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Sample records for monocyte transendothelial migration

  1. CXCL1 contributes to β-amyloid-induced transendothelial migration of monocytes in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Ke Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow-derived microglia that originates in part from hematopoietic cells, and more particularly from monocytes preferentially attach to amyloid deposition in brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the mechanism of monocytes recruited into the amyloid plaques with an accelerated process in AD is unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we reported that monocytes from AD patients express significantly higher chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL1 compared to age-matched controls. AD patient's monocytes or CXCL1-overexpressing THP-1 cells had enhanced ability of β-amyloid (Aβ-induced transendothelial migration and Aβ-induced transendothelial migration for AD patient's monocytes or CXCL1-overexpressing THP-1 cells was almost abrogated by anti-CXCL1 antibody. Furthermore, monocytes derived from a transgenic mouse model of AD also expressed significantly higher CXCL1. CD11b⁺CD45(hi population of cells that were recruited from the peripheral blood were markedly bolcked in APP mouse brain by anti-CXCL1 antibody. Accordingly, in response to Aβ, human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC significantly up-regulated CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2 expression, which was the only identified receptor for CXCL1. In addition, a high level expression of CXCR2 in HBMEC significantly promoted the CXCL1-overexpressing THP-1 cells transendothelial migration, which could be was abrogated by anti-CXCR2 antibody. Further examination of possible mechanisms found that CXCL1-overexpressing THP-1 cells induced transendothelial electrical resistance decrease, horseradish peroxidase flux increase, ZO-1 discontinuous and occludin re-distribution from insoluble to soluble fraction through interacting with CXCR2. ROCK inhibitor, Y27632, could block CXCL1-overexpressing THP-1 cells transendothelial migration, whereas other inhibitors had no effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data indicate that monocytes derived from AD

  2. Monocytes from HIV+ individuals show impaired cholesterol efflux and increased foam cell formation after transendothelial migration

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    MAISA, Anna; HEARPS, Anna C.; ANGELOVICH, Thomas A.; PEREIRA, Candida F.; ZHOU, Jingling; SHI, Margaret D.Y.; PALMER, Clovis S.; MULLER, William A.; CROWE, Suzanne M.; JAWOROWSKI, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Design HIV+ individuals have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease which is independent of antiretroviral therapy and traditional risk factors. Monocytes play a central role in the development of atherosclerosis, and HIV-related chronic inflammation and monocyte activation may contribute to increased atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Methods Using an in vitro model of atherosclerotic plaque formation, we measured the transendothelial migration of purified monocytes from age-matched HIV+ and uninfected donors and examined their differentiation into foam cells. Cholesterol efflux and the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes were also assessed. Results Monocytes from HIV+ individuals showed increased foam cell formation compared to controls (18.9% vs 0% respectively, p=0.004) and serum from virologically suppressed HIV+ individuals potentiated foam cell formation by monocytes from both uninfected and HIV+ donors. Plasma TNF levels were increased in HIV+ vs control donors (5.9 vs 3.5 pg/ml, p=0.02) and foam cell formation was inhibited by blocking antibodies to TNF receptors, suggesting a direct effect on monocyte differentiation to foam cells. Monocytes from virologically suppressed HIV+ donors showed impaired cholesterol efflux and decreased expression of key genes regulating cholesterol metabolism, including the cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (p=0.02). Conclusions Monocytes from HIV+ individuals show impaired cholesterol efflux and are primed for foam cell formation following trans-endothelial migration. Factors present in HIV+ serum, including elevated TNF levels, further enhance foam cell formation. The pro-atherogenic phenotype of monocytes persists in virologically suppressed HIV+ individuals and may contribute mechanistically to increased atherosclerosis in this population. PMID:26244384

  3. Monocyte ADAM17 promotes diapedesis during transendothelial migration: identification of steps and substrates targeted by metalloproteinases.

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    Tsubota, Yoshiaki; Frey, Jeremy M; Tai, Phillip W L; Welikson, Robert E; Raines, Elaine W

    2013-04-15

    Despite expanded definition of the leukocyte adhesion cascade and mechanisms underlying individual steps, very little is known about regulatory mechanisms controlling sequential shifts between steps. We tested the hypothesis that metalloproteinases provide a mechanism to rapidly transition monocytes between different steps. Our study identifies diapedesis as a step targeted by metalloproteinase activity. Time-lapse video microscopy shows that the presence of a metalloproteinase inhibitor results in a doubling of the time required for human monocytes to complete diapedesis on unactivated or inflamed human endothelium, under both static and physiological-flow conditions. Thus, diapedesis is promoted by metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, neither adhesion of monocytes nor their locomotion over the endothelium is altered by metalloproteinase inhibition. We further demonstrate that metalloproteinase inhibition significantly elevates monocyte cell surface levels of integrins CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1), specifically during transendothelial migration. Interestingly, such alterations are not detected for other endothelial- and monocyte-adhesion molecules that are presumed metalloproteinase substrates. Two major transmembrane metalloproteinases, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)17 and ADAM10, are identified as enzymes that control constitutive cleavage of Mac-1. We further establish that knockdown of monocyte ADAM17, but not endothelial ADAM10 or ADAM17 or monocyte ADAM10, reproduces the diapedesis delay observed with metalloproteinase inhibition. Therefore, we conclude that monocyte ADAM17 facilitates the completion of transendothelial migration by accelerating the rate of diapedesis. We propose that the progression of diapedesis may be regulated by spatial and temporal cleavage of Mac-1, which is triggered upon interaction with endothelium.

  4. Live Brugia malayi microfilariae inhibit transendothelial migration of neutrophils and monocytes.

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    Jan-Hendrik Schroeder

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is a major tropical disease caused by the parasite Brugia malayi. Microfilariae (Mf circulate in the peripheral blood for 2-3 hours in synchronisation with maximal feeding of the mosquito vector. When absent from the peripheral blood, Mf sequester in the capillaries of the lungs. Mf are therefore in close contact with vascular endothelial cells (EC and may induce EC immune function and/or wound repair mechanisms such as angiogenesis. In this study, Mf were co-cultured with human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC or human lung microvascular EC (HLMVEC and the transendothelial migration of leukocyte subsets was analysed. In addition, the protein and/or mRNA expression of chemokine, cytokine and angiogenic mediators in endothelial cells in the presence of live microfilariae were measured by a combination of cDNA arrays, protein arrays, ELISA and fluorescence antibody tests.Surprisingly, our findings indicate that Mf presence partially blocked transendothelial migration of monocytes and neutrophils, but not lymphocytes. However, Mf exposure did not result in altered vascular EC expression of key mediators of the tethering stage of extravasation, such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and various chemokines. To further analyse the immunological function of vascular EC in the presence of Mf, we measured the mRNA and/or protein expression of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators. We found that expression levels of the mediators tested were predominantly unaltered upon B. malayi Mf exposure. In addition, a comparison of angiogenic mediators induced by intact Mf and Wolbachia-depleted Mf revealed that even intact Mf induce the expression of remarkably few angiogenic mediators in vascular EC. Our study suggests that live microfilariae are remarkably inert in their induction and/or activation of vascular cells in their immediate local environment. Overall, this work presents important insights into the immunological function of the vascular endothelium during

  5. Intracerebral GM-CSF contributes to transendothelial monocyte migration in APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease mice.

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    Shang, De S; Yang, Yi M; Zhang, Hu; Tian, Li; Jiang, Jiu S; Dong, Yan B; Zhang, Ke; Li, Bo; Zhao, Wei D; Fang, Wen G; Chen, Yu H

    2016-11-01

    Although tight junctions between human brain microvascular endothelial cells in the blood-brain barrier prevent molecules or cells in the bloodstream from entering the brain, in Alzheimer's disease, peripheral blood monocytes can "open" these tight junctions and trigger subsequent transendothelial migration. However, the mechanism underlying this migration is unclear. Here, we found that the CSF2RB, but not CSF2RA, subunit of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor was overexpressed on monocytes from Alzheimer's disease patients. CSF2RB contributes to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced transendothelial monocyte migration. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor triggers human brain microvascular endothelial cells monolayer tight junction disassembly by downregulating ZO-1 expression via transcription modulation and claudin-5 expression via the ubiquitination pathway. Interestingly, intracerebral granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor blockade abolished the increased monocyte infiltration in the brains of APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease model mice. Our results suggest that in Alzheimer's disease patients, high granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid induced blood-brain barrier opening, facilitating the infiltration of CSF2RB-expressing peripheral monocytes across blood-brain barrier and into the brain. CSF2RB might be useful as an Alzheimer's disease biomarker. Thus, our findings will help to understand the mechanism of monocyte infiltration in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

  6. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL LIGANDS OF PATTERN-RECOGNIZING RECEPTORS (PRR ON MONOCYTE-LIKE THP-1 CELLS UPON THEIR TRANSENDOTHELIAL MIGRATION

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    E. P. Starikova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of study was to compare the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS component from Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli 055:B5, and a lysate of Gram-positive bacterium (Streptococcus pyogenes, type M1, strain 40/58 upon transendothelial migration rates of monocyte-like cells (THP-1 strain. Both LPS and lysate of Streptococcus pyogenes acted as chemoattractants for THP-1 cells. he studied components of Streptococcus pyogenes proved to be more active stimulants of transendothelial THP-1 cell migration, than LPS from E. coli. During spontaneous transmigration of THP-1 cells through a monolayer of endothelial cells, augmented levels of chemokines (RANTES, MCP-1, IL-8, IP-10 were noticed, that were more pronounced in presence of LPS. Upon spontaneous transmigration of THP-1 cells through endothelial monolayer, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in cultural medium were found to be rather low. The transmigration-associated secretion of these cytokines increased in presence of LPS and Streptococcus pyogenes lysate. Incubation with these bacterial constituents did increase cytokine levels both in monoculture of THP-1 cells and in transmigration model. Our results suggest that the levels of THP-1 transendothelial migration depend mainly on activation of monocyte-like cells influenced by PRR-ligands from Streptococcus pyogenes lysate. (Med. Immunol., vol. 10, N 6, pp 571-576.

  7. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

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    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  8. PLACENTAL SECRETORY FACTORS INFLUENCE TO THP-1 CELLS PHENOTYPE AND THP-1 CELLS TRANSENDOTHELIAL MIGRATION

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    O. I. Stepanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decidual and placental macrophage pools are renewed due to its transendothelial monocyte migration from peripheral blood. Tissue macrophages control placental development and provide fetomaternal immunological tolerance. Preeclamptic pregnancy is accompanied by increased monocyte migration to decidual tissue and local inflammatory events. Regulatory mechanisms of monocyte recruitment to placental and decidual tissues is still unclear. Therefore we investigated the influence soluble placental factors (SPFs during the first- and third-trimester normal pregnancy, as compared to effects of these factors in preeclamptic pregnancy. We studied biological actions of SPF upon transendothelial migration of monocyte-like THP-1 cells and their phenotypic pattern. Transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells was more intensive with firsttrimester SPFs from normal pregnancy, when compared with third-trimester samples, and it was accompanied by decreased CD11a expression. SPFs from pre-eclamptic pregnancy caused an increase in transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells, as compared to SPFs from normal pregnancies, being accompanied by increased CD11b expression. The present study was supported by grants ГК №  02.740.11.0711, НШ-3594.2010.7, МД-150.2011.7 and a grant from St.-Petersburg Goverment for young scientists.

  9. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes exhibit diverse behaviors in transendothelial and subendothelial migrations under coculture with smooth muscle cells in disturbed flow.

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    Chen, Cheng-Nan; Chang, Shun-Fu; Lee, Pei-Ling; Chang, Kyle; Chen, Li-Jing; Usami, Shunichi; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis develops at regions of the arterial tree exposed to disturbed flow. The early stage of atherogenesis involves the adhesion of leukocytes (white blood cells [WBCs]) to and their transmigration across endothelial cells (ECs), which are located in close proximity to smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We investigated the effects of EC/SMC coculture and disturbed flow on the adhesion and transmigration of 3 types of WBCs (neutrophils, peripheral blood lymphocytes [PBLs], and monocytes) using our vertical-step flow (VSF) chamber, in which ECs were cocultured with SMCs in collagen gels. Such coculture significantly increased the adhesion and transmigration of neutrophils, PBLs, and monocytes under VSF, particularly in the reattachment area, where the rolling velocity of WBCs and their transmigration time were decreased, as compared with the other areas. Neutrophils, PBLs, and monocytes showed different subendothelial migration patterns under VSF. Their movements were more random and shorter in distance in the reattachment area. Coculture of ECs and SMCs induced their expressions of adhesion molecules and chemokines, which contributed to the increased WBC adhesion and transmigration. Our findings provide insights into the mechanisms of WBC interaction with the vessel wall (composed of ECs and SMCs) under the complex flow environments found in regions of prevalence for atherogenesis.

  10. Methylene blue modulates transendothelial migration of peripheral blood cells.

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    Isabella Werner

    Full Text Available Vasoplegia is a severe complication after cardiac surgery. Within the last years the administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor methylene blue (MB became a new therapeutic strategy. Our aim was to investigate the role of MB on transendothelial migration of circulating blood cells, the potential role of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS in this process, and the influence of MB on endothelial cell apoptosis. Human vascular endothelial cells (HuMEC-1 were treated for 30 minutes or 2 hours with different concentrations of MB. Inflammation was mimicked by LPS stimulation prior and after MB. Transmigration of PBMCs and T-Lymphocytes through the treated endothelial cells was investigated. The influence of MB upon the different subsets of PBMCs (Granulocytes, T- and B-Lymphocytes, and Monocytes was assessed after transmigration by means of flow-cytometry. The effect of MB on cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide stainings. Analyses of the expression of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS were performed by means of RT-PCR and Western Blot. Results were analyzed using unpaired Students T-test. Analysis of endothelial cell apoptosis by MB indicated a dose-dependent increase of apoptotic cells. We observed time- and dose-dependent effects of MB on transendothelial migration of PBMCs. The prophylactic administration of MB led to an increase of transendothelial migration of PBMCs but not Jurkat cells. Furthermore, HuMEC-1 secretion of cGMP correlated with iNOS expression after MB administration but not with eNOS expression. Expression of these molecules was reduced after MB administration at protein level. This study clearly reveals that endothelial response to MB is dose- and especially time-dependent. MB shows different effects on circulating blood cell-subtypes, and modifies the release patterns of eNOS, iNOS, and cGMP. The transendothelial migration is modulated after treatment with MB. Furthermore, MB provokes apoptosis of endothelial

  11. Methylene blue modulates transendothelial migration of peripheral blood cells.

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    Werner, Isabella; Guo, Fengwei; Bogert, Nicolai V; Stock, Ulrich A; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Vasoplegia is a severe complication after cardiac surgery. Within the last years the administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor methylene blue (MB) became a new therapeutic strategy. Our aim was to investigate the role of MB on transendothelial migration of circulating blood cells, the potential role of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS in this process, and the influence of MB on endothelial cell apoptosis. Human vascular endothelial cells (HuMEC-1) were treated for 30 minutes or 2 hours with different concentrations of MB. Inflammation was mimicked by LPS stimulation prior and after MB. Transmigration of PBMCs and T-Lymphocytes through the treated endothelial cells was investigated. The influence of MB upon the different subsets of PBMCs (Granulocytes, T- and B-Lymphocytes, and Monocytes) was assessed after transmigration by means of flow-cytometry. The effect of MB on cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide stainings. Analyses of the expression of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS were performed by means of RT-PCR and Western Blot. Results were analyzed using unpaired Students T-test. Analysis of endothelial cell apoptosis by MB indicated a dose-dependent increase of apoptotic cells. We observed time- and dose-dependent effects of MB on transendothelial migration of PBMCs. The prophylactic administration of MB led to an increase of transendothelial migration of PBMCs but not Jurkat cells. Furthermore, HuMEC-1 secretion of cGMP correlated with iNOS expression after MB administration but not with eNOS expression. Expression of these molecules was reduced after MB administration at protein level. This study clearly reveals that endothelial response to MB is dose- and especially time-dependent. MB shows different effects on circulating blood cell-subtypes, and modifies the release patterns of eNOS, iNOS, and cGMP. The transendothelial migration is modulated after treatment with MB. Furthermore, MB provokes apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose

  12. [Induction of monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation by asthmatic serum in a transendothelial trafficking model].

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    Zhou, Lin-fu; Wang, Wen-lu; Li, Hong-yan; Zhang, Ming-shun; Ji, Xiao-hui; He, Shao-heng; Huang, Mao; Yin, Kai-sheng

    2011-03-01

    To explore the effect of asthmatic and healthy serum on differentiation and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) in a transendothelial trafficking model. The sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated from 12 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy volunteers, and monocytes were selected from PBMC using magnetic beads. The trypsin-digested human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) at passage 2 from 5 healthy lying-in women were used to construct the transendothelial trafficking model under asthmatic or healthy serum, wherein MDDC were identified by silver nitrate staining and scanning electron microscopy. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Flow cytometry, ELISA and mixed leukocyte reaction were relevantly utilized to detect the phenotype, cytokine and T cell proliferation. (1) Monocytes traversed through HUVEC monolayer after 2 h, and reverse-transmigrated to develop into DC 48 h later. (2) The healthy serum stimulated monocytes into immature MDDC with lower CD(14) [(20 ± 5)%] (F = 49.01, P 0.05), higher CD(80) and CD(83) [(49.7 ± 10.2)% and (30.2 ± 6.8)%] (F = 4.01 and 20.68, all P trafficking model, which provides a promising experimental platform for both investigation of immunological mechanisms in asthma and screening of novel anti-asthma drugs in vitro.

  13. A three-dimensional in vitro model to demonstrate the haptotactic effect of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 on atherosclerosis-associated monocyte migration.

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    Ghousifam, Neda; Mortazavian, Hamid; Bhowmick, Rudra; Vasquez, Yolanda; Blum, Frank D; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Monocyte transendothelial migration is a multi-step process critical for the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is overexpressed during atheroma and its concentration gradients in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical for the transendothelial recruitment of monocytes. Based on prior observations, we hypothesize that both free and bound gradients of MCP-1 within the ECM are involved in directing monocyte migration. The interaction between a three-dimensional (3D), cell-free, collagen matrix and MCP-1; and its effect on monocyte migration was measured in this study. Our results showed such an interaction existed between MCP-1 and collagen, as 26% of the total MCP-1 added to the collagen matrix was bound to the matrix after extensive washes. We also characterized the collagen-MCP-1 interaction using biophysical techniques. The treatment of the collagen matrix with MCP-1 lead to increased monocyte migration, and this phenotype was abrogated by treating the matrix with an anti-MCP-1 antibody. Thus, our results indicate a binding interaction between MCP-1 and the collagen matrix, which could elicit a haptotactic effect on monocyte migration. A better understanding of such mechanisms controlling monocyte migration will help identify target cytokines and lead to the development of better anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies.

  14. Reverse transendothelial cell migration in inflammation: to help or to hinder?

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    Burn, Thomas; Alvarez, Jorge Ivan

    2017-05-01

    The endothelium provides a strong barrier separating circulating blood from tissue. It also provides a significant challenge for immune cells in the bloodstream to access potential sites of infection. To mount an effective immune response, leukocytes traverse the endothelial layer in a process known as transendothelial migration. Decades of work have allowed dissection of the mechanisms through which immune cells gain access into peripheral tissues, and subsequently to inflammatory foci. However, an often under-appreciated or potentially ignored question is whether transmigrated leukocytes can leave these inflammatory sites, and perhaps even return across the endothelium and re-enter circulation. Although evidence has existed to support "reverse" transendothelial migration for a number of years, it is only recently that mechanisms associated with this process have been described. Here we review the evidence that supports both reverse transendothelial migration and reverse interstitial migration within tissues, with particular emphasis on some of the more recent studies that finally hint at potential mechanisms. Additionally, we postulate the biological significance of retrograde migration, and whether it serves as an additional mechanism to limit pathology, or provides a basis for the dissemination of systemic inflammation.

  15. Regulation of endothelial permeability and transendothelial migration of cancer cells by tropomyosin-1 phosphorylation

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    Simoneau Bryan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of endothelial cell integrity and selective permeability barrier is an early event in the sequence of oxidant-mediated injury and may result in atherosclerosis, hypertension and facilitation of transendothelial migration of cancer cells during metastasis. We already reported that endothelial cell integrity is tightly regulated by the balanced co-activation of p38 and ERK pathways. In particular, we showed that phosphorylation of tropomyosin-1 (tropomyosin alpha-1 chain = Tm1 at Ser283 by DAP kinase, downstream of the ERK pathway might be a key event required to maintain the integrity and normal functions of the endothelium in response to oxidative stress. Methods Endothelial permeability was assayed by monitoring the passage of Dextran-FITC through a tight monolayer of HUVECs grown to confluence in Boyden chambers. Actin and Tm1 dynamics and distribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence. We modulated the expression of Tm1 by siRNA and lentiviral-mediated expression of wild type and mutated forms of Tm1 insensitive to the siRNA. Transendothelial migration of HT-29 colon cancer cells was monitored in Boyden chambers similarly as for permeability. Results We provide evidence indicating that Tm1 phosphorylation at Ser283 is essential to regulate endothelial permeability under oxidative stress by modulating actin dynamics. Moreover, the transendothelial migration of colon cancer cells is also regulated by the phosphorylation of Tm1 at Ser283. Conclusion Our finding strongly support the role for the phosphorylation of endothelial Tm1 at Ser283 to prevent endothelial barrier dysfunction associated with oxidative stress injury.

  16. Expression of aminopeptidase N (APN on peripheral blood mononuclear cells' surface as a marker of these cells' transendothelial migration properties in the course of multiple sclerosis

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    J. Ziąber

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available CD13 AG and CD11a, CD11b, CD18 molecule expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were studied as these cells’ adherent or transendothelial migration properties in three different multiple sclerosis (MS patients groups (total 38: with clinically active MS (acute exacerbation of MS and primary chronic progressive MS (CP-MS and with MS remission. The control group consisted of patients, suffering from other non-inflammatory neurological diseases (OND. The results of our study suggest that CD11a/CD18 molecules expression on PB lymphocytes, although higher on these cells’ surface in the course of MS as compared to OND, does not differentiate clinical forms of MS. CD11a molecule expression on monocytes did not differ significantly in all tested MS patient groups in comparison to OND. Although the expression of CD11b/CD18 molecules on monocytes’ surface shows their activation in the course of MS, it does not differentiate them either. However, CD13 Ag of APN expression on PBMC surface may be an immunological marker of MS clinical form. CD13 Ag expression may also be a sensitive marker of these cells’ transendothelial migration properties.

  17. Adenosine inhibits neutrophil vascular endothelial growth factor release and transendothelial migration via A2B receptor activation.

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    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    The effects of adenosine on neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophils; PMN)-directed changes in vascular permeability are poorly characterized. This study investigated whether adenosine modulates activated PMN vascular endothelial growth factor (vascular permeability factor; VEGF) release and transendothelial migration. PMN activated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, 10 ng\\/mL) were incubated with adenosine and its receptor-specific analogues. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF. PMN transendothelial migration across human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers was assessed in vitro. Adhesion molecule receptor expression was assessed flow cytometrically. Adenosine and some of its receptor-specific analogues dose-dependently inhibited activated PMN VEGF release. The rank order of potency was consistent with the affinity profile of human A2B receptors. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was reversed by 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 receptor antagonist. Adenosine (100 microM) or the A2B receptor agonist 5\\'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 100 microM) significantly reduced PMN transendothelial migration. However, expression of activated PMN beta2 integrins and HUVEC ICAM-1 were not significantly altered by adenosine or NECA. Adenosine attenuates human PMN VEGF release and transendothelial migration via the A2B receptor. This provides a novel target for the modulation of PMN-directed vascular hyperpermeability in conditions such as the capillary leak syndrome.

  18. Leukotriene B4-Neutrophil Elastase Axis Drives Neutrophil Reverse Transendothelial Cell Migration In Vivo

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    Colom, Bartomeu; Bodkin, Jennifer V.; Beyrau, Martina; Woodfin, Abigail; Ody, Christiane; Rourke, Claire; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Brohi, Karim; Imhof, Beat A.; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Breaching endothelial cells (ECs) is a decisive step in the migration of leukocytes from the vascular lumen to the extravascular tissue, but fundamental aspects of this response remain largely unknown. We have previously shown that neutrophils can exhibit abluminal-to-luminal migration through EC junctions within mouse cremasteric venules and that this response is elicited following reduced expression and/or functionality of the EC junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C). Here we demonstrate that the lipid chemoattractant leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was efficacious at causing loss of venular JAM-C and promoting neutrophil reverse transendothelial cell migration (rTEM) in vivo. Local proteolytic cleavage of EC JAM-C by neutrophil elastase (NE) drove this cascade of events as supported by presentation of NE to JAM-C via the neutrophil adhesion molecule Mac-1. The results identify local LTB4-NE axis as a promoter of neutrophil rTEM and provide evidence that this pathway can propagate a local sterile inflammatory response to become systemic. PMID:26047922

  19. Leukotriene B4-Neutrophil Elastase Axis Drives Neutrophil Reverse Transendothelial Cell Migration In Vivo.

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    Colom, Bartomeu; Bodkin, Jennifer V; Beyrau, Martina; Woodfin, Abigail; Ody, Christiane; Rourke, Claire; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Brohi, Karim; Imhof, Beat A; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2015-06-16

    Breaching endothelial cells (ECs) is a decisive step in the migration of leukocytes from the vascular lumen to the extravascular tissue, but fundamental aspects of this response remain largely unknown. We have previously shown that neutrophils can exhibit abluminal-to-luminal migration through EC junctions within mouse cremasteric venules and that this response is elicited following reduced expression and/or functionality of the EC junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C). Here we demonstrate that the lipid chemoattractant leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was efficacious at causing loss of venular JAM-C and promoting neutrophil reverse transendothelial cell migration (rTEM) in vivo. Local proteolytic cleavage of EC JAM-C by neutrophil elastase (NE) drove this cascade of events as supported by presentation of NE to JAM-C via the neutrophil adhesion molecule Mac-1. The results identify local LTB4-NE axis as a promoter of neutrophil rTEM and provide evidence that this pathway can propagate a local sterile inflammatory response to become systemic.

  20. Tracking neutrophil intraluminal crawling, transendothelial migration and chemotaxis in tissue by intravital video microscopy.

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    Xu, Najia; Lei, Xi; Liu, Lixin

    2011-09-24

    The recruitment of circulating leukocytes from blood stream to the inflamed tissue is a crucial and complex process of inflammation(1,2). In the postcapillary venules of inflamed tissue, leukocytes initially tether and roll on the luminal surface of venular wall. Rolling leukocytes arrest on endothelium and undergo firm adhesion in response to chemokine or other chemoattractants on the venular surface. Many adherent leukocytes relocate from the initial site of adhesion to the junctional extravasation site in endothelium, a process termed intraluminal crawling(3). Following crawling, leukocytes move across endothelium (transmigration) and migrate in extravascular tissue toward the source of chemoattractant (chemotaxis)(4). Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo and revealing cellular and molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment(2,5). In this report, we provide a comprehensive description of using brightfield intravital microscopy to visualize and determine the detailed processes of neutrophil recruitment in mouse cremaster muscle in response to the gradient of a neutrophil chemoattractant. To induce neutrophil recruitment, a small piece of agarose gel (~1-mm(3) size) containing neutrophil chemoattractant MIP-2 (CXCL2, a CXC chemokine) or WKYMVm (Trp-Lys-Tyr-Val-D-Met, a synthetic analog of bacterial peptide) is placed on the muscle tissue adjacent to the observed postcapillary venule. With time-lapsed video photography and computer software ImageJ, neutrophil intraluminal crawling on endothelium, neutrophil transendothelial migration and the migration and chemotaxis in tissue are visualized and tracked. This protocol allows reliable and quantitative analysis of many neutrophil recruitment parameters such as intraluminal crawling velocity, transmigration time, detachment time, migration velocity, chemotaxis velocity and chemotaxis index in tissue. We demonstrate that using this protocol, these

  1. Mechanisms of Transendothelial Migration of Primary Human Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Cells from ER+, Her2+, and Triple-Negative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration. Science signaling 7, ra112 (Nov 25, 2014). 11. M. Roh- Johnson et al... stainer (Dako Autostainer Plus). The primary mouse monoclonal antibody AE13 (catalog no. M3515, Dako; 1:200) and mouse monoclonal antibody CD68...structures of macrophages and carcinoma cells using photoconvertible b-actin—Dendra2 fusion proteins. PLOS One 6, e16485 (2011). 39. M. Roh- Johnson , J. J

  2. Lymphocyte crawling and transendothelial migration require chemokine triggering of high-affinity LFA-1 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Ziv; Shinder, Vera; Klein, Eugenia; Grabovsky, Valentin; Yeger, Orna; Geron, Erez; Montresor, Alessio; Bolomini-Vittori, Matteo; Feigelson, Sara W; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Laudanna, Carlo; Shakhar, Guy; Alon, Ronen

    2009-03-20

    Endothelial chemokines are instrumental for integrin-mediated lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration (TEM). By dissecting how chemokines trigger lymphocyte integrins to support shear-resistant motility on and across cytokine-stimulated endothelial barriers, we found a critical role for high-affinity (HA) LFA-1 integrin in lymphocyte crawling on activated endothelium. Endothelial-presented chemokines triggered HA-LFA-1 and adhesive filopodia at numerous submicron dots scattered underneath crawling lymphocytes. Shear forces applied to endothelial-bound lymphocytes dramatically enhanced filopodia density underneath crawling lymphocytes. A fraction of the adhesive filopodia invaded the endothelial cells prior to and during TEM and extended large subluminal leading edge containing dots of HA-LFA-1 occupied by subluminal ICAM-1. Memory T cells generated more frequent invasive filopodia and transmigrated more rapidly than their naive counterparts. We propose that shear forces exerted on HA-LFA-1 trigger adhesive and invasive filopodia at apical endothelial surfaces and thereby promote lymphocyte crawling and probing for TEM sites.

  3. Ena/VASP proteins regulate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting diapedesis during transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estin, Miriam L; Thompson, Scott B; Traxinger, Brianna; Fisher, Marlie H; Friedman, Rachel S; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2017-04-04

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and Ena-VASP-like (EVL) are cytoskeletal effector proteins implicated in regulating cell morphology, adhesion, and migration in various cell types. However, the role of these proteins in T-cell motility, adhesion, and in vivo trafficking remains poorly understood. This study identifies a specific role for EVL and VASP in T-cell diapedesis and trafficking. We demonstrate that EVL and VASP are selectively required for activated T-cell trafficking but are not required for normal T-cell development or for naïve T-cell trafficking to lymph nodes and spleen. Using a model of multiple sclerosis, we show an impairment in trafficking of EVL/VASP-deficient activated T cells to the inflamed central nervous system of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additionally, we found a defect in trafficking of EVL/VASP double-knockout (dKO) T cells to the inflamed skin and secondary lymphoid organs. Deletion of EVL and VASP resulted in the impairment in α4 integrin (CD49d) expression and function. Unexpectedly, EVL/VASP dKO T cells did not exhibit alterations in shear-resistant adhesion to, or in crawling on, primary endothelial cells under physiologic shear forces. Instead, deletion of EVL and VASP impaired T-cell diapedesis. Furthermore, T-cell diapedesis became equivalent between control and EVL/VASP dKO T cells upon α4 integrin blockade. Overall, EVL and VASP selectively mediate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting the diapedesis step of transendothelial migration in a α4 integrin-dependent manner.

  4. ILK mediates LPS-induced vascular adhesion receptor expression and subsequent leucocyte trans-endothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, Sonsoles; López-Fontal, Raquel; Través, Paqui G; Villa, Natividad; Grashoff, Carsten; Boscá, Lisardo; Luque, Alfonso

    2010-05-01

    The inflammatory response to injurious agents is tightly regulated to avoid adverse consequences of inappropriate leucocyte accumulation or failed resolution. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated endothelium recruits leucocytes to the inflamed tissue through controlled expression of membrane-associated adhesion molecules. LPS responses in macrophages are known to be regulated by integrin-linked kinase (ILK); in this study, we investigated the role of ILK in the regulation of the LPS-elicited inflammatory response in endothelium. This study was performed on immortalized mouse endothelial cells (EC) isolated from lung and coronary vasculature. Cells were thoroughly characterized and the role of ILK in the regulation of the LPS response was investigated by suppressing ILK expression using siRNA and shRNA technologies. Phenotypic and functional analyses confirmed that the immortalized cells behaved as true EC. LPS induced the expression of the inflammatory genes E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). ILK knockdown impaired LPS-mediated endothelial activation by preventing the induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Blockade of the LPS-induced response inhibited the inflammatory-related processes of firm adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of leucocytes. ILK is involved in the expression of cell adhesion molecules by EC activated with the inflammatory stimulus LPS. This reduced expression modulates leucocyte adhesion to the endothelium and the extravasation process. This finding suggests ILK as a potential anti-inflammatory target for the development of vascular-specific treatments for inflammation-related diseases.

  5. Migration of monocytes after intracerebral injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Miriam; Bechmann, Ingo; Kiwit, Jürgen; Glumm, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we monitored green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing monocytes after injection at the entorhinal cortex lesion (ECL) site in mice. We followed their migration out of the central nervous system (CNS) along olfactory nerve fibers penetrating the lamina cribrosa, within the nasal mucosa, and their subsequent appearance within the deep cervical lymph nodes (CLN), with numbers peaking at day 7. This is the same route activated T cells use for reaching the CLN, as we have shown before. Interestingly, GFP cells injected into the brain and subsequently found in the CLN exhibited ramified morphologies, which are typical of microglia and dendritic cells. To gain more insight into immunity and regeneration within the CNS we want to monitor injected monocytes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after labeling with very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP). Due to their small size, nanoparticles have huge potential for magnetic labeling of different cell populations and their MRI tracking in vivo. So far we have verified that incubation with VSOP particles does not alter their migration pattern after ECL.

  6. Dynamical optical imaging monocytes/macrophages migration and activation in contact hypersensitivity (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory monocytes/macrophages (Mon/Mφ) play an important role in cutaneous allergic inflammation. However, their migration and activation in dermatitis and how they accelerate the inflammatory reaction are largely unknown. Optical molecular imaging is the most promising tool for investigating the function and motility of immune cells in vivo. We have developed a multi-scale optical imaging approach to evaluate the spatio-temporal dynamic behavior and properties of immune cells from the whole field of organs to the cellular level at the inflammatory site in delayed type hypersensitivity reaction. Here, we developed some multi-color labeling mouse models based on the endogenous labeling with fluorescent proteins and the exogenous labeling with fluorescent dyes. We investigated the cell movement, cell interaction and function of immunocytes (e.g. Mon/Mφ, DC, T cells and neutrophils) in the skin allergy inflammation (e.g., contact hypersensitivity) by using intravital microscopy. The long-term imaging data showed that after inflammatory Mon/Mφ transendothelial migration in dermis, they migrating in interstitial space of dermis. Depletion of blood monocyte with clodronate liposome extremely reduced the inflammatory reaction. Our finding provided further insight into inflammatory Mon/Mφ mediating the inflammatory cascade through functional migration in allergic contact dermatitis.

  7. Monocyte scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis: the dynamics of monocyte migration in immune-mediated inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier M Thurlings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages are principal drivers of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a prototype immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Conceivably, synovial macrophages are continuously replaced by circulating monocytes in RA. Animal studies from the 1960s suggested that macrophage replacement by monocytes is a slow process in chronic inflammatory lesions. Translation of these data into the human condition has been hampered by the lack of available techniques to analyze monocyte migration in man. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a technique that enabled us to analyze the migration of labelled autologous monocytes in RA patients using single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. We isolated CD14+ monocytes by CliniMACS in 8 patients and labeled these with technetium-99m (99mTc-HMPAO. Monocytes were re-infused into the same patient. Using SPECT we calculated that a very small but specific fraction of 3.4 x 10(-3 (0.95-5.1 x 10(-3 % of re-infused monocytes migrated to the inflamed joints, being detectable within one hour after re-infusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate monocytes migrate continuously into the inflamed synovial tissue of RA patients, but at a slow macrophage-replacement rate. This suggests that the rapid decrease in synovial macrophages that occurs after antirheumatic treatment might rather be explained by an alteration in macrophage retention than in monocyte influx and that RA might be particularly sensitive to treatments targeting inflammatory cell retention.

  8. Overexpression of CD44 in neural precursor cells improves trans-endothelial migration and facilitates their invasion of perivascular tissues in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Deboux

    Full Text Available Neural precursor (NPC based therapies are used to restore neurons or oligodendrocytes and/or provide neuroprotection in a large variety of neurological diseases. In multiple sclerosis models, intravenously (i.v -delivered NPCs reduced clinical signs via immunomodulation. We demonstrated recently that NPCs were able to cross cerebral endothelial cells in vitro and that the multifunctional signalling molecule, CD44 involved in trans-endothelial migration of lymphocytes to sites of inflammation, plays a crucial role in extravasation of syngeneic NPCs. In view of the role of CD44 in NPCs trans-endothelial migration in vitro, we questioned presently the benefit of CD44 overexpression by NPCs in vitro and in vivo, in EAE mice. We show that overexpression of CD44 by NPCs enhanced over 2 folds their trans-endothelial migration in vitro, without impinging on the proliferation or differentiation potential of the transduced cells. Moreover, CD44 overexpression by NPCs improved significantly their elongation, spreading and number of filopodia over the extracellular matrix protein laminin in vitro. We then tested the effect of CD44 overexpression after i.v. delivery in the tail vein of EAE mice. CD44 overexpression was functional invivo as it accelerated trans-endothelial migration and facilitated invasion of HA expressing perivascular sites. These in vitro and in vivo data suggest that CD44 may be crucial not only for NPC crossing the endothelial layer but also for facilitating invasion of extravascular tissues.

