunction, which is common with aging. Although mouse models of aging are prevalent, monocyte subset assessment is rare. Our purpose was to compare cell receptor expression on classic (CD115+/Gr-1high) and non-classic (CD115+/Gr-1low) monocytes from 80- or 20-week-old CD-1 mice. Three-colour flow cytometry was used to determine the concentration of monocyte subsets and their respective cell-surface expression of TLR2, TLR4, CD80, CD86, MHC II and CD54. These receptors were selected because they have been previously associated with altered monocyte function. Data were analysed with independent -tests; significance was set at < 0.05. Old mice had a greater concentration of both classic (258%, =0.003) and non-classic (70%, =0.026) monocytes. The classic : non-classic monocyte ratio doubled in old as compared with that in young mice (=0.006), indicating a pro-inflammatory shift. TLR4 ($\\downarrow$27%, =0.001) and CD80 ($\\downarrow$37%, =0.004) were decreased on classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. TLR2 ($\\uparrow$24%, =0.002) and MHCII ($\\downarrow$21%, =0.026) were altered on non-classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. The increased classic : non-classic monocyte ratio combined with changes in the cell-surface receptor expression on both monocyte subsets is indicative of immune dysfunction, which may increase age-associated disease risk.

  7. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  8. IL-4 induces cAMP and cGMP in human monocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dugas

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human monocytes, preincubated with IFN-γ respond to IL-4 by a cGMP increase through activation of an inducible NO synthase. Here, IL-4 was found to induce an accumulation of cGMP (1 – 3 min and cAMP (20 – 25 min in unstimulated monocytes. This was impaired with NOS inhibitors, but also with EGTA and calcium/calmodulin inhibitors. These results suggest that: (1 IL-4 may stimulate different NOS isoforms in resting and IFN-γ activated monocytes, and (2 cAMP accumulation may be partially dependent on the NO pathway. By RT-PCR, a type III constitutive NOS mRNA was detected in U937 monocytic cells. IL-4 also increased the [Ca2+]i in these cells. Different NOS may thus be expressed in monocytic cells depending on their differentiation and the signals they receive.

  9. Dendritic cell SIRPα regulates homeostasis of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Ken; Kotani, Takenori; Saito, Yasuyuki; Respatika, Datu; Murata, Yoji; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that is expressed predominantly in myeloid lineage cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages, mediates cell-cell signaling. In the immune system, SIRPα is thought to be important for homeostasis of DCs, but it remains unclear whether SIRPα intrinsic to DCs is indeed indispensable for such functional role. Thus, we here generated the mice, in which SIRPα was specifically ablated in CD11c(+) DCs (Sirpa(Δ) (DC) ). Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice manifested a marked reduction of CD4(+) CD8α(-) conventional DCs (cDCs) in the secondary lymphoid organs, as well as of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Such reduction of cDCs in Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice was comparable to that apparent with the mice, in which SIRPα was systemically ablated. Expression of SIRPα in DCs was well correlated with that of either endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) or Epstein-Barr virus-induced molecule 2 (EBI2), both of which were also implicated in the regulation of DC homeostasis. Indeed, ESAM(+) or EBI2(+) cDCs were markedly reduced in the spleen of Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice. Thus, our results suggest that SIRPα intrinsic to CD11c(+) DCs is essential for homeostasis of cDCs in the secondary lymphoid organs and skin.

  10. Dendritic Cells in Kidney Transplant Biopsy Samples Are Associated with T Cell Infiltration and Poor Allograft Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batal, Ibrahim; De Serres, Sacha A; Safa, Kassem; Bijol, Vanesa; Ueno, Takuya; Onozato, Maristela L; Iafrate, A John; Herter, Jan M; Lichtman, Andrew H; Mayadas, Tanya N; Guleria, Indira; Rennke, Helmut G; Najafian, Nader; Chandraker, Anil