  9. Cell-stiffness-induced mechanosignaling - a key driver of leukocyte transendothelial migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Schaefer; P.L. Hordijk

    2015-01-01

    The breaching of cellular and structural barriers by migrating cells is a driving factor in development, inflammation and tumor cell metastasis. One of the most extensively studied examples is the extravasation of activated leukocytes across the vascular endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessel

  10. Differential modulation of IL-1-induced endothelial adhesion molecules and transendothelial migration of granulocytes by G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissner, G; Lindner, H; Reisbach, G; Klauke, I; Holler, E

    1997-06-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used for mobilization of haemopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in mobilization and the immune modulatory effects of this growth factor. In this report we show that G-CSF down-regulated intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) induced by Interleukin-1 (IL-1) on human endothelial cells. Interestingly, the G-CSF-mediated down-modulation of IL-1-induced ICAM-1 appeared to be biphasic. In pharmacological concentrations (> 300 ng/ml), and in dose ranges of plasma G-CSF levels above that of nonfebrile healthy individuals (30 pg/ml), a significant decrease in surface ICAM-1 could be observed. This could be explained, at least in part, by an increased autocrine G-CSF production by endothelial cells in response to IL-1 and exogenous G-CSF. In contrast to ICAM-1, IL-1-triggered VCAM-1 expression was superinduced by G-CSF with the optimal concentration of 30 pg/ml. To evaluate the functional significance of these findings, 51Cr adhesion assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or granulocytes known to lack the VCAM-1 counter-receptor very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) and IL-1-stimulated endothelial cells, in the presence or absence of G-CSF, were performed. G-CSF could not inhibit the IL-1-induced adhesion of PBMC to endothelial cells, which may be due to the differential adhesion molecule modulation. In contrast, granulocyte adhesion induced by IL-1 could effectively be blocked by co-incubation with G-CSF. Finally, G-CSF also inhibited transendothelial migration of granulocytes through IL-1-activated endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.

  11. Divergent JAM-C Expression Accelerates Monocyte-Derived Cell Exit from Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F Bradfield

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, caused in part by monocytes in plaques, continues to be a disease that afflicts the modern world. Whilst significant steps have been made in treating this chronic inflammatory disease, questions remain on how to prevent monocyte and macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C (JAM-C expressed by vascular endothelium directs monocyte transendothelial migration in a unidirectional manner leading to increased inflammation. Here we show that interfering with JAM-C allows reverse-transendothelial migration of monocyte-derived cells, opening the way back out of the inflamed environment. To study the role of JAM-C in plaque regression we used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, and tested the impact of vascular JAM-C expression levels on monocyte reverse transendothelial migration using human cells. Studies in-vitro under inflammatory conditions revealed that overexpression or gene silencing of JAM-C in human endothelium exposed to flow resulted in higher rates of monocyte reverse-transendothelial migration, similar to antibody blockade. We then transplanted atherosclerotic, plaque-containing aortic arches from hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice into wild-type normolipidemic recipient mice. JAM-C blockade in the recipients induced greater emigration of monocyte-derived cells and further diminished the size of atherosclerotic plaques. Our findings have shown that JAM-C forms a one-way vascular barrier for leukocyte transendothelial migration only when present at homeostatic copy numbers. We have also shown that blocking JAM-C can reduce the number of atherogenic monocytes/macrophages in plaques by emigration, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory pathologies.

  12. Divergent JAM-C Expression Accelerates Monocyte-Derived Cell Exit from Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, Paul F; Menon, Arjun; Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Lee, Boris P; Fischer, Nicolas; Fish, Richard J; Kwak, Brenda; Fisher, Edward A; Imhof, Beat A

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, caused in part by monocytes in plaques, continues to be a disease that afflicts the modern world. Whilst significant steps have been made in treating this chronic inflammatory disease, questions remain on how to prevent monocyte and macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C (JAM-C) expressed by vascular endothelium directs monocyte transendothelial migration in a unidirectional manner leading to increased inflammation. Here we show that interfering with JAM-C allows reverse-transendothelial migration of monocyte-derived cells, opening the way back out of the inflamed environment. To study the role of JAM-C in plaque regression we used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, and tested the impact of vascular JAM-C expression levels on monocyte reverse transendothelial migration using human cells. Studies in-vitro under inflammatory conditions revealed that overexpression or gene silencing of JAM-C in human endothelium exposed to flow resulted in higher rates of monocyte reverse-transendothelial migration, similar to antibody blockade. We then transplanted atherosclerotic, plaque-containing aortic arches from hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice into wild-type normolipidemic recipient mice. JAM-C blockade in the recipients induced greater emigration of monocyte-derived cells and further diminished the size of atherosclerotic plaques. Our findings have shown that JAM-C forms a one-way vascular barrier for leukocyte transendothelial migration only when present at homeostatic copy numbers. We have also shown that blocking JAM-C can reduce the number of atherogenic monocytes/macrophages in plaques by emigration, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory pathologies.

  13. Impaired migration capacity in monocytes derived from patients with Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettman, Noam; Avivi, Irit; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Bisharat, Lina; Katz, Tamar

    2015-08-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by glucocerebroside (GC) accumulation due to defective activity of the glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase) enzyme. Monocytes and macrophages exhibit the highest GlcCerase activity and are most prominently affected by GC engorgement. As GD patients tend to exert various immune system-related changes, this study was designed to investigate potential effects of monocyte dysfunction on these alterations. Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of untreated GD patients and healthy volunteers. Monocyte migration capacity towards SDF1α was assessed. The GD patients exhibited reduced numbers of monocytes and decreased capability of SDF1α-dependent monocyte migration. Evaluation of CXCR4, the SDF1α receptor, revealed reduced expression of surface CXCR4 on GD-derived monocytes, despite similar CXCR4 mRNA transcript levels in the monocytes of healthy volunteers and GD patients. Reduction of surface CXCR4 was accompanied by increased intracellular CXCR4 levels in patient monocytes. This elevated intracellular CXCR4 might reflect significantly increased SDF1α concentrations characterizing patients' serum and the lysosomal impairment of GD, resulting in decreased degradation of CXCR4. Different distributions of CXCR4 expression observed in the two groups explain impaired SDF1α-dependent monocyte migration. Reduced numbers and impaired migration capacity of GD-derived monocytes could contribute to abnormal inflammation and GD-associated immune alterations seen in these patients.

  14. The RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor, LARG, mediates ICAM-1-dependent mechanotransduction in endothelial cells to stimulate transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessey-Morillon, Elizabeth C; Osborne, Lukas D; Monaghan-Benson, Elizabeth; Guilluy, Christophe; O'Brien, E Timothy; Superfine, Richard; Burridge, Keith

    2014-04-01

    RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements in endothelial cells (ECs) play an active role in leukocyte transendothelial cell migration (TEM), a normal physiological process in which leukocytes cross the endothelium to enter the underlying tissue. Although much has been learned about RhoA signaling pathways downstream from ICAM-1 in ECs, little is known about the consequences of the tractional forces that leukocytes generate on ECs as they migrate over the surface before TEM. We have found that after applying mechanical forces to ICAM-1 clusters, there is an increase in cellular stiffening and enhanced RhoA signaling compared with ICAM-1 clustering alone. We have identified that leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG), also known as Rho GEF 12 (ARHGEF12) acts downstream of clustered ICAM-1 to increase RhoA activity, and that this pathway is further enhanced by mechanical force on ICAM-1. Depletion of LARG decreases leukocyte crawling and inhibits TEM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of endothelial LARG regulating leukocyte behavior and EC stiffening in response to tractional forces generated by leukocytes.

  15. Fucoidan Stimulates Monocyte Migration via ERK/p38 Signaling Pathways and MMP9 Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Elene Sapharikas; Anna Lokajczyk; Anne-Marie Fischer; Catherine Boisson-Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) induces the secretion of paracrine signals, leading to monocyte recruitment and thereby contributing to the initiation of angiogenesis and tissue healing. We have previously demonstrated that fucoidan, an antithrombotic polysaccharide, promotes the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We examined the effect of fucoidan on the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to adhere and migrate. Monocytes negatively isolated with magnetic b...

  16. Fucoidan Stimulates Monocyte Migration via ERK/p38 Signaling Pathways and MMP9 Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elene Sapharikas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Critical limb ischemia (CLI induces the secretion of paracrine signals, leading to monocyte recruitment and thereby contributing to the initiation of angiogenesis and tissue healing. We have previously demonstrated that fucoidan, an antithrombotic polysaccharide, promotes the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We examined the effect of fucoidan on the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to adhere and migrate. Monocytes negatively isolated with magnetic beads from peripheral blood of healthy donors were treated with fucoidan. Fucoidan induced a 1.5-fold increase in monocyte adhesion to gelatin (p < 0.05 and a five-fold increase in chemotaxis in Boyden chambers (p < 0.05. Fucoidan also enhanced migration 2.5-fold in a transmigration assay (p < 0.05. MMP9 activity in monocyte supernatants was significantly enhanced by fucoidan (p < 0.05. Finally, Western blot analysis of fucoidan-treated monocytes showed upregulation of ERK/p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK/p38 phosphorylation abrogated fucoidan enhancement of migration (p < 0.01. Fucoidan displays striking biological effects, notably promoting monocyte adhesion and migration. These effects involve the ERK and p38 pathways, and increased MMP9 activity. Fucoidan could improve critical limb ischemia by promoting monocyte recruitment.

  17. Fucoidan Stimulates Monocyte Migration via ERK/p38 Signaling Pathways and MMP9 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapharikas, Elene; Lokajczyk, Anna; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2015-06-30

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) induces the secretion of paracrine signals, leading to monocyte recruitment and thereby contributing to the initiation of angiogenesis and tissue healing. We have previously demonstrated that fucoidan, an antithrombotic polysaccharide, promotes the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We examined the effect of fucoidan on the capacity of peripheral blood monocytes to adhere and migrate. Monocytes negatively isolated with magnetic beads from peripheral blood of healthy donors were treated with fucoidan. Fucoidan induced a 1.5-fold increase in monocyte adhesion to gelatin (p Fucoidan also enhanced migration 2.5-fold in a transmigration assay (p fucoidan (p fucoidan-treated monocytes showed upregulation of ERK/p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK/p38 phosphorylation abrogated fucoidan enhancement of migration (p Fucoidan displays striking biological effects, notably promoting monocyte adhesion and migration. These effects involve the ERK and p38 pathways, and increased MMP9 activity. Fucoidan could improve critical limb ischemia by promoting monocyte recruitment.

  18. Adapting coculture in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier for use in cancer research: maintaining an appropriate endothelial monolayer for the assessment of transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhaute, Elodie; Drolez, Aurore; Sevin, Emmanuel; Gosselet, Fabien; Mysiorek, Caroline; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre

    2016-05-01

    Although brain metastases are the most common brain tumors in adults, there are few treatment options in this setting. To colonize the brain, circulating tumor cells must cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is situated within specialized, restrictive microvascular endothelium. Understanding how cancer cells manage to transmigrate through the BBB might enable this process to be prevented. In vitro models are dedicated tools for characterizing the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie transendothelial migration process, as long as they accurately mimic the brain endothelium's in vivo characteristics. The objective of the present study was to adapt an existing in vitro model of the human BBB for use in studying cancer cell transmigration. The model is based on the coculture of endothelial cells (ECs, derived from cord blood hematopoietic stem cells) and brain pericytes. To allow the migration of cancer cells into the lower compartment, our model had to be transposed onto inserts with a larger pore size. However, we encountered a problem when culturing ECs on large (3-μm)-pore inserts: the cells crossed the membrane and formed a non-physiological second layer on the lower face of the insert. Using 3-μm-pore inserts (in a 12-well plate format), we report here on a method that enables the maintenance of a single monolayer of ECs on the insert's upper face only. Under these chosen conditions, the ECs exhibited typical BBB properties found in the original model (including restricted paracellular permeability and the expression of continuous tight junctions). This modified in vitro model of the human BBB enabled us to investigate the migratory potential of the MDA-MB-231 cell line (derived from highly metastatic human breast cancer cells). Last, the results obtained were compared with the rate of transmigration through endothelia with no BBB features.

  19. Immune surveillance of the lung by migrating tissue monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Poupel, Lucie; Loyher, Pierre-Louis; Hamon, Pauline; Licata, Fabrice; Pessel, Charlotte; Hume, David A; Combadière, Christophe; Boissonnas, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are phagocytic effector cells in the blood and precursors of resident and inflammatory tissue macrophages. The aim of the current study was to analyse and compare their contribution to innate immune surveillance of the lung in the steady state with macrophage and dendritic cells (DC). ECFP and EGFP transgenic reporters based upon Csf1r and Cx3cr1 distinguish monocytes from resident mononuclear phagocytes. We used these transgenes to study the migratory properties of monocytes and macrophages by functional imaging on explanted lungs. Migratory monocytes were found to be either patrolling within large vessels of the lung or locating at the interface between lung capillaries and alveoli. This spatial organisation gives to monocytes the property to capture fluorescent particles derived from both vascular and airway routes. We conclude that monocytes participate in steady-state surveillance of the lung, in a way that is complementary to resident macrophages and DC, without differentiating into macrophages. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07847.001 PMID:26167653

  20. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  1. Increased migration of monocytes in essential hypertension is associated with increased transient receptor potential channel canonical type 3 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Ni, Yinxing; Chen, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Increased transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels have been observed in patients with essential hypertension. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that increased monocyte migration is associated with increased TRPC3 expression. Monocyte migration assay was performed...... of TRPC3 were investigated. We observed an increased fMLP-induced migration of monocytes from hypertensive patients compared with normotensive control subjects (246 ± 14% vs 151 ± 10%). The TNF-α-induced migration of monocytes in patients with essential hypertension was also significantly increased...... compared to normotensive control subjects (221 ± 20% vs 138 ± 18%). In the presence of 2-APB or after siRNA knockdown of TRPC3 the fMLP-induced monocyte migration was significantly blocked. The fMLP-induced changes of cytosolic calcium were significantly increased in monocytes from hypertensive patients...

  2. Lipoapoptosis induced by saturated free fatty acids stimulates monocyte migration: a novel role for Pannexin1 in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Waldrop, Shar L; Bronk, Steve F; Gores, Gregory J; Davis, Laurie S; Kilic, Gordan

    2015-09-01

    Recruitment of monocytes in the liver is a key pathogenic feature of hepatic inflammation in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we studied migration of human monocytes in response to supernatants obtained from liver cells after inducing lipoapoptosis with saturated free fatty acids (FFA). Lipoapoptotic supernatants stimulated monocyte migration with the magnitude similar to a monocyte chemoattractant protein, CCL2 (MCP-1). Inhibition of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in liver cells with SP600125 blocked migration of monocytes in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that JNK stimulates release of chemoattractants in lipoapoptosis. Notably, treatment of supernatants with Apyrase to remove ATP potently inhibited migration of THP-1 monocytes and partially blocked migration of primary human monocytes. Inhibition of the CCL2 receptor (CCR2) on THP-1 monocytes with RS102895, a specific CCR2 inhibitor, did not block migration induced by lipoapoptotic supernatants. Consistent with these findings, lipoapoptosis stimulated pathophysiological extracellular ATP (eATP) release that increased supernatant eATP concentration from 5 to ~60 nM. Importantly, inhibition of Panx1 expression in liver cells with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased supernatant eATP concentration and inhibited monocyte migration, indicating that monocyte migration is mediated in part by Panx1-dependent eATP release. Moreover, JNK inhibition decreased supernatant eATP concentration and inhibited Pannexin1 activation, as determined by YoPro-1 uptake in liver cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that JNK regulates activation of Panx1 channels, and provide evidence that Pannexin1-dependent pathophysiological eATP release in lipoapoptosis is capable of stimulating migration of human monocytes, and may participate in the recruitment of monocytes in chronic liver injury induced by saturated FFA.

  3. Endothelial microparticles (EMP) bind and activate monocytes: elevated EMP-monocyte conjugates in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jy, Wenche; Minagar, Alireza; Jimenez, Joaquin J; Sheremata, William A; Mauro, Lucia M; Horstman, Lawrence L; Bidot, Carlos; Ahn, Yeon S

    2004-09-01

    Elevated plasma endothelial microparticles (EMP) have been documented in MS during exacerbation. However, the role of EMP in pathogenesis of MS remains unclear. We investigated the formation of EMP-monocyte conjugates (EMP-MoC) and their potential role in transendothelial migration of inflammatory cells in MS. EMP-MoC were assayed in 30 MS patients in exacerbation, 20 in remission and in 35 controls. EMP-leukocyte conjugation was investigated flowcytometrically by employing alpha-CD54 or alpha-CD62E for EMP, and alpha-CD45 for leukocytes. EMP-MoC were characterized by identifying adhesion molecules involved and their effect on monocyte function. In vivo (clinical): EMP-MoC were markedly elevated in exacerbation vs. remission and controls, correlating with presence of GD+ MRI lesions. Free CD54+ EMP were not elevated but free CD62E+ EMP were. In vitro: EMP bound preferentially to monocytes, less to neutrophils, but little to lymphocytes. Bound EMP activated monocytes: CD11b expression increased 50% and migration through cerebral endothelial cell layer increased 2.6-fold. Blockade of CD54 reduced binding by 80%. Most CD54+ EMP bound to monocytes, leaving little free EMP, while CD62+ EMP were found both free and bound. These results demonstrated that phenotypic subsets of EMP interacted differently with monocytes. Based on our observations, EMP may enhance inflammation and increase transendothelial migration of monocytes in MS by binding to and activating monocytes through CD54. EMP-MoC were markedly increased in MS patients in exacerbation compared to remission and may serve as a sensitive marker of MS disease activity.

  4. Mediators of Monocyte Migration in Response to Recovery Modalities following Resistance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Jajtner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediators of monocyte migration, complement receptor-3 (CR3, and chemokine ligand-4 (CCL4 were measured in response to recovery modalities following resistance exercise. Thirty resistance-trained men (23.1±2.9 y; 175.2±7.1 cm; 82.1±8.4 kg were given neuromuscular electric stimulation (NMES, cold water immersion (CWI, or control (CON treatments immediately following resistance exercise. Blood samples were obtained preexercise (PRE, immediately (IP, 30 minutes (30 P, 24 hours (24 H, and 48 hours (48 H after exercise for measurement of circulating CCL4 and CR3 expression on CD14+ monocytes, by assay and flow cytometry. Circulating CCL4 showed no consistent changes. Inferential analysis indicated that CR3 expression was likely greater in CON at 30 P than NMES (90.0% or CWI (86.8%. NMES was likely lower than CON at 24 H (92.9% and very likely lower at 48 H (98.7%. Expression of CR3 following CWI was very likely greater than CON (96.5% at 24 H. The proportion of CR3+ monocytes was likely greater following CWI than NMES (85.8% or CON (85.2% at 24 H. The change in proportion of CR3+ monocytes was likely (86.4% greater following NMES than CON from IP to 30 P. The increased expression of CR3 and increased proportion of CR3+ monocytes following CWI at 24 H indicate a potentially improved ability for monocyte adhesion to the endothelium, possibly improving phagocytosis of damaged tissues.

  5. A functional study on the migration of human monocytes to human leukemic cell lines and the role of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legdeur, MCJC; Beelen, RHJ; Schuurhuis, GJ; Broekhoven, MG; vandeLoosdrecht, AA; Tekstra, J; Langenhuijsen, MMAC; Ossenkoppele, GJ

    1997-01-01

    In the present study the migration of human monocytes towards the supernatants of five different human myeloid leukemic cell lines, four different human lymphatic leukemic cell lines and blasts derived from three different patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was studied and the role of monocy

  6. Role of recently migrated monocytes in cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation in different strain of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pérez-Rial

    Full Text Available This study investigates the role of proinflammatory monocytes recruited from blood circulation and recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid in mediating the lung damage in a model of acute cigarette smoke (CS-induced lung inflammation in two strains of mice with different susceptibility to develop emphysema (susceptible -C57BL/6J and non susceptible -129S2/SvHsd. Exposure to whole-body CS for 3 consecutive research cigarettes in one single day induced acute inflammation in the lung of mice. Analysis of BAL fluid showed more influx of recently migrated monocytes at 72 h after CS-exposition in susceptible compared to non susceptible mice. It correlated with an increase in MMP-12 and TNF-α protein levels in the lung tissue, and with an increment of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay in C57BL/6J mice. To determine the functional role of these proinflammatory monocytes in mediating CS-induced airway inflammation, alveolar macrophages and blood monocytes were transiently removed by pretreatment with intratracheal and intravenous liposome-encapsulated CL2MDP, given 2 and 4 days prior to CS exposure and their repopulation was studied. Monocytes/macrophages were maximally depleted 48 h after last liposome application and subsequently recently migrated monocytes reappeared in BAL fluid of susceptible mice at 72 h after CS exposure. Recently migrated monocytes influx to the lung correlated with an increase in the MMP-12 protein level in the lung tissue, indicating that the increase in proinflammatory monocytes is associated with a major tissue damaging. Therefore our data confirm that the recruitment of proinflammatory recently migrated monocytes from the blood are responsible for the increase in MMP-12 and has an important role in the pathogenesis of lung disease induced by acute lung inflammation. These results could contribute to understanding the different susceptibility to CS of these strains of

  7. Olopatadine Suppresses the Migration of THP-1 Monocytes Induced by S100A12 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Olopatadine hydrochloride (olopatadine is an antiallergic drug with histamine H 1 receptor antagonistic activity. Recently, olopatadine has been shown to bind to S100A12 which is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins, and exerts multiple proinflammatory activities including chemotaxis for monocytes and neutrophils. In this study, we examined the possibility that the interaction of olopatadine with S100A12 inhibits the proinflammatory effects of S100A12. Pretreatment of olopatadine with S100A12 reduced migration of THP-1, a monocyte cell line, induced by S100A12 alone, but did not affect recombinant human regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES-induced migration. Amlexanox, which also binds to S100A12, inhibited the THP-1 migration induced by S100A12. However, ketotifen, another histamine H 1 receptor antagonist, had little effect on the activity of S100A12. These results suggest that olopatadine has a new mechanism of action, that is, suppression of the function of S100A12, in addition to histamine H 1 receptor antagonistic activity.

  8. Polarization of migrating monocytic cells is independent of PI 3-kinase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Volpe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration of mammalian cells is a complex cell type and environment specific process. Migrating hematopoietic cells assume a rapid amoeboid like movement when exposed to gradients of chemoattractants. The underlying signaling mechanisms remain controversial with respect to localization and distribution of chemotactic receptors within the plasma membrane and the role of PI 3-kinase activity in cell polarization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a novel model for the investigation of human leukocyte migration. Monocytic THP-1 cells transfected with the alpha(2A-adrenoceptor (alpha(2AAR display comparable signal transduction responses, such as calcium mobilization, MAP-kinase activation and chemotaxis, to the noradrenaline homologue UK 14'304 as when stimulated with CCL2, which binds to the endogenous chemokine receptor CCR2. Time-lapse video microscopy reveals that chemotactic receptors remain evenly distributed over the plasma membrane and that their internalization is not required for migration. Measurements of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET of alpha(2AAR-YFP/CFP suggest a uniform activation of the receptors over the entire plasma membrane. Nevertheless, PI 3-kinase activation is confined to the leading edge. When reverting the gradient of chemoattractant by moving the dispensing micropipette, polarized monocytes--in contrast to neutrophils--rapidly flip their polarization axis by developing a new leading edge at the previous posterior side. Flipping of the polarization axis is accompanied by re-localization of PI-3-kinase activity to the new leading edge. However, reversal of the polarization axis occurs in the absence of PI 3-kinase activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Accumulation and internalization of chemotactic receptors at the leading edge is dispensable for cell migration. Furthermore, uniformly distributed receptors allow the cells to rapidly reorient and adapt to changes in the

  9. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  10. Dopamine Increases CD14+CD16+ Monocyte Migration and Adhesion in the Context of Substance Abuse and HIV Neuropathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Jacqueline S.; Calderon, Tina M.; Gaskill, Peter J.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug abuse is a major comorbidity of HIV infection and cognitive disorders are often more severe in the drug abusing HIV infected population. CD14+CD16+ monocytes, a mature subpopulation of peripheral blood monocytes, are key mediators of HIV neuropathogenesis. Infected CD14+CD16+ monocyte transmigration across the blood brain barrier mediates HIV entry into the brain and establishes a viral reservoir within the CNS. Despite successful antiretroviral therapy, continued influx of CD14+CD16+ monocytes, both infected and uninfected, contributes to chronic neuroinflammation and the development of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Drug abuse increases extracellular dopamine in the CNS. Once in the brain, CD14+CD16+ monocytes can be exposed to extracellular dopamine due to drug abuse. The direct effects of dopamine on CD14+CD16+ monocytes and their contribution to HIV neuropathogenesis are not known. In this study, we showed that CD14+CD16+ monocytes express mRNA for all five dopamine receptors by qRT-PCR and D1R, D5R and D4R surface protein by flow cytometry. Dopamine and the D1-like dopamine receptor agonist, SKF38393, increased CD14+CD16+ monocyte migration that was characterized as chemokinesis. To determine whether dopamine affected cell motility and adhesion, live cell imaging was used to monitor the accumulation of CD14+CD16+ monocytes on the surface of a tissue culture dish. Dopamine increased the number and the rate at which CD14+CD16+ monocytes in suspension settled to the dish surface. In a spreading assay, dopamine increased the area of CD14+CD16+ monocytes during the early stages of cell adhesion. In addition, adhesion assays showed that the overall total number of adherent CD14+CD16+ monocytes increased in the presence of dopamine. These data suggest that elevated extracellular dopamine in the CNS of HIV infected drug abusers contributes to HIV neuropathogenesis by increasing the accumulation of CD14+CD16+ monocytes in dopamine rich brain

  11. Transendothelial lipoprotein exchange and microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Jensen, Kurt Svarre

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microalbuminuria associates with increased risk of atherosclerosis in individuals without diabetes. We hypothesized that transendothelial lipoprotein exchange is elevated among such individuals, possibly explaining increased intimal lipoprotein accumulation and thus atherosclerosis....... METHODS: Using an in vivo isotope technique, transendothelial exchange of low density lipoprotein (LDL) was measured in 77 non-diabetic individuals. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-h fractional escape rate was calculated as index of transendothelial exchange. RESULTS...... transformed) plasma insulin: beta=0.6 (95% CI: 0.1-1.1); R=0.22; Plipoproteins, LDL size, body mass index, plasma volume, and use of medicine, and it was unlikely caused by altered hepatic LDL receptor expression...

  12. Soya-cerebroside, an extract of Cordyceps militaris, suppresses monocyte migration and prevents cartilage degradation in inflammatory animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-Chi; Chiu, Ching-Peng; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Hung, Chun-Yin; Li, Te-Mao; Wu, Yang-Chang; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2017-02-22

    Pathophysiological events that modulate the progression of structural changes in osteoarthritis (OA) include the secretion of inflammatory molecules, such as proinflammatory cytokines. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) is the prototypical inflammatory cytokine that activates OA synovial cells to release cytokines and chemokines in support of the inflammatory response. The monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) is one of the key chemokines that regulate migration and infiltration of monocytes in response to inflammation. We show in this study that IL-1β-induced MCP-1 expression and monocyte migration in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) is effectively inhibited by soya-cerebroside, an extract of Cordyceps militaris. We found that soya-cerebroside up-regulated of microRNA (miR)-432 expression via inhibiting AMPK and AKT signaling pathways in OASFs. Soya-cerebroside also effectively decreased monocyte infiltration and prevented cartilage degradation in a rat inflammatory model. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that soya-cerebroside inhibits monocyte/macrophage infiltration into synoviocytes, attenuating synovial inflammation and preventing cartilage damage by reducing MCP-1 expression in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, we suggest a novel therapeutic strategy based on the use of soya-cerebroside for the management of OA.

  13. Soya-cerebroside, an extract of Cordyceps militaris, suppresses monocyte migration and prevents cartilage degradation in inflammatory animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-Chi; Chiu, Ching-Peng; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Hung, Chun-Yin; Li, Te-Mao; Wu, Yang-Chang; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    Pathophysiological events that modulate the progression of structural changes in osteoarthritis (OA) include the secretion of inflammatory molecules, such as proinflammatory cytokines. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) is the prototypical inflammatory cytokine that activates OA synovial cells to release cytokines and chemokines in support of the inflammatory response. The monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) is one of the key chemokines that regulate migration and infiltration of monocytes in response to inflammation. We show in this study that IL-1β-induced MCP-1 expression and monocyte migration in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) is effectively inhibited by soya-cerebroside, an extract of Cordyceps militaris. We found that soya-cerebroside up-regulated of microRNA (miR)-432 expression via inhibiting AMPK and AKT signaling pathways in OASFs. Soya-cerebroside also effectively decreased monocyte infiltration and prevented cartilage degradation in a rat inflammatory model. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that soya-cerebroside inhibits monocyte/macrophage infiltration into synoviocytes, attenuating synovial inflammation and preventing cartilage damage by reducing MCP-1 expression in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, we suggest a novel therapeutic strategy based on the use of soya-cerebroside for the management of OA. PMID:28225075

  14. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi [Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Ichihara, Sahoko, E-mail: saho@gene.mie-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  15. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases affects KC/CXCL1-induced intraluminal crawling, transendothelial migration, and chemotaxis of neutrophils in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Najia; Hossain, Mokarram; Liu, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling is critical in the pathophysiology of a variety of inflammatory processes. Leukocyte recruitment to the site of inflammation is a multistep process governed by specific signalling cascades. After adhesion in the lumen, many leukocytes crawl to optimal sites at endothelial junctions and transmigrate to extravascular tissue in a Mac-1-dependent manner. The signalling mechanisms that regulate postadhesion steps of intraluminal crawling, transmigration, and chemotaxis in tissue remain incompletely understood. The present study explored the effect of p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 on various parameters of neutrophil recruitment triggered by chemokine KC (CXCL1) gradient. Neutrophil-endothelial interactions in microvasculature of murine cremaster muscle were determined using intravital microscopy and time-lapsed video analysis. SB203580 (100 nM) did not change leukocyte rolling but significantly attenuated neutrophil adhesion, emigration, and transmigration and impaired the initiation of neutrophil crawling and transmigration. In response to KC chemotactic gradient, SB203580 significantly reduced the velocity of migration and chemotaxis index of neutrophils in tissue. The upregulation of Mac-1 expression in neutrophils stimulated by KC was significantly blunted by SB203580 in vitro. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that pharmacological suppression of p38 MAPK significantly impairs multiple steps of neutrophil recruitment in vivo.

  16. Pharmacological Inhibition of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Affects KC/CXCL1-Induced Intraluminal Crawling, Transendothelial Migration, and Chemotaxis of Neutrophils In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najia Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling is critical in the pathophysiology of a variety of inflammatory processes. Leukocyte recruitment to the site of inflammation is a multistep process governed by specific signalling cascades. After adhesion in the lumen, many leukocytes crawl to optimal sites at endothelial junctions and transmigrate to extravascular tissue in a Mac-1-dependent manner. The signalling mechanisms that regulate postadhesion steps of intraluminal crawling, transmigration, and chemotaxis in tissue remain incompletely understood. The present study explored the effect of p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 on various parameters of neutrophil recruitment triggered by chemokine KC (CXCL1 gradient. Neutrophil-endothelial interactions in microvasculature of murine cremaster muscle were determined using intravital microscopy and time-lapsed video analysis. SB203580 (100 nM did not change leukocyte rolling but significantly attenuated neutrophil adhesion, emigration, and transmigration and impaired the initiation of neutrophil crawling and transmigration. In response to KC chemotactic gradient, SB203580 significantly reduced the velocity of migration and chemotaxis index of neutrophils in tissue. The upregulation of Mac-1 expression in neutrophils stimulated by KC was significantly blunted by SB203580 in vitro. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that pharmacological suppression of p38 MAPK significantly impairs multiple steps of neutrophil recruitment in vivo.

  17. LFA-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced during melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture favors the transendothelial migration of melanoma cell lines in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislin Stephanie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with metastatic melanoma have a poor median rate of survival. It is therefore necessary to increase our knowledge about melanoma cell dissemination which includes extravasation, where cancer cells cross the endothelial barrier. Extravasation is well understood during travelling of white blood cells, and involves integrins such as LFA-1 (composed of two chains, CD11a and CD18 expressed by T cells, while ICAM-1 is induced during inflammation by endothelial cells. Although melanoma cell lines cross endothelial cell barriers, they do not express LFA-1. We therefore hypothesized that melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture might induce the LFA-1/ICAM ligand/receptor couple during melanoma transmigration. Methods A transwell approach has been used as well as blocking antibodies against CD11a, CD18 and ICAM-1. Data were analyzed with an epifluorescence microscope. Fluorescence intensity was quantified with the ImageJ software. Results We show here that HUVEC-conditioned medium induce cell-surface expression of LFA-1 on melanoma cell lines. Similarly melanoma-conditioned medium activates ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells. Accordingly blocking antibodies of ICAM-1, CD11a or CD18 strongly decrease melanoma transmigration. We therefore demonstrate that melanoma cells can cross endothelial monolayers in vitro due to the induction of ICAM-1 and LFA-1 occurring during the co-culture of melanoma and endothelial cells. Our data further suggest a role of LFA-1 and ICAM-1 in the formation of melanoma cell clumps enhancing tumor cell transmigration. Conclusion Melanoma-endothelial cell co-culture induces LFA-1 and ICAM-1 expression, thereby favoring in vitro melanoma trans-migration.

  18. [Characteristics of migration of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells after co-cultivation with activated monocytes in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, O A; Korovina, I V; Gogia, B Sh; Sysoeva, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are considered to be promising tool of regenerative medicine. Migration of MSC toward damaged inflammatory site is essential for physiological tissue reparation. Therefore we studied modifications of migratory features of adipose tissue derived MSC (AT-MSC) after co-cultivation with activated monocytes derived from THP-1 cell line. As a result, we have observed an increased migration rate of AT-MSC in vitro in the absence of chemoattractant gradient as well as toward the gradient of PDGF BB (platelet-derived growth factor BB), which is well known chemoattractant for the cells of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, the rate of directional AT-MSC migration through fibronectin was also increased. We have established that signaling from PDGFRβ which is activated through binding of integrin receptors with extracellular matrix may be possible way to stimulate cellular migration under simulated inflammatory conditions.

  19. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: The Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study

    KAUST Repository

    Hägg, Sara

    2009-12-04

    Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes) important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n =66/tissue) and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n =40/tissue) isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n =15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes) in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n= 3958 genes). In the second step (performed within tissue clusters), one atherosclerotic lesion (n =49/48) and one visceral fat (n =59) cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P=0.008 and P=0.00015). The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n =55/54) relating to carotid stenosis (P =0.04), 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n= 16/17, P<10 -27and-30). Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML) pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module). In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the Amodule was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004). The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2) was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2, and by the

  20. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hägg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD. The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n = 66/tissue and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n = 40/tissue isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n = 15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n = 3958 genes. In the second step (performed within tissue clusters, one atherosclerotic lesion (n = 49/48 and one visceral fat (n = 59 cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P = 0.008 and P = 0.00015. The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n = 55/54 relating to carotid stenosis (P = 0.04, 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n = 16/17, P<10(-27 and-30. Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module. In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the A-module was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004. The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2 was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2

  1. Induction of monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation by asthmatic serum in a transendothelial trafficking model%支气管哮喘患者血清对内皮穿越模型中单核细胞分化为树突状细胞的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周林福; 王文璐; 李红岩; 张明顺; 季晓辉; 何韶衡; 黄茂; 殷凯生

    2011-01-01

    新的体外实验平台.%Objective To explore the effect of asthmatic and healthy serum on differentiation and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) in a transendothelial trafficking model. Methods The sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated from 12 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy volunteers, and monocytes were selected from PBMC using magnetic beads. The trypsin-digested human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) at passage 2 from 5 healthy lying-in women were used to construct the transendothelial trafficking model under asthmatic or healthy serum, wherein MDDC were identified by silver nitrate staining and scanning electron microscopy. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Flow cytometry, ELISA and mixed leukocyte reaction were relevantly utilized to detect the phenotype, cytokine and T cell proliferation. Results ( 1 ) Monocytes traversed through HUVEC monolayer after 2 h, and reverse-transmigrated to develop into DC 48 h later. ( 2 ) The healthy serum stimulated monocytes into immature MDDC with lower CD14 [ ( 20 ±5)%] (F=49.01, P<0.05), and higher HLA-DR, CD80, CD86 and CD83 [(43 ±4)%, (17.9 ±3.5)%, (43 ± 11)% and (6.7 ± 1.8)%, respectively] (F= 10.35 -40.17, all P<0.05) than monocytes did before transmigration at 0 h [ CD14(81 ±6)%, HLA-DR (24 ±5)%, CD80(2. 8 ±2. 0)%,CD86( 14 ±4)% and CD83(0. 9 ±0. 8)%, respectively]. (3) The asthmatic serum stimulated monocytes into mature MDDC, characteristic of dendrites, with similar HLA-DR and CD86 [ ( 55 ± 6 ) % and ( 59 ±12)%] (F=15.29 and 35.97, all P >0.05), higher CD80 and CD83 [(49.7 ± 10.2)% and (30.2 ±6. 8) % ] ( F = 4. 01 and 20. 68, all P < 0. 05), accompanied by increased levels of NF-κB activity, IL-12 p70 and T cell proliferation [ ( 100 ± 11 )%, (568 ±43) ng/L and (2033 ± 198) cpm, respectively] (F=49. 23 - 350. 84, all P < 0. 05 ) relative to the healthy serum-stimulated immature MDDC [ ( 12 ± 3 ) %,(220 ± 35) ng

  2. Interactions of TANGO and leukocyte integrin CD11c/CD18 regulate the migration of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stephanie; Melle, Christian; Mondal, Krishna; Klein, Gerd; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2007-12-01

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new member of the MIA gene family. It codes for a protein of yet unknown function. TANGO revealed a very broad expression pattern in contrast to the highly restricted expression pattern determined for the other family members. The only cells lacking TANGO expression are cells of the hematopoietic system. One of the major differences between mature hematopoietic cells and other tissue cells is the lack of adhesion until these cells leave the bloodstream. In this study, we observed that TANGO expression was induced after adhesion of human monocytic cells to substrate. To understand the mechanism of TANGO function during monocyte adhesion we isolated interacting proteins and found an interaction between TANGO and the leukocyte-specific integrin CD11c. In functional assays, we observed reduced attachment of human monocytic cells to fibrinogen, ICAM-1 and to human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) after stimulation with recombinant TANGO protein. Additionally, the migrating capacity of premonocytic cells through fibrinogen or HMECs was increased after stimulation of these cells with recombinant TANGO. Therefore, we suggest that TANGO reduced the attachment to fibrinogen or other cell adhesion molecules. As TANGO does not compete for CD11c ligand binding directly, we hypothesize TANGO function by modulation of integrin activity. Taken together, the results from this study present TANGO as a novel ligand for CD11c, regulating migratory processes of hematopoietic cells.

  3. Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels modulate α-defensin release from polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocyte recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Tyler Jacob; Cohen, Hannah Caitlin; Kao, W John

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) release granule proteins as the first line of defense against bacteria and set up chemotactic gradients that result in monocyte infiltration to the site of injury. Although well established, the role of biomaterials in regulating adherent PMN degranulation and subsequent PMN-monocyte paracrine interactions is less clear. The aim of this study was to determine how biomaterials affect the degranulation of selected biomarkers and downstream monocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-containing hydrogels (PEG and an interpenetrating network of PEG and gelatin) promote the release of the α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1-3, but not azurocidin or monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Although human neutrophil peptides 1-3 are monocyte chemoattractants, no subsequent effects on monocyte transmigration are observed in static conditions. Under flow conditions, monocyte adhesion on human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α is elevated in the presence of granule proteins from PMNs adherent on polydimethylsiloxane, but not from PMNs cultured on PEG hydrogels. These results suggest that PEG promotes PMN antimicrobial capacity without enhanced monocyte recruitment.

  4. Induction of Chemokine Secretion and Monocyte Migration by Human Choroidal Melanocytes in Response to Proinflammatory Cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehs, Tina; Faber, Carsten; Udsen, Maja S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine to which extent inflammatory cytokines affect chemokine secretion by primary human choroidal melanocytes (HCMs), their capacity to attract monocytes, and whether HCMs are able to influence the proliferation of activated T cells. Methods: Primary cultures of HCMs were...... established from eyes of 13 donors. Human choroidal melanocytes were stimulated with IFN-γ and TNF-α or with supernatant from activated T cells (T-cell–conditioned media [TCM]). Gene expression analysis was performed by using microarrays. Protein levels were quantified with ELISA or cytometric bead array....... Supernatants of HCMs were assessed for the capability to attract monocytes in a transwell plate. Proliferation of activated T cells was assessed in a direct coculture with HCMs by a [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Results: Stimulation of HCMs with TCM or IFN-γ and TNF-α resulted in increased expression...

  5. Ex vivo foam cell formation is enhanced in monocytes from older individuals by both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovich, Thomas A; Shi, Margaret D Y; Zhou, Jingling; Maisa, Anna; Hearps, Anna C; Jaworowski, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Aging is the strongest predictor of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, which are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly men. Monocytes play an important role in atherosclerosis by differentiating into foam cells (lipid-laden macrophages) and producing atherogenic proinflammatory cytokines. Monocytes from the elderly have an inflammatory phenotype that may promote atherosclerotic plaque development; here we examined whether they are more atherogenic than those from younger individuals. Using an in vitro model of monocyte transmigration and foam cell formation, monocytes from older men (median age [range]: 75 [58-85] years, n=20) formed foam cells more readily than those of younger men (32 [23-46] years, n=20) (PFoam cell formation was enhanced by soluble factors in serum from older men, but did not correlate with plasma lipid levels. Of the three subsets, intermediate monocytes formed the most foam cells. Therefore, both cellular changes to monocytes and soluble plasma factors in older men primes monocytes for foam cell formation following transendothelial migration, which may contribute to enhanced atherosclerosis in this population.

  6. Pathogenic bacteria and TNF do not induce production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) by human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Suzanna E L; Cheong, Karey Y; Price, Patricia; Waterer, Grant W

    2009-06-01

    Elevated serum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is associated with severe sepsis, but it is not clear whether bacteria stimulate synthesis of MIF by blood leukocytes directly or via induction of TNF. Here we assess production of MIF mRNA and protein by blood leukocytes from healthy human subjects (n=28) following exposure to bacteria commonly associated with sepsis (Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Bacteria did not increase levels of MIF mRNA or secreted protein. CD14(+) monocytes were the main cell type producing MIF before and after stimulation. Exposure of leukocytes to TNF did not induce MIF. Hence elevated levels of serum MIF observed in sepsis may not reflect MIF produced by blood leukocytes stimulated directly by bacteria or TNF.

  7. Roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and NF-kappaB in human cytomegalovirus-mediated monocyte diapedesis and adhesion: strategy for viral persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M Shane; Bivins-Smith, Elizabeth R; Tilley, A Michael; Bentz, Gretchen L; Chan, Gary; Minard, Jessica; Yurochko, Andrew D

    2007-07-01

    Infected peripheral blood monocytes are proposed to play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to tissues, a critical step in the establishment of HCMV persistence and the development of HCMV-associated diseases. We recently provided evidence for a unique strategy involved in viral dissemination: HCMV infection of primary human monocytes promotes their transendothelial migration and differentiation into proinflammatory macrophages permissive for the replication of the original input virus. To decipher the mechanism of hematogenous spread, we focused on the viral dysregulation of early cellular processes involved in transendothelial migration. Here, we present evidence that both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI(3)K] and NF-kappaB activities were crucial for the HCMV induction of monocyte motility and firm adhesion to endothelial cells. We found that the beta(1) integrins, the beta(2) integrins, intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and ICAM-3 were upregulated following HCMV infection and that they played a key role in the firm adhesion of infected monocytes to the endothelium. The viral regulation of adhesion molecule expression is complex, with PI(3)K and NF-kappaB affecting the expression of each adhesion molecule at different stages of the expression cascade. Our data demonstrate key roles for PI(3)K and NF-kappaB signaling in the HCMV-induced cellular changes in monocytes and identify the biological rationale for the activation of these pathways in infected monocytes, which together suggest a mechanism for how HCMV promotes viral spread to and persistence within host organs.

  8. Quantitative Glycoproteomic Analysis Identifies Platelet-Induced Increase of Monocyte Adhesion via the Up-Regulation of Very Late Antigen 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiqing; Kast, Juergen

    2015-08-07

    Physiological stimuli, such as thrombin, or pathological stimuli, such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), activate platelets circulating in blood. Once activated, platelets bind to monocytes via P-selectin-PSGL-1 interactions but also release the stored contents of their granules. These platelet releasates, in addition to direct platelet binding, activate monocytes and facilitate their recruitment to atherosclerotic sites. Consequently, understanding the changes platelet releasates induce in monocyte membrane proteins is critical. We studied the glyco-proteome changes of THP-1 monocytic cells affected by LPA- or thrombin-induced platelet releasates. We employed lectin affinity chromatography combined with filter aided sample preparation to achieve high glyco- and membrane protein and protein sequence coverage. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we quantified 1715 proteins, including 852 membrane and 500 glycoproteins, identifying the up-regulation of multiple proteins involved in monocyte extracellular matrix binding and transendothelial migration. Flow cytometry indicated expression changes of integrin α5, integrin β1, PECAM-1, and PSGL-1. The observed increase in monocyte adhesion to fibronectin was determined to be mediated by the up-regulation of very late antigen 5 via a P-selectin-PSGL-1 independent mechanism. This novel aspect could be validated on CD14+ human primary monocytes, highlighting the benefits of the improved enrichment method regarding high membrane protein coverage and reliable quantification.

  9. Sinomenine influences capacity for invasion and migration in activated human monocytic THP-1 cells by inhibiting the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and CD147

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang-qiong OU; Li-hua CHEN; Xue-jun LI; Zhi-bin LIN; Wei-dong LI

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the effects of Sinomenine (SIN) on the invasion and migration ability of activated human monocytic THP-1 cells (A-THP-1). Sinomenine is a pure alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medical plant Sinomenium acutum.Methods: Human monocytic THP-1 cells were induced to differentiate into macrophages with phorbol 12-myristate 13-ac-etate (PMA). Cells were treated with different concentrations of SIN. The invasion and migration ability of cells was tested by in vitro transwell assays. The levels of CD147 and MMPs were evaluated by flow cytometric analysis and zymographic analysis, respectively. The mRNA expression of CD147, MMP-2, and MMP-9 was measured by RT-PCR. Results: The invasion and migration ability of A-THP-1 cells was significantly inhibited by SIN in a concentration-depen-dent fashion; at the same time, the levels of CD147, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were markedly down-regulated. This inhibitory effect was most notable at concentrations of 0.25 mmol/L and 1.00 mmol/L (P<0.01). Conclusion: A possible mechanism of the inhibitory effect of SIN on cell invasion and migration ability is repression of the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, which strongly correlates with the inhibition of CD147 activity.

  10. Monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of adult human aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Navab, M; Hough, G P; Stevenson, L W; Drinkwater, D C; Laks, H; Fogelman, A M

    1988-01-01

    Human aortic endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) were isolated and used to form a multilayer of EC-SMC separated by a layer of collagen. SMC and/or collagen layers exerted minimal effects on Na+ transport but impeded the transport of LDL. The presence of an endothelial monolayer markedly reduced the transport of Na+ and LDL. When monocytes were presented to the complete coculture, in the absence of added chemoattractant, one monocyte entered the subendothelial space for every...

  11. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing both chemotactic cytokines IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their receptors,and their selective migration to these chemokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To characterize the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine IL-8, CC chemokine monocyte chemothractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated on activation,normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and a newly defined DC chemokine DC- CK1 as well as the expression of IL-8 receptor, MCP-1 receptor and RANTES receptor in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDCs).The migratory responsiveness of MoDC to IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES was alsso studied. Methods In vitro generated MoDCs were obtained by differentiating monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 5 days. The time course of RNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and migratoly ability was assessed by a micromultiwell chemotaxis chamber assay. Results IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their corres ponding receptors were consistently expressed in MoDCs. DC-CK-1 expression was detectable efter 48 hours of differentiation. MoDC selectively migrated in response to MCP-1 and RANTES but not to IL-8 though transcripts of IL-8 receptor were present. Conclusion Because the capacity of dendritic cells to initiate immune responses depends on their specialized migratory and tissue homing properties, the expression of chemokines and their receptors along with the migratory responsiveness to chemokines of MoDC in our study suggests a potential role of chemokines in the interaction between dendritic cells and T cells and the induction of immune responses.

  12. Low CCR7-mediated migration of human monocyte derived dendritic cells in response to human respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV and, to a lesser extent, human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, can re-infect symptomatically throughout life without significant antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete or short-lived immunity. In contrast, re-infection by influenza A virus (IAV largely depends on antigenic change, suggestive of more complete immunity. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DC is critical in initiating the adaptive immune response. Antigen uptake by DC induces maturational changes that include decreased expression of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 that maintain DC residence in peripheral tissues, and increased expression of CCR7 that mediates the migration of antigen-bearing DC to lymphatic tissue. We stimulated human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC with virus and found that, in contrast to HPIV3 and IAV, HMPV and HRSV did not efficiently decrease CCR1, 2, and 5 expression, and did not efficiently increase CCR7 expression. Consistent with the differences in CCR7 mRNA and protein expression, MDDC stimulated with HRSV or HMPV migrated less efficiently to the CCR7 ligand CCL19 than did IAV-stimulated MDDC. Using GFP-expressing recombinant virus, we showed that the subpopulation of MDDC that was robustly infected with HRSV was particularly inefficient in chemokine receptor modulation. HMPV- or HRSV-stimulated MDDC responded to secondary stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide or with a cocktail of proinflammatory cytokines by increasing CCR7 and decreasing CCR1, 2 and 5 expression, and by more efficient migration to CCL19, suggesting that HMPV and HRSV suboptimally stimulate rather than irreversibly inhibit MDDC migration. This also suggests that the low concentration of proinflammatory cytokines released from HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated MDDC is partly responsible for the low CCR7-mediated migration. We propose that inefficient migration of HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated DC to

  13. Knockdown of p54nrb inhibits migration, invasion and TNF-α release of human acute monocytic leukemia THP1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Wu, Changli; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Chunling; Li, Rong; Zhou, Guangji

    2016-06-01

    54 kDa nuclear RNA- and DNA-binding protein (p54nrb) which is also called non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO) is known to be multifunctional involved in many nuclear processes. It was shown that p54nrb/NONO was closely related to the occurrence of erythroleukemia. Whether p54nrb/NONO plays a role in progress of human acute monocytic leukemia remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of p54nrb/NONO silencing on the biological characteristics of human acute monocytic leukemia THP1 cells. The results showed that p54nrb was strongly expressed in THP1 cells, and knockdown of p54nrb slightly promoted proliferation and strongly inhibited motility and invasion of THP1 cells. Moreover, knockdown of p54nrb strongly decreased the release of TNF-α from THP1 cells by inhibiting certain process of TNF-α secretion, specially for the release of TNF-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Notably, the infection of negative control shRNA-containing lentiviruses promoted the migration and the release of TNF-α induced by LPS in THP1 cells. All the above results demonstrated that p54nrb slightly inhibited THP1 cell proliferation, but significantly promoted migration, invasion and release of TNF-α induced by LPS in THP1 cells. The present study indicates that p54nrb is a powerful molecule involved in the regulation of cell motility and promotes the migration and invasion of THP1 cells, and it is more likely to be involved in the release of inflammatory mediators and the motility of inflammatory cells.

  14. Phospholipase D from Loxosceles laeta Spider Venom Induces IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1/GRO-α, and CCL2/MCP-1 Production in Human Skin Fibroblasts and Stimulates Monocytes Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Rojas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous loxoscelism envenomation by Loxosceles spiders is characterized by the development of a dermonecrotic lesion, strong inflammatory response, the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and leukocyte migration to the bite site. The role of phospholipase D (PLD from Loxosceles in the recruitment and migration of monocytes to the envenomation site has not yet been described. This study reports on the expression and production profiles of cytokines and chemokines in human skin fibroblasts treated with catalytically active and inactive recombinant PLDs from Loxosceles laeta (rLlPLD and lipid inflammatory mediators ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, and the evaluation of their roles in monocyte migration. Recombinant rLlPLD1 (active and rLlPLD2 (inactive isoforms induce interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1/GRO-α, and CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 expression and secretion in fibroblasts. Meanwhile, C1P and LPA only exhibited a minor effect on the expression and secretion of these cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, neutralization of both enzymes with anti-rLlPLD1 antibodies completely inhibited the secretion of these cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, conditioned media from fibroblasts, treated with rLlPLDs, stimulated the transmigration of THP-1 monocytes. Our data demonstrate the direct role of PLDs in chemotactic mediator synthesis for monocytes in human skin fibroblasts and indicate that inflammatory processes play an important role during loxoscelism.

  15. Differential transendothelial transport of adiponectin complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Adiponectin’s effects on systemic physiology and cell-specific responses are well-defined, but little is known about how this insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory adipokine reaches its target cells. All molecules face active and passive transport limitations, but adiponectin is particularly noteworthy due to the diverse size range and high molecular weights of its oligomers. Additionally, its metabolic target organs possess a range of endothelial permeability. Methods Full-length recombinant murine adiponectin was produced and oligomer fractions isolated by gel filtration. Adiponectin complex sizes were measured by dynamic light scattering to determine Stokes radii. Transendothelial transport of purified oligomers was quantitatively assessed under a number of different conditions in vitro using murine endothelial cells and in vivo using several mouse models of altered endothelial function. Results Adiponectin oligomers exhibit large transport radii that limit transendothelial transport. Oligomerization is a significant determinant of flux across endothelial monolayers in vitro; low molecular weight adiponectin is preferentially transported. In vivo sampled sera from the heart, liver, and tail vein demonstrated significantly different complex distribution of lower molecular weight oligomers. Pharmacological interventions, such as PPARγ agonist treatment, differentially affect adiponectin plasma clearance and tissue uptake. Exercise induces enhanced adiponectin uptake to oxidative skeletal muscles, wherein adiponectin potently lowers ceramide levels. In total, endothelial barriers control adiponectin transport in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. Conclusions Adiponectin oligomer efficacy in a given tissue may therefore be endothelial transport mediated. Targeting endothelial dysfunction in the metabolic syndrome through exercise and pharmaceuticals may afford an effective approach to increasing adiponectin’s beneficial effects. PMID:24552349

  16. Lysolipid containing liposomes for transendothelial drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koklic Tilen

    2012-04-01

    transendothelial permeability in presence and absence of albumin. Implications of the hypothesis We propose that lysolipid containing liposomal formulations might be used as nonspecific transendothelial transport vector, since leakage of liposome encapsulated active drug occurs simultaneously with the release of the lysolipids. The concentration of the active drug is therefore expected to be the highest at the site of compromised endothelial barrier. By appropriate choice of the lysolipids an endothelial barrier would stay open only for a short time. Use of such liposomes would potentially maximize the delivery of the drug while limiting the passage of toxic substances and pathogens across the endothelial barrier. Combining lysolipid containing liposomes with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles or a targeting ligand might be required to efficiently localize drug delivery to a disease affected tissue and to avoid endothelial disruption over the entire body.

  17. Growth Factors: Production of Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 (MCP-1/JE) by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: Effect on the Migration and Proliferation of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. X.; Talati, B. R.; Janakiraman, N.; Chapman, R. A.; Gautam, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) have been shown to modulate in vitro proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Whether bone marrow stromal cells produce chemokines and the physiological role they may have in the regulation of hematopoiesis has largely remained unexamined. We have examined the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/JE) in bone marrow stromal cells and its effect on the migration and proliferation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells. Freshly derived murine bone marrow stromal cells were found to secrete abundant amounts of MCP-1/JE, which was further increased upon stimulation of stromal cells with pro-inflammatory agents LPS, IL1-alpha, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha. Although culture supernatant conditioned by stromal cells exhibited chemotactic activity toward hematopoietic progenitor cells, the chemotactic activity was not due to MCP-1/JE. Furthermore, rMCP-1/JE also failed to induce migration of progenitor cells. MCP-1/JE, however, caused 20 to 30% increase in the clonal expansion of progenitor cells. Thus, although MCP-1/JE does not chemoattract hematopoietic progenitor cells it may have a role in their proliferation and clonal expansion.

  18. Innate immune interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 exacerbates viral myocarditis by reducing CCR5(+) CD11b(+) monocyte migration and impairing interferon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaperti, Alan; Nishii, Mototsugu; Liu, Youan; Naito, Kotaro; Chan, Megan; Zhang, Liyong; Skurk, Carsten; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Wells, George A; Eriksson, Urs; Liu, Peter P

    2013-10-01

    Viral myocarditis follows a fatal course in ≈30% of patients. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4), a major nodal signal transducer in innate immunity, can play a pivotal role in host inflammatory response. We sought to determine how IRAK4 modulates inflammation and outcome in a mouse model of viral myocarditis. Myocarditis was induced after intraperitoneal inoculation of coxsackievirus B3 into C57Bl/6 IRAK4-deficient mice and their littermate controls. Mortality and viral proliferation were markedly reduced in IRAK4(-/-) mice compared with their IRAK4(+/+) littermates. Disease resistance of IRAK4(-/-) mice paralleled increased amounts of protective heart-infiltrating CCR5(+) monocytes/macrophages and enhanced interferon-α and interferon-γ production 2 days after infection. Competitive bone marrow chimera demonstrated that intact IRAK4 function inhibited heart-specific migration of bone marrow-derived CCR5(+) cells. Mechanistically, lack of IRAK4 resulted in interferon regulatory factor 5 homodimerization via reduced melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 degradation and enhanced Stat1 and Stat5 phosphorylation. Consequently, antiviral interferon-α and interferon-γ production, as well as CCR5(+) cell recruitment, increased, whereas the overall proinflammatory response was drastically reduced in the absence of IRAK4. Innate immunity signal transducer IRAK4 exacerbates viral myocarditis through inhibition of interferon production and reduced mobilization of protective CCR5(+) monocytes/macrophages to the heart. The combination of IRAK4 inhibitors and antiviral adjuvants may become an attractive therapeutic approach against viral myocarditis in the future.

  19. Mannose reduces hyaluronan and leukocytes in wound granulation tissue and inhibits migration and hyaluronan-dependent monocyte binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Tiina A; Kuokkanen, Jukka; Kärnä, Riikka; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Rilla, Kirsi; Kössi, Jyrki; Laato, Matti; Tammi, Raija H; Tammi, Markku I

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a highly regulated process starting from coagulation and ending in tissue remodeling. The end result varies from perfectly restored tissue, such as in early fetal skin, to scars in adults. The balanced repair process is frequently disturbed by local or systemic factors, like infections and diabetes. A rapid increase of hyaluronan is an inherent feature of wounds and is associated with tissue swelling, epithelial and mesenchymal cell migration and proliferation, and induction of cytokine signaling. Hyaluronan extending from cell surface into structures called cables can trap leukocytes and platelets and change their functions. All these features of hyaluronan modulate inflammation. The present data show that mannose, a recently described inhibitor of hyaluronan synthesis, inhibits dermal fibroblast invasion and prevents the enhanced leukocyte binding to hyaluronan that takes place in cells treated with an inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β. Mannose also reduced hyaluronan in subcutaneous sponge granulation tissue, a model of skin wound, and suppressed its leukocyte recruitment and tissue growth. Mannose thus seems to suppress wounding-induced inflammation in skin by attenuating hyaluronan synthesis.

  20. Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gienapp, P.; Candolin, Ulrika; Wong, Bob

    2012-01-01

    This chapter examines how human-induced environmental changes affect migration. It explores how such changes affect conditions along the migration route, as well as the cues that are used in the timing of migration such as the celestial bodies and the planet's magnetic field. It emphasizes the effec

  1. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, Mary

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte\\/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1\\/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  2. Directed migration of human neural progenitor cells to interleukin-1β is promoted by chemokines stromal cell-derived factor-1 and monocyte chemotactic factor-1 in mouse brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yumei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis, including the proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs, is impaired in HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected macrophages (HIV-MDM regulate stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1 production in astrocytes through Interleukin-1β (IL-1β. Chemokines are known to induce NPC migration; however, it remains unclear how chemokines produced in inflammation regulate NPC migration. Methods The secretion of SDF-1 and Monocyte chemotactic preotein-1 (MCP-1 in astrocytes upon IL-1β stimulation was measured by ELISA assay. Human NPCs were injected parallel along with IL-1β, SDF-1 or MCP-1 intracranially into basal ganglion 1 mm apart in SCID mice, and immunofluorescent staining was used to study the survival and migration of injected human NPCs. Results SDF-1 and MCP-1 are secreted by astrocytes upon IL-1β stimulation in a time-dependent manner. Injected human NPCs survived in SCID mice and migrated towards sites of IL-1β, SDF-1 and MCP-1 injection. Conclusions In conclusion, chemokines SDF-1 or MCP-1 secreted by astrocytes in the presence of IL-1β injection are attractive to NPCs injected into SCID mouse brains, suggesting that SDF-1 and MCP-1 play important roles in NPC migration during neuroinflammation.

  3. Effects of Fluoroquinolones on the Migration of Human Phagocytes through Chlamydia pneumoniae-Infected and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Stimulated Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Molestina, Robert E.; Miller, Richard D.; Bernabo, Jorge; Farinati, Alicia; Eiguchi, Kumiko; Ramirez, Julio A.; Summersgill, James T.

    2004-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activities of three quinolones, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin, were investigated with an in vitro model of transendothelial migration (TEM). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were seeded in Transwell inserts, treated with serial dilutions of antibiotics, infected with Chlamydia pneumoniae, or stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Neutrophils or monocytes were also preincubated with serial dilutions of each antibiotic. TEM was assessed by light microscopic examination of the underside of the polycarbonate membrane, and levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In HUVEC infected with C. pneumoniae or stimulated with TNF-α, all fluoroquinolones significantly decreased neutrophil and monocyte TEM, compared to antibiotic-free controls. Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin produced a significant decrease in IL-8 in C. pneumoniae-infected and TNF-α-stimulated HUVEC; however, moxifloxacin was the only fluoroquinolone that produced a significant decrease in MCP-1 levels under both conditions. Results from this study indicate similarities in the anti-inflammatory activities of these fluoroquinolones, although no statistically significant decrease in chemokine secretion was observed when levofloxacin was used. Mechanisms of neutrophil and monocyte TEM inhibition by fluoroquinolone antibiotics are unknown but may be partially due to inhibition of IL-8 and MCP-1 production, respectively. PMID:15215106

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 act synergistically to support migration of blood-borne monocytes into the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoqian; Trivedi, Alpa; Lee, Jung-Uek; Lohela, Marja; Lee, Sang Mi; Fandel, Thomas M; Werb, Zena; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2011-11-01

    The infiltration of monocytes into the lesioned site is a key event in the inflammatory response after spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that the molecular events governing the infiltration of monocytes into the injured cord involve cooperativity between the upregulation of the chemoattractant stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXCL12 in the injured cord and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9/gelatinase B), expressed by infiltrating monocytes. SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 mRNAs were upregulated in the injured cord, while macrophages immunoexpressed CXCR4. When mice, transplanted with bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, were subjected to SCI, GFP+ monocytes infiltrated the cord and displayed gelatinolytic activity. In vitro studies confirmed that SDF-1α, acting through CXCR4, expressed on bone marrow-derived macrophages, upregulated MMP-9 and stimulated MMP-9-dependent transmigration across endothelial cell monolayers by 2.6-fold. There was a reduction in F4/80+ macrophages in spinal cord-injured MMP-9 knock-out mice (by 36%) or wild-type mice, treated with the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 (by 30%). Mice were adoptively transferred with myeloid cells and treated with the MMP-9/-2 inhibitor SB-3CT, the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, or a combination of both drugs. While either drug resulted in a 28-30% reduction of infiltrated myeloid cells, the combined treatment resulted in a 45% reduction, suggesting that SDF-1 and MMP-9 function independently to promote the trafficking of myeloid cells into the injured cord. Collectively, these observations suggest a synergistic partnership between MMP-9 and SDF-1 in facilitating transmigration of monocytes into the injured spinal cord.

  5. Functional role of CD11c+ monocytes in atherogenesis associated with hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monocyte activation and migration into the arterial wall are key events in atherogenesis associated with hypercholesterolemia. CD11c/CD18, a beta2 integrin expressed on human monocytes and a subset of mouse monocytes, has been shown to play a distinct role in human monocyte adhesion on endothelial c...

  6. Distinct monocyte Gene-Expression profiles in autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Padmos (Roos); N.C. Schloot (Nanette); H. Beyan (Huriya); C. Ruwhof (Cindy); F.J.T. Staal (Frank); D. de Ridder (Dick); H-J. Aanstoot (Henk-Jan); W.K. Lam-Tse; H.J. de Wit (Harm); C. Herder (Christian); R.C. Drexhage (Roos); B. Menart (Barbara); R.D. Leslie

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE-There is evidence that monocytes of patients with type 1 diabetes show proinflammatory activation and disturbed migration/adhesion, but the evidence is inconsistent. Our hypothesis is that monocytes are distinctly activated/disturbed in different subforms of autoimmune diabetes

  7. Transendothelial exchange of low-density lipoprotein is unaffected by the presence of severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Karen; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that transendothelial exchange of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is influenced by the presence of severe atherosclerosis; we previously found this exchange elevated in diabetes patients. METHODS: By an in vivo isotope method, we compared transendothelial LDL...... exchange in 24 patients with angiographically verified coronary atherosclerosis, 11 patients with angiographically verified peripheral atherosclerosis, 60 patients with diabetes, and in 42 controls. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL ((131)I-LDL) and 125-iodinated albumin ((125)I-albumin) were injected...... intravenously (i.v.), and the 1-h fractional escape rates (FER(LDL) and FER(alb)) were taken as indices of transendothelial exchange. RESULTS: Patients with coronary or peripheral atherosclerosis had FER(LDL) similar to that of controls [4.3 (3.5-5.1) and 3.2 (2.3-4.1) versus 4.2 (3.7-4.7)%/h; P>0.05], even...

  8. Monocyte Subpopulations in Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Heather J.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Growing understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in angiogenesis has brought monocyte-derived cells into focus. Monocyte subpopulations are an increasingly attractive therapeutic target in many pathologic states, including cancer. Before monocyte-directed therapies can be fully harnessed for clinical use, understanding of monocyte-driven angiogenesis in tissue development and homeostasis, as well as malignancy, is required. Here, we provide an overview of the mechanisms by which monocytic subpopulations contribute to angiogenesis in tissue and tumor development, highlight gaps in our existing knowledge, and discuss opportunities to exploit these cells for clinical benefit. PMID:24556724

  9. Direct quantification of transendothelial electrical resistance in organs-on-chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, van der Marinke W.; Odijk, M.; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Meer, van der Andries D.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Berg, van den Albert; Segerink, Loes I.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring transendothelial or transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a widely used method to monitor cellular barrier tightness in organs-on-chips. Unfortunately, integrated electrodes close to the cellular barrier hamper visual inspection of the cells or require specialized cleanroom proce

  10. Novel three-dimensional Boyden chamber system for studying transendothelial transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hebeiss, I.; Truckenmuller, R.K.; Giselbrecht, S.; Schepers, U.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development in combinatorial chemistry of millions of novel potential drug candidates requires in vitro devices for reliable testing of their transendothelial transport and the uptake in specific cells. To date, this is often achieved in vitro by the use of regular planar Boyden chambers,

  11. Simple and stable transendothelial electrical resistance measurement in organs-on-chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Marieke Willemijn; Odijk, Mathieu; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2015-01-01

    Measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a popular way to monitor cellular barrier tightness in organs-on-chips. However, in these devices integrated electrodes often block sight on the cells and the measured part often includes fluid-filled channels with variable resistance.

  12. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration via P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important for inflammation in addition to thrombosis. Platelets promote the adhesion of neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)] to the endothelium; P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1 have been suggested to participate in these i...

  13. A Chemomechanical Model for Nuclear Morphology and Stresses during Cell Transendothelial Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan; Moeendarbary, Emad; Isermann, Philipp; Davidson, Patricia M; Wang, Xiao; Chen, Michelle B; Burkart, Anya K; Lammerding, Jan; Kamm, Roger D; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2016-10-04

    It is now evident that the cell nucleus undergoes dramatic shape changes during important cellular processes such as cell transmigration through extracellular matrix and endothelium. Recent experimental data suggest that during cell transmigration the deformability of the nucleus could be a limiting factor, and the morphological and structural alterations that the nucleus encounters can perturb genomic organization that in turn influences cellular behavior. Despite its importance, a biophysical model that connects the experimentally observed nuclear morphological changes to the underlying biophysical factors during transmigration through small constrictions is still lacking. Here, we developed a universal chemomechanical model that describes nuclear strains and shapes and predicts thresholds for the rupture of the nuclear envelope and for nuclear plastic deformation during transmigration through small constrictions. The model includes actin contraction and cytosolic back pressure that squeeze the nucleus through constrictions and overcome the mechanical resistance from deformation of the nucleus and the constrictions. The nucleus is treated as an elastic shell encompassing a poroelastic material representing the nuclear envelope and inner nucleoplasm, respectively. Tuning the chemomechanical parameters of different components such as cell contractility and nuclear and matrix stiffnesses, our model predicts the lower bounds of constriction size for successful transmigration. Furthermore, treating the chromatin as a plastic material, our model faithfully reproduced the experimentally observed irreversible nuclear deformations after transmigration in lamin-A/C-deficient cells, whereas the wild-type cells show much less plastic deformation. Along with making testable predictions, which are in accord with our experiments and existing literature, our work provides a realistic framework to assess the biophysical modulators of nuclear deformation during cell transmigration. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transport of transferrin in cultured brain endothelial monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersom, Maria; Helms, Hans Christian; Pretzer, Natasia;

    2016-01-01

    across the endothelial cells by transcytosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate transferrin receptor expression and role in transendothelial transferrin transport in cultured bovine brain endothelial cell monolayers. Transferrin receptor mRNA and protein levels were investigated...... in endothelial mono-cultures and co-cultures with astrocytes, as well as in freshly isolated brain capillaries using qPCR, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Transendothelial transport and luminal association of holo-transferrin was investigated using [125I]holo-transferrin or [59Fe......]-transferrin. Transferrin receptor mRNA expression in all cell culture configurations was lower than in freshly isolated capillaries, but the expression slightly increased during six days of culture. The mRNA expression levels were similar in mono-cultures and co-cultures. Immunostaining demonstrated comparable transferrin...

  15. Novel three-dimensional Boyden chamber system for studying transendothelial transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeiss, I; Truckenmüller, R; Giselbrecht, S; Schepers, U

    2012-02-21

    The rapid development in combinatorial chemistry of millions of novel potential drug candidates requires in vitro devices for reliable testing of their transendothelial transport and the uptake in specific cells. To date, this is often achieved in vitro by the use of regular planar Boyden chambers, which are not reflecting the three dimensionality of the blood vessel. This technical note describes the fabrication and biological validation of a novel three-dimensional Boyden chamber system for studying transendothelial transport. The key element of this new system is a porous thin-walled microchannel produced by a SMART (substrate modification and replication by thermoforming) process comprising a combination of microthermoforming and ion track technology. The membrane-like microstructure offers the opportunity to grow endothelial cells on the inner side of the channel resembling a more natural curved organization of vessels. After establishment of a confluent HUVECs layer in the porous microchannel this novel Boyden chamber was successfully applied to study the transendothelial transport of a polycationic cell penetrating peptoid through the 3D- or curved endothelial cell layer. Thus, this system will enable the investigation of such synthetic compounds as drug delivery systems with regard to their bioavailability and functionality under organotypic conditions.

  16. Increased vesicular and vacuolar transendothelial transport in traumatic human brain oedema. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, Orlando J

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial vacuolar and vesicular transports in traumatic human brain oedema have been reviewed and compared with experimental brain oedema in order to establish their role in both oedema formation and oedema resolution. Normal or "non-activated" and "activated" capillaries are found. The activated capillaries showed predominantly an enhanced abluminally orientated vesicular transport by means of small, medium and large uncoated and clathrin coated vesicles, as well as the presence of endothelial tubular structures. Activation of the endothelial nuclear zone is featured by the increased amount of micropinocytotic vesicles. Vesicles internalizing to the hypertrophic Golgi complex, lysosomes and multivesicular bodies are observed. The protein vacuolar transport is predominant in most cortical capillaries. A wide spectrum of endothelial cell mechanisms is observed increasing the vesicular and vacuolar transport, such as deep invaginations of the luminal surface, large coated vesicles, tubular structures, and transient and incomplete transendothelial channels formed either by chained plasmalemmal vesicles or elongated protein-containing vacuoles. Uncoated vesicles are seen surrounding lysosomes. Vesicular transport might be discriminated between abluminally orientated or transendothelial transport (oedema formation) and intraendothelial transport (oedema resolution) directed towards cell lysosomes to be degraded by lysosomal enzymes. The transendothelial passage via large vacuoles is mainly caused by macromolecular protein transport.

  17. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from...... for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed....

  18. Nomenclature of monocytes and dendritic cells in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ziegler-Heitbrock (Loems); P. Ancuta (Petronela); S. Crowe (Suzanne); M. Dalod (Marc); V. Grau (Veronika); D.N. Hart (Derek); P.J. Leenen (Pieter); Y.J. Liu; G. MacPherson (Gordon); G.J. Randolph (Gwendalyn); J. Scherberich (Juergen); J. Schmitz (Juergen); K. Shortman (Ken); S. Sozzani (Silvano); H. Strobl (Herbert); M. Zembala (Marek); J.M. Austyn (Jonathan); M.B. Lutz (Manfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonocytes and cells of the dendritic cell lineage circulate in blood and eventually migrate into tissue where they further mature and serve various functions, most notably in immune defense. Over recent years these cells have been characterized in detail with the use of cell surface mark

  19. Inhibition of neutrophil-mediated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by endothelial cells is not impaired in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Laham, F.; Kaelsch, A. -I.; Heinrich, L.; Birck, R.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Heeringa, P.; Yard, B.