    2015-12-01

    Progress in long-term renal allograft survival continues to lag behind the progress in short-term transplant outcomes. Dendritic cells are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells, but surprisingly little attention has been paid to their presence in transplanted kidneys. We used dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin as a marker of dendritic cells in 105 allograft biopsy samples from 105 kidney transplant recipients. High dendritic cell density was associated with poor allograft survival independent of clinical variables. Moreover, high dendritic cell density correlated with greater T cell proliferation and poor outcomes in patients with high total inflammation scores, including inflammation in areas of tubular atrophy. We then explored the association between dendritic cells and histologic variables associated with poor prognosis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent association between the densities of dendritic cells and T cells. In biopsy samples with high dendritic cell density, electron microscopy showed direct physical contact between infiltrating lymphocytes and cells that have the ultrastructural morphologic characteristics of dendritic cells. The origin of graft dendritic cells was sought in nine sex-mismatched recipients using XY fluorescence in situ hybridization. Whereas donor dendritic cells predominated initially, the majority of dendritic cells in late allograft biopsy samples were of recipient origin. Our data highlight the prognostic value of dendritic cell density in allograft biopsy samples, suggest a new role for these cells in shaping graft inflammation, and provide a rationale for targeting dendritic cell recruitment to promote long-term allograft survival.

  11. Immune Suppressive Effects of Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Mouse Bone-Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhwa Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are considered valuable sources for cell therapy because of their immune regulatory function. Here, we investigated the effects of tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs on the differentiation, maturation, and function of dendritic cells (DCs. We examined the effect of T-MSCs on differentiation and maturation of bone-marrow- (BM- derived monocytes into DCs and we found suppressive effect of T-MSCs on DCs via direct contact as well as soluble mediators. Moreover, T cell proliferation, normally increased in the presence of DCs, was inhibited by T-MSCs. Differentiation of CD4+ T cell subsets by the DC-T cell interaction also was inhibited by T-MSCs. The soluble mediators suppressed by T-MSCs were granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, RANTES, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. Taken together, T-MSCs exert immune modulatory function via suppression of the differentiation, maturation, and function of BM-derived DCs. Our data suggests that T-MSCs could be used as a novel source of stem cell therapy as immune modulators.

  12. Medroxyprogesterone acetate impairs human dendritic cell activation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe Calla, N E; Ghonime, M G; Cherpes, T L; Vicetti Miguel, R D

    2015-05-01

    Does medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) impair human dendritic cell (DC) activation and function? In vitro MPA treatment suppressed expression of CD40 and CD80 by human primary DCs responding to Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist stimulation (i.e. DC activation). Moreover, this MPA-mediated decrease in CD40 expression impaired DC capacity to stimulate T cell proliferation (i.e. DC function). MPA is the active molecule in Depo-Provera(®) (DMPA), a commonly used injectable hormonal contraceptive (HC). Although DMPA treatment of mice prior to viral mucosal tissue infection impaired the capacity of DCs to up-regulate CD40 and CD80 and prime virus-specific T cell proliferation, neither DC activation marker expression nor the ability of DCs to promote T cell proliferation were affected by in vitro progesterone treatment of human DCs generated from peripheral blood monocytes. This cross-sectional study examined MPA-mediated effects on the activation and function of human primary untouched peripheral blood DCs. Human DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by negative immunomagnetic selection were incubated for 24 h with various concentrations of MPA. After an additional 24 h incubation with the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flow cytometry was used to evaluate DC phenotype (i.e. expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR). In separate experiments, primary untouched human DCs were sequentially MPA-treated, poly I:C-activated, and incubated for 7 days with fluorescently labeled naïve allogeneic T cells. Flow cytometry was then used to quantify allogeneic T cell proliferation. Several pharmacologically relevant concentrations of MPA dramatically reduced CD40 and CD80 expression in human primary DCs responding to the immunostimulant poly I:C. In addition, MPA-treated DCs displayed a reduced capacity to promote allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation. In other DC: T cell co-cultures, the addition of antibody blocking the CD40

  13. Comparison between Sendai virus and adenovirus vectors to transduce HIV-1 genes into human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Odawara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Kano, Munehide; Kato, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2008-03-01

    Immuno-genetherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) can be applied to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Sendai virus (SeV) has unique features such as cytoplasmic replication and high protein expression as a vector for genetic manipulation. In this study, we compared the efficiency of inducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and HIV-1 gene expression in human monocyte-derived DCs between SeV and adenovirus (AdV). Human monocyte-derived DCs infected with SeV showed the maximum gene expression 24 hr after infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2. Although SeV vector showed higher cytopathic effect on DCs than AdV, SeV vector induced maximum gene expression earlier and at much lower MOI. In terms of cell surface phenotype, both SeV and AdV vectors induced DC maturation. DCs infected with SeV as well as AdV elicited HIV-1 specific T-cell responses detected by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot). Our data suggest that SeV could be one of the reliable vectors for immuno-genetherapy for HIV-1 infected patients.