    2010-01-01

    P>Leucocyte transendothelial migration is strictly regulated to prevent undesired inflammation and collateral damage of endothelial cells by activated neutrophils/monocytes. We hypothesized that in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients' dysregulation

  20. Intraluminal crawling versus interstitial neutrophil migration during inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Robert; Brechtefeld, Doris; Walzog, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    Site-directed trafficking of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to their target regions within the tissue is an important prerequisite for efficient host defense during the acute inflammatory response. This process requires intraluminal crawling of PMN on the activated endothelial cells to their extravasation sites. Upon transendothelial diapedesis, PMN migrate in the interstitial tissue to sites of inflammation. These crucial steps within the recruitment cascade are defined as intraluminal crawling and interstitial migration. In this review, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that control and fine-tune these migratory processes and discuss the role of adhesion molecules of the β2 integrin (CD11/CD18) family for these cellular functions.

  1. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  2. Ursolic acid protects monocytes against metabolic stress-induced priming and dysfunction by preventing the induction of Nox4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Ullevig

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: UA protects THP-1 monocytes against dysfunction by suppressing metabolic stress-induced Nox4 expression, thereby preventing the Nox4-dependent dysregulation of redox-sensitive processes, including actin turnover and MAPK-signaling, two key processes that control monocyte migration and adhesion. This study provides a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and athero- and renoprotective properties of UA and suggests that dysfunctional blood monocytes may be primary targets of UA and related compounds.

  3. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J; Rhodes, J M; Kølendorf, K

    1982-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from the healthy individuals. Phagocytosis of Candida albicans was decreased in the monocytes from the patients, whereas pinocytosis of acridine and phagocytosis of latex and sheep red blood cells were normal. The chemotactic response towards casein was enhanced. The possible consequences of these findings for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed.

  4. VEGF-A Regulates Cellular Localization of SR-BI as Well as Transendothelial Transport of HDL but Not LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Srividya; Yalcinkaya, Mustafa; Piemontese, Antonio; Meier, Roger; Nørrelykke, Simon Flyvbjerg; Perisa, Damir; Rzepiela, Andrzej; Stebler, Michael; Stoma, Szymon; Zanoni, Paolo; Rohrer, Lucia; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2017-05-01

    Low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL and HDL) must pass the endothelial layer to exert pro- and antiatherogenic activities, respectively, within the vascular wall. However, the rate-limiting factors that mediate transendothelial transport of lipoproteins are yet little known. Therefore, we performed a high-throughput screen with kinase drug inhibitors to identify modulators of transendothelial LDL and HDL transport. Microscopy-based high-content screening was performed by incubating human aortic endothelial cells with 141 kinase-inhibiting drugs and fluorescent-labeled LDL or HDL. Inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (VEGFR) significantly decreased the uptake of HDL but not LDL. Silencing of VEGF receptor 2 significantly decreased cellular binding, association, and transendothelial transport of (125)I-HDL but not (125)I-LDL. RNA interference with VEGF receptor 1 or VEGF receptor 3 had no effect. Binding, uptake, and transport of HDL but not LDL were strongly reduced in the absence of VEGF-A from the cell culture medium and were restored by the addition of VEGF-A. The restoring effect of VEGF-A on endothelial binding, uptake, and transport of HDL was abrogated by pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as silencing of scavenger receptor BI. Moreover, the presence of VEGF-A was found to be a prerequisite for the localization of scavenger receptor BI in the plasma membrane of endothelial cells. The identification of VEGF as a regulatory factor of transendothelial transport of HDL but not LDL supports the concept that the endothelium is a specific and, hence, druggable barrier for the entry of lipoproteins into the vascular wall. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 maintains the membrane potential and regulates the activation and chemokine-induced migration of a monocyte-derived dendritic cell subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Hajdu, Peter; Bacskai, Ildiko; Szilagyi, Orsolya; Papp, Ferenc; Szanto, Attila; Posta, Edit; Gogolak, Peter; Panyi, Gyorgy; Rajnavolgyi, Eva

    2011-08-01

    Expression of CD1a protein defines a human dendritic cell (DC) subset with unique functional activities. We aimed to study the expression of the Nav1.7 sodium channel and the functional consequences of its activity in CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) DC. Single-cell electrophysiology (patch-clamp) and quantitative PCR experiments performed on sorted CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) immature DC (IDC) showed that the frequency of cells expressing Na(+) current, current density, and the relative expression of the SCN9A gene encoding Nav1.7 were significantly higher in CD1a(+) cells than in their CD1a(-) counterparts. The activity of Nav1.7 results in a depolarized resting membrane potential (-8.7 ± 1.5 mV) in CD1a(+) IDC as compared with CD1a(-) cells lacking Nav1.7 (-47 ± 6.2 mV). Stimulation of DC by inflammatory signals or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in reduced Nav1.7 expression. Silencing of the SCN9A gene shifted the membrane potential to a hyperpolarizing direction in CD1a(+) IDC, resulting in decreased cell migration, whereas pharmacological inhibition of Nav1.7 by tetrodotoxin sensitized the cells for activation signals. Fine-tuning of IDC functions by a voltage-gated sodium channel emerges as a new regulatory mechanism modulating the migration and cytokine responses of these DC subsets.

  6. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Han, Summer S.; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Leng, Lin; Mizue, Yuka; Anderson, George M.; Mulder, Erik J.; de Bildt, Annelies; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Chang, Joseph T.; Bucala, Richard

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Autistic spectrum disorders are childhood neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by social and communicative impairment and repetitive and stereotypical behavior. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an upstream regulator of innate immunity that promotes monocyte/macrophage

  7. Mechanisms of Transendothelial Migration of Primary Human Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Cells from ER+, Her2+, and Triple-Negative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Biosearch Tehchnologies). Each probe was 20 nt long and contained a 5′ amino-modified nucleotide that was chemically coupled to CAL Fluor 610 fluorescent...Cell-tracker Green), and SP-103v1 (CAL Fluor 610) (Chroma Technology). Vertical stacks of 30 images with a Z step size of 0.2 μ m were acquired using a...1979). Induction of a fibrin- gel investment: an early event in line 10 27 hepatocarcinoma growth mediated by tumor-secreted products. J Immunol. 122

  8. Sialoadhesin expressed on IFN-induced monocytes binds HIV-1 and enhances infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Rempel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14(+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1, a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14(+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14(+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells.

  9. Direct quantification of transendothelial electrical resistance in organs-on-chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Helm, Marinke W; Odijk, Mathieu; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; van der Meer, Andries D; Eijkel, Jan C T; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes I

    2016-11-15

    Measuring transendothelial or transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a widely used method to monitor cellular barrier tightness in organs-on-chips. Unfortunately, integrated electrodes close to the cellular barrier hamper visual inspection of the cells or require specialized cleanroom processes to fabricate see-through electrodes. Out-of-view electrodes inserted into the chip's outlets are influenced by the fluid-filled microchannels with relatively high resistance. In this case, small changes in temperature or medium composition strongly affect the apparent TEER. To solve this, we propose a simple and universally applicable method to directly determine the TEER in microfluidic organs-on-chips without the need for integrated electrodes close to the cellular barrier. Using four electrodes inserted into two channels - two on each side of the porous membrane - and six different measurement configurations we can directly derive the isolated TEER independent of channel properties. We show that this method removes large variation of non-biological origin in chips filled with culture medium. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of our method by quantifying the TEER of a monolayer of human hCMEC/D3 cerebral endothelial cells, mimicking the blood-brain barrier inside our microfluidic organ-on-chip device. We found stable TEER values of 22 Ω cm(2)±1.3 Ω cm(2) (average ± standard error of the mean of 4 chips), comparable to other TEER values reported for hCMEC/D3 cells in well-established Transwell systems. In conclusion, we demonstrate a simple and robust way to directly determine TEER that is applicable to any organ-on-chip device with two channels separated by a membrane. This enables stable and easily applicable TEER measurements without the need for specialized cleanroom processes and with visibility on the measured cell layer.

  10. Lab-on-a-brane: A novel physiologically relevant planar arterial model to study transendothelial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Karim Ismail

    The tremendous quality of life impact notwithstanding, cardiovascular diseases and Cancer add up to over US$ 700bn each year in financial costs alone. Aging and population growth are expected to further expand the problem space while drug research and development remain expensive. However, preclinical costs can be substantially mitigated by substituting animal models with in vitro devices that accurately model human cardiovascular transport. Here we present a novel physiologically relevant lab-on-a-brane that simulates in vivo pressure, flow, strain, and shear waveforms associated with normal and pathological conditions in large and small blood vessels for studying molecular transport across the endothelial monolayer. The device builds upon previously demonstrated integrated microfluidic loop design by: (a) introducing nanoscale pores in the substrate membrane to enable transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transforming the substrate membrane into a nanofibrous matrix for 3D smooth muscle cell (SMC) tissue culture, (c) integrating electrospinning fabrication methods, (d) engineering an invertible sandwich cell culture device architecture, and (e) devising a healthy co-culture mechanism for human arterial endothelial cell (HAEC) monolayer and multiple layers of human smooth muscle cells (HSMC) to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural and mechanical characterization was conducted using confocal microscopy, SEM, stress/strain analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Transport was characterized using FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability protocol. Structure and transport characterization successfully demonstrate device viability as a physiologically relevant arterial mimic for testing transendothelial transport. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides a highly effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in pre-clinical testing, clinical trials cost from false

  11. Human recombinant macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha and -beta and monocyte chemotactic and activating factor utilize common and unique receptors on human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J M; Sherry, B; Fivash, M J; Kelvin, D J; Oppenheim, J J

    1993-04-01

    The human macrophage inflammatory proteins-1 alpha and -beta (MIP-1 alpha and -beta), which are also known as LD78 and ACT2, respectively, are distinct but highly related members of the chemoattractant cytokine (chemokine) family. rMIP-1 alpha and -beta labeled with 125I specifically bind to human peripheral blood monocytes, the monocytic cell line THP-1, peripheral blood T cells, and the YT cell line. Steady state binding experiments revealed approximately 3000 high affinity binding sites/cell for MIP-1 alpha on human monocytes and on THP-1 cells, with Kd values of 383 pM and 450 pM, respectively. Human MIP-1 alpha and -beta had nearly identical affinities for the binding sites and each competed equally well for binding. Human monocyte chemotactic and activating factor (MCAF), a member of the same chemokine family, consistently displaced about 25% of human MIP-1 alpha and -beta binding on monocytes but not on YT cells, which did not bind MCAF. On the other hand, human rMIP-1 alpha and -beta partially inhibited binding of radiolabeled MCAF to monocytes. Both MIP-1 alpha and -beta were chemotactic for human monocytes. Preincubation of monocytes with human rMIP-1 alpha or -beta markedly reduced cell migration towards the other cytokine, whereas preincubation with human rMCAF only partially desensitized the monocyte chemotaxis response to human rMIP-1 alpha or -beta. These data suggest the existence of three subtypes of receptors, i.e., one unique receptor shared by MIP-1 alpha and -beta, a second unique receptor for MCAF, and a third species that recognizes both MCAF and MIP-1 peptides.

  12. Modeling error and stability of endothelial cytoskeletal membrane parameters based on modeling transendothelial impedance as resistor and capacitor in series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodmer, James E; English, Anthony; Brady, Megan; Blackwell, Ken; Haxhinasto, Kari; Fotedar, Sunaina; Borgman, Kurt; Bai, Er-Wei; Moy, Alan B

    2005-09-01

    Transendothelial impedance across an endothelial monolayer grown on a microelectrode has previously been modeled as a repeating pattern of disks in which the electrical circuit consists of a resistor and capacitor in series. Although this numerical model breaks down barrier function into measurements of cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and membrane capacitance, such solution parameters can be inaccurate without understanding model stability and error. In this study, we have evaluated modeling stability and error by using a chi(2) evaluation and Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least-squares (LM-NLS) method of the real and/or imaginary data in which the experimental measurement is compared with the calculated measurement derived by the model. Modeling stability and error were dependent on current frequency and the type of experimental data modeled. Solution parameters of cell-matrix adhesion were most susceptible to modeling instability. Furthermore, the LM-NLS method displayed frequency-dependent instability of the solution parameters, regardless of whether the real or imaginary data were analyzed. However, the LM-NLS method identified stable and reproducible solution parameters between all types of experimental data when a defined frequency spectrum of the entire data set was selected on the basis of a criterion of minimizing error. The frequency bandwidth that produced stable solution parameters varied greatly among different data types. Thus a numerical model based on characterizing transendothelial impedance as a resistor and capacitor in series and as a repeating pattern of disks is not sufficient to characterize the entire frequency spectrum of experimental transendothelial impedance.

  13. Monocyte Subsets Coregulate Inflammatory Responses by Integrated Signaling through TNF and IL-6 at the Endothelial Cell Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimen, Myriam; Yates, Clara M.; McGettrick, Helen M.; Ward, Lewis S. C.; Harrison, Matthew J.; Apta, Bonita; Dib, Lea H.; Imhof, Beat A.; Harrison, Paul; Nash, Gerard B.

    2017-01-01

    Two major monocyte subsets, CD14+CD16− (classical) and CD14+/dimCD16+ (nonclassical/intermediate), have been described. Each has different functions ascribed in its interactions with vascular endothelial cells (EC), including migration and promoting inflammation. Although monocyte subpopulations have been studied in isolated systems, their influence on EC and on the course of inflammation has been ignored. In this study, using unstimulated or cytokine-activated EC, we observed significant differences in the recruitment, migration, and reverse migration of human monocyte subsets. Associated with this, and based on their patterns of cytokine secretion, there was a difference in their capacity to activate EC and support the secondary recruitment of flowing neutrophils. High levels of TNF were detected in cocultures with nonclassical/intermediate monocytes, the blockade of which significantly reduced neutrophil recruitment. In contrast, classical monocytes secreted high levels of IL-6, the blockade of which resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment. When cocultures contained both monocyte subsets, or when conditioned supernatant from classical monocytes cocultures (IL-6hi) was added to nonclassical/intermediate monocyte cocultures (TNFhi), the activating effects of TNF were dramatically reduced, implying that when present, the anti-inflammatory activities of IL-6 were dominant over the proinflammatory activities of TNF. These changes in neutrophil recruitment could be explained by regulation of E-selectin on the cocultured EC. This study suggests that recruited human monocyte subsets trigger a regulatory pathway of cytokine-mediated signaling at the EC interface, and we propose that this is a mechanism for limiting the phlogistic activity of newly recruited monocytes. PMID:28193827

  14. Irradiation Enhances the Ability of Monocytes as Nanoparticle Carrier for Cancer Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Shin Jiang

    Full Text Available The tumor-homing ability of monocytes renders them a potential cellular delivery system for alternative cancer therapies, although their migratory ability can be impaired following reagent uptake. Approaches that enhance monocyte tumor homing and promote their migration will improve the clinical value of these cells as cellular carriers. Previous studies have shown that irradiation (IR can promote macrophage aggregation in hypoxic regions. To investigate whether IR enhances the infiltration of bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs into tumors, the infiltration of BMDMs from GFP-transgenic mice in a murine prostate adenocarcinoma TRAMP-C1 model was examined by fluorescence microscopy. IR did not increase the number of BMDMs that infiltrated initially, but did increase monocyte retention within IR-treated tumors for up to 2 weeks. We also showed that BMDMs can take up various imaging and therapeutic agents, although the mobility of BMDMs decreased with increasing load. When BMDMs were differentiated in IR-treated tumor-conditioned medium (IR-CM in vitro, the nanoparticle load-mediated inhibition of migration was attenuated. These IR-CM-differentiated BMDMs delivered polymer vesicles encapsulating doxorubicin to radiation therapy (RT-induced hypoxic tumor regions, and enhanced the efficacy of RT. The prolonged retention of monocytes within irradiated tumor tissues and the ability of IR-CM to enhance the migratory ability of cargo-laden BMDMs suggest that monocytes pre-conditioned by IR-CM can potentially act as cellular carriers for targeted therapy following conventional RT.

  15. Irradiation Enhances the Ability of Monocytes as Nanoparticle Carrier for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Yu, Ching-Fang; Yen, Chia-Yi; Woo, Christopher William; Lo, Shao-Hua; Huang, Yu-Kuan; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    2015-01-01

    The tumor-homing ability of monocytes renders them a potential cellular delivery system for alternative cancer therapies, although their migratory ability can be impaired following reagent uptake. Approaches that enhance monocyte tumor homing and promote their migration will improve the clinical value of these cells as cellular carriers. Previous studies have shown that irradiation (IR) can promote macrophage aggregation in hypoxic regions. To investigate whether IR enhances the infiltration of bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs) into tumors, the infiltration of BMDMs from GFP-transgenic mice in a murine prostate adenocarcinoma TRAMP-C1 model was examined by fluorescence microscopy. IR did not increase the number of BMDMs that infiltrated initially, but did increase monocyte retention within IR-treated tumors for up to 2 weeks. We also showed that BMDMs can take up various imaging and therapeutic agents, although the mobility of BMDMs decreased with increasing load. When BMDMs were differentiated in IR-treated tumor-conditioned medium (IR-CM) in vitro, the nanoparticle load-mediated inhibition of migration was attenuated. These IR-CM-differentiated BMDMs delivered polymer vesicles encapsulating doxorubicin to radiation therapy (RT)-induced hypoxic tumor regions, and enhanced the efficacy of RT. The prolonged retention of monocytes within irradiated tumor tissues and the ability of IR-CM to enhance the migratory ability of cargo-laden BMDMs suggest that monocytes pre-conditioned by IR-CM can potentially act as cellular carriers for targeted therapy following conventional RT.

  16. The effect of low oxygen with and without steady-state hydrogen peroxide on cytokine gene and protein expression of monocyte-derived macrophages - biomed 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owegi, H.; Bouwens, M.; Egot-Lemaire, S.; Mueller, S.; Geib, R.W.; Waite, G.N.

    2011-01-01

    An early event during inflammation and infection is the migration of monocytes into tissues where they differentiate into macrophages. Such monocyte-derived macrophages face an unfavorable environment characterized by extremely low oxygen tension and accumulation of reactive oxygen species such as h

  17. Plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human peripheral monocytes acting via a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovets, T; Tippler, B; Rieks, M; Simmet, T

    1997-06-15

    We have previously reported that the serine protease plasmin generated during contact activation of human plasma triggers biosynthesis of leukotrienes (LTs) in human peripheral monocytes (PMs), but not in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We now show that purified plasmin acts as a potent chemoattractant on human monocytes, but not on PMNs. Human plasmin or plasminogen activated with urokinase, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, elicited monocyte migration across polycarbonate membranes. Similarly, stimulation of monocytes with plasmin, but not with active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, induced actin polymerization. As assessed by checkerboard analysis, the plasmin-mediated monocyte locomotion was a true chemotaxis. The plasmin-induced chemotactic response was inhibited by the lysine analog trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (t-AMCA), which prevents binding of plasmin/ogen to the appropriate membrane binding sites. In addition, active site-blocked plasmin inhibited monocyte migration triggered by active plasmin. Further, plasmin-induced monocyte chemotaxis was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX) and 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (HMG) and chelerythrine, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC). Plasmin, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, triggered formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in monocytes. LY83583, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, inhibited both plasmin-induced cGMP formation and the chemotactic response. The latter effect could be antagonized by 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, KT5823 and (Rp)-8-(p-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate [(Rp)-8-pCPT-cGMPs], two structurally unrelated inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase, inhibited plasmin-mediated monocyte chemotaxis. Thus, beyond being a stimulus for lipid mediator release, plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human monocytes acting via a c

  18. Monocytes infiltrate the pancreas via the MCP-1/CCR2 pathway and differentiate into stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Ino

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that monocytes possess pluripotent plasticity. We previously reported that monocytes could differentiate into hepatic stellate cells. Although stellate cells are also present in the pancreas, their origin remains unclear. An accumulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP(+CD45(- cells was observed in the pancreases and livers of chimeric mice, which were transplanted with a single hematopoietic stem cell isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice and treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. Because the vast majority of EGFP(+CD45(- cells in the pancreas expressed stellate cell-associated antigens such as vimentin, desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, procollagen-I, and α-smooth muscle actin, they were characterized as pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs. EGFP(+ PaSCs were also observed in CCl4-treated mice adoptively transferred with monocytes but not with other cell lineages isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice. The expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and angiotensin II (Ang II increased in the pancreas of CCl4-treated mice and their respective receptors, C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 and Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R, were expressed on Ly6C(high monocytes isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice. We examined the effect of an AT1R antagonist, irbesartan, which is also a CCR2 antagonist, on the migration of monocytes into the pancreas. Monocytes migrated toward MCP-1 but not Ang II in vitro. Irbesartan inhibited not only their in vitro chemotaxis but also in vivo migration of adoptively transferred monocytes from peripheral blood into the pancreas. Irbesartan treatment significantly reduced the numbers of EGFP(+F4/80(+CCR2(+ monocytic cells and EGFP(+ PaSCs in the pancreas of CCl4-treated chimeric mice receiving EGFP(+ bone marrow cells. A specific CCR2 antagonist RS504393 inhibited the occurrence of EGFP(+ PaSCs in injured mice. We propose that CCR2(+ monocytes migrate into the pancreas possibly via the

  19. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha is correlated with monocyte infiltration in mouse lipid lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckless, Jill; Rubin, Edward M.; Verstuyft, Judy B.; Metcalfe, James C.; Grainger, David J.

    1999-01-11

    The infiltration of monocytes into the vascular wall and their transformation into lipid-laden foam cells characterize early atherogenesis. This focal accumulation of lipids, together with smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, and the synthesis of extracellular matrix in the intima of large arteries result in the formation of an atherosclerotic plaque. The extent to which the plaque is infiltrated with monocytes appears to be an important determinant of plaque stability. It has been proposed that macrophages secrete an excess of matrix-degrading enzymes over their inhibitors, resulting in conversion of a stable plaque into anunstable plaque that is likely to rupture, resulting in acutemyocardial infarction. Macrophages and T cells constitute {approx}40 percent of the total population of cells in the lipid core region of atherosclerotic plaques. Their recruitment to the lesion may depend on alterations in the adhesive properties of the endothelial surface. Increased endothelial cell permeability and endothelial cell activation are among the earliest changes associated with developing lesions of atherosclerosis. Many of the cell adhesion molecules involved in monocyte recruitment are expressed at low or undetectable levels on normal endothelium but are substantially elevated on the endothelium overlaying atherosclerotic lesions In addition to endothelial cell activation, numerous chemotactic cytokines have also been postulated to be involved in monocyte recruitment. For example, interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) are direct chemoattractants for human monocytes but additionally induce cytoskeletal changes in the endothelium that result in increased permeability. This increased permeability, together with stimulated expression of adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, plays an important part in the local inflammation mediated by TNF-a and IL-1. In addition, a large number of other proinflammatory cytokines, including macrophage

  20. Acidosis differently modulates the inflammatory program in monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, Anne; Wußling, Hanna; Loppnow, Harald; Fu, Hang; Reime, Sarah; Thews, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, ischemia or the microenvironment of solid tumors is often accompanied by a reduction of extracellular pH (acidosis) that stresses the cells and acts on cellular signaling and transcription. The effect of acidosis on the expression of various inflammatory markers, on functional parameters (migration, phagocytic activity) and on signaling pathways involved was studied in monocytic cells and macrophages. In monocytic cell lines acidosis led to a reduction in expression of most of the inflammatory mediators, namely IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, COX-2 and osteopontin. In primary human monocytes MCP-1 and TNF-α were reduced but COX-2 and IL-6 were increased. In RAW264.7 macrophage cell line IL-1ß, COX-2 and iNOS expression was increased, whereas MCP-1 was reduced similar to the effect in monocytic cells. For primary human monocyte-derived macrophages the regulation of inflammatory markers by acidosis depended on activation state, except for the acidosis-induced downregulation of MCP-1 and TNF-α. Acidosis affected functional immune cell behavior when looking at phagocytic activity which was increased in a time-dependent manner, but cellular motility was not changed. Neither ERK1/2 nor CREB signaling was stimulated by the reduction of extracellular pH. However, p38 was activated by acidosis in RAW264.7 cells and this activation was critical for the induction of IL-1ß, COX-2 and iNOS expression. In conclusion, acidosis may impede the recruitment of immune cells, but fosters inflammation when macrophages are present by increasing the level of COX-2 and iNOS and by functionally forcing up the phagocytic activity.

  1. Monocyte targeting and activation by cationic liposomes formulated with a TLR7 agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pia Thermann; Zucker, Daniel; Parhamifar, Ladan;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Monocytes are one of the major phagocytic cells that patrol for invading pathogens, and upon activation, differentiate into macrophages or antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) capable of migrating to lymph nodes eliciting an adaptive immune response. The key role in regulating ada...... cytokines. We envision this technology as a promising tool in future cancer immunotherapy....

  2. Evaluating the Use of Monocytes with a Degradable Polyurethane for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Kyle Giovanni

    Monocytes are one of the first cell types present following the implantation of a biomaterial or tissue engineered construct. Depending on the monocyte activation state supported by the biomaterial, monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDMs) can act as positive contributors to tissue regeneration and wound healing, or conversely promote a chronic inflammatory response that leads to fibrous encapsulation and implant rejection. A degradable polar hydrophobic iconic polyurethane (D-PHI) has been shown to reduce pro-inflammatory monocyte/macrophage response compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), a substrate routinely used for in vitro culture of cells, as well as poly(lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA), a standard synthetic biodegradable biomaterial in the tissue engineering field. D-PHI has also shown properties suitable for use in a vascular tissue engineering context. In order to understand the mechanism through which D-PHI attenuates pro-inflammatory monocyte response, this thesis investigated the ability of D-PHI to modulate interactions with adsorbed serum proteins and the properties of D-PHI that were important for this activity. D-PHI was shown to regulate protein adsorption in a manner that produced divergent monocyte responses compared to TCPS and PLGA when coated with the serum proteins alpha2-macroglobulin or immunoglobulin G (IgG). In the case of IgG, D-PHI was shown to reduce pro-inflammatory binding site exposure as a function of the material's polar, hydrophobic, and ionic character. Due to the favourable monocyte activation state supported by D-PHI, and the importance of monocytes/macrophages in regulating the response of tissue-specific cell types in vivo, the ability of a D-PHI-stimulated monocyte/macrophage activation state to contribute to modulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in a vascular tissue engineering context was investigated. D-PHI- stimulated monocytes promoted VSMC growth and migration through biomolecule

  3. Monocyte transmigration induced by modification of low density lipoprotein in cocultures of human aortic wall cells is due to induction of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 synthesis and is abolished by high density lipoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Navab, M; Imes, S S; Hama, S Y; Hough, G P; Ross, L.A.; Bork, R W; Valente, A. J.; Berliner, J A; Drinkwater, D C; Laks, H

    1991-01-01

    Incubation of cocultures of human aortic endothelial (HAEC) and smooth muscle cells (HASMC) with LDL in the presence of 5-10% human serum resulted in a 7.2-fold induction of mRNA for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), a 2.5-fold increase in the levels of MCP-1 protein in the coculture supernatants, and a 7.1-fold increase in the transmigration of monocytes into the subendothelial space of the cocultures. Monocyte migration was inhibited by 91% by antibody to MCP-1. Media collected from t...

  4. Altered monocyte and fibrocyte phenotype and function in scleroderma interstitial lung disease: reversal by caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourkina, Elena; Bonner, Michael; Oates, James; Hofbauer, Ann; Richard, Mathieu; Znoyko, Sergei; Visconti, Richard P; Zhang, Jing; Hatfield, Corey M; Silver, Richard M; Hoffman, Stanley

    2011-07-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, or SSc). Fibrocytes are a monocyte-derived cell population implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders. Given the recently recognized importance of caveolin-1 in regulating function and signaling in SSc monocytes, in the present study we examined the role of caveolin-1 in the migration and/or trafficking and phenotype of monocytes and fibrocytes in fibrotic lung disease in human patients and an animal model. These studies fill a gap in our understanding of how monocytes and fibrocytes contribute to SSc-ILD pathology. We found that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+)/collagen I-positive (ColI+), CD34+/ColI+ and CD45+/ColI+ cells are present in SSc-ILD lungs, but not in control lungs, with CXCR4+ cells being most prevalent. Expression of CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (CXCL12), are also highly upregulated in SSc-ILD lung tissue. SSc monocytes, which lack caveolin-1 and therefore overexpress CXCR4, exhibit almost sevenfold increased migration toward CXCL12 compared to control monocytes. Restoration of caveolin-1 function by administering the caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD) peptide reverses this hypermigration. Similarly, transforming growth factor β-treated normal monocytes lose caveolin-1, overexpress CXCR4 and exhibit 15-fold increased monocyte migration that is CSD peptide-sensitive. SSc monocytes exhibit a different phenotype than normal monocytes, expressing high levels of ColI, CD14 and CD34. Because ColI+/CD14+ cells are prevalent in SSc blood, we looked for such cells in lung tissue and confirmed their presence in SSc-ILD lungs but not in normal lungs. Finally, in the bleomycin model of lung fibrosis, we show that CSD peptide diminishes fibrocyte accumulation in the lungs. Our results suggest that low caveolin-1 in SSc monocytes contributes to ILD via effects on cell migration and phenotype and that the

  5. Altered monocyte and fibrocyte phenotype and function in scleroderma interstitial lung disease: reversal by caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourkina Elena

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, or SSc. Fibrocytes are a monocyte-derived cell population implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders. Given the recently recognized importance of caveolin-1 in regulating function and signaling in SSc monocytes, in the present study we examined the role of caveolin-1 in the migration and/or trafficking and phenotype of monocytes and fibrocytes in fibrotic lung disease in human patients and an animal model. These studies fill a gap in our understanding of how monocytes and fibrocytes contribute to SSc-ILD pathology. We found that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+/collagen I-positive (ColI+, CD34+/ColI+ and CD45+/ColI+ cells are present in SSc-ILD lungs, but not in control lungs, with CXCR4+ cells being most prevalent. Expression of CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (CXCL12, are also highly upregulated in SSc-ILD lung tissue. SSc monocytes, which lack caveolin-1 and therefore overexpress CXCR4, exhibit almost sevenfold increased migration toward CXCL12 compared to control monocytes. Restoration of caveolin-1 function by administering the caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD peptide reverses this hypermigration. Similarly, transforming growth factor β-treated normal monocytes lose caveolin-1, overexpress CXCR4 and exhibit 15-fold increased monocyte migration that is CSD peptide-sensitive. SSc monocytes exhibit a different phenotype than normal monocytes, expressing high levels of ColI, CD14 and CD34. Because ColI+/CD14+ cells are prevalent in SSc blood, we looked for such cells in lung tissue and confirmed their presence in SSc-ILD lungs but not in normal lungs. Finally, in the bleomycin model of lung fibrosis, we show that CSD peptide diminishes fibrocyte accumulation in the lungs. Our results suggest that low caveolin-1 in SSc monocytes contributes to ILD via effects on cell migration and

  6. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein induces monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, S.D.; Berliner, J.A.; Valente, A.J.; Territo, M.C.; Navab, M.; Parhami, F.; Gerrity, R.; Schwartz, C.J.; Fogelman, A.M.

    1990-07-01

    After exposure to low density lipoprotein (LDL) that had been minimally modified by oxidation (MM-LDL), human endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) cultured separately or together produced 2- to 3-fold more monocyte chemotactic activity than did control cells or cells exposed to freshly isolated LDL. This increase in monocyte chemotactic activity was paralleled by increases in mRNA levels for a monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) that is constitutively produced by the human glioma U-105MG cell line. Antibody that had been prepared against cultured baboon smooth muscle cell chemotactic factor (anti-SMCF) did not inhibit monocyte migration induced by the potent bacterial chemotactic factor f-Met-Leu-Phe. However, anti-SMCF completely inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the media of U-105MG cells, EC, and SMC before and after exposure to MM-LDL. Moreover, monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of EC and SMC that had been exposed to MM-LDL was completely inhibited by anti-SMCF. Anti-SMCF specifically immunoprecipitated 10-kDa and 12.5-kDa proteins from EC. Incorporation of (35S)methionine into the immunoprecipitated proteins paralleled the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the medium of MM-LDL stimulated EC and the levels of MCP-1 mRNA found in the EC. We conclude that SMCF is in fact MCP-1 and MCP-1 is induced by MM-LDL.

  7. Return migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmelch, G

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the findings of the growing literature on return migration. Topics covered include typologies of return migrants, reasons for return, adaptation and readjustment of returnees, and the impact of return migration on the migrants' home societies. The focus of the study is on international return migration, migration to Northern Europe and northeastern North America, and return migration to the southern and eastern fringes of Europe and the Caribbean

  8. Suppression of blood monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis in acute human malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Kharazmi, A; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    The host response to Plasmodia includes the production of enlarged populations of peripheral blood monocytes and tissue macrophages in the spleen and the liver. Since the hyperplasia of the mononuclear phagocyte system is believed to arise as a consequence of an enhanced blood monocyte influx, we....... In conclusion, not all cell functions were altered in concert, and the previously unreported suppression of chemotactic migration might reflect a change in blood leucocyte subpopulations, deactivation in vivo or a direct suppressive effect of plasmodia induced products....

  9. Particulate matter air pollution exposure promotes recruitment of monocytes into atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatera, Kazuhiro; Hsieh, Joanne; Hogg, James C; Tranfield, Erin; Suzuki, Hisashi; Shih, Chih-Horng; Behzad, Ali R; Vincent, Renaud; van Eeden, Stephan F

    2008-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown an association between exposure to ambient particulate air pollution <10 microm in diameter (PM(10)) and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We previously showed that PM(10) exposure causes progression of atherosclerosis in coronary arteries. We postulate that the recruitment of monocytes from the circulation into atherosclerotic lesions is a key step in this PM(10)-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis. The study objective was to quantify the recruitment of circulating monocytes into vessel walls and the progression of atherosclerotic plaques induced by exposure to PM(10). Female Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, which naturally develop systemic atherosclerosis, were exposed to PM(10) (EHC-93) or vehicle by intratracheal instillation twice a week for 4 wk. Monocytes, labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in donors, were transfused to recipient rabbits as whole blood, and the recruitment of BrdU-labeled cells into vessel walls and plaques in recipients was measured by quantitative histological methodology. Exposure to PM(10) caused progression of atherosclerotic lesions in thoracic and abdominal aorta. It also decreased circulating monocyte counts, decreased circulating monocytes expressing high levels of CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1) and CD49d (very late antigen-4 alpha-chain), and increased expression of CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD106 (VCAM-1) in plaques. Exposure to PM(10) increased the number of BrdU-labeled monocytes adherent to endothelium over plaques and increased the migration of BrdU-labeled monocytes into plaques and smooth muscle underneath plaques. We conclude that exposure to ambient air pollution particles promotes the recruitment of circulating monocytes into atherosclerotic plaques and speculate that this is a critically important step in the PM(10)-induced progression of atherosclerosis.

  10. Hemoglobin induces monocyte recruitment and CD163-macrophage polarization in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Lindholt, Jes S; Buendía, Irene; Egido, Jesús; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Samaniego, Rafael; Meilhac, Olivier; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2015-12-15

    Increased hemoglobin (Hb) accumulation was reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). CD163 is a macrophage receptor involved in tissue Hb clearance, however its role in AAA has not been reported. We investigated the role of Hb on monocyte recruitment and differentiation towards CD163 expressing macrophages ex vivo, in vitro and in human AAA. CD163 mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in human AAA (n=7) vs. healthy wall (n=6). CD163 was predominantly found in adventitia of AAA, coinciding with areas rich in hemosiderin and adjacent to neoangiogenic microvessels. Dual CD14/CD163 expression was observed in recently infiltrated monocytes surrounding microvessels. A higher release of soluble CD163 was observed in the conditioned medium from AAA (AAA-CM, n=10), mainly in the adventitial layer. Similar to Hb, AAA-CM induced CD163-dependent monocyte chemotaxis, especially on circulating monocytes from AAA patients. Hb or AAA-CM promoted differentiation towards CD163(high)/HLA-DR(low)-expressing macrophages, with enhanced Hb uptake, increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 secretion and decreased pro-inflammatory IL-12p40 release. All these effects were partially suppressed when Hb was removed from AAA-CM. Separate analysis on circulating monocytes reported increased percentage of pre-infiltrating CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes in patients with AAA (n=21), as compared to controls (n=14). A significant increase in CD163 expression in CD14(++)CD16(+) monocyte subpopulation was observed in AAA patients. The presence of Hb in the adventitial AAA-wall promotes the migration and differentiation of activated circulating monocytes in AAA patients, explaining the existence of a protective CD163-macrophage phenotype that could take up the Hb present in the AAA-wall, avoiding its injurious effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochando, Jordi; Conde, Patricia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

  12. Attenuation of monocyte chemotaxis--a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of action for the cardio-protective hormone B-type natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezeva, Nadezhda; Collier, Patrick; Voon, Victor; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth; Watson, Chris; Baugh, John

    2013-08-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a prognostic and diagnostic marker for heart failure (HF). An anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective role for BNP was proposed. In cardiovascular diseases including pressure overload-induced HF, perivascular inflammation and cardiac fibrosis are, in part, mediated by monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)1-driven monocyte migration. We aimed to determine the role of BNP in monocyte motility to MCP1. A functional BNP receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) was identified in human monocytes. BNP treatment inhibited MCP1-induced THP1 (monocytic leukemia cells) and primary monocyte chemotaxis (70 and 50 %, respectively). BNP did not interfere with MCP1 receptor expression or with calcium. BNP inhibited activation of the cytoskeletal protein RhoA in MCP1-stimulated THP1 (70 %). Finally, BNP failed to inhibit MCP1-directed motility of monocytes from patients with hypertension (n = 10) and HF (n = 6) suggesting attenuation of this anti-inflammatory mechanism in chronic heart disease. We provide novel evidence for a direct role of BNP/NPRA in opposing human monocyte migration and support a role for BNP as a cardio-protective hormone up-regulated as part of an adaptive compensatory response to combat excess inflammation.

  13. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Monocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Acute Monoblastic Leukemias; Acute... Monocytic Leukemia; Acute Monocytic Leukemias; Acute monoblastic leukaemia; Acute monoblastic leukemia; Acute... monocytic leukaemia; Acute monocytic leukemia, morphology; Acute monocytoid leukemia; Leukemia, Acute... Monoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Monocytic; Leukemia, Monoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute... Schilling-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Monoblastic; Leukemias, Acute Monocytic; M5a - Acute monoblastic leukaemia; M5a - Acute

  14. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  15. Age-dependent alterations of monocyte subsets and monocyte-related chemokine pathways in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trautwein Christian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental approaches have unraveled essential migratory and functional differences of monocyte subpopulations in mice. In order to possibly translate these findings into human physiology and pathophysiology, human monocyte subsets need to be carefully revisited in health and disease. In analogy to murine studies, we hypothesized that human monocyte subsets dynamically change during ageing, potentially influencing their functionality and contributing to immunosenescence. Results Circulating monocyte subsets, surface marker and chemokine receptor expression were analyzed in 181 healthy volunteers (median age 42, range 18-88. Unlike the unaffected total leukocyte or total monocyte counts, non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocytes significantly increased with age, but displayed reduced HLA-DR and CX3CR1 surface expression in the elderly. Classical CD14++CD16- monocyte counts did not vary dependent on age. Serum MCP-1 (CCL2, but not MIP1α (CCL3, MIP1β (CCL4 or fractalkine (CX3CL1 concentrations increased with age. Monocyte-derived macrophages from old or young individuals did not differ with respect to cytokine release in vitro at steady state or upon LPS stimulation. Conclusions Our study demonstrates dynamic changes of circulating monocytes during ageing in humans. The expansion of the non-classical CD14+CD16+ subtype, alterations of surface protein and chemokine receptor expression as well as circulating monocyte-related chemokines possibly contribute to the preserved functionality of the monocyte pool throughout adulthood.

  16. Galectin-3 Binding Protein Secreted by Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Monocyte-Derived Fibrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J V; Roife, David; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-08-15

    To metastasize, tumor cells often need to migrate through a layer of collagen-containing scar tissue which encapsulates the tumor. A key component of scar tissue and fibrosing diseases is the monocyte-derived fibrocyte, a collagen-secreting profibrotic cell. To test the hypothesis that invasive tumor cells may block the formation of the fibrous sheath, we determined whether tumor cells secrete factors that inhibit monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. We found that the human metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 secretes activity that inhibits human monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, whereas less aggressive breast cancer cell lines secrete less of this activity. Purification indicated that Galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) is the active factor. Recombinant LGALS3BP inhibits monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, and immunodepletion of LGALS3BP from MDA-MB 231 conditioned media removes the monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting activity. LGALS3BP inhibits the differentiation of monocyte-derived fibrocytes from wild-type mouse spleen cells, but not from SIGN-R1(-/-) mouse spleen cells, suggesting that CD209/SIGN-R1 is required for the LGALS3BP effect. Galectin-3 and galectin-1, binding partners of LGALS3BP, potentiate monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. In breast cancer biopsies, increased levels of tumor cell-associated LGALS3BP were observed in regions of the tumor that were invading the surrounding stroma. These findings suggest LGALS3BP and galectin-3 as new targets to treat metastatic cancer and fibrosing diseases.

  17. Galectin-2 induces a proinflammatory, anti-arteriogenic phenotype in monocytes and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Yıldırım

    Full Text Available Galectin-2 is a monocyte-expressed carbohydrate-binding lectin, for which increased expression is genetically determined and associated with decreased collateral arteriogenesis in obstructive coronary artery disease patients. The inhibiting effect of galectin-2 on arteriogenesis was confirmed in vivo, but the mechanism is largely unknown. In this study we aimed to explore the effects of galectin-2 on monocyte/macrophage phenotype in vitro and vivo, and to identify the receptor by which galectin-2 exerts these effects. We now show that the binding of galectin-2 to different circulating human monocyte subsets is dependent on monocyte surface expression levels of CD14. The high affinity binding is blocked by an anti-CD14 antibody but not by carbohydrates, indicating a specific protein-protein interaction. Galectin-2 binding to human monocytes modulated their transcriptome by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and inhibiting pro-arteriogenic factors, while attenuating monocyte migration. Using specific knock-out mice, we show that galectin-2 acts through the CD14/toll-like receptor (TLR-4 pathway. Furthermore, galectin-2 skews human macrophages to a M1-like proinflammatory phenotype, characterized by a reduced motility and expression of an anti-arteriogenic cytokine/growth factor repertoire. This is accompanied by a switch in surface protein expression to CD40-high and CD206-low (M1. In a murine model we show that galectin-2 administration, known to attenuate arteriogenesis, leads to increased numbers of CD40-positive (M1 and reduced numbers of CD206-positive (M2 macrophages surrounding actively remodeling collateral arteries. In conclusion galectin-2 is the first endogenous CD14/TLR4 ligand that induces a proinflammatory, non-arteriogenic phenotype in monocytes/macrophages. Interference with CD14-Galectin-2 interaction may provide a new intervention strategy to stimulate growth of collateral arteries in genetically compromised cardiovascular

  18. Peripheral monocyte functions and activation in patients with quiescent Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schwarzmaier

    Full Text Available Recent developments suggest a causal link between inflammation and impaired bacterial clearance in Crohn's disease (CD due to alterations of intestinal macrophages. Studies suggest that excessive inflammation is the consequence of an underlying immunodeficiency rather than the primary cause of CD pathogenesis. We characterized phenotypic and functional features of peripheral blood monocytes of patients with quiescent CD (n = 18 and healthy controls (n = 19 by analyses of cell surface molecule expression, cell adherence, migration, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and cytokine expression and secretion with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS priming. Peripheral blood monocytes of patients with inactive CD showed normal expression of cell surface molecules (CD14, CD16, CD116, adherence to plastic surfaces, spontaneous migration, chemotaxis towards LTB4, phagocytosis of E. coli, and production of reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, peripheral blood monocytes of CD patients secreted higher levels of IL1β (p<.05. Upon LPS priming we found a decreased release of IL10 (p<.05 and higher levels of CCL2 (p<.001 and CCL5 (p<.05. The expression and release of TNFα, IFNγ, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL13, IL17, CXCL9, and CXCL10 were not altered compared to healthy controls. Based on our phenotypic and functional studies, peripheral blood monocytes from CD patients in clinical remission were not impaired compared to healthy controls. Our results highlight that defective innate immune mechanisms in CD seems to play a role in the (inflamed intestinal mucosa rather than in peripheral blood.

  19. Monocyte subsets in myocardial infarction: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfvidsson, John; Ahlin, Fredrik; Vargas, Kris G; Thaler, Barbara; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2017-03-15

    Monocytes form an important part of the human innate immune system by taking part in inflammatory reactions. With time, monocytes have gained interest in the role they may play during the event of myocardial infarction (MI). The current paradigm suggests that monocytes consist of three subdivisions which differ in phenotypic and dynamic patterns after an MI. In the inflammation that ensues, the different subsets have been shown to have an impact on reparative processes and patient recovery. We searched Medline and Embase until April 5, 2016, for observational studies or clinical trials regarding monocyte functions and dynamics in MI. Apart from studies in humans, extensive work has been done in mice in an effort to understand the complex nature of monocyte dynamics. Animal models might add useful information on mapping these processes. The question still remains whether animal data can, to a certain degree, be extrapolated to monocyte functions during human MI. This review aims to summarize current available evidence on both mice and men with particular focus on the understanding of monocyte subsets dynamics and effects in human MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Strenuous physical exercise adversely affects monocyte chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czepluch, Frauke S; Barres, Romain; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise is important for proper cardiovascular function and disease prevention, but it may influence the immune system. We evaluated the effect of strenuous exercise on monocyte chemotaxis. Monocytes were isolated from blood of 13 young, healthy, sedentary individuals participating...... in a three-week training program which consisted of repeated exercise bouts. Monocyte chemotaxis and serological biomarkers were investigated at baseline, after three weeks training and after four weeks recovery. Chemotaxis towards vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and transforming growth factor...

  1. Monocyte-Platelet Interaction Induces a Pro-Inflammatory Phenotype in Circulating Monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activated platelets exert a pro-inflammatory action that can be largely ascribed to their ability to interact with leukocytes and modulate their activity. We hypothesized that platelet activation and consequent formation of monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPA) induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in circulating monocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD62P(+) platelets and MPA were measured, and monocytes characterized, by whole blood flow cytometry in healthy subjects, before an...

  2. Growth factors induce monocyte binding to vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for monocyte retention in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Natarajan, Rama

    2004-09-01

    Adhesive interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) may contribute to subendothelial monocyte-macrophage retention in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB on VSMC-monocyte interactions. Treatment of human aortic VSMC (HVSMC) with ANG II or PDGF-BB significantly increased binding to human monocytic THP-1 cells and to peripheral blood monocytes. This was inhibited by antibodies to monocyte beta(1)- and beta(2)-integrins. The binding was also attenuated by blocking VSMC arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by inhibitors of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conversely, binding was enhanced by overexpression of 12/15-LO or COX-2. Direct treatment of HVSMC with AA or its metabolites also increased binding. Furthermore, VSMC derived from 12/15-LO knockout mice displayed reduced binding to mouse monocytic cells relative to genetic control mice. Using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we demonstrated the involvement of Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and MAPKs in ANG II- or PDGF-BB-induced binding. Interestingly, after coculture with HVSMC, THP-1 cell surface expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was increased. These results show for the first time that growth factors may play additional roles in atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte binding to VSMC via AA metabolism and key signaling pathways. This can lead to monocyte subendothelial retention, CD36 expression, and foam cell formation.

  3. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine stimulates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell chemotaxis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-young LEE; Eun-ha SHIN; Yoe-sik BAE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) chemotaxis. Methods: Human DC were generated from peripheral blood monocytes by culturing them with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The effect of SPC on the DC chemotactic migration was measured by chemotaxis assay. Intracellular signaling event involved in the SPC-induced DC chemotaxis was investigated with several inhibitors for specific kinase. The expression of the SPC receptors was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that SPC induced chemotactic migration in immature DC (iDC) and mature DC (mDC). In terms of SPC-induced signaling events, mitogen activated protein kinase activation and Akt activation in iDC and mDC were stimulated. SPC-induced chemotaxis was mediated by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and phosphoino-sitide-3-kinase, but not by calcium in both iDC and mDC. Although mDC express ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1, but not G protein-coupled receptor 4, iDC do not express any of these receptors. To examine the involvement of sphin-gosine-1-phosphate (SIP) receptors, we checked the effect of an SIP receptor antagonist (VPC23019) on SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. VPC23019 did not affect SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. Conclusion: The results suggest that SPC may play a role in regulating DC trafficking during phagocytosis and the T cell-stimulating phase, and the unique SPC receptor, which is different from SIP receptors, is involved in SPC-induced chemotaxis.

  4. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  5. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  6. Association of haemolytic uraemic syndrome with dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression in circulating monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Ruggieri, Matias; Panek, Analia Cecilia; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Exeni, Andrea; Barilari, Catalina; Exeni, Ramon; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Escherichia coli gastrointestinal infections that are Shiga toxin (Stx) producing. Monocytes contribute to HUS evolution by producing cytokines that sensitize endothelial cells to Stx action and migration to the injured kidney. As CC chemokine receptors (CCRs) are involved in monocyte recruitment to injured tissue, we analysed the contribution of these receptors to the pathogenesis of HUS. We analysed CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression in peripheral monocytes from HUS patients during the acute period, with healthy children as controls. We observed an increased expression of CCRs per cell in monocytes from HUS patients, accompanied by an increase in the absolute number of monocytes CCR1+, CCR2+ and CCR5+. It is interesting that prospective analysis confirmed that CCR1 expression positively correlated with HUS severity. The evaluation of chemokine levels in plasma showed that regulated on activation of normal T-cell-expressed and -secreted (RANTES) protein was reduced in plasma from patients with severe HUS, and this decrease correlated with thrombocytopenia. Finally, the expression of the higher CCRs was accompanied by a loss of functionality which could be due to a mechanism for desensitization to compensate for altered receptor expression. The increase in CCR expression correlates with HUS severity, suggesting that the dysregulation of these receptors might contribute to an increased risk of renal damage. Activated monocytes could be recruited by chemokines and then receptors could be dysregulated. The dysregulation of CCRs and their ligands observed during the acute period suggests that a chemokine pathway would participate in HUS development.

  7. An in vitro coculture model of transmigrant monocytes and foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, M; Wada, Y; Jinnouchi, K; Takeya, M; Takahashi, K; Usuda, H; Naito, M; Kurihara, H; Yazaki, Y; Kumazawa, Y; Okimoto, Y; Umetani, M; Noguchi, N; Niki, E; Hamakubo, T; Kodama, T

    1999-10-01

    To analyze in vitro the migration of monocytes to the subendothelial space, their differentiation into macrophages, and the subsequent formation of foam cells in vitro, we have developed a 2-coculture system with rabbit aortic endothelial cells (AECs), aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and a mixture of matrix proteins on polyethylene filters in chemotaxis chambers. AECs were seeded on a mixture of type I and IV collagen with or without various types of serum lipoproteins (method 1) or on matrix proteins secreted by SMCs (method 2). In these coculture systems, rabbit AECs can maintain a well-preserved monolayer for up to 2 weeks. When human CD14-positive monocytes were added to the upper medium of the system, with monocyte chemotactic protein-1 treatment approximately 60% of the monocytes transmigrated within 24 hours and were retained for up to 7 days, whereas without MCP-1 treatment, monocytes transmigrated. On day 1, transmigrant monocytes were negative for immunostaining of type I and II macrophage scavenger receptors but by day 3, became positive for scavenger receptors as well as other macrophage markers. When oxidized low density lipoprotein was added to the matrix layer of the method I coculture, on day 4 transmigrant cells exhibited lipid deposit droplets, and by day 7, they had the appearance of typical foam cells. Some of the transmigrant cells recovered in the lower medium on day 7 also appeared to be foam cells, indicating foam cell motility and escape from the coculture layer through the filter. In summary, this coculture system is a useful in vitro tool to dissect the cellular and molecular events that make up the process of foam cell formation.

  8. Prostaglandin E 2 Does Not Modulate CCR7 Expression and Functionality after Differentiation of Blood Monocytes into Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Marc-André Allaire; Bérengère Tanné; Côté, Sandra C.; Nancy Dumais

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induces C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) expression on human monocytes, which stimulates their subsequent migration in response to the CCR7 natural ligands CCL19 and CCL21. In this study, we determined whether PGE2 affects CCR7 expression on macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis and chemotaxis assays were performed on Mono Mac-1-derived macrophage (MDMM-1) as well as unpolarized monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) to determine the C...

  9. Transcellular lipoxygenase metabolism between monocytes and platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigby, T.D.; Meslier, N. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-15

    We have examined the effects of co-culture and in vitro co-stimulation on lipoxygenase metabolism in monocytes and platelets. Monocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of normal volunteers by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and adherence to tissue culture plastic. Platelets were obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of the same donor. When 10(9) platelets and 2.5 x 10(6) monocytes were co-stimulated with 1 microM A23187, these preparations released greater quantities of 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5(S),12-(S)dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene C4, 5(S)-hydroxy-6(R)-S-glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic (LTC4) when compared with monocytes alone. Release of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, delta 6-trans-LTB4, and delta 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4 from monocytes was decreased in the presence of platelets. A dose-response curve was constructed and revealed that the above changes became evident when the platelet number exceeded 10(7). Dual radiolabeling experiments with 3H- and 14C-arachidonic acid revealed that monocytes provided arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, and LTA4 for further metabolism by the platelet. Monocytes did not metabolize platelet intermediates detectably. In addition, as much as 1.2 microM 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid and 12(S)-hydroperoxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid had no effect on monocyte lipoxygenase metabolism. Platelets were capable of converting LTA4 to LTC4, but conversion of LTA4 to LTB4 was not detected. We conclude that the monocyte and platelet lipoxygenase pathways undergo a transcellular lipoxygenase interaction that differs from the interaction of the neutrophil and platelet lipoxygenase pathways. In this interaction monocytes provide intermediate substrates for further metabolic conversion by platelets in an unidirectional manner.

  10. Cryptic chemotactic activity of fibronectin for human monocytes resides in the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell-binding fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R A; Wikner, N E; Doherty, D E; Norris, D A

    1988-08-25

    Monocytes and lymphocytes form a second wave of infiltrating blood leukocytes in areas of tissue injury. The mechanisms for monocyte accumulation at these sites are not completely understood. Recently, however, fragments from extracellular matrix proteins including collagen, elastin, and fibronectin have been shown to induce monocyte chemotaxis. In this report we demonstrate that chemotactic activity for human monocytes is expressed when a 120-kDa fragment containing the RGDS cell-binding peptide is released from intact fibronectin or from larger fibronectin fragments. Monocytes, either from mononuclear cell Ficoll-Hypaque preparations (10-20% monocytes, 89-90% lymphocytes) or from elutriation preparations (95% monocytes, 5% lymphocytes), but not lymphocytes, migrated toward 120-kDa fragment preparations (10(-7) M) in blind-end chambers when the cells were separated from the chemoattractant by a 5-micron pore polycarbonate filter either alone or overlying a 0.45-micron pore nitrocellulose filter. Neutrophils migrated toward zymosan-activated serum but not toward 10(-5)-10(-8) M concentrations of the 120-kDa fragment. Intact fibronectin had no chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Fibronectin was isolated from citrated human plasma by sequential gelatin-Sepharose affinity and DEAE ion-exchange chromatography in the presence of buffers containing 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride to prevent fragmentation. Controlled enzymatic digestion with thermolysin cleaved fibronectin into 30 kDa fibrin, 45 kDa collagen, and 150/160-kDa cell and heparin domains. Upon prolonged digestion, purified 150/160-kDa fragments were cleaved into 120-kDa cell and 30/40-kDa heparin-binding fragments. Even though the intact fibronectin molecule, the 150/160-kDa fragments, and the 120-kDa fragment, have cell binding activity for Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts, only the 120-kDa fragment expressed chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Thus, the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell

  11. Detection of early atherosclerosis with radiolabeled monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in prediabeteic Zucker rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenberg, F.G. [Div. of Pediatric Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Wen, P.; Dai, M.; Zhu, D.; Panchal, S.N.; Valantine, H.A. [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Tait, J.F. [Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Post, A.M.; Strauss, H.W. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Background: Migration of monocytes into the arterial wall is an early finding of atherosclerosis. Monocytes are attracted to sites of vascular endothelial cell injury, the initiating event in the development of atheromatous disease, by a chemokine known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Injured vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells selectively secrete MCP-1. Objective: This study was performed to determine if radiolabeled MCP-1 would co-localize at sites of monocyte/macrophage concentration in an experimental model of transplant-induced vasculopathy in diabetic animals. Materials and methods: Hearts from 3-month-old male Zucker rats, heterozygote (Lean) or homozygote (Fat) for the diabetes-associated gene fa, were transplanted into the abdomens of genetically matched recipients. Lean and Fat animals were then fed normal or high-fat diets for 90 days. Results: At 90 days significant increases (P < 0.013) of MCP-1 graft uptake were seen at imaging and confirmed on scintillation gamma well counting studies in Lean (n = 5) and Fat (n = 12) animals, regardless of diet, 400 % and 40 %, above control values, respectively. MCP-1 uptake of native and grafted hearts correlated with increased numbers of perivascular macrophages (P < 0.02), as seen by immunostaining with an antibody specific for macrophages (ED 2). Conclusion: Radiolabeled MCP-1 can detect abnormally increased numbers of perivascular mononuclear cells in native and grafted hearts in prediabetic rats. MCP-1 may be useful in the screening of diabetic children for early atherosclerotic disease. (orig.)

  12. The Rap GTPases regulate the migration, invasiveness and in vivo dissemination of B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K B L; Tan, P; Freeman, S A; Lam, M; McNagny, K M; Gold, M R

    2010-01-28

    B-cell lymphomas are common malignancies in which transformed B cells enter the circulation, extravasate into tissues and form tumors in multiple organs. Lymphoma cells are thought to exit the vasculature and enter tissues through the same chemokine- and adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms as normal B cells. We have previously shown that activation of the Rap GTPases, proteins that control cytoskeletal organization and integrin activation, is critical for chemokine-induced migration and adhesion in B-lymphoma cell lines. Using the A20 murine B-lymphoma cell line as a model, we now show that Rap activation is important for circulating lymphoma cells to enter tissues and form tumors in vivo. In vitro assays showed that Rap activation is required for A20 cells to efficiently adhere to vascular endothelial cells and undergo transendothelial migration. These findings suggest that Rap or its effectors could be novel targets for treating B-cell lymphomas.

  13. [Internal migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  14. Autocrine CCL19 blocks dendritic cell migration toward weak gradients of CCL21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, Özcan; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2016-01-01

    the effect of autocrine CCL19 on in vitro migration of human DCs toward CCL21. Results. Using human monocyte-derived DCs in a 3D chemotaxis assay, we are the first to demonstrate that CCL19 more potently induces directed migration of human DCs compared with CCL21. When comparing migration of type 1 DCs......Background aims. Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) induces their homing from peripheral to lymphatic tissues guided by CCL21. However, in vitro matured human monocyte-derived DC cancer vaccines injected intradermally migrate poorly to lymph nodes (LNs). In vitro maturation protocols generate DCs...... and PGE2-DCs, migration of type 1 DCs was strikingly impaired compared with PGE2-DCs, but only toward low concentrations of CCL21. When type 1 DCs were cultured overnight in fresh culture medium (reducing autocrine CCL19 levels), a rescuing effect was observed on migration toward low concentrations of CCL...

  15. Acute monocytic leukemia in an irradiated beagle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Fritz, T.E.; Lombard, L.S.; Poole, C.M.; Norris, W.P.

    1979-01-01

    A purebred female Beagle dog that had received 2,000 R of protracted whole-body ..gamma..-irradiation from /sup 60/Co when 14 months old had hematologic changes consistent with a myeloproliferative disorder 3 years after the termination of radiation exposure. Peripheral blood and bone marrow findings during the 7-month period before death showed progressive anemia with increased numbers of platelets; immature granulocytes, monocytes and promonocytes. A period of partial remission occurred during which time the peripheral blood was aleukemic, although there was marked thrombocytosis and abnormal erythropoiesis which was evidenced by bizarre circulating nucleated red cells, anisocytosis, poikilocytosis and Howell-Jolly bodies. The dog had a terminal crisis with marked leukocytosis, most cells in the peripheral blood being bizarre monocytes and promonocytes. Tissues obtained at necroscopy showed diffuse as well as focal infiltration of the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, heart, kidney and gastrointestinal wall with immature neoplastic cells resembling monocytes and monocytic precursors. The monocytic differentiation of the invasive cell population was confirmed by morphological, cytochemical, histological, ultrastructural and in vitro cell culture studies.

  16. SDA, a DNA aptamer inhibiting E- and P-selectin mediated adhesion of cancer and leukemia cells, the first and pivotal step in transendothelial migration during metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassa Faryammanesh

    Full Text Available Endothelial (E- and platelet (P- selectin mediated adhesion of tumor cells to vascular endothelium is a pivotal step of hematogenous metastasis formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectin deficiency significantly reduces metastasis formation in vivo. We selected an E- and P-Selectin specific DNA Aptamer (SDA via SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment with a K(d value of approximately 100 nM and the capability of inhibiting the interaction between selectin and its ligands. Employing human colorectal cancer (HT29 and leukemia (EOL-1 cell lines we could demonstrate an anti-adhesive effect for SDA in vitro. Under physiological shear stress conditions in a laminar flow adhesion assay, SDA inhibited dynamic tumor cell adhesion to immobilized E- or P-selectin. The stability of SDA for more than two hours allowed its application in cell-cell adhesion assays in cell culture medium. When adhesion of HT29 cells to TNFα-stimulated E-selectin presenting human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was analyzed, inhibition via SDA could be demonstrated as well. In conclusion, SDA is a potential new therapeutic agent that antagonizes selectin-mediated adhesion during metastasis formation in human malignancies.

  17. Oxidized Lipids and Lysophosphatidylcholine Induce the Chemotaxis, Up-Regulate the Expression of CCR9 and CXCR4 and Abrogate the Release of IL-6 in Human Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Johannes; Vego, Heidi; Maghazachi, Azzam A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids through regulation of chronic inflammation play key roles in the development of various diseases. Here, we report that a mixed population of human primary monocytes migrated towards LPC, as well as oxidized linoleic acid isoforms 9-S-HODE, 9-R-HODE and 13-R-HODE. Incubation with 9-R-HODE, 13-R-HODE and LPC resulted in increased expression of CXCR4, the receptor for SDF-1α/CXCL12, correlated with increased monocyte migration towards SDF-1α/CXCL12. Further, we report increased expression of CCR9, the receptor for TECK/CCL25, after stimulation with these lipids. Upon examining the migratory response towards TECK/CCL25, it was observed that an increase in CCR9 expression upon pre-treatment with 9-S-HODE, 9-R-HODE, 13-R-HODE and LPC resulted in increased migration of monocytes expressing CCR9. Only LPC but not any other lipid examined increased the influx of intracellular Ca2+ in monocytes. Finally, 9-S-HODE, 9-R-HODE, 13-R-HODE, or LPC inhibited the release of IL-6 from monocytes suggesting that these lipids may play important role in controlling inflammatory responses. PMID:25251539

  18. Pregnancy and Preeclampsia Affect Monocyte Subsets in Humans and Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, Barbro N.; Spaans, Floor; Borghuis, Theo; Klok, Pieter A.; Groen, Bart; Bolt, Annemarie; de Vos, P.; van Pampus, Maria; Wong, Tsz Y.; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, Winston W.; Faas, Marijke M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Both nonclassical and intermediate monocytes have been implicated in different inflammatory conditions. We hypothesized that these monocytes would increase during pregnancy, a condition associated with generalized activation of inflammatory responses and that they would increase even

  19. Patrolling Monocytes Control Tumor Metastasis to the Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Richard N.; Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Tacke, Robert; Graham D. Thomas; Nowyhed, Heba; Herrley, Erica; Rasquinha, Nicole; McArdle, Sara; Wu, Runpei; Peluso, Esther; Metzger, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Shaked, Iftach; Chodaczek, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. For example, classical monocytes promote tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis; however, how nonclassical “patrolling” monocytes interact with tumors is unknown. Here we show that patrolling monocytes are enriched in the microvasculature of the lung and reduce tumor metastasis to lung in multiple mouse metastatic tumor models. Nr4a1-deficient mice, which specifically lack patrolling monocytes, showed increased ...

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  1. Nf1+/- monocytes/macrophages induce neointima formation via CCR2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Waylan K; Kim, Grace; Hudson, Farlyn Z; Mund, Julie A; Mali, Raghuveer; Menon, Keshav; Kapur, Reuben; Clapp, D Wade; Ingram, David A; Stansfield, Brian K

    2016-03-15

    Persons with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a predisposition for premature and severe arterial stenosis. Mutations in the NF1 gene result in decreased expression of neurofibromin, a negative regulator of p21(Ras), and increases Ras signaling. Heterozygous Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) mice develop a marked arterial stenosis characterized by proliferating smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and a predominance of infiltrating macrophages, which closely resembles arterial lesions from NF1 patients. Interestingly, lineage-restricted inactivation of a single Nf1 allele in monocytes/macrophages is sufficient to recapitulate the phenotype observed in Nf1(+/-) mice and to mobilize proinflammatory CCR2+ monocytes into the peripheral blood. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCR2 receptor activation by its primary ligand monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is critical for monocyte infiltration into the arterial wall and neointima formation in Nf1(+/-) mice. MCP-1 induces a dose-responsive increase in Nf1(+/-) macrophage migration and proliferation that corresponds with activation of multiple Ras kinases. In addition, Nf1(+/-) SMCs, which express CCR2, demonstrate an enhanced proliferative response to MCP-1 when compared with WT SMCs. To interrogate the role of CCR2 activation on Nf1(+/-) neointima formation, we induced neointima formation by carotid artery ligation in Nf1(+/-) and WT mice with genetic deletion of either MCP1 or CCR2. Loss of MCP-1 or CCR2 expression effectively inhibited Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and reduced macrophage content in the arterial wall. Finally, administration of a CCR2 antagonist significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation. These studies identify MCP-1 as a potent chemokine for Nf1(+/-) monocytes/macrophages and CCR2 as a viable therapeutic target for NF1 arterial stenosis.

  2. Circulating monocytes and B-lymphocytes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Background Individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have altered number and distribution of retinal macrophages and show changes in circulating antibodies. We wanted to investigate the corresponding precursors, with subpopulations. We therefore measured monocyte and B-lymphocyte populations in individuals with neovascular AMD. Design This was an observational case–control study. Participants or samples A total of 31 individuals with neovascular AMD and 30 healthy age-matched controls were included. Methods Patients and controls were interviewed, and ophthalmological examination included visual acuity assessment using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) chart, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), slit-lamp examination and fundus photography. Moreover, venous blood was drawn and prepared for flow cytometry. Cells were gated and measured for surface markers. Main outcome measures Relative amounts of monocytes and B-lymphocytes with subsets, as well as selected surface markers, were measured. Results The two groups did not significantly differ in age, smoking history, body mass index, physical activity or C-reactive protein (CRP). Total monocytes (percentage of all leukocytes) were lower in the neovascular AMD group (median 5.5%) compared with the level in the control group (6.5%; P-value: 0.028). The percentage of intermediate monocytes positive for cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b) was lower for AMD patients (99.4%) compared with 100% for the control group (P-value: 0.032). Conclusion We observed lower numbers of monocytes, which show a potentially impaired ability to migrate across the endothelial wall in patients with neovascular AMD. These subtle changes could potentially lead to an imbalance in the recruitment of macrophages into the retina during disease development. PMID:28176950

  3. Oxygen-Loaded Nanodroplets Effectively Abrogate Hypoxia Dysregulating Effects on Secretion of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 by Human Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rossana Gulino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes play a key role in the inflammatory stage of the healing process. To allow monocyte migration to injured tissues, the balances between secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs must be finely modulated. However, a reduction of blood supply and local oxygen tension can modify the phenotype of immune cells. Intriguingly, hypoxia might be targeted by new effective oxygenating devices such as 2H,3H-decafluoropentane- (DFP- based oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNs. Here, hypoxia effects on gelatinase/TIMP release from human peripheral monocytes were investigated, and the therapeutic potential of dextran-shelled OLNs was evaluated. Normoxic monocytes constitutively released ~500 ng/mL MMP-9, ~1.3 ng/mL TIMP-1, and ~0.6 ng/mL TIMP-2 proteins. MMP-2 was not detected. After 24 hours, hypoxia significantly altered MMP-9/TIMP-1 balance by reducing MMP-9 and increasing TIMP-1, without affecting TIMP-2 secretion. Interestingly OLNs, not displaying toxicity to human monocytes after cell internalization, effectively counteracted hypoxia, restoring a normoxia-like MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. The action of OLNs was specifically dependent on time-sustained oxygen diffusion up to 24 h from their DFP-based core. Therefore, OLNs appear as innovative, nonconventional, cost-effective, and nontoxic therapeutic tools, to be potentially employed to restore the physiological invasive phenotype of immune cells in hypoxia-associated inflammation.

  4. Ranitidine improves postoperative monocyte and neutrophil function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Jensen, S;

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The histamine H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine hydrochloride has been shown to improve trauma-, blood transfusion-, and sepsis-induced immunosuppression. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of ranitidine on postoperative impairment in monocyte and neutrophil function. METHODS: Twenty...... difference (P detected. There were no infectious complications in ranitidine-treated patients. CONCLUSION: These results support previous studies...

  5. Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Gutierrez, Carolina G.; Solorzano-Santos, Fortino; Walker, David H.; Torres, Javier; Serrano, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is a febrile illness caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks. In Mexico, a case of E. chaffeensis infection in an immunocompetent 31-year-old woman without recognized tick bite was fatal. This diagnosis should be considered for patients with fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzyme levels. PMID:27088220

  6. Ranitidine improves postoperative monocyte and neutrophil function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Jensen, S

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The histamine H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine hydrochloride has been shown to improve trauma-, blood transfusion-, and sepsis-induced immunosuppression. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of ranitidine on postoperative impairment in monocyte and neutrophil function. METHODS: Twenty...... difference (P detected. There were no infectious complications in ranitidine-treated patients. CONCLUSION: These results support previous studies...

  7. TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role in monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Choi, Eun Kyoung; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is known to mediate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, however, its role on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TLR4 on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules, and determined the functional role of TLR4-induced adhesion molecules on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. When THP-1 monocytes were stimulated with Kdo2-Lipid A (KLA), a specific TLR4 agonist, Mac-1 expression was markedly increased in association with an increased adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. These were attenuated by anti-Mac-1 antibody, suggesting a functional role of TLR4-induced Mac-1 on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In monocytes treated with MK886, a 5-lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitor, both Mac-1 expression and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by KLA were markedly attenuated. Moreover, KLA increased the expression of mRNA and protein of 5-LO, suggesting a pivotal role of 5-LO on these processes. In in vivo studies, KLA increased monocyte adhesion to aortic endothelium of wild-type (WT) mice, which was attenuated in WT mice treated with anti-Mac-1 antibody as well as in TLR4-deficient mice. Taken together, TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role on monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, leading to increased foam cell formation in the development of atherosclerosis.

  8. Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta, Franklin R; Bernal, Paula J; Fresnay, Stephanie; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2015-06-01

    A new human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) was recently developed. In this model, ingestion of 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of subjects developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD-) 5-10 days post-challenge. TD criteria included meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12 h) and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia) endpoints. One of the first lines of defense against pathogens are the cells of the innate immune system (e.g., monocytes, dendritic cells -DCs-). Various changes in circulating monocytes and DCs have been described in the murine S. Typhimurium model; however, whether similar changes are present in humans remains to be explored. To address these questions, a subset of volunteers (5 TD and 3 who did not develop typhoid despite oral challenge -NoTD-) were evaluated for changes in circulating monocytes and DCs. Expression of CD38 and CD40 were upregulated in monocytes and DCs in TD volunteers during the disease days (TD-0h to TD-96h). Moreover, integrin α4β7, a gut homing molecule, was upregulated on monocytes but not DCs. CD21 upregulation was only identified in DCs. These changes were not observed among NoTD volunteers despite the same oral challenge. Moreover, monocytes and DCs from NoTD volunteers showed increased binding to S. Typhi one day after challenge. These monocytes showed phosphorylation of p38MAPK, NFkB and Erk1/2 upon stimulation with S. Typhi-LPS-QDot micelles. In contrast, monocytes from TD volunteers showed only a moderate increase in S. Typhi binding 48 h and 96 h post-TD, and only Erk1/2 phosphorylation. This is the first study to describe different activation and migration profiles, as well as differential signaling patterns, in monocytes and DCs which relate directly to the clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild type S. Typhi.

  9. The role of Januskinases Jak1 and Tyk2 in monocyte-induced growth inhibition of smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schaewen, Markus von

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) plays an important role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating VSMC functional behaviour via an interaction of monozytic urokinase plasminogen (uPA) and its uPA receptor (uPAR). The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. This work investigates the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not comp...