  14. A rapid crosstalk of human gammadelta T cells and monocytes drives the acute inflammation in bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Eberl

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells are a minor subset of T cells in human blood and differ from other T cells by their immediate responsiveness to microbes. We previously demonstrated that the primary target for Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells is (E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP, an essential metabolite produced by a large range of pathogens. Here we wished to study the consequence of this unique responsiveness in microbial infection. The majority of peripheral Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells shares migration properties with circulating monocytes, which explains the presence of these two distinct blood cell types in the inflammatory infiltrate at sites of infection and suggests that they synergize in anti-microbial immune responses. Our present findings demonstrate a rapid and HMB-PP-dependent crosstalk between Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells and autologous monocytes that results in the immediate production of inflammatory mediators including the cytokines interleukin (IL-6, interferon (IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, and oncostatin M (OSM; the chemokines CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10; and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, under these co-culture conditions monocytes differentiate within 18 hours into inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs with antigen-presenting functions. Addition of further microbial stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan induces CCR7 and enables these inflammatory DCs to trigger the generation of CD4(+ effector alphabeta T cells expressing IFN-gamma and/or IL-17. Importantly, our in vitro model replicates the responsiveness to microbes of effluent cells from peritoneal dialysis (PD patients and translates directly to episodes of acute PD-associated bacterial peritonitis, where Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cell numbers and soluble inflammatory mediators are elevated in patients infected with HMB-PP-producing pathogens. Collectively, these findings suggest a direct link between invading pathogens, microbe

  15. Phenotypical and functional characterization of clinical-grade dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, I.J.M. de; Adema, G.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and form a promising new treatment modality. Fully activated DC loaded with antigen are very useful in stimulating immune responses, in particular those to combat cancer. Immature DC can either cause immunological tolerance or induce

  16. Dendritic cells and their role in tumor immunosurveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strioga, M.M.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Powell, D.J.; Pasukoniene, V.; Dobrovolskiene, N.T.; Michalek, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of cells that play a key role in initiating, directing and regulating adaptive immune responses, including those critically involved in tumor immunosurveillance. As a riposte to the central role of DCs in the generation of antitumor immune re

  17. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Human Dendritic Cell Development, Survival and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) with a dual function in the immune system. On the one hand, these specialized leukocytes are equipped to alert the immune system to invading pathogens or other danger signals. On the other, DC can promote tolerogenic re

  18. IL-10 control of dendritic cells in the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Clausen (Bjorn); M.J.H. Girard-Madoux (Mathilde)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractInterleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent immunomodulatory cytokine, whose cellular targets have not yet been precisely identified. Mice bearing a dendritic cell (DC)-specific defect in the IL-10 receptor mice exhibit exaggerated T-cell reactivation in the skin, highlighting a key function of D

  19. Dendritic cell maturation results in pronounced changes in glycan expression affecting recognition by siglecs and galectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, Marieke; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Jang-Lee, Jihye; North, Simon J.; Gilmartin, Tim J.; Hernandez, Gilberto; Crocker, Paul R.; Leffler, Hakon; Head, Steven R.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent APC in the organism. Immature dendritic cells (iDC) reside in the tissue where they capture pathogens whereas mature dendritic cells (mDC) are able to activate T cells in the lymph node. This dramatic functional change is mediated by an important genetic repr

  20. Dendritic Cells are Critical Accessory Cells for Thymus-Dependent Antibody Responses in Mouse and in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kayo; Steinman, Ralph M.; van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Muramatsu, Shigeru