  10. Transcriptome analysis of monocyte-HIV interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Huyen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During HIV infection and/or antiretroviral therapy (ART, monocytes and macrophages exhibit a wide range of dysfunctions which contribute significantly to HIV pathogenesis and therapy-associated complications. Nevertheless, the molecular components which contribute to these dysfunctions remain elusive. We therefore applied a parallel approach of genome-wide microarray analysis and focused gene expression profiling on monocytes from patients in different stages of HIV infection and/or ART to further characterise these dysfunctions. Results Processes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, lipid metabolism, proteasome function, protein trafficking and transcriptional regulation were identified as areas of monocyte dysfunction during HIV infection. Individual genes potentially contributing to these monocyte dysfunctions included several novel factors. One of these is the adipocytokine NAMPT/visfatin, which we show to be capable of inhibiting HIV at an early step in its life cycle. Roughly half of all genes identified were restored to control levels under ART, while the others represented a persistent dysregulation. Additionally, several candidate biomarkers (in particular CCL1 and CYP2C19 for the development of the abacavir hypersensitivity reaction were suggested. Conclusions Previously described areas of monocyte dysfunction during HIV infection were confirmed, and novel themes were identified. Furthermore, individual genes associated with these dysfunctions and with ART-associated disorders were pinpointed. These genes form a useful basis for further functional studies concerning the contribution of monocytes/macrophages to HIV pathogenesis. One such gene, NAMPT/visfatin, represents a possible novel restriction factor for HIV. Background Both macrophages and T lymphocyte subsets express the CD4 receptor and either the CXCR4 and/or the CCR5 coreceptor which confer susceptibility to infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

  11. Monocyte-platelet interaction induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in circulating monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Passacquale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activated platelets exert a pro-inflammatory action that can be largely ascribed to their ability to interact with leukocytes and modulate their activity. We hypothesized that platelet activation and consequent formation of monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPA induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in circulating monocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD62P(+ platelets and MPA were measured, and monocytes characterized, by whole blood flow cytometry in healthy subjects, before and two days after receiving influenza immunization. Three monocytic subsets were identified: CD14(+CD16(-, CD14(highCD16(+and CD14(lowCD16(+. The increase in high sensitivity C-reactive protein post-immunization was accompanied by increased platelet activation and MPA formation (25.02±12.57 vs 41.48±16.81; p = 0.01, along with enhancement of circulating CD14(highCD16(+ cells (4.7±3.6 vs 10.4±4.8; p = 0.003, their percentage being linearly related to levels of CD62P(+-platelets (r(2 = 0.4347; p = 0.0008. In separate in vitro experiments, co-incubation of CD14(+CD16(- cells, isolated from healthy donor subjects, with autologous platelets gave rise to up-regulation of CD16 on monocytes as compared with those maintained in medium alone (% change in CD14(+CD16(+ cells following 48 h co-incubation of monocytes with platelets was +106±51% vs monocytes in medium alone; p<0.001. This effect correlated directly with degree of MPA formation (r(2 = 0.7731; p<0.0001 and was associated with increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 blocking antibody, which abrogates MPA formation, abolished these effects, as did the cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitor NS-398, aspirin and the EP1/EP2-selective antagonist AH6809. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that MPA formation, as occurs in the blood under pro-inflammatory conditions, expands the pool of circulating CD14(highCD16(+ monocytes in a

  12. Patrolling Monocytes Control Tumor Metastasis to the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Richard N.; Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Tacke, Robert; Thomas, Graham D.; Nowyhed, Heba; Herrley, Erica; Rasquinha, Nicole; McArdle, Sara; Wu, Runpei; Peluso, Esther; Metzger, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Shaked, Iftach; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Biswas, Subhra K.; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. For example, classical monocytes promote tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis; however, how nonclassical “patrolling” monocytes interact with tumors is unknown. Here we show that patrolling monocytes are enriched in the microvasculature of the lung and reduce tumor metastasis to lung in multiple mouse metastatic tumor models. Nr4a1-deficient mice, which specifically lack patrolling monocytes, showed increased lung metastasis in vivo. Transfer of Nr4a1-proficient patrolling monocytes into Nr4a1-deficient mice prevented tumor invasion in lung. Patrolling monocytes established early interactions with metastasizing tumor cells, scavenged tumor material from the lung vasculature and promoted natural killer cell recruitment and activation. Thus, patrolling monocytes contribute to cancer immunosurveillance and may be targets for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26494174

  13. Minimum Transendothelial Electrical Resistance Thresholds for the Study of Small and Large Molecule Drug Transport in a Human in Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, Jennifer L; Min, Lie; Lee, Kelvin H

    2016-12-05

    A human cell-based in vitro model that can accurately predict drug penetration into the brain as well as metrics to assess these in vitro models are valuable for the development of new therapeutics. Here, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are differentiated into a polarized monolayer that express blood-brain barrier (BBB)-specific proteins and have transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values greater than 2500 Ω·cm(2). By assessing the permeabilities of several known drugs, a benchmarking system to evaluate brain permeability of drugs was established. Furthermore, relationships between TEER and permeability to both small and large molecules were established, demonstrating that different minimum TEER thresholds must be achieved to study the brain transport of these two classes of drugs. This work demonstrates that this hPSC-derived BBB model exhibits an in vivo-like phenotype, and the benchmarks established here are useful for assessing functionality of other in vitro BBB models.

  14. A preference for migration

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Oded

    2007-01-01

    At least to some extent migration behavior is the outcome of a preference for migration. The pattern of migration as an outcome of a preference for migration depends on two key factors: imitation technology and migration feasibility. We show that these factors jointly determine the outcome of a preference for migration and we provide examples that illustrate how the prevalence and transmission of a migration-forming preference yield distinct migration patterns. In particular, the imitation of...

  15. A preference for migration

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Oded

    2007-01-01

    At least to some extent migration behavior is the outcome of a preference for migration. The pattern of migration as an outcome of a preference for migration depends on two key factors: imitation technology and migration feasibility. We show that these factors jointly determine the outcome of a preference for migration and we provide examples that illustrate how the prevalence and transmission of a migration-forming preference yield distinct migration patterns. In particular, the imitation of...

  16. Real-time acquisition of transendothelial electrical resistance in an all-human, in vitro, 3-dimensional, blood-brain barrier model exemplifies tight-junction integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maherally, Zaynah; Fillmore, Helen L; Tan, Sim Ling; Tan, Suk Fei; Jassam, Samah A; Quack, Friederike I; Hatherell, Kathryn E; Pilkington, Geoffrey J

    2017-09-07

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists of endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes embedded in basal lamina (BL). Most in vitro models use nonhuman, monolayer cultures for therapeutic-delivery studies, relying on transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements without other tight-junction (TJ) formation parameters. We aimed to develop reliable, reproducible, in vitro 3-dimensional (3D) models incorporating relevant human, in vivo cell types and BL proteins. The 3D BBB models were constructed with human brain endothelial cells, human astrocytes, and human brain pericytes in mono-, co-, and tricultures. TEER was measured in 3D models using a volt/ohmmeter and cellZscope. Influence of BL proteins-laminin, fibronectin, collagen type IV, agrin, and perlecan-on adhesion and TEER was assessed using an electric cell-substrate impedance-sensing system. TJ protein expression was assessed by Western blotting (WB) and immunocytochemistry (ICC). Perlecan (10 µg/ml) evoked unreportedly high, in vitro TEER values (1200 Ω) and the strongest adhesion. Coculturing endothelial cells with astrocytes yielded the greatest resistance over time. ICC and WB results correlated with resistance levels, with evidence of prominent occludin expression in cocultures. BL proteins exerted differential effects on TEER, whereas astrocytes in contact yielded higher TEER values and TJ expression.-Maherally, Z., Fillmore, H. L., Tan, S. L., Tan, S. F., Jassam, S. A., Quack, F. I., Hatherell, K. E., Pilkington, G. J. Real-time acquisition of transendothelial electrical resistance in an all-human, in vitro, 3-dimensional, blood-brain barrier model exemplifies tight-junction integrity. © FASEB.

  17. Bosnia: Migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepan Pavičić

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a reprint of a very informative review of migrations in Bosnia published almost 60 years ago. The author first notes that the [Slavic] population that first settled Bosnia spoke variants of the ikavian-ţakavian dialect spoken also in neighbouring parts of Croatia (although the interrogative ča itself was not common. From the 13th century the jekavian-štokavian dialect expanded from the Southeast, from areas in modern Montenegro. This change was greatly due to immigration of Vlachs, who had adopted jekavian-štokavian. Although earlier Vlach immigrants had adopted the indigenous ikavian idiom, as well as associating themselves with Catholicism or with the Patarene Bosnian Church, later arrivals spoke jekavian-štokavian and adhered to Eastern Orthodoxy. In the 14th century the former group, living on both sides of the Neretva valley and in the Dinaric range, expanded to areas of Croatia, whereas the Eastern Vlachs had already established themselves on the left bank of the Drina river. By 1450 all Vlachs in Bosnia spoke jekavian-štokavian. In the 15–16th centuries the Ottomans favoured the settlement of Vlachs in Bosnia. The Vlachs served in Ottoman military structures, provided transportation services and were useful in the integration of conquered western and northwestern lands. In general, the establishment of Ottoman rule in Bosnia induced major changes in the population and in migration flows. The author divides this history into three periods. The first lasted from the initial Ottoman conquests to the wars of 1683–1699. At its start in the 15th century almost all Patarenes adopted Islam, especially in areas where the Bosnian Church was strong, but also in areas where Catholicism dominated, where some Catholics embraced Islam. Conversions of Catholics to Islam intensified in the 16th century and throughout the 17th, to a different degree in various regions: a in Central Bosnia conversion was almost total, b along the Sava

  18. [Neutrophils and monocytes in gingival epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, H X; Zheng, L P

    1994-06-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes of gingival epithellium in health gingiva(H),marginal gingivitis(MG),juvenile periodontitis(JP),adult periodontitis(AP) and subgingival bacteria were quantitated and analyzed,The results showed that the numbers of PMN within either pocket epithelium or oral gingival epithelium in JP were significantly lower than in AP and G.The amounts of PMN in AP were much larger than other three groups.Positive correlation between the number of PMN in sulcular pocket epitelium and the motile bacteri of subgingival plaque was demonstrated by correlation analysis.Monocytes mainly presented in deep pocket and junctional epithelum which were stained by NAE method,however very few Langhans cells were seen in these areas.

  19. Abnormalities in Monocyte Recruitment and Cytokine Expression in Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1–deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bao; Rutledge, Barbara J.; Gu, Long; Fiorillo, Joseph; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Kunkel, Steven L.; North, Robert; Gerard, Craig; Rollins, Barrett J.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a CC chemokine that attracts monocytes, memory T lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Because other chemokines have similar target cell specificities and because CCR2, a cloned MCP-1 receptor, binds other ligands, it has been uncertain whether MCP-1 plays a unique role in recruiting mononuclear cells in vivo. To address this question, we disrupted SCYA2 (the gene encoding MCP-1) and tested MCP-1–deficient mice in models of inflammation. Despite normal numbers of circulating leukocytes and resident macrophages, MCP-1−/− mice were specifically unable to recruit monocytes 72 h after intraperitoneal thioglycollate administration. Similarly, accumulation of F4/80+ monocytes in delayed-type hypersensitivity lesions was impaired, although the swelling response was normal. Development of secondary pulmonary granulomata in response to Schistosoma mansoni eggs was blunted in MCP-1−/− mice, as was expression of IL-4, IL-5, and interferon γ in splenocytes. In contrast, MCP-1−/− mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice in their ability to clear Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data indicate that MCP-1 is uniquely essential for monocyte recruitment in several inflammatory models in vivo and influences expression of cytokines related to T helper responses. PMID:9463410

  20. Regulation of ICAM-1 in Cells of the Monocyte/Macrophage System in Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Paulsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells.

  1. Regulation of ICAM-1 in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M; Gölz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Unverdorben, Felix; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmänner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Buttron, Isabell; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Thiel, Cora S; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells.

  2. Acute exposure to apolipoprotein A1 inhibits macrophage chemotaxis in vitro and monocyte recruitment in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif J; Barrett, Tessa J; Taylor, Lewis; McNeill, Eileen; Manmadhan, Arun; Recio, Carlota; Carmineri, Alfredo; Brodermann, Maximillian H; White, Gemma E; Cooper, Dianne; DiDonato, Joseph A; Zamanian-Daryoush, Maryam; Hazen, Stanley L; Channon, Keith M

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) is the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and has well documented anti-inflammatory properties. To better understand the cellular and molecular basis of the anti-inflammatory actions of apoA1, we explored the effect of acute human apoA1 exposure on the migratory capacity of monocyte-derived cells in vitro and in vivo. Acute (20–60 min) apoA1 treatment induced a substantial (50–90%) reduction in macrophage chemotaxis to a range of chemoattractants. This acute treatment was anti-inflammatory in vivo as shown by pre-treatment of monocytes prior to adoptive transfer into an on-going murine peritonitis model. We find that apoA1 rapidly disrupts membrane lipid rafts, and as a consequence, dampens the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway that coordinates reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration. Our data strengthen the evidence base for therapeutic apoA1 infusions in situations where reduced monocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation could have beneficial outcomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15190.001 PMID:27572261

  3. Statins attenuate polymethylmethacrylate-mediated monocyte activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, Alan J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic osteolysis precipitates aseptic loosening of components, increases the risk of periprosthetic fracture and, through massive bone loss, complicates revision surgery and ultimately is the primary cause for failure of joint arthroplasty. The anti-inflammatory properties of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors belonging to the statin family are well recognized. We investigated a possible role for status in initiating the first stage of the osteolytic cycle, namely monocytic activation. METHODS: We used an in vitro model of the human monocyte\\/macrophage inflammatory response to poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles after pretreat-ing cells with cerivastatin, a potent member of the statin family. Cell activation based upon production of TNF-alpha and MCP-1 cytokines was analyzed and the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK signal transduction pathway was evaluated using western blot analysis, to identify its role in cell activation and in any cerivastatin effects observed. RESULTS: We found that pretreatment with cerivastatin significantly abrogates the production of inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and MCP-1 by human monocytes in response to polymethylmethacrylate particle activation. This inflammatory activation and attenuation appear to be mediated through the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. INTERPRETATION: We propose that by intervening at the upstream activation stage, subsequent osteoclast activation and osteolysis can be suppressed. We believe that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may potentially play a prophylactic role in the setting of aseptic loosening, and in so doing increase implant longevity.

  4. EXPRESSION OF ADHESION MOLECULES ON PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONOCYTES DURING PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mikhaylova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood monocytes play a key role in regulation of immune response during pregnancy. Intensive adhesion of monocytes to endothelium proves that monocytes are activated during pregnancy. To determine a potential role of adhesion molecules for ability of monocytes to adhere, we studied expression of CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, CD18, CD49d, CD29 markers of monocytes from non-pregnant and pregnant women. Expression of adhesion molecules on monocytes was analyzed by flow cytometry. The amounts of CD11b-expressing monocytes increased during pregnancy, as compared with non-pregnant women. Intensity of CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, CD29 expression on the monocytes did also increase at normal pregnancy. These results suggest that intense adhesion of monocytes to endothelium during uncomplicated pregnancy may be determined by increased expression of CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, CD29, and higher amounts of CD11b+ monocytes.

  5. Circulating CD14+ monocytes in patients with aortic stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara Shimoni; Valery Meledin; Iris Bar; Jacob Fabricant; Gera Gandelman; Jacob George

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCalcific aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process sharing similarities with atherosclerosis and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of AS is notable for three cardinal components: inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Monocytes play a role in each of these processes. The role of circulating monocytes in AS is not clear. The aim of the present study was to study an association between cir-culating apoptotic and non apoptotic CD14+ monocytes and AS features.MethodsWe assessed the number of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes in 54 patients with significant AS (aortic valve area 0.74 ± 0.27 cm2) and compared them to 33 patients with similar risk factors and no valvular disease. The level of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry.ResultsThere was no difference in the risk factor profile and known coronary or peripheral vascular diseases between patients with AS and controls.Pa-tients with AS exhibited increased numbers of CD14+ monocytes as compared to controls (9.9% ± 4.9%vs. 7.7% ± 3.9%,P= 0.03). CD14+ monocyte number was related to age and the presence and severity of AS. In patients with AS, both CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic mono-cytes were inversely related to aortic valve area.ConclusionsPatients with significant AS have increased number of circulating CD14+ monocytes and there is an inverse correlation between monocyte count and aortic valve area. These findings may suggest that inflammation is operative not only in early valve injury phase, but also at later developed stages such as calcification when AS is severe.

  6. Tracking the Spatial and Functional Gradient of Monocyte-To-Macrophage Differentiation in Inflamed Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Debasish; Jones, Stephen M; Oswald, Erin M; Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages are at the heart of the immune effector function in an inflammatory response. But because of the lack of an efficient imaging system to trace these cells live during their migration and maturation in their native environment at sub-cellular resolution, our knowledge is limited to data available from specific time-points analyzed by flow cytometry, histology, genomics and other immunological methods. Here, we have developed a ratiometric imaging method for measuring monocyte maturation in inflamed mouse lungs in situ using real-time using 2-photon imaging and complementary methods. We visualized that while undifferentiated monocytes were predominantly found only in the vasculature, a semi-differentiated monocyte/macrophage population could enter the tissue and resembled more mature and differentiated populations by morphology and surface phenotype. As these cells entered and differentiated, they were already selectively localized near inflamed airways and their entry was associated with changes in motility and morphology. We were able to visualize these during the act of differentiation, a process that can be demonstrated in this way to be faster on a per-cell basis under inflammatory conditions. Finally, our in situ analyses demonstrated increases, in the differentiating cells, for both antigen uptake and the ability to mediate interactions with T cells. This work, while largely confirming proposed models for in situ differentiation, provides important in situ data on the coordinated site-specific recruitment and differentiation of these cells and helps elaborate the predominance of immune pathology at the airways. Our novel imaging technology to trace immunogenic cell maturation in situ will complement existing information available on in situ differentiation deduced from other immunological methods, and assist better understanding of the spatio-temporal cellular behavior during an

  7. Comparison of techniques for the detection of monocyte specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, M J; Thompson, J S; Claas, F H; Van Rood, J J

    1985-10-10

    Monocyte specific antigens are relevant in renal and bone marrow transplantation, but a reproducible monocyte-antigen system has not yet been recognized. In order to establish a sensitive test system with reproducible results in monocyte serology, 3 different monocyte cytotoxicity techniques were compared. In our hands the two-colour fluorescence test on post-Ficoll total leukocyte suspensions fulfilled the criteria. This technique was used to screen sera from multiparous women and renal transplant recipients for the presence of monocyte specific antibodies. By testing sera on cells from individuals who were HLA compatible with the serum donors, anti-HLA reactions were excluded. Several promising sera containing monocyte specific antibodies were identified, thus indicating the success of our approach.

  8. EU Migration Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinschmidt, Harald

    2004-01-01

    I shall confine myself in this paper to international migration as migration across international borders.I do so despite the fact that,still today,international migration accounts only for a small share of migration at large.Likewise,I shall deal widh voluntary migration and shall thus exclude,deportation ...

  9. Prostaglandin E2 Does Not Modulate CCR7 Expression and Functionality after Differentiation of Blood Monocytes into Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-André Allaire

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 induces C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7 expression on human monocytes, which stimulates their subsequent migration in response to the CCR7 natural ligands CCL19 and CCL21. In this study, we determined whether PGE2 affects CCR7 expression on macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis and chemotaxis assays were performed on Mono Mac-1-derived macrophage (MDMM-1 as well as unpolarized monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs to determine the CCR7 expression and functionality in the presence of PGE2. Data revealed that a MDMM-1 exhibited markedly downregulated CCR7 expression and functionality that were partially restored by treatment with PGE2. In MDMs, we observed a drastic downregulation of CCR7 expression and functionality that were unaffected following PGE2 treatment. Our data indicate that monocyte differentiation induces the loss of CCR7 expression and that PGE2 is unable to modulate CCR7 expression and functionality as shown previously in monocytes.

  10. MIF inhibition reverts the gene expression profile of human melanoma cell line-induced MDSCs to normal monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Waigel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are potently immunosuppressive innate immune cells that accumulate in advanced cancer patients and actively inhibit anti-tumor T lymphocyte responses [1]. Increased numbers of circulating MDSCs directly correlate with melanoma patient morbidity and reduced anti-tumor immune responses [2,3]. Previous studies have revealed that monocyte-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is necessary for the immune suppressive function of MDSCs in mouse models of melanoma [4,5]. To investigate whether MIF participates in human melanoma-induced MDSC differentiation and/or suppressive function, we have established an in vitro MDSC induction model using primary, normal human monocytes co-cultured with human melanoma cell lines in the presence or absence of the MIF antagonist—4-IPP [4,6–9]. To identify potential mechanistic effectors, we have performed transcriptome analyses on cultured monocytes and on melanoma-induced MDSCs obtained from either untreated or 4-IPP-treated A375:monocyte co-cultures. Here, we present a detailed protocol, which can facilitate easy reproduction of the microarray results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE73333 published by Yaddanapudi et al. (2015 in Cancer Immunology Research [10].

  11. Telmisartan ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced innate immune response through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tao; Benicky, Julius; Wang, Juan; Orecna, Martina; Sanchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) blockers (ARBs) reduce the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced innate immune response in human circulating monocytes expressing few AT1. To clarify the mechanisms of anti-inflammatory effects of ARBs with different peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ)-activating potencies, we focused our study on telmisartan, an ARB with the highest PPARγ-stimulating activity. Methods Human circulating monocytes and monocytic THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) cells were exposed to 50 ng/ml LPS with or without pre-incubation with telmisartan. AT1 mRNA and protein expressions were determined by real-time PCR and membrane receptor binding assay, respectively. The expression of pro-inflammatory factors was determined by real-time PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA. PPARγ activation was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and its role was determined by pharmacological inhibition and PPARγ gene silencing. Results In human monocytes, telmisartan significantly attenuated the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory factors, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2, nuclear factor-κB activation and reactive oxygen species formation. In THP-1 cells, telmisartan significantly reduced LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α, inhibitor of κB-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene expression and MCP-1-directed migration. Telmisartan also stimulated the expression of the PPARγ target genes cluster of differentiation 36 and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 1 in monocytes. The anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan were prevented by both PPARγ antagonism and PPARγ gene silencing. Anti-inflammatory effects of ARBs correlated with their PPARγ agonist potency. Conclusion Our observations demonstrate that in human monocytes, ARBs inhibit the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response to a

  12. Migration of birds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the migration of birds. Topics covered include why birds migrate, when birds migrate, speed, altitude, courses, distance, major flyways and...

  13. Research on Protocol Migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪芸; 顾冠群; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper elaborates the concept and model of protocol migration in network interconnection.Migration strategies and principles are discussed and several cases are studied in detail which show the basic procedure and techniques used in protocol migration.

  14. Internationalization and migration pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultalahti, O

    1994-01-01

    The author first develops the concept of migration pressure, which is defined as the growth in the number of people wishing to migrate and the barriers preventing them from so doing. Both macro- and micro-level factors affecting migration pressure are identified. Historical trends in migration pressure in Finland are then discussed. The author then applies this concept to the analysis of current Finnish migration trends. The primary focus is on international migration.

  15. Host hindrance to HIV-1 replication in monocytes and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pancino Gianfranco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monocytes and macrophages are targets of HIV-1 infection and play critical roles in multiple aspects of viral pathogenesis. HIV-1 can replicate in blood monocytes, although only a minor proportion of circulating monocytes harbor viral DNA. Resident macrophages in tissues can be infected and function as viral reservoirs. However, their susceptibility to infection, and their capacity to actively replicate the virus, varies greatly depending on the tissue localization and cytokine environment. The susceptibility of monocytes to HIV-1 infection in vitro depends on their differentiation status. Monocytes are refractory to infection and become permissive upon differentiation into macrophages. In addition, the capacity of monocyte-derived macrophages to sustain viral replication varies between individuals. Host determinants regulate HIV-1 replication in monocytes and macrophages, limiting several steps of the viral life-cycle, from viral entry to virus release. Some host factors responsible for HIV-1 restriction are shared with T lymphocytes, but several anti-viral mechanisms are specific to either monocytes or macrophages. Whilst a number of these mechanisms have been identified in monocytes or in monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro, some of them have also been implicated in the regulation of HIV-1 infection in vivo, in particular in the brain and the lung where macrophages are the main cell type infected by HIV-1. This review focuses on cellular factors that have been reported to interfere with HIV-1 infection in monocytes and macrophages, and examines the evidences supporting their role in vivo, highlighting unique aspects of HIV-1 restriction in these two cell types.

  16. Differential control of Helios+/− Treg development by monocyte subsets through disparate inflammatory cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Hui; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Control of Helios+/− Treg subset development is mediated through distinct cytokines and monocyte subpopulations.CD16+ monocytes inhibit Helios+ Treg proliferation through IL-12, whereas CD16− monocytes suppress Helios− Treg development through TNF-α.

  17. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Show Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage traffic

  18. IVIG inhibits TNF-α-induced MMP9 expression and activity in monocytes by suppressing NF-κB and P38 MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cuizhen; Huang, Min; Xie, Lijian; Shen, Jie; Xiao, Tingting; Wang, Renjian

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) has been involved in inflammatory and pathologic processes of coronary artery lesions (CAL) in Kawasaki disease (KD). Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a traditional treatment for Kawasaki disease, could decrease the expressions of MMP9. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of IVIG in chemotactic migration of monocyte and the regulation of MMP9 induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in U937s. Studies were carried out with real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), zymographic, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. U937s' migration was enhanced by TNF-α stimulation, while was inhibited by IVIG pretreatment. MMP9 expression and activity in U937s were also significantly enhanced by TNF-α and inhibited by IVIVG pretreatment. During inflammatory stimulus, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and P38 Mitogenactivated protein kinase (P38 MAPK) pathways play a significant role in regulating MMP9 gene expression. TNF-α induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and P38 MAPK activation in U937s were inhibited significantly by IVIG. Furthermore, we clarified that nuclear NF-κB and P38 MAPK pathways play pivotal roles in regulating U937s' migration and MMP9 expressions using PDTC and SB203580, which were specific inhibitors of NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. IVIG displays striking biological effects, notably promoting monocyte migration. These effects involve the NF-κB and p38 pathways, and increased MMP9 activity. It might be a crucial mechanism of IVIG reducing the occurrence of CAL that IVIG inhibited monocytes expressing MMP9 and decreased chemotactic migration of monocyte.

  19. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  20. Design of phosphorylated dendritic architectures to promote human monocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupot, Mary; Griffe, Laurent; Marchand, Patrice; Maraval, Alexandrine; Rolland, Olivier; Martinet, Ludovic; L'Faqihi-Olive, Fatima-Ezzahra; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Poupot, Rémy

    2006-11-01

    As first defensive line, monocytes are a pivotal cell population of innate immunity. Monocyte activation can be relevant to a range of immune conditions and responses. Here we present new insights into the activation of monocytes by a series of phosphonic acid-terminated, phosphorus-containing dendrimers. Various dendritic or subdendritic structures were synthesized and tested, revealing the basic structural requirements for monocyte activation. We showed that multivalent character and phosphonic acid capping of dendrimers are crucial for monocyte targeting and activation. Confocal videomicroscopy showed that a fluorescein-tagged dendrimer binds to isolated monocytes and gets internalized within a few seconds. We also found that dendrimers follow the phagolysosomial route during internalization by monocytes. Finally, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments between a specifically designed fluorescent dendrimer and phycoerythrin-coupled antibodies. We showed that the typical innate Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 is clearly involved, but not alone, in the sensing of dendrimers by monocytes. In conclusion, phosphorus-containing dendrimers appear as precisely tunable nanobiotools able to target and activate human innate immunity and thus prove to be good candidates to develop new drugs for immunotherapies.

  1. Monocyte Subsets in Schistosomiasis Patients with Periportal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamille Souza Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major issue with Schistosoma mansoni infection is the development of periportal fibrosis, which is predominantly caused by the host immune response to egg antigens. Experimental studies have pointed to the participation of monocytes in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was to characterize the subsets of monocytes in individuals with different degrees of periportal fibrosis secondary to schistosomiasis. Monocytes were classified into classical (CD14++CD16−, intermediate (CD14++CD16+, and nonclassical (CD14+CD16++. The expressions of monocyte markers and cytokines were assessed using flow cytometry. The frequency of classical monocytes was higher than the other subsets. The expression of HLA-DR, IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β was higher in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis as compared to other groups. Although no differences were observed in receptors expression (IL-4R and IL-10R between groups of patients, the expression of IL-12 was lower in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis, suggesting a protective role of this cytokine in the development of fibrosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the three different monocyte populations participate in the immunopathogenesis of periportal fibrosis, since they express high levels of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines and low levels of regulatory markers.

  2. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijff, EM; Ruwhof, C; de Wit, HJ; Kupka, RW; Vonk, R; Akkerhuis, GW; Nolen, WA; Drexhage, HA

    2006-01-01

    Background: Dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of the immune system, which is compromised in patients with bipolar disorder. We sought to study monocyte-derived DC in bipolar disorder. Methods: Monocytes purified from blood collected from DSM-IV bipolar disorder outpatients (n = 53, 12 without

  3. Granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis ameliorates sepsis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuai; Xu, Qingqing; Deng, Bo; Zheng, Yin; Tian, Hongyan; Wang, Li; Ding, Feng

    2017-12-01

    Overwhelming activation of granulocytes and monocytes is central to inflammatory responses during sepsis. Granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis (GMA) is an extracorporeal leukocyte apheresis device filled with cellulose acetate beads and selectively adsorbs granulocytes and monocytes from the peripheral blood. In this study, septic rats received the GMA treatment for 2 h at 18 h after cecal ligation and puncture. GMA selectively adsorbed activated neutrophils and monocytes from the peripheral blood, reduced serum inflammatory cytokine expression, and seemed to improve organ injuries and animal survival. GMA potentially reduced lung injury by alleviating the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of cytokines. This study showed that selective granulocyte and monocyte adsorption with cellulose acetate beads might ameliorate cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis and improve survival and organ function.

  4. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  5. Increased muscle blood supply and transendothelial nutrient and insulin transport induced by food intake and exercise: effect of obesity and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenmakers, Anton J M; Strauss, Juliette A; Shepherd, Sam O; Keske, Michelle A; Cocks, Matthew

    2016-04-15

    This review concludes that a sedentary lifestyle, obesity and ageing impair the vasodilator response of the muscle microvasculature to insulin, exercise and VEGF-A and reduce microvascular density. Both impairments contribute to the development of insulin resistance, obesity and chronic age-related diseases. A physically active lifestyle keeps both the vasodilator response and microvascular density high. Intravital microscopy has shown that microvascular units (MVUs) are the smallest functional elements to adjust blood flow in response to physiological signals and metabolic demands on muscle fibres. The luminal diameter of a common terminal arteriole (TA) controls blood flow through up to 20 capillaries belonging to a single MVU. Increases in plasma insulin and exercise/muscle contraction lead to recruitment of additional MVUs. Insulin also increases arteriolar vasomotion. Both mechanisms increase the endothelial surface area and therefore transendothelial transport of glucose, fatty acids (FAs) and insulin by specific transporters, present in high concentrations in the capillary endothelium. Future studies should quantify transporter concentration differences between healthy and at risk populations as they may limit nutrient supply and oxidation in muscle and impair glucose and lipid homeostasis. An important recent discovery is that VEGF-B produced by skeletal muscle controls the expression of FA transporter proteins in the capillary endothelium and thus links endothelial FA uptake to the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle, potentially preventing lipotoxic FA accumulation, the dominant cause of insulin resistance in muscle fibres.

  6. Circulating monocytes and B-lymphocytes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector SM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sven Magnus Hector,1 Torben Lykke Sørensen1,2 1Clinical Eye Research Unit, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, 2Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Background: Individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD have altered number and distribution of retinal macrophages and show changes in circulating antibodies. We wanted to investigate the corresponding precursors, with subpopulations. We therefore measured monocyte and B-lymphocyte populations in individuals with neovascular AMD.Design: This was an observational case–control study.Participants or samples: A total of 31 individuals with neovascular AMD and 30 healthy age-matched controls were included.Methods: Patients and controls were interviewed, and ophthalmological examination included visual acuity assessment using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS chart, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, slit-lamp examination and fundus photography. Moreover, venous blood was drawn and prepared for flow cytometry. Cells were gated and measured for surface markers.Main outcome measures: Relative amounts of monocytes and B-lymphocytes with subsets, as well as selected surface markers, were measured.Results: The two groups did not significantly differ in age, smoking history, body mass index, physical activity or C-reactive protein (CRP. Total monocytes (percentage of all leukocytes were lower in the neovascular AMD group (median 5.5% compared with the level in the control group (6.5%; P-value: 0.028. The percentage of intermediate monocytes positive for cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b was lower for AMD patients (99.4% compared with 100% for the control group (P-value: 0.032.Conclusion: We observed lower numbers of monocytes, which show a potentially impaired ability to migrate across the endothelial wall in patients with neovascular AMD. These subtle changes could potentially lead to an

  7. KR-31543 reduces the production of proinflammatory molecules in human endothelial cells and monocytes and attenuates atherosclerosis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Ji-Young; Kim, Sun-Ok; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2012-12-31

    KR-31543, (2S, 3R, 4S)-6-amino-4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl)- N-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-ylmethyl) amino]-3,4-dihydro- 2-dimethyoxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1-benz opyran is a new neuroprotective agent for ischemiareperfusion damage. It has also been reported that KR-31543 has protective effects on lipid peroxidation and H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species production. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties of KR-31543. We observed that KR-31543 treatment reduced the production of MCP-1, IL-8, and VCAM-1 in HUVECs, and of MCP-1 and IL-6 in THP-1 human monocytes. We also examined the effect of KR-31543 on monocytes migration in vitro. KR-31543 treatment effectively reduced the migration of THP-1 human monocytes to the HUVEC monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. We next examined the effects of this compound on atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr ⁻/⁻) mice. After 10 weeks of western diet, the formation of atherosclerotic lesion in aorta was reduced in the KR-31543-treated group compared to the control group. The accumulation of macrophages in lesion was also reduced in KR-31543 treated group. However, the plasma levels of total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride were not affected by KR-31543 treatment. Taken together, these results show that KR-31543 has anti-inflammatory properties on human monocytes and endothelial cells, and inhibits fatty streak lesion formation in mouse model of atherosclerosis, suggesting the potential of KR-31543 for the treatment for atherosclerosis.

  8. 25(OH) vitamin D suppresses macrophage adhesion and migration by downregulation of ER stress and scavenger receptor A1 in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, Amy E; Oh, Jisu; Darwech, Isra; Moynihan, Clare E; Bruchas, Robin R; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Vitamin D deficiency is not only more prevalent in diabetics but also doubles the risk of developing CVD. However, it is unknown whether 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D3] replacement slows monocyte adhesion and migration, critical mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis progression. In this study, monocytes from vitamin D-deficient diabetic patients were cultured either in the patient's serum or in vitamin D-deficient media with or without 25(OH)D3 treatment. Adding 25(OH)D3 to monocytes cultured in vitamin D-deficient serum or media decreased monocyte adhesion to fibronectin and migration stimulated by monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). Accordingly, 25(OH)D3 decreased adhesion marker β1- and β2-integrin expression and migration receptor chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. 25(OH)D3 treatment downregulated monocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and scavenger receptor class A, type 1 (SR-A1) expression. The absence of SR-A1 prevented the increased macrophage adhesion and migration induced by vitamin D deficiency. Moreover, the absence of SR-A1 prevented the induction of adhesion and migration and expression of their associated membrane receptors by Thapsigargin, an ER stress inducer. These results identify cellular activation of monocyte/macrophage vitamin D signaling through 25(OH)D3 as a potential mechanism that could modulate adhesion and migration in diabetic subjects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Induction of reactive oxygen intermediates in human monocytes by tumour cells and their role in spontaneous monocyte cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytar, B; Siedlar, M; Woloszyn, M; Ruggiero, I; Pryjma, J; Zembala, M

    1999-01-01

    The present study examined the ability of human monocytes to produce reactive oxygen intermediates after a contact with tumour cells. Monocytes generated oxygen radicals, as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence and superoxide anion production, after stimulation with the tumour, but not with untransformed, cells. The use of specific oxygen radical scavengers and inhibitors, superoxide dismutase, catalase, dimethyl sulphoxide and deferoxamine as well as the myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, indicated that chemiluminescence was dependent on the production of superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical and the presence of myeloperoxidase. The tumour cell-induced chemiluminescent response of monocytes showed different kinetics from that seen after activation of monocytes with phorbol ester. These results indicate that human monocytes can be directly stimulated by tumour cells for reactive oxygen intermediate production. Spontaneous monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity towards cancer cells was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, deferoxamine and hydrazide, implicating the role of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical and hypohalite. We wish to suggest that so-called ‘spontaneous’ tumoricidal capacity of freshly isolated human monocytes may in fact be an inducible event associated with generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and perhaps other toxic mediators, resulting from a contact of monocytes with tumour cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070862

  10. Interleukin-17 (IL-17 Expression Is Reduced during Acute Myocardial Infarction: Role on Chemokine Receptor Expression in Monocytes and Their in Vitro Chemotaxis towards Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guro Valen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The roles of immune cells and their soluble products during myocardial infarction (MI are not completely understood. Here, we observed that the percentages of IL-17, but not IL-22, producing cells are reduced in mice splenocytes after developing MI. To correlate this finding with the functional activity of IL-17, we sought to determine its effect on monocytes. In particular, we presumed that this cytokine might affect the chemotaxis of monocytes important for cardiac inflammation and remodeling. We observed that IL-17 tends to reduce the expression of two major chemokine receptors involved in monocyte chemotaxis, namely CCR2 and CXCR4. Further analysis showed that monocytes pretreated with IL-17 have reduced in vitro chemotaxis towards the ligand for CCR2, i.e., MCP-1/CCL2, and the ligand for CXCR4, i.e., SDF-1α/CXCL12. Our results support the possibility that IL-17 may be beneficial in MI, and this could be due to its ability to inhibit the migration of monocytes.

  11. Governing Global Migration

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the global regulative function of migration politics. Its main aim is to rethink migration politics through an engagement with the Foucauldian governmentality perspective, which focuses on the relation between government and thought. A secondary aim is to use this perspective to explore the global description of migration and migration politics which is emerging with the currently evolving global governance of migration. Doing so, it wishes to contribute both to the study ...

  12. Fertility, Migration, and Altruism

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Consider migration to a higher income region as a human capital investment in which parents bear migration costs and children share returns. Migrants from a population with heterogeneous intergenerational discount rates will be self-selected on intergenerational altruism. Thus, immigrants may be self-selected on fertility. Soviet Jews who migrate to Israel despite high migration costs have significantly more children than members of the same birth cohort who migrate later when costs are low. ...