    1983-10-01

    We report that dendritic cells (DC) are necessary and potent accessory cells for anti-sheep erythrocyte responses in both mouse and man. In mice, a small number of DC (0.3-1% of the culture) restores the response of B/T-lymphocyte mixtures to that observed in unfractionated spleen. An even lower dose (0.03-0.1% DC) is needed if the T cells have been primed to antigen. Responses are both antigen and T cell dependent. Selective depletion of DC from unfractionated spleen with the monoclonal antibody 33D1 and complement ablates the antibody response. In contrast to DC, purified spleen macrophages are weak or inactive stimulators. However, when mixed with DC, macrophages can increase the yield of antibody-secreting cells about 2-fold. In man, small numbers (0.3-1%) of blood DC stimulate antibody formation in vitro. Purified human monocytes do not stimulate but in low doses (1% of the culture) inhibit the antibody response. Likewise, selective removal of human monocytes with antibody and complement enhances or accelerates the development of antibody-secreting cells. We conclude that DC are required for the development of T-dependent antibody responses by mouse and human lymphocytes in vitro.

  1. Effect of zinc and nitric oxide on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungmun; Eskin, Suzanne G; Shah, Ankit K; Schildmeyer, Lisa A; McIntire, Larry V

    2012-03-01

    This study describes the effect of zinc on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under different shear stress regimens, which may trigger atherogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to steady shear stress (15 dynes/cm(2) or 1 dyne/cm(2)) or reversing shear stress (time average 1 dyne/cm(2)) for 24 h. In all shear stress regimes, zinc deficiency enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, while heparinase III reduced monocyte adhesion following reversing shear stress exposure. Unlike other shear stress regimes, reversing shear stress alone enhanced monocyte adhesion, which may be associated with increased H(2)O(2) and superoxide together with relatively low levels of nitric oxide (NO) production. L-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment increased monocyte adhesion under 15 dynes/cm(2) and under reversing shear stress. After reversing shear stress, monocyte adhesion dramatically increased with heparinase III treatment followed by a zinc scavenger. Static culture experiments supported the reduction of monocyte adhesion by zinc following endothelial cell cytokine activation. These results suggest that endothelial cell zinc levels are important for the inhibition of monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and may be one of the key factors in the early stages of atherogenesis.

  2. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos-Campos, I; AsIn, L; Torres, T E; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Mariano Esquillor s/n, CP 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Marquina, C, E-mail: goya@unizar.es [Condensed Matter Department, Sciences Faculty, University of Zaragoza, 50009 (Spain)

    2011-05-20

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH{sub 2}{sup +}) or negative (COOH{sup -}) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  3. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Campos, I.; Asín, L.; Torres, T. E.; Marquina, C.; Tres, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Goya, G. F.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2 + ) or negative (COOH - ) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  4. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A

    2016-01-05

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as "slanDCs", has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues.

  5. The Neurorepellent Slit2 Inhibits Postadhesion Stabilization of Monocytes Tethered to Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukovozov, Ilya; Huang, Yi-Wei; Zhang, Qiuwang; Liu, Guang Ying; Siu, Allan; Sokolskyy, Yaroslav; Patel, Sajedabanu; Hyduk, Sharon J; Kutryk, Michael J B; Cybulsky, Myron I; Robinson, Lisa A