  13. Filaria-induced monocyte dysfunction and its reversal following treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Keiser, Paul B; Coulibaly, Yaya I; Keita, Falaye; Diallo, Abdallah A; Traore, Diakaridia; Diallo, Dapa A; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Traore, Sekou F; Kubofcik, Joseph; Klion, Amy D; Nutman, Thomas B

    2006-08-01

    Monocyte dysfunction in filarial infection has been proposed as one mechanism underlying the diminished antigen-specific T-cell response seen in patent lymphatic filariasis. Cytokine/chemokine production and gene expression in monocytes from filaria-infected patients and uninfected healthy donors were assessed unstimulated and in response to stimulation with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I bacteria plus gamma interferon both before and 8 months following treatment. Monocytes from filaria-infected individuals were studded with intracellular microfilarial antigens. Furthermore, monocytes from these individuals were less capable of producing interleukin-8 (IL-8), Exodus II, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and IL-1alpha and preferentially expressed genes involved in apoptosis and adhesion compared with monocytes from uninfected donors. Eight months following treatment with a single dose of ivermectin-albendazole, some of these defects were reversed, with monocyte production of IL-8, IL-1alpha, MIP-1alpha, and IL-10 being comparable to that seen in the uninfected controls. In addition, a marked increase in mRNA expression of genes associated with protein metabolism, particularly heat shock proteins, was seen compared with pretreatment expression. These data suggest that the function and gene expression of monocytes in filaria-infected patients are altered but that this dysfunction is partially reversible following antifilarial treatment.

  14. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  15. Altered signaling in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaubas, Claudia; Wong, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yujuan; Nguyen, Khoa D; Lee, Justin; Milojevic, Diana; Shenoi, Susan; Stevens, Anne M; Ilowite, Norman; Saper, Vivian; Lee, Tzielan; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2016-02-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is characterized by systemic inflammation and arthritis. Monocytes are implicated in sJIA pathogenesis, but their role in disease is unclear. The response of sJIA monocytes to IFN may be dysregulated. We examined intracellular signaling in response to IFN type I (IFNα) and type II (IFNγ) in monocytes during sJIA activity and quiescence, in 2 patient groups. Independent of disease activity, monocytes from Group 1 (collected between 2002 and 2009) showed defective STAT1 phosphorylation downstream of IFNs, and expressed higher transcript levels of SOCS1, an inhibitor of IFN signaling. In the Group 2 (collected between 2011 and 2014), monocytes of patients with recent disease onset were IFNγ hyporesponsive, but in treated, quiescent subjects, monocytes were hyperresponsive to IFNγ. Recent changes in medication in sJIA may alter the IFN hyporesponsiveness. Impaired IFN/pSTAT1 signaling is consistent with skewing of sJIA monocytes away from an M1 phenotype and may contribute to disease pathology.

  16. Vascular Leakage in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Is Associated with Dengue Infected Monocytes, Monocyte Activation/Exhaustion, and Cytokines Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirichan Chunhakan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vascular leakage was shown by the increment of hematocrit (Hct, dengue viral infected monocyte, monocyte status, and cytokines production in patients infected with dengue virus. Dengue viral antigens were demonstrated in monocytes (CD14+ from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The increased levels of Hct, interleukin- (IL- 10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α were detected in dengue fever (DF, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS patients as compared with other febrile illnesses (OFIs. The highest levels of Hct and IL-10 were detected in DSS patients as compared with other groups (P<0.05 especially on one day before and after defervescence. The unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated monocytes from DSS patients showed the significantly decreased of intracellular IL-1β and TNF-α. In addition, the lowest level of mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of CD11b expression on monocytes surface in DSS patients was also demonstrated. Furthermore, the negative correlations between IL-10 levels and intracellular IL-1β and MFI of CD11b expression in unstimulated and LPS-stimulated monocytes were also detected. Nevertheless, not only were the relationships between the prominent IL-10 and the suppression of intracellular monocyte secretion, namely, IL-1β, TNF-α, demonstrated but also the effect of vascular leakage was observed.

  17. HIV-1-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages are impaired in their ability to produce superoxide radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, A L; Groveman, D S; Wallace, P K; Fanger, M W

    1997-01-01

    Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in immune defense against pathogenic organisms. Superoxide anion production is a key mechanism by which phagocytes kill pathogens. We sought to determine whether human immunodeficiency virus-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages are compromised in their ability to produce the superoxide anion following stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or after cross-linking the type I Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI). Fc gamma RI was cross-linked by the binding of monoclonal antibody 197, which reacts with an epitope of Fc gamma RI via its Fc region. Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages obtained from seronegative donors were infected in vitro with human immunodeficiency virus-1JR-FL and used in effector assays that measured superoxide anion production by the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium. Reduced nitroblue tetrazolium was measured spectrophotometrically and by microscopy in which the percentage of cells containing intracellular deposits of the dye was assessed. By spectrophotometric measurement, we found that human immunodeficiency virus-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages produced less superoxide anion following either phorbol myristate acetate stimulation or Fc gamma RI cross-linking than uninfected cells from the same donor. Using microscopy we saw no difference in the percentage of infected and uninfected macrophages containing intracellular deposits of nitroblue tetrazolium suggesting that human immunodeficiency virus-infected macrophages produce less superoxide anion on a per cell basis than uninfected macrophages. Activation of human immunodeficiency virus-infected monocytes with interferon-gamma for 72 h prior to stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate or monoclonal antibody 197 increased their ability to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium. These findings suggest that impairment in the production of reactive oxygen intermediates may, in some cases, contribute to

  18. Return migration to Italy and labour migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, C

    1983-01-01

    The problems caused by large-scale return migration to Italy in recent years are considered. The importance of the additional skills and capital acquired by these migrants while abroad is stressed. Extensive data on the volume of return migration in the 1970s are included.

  19. Monocyte chemiluminescence and macrophage precursors in the aged.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi,Isao

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-related alterations in the host defense system have been vigorously investigated because of increased susceptibility to infection and neoplasms in the aged. Although monocyte-macrophages form a major part of the cellular defense against microorganisms, the majority of investigations has been limited to neutrophils and lymphocytes. The present study, designed to determine the influence of age on mononuclear phagocytes, revealed no significant decrease in the absolute number of blood monocytes, but did reveal a tendency for the chemiluminescence of blood monocytes to decrease (p less than 0.10 and a significant decrease in the numbers of macrophage precursors (p less than 0.05 in the aged (over 70 year old, in comparison with controls (under 40 years old. On the basis of these findings, functional alterations of monocyte-macrophages seem to participate in the increased susceptibility to infection in the aged.

  20. Two-way communication between endometrial stromal cells and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkova, Olga; Hansen, Keith A; Winterton, Emily; Mark, Connie J; Eyster, Kathleen M

    2010-02-01

    Immune system cells and cells of the endometrium have long been proposed to interact in both physiological and pathological processes. The current study was undertaken to examine communication between cultured monocytes and endometrial stromal cells and also to assess responses of endometrial stromal cells for treatment with estradiol (E) in the absence and presence of medroxyprogesterone acetate (P). A telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cell (T-HESC) line and the U937 monocyte cell line were used. Telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cells were treated with E +/- P +/- monocyte conditioned medium; U937 were treated +/- T-HESC conditioned medium. Gene expression in response to treatment was examined by DNA microarray. Bidirectional communication, as demonstrated by changes in gene expression, clearly occurred between U937 monocytes and T-HESC.

  1. Monocyte and Macrophage Plasticity in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amitava; Sinha, Mithun; Datta, Soma; Abas, Motaz; Chaffee, Scott; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and high versatility are the characteristic features of the cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The mononuclear phagocyte system, derived from the bone marrow progenitor cells, is primarily composed of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In regenerative tissues, a central role of monocyte-derived macrophages and paracrine factors secreted by these cells is indisputable. Macrophages are highly plastic cells. On the basis of environmental cues and molecular mediators, these cells differentiate to proinflammatory type I macrophage (M1) or anti-inflammatory or proreparative type II macrophage (M2) phenotypes and transdifferentiate into other cell types. Given a central role in tissue repair and regeneration, the review focuses on the heterogeneity of monocytes and macrophages with current known mechanisms of differentiation and plasticity, including microenvironmental cues and molecular mediators, such as noncoding RNAs. PMID:26118749

  2. Rap GTPase-mediated adhesion and migration: A target for limiting the dissemination of B-cell lymphomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Gold, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas, which arise in lymphoid organs, can spread rapidly via the circulatory system and form solid tumors within multiple organs. Rate-limiting steps in this metastatic process may be the adhesion of lymphoma cells to vascular endothelial cells, their exit from the vasculature and their migration to tissue sites that will support tumor growth. Thus proteins that control B cell adhesion and migration are likely to be key factors in lymphoma dissemination, and hence potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The Rap GTPases are master regulators of integrin activation, cell motility and the underlying cytoskeletal, adhesion and membrane dynamics. We have recently shown that Rap activation is critical for B-lymphoma cells to undergo transendothelial migration in vitro and in vivo. As a consequence, suppressing Rap activation impairs the ability of intravenously injected B-lymphoma cells to form solid tumors in the liver and other organs. We discuss this work in the context of targeting Rap, its downstream effectors, or other regulators of B cell adhesion and migration as an approach for limiting the dissemination of B-lymphoma cells and the development of secondary tumors.

  3. Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin R Toapanta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi was recently developed. In this model, ingestion of 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of subjects developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD- 5-10 days post-challenge. TD criteria included meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12 h and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia endpoints. One of the first lines of defense against pathogens are the cells of the innate immune system (e.g., monocytes, dendritic cells -DCs-. Various changes in circulating monocytes and DCs have been described in the murine S. Typhimurium model; however, whether similar changes are present in humans remains to be explored. To address these questions, a subset of volunteers (5 TD and 3 who did not develop typhoid despite oral challenge -NoTD- were evaluated for changes in circulating monocytes and DCs. Expression of CD38 and CD40 were upregulated in monocytes and DCs in TD volunteers during the disease days (TD-0h to TD-96h. Moreover, integrin α4β7, a gut homing molecule, was upregulated on monocytes but not DCs. CD21 upregulation was only identified in DCs. These changes were not observed among NoTD volunteers despite the same oral challenge. Moreover, monocytes and DCs from NoTD volunteers showed increased binding to S. Typhi one day after challenge. These monocytes showed phosphorylation of p38MAPK, NFkB and Erk1/2 upon stimulation with S. Typhi-LPS-QDot micelles. In contrast, monocytes from TD volunteers showed only a moderate increase in S. Typhi binding 48 h and 96 h post-TD, and only Erk1/2 phosphorylation. This is the first study to describe different activation and migration profiles, as well as differential signaling patterns, in monocytes and DCs which relate directly to the clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild type S. Typhi.

  4. Cell culture plastics with immobilized interleukin-4 for monocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Met, Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    at similar concentrations to the passive adsorption process, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the bound IL-4 did not leak into solution to any measurable extent during cell culture. However, covalently bound IL-4 was incapable of inducing monocyte differentiation. This may be caused...... by IL-4 denaturation or improper epitope presentation induced by the immobilization process, or by biological irresponsiveness of monocytes to IL-4 in immobilized formats....

  5. Monocytes regulate systemic coagulation and inflammation in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhi; Braun, Oscar Ö; Zhang, Su; Norström, Eva; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal sepsis is associated with significant changes in systemic inflammation and coagulation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of peripheral blood monocytes for systemic coagulation, including thrombin generation and consumption of coagulation factors. Abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in C57BL/6 mice. Plasma and lung levels of IL-6 and C-X-C motif (CXC) chemokines [chemokine CXC ligand (CXCL)1, CXCL2, and CXCL5], pulmonary activity of myeloperoxidase, thrombin generation, and coagulation factors were determined 6 h after CLP induction. Administration of clodronate liposomes decreased circulating levels of monocytes by 96%. Time to peak thrombin formation was increased and peak and total thrombin generation was decreased in plasma from CLP animals. Monocyte depletion decreased time to peak formation of thrombin and increased peak and total generation of thrombin in septic animals. In addition, monocyte depletion decreased the CLP-induced increase in the levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes in plasma. Depletion of monocytes increased plasma levels of prothrombin, factor V, factor X, and protein C in septic mice. Moreover, depletion of monocytes decreased CLP-induced levels of IL-6 and CXC chemokines in the plasma and lung by >59% and 20%, respectively. CLP-induced myeloperoxidase activity in the lung was attenuated by 44% in animals depleted of monocytes. Taken together, our findings show, for the first time, that peripheral blood monocytes regulate systemic coagulation. The results of our study improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis and encourage further attempts to target innate immune cell functions in abdominal sepsis.

  6. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nicola, Milena, E-mail: milena.de.nicola@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy); Mirabile Gattia, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.mirabile@enea.it [UTTMAT, ENEA-C.R. Casaccia (Italy); Traversa, Enrico, E-mail: Enrico.Traversa@kaust.edu.sa [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Division of Physical Science and Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Ghibelli, Lina, E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 {mu}m) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  7. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  8. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    De Nicola, Milena D.

    2013-05-17

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  9. Malaysia and forced migration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of "forced migration" in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants...

  10. A novel approach for the generation of human dendritic cells from blood monocytes in the absence of exogenous factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanen, Brian C; Drake, Donald R

    2008-06-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) for research and clinical applications are typically derived from purified blood monocytes that are cultured in a cocktail of cytokines for a week or more. Because it has been suggested that these cytokine-derived DCs may be deficient in some important immunological functions and might not accurately represent antigen presenting cell (APC) populations found under normal conditions in vivo, there is an interest in developing methods that permit the derivation of DCs in a more physiologically relevant manner in vitro. Here, we describe a simple and reliable technique for generating large numbers of highly purified DCs that is based on a one-way migration of blood monocytes through a layer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that are cultured to confluency in the upper chamber of a Transwell device. The resultant APCs, harvested from the lower Transwell chamber, resemble other cultured DC populations in their expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) and costimulatory molecules, ability to phagocytose protein antigens and capacity to trigger primary antigen-specific T cell responses. This technique offers several advantages over the standard method of in vitro cytokine-driven DC development, including: (1) the rapidity of this approach, as DC differentiation occurs in only 2 days, (2) the differentiation process itself, which is more akin to the development of DCs under physiologic conditions and (3) the cost-effectiveness of the system, since no monocyte pre-selection is required and DC development occurs in the absence of expensive recombinant cytokines.

  11. Population, migration and urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    Despite recent estimates that natural increase is becoming a more important component of urban growth than rural urban transfer (excess of inmigrants over outmigrants), the share of migration in the total population growth has been consistently increasing in both developed and developing countries. From a demographic perspective, the migration process involves 3 elements: an area of origin which the mover leaves and where he or she is considered an outmigrant; the destination or place of inmigration; and the period over which migration is measured. The 2 basic types of migration are internal and international. Internal migration consists of rural to urban migration, urban to urban migration, rural to rural migration, and urban to rural migration. Among these 4 types of migration various patterns or processes are followed. Migration may be direct when the migrant moves directly from the village to the city and stays there permanently. It can be circular migration, meaning that the migrant moves to the city when it is not planting season and returns to the village when he is needed on the farm. In stage migration the migrant makes a series of moves, each to a city closer to the largest or fastest growing city. Temporary migration may be 1 time or cyclical. The most dominant pattern of internal migration is rural urban. The contribution of migration to urbanization is evident. For example, the rapid urbanization and increase in urban growth from 1960-70 in the Republic of Korea can be attributed to net migration. In Asia the largest component of the population movement consists of individuals and groups moving from 1 rural location to another. Recently, because urban centers could no longer absorb the growing number of migrants from other places, there has been increased interest in the urban to rural population redistribution. This reverse migration also has come about due to slower rates of employment growth in the urban centers and improved economic opportunities

  12. Derivation of multipotent progenitors from human circulating CD14+ monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Noriyuki; Kuwana, Masataka

    2010-07-01

    Circulating CD14(+) monocytes are originated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and believed to be committed precursors for phagocytes, such as macrophages. Recently, we have reported a primitive cell population termed monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs), which has a fibroblast-like morphology in culture and a unique phenotype positive for CD14, CD45, CD34, and type I collagen. MOMCs are derived from circulating CD14(+) monocytes, but circulating precursors for MOMCs still remain undetermined. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of MOMCs and other monocyte-derived cells has revealed that embryonic stem cell markers, Nanog and Oct-4, are specifically expressed by MOMCs. In vitro generation of MOMCs requires binding to fibronectin and exposure to soluble factors derived from activated platelets. MOMCs contain progenitors with capacity to differentiate into a variety of nonphagocytes, including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal and cardiac muscle, neuron, and endothelium, indicating that circulating monocytes are more multipotent than previously thought. In addition, MOMCs are capable of promoting ex vivo expansion of human hematopoietic progenitor cells through direct cell-to-cell contact and secretion of a variety of hematopoietic growth factors. These findings obtained from the research on MOMCs indicate that CD14(+) monocytes in circulation are involved in a variety of physiologic functions other than innate and acquired immune responses, such as repair and regeneration of the damaged tissue.

  13. Migration and Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  14. More Myths of Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Linda; Lerner, Gail

    1986-01-01

    Challenges "myths" about women and migration, including (1) the causes of migration are economic, not racism; (2) migrant women receive support from feminist groups and trade unions; (3) transnational corporations are positive forces in developing nations; (4) migration today has little impact on family life; and (5) most migrants cluster in…

  15. Migration and Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Søren

    We live in an age of migration and more and more authors have migrant backgrounds. Migration and Literature offers a thorough and thought provoking examination of the thematic and formal role of migration in four contemporary and canonized novelists, Günter Grass, Milan Kundera, Salman Rushdie...

  16. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchai, Darawan; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp.

  17. FastDC derived from human monocytes within 48 h effectively prime tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Schad, Katharina; Herten, Jan; Junkmann, Jana; Bauer, Christian; Kiefl, Rosemarie; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2005-07-01

    Previously, we have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) with full T-cell stimulatory capacity can be derived from human monocytes after 48 h of in vitro culture (FastDC). Compared to a standard 7-day protocol, this new strategy not only reduces the time span and the amount of recombinant cytokines required, but may also resemble DC development in vivo more closely. Using a melanoma antigen model, we show here that FastDC prime CTL responses against tumor antigens as effectively as standard monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). FastDC and moDCs derived from monocytes of HLA-A2(+) donors were loaded with the melanoma-associated, HLA-A(*)0201-restricted peptide Melan-A and cocultured with autologous CD3(+) T cells. After two weekly restimulations with freshly prepared, peptide-loaded FastDC or moDCs, binding of CD8(+) T cells to fluorescently labeled MHC-I/Melan-A-peptide complexes and intracellular cytokine staining revealed that the two DC preparations had an equal capacity to prime Melan-A-specific, IFN-gamma producing CD8(+) T cells. CTLs derived from cocultures with FastDC lysed Melan-A-loaded T2 cells even more effectively than CTLs primed by moDCs. Comparative analysis also revealed that FastDC possess an equal capacity to migrate in response to the chemokine receptor CCR-7 ligand 6Ckine. Importantly, DCs can be generated with higher yield and purity using the FastDC-protocol. The reliability and efficacy of this new strategy for DC development from monocytes may facilitate clinical investigation of DC-based tumor immunotherapy.

  18. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  19. Endogenous epoxygenases are modulators of monocyte/macrophage activity.

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    Jonas Bystrom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arachidonic acid is metabolized through three major metabolic pathways, the cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and CYP450 enzyme systems. Unlike cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases, the role of CYP450 epoxygenases in monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses is not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When transfected in vitro, CYP2J2 is an efficient activator of anti-inflammatory pathways through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR α. Human monocytes and macrophages contain PPARα and here we show they express the epoxygenases CYP2J2 and CYP2C8. Inhibition of constitutive monocyte epoxygenases using the epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A induces cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression and activity, and the release of TNFα, and can be reversed by either add back of the endogenous epoxygenase products and PPARα ligand 11,12- epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET or the addition of the selective synthetic PPARα ligand GW7647. In alternatively activated (IL-4-treated monocytes, in contrast to classically activated cells, epoxygenase inhibition decreased TNFα release. Epoxygenases can be pro-inflammatory via superoxide anion production. The suppression of TNFα by SKF525A in the presence of IL-4 was associated with a reduction in superoxide anion generation and reproduced by the superoxide dismutase MnCl(2. Similar to these acute activation studies, in monocyte derived macrophages, epoxygenase inhibition elevates M1 macrophage TNFα mRNA and further decreases M2 macrophage TNFα. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, epoxygenase activity represents an important endogenous pathway which limits monocyte activation. Moreover endogenous epoxygenases are immuno-modulators regulating monocyte/macrophage activation depending on the underlying activation state.

  20. STAT3 activation in monocytes accelerates liver cancer progression

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    Wu Wen-Yong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is an important transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in different cell types. STAT3 plays an essential role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Aberrantly hyper-activated STAT3 signaling in cancer cells and in the tumor microenvironment has been detected in a wide variety of human cancers and is considered an important factor for cancer initiation, development, and progression. However, the role of STAT3 activation in monocytes in the development of HCC has not been well understood. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated STAT3 was performed on tissue microarray from HCC patients. Using a co-culture system in vivo, HCC cell growth was determined by the MTT assay. In vivo experiments were conducted with mice given diethylinitrosamine (DEN, which induces HCC was used to investigate the role of STAT3 expression in monocytes on tumor growth. Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression of cell proliferation and cell arrest associated genes in the tumor and nontumor tissue from liver. Results Phosphorylated STAT3 was found in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue samples and was expressed in tumor cells and also in monocytes. Phosphorylated STAT3 expression in monocyte was significantly correlated to advanced clinical stage of HCC and a poor prognosis. Using a co-culture system in vivo, monocytes promoted HCC cell growth via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. The STAT3 inhibitor, NSC 74859, significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo in mice with diethylinitrosamine (DEN-induced HCC. In this animal model, blockade of STAT3 with NSC 74859 induced tumor cell apoptosis, while inhibiting both tumor cells and monocytes proliferation. Furthermore, NSC 74859 treatment suppressed cancer associated inflammation in DEN-induce HCC. Conclusion Our data suggest constitutively activated STAT3 monocytes promote liver tumorigenesis in clinical

  1. Deficiency for the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 aggravates tubular damage after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

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    Ingrid Stroo

    Full Text Available Temporal expression of chemokines is a crucial factor in the regulation of renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and repair. Beside their role in the migration and activation of inflammatory cells to sites of injury, chemokines are also involved in other processes such as angiogenesis, development and migration of stem cells. In the present study we investigated the role of the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 or CCL2, the main chemoattractant for monocytes, during renal I/R injury. MCP-1 expression peaks several days after inducing renal I/R injury coinciding with macrophage accumulation. However, MCP-1 deficient mice had a significant decreased survival and increased renal damage within the first two days, i.e. the acute inflammatory response, after renal I/R injury with no evidence of altered macrophage accumulation. Kidneys and primary tubular epithelial cells from MCP-1 deficient mice showed increased apoptosis after ischemia. Taken together, MCP-1 protects the kidney during the acute inflammatory response following renal I/R injury.

  2. Deficiency for the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 aggravates tubular damage after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroo, Ingrid; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J D; Butter, Loes M; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2015-01-01

    Temporal expression of chemokines is a crucial factor in the regulation of renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and repair. Beside their role in the migration and activation of inflammatory cells to sites of injury, chemokines are also involved in other processes such as angiogenesis, development and migration of stem cells. In the present study we investigated the role of the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 or CCL2), the main chemoattractant for monocytes, during renal I/R injury. MCP-1 expression peaks several days after inducing renal I/R injury coinciding with macrophage accumulation. However, MCP-1 deficient mice had a significant decreased survival and increased renal damage within the first two days, i.e. the acute inflammatory response, after renal I/R injury with no evidence of altered macrophage accumulation. Kidneys and primary tubular epithelial cells from MCP-1 deficient mice showed increased apoptosis after ischemia. Taken together, MCP-1 protects the kidney during the acute inflammatory response following renal I/R injury.

  3. IFN-alpha promotes definitive maturation of dendritic cells generated by short-term culture of monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Schad, Katharina; Junkmann, Jana; Bauer, Christian; Herten, Jan; Kiefl, Rosemarie; Schnurr, Max; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2006-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) generated in vitro have to be viable and phenotypically mature to be capable of inducing T cell-mediated immunity after in vivo administration. To facilitate optimization of DC-based vaccination protocols, we investigated whether the cytokine environment and the mode of activation affect maturation and survival of DC derived from monocytes by a short-term protocol. Monocytes cultured for 24 h with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4 were stimulated with proinflammatory mediators for another 36 h to generate mature DC. Additional activation with CD40 ligand and interferon (IFN)-gamma increased viability of DC and promoted definitive maturation as defined by maintenance of a mature phenotype after withdrawal of cytokines. Addition of IFN-alpha to DC cultures prior to stimulation further enhanced definitive maturation: IFN-alpha-primed DC expressed high levels of costimulatory molecules and CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) up to 5 days after cytokine withdrawal. Compared with unprimed DC, IFN-alpha-primed DC displayed equal capacity to migrate upon CCR7 ligation and to prime antigen-specific T helper cell as well as cytolytic T cell responses. In conclusion, we show that optimal maturation and survival of monocyte-derived DC require multiple activation signals. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for IFN-alpha in DC development: IFN-alpha priming of monocytes promotes definitive maturation of DC upon activation.

  4. Characterization of a Plasmodium falciparum macrophage-migration inhibitory factor homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordery, Damien V; Kishore, Uday; Kyes, Sue; Shafi, Mohammed J; Watkins, Katherine R; Williams, Thomas N; Marsh, Kevin; Urban, Britta C

    2007-03-15

    Macrophage-migration inhibitory factor (MIF), one of the first cytokines described, has a broad range of proinflammatory properties. The genome sequencing project of Plasmodium falciparum identified a parasite homologue of MIF. The protein is expressed during the asexual blood stages of the parasite life cycle that cause malarial disease. The identification of a parasite homologue of MIF raised the question of whether it affects monocyte function in a manner similar to its human counterpart. Recombinant P. falciparum MIF (PfMIF) was generated and used in vitro to assess its influence on monocyte function. Antibodies generated against PfMIF were used to determine the expression profile and localization of the protein in blood-stage parasites. Antibody responses to PfMIF were determined in Kenyan children with acute malaria and in control subjects. PfMIF protein was expressed in asexual blood-stage parasites, localized to the Maurer's cleft. In vitro treatment of monocytes with PfMIF inhibited random migration and reduced the surface expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and CD86. These results indicate that PfMIF is released during blood-stage malaria and potentially modulates the function of monocytes during acute P. falciparum infection.

  5. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar J Evani

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation.

  6. Immunomodulation of human monocytes following exposure to Lutzomyia intermedia saliva

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    Barral Aldina

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sand fly saliva contains potent and complex pharmacologic molecules that are able to modulate the host's hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune systems. In this study, we evaluated the effects of salivary gland sonicate (SGS of Lutzomyia intermedia, the natural vector of Leishmania braziliensis, on monocytes obtained from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of healthy volunteers. We investigated the effects of sand fly saliva on cytokine production and surface molecule expression of LPS-stimulated human monocytes uninfected or infected with L. braziliensis. Results Pre-treatment of non-infected human monocytes with L. intermedia SGS followed by LPS-stimulation led to a significant decrease in IL-10 production accompanied by a significant increase in CD86, CD80, and HLA-DR expression. Pre-treatment with SGS followed by LPS stimulation and L. braziliensis infection led to a significant increase in TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 production without significant alterations in co-stimulatory molecule expression. However, pre-treatment with L. intermedia SGS did not result in significant changes in the infection rate of human monocytes. Conclusion Our data indicate that L. intermedia saliva is able to modulate monocyte response, and, although this modulation is dissociated from enhanced infection with L. braziliensis, it may be associated with successful parasitism.

  7. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Promotes the Myocardial Homing of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Yunzeng Zou

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is the most common form of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy that leads to heart failure. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are under active investigation currently as a potential therapy for DCM. However, little information is available about the therapeutic potential of intravenous administration of MSCs for DCM. Moreover, how MSCs home to the myocardium in DCM is also unclear. DCM was induced by intraperitoneally administering Doxorubicin and MSCs or vehicles were infused through the internal jugular vein. Cardiac functions including the percentage of fractional shortening, left ventricular diastolic dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and left ventricular maximum dp/dt were evaluated by echocardiographic and hemodynamic studies. Fibrosis was determined by Masson’s trichrome staining. The mRNA expression levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α, and monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3 were determined using real time polymerase chain reactions and the protein expression level of MCP-1 was detected with Western blot. The MSCs expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2, a MCP-1 receptor, was confirmed by Western blot and flow cytometry analysis. The chemotactic effects of MCP-1/CCR2 were checked by assessing the migration in vitro and in vivo. MSCs transplantation improved the cardiac function and decreased the myocardial fibrosis of mice with DCM. MCP-1 was up-regulated in dilated myocardial tissue both at the mRNA and protein level while SDF-1, MIP-1α and MCP-3 remain unchanged. CCR2 was present in MSCs. MCP-1 promoted MSCs migration in vitro while CCR2 inhibition decreased the migration of MCP-1 to the dilated heart. This study provides direct evidences that peripheral intravenous infusion of MSCs can support the functional recovery of DCM. In addition, novel insights into the myocardial homing factor of MSCs

  8. TLR7/9-mediated monocytosis and maturation of Gr-1(hi) inflammatory monocytes towards Gr-1(lo) resting monocytes implicated in murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Baudino, Lucie; Alvarez, Montserrat; van Rooijen, Nico; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Izui, Shozo

    2011-11-01

    Circulating monocytes are divided into two major, phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets: Gr-1(hi) "inflammatory" and Gr-1(lo) "resting" monocytes. One of the unique cellular abnormalities in lupus-prone mice is monocytosis, which is characterized by a selective expansion of Gr-1(lo) monocytes and dependent on the expression of stimulatory IgG Fc receptors (FcγR). We speculated that IgG immune complexes containing nuclear antigens could stimulate Gr-1(hi) monocytes through interaction with FcγRs and then TLR7 and TLR9, thereby promoting the maturation towards Gr-1(lo) monocytes. In the present study, we assessed this hypothesis by analyzing effects of TLR9 or TLR7 agonist on monocytes in vivo. The analysis of various surface markers differentially expressed on both subsets of monocytes in combination with selective depletion of either subset revealed that within 48 h after injection of the TLR9 agonist CpG, approximately one third of Gr-1(hi) monocytes became phenotypically identical to Gr-1(lo) monocytes. In addition, we observed approximately two-fold increases in the total monocyte population 8-24 h after injection of CpG. Moreover, the activation of TLR9 resulted in an increased expression of stimulatory FcγRIV relative to inhibitory FcγRIIB on monocytes, thereby enhancing their responsiveness to IgG immune complexes. Essentially identical results were obtained after stimulation of TLR7 with a synthetic agonist (1V136). Our results indicate that the activation of TLR7 and TLR9 not only induced the maturation of a fraction of Gr-1(hi) monocytes towards Gr-1(lo) monocytes but also promoted the overall generation of monocytes, thereby supporting the critical role of TLR7 and TLR9 for the development of monocytosis in lupus-prone mice.

  9. Many Faces of Migrations

    OpenAIRE

    Milica Antić Gaber; Marko Krevs

    2013-01-01

    Temporary or permanent, local or international, voluntary or forced, legal or illegal, registered or unregistered migrations of individuals, whole communities or individual groups are an important factor in constructing and modifying (modern) societies. The extent of international migrations is truly immense. At the time of the preparation of this publication more than 200 million people have been involved in migrations in a single year according to the United Nations. Furthermore, three time...

  10. Union Dissolution and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Thomas; Mulder, Clara H.; Thomas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While there is a limited body of research regarding residential mobility and migration following union dissolution, there is a particular dearth of studies that go into detail about the factors that shape how union dissolution may result in long-distance migration. OBJECTIVE This research isolates and identifies the processes that influence inter-state migration in the period immediately following the dissolution of a marital union. METHODS Multilevel logit models of the probabilit...

  11. Malaysia and forced migration

    OpenAIRE

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysi...

  12. Pivotal Role for CD16+ Monocytes in Immune Surveillance of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschbisch, Anne; Schröder, Sina; Schraudner, Dana; Sammet, Laura; Weksler, Babette; Melms, Arthur; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Stadelmann, Christine; Schwab, Stefan; Linker, Ralf A

    2016-02-15

    Monocytes represent a heterogeneous population of primary immune effector cells. At least three different subsets can be distinguished based on expression of the low-affinity FcγRIII: CD14(++)CD16 -: classical monocytes, CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes, and CD14(+)CD16 ++: non-classical monocytes. Whereas CD16 -: classical monocytes are considered key players in multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known on CD16(+) monocytes and how they contribute to the disease. In this study, we examined the frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and brain biopsy material derived from MS patients and controls. Furthermore, we addressed a possible monocyte dysfunction in MS and analyzed migratory properties of monocyte subsets using human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Our ex vivo studies demonstrated that CD16(+) monocyte subpopulations are functional but numerically reduced in the peripheral blood of MS patients. CD16(+) monocytes with an intermediate-like phenotype were found to be enriched in CSF and dominated the CSF monocyte population under noninflammatory conditions. In contrast, an inversed CD16(+) to CD16 -: CSF monocyte ratio was observed in MS patients with relapsing-remitting disease. Newly infiltrating, hematogenous CD16(+) monocytes were detected in a perivascular location within active MS lesions, and CD16(+) monocytes facilitated CD4(+) T cell trafficking in a blood -: brain barrier model. Our findings support an important role of CD16(+) monocytes in the steady-state immune surveillance of the CNS and suggest that CD16(+) monocytes shift to sites of inflammation and contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in CNS autoimmune diseases.

  13. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-α concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-κB activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-α signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-κB/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages. PMID:24893991

  14. Circulating monocytes from healthy individuals and COPD patients

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    Piitulainen Eeva

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by incompletely reversible airflow obstruction associated with inflammation in which monocytes/macrophages are the predominant inflammatory cells. The only known genetic factor related to COPD is inherited PiZZ deficiency of α1-antitrypsin (AAT, an inhibitor of serine proteases. Methods We investigated the basal and LPS-stimulated release of pro-inflammatory molecules from blood monocytes isolated from age and gender matched healthy (n = 30 and COPD (n = 20 individuals with and without AAT deficiency. Results After 18 h of cell culture the basal release of MMP-9 was 2.5-fold, p Conclusions The basal and LPS-stimulated secretion of specific pro-inflammatory molecules from circulating monocytes differs between healthy and COPD subjects. These findings may be valuable for further studies on the mechanisms involved in recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells in COPD.

  15. In vitro stimulation of murine peritoneal monocytes induced by alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Paolo; Zalcman, Amy; Murtas, Susanna; Adone, Rosanna; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Marianelli, Cinzia; Cagiola, Monica; Ciuchini, Franco

    2005-08-01

    In this trial we assessed the effect of soluble alginates on murine cells. Mouse peritoneal monocytes were stimulated in vitro with a solution of alginate. The production of TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), the expression of surface molecules CD80 and CD86, and the ability of monocytes to phagocyte bacteria were assessed, in order to evaluate the effect of alginate on cell functionality. We showed that mouse peritoneal monocytes stimulated with alginate produce NO and TNF-alpha. In addition, alginate is able also to increase their phagocytic activity and to a lesser extent also to increase the expression of CD80. Even with different degrees, it implies that alginates per se act directly on immune response, being able to effectively stimulate proinflammatory activity. These findings corroborate the idea that alginates can represent interesting adjuvants to use to increase the efficacy of antigenic stimulation.

  16. Enhanced lentiviral transduction of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the presence of conditioned medium from dying monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurier, C; Boutin, S; Veron, P; Bernard, J; Danos, O; Davoust, J

    2007-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are attractive vehicles for the transduction of human dendritic cells (DCs) in order to mobilize their endogenous antigen presentation pathways. We analyzed here how to improve the efficiency of LV transduction, which we performed at the initial stages of the differentiation of purified monocytes into dendritic cells (Mo-DCs). Using LVs pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope G glycoprotein (VSV-G), we found that a conditioned medium derived from dying monocytes (MCM) improved by 2- to 10- fold the proportion of transduced Mo-DCs. This enhanced transduction efficiency requires the presence of MCM during the initial stage of LV transduction and does not affect the phenotype and antigen presentation function of terminally differentiated Mo-DCs. Importantly, we found that MCM derived from a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1, was equally effective. The MCM activity was heat stable (56 degrees C) and was present in the soluble fraction after high-speed centrifugation. Altogether our results show that a soluble factor present in dying monocyte cultures can replace advantageously facilitating agents such as Polybrene, to achieve high LV transductions levels. This protocol can be performed with autologous monocytes and is therefore applicable in clinical settings.

  17. TRAIL+ monocytes and monocyte-related cells cause lung damage and thereby increase susceptibility to influenza-Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Gregory T; Davidson, Sophia; Crotta, Stefania; Branzk, Nora; Papayannopoulos, Venizelos; Wack, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection is a major cause of influenza-associated mortality; however, the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis or protection remain unclear. Using a clinically relevant mouse model, we identify immune-mediated damage early during coinfection as a new mechanism causing susceptibility. Coinfected CCR2(-/-) mice lacking monocytes and monocyte-derived cells control bacterial invasion better, show reduced epithelial damage and are overall more resistant than wild-type controls. In influenza-infected wild-type lungs, monocytes and monocyte-derived cells are the major cell populations expressing the apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL. Accordingly, anti-TRAIL treatment reduces bacterial load and protects against coinfection if administered during viral infection, but not following bacterial exposure. Post-influenza bacterial outgrowth induces a strong proinflammatory cytokine response and massive inflammatory cell infiltrate. Depletion of neutrophils or blockade of TNF-α facilitate bacterial outgrowth, leading to increased mortality, demonstrating that these factors aid bacterial control. We conclude that inflammatory monocytes recruited early, during the viral phase of coinfection, induce TRAIL-mediated lung damage, which facilitates bacterial invasion, while TNF-α and neutrophil responses help control subsequent bacterial outgrowth. We thus identify novel determinants of protection versus pathology in influenza-Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection.