    2015-10-01

    The secreted neurorepellent Slit2, acting through its transmembrane receptor, Roundabout (Robo)-1, inhibits chemotaxis of varied cell types, including leukocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, toward diverse attractants. The role of Slit2 in regulating the steps involved in recruitment of monocytes in vascular inflammation is not well understood. In this study, we showed that Slit2 inhibited adhesion of monocytic cells to activated human endothelial cells, as well as to immobilized ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Microfluidic live cell imaging showed that Slit2 inhibited the ability of monocytes tethered to endothelial cells to stabilize their actin-associated anchors and to resist detachment in response to increasing shear forces. Transfection of constitutively active plasmids revealed that Slit2 inhibited postadhesion stabilization of monocytes on endothelial cells by preventing activation of Rac1. We further found that Slit2 inhibited chemotaxis of monocytes toward CXCL12 and CCL2. To determine whether Slit2 and Robo-1 modulate pathologic monocyte recruitment associated with vascular inflammation and cardiovascular disease, we tested PBMC from patients with coronary artery disease. PBMC from these patients had reduced surface levels of Robo-1 compared with healthy age- and sex-matched subjects, and Slit2 failed to inhibit chemotaxis of PBMC of affected patients, but not healthy control subjects, toward CCL2. Furthermore, administration of Slit2 to atherosclerosis-prone LDL receptor-deficient mice inhibited monocyte recruitment to nascent atherosclerotic lesions. These results demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits chemotaxis of monocytes, as well as their ability to stabilize adhesions and resist detachment forces. Slit2 may represent a powerful new tool to inhibit pathologic monocyte recruitment in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  6. Interaction of dendritic cells with antigen-containing liposomes: effect of bilayer composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Arigita, Carmen; Sundblad, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy might be improved by exploiting the potent antigen presenting properties of dendrite cells (DCs), since their ability to stimulate specific major histocompatibility complex-restricted immune responses has been well documented during the recent years. In that light, we investigated...... how the interaction of antigen-containing liposomes with DCs was affected by the bilayer composition. Monocyte-derived human DCs and murine bone marrow-derived DCs were analysed and compared upon in vitro incubation with liposomes by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Anionic liposomes...... with a bilayer composition of phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidylserine interacted with a limited fraction of the total DC population in case of both DC types. Inclusion of mannosylated phosphatidylethanolamine (Man-PE) for targeting to the mannose receptor (MR) increased...

  7. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  8. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  9. Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge L. Huibregtse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-10 (IL-10 plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L.  lactisIL-10 on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated with L.  lactisIL-10 induced effector Th-cells that markedly suppressed the proliferation of allogenic Th-cells as compared to L. lactis. This suppressive effect was only seen when DC showed increased CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, enhanced production of IL-10 was measured in both L.  lactisIL-10-derived DC and Th-cells compared to L. lactis-derived DC and Th-cells. Neutralizing IL-10 during DC-Th-cell interaction and coculturing L.  lactisIL-10-derived suppressor Th-cells with allogenic Th-cells in a transwell system prevented the induction of suppressor Th-cells. Only 130 pg/mL of bacterial-derived IL-10 and 40 times more exogenously added recombinant human IL-10 were needed during DC priming for the generation of suppressor Th-cells. The spatially restricted delivery of IL-10 by food-grade bacteria is a promising strategy to induce suppressor Th-cells in vivo and to treat inflammatory diseases.

  10. Monocytes from HIV+ individuals show impaired cholesterol efflux and increased foam cell formation after transendothelial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAISA, Anna; HEARPS, Anna C.; ANGELOVICH, Thomas A.; PEREIRA, Candida F.; ZHOU, Jingling; SHI, Margaret D.Y.; PALMER, Clovis S.; MULLER, William A.; CROWE, Suzanne M.; JAWOROWSKI, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Design HIV+ individuals have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease which is independent of antiretroviral therapy and traditional risk factors. Monocytes play a central role in the development of atherosclerosis, and HIV-related chronic inflammation and monocyte activation may contribute to increased atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Methods Using an in vitro model of atherosclerotic plaque formation, we measured the transendothelial migration of purified monocytes from age-matched HIV+ and uninfected donors and examined their differentiation into foam cells. Cholesterol efflux and the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes were also assessed. Results Monocytes from HIV+ individuals showed increased foam cell formation compared to controls (18.9% vs 0% respectively, p=0.004) and serum from virologically suppressed HIV+ individuals potentiated foam cell formation by monocytes from both uninfected and HIV+ donors. Plasma TNF levels were increased in HIV+ vs control donors (5.9 vs 3.5 pg/ml, p=0.02) and foam cell formation was inhibited by blocking antibodies to TNF receptors, suggesting a direct effect on monocyte differentiation to foam cells. Monocytes from virologically suppressed HIV+ donors showed impaired cholesterol efflux and decreased expression of key genes regulating cholesterol metabolism, including the cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (p=0.02). Conclusions Monocytes from HIV+ individuals show impaired cholesterol efflux and are primed for foam cell formation following trans-endothelial migration. Factors present in HIV+ serum, including elevated TNF levels, further enhance foam cell formation. The pro-atherogenic phenotype of monocytes persists in virologically suppressed HIV+ individuals and may contribute mechanistically to increased atherosclerosis in this population. PMID:26244384