  18. Migration and Its Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Vasile Ivanoff

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Migration, as a social phenomenon, has an especially complex character and can be analyzed from the point of view of the state which is the source of the migration as well as from the point of view of the state which is the destination of the migration. Its causes are especially complex but the economic ones are determinant and are fundamentally different of the causes which determine the population to seek refuge in case of armed conflict. The effects of the migration are equally c...

  19. Regional Redistribution and Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manasse, Paolo; Schultz, Christian

    We study a model with free migration between a rich and a poor region. Since there is congestion, the rich region has an incentive to give the poor region a transfer in order to reduce immigration. Faced with free migration, the rich region voluntarily chooses a transfer, which turns out...... to be equal to that a social planner would choose. Provided migration occurs in equilibrium, this conclusion holds even in the presence of moderate mobility costs. However, large migration costs will lead to suboptimal transfers in the market solution...

  20. Regional Redistribution and Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manasse, Paolo; Schultz, Christian

    We study a model with free migration between a rich and a poor region. Since there is congestion, the rich region has an incentive to give the poor region a transfer in order to reduce immigration. Faced with free migration, the rich region voluntarily chooses a transfer, which turns out...... to be equal to that a social planner would choose. Provided migration occurs in equilibrium, this conclusion holds even in the presence of moderate mobility costs. However, large migration costs will lead to suboptimal transfers in the market solution...

  1. Effects of TNF-alpha on Endothelial Cell Collective Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Desu; Wu, Di; Helim Aranda-Espinoza, Jose; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) is a small cell-signaling protein usually released by monocytes and macrophages during an inflammatory response. Previous work had shown the effects of TNF-alpha on single cell morphology, migration, and biomechanical properties. However, the effect on collective migrations remains unexplored. In this work, we have created scratches on monolayers of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with 25ng/mL TNF-alpha on glass substrates. The wound healing like processes were imaged with phase contrast microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the collective migration of cells treated with TNF-alpha indicates that these cells maintain their persistent motion and alignment better than untreated cells. In addition, the collective migration was characterized by measuring the amount of non-affine deformations of the wound healing monolayer. We found a lower mean non-affinity and narrower distribution of non-affinities upon TNF-alpha stimulation. These results suggest that TNF-alpha introduces a higher degree of organized cell collective migration.

  2. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolation and cryopreservation of human peripheral blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, T; Nickolov, C; Buckureshtliev, A; Mincheff, M; Tsoney, L; Terziev, R; Popov, D

    1986-12-01

    A modification of the Freundlich and Avdalovic method (J. Immunol. Methods 62, 31 (1983] is reported. Buffy coats, separated and pooled together, are used for isolation of monocytes (70% yield, 100% purity). Cell density of working suspension is increased up to 0.65 X 10(9) cells/75 cm2 surface by multiplication of the active fibronectin sites. For the purpose, cryoprecipitate is used instead of plasma for coating the glass-gelatin surface. Monocytes, isolated by that procedure, could be successfully cryopreserved with dimethyl sulfoxide cryoprotective solution.

  4. Influence of phthalates on cytokine production in monocytes and macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohnert, Juliana; Bendtzen, Klaus; Boas, Malene;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phthalates are a group of endocrine disrupting chemicals suspected to influence the immune system. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the present knowledge on the influence of phthalates on monocyte and macrophage production and secretion of cytokines, an influence which......-α secretion/production from monocytes or macrophages. A summary of cytokine measurements was not possible since few studies were comparable in study design and due to insufficient reporting of raw data for most of the included studies. CONCLUSION: Results from this review have suggested that at least one...

  5. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tissue factor in human monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie C; Klein, Thomas W; Goldberger, Bruce A; Sleasman, John W; Mackman, Nigel; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects in humans of Δ(9-)Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana are controversial. Tissue factor (TF), the activator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, is increased on circulating activated monocytes and is expressed on microvesicles released from activated monocytes during inflammatory conditions, which perpetuate coagulopathies in a number of diseases. In view of the increased medicinal use of marijuana, effects of THC on human monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated. Peak levels of TF procoagulant activity developed in monocytes or microvesicles 6 h following LPS treatment and were unaltered by THC. After 24 h of LPS stimulation, TF activity declined in control-treated or untreated cells and microvesicles, but persisted with THC treatment. Peak TF protein occurred within 6 h of LPS treatment independent of THC; by 24 h, TF protein declined to almost undetectable levels without THC, but was about 4-fold greater with THC. Steady-state TF mRNA levels were similar up to 2 h in the presence of LPS with or without THC, while 10-fold greater TF mRNA levels persisted over 3-24 h with THC treatment. Activation of MAPK or NF-κB pathways was unaltered by THC treatment and inflammatory cytokine IL-6 levels were unchanged. In contrast, TNF and IL-8 levels were enhanced by 20-50 %. THC enhances TF expression in activated monocytes resulting in elevated procoagulant activity. Marijuana use could potentiate coagulopathies in individuals with chronic immune activation such as HIV-1 infection or inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Model Migration Schedules

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    This report draws on the fundamental regularity exhibited by age profiles of migration all over the world to develop a system of hypothetical model schedules that can be used in multiregional population analyses carried out in countries that lack adequate migration data.

  7. Migrating Art History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Review of Hiroko Ikegami, The Great Migrator. Robert Rauschenberg and the Global Rise of American Art. Cambridge Mass., The MIT Press, 2010. 277 pages. ISBN 978-0-262-01425-0.......Review of Hiroko Ikegami, The Great Migrator. Robert Rauschenberg and the Global Rise of American Art. Cambridge Mass., The MIT Press, 2010. 277 pages. ISBN 978-0-262-01425-0....

  8. Migration, klima og sundhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tellier, Siri; Carballo, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Many tentative connections have been postulated between migration and climate. This article points to rural-urban migration, particularly into low elevation urban slums prone to flooding as an issue needing urgent attention by health professionals. It also notes the no-man's land in which...

  9. Migration in Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, F.S.

    2007-01-01

    Migration plays an important role in development and as a strategy for poverty reduction. A recent World Bank investigation finds a significant positive relationship between international migration and poverty reduction at the country level (Adams and Page 2003). Burkina Faso, whose conditions for

  10. Migrating Art History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Review of Hiroko Ikegami, The Great Migrator. Robert Rauschenberg and the Global Rise of American Art. Cambridge Mass., The MIT Press, 2010. 277 pages. ISBN 978-0-262-01425-0.......Review of Hiroko Ikegami, The Great Migrator. Robert Rauschenberg and the Global Rise of American Art. Cambridge Mass., The MIT Press, 2010. 277 pages. ISBN 978-0-262-01425-0....

  11. Geography of European Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitin Dmitry V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the role of international migration has increased dramatically in most European countries. The growth in migration has made some authors proclaim the beginning of a second Migration Period that could transform the social and cultural identity of Europe. The article presents an analysis of international migration geography in Europe in the last twenty-five years. The authors identify the main trends in migration, provide migration profiles of European countries, and propose a classification based on the recent changes in the migrant stock. Changes in the migrant stock (total emigration and immigration reflect the level of involvement in international and global processes. They can serve as an indicator of a country’s attractiveness for both foreigners and the country’s citizens. The study shows that European countries are increasingly split into ‘immigrant’ and ‘emigrant’ states. The authors describe spatial patterns of migration. The volume and localisation of migration flows in Europe are affected not only by cultural and historical circumstance, such as a colonial past or a common language. The scale of immigrant influx often does not depend on a donor country’s demographic potential or the level of its socio-economic development. The links between the place of origin and destination are often more complex than it might initially seem. The authors stress the importance of a differentiated immigration policy taking into account ethnic and cultural features of host societies.

  12. International Migration of Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Martin; Munk, Martin D.; Poutvaara, Panu

    2017-01-01

    Migrant self-selection is important to both origin and destination countries. We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it in the context of international migration, using population-wide administrative data from Denmark. Our model predicts...

  13. Samtidskunst og migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    2010-01-01

    "Samtidskunst og migration. En oversigt over faglitteraturen" er en forskningsoversigt der gør status over hvad der hidtil er skrevet inden for det kunsthistoriske område om vor tids billedkunst og migration som politisk, socialt og kulturelt fænomen, primært i forbindelse med immigration til...

  14. Migration in Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, F.S.

    2007-01-01

    Migration plays an important role in development and as a strategy for poverty reduction. A recent World Bank investigation finds a significant positive relationship between international migration and poverty reduction at the country level (Adams and Page 2003). Burkina Faso, whose conditions for a

  15. Assessment of monocyte to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahit, Demir; Mehmet, Kadri Akboga; Samet, Yilmaz; Hüseyin, Ede

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationships between metabolic syndrome (MS) and monocyte to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (MHR) and lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR). 762 patients (n = 371 MS present and n = 391 MS absent) were enrolled. MHR was significantly higher [13.9 (10.5-18.1) vs 11.1 (8.0-14.8); p MHR [OR: 1.052 (95% CI: 1.018-1.088); p = 0.003] and C-reactive protein [OR: 1.048 (95% CI: 1.032-1.065); p MHR may be novel and useful indicators of MS.

  16. Nogo-B is associated with cytoskeletal structures in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gredler Viktoria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reticulon Nogo-B participates in cellular and immunological processes in murine macrophages. Since leukocytes are an essential part of the immune system in health and disease, we decided to investigate the expression of Nogo-A, Nogo-B and Nogo-C in different human immune cell subpopulations. Furthermore, we analyzed the localization of Nogo-B in human monocyte-derived macrophages by indirect immunofluorescence stainings to gain further insight into its possible function. Findings We describe an association of Nogo-B with cytoskeletal structures and the base of filopodia, but not with focal or podosomal adhesion sites of monocyte-derived macrophages. Nogo-B positive structures are partially co-localized with RhoA staining and Rac1 positive membrane ruffles. Furthermore, Nogo-B is associated with the tubulin network, but not accumulated in the Golgi region. Although Nogo-B is present in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can also be translocated to large cell protrusions or the trailing end of migratory cells, where it is homogenously distributed. Conclusions Two different Nogo-B staining patterns can be distinguished in macrophages: firstly we observed ER-independent Nogo-B localization in cell protrusions and at the trailing end of migrating cells. Secondly, the localization of Nogo-B in actin/RhoA/Rac1 positive regions supports an influence on cytoskeletal organization. To our knowledge this is the first report on Nogo-B expression at the base of filopodia, thus providing further insight into the distribution of this protein.

  17. Muramyl dipeptide induces NOD2-dependent Ly6C(high monocyte recruitment to the lungs and protects against influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Coulombe

    Full Text Available Bacterial peptidoglycan-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP and derivatives have long-recognized antiviral properties but their mechanism of action remains unclear. In recent years, the pattern-recognition receptor NOD2 has been shown to mediate innate responses to MDP. Here, we show that MDP treatment of mice infected with Influenza A virus (IAV significantly reduces mortality, viral load and pulmonary inflammation in a NOD2-dependent manner. Importantly, the induction of type I interferon (IFN and CCL2 chemokine was markedly increased in the lungs following MDP treatment and correlated with a NOD2-dependent enhancement in circulating monocytes. Mechanistically, the protective effect of MDP could be explained by the NOD2-dependent transient increase in recruitment of Ly6C(high "inflammatory" monocytes and, to a lesser extent, neutrophils to the lungs. Indeed, impairment in both Ly6C(high monocyte recruitment and survival observed in infected Nod2-/- mice treated with MDP was recapitulated in mice deficient for the chemokine receptor CCR2 required for CCL2-mediated Ly6C(high monocyte migration from the bone marrow into the lungs. MDP-induced pulmonary monocyte recruitment occurred normally in IAV-infected and MDP-treated Ips-1-/- mice. However, IPS-1 was required for improved survival upon MDP treatment. Finally, mycobacterial N-glycolyl MDP was more potent than N-acetyl MDP expressed by most bacteria at reducing viral burden while both forms of MDP restored pulmonary function following IAV challenge. Overall, our work sheds light on the antiviral mechanism of a clinically relevant bacterial-derived compound and identifies the NOD2 pathway as a potential therapeutic target against IAV.

  18. World Migration Degree Global migration flows in directed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Porat, Idan

    2015-01-01

    In this article we analyze the global flow of migrants from 206 source countries to 145 destination countries (2006-2010) and focus on the differences in the migration network pattern between destination and source counters as represented by its degree and weight distribution. Degree represents the connectivity of a country to the global migration network, and plays an important role in defining migration processes and characteristics. Global analysis of migration degree distribution offers a strong potential contribution to understanding of migration as a global phenomenon. In regard to immigration, we found that it is possible to classify destination countries into three classes: global migration hubs with high connectivity and high migration rate; local migration hubs with low connectivity and high migration rate; and local migration hubs with opposite strategy of high connectivity and low migration rate. The different migration strategies of destination countries are emerging from similar and homogenies p...

  19. Trafficking and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Florian; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2009-07-01

    The migration of single cells and epithelial sheets is of great importance for gastrulation and organ formation in developing embryos and, if misregulated, can have dire consequences e.g. during cancer metastasis. A keystone of cell migration is the regulation of adhesive contacts, which are dynamically assembled and disassembled via endocytosis. Here, we discuss some of the basic concepts about the function of endocytic trafficking during cell migration: transport of integrins from the cell rear to the leading edge in fibroblasts; confinement of signalling to the front of single cells by endocytic transport of growth factors; regulation of movement coherence in multicellular sheets by cadherin turnover; and shaping of extracellular chemokine gradients. Taken together, endocytosis enables migrating cells and tissues to dynamically modulate their adhesion and signalling, allowing them to efficiently migrate through their extracellular environment.

  20. Migration of health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, James

    2008-01-01

    The discussion and debate stimulated by these papers focused across a range of issues but there were four main areas of questioning: "measuring" and monitoring migration (issues related to comparability, completeness and accuracy of data sets on human resources); the impact of migration of health workers on health systems; the motivations of individual health workers to migrate (the "push" and "pull" factors) and the effect of policies designed either to reduce migration (e.g "self ufficiency") or to stimulate it (e.g active international recruitment). It was recognised that there was a critical need to examine migratory flows within the broader context of all health care labour market dynamics within a country, that increasing migration of health workers was an inevitable consequence of globalisation, and that there was a critical need to improve monitoring so as to better inform policy formulation and policy testing in this area.

  1. Malaysia and forced migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzura Idris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysia due to “south-south forced migration movements.” These responses are, however, inadequate in terms of commitment to the international refugee regime. While Malaysia did respond to economic and migration challenges, the paper asserts that such efforts are futile if she ignores issues critical to forced migrants.

  2. On marriage and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, O

    1988-09-01

    Marriage, migration, and related phenomena such as marital stability, fertility, and investment in human capital may be better explained by studying marriage and migration jointly. This paper examines the role of migration in obtaining joint labor market and marriage market equilibrium. When broadly interpreted, marriage and migration share a number of common features. Both involve search and its resolution (pairing of mates in the former and matching of labor and firms in the latter). In both cases, success in finding a partner is sensitive to the availability of partners and to the distribution of their endowments and traits. Almost always, and along with separation and divorce, marriage mandates spatial relocation which may translate into migration. Both involve a movement that is associated with adjustment costs from 1 state into another. The decisions to enter marriage and undertake employment or the decisions to divorce and quit a job depend on exogenous parameters, some of which are determined by the marriage market and the labor market. Since both marriage and divorce take place in the context of broadly defined markets, they may and often are analyzed applying market concepts, theorems, and solutions. Yet the authors could not pinpoint 1 single, systematic attempt that checks through the interactions between marriage and migration, so this paper attempts to rectify this state of research. Essentially, this paper 1) discusses individual decision making pending possible migration prior to or following marriage, 2) examines whether it is easier for a married couple or a single person to migrate, and 3) considers whether marriage dissolution could cause migration when marriage is the only reason that has kept a spouse from moving. This integrated research agenda for both marriage and migration can delineate interesting new implications to examine.

  3. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Monocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Monocytes-CD14+ [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Monocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Monocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Aminopeptidase N/CD13 is associated with raft membrane microdomains in monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarrete Santos, A; Roentsch, J; Danielsen, E M;

    2000-01-01

    of monocytes were characterized by the presence of GM1 ganglioside as raft marker molecule and by the high level of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. Furthermore, similar to polarized cells, rafts in monocytic cells lack Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. Cholesterol depletion of monocytes by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin greatly...

  16. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease Does Not Affect Circulating Monocyte Subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Maga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes are mononuclear cells characterized by distinct morphology and expression of CD14 and CD16 surface receptors. Classical, quiescent monocytes are positive for CD14 (lipopolysaccharide receptor but do not express Fc gamma receptor III (CD16. Intermediate monocytes coexpress CD16 and CD14. Nonclassical monocytes with low expression of CD14 represent mature macrophage-like monocytes. Monocyte behavior in peripheral arterial disease (PAD and during vessel wall directed treatment is not well defined. This observation study aimed at monitoring of acute changes in monocyte subpopulations during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA in PAD patients. Patients with Rutherford 3 and 4 PAD with no signs of inflammatory process underwent PTA of iliac, femoral, or popliteal segments. Flow cytometry for CD14, CD16, HLA-DR, CD11b, CD11c, and CD45RA antigens allowed characterization of monocyte subpopulations in blood sampled before and after PTA (direct angioplasty catheter sampling. Patients were clinically followed up for 12 months. All 61 enrolled patients completed 12-month follow-up. Target vessel failure occurred in 12 patients. While absolute counts of monocyte were significantly lower after PTA, only subtle monocyte activation after PTA (CD45RA and β-integrins occurred. None of the monocyte parameters correlated with long-term adverse clinical outcome. Changes in absolute monocyte counts and subtle changes towards an activation phenotype after PTA may reflect local cell adhesion phenomenon in patients with Rutherford 3 or 4 peripheral arterial disease.

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  9. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko ...tml) (.csml) Show Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. PubmedID 17056121 Titl...e Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Authors Has

  10. DMPD: LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11257452 LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Guha M, Mackman N. Ce...ll Signal. 2001 Feb;13(2):85-94. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS induction of gene expression in human... monocytes. PubmedID 11257452 Title LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Authors Guha M, Ma

  11. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  12. Vitamin d-directed rheostatic regulation of monocyte antibacterial responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, John S; Ren, Songyang; Liu, Philip T

    2009-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) enhances innate immunity by inducing the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP). In monocytes/macrophages, this occurs primarily in response to activation of TLR, that induce expression of the vitamin D receptor and localized...

  13. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  14. Monocytes and macrophages in pregnancy and pre-eclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M.; Spaans, Floor; De Vos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is an important complication in pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy. Generalized activation of the inflammatory response is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. Monocytes may play a central role in this

  15. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 gene polymorphism and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Levent; Filik

    2010-01-01

    I read with great interest the article by Gbele et al published in issue 44 of World J Gastroenterol 2009.The results of their study indicate that-2518 Monocyte chemotactic protein-1(MCP-1)genotype AA is a risk factor for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.However,there are some items that need to be discussed.

  16. Monocytes and macrophages in pregnancy and pre-eclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M.; Spaans, Floor; De Vos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is an important complication in pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of pregnancy. Generalized activation of the inflammatory response is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. Monocytes may play a central role in this inflamm

  17. Dexamethasone Suppresses Oxysterol-Induced Differentiation of Monocytic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghae Son

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxysterol like 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHChol has been reported to induce differentiation of monocytic cells into a mature dendritic cell phenotype. We examined whether dexamethasone (Dx affects 27OHChol-induced differentiation using THP-1 cells. Treatment of monocytic cells with Dx resulted in almost complete inhibition of transcription and surface expression of CD80, CD83, and CD88 induced by 27OHChol. Elevated surface levels of MHC class I and II molecules induced by 27OHChol were reduced to basal levels by treatment with Dx. A decreased endocytosis ability caused by 27OHChol was recovered by Dx. We also examined effects of Dx on expression of CD molecules involved in atherosclerosis. Increased levels of surface protein and transcription of CD105, CD137, and CD166 by treatment with 27OHChol were significantly inhibited by cotreatment with Dx. These results indicate that Dx inhibits 27OHChol-induced differentiation of monocytic cells into a mature dendritic cell phenotype and expression of CD molecules whose levels are associated with atherosclerosis. In addition, we examined phosphorylation of AKT induced by 27OHChol and effect of Dx, where cotreatment with Dx inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT. The current study reports that Dx regulates oxysterol-mediated dendritic cell differentiation of monocytic cells.

  18. Interactions of human monocytes with TMVs (tumour-derived microvesicles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jarosław; Szatanek, Rafał; Mytar, Bożenna; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2013-02-01

    The tumour microenvironment represents a dynamic complex milieu, which includes tumour cells, cells of the immune system and other (cellular and non-cellular) components. The role of these particular 'puzzle pieces' may change substantially due to their mutual interactions. The present review concerns different opinions on interactions that occur between monocytes, tumour cells and TMVs (tumour-derived microvesicles).

  19. Glucocorticoids enhance the in vivo migratory response of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Mark P; Pioli, Patricia A; Collins, Jane; Barr, Fiona; Metzler, Sara; Sites, Brian D; Guyre, Paul M

    2016-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are best known for their potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, an emerging model for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of in vivo inflammation also includes a delayed, preparatory effect that manifests as enhanced inflammation following exposure to an inflammatory stimulus. When GCs are transiently elevated in vivo following exposure to a stressful event, this model proposes that a subsequent period of increased inflammatory responsiveness is adaptive because it enhances resistance to a subsequent stressor. In the present study, we examined the migratory response of human monocytes/macrophages following transient in vivo exposure to stress-associated concentrations of cortisol. Participants were administered cortisol for 6h to elevate in vivo cortisol levels to approximate those observed during major systemic stress. Monocytes in peripheral blood and macrophages in sterile inflammatory tissue (skin blisters) were studied before and after exposure to cortisol or placebo. We found that exposure to cortisol induced transient upregulation of monocyte mRNA for CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) as well as for the chemokine receptor CX3CR1. At the same time, mRNA for the transcription factor IκBα was decreased. Monocyte surface expression of CCR2 but not CX3CR1 increased in the first 24h after cortisol exposure. Transient exposure to cortisol also led to an increased number of macrophages and neutrophils in fluid derived from a sterile inflammatory site in vivo. These findings suggest that the delayed, pro-inflammatory effects of cortisol on the human inflammatory responses may include enhanced localization of effector cells at sites of in vivo inflammation.

  20. Estrogen-Induced Monocytic Response Correlates with Temporomandibular Disorder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Dasilva, M C; Fillingim, R B; Wallet, S M

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a set of conditions characterized by pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular joint and muscles of mastication. These pain conditions are associated with considerable morbidity, societal costs, and reduced quality of life. The prevalence varies between 4% and 10%, with females at higher risk, and a higher prevalence occurs during reproductive years. The increased prevalence of TMD in females and low prevalence in childhood reinforce that sex hormones, like estrogen, play an important, complex role in the pathophysiology of these disorders. The goal of this study was to determine whether women with TMD exhibit a monocytic hyperinflammatory response compared with control women, and to examine associations of monocytic inflammatory responses with clinical pain. Eighteen women, aged 18 to 35 y, were seen during their follicular menstrual phase. A blood sample was collected, a clinical questionnaire about pain history was administered, and a Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) exam was performed. Extracted monocytes were stimulated with the toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in the presence and absence of estrogen, and the levels of IL6 expression evaluated. Women with TMD showed a systemic hyperinflammatory phenotype, manifested by an increased monocytic release of cytokines after an inflammatory insult, and this was further increased by estrogen. In addition, monocytes from participants who self-reported more pain on the VAS scale produced higher levels of IL6 compared with those from participants who self-reported lower pain sensitivity. These data suggest that an estrogen-induced hyperinflammatory phenotype in women with TMD may at least in part contribute to heightened clinical pain, perhaps via central sensitization.

  1. Migration without migraines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lines, L.; Burton, A.; Lu, H.X. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John`s (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Accurate velocity models are a necessity for reliable migration results. Velocity analysis generally involves the use of methods such as normal moveout analysis (NMO), seismic traveltime tomography, or iterative prestack migration. These techniques can be effective, and each has its own advantage or disadvantage. Conventional NMO methods are relatively inexpensive but basically require simplifying assumptions about geology. Tomography is a more general method but requires traveltime interpretation of prestack data. Iterative prestack depth migration is very general but is computationally expensive. In some cases, there is the opportunity to estimate vertical velocities by use of well information. The well information can be used to optimize poststack migrations, thereby eliminating some of the time and expense of iterative prestack migration. The optimized poststack migration procedure defined here computes the velocity model which minimizes the depth differences between seismic images and formation depths at the well by using a least squares inversion method. The optimization methods described in this paper will hopefully produce ``migrations without migraines.``

  2. H-2g, a glucose analog of blood group H antigen, mediates monocyte recruitment in vitro and in vivo via IL-8/CXCL8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabquer BJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J Rabquer,1,2 Yong Hou,1 Jeffrey H Ruth,1 Wei Luo,1 Daniel T Eitzman,1 Alisa E Koch,3,1 Mohammad A Amin11University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Albion College, Biology Department, Albion, MI, USA; 3VA Medical Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, MI, USAObjective: Monocyte (MN recruitment is an essential inflammatory component of many autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In this study we investigated the ability of 2-fucosyllactose (H-2g, a glucose analog of blood group H antigen to induce MN migration in vivo and determined if H-2g-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8 plays a role in MN ingress in RA.Methods: Sponge granuloma and intravital microscopy assays were performed to examine H-2g-induced in vivo MN migration and rolling, respectively. MNs were stimulated with H-2g, and the production of IL-8/CXCL8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lastly, in vitro MN migration assays and an in vivo RA synovial tissue severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model were used to determine the role of IL-8/CXCL8 in H-2g-induced MN migration.Results: In vivo, H-2g induced significantly greater MN migration compared to phosphate buffered saline. Intravital microscopy revealed that H-2g mediates MN migration in vivo by inducing MN rolling. In addition, H-2g induced MN production of IL-8/CXCL8, a process that was dependent on Src kinase. Moreover, we found that H-2g mediated MN migration in vitro, and in vivo migration was inhibited by a neutralizing anti-IL-8/CXCL8 antibody.Conclusion: These findings suggest that H-2g mediates MN recruitment in vitro and in vivo (in part via IL-8/CXCL8.Keywords: inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, chemokine, migration

  3. The Activity of the Neutral Sphingomyelinase Is Important in T Cell Recruitment and Directional Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Collenburg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Breakdown of sphingomyelin as catalyzed by the activity of sphingomyelinases profoundly affects biophysical properties of cellular membranes which is particularly important with regard to compartmentalization of surface receptors and their signaling relay. As it is activated both upon TCR ligation and co-stimulation in a spatiotemporally controlled manner, the neutral sphingomyelinase (NSM has proven to be important in T cell activation, where it appears to play a particularly important role in cytoskeletal reorganization and cell polarization. Because these are important parameters in directional T cell migration and motility in tissues, we analyzed the role of the NSM in these processes. Pharmacological inhibition of NSM interfered with early lymph node homing of T cells in vivo indicating that the enzyme impacts on endothelial adhesion, transendothelial migration, sensing of chemokine gradients or, at a cellular level, acquisition of a polarized phenotype. NSM inhibition reduced adhesion of T cells to TNF-α/IFN-γ activated, but not resting endothelial cells, most likely via inhibiting high-affinity LFA-1 clustering. NSM activity proved to be highly important in directional T cell motility in response to SDF1-α, indicating that their ability to sense and translate chemokine gradients might be NSM dependent. In fact, pharmacological or genetic NSM ablation interfered with T cell polarization both at an overall morphological level and redistribution of CXCR4 and pERM proteins on endothelial cells or fibronectin, as well as with F-actin polymerization in response to SDF1-α stimulation, indicating that efficient directional perception and signaling relay depend on NSM activity. Altogether, these data support a central role of the NSM in T cell recruitment and migration both under homeostatic and inflamed conditions by regulating polarized redistribution of receptors and their coupling to the cytoskeleton.

  4. Slit2N/Robo1 inhibit HIV-gp120-induced migration and podosome formation in immature dendritic cells by sequestering LSP1 and WASp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Prasad

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated transmission and dissemination of sexually-acquired human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 in the host involves the migration of immature dendritic cells (iDCs. iDCs migrate in response to the HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120, and inhibiting such migration may limit the mucosal transmission of HIV-1. In this study, we elucidated the mechanism of HIV-1-gp120-induced transendothelial migration of iDCs. We found that gp120 enhanced the binding of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp and the Actin-Related Protein 2/3 (Arp2/3 complex with β-actin, an interaction essential for the proper formation of podosomes, specialized adhesion structures required for the migration of iDCs through different tissues. We further identified Leukocyte-Specific Protein 1 (LSP1 as a novel component of the WASp-Arp2/3-β-actin complex. Pretreating iDCs with an active fragment of the secretory glycoprotein Slit2 (Slit2N inhibited HIV-1-gp120-mediated migration and podosome formation, by inducing the cognate receptor Roundabout 1 (Robo1 to bind to and sequester WASp and LSP1 from β-actin. Slit2N treatment also inhibited Src signaling and the activation of several downstream molecules, including Rac1, Pyk2, paxillin, and CDC42, a major regulator of podosome formation. Taken together, our results support a novel mechanism by which Slit2/Robo1 may inhibit the HIV-1-gp120-induced migration of iDCs, thereby restricting dissemination of HIV-1 from mucosal surfaces in the host.

  5. Global Governance of Migration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze the recently formed global governance of migration, which has got an unprecedented trans-boundary nature due to the impacts og globalization in the post Cold War era. 

  6. Migration og etnicitet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2004-01-01

    Migration og etnicitet er aktuelle og forbundne fænomener, idet migration øger berøringsfladerne mellem befolkningsgrupper. Etniciteter formes i takt med at grænser drages imellem disse grupper. Imod moderniserings-teoriernes forventning forsvandt etnicitet ikke som en traditionel eller oprindelig...... måde at skabe tilhørsforhold på; globalt set fremstår vor tid istedet som en "migrationens tidsalder", der tilsyneladende også er en tidsalder, hvor kulturelle særtræk, i form af etnicitet, udgør vigtige linjer, hvorefter grupper skilller sig ud fra hinanden. Både migration og etnicitet bringer fokus...... den finder sted i modtagerlandet, men nyere perspektiver på migration, som begreber om medborgerskab, transnationalisme og diaspora er eksponenter for, søger udover den nationalstatslige ramme og inddrager konsekvenserne af migrationen for afsenderlande....

  7. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  8. Regulation of monocyte cell fate by blood vessels mediated by Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Giagnorio, Roberto; Jussofie, Jasmin; Soehnlein, Oliver; Duchene, Johan; Briseño, Carlos G; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Krishnasamy, Kashyap; Limbourg, Anne; Kapanadze, Tamar; Ishifune, Chieko; Hinkel, Rabea; Radtke, Freddy; Strobl, Lothar J; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Napp, L Christian; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Yasutomo, Koji; Kupatt, Christian; Murphy, Kenneth M; Adams, Ralf H; Weber, Christian; Limbourg, Florian P

    2016-08-31

    A population of monocytes, known as Ly6C(lo) monocytes, patrol blood vessels by crawling along the vascular endothelium. Here we show that endothelial cells control their origin through Notch signalling. Using combinations of conditional genetic deletion strategies and cell-fate tracking experiments we show that Notch2 regulates conversion of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into Ly6C(lo) monocytes in vivo and in vitro, thereby regulating monocyte cell fate under steady-state conditions. This process is controlled by Notch ligand delta-like 1 (Dll1) expressed by a population of endothelial cells that constitute distinct vascular niches in the bone marrow and spleen in vivo, while culture on recombinant DLL1 induces monocyte conversion in vitro. Thus, blood vessels regulate monocyte conversion, a form of committed myeloid cell fate regulation.

  9. Impaired immune tolerance to Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide promotes neutrophil migration and decreased apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaric, Svetislav; Shelburne, Charles; Darveau, Richard; Quinn, Derek J; Weldon, Sinéad; Taggart, Clifford C; Coulter, Wilson A

    2010-10-01

    Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the tissues supporting the teeth, is characterized by an exaggerated host immune and inflammatory response to periopathogenic bacteria. Toll-like receptor activation, cytokine network induction, and accumulation of neutrophils at the site of inflammation are important in the host defense against infection. At the same time, induction of immune tolerance and the clearance of neutrophils from the site of infection are essential in the control of the immune response, resolution of inflammation, and prevention of tissue destruction. Using a human monocytic cell line, we demonstrate that Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is a major etiological factor in periodontal disease, induces only partial immune tolerance, with continued high production of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but diminished secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) after repeated challenge. This cytokine response has functional consequences for other immune cells involved in the response to infection. Primary human neutrophils incubated with P. gingivalis LPS-treated naïve monocyte supernatant displayed a high migration index and increased apoptosis. In contrast, neutrophils treated with P. gingivalis LPS-tolerized monocyte supernatant showed a high migration index but significantly decreased apoptosis. Overall, these findings suggest that induction of an imbalanced immune tolerance in monocytes by P. gingivalis LPS, which favors continued secretion of IL-8 but decreased TNF-α production, may be associated with enhanced migration of neutrophils to the site of infection but also with decreased apoptosis and may play a role in the chronic inflammatory state seen in periodontal disease.

  10. Indonesia's migration transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, G

    1995-01-01

    This article describes population movements in Indonesia in the context of rapid and marked social and economic change. Foreign investment in Indonesia is increasing, and global mass media is available to many households. Agriculture is being commercialized, and structural shifts are occurring in the economy. Educational levels are increasing, and women's role and status are shifting. Population migration has increased over the decades, both short and long distance, permanent and temporary, legal and illegal, and migration to and between urban areas. This article focuses specifically on rural-to-urban migration and international migration. Population settlements are dense in the agriculturally rich inner areas of Java, Bali, and Madura. Although the rate of growth of the gross domestic product was 6.8% annually during 1969-94, the World Bank ranked Indonesia as a low-income economy in 1992 because of the large population size. Income per capita is US $670. Indonesia is becoming a large exporter of labor to the Middle East, particularly women. The predominance of women as overseas contract workers is changing women's role and status in the family and is controversial due to the cases of mistreatment. Malaysia's high economic growth rate of over 8% per year means an additional 1.3 million foreign workers and technicians are needed. During the 1980s urban growth increased at a very rapid rate. Urban growth tended to occur along corridors and major transportation routes around urban areas. It is posited that most of the urban growth is due to rural-to-urban migration. Data limitations prevent an exact determination of the extent of rural-to-urban migration. More women are estimated to be involved in movements to cities during the 1980s compared to the 1970s. Recruiters and middlemen have played an important role in rural-to-urban migration and international migration.

  11. Astrocytes in Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jiang Shan; Gao, Kai; Chai, Rui Chao; Jia, Xi Hua; Luo, Dao Peng; Ge, Guo; Jiang, Yu Wu; Fung, Yin-Wan Wendy; Li, Lina; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental phenomenon that underlies tissue morphogenesis, wound healing, immune response, and cancer metastasis. Great progresses have been made in research methodologies, with cell migration identified as a highly orchestrated process. Brain is considered the most complex organ in the human body, containing many types of neural cells with astrocytes playing crucial roles in monitoring normal functions of the central nervous system. Astrocytes are mostly quiescent under normal physiological conditions in the adult brain but become migratory after injury. Under most known pathological conditions in the brain, spinal cord and retina, astrocytes are activated and become hypertrophic, hyperplastic, and up-regulating GFAP based on the grades of severity. These three observations are the hallmark in glia scar formation-astrogliosis. The reactivation process is initiated with structural changes involving cell process migration and ended with cell migration. Detailed mechanisms in astrocyte migration have not been studied extensively and remain largely unknown. Here, we therefore attempt to review the mechanisms in migration of astrocytes.

  12. Infection-induced bystander-apoptosis of monocytes is TNF-alpha-mediated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Dreschers

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis induced cell death (PICD is crucial for controlling phagocyte effector cells, such as monocytes, at sites of infection, and essentially contributes to termination of inflammation. Here we tested the hypothesis, that during PICD bystander apoptosis of non-phagocyting monocytes occurs, that apoptosis induction is mediated via tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and that TNF-α secretion and -signalling is causal. Monocytes were infected with Escherichia coli (E. coli, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP, or a pH-sensitive Eos-fluorescent protein (EOS-FP. Monocyte phenotype, phagocytic activity, apoptosis, TNF-receptor (TNFR-1, -2-expression and TNF-α production were analyzed. Apoptosis occured in phagocyting and non-phagocyting, bystander monocytes. Bacterial transport to the phagolysosome was no prerequisite for apoptosis induction, and desensitized monocytes from PICD, as confirmed by EOS-FP expressing E. coli. Co-cultivation with non-infected carboxyfluorescein-succinimidyl-ester- (CFSE- labelled monocytes resulted in significant apoptotic cell death of non-infected bystander monocytes. This process required protein de-novo synthesis and still occurred in a diminished way in the absence of cell-cell contact. E. coli induced a robust TNF-α production, leading to TNF-mediated apoptosis in monocytes. Neutralization with an anti-TNF-α antibody reduced monocyte bystander apoptosis significantly. In contrast to TNFR2, the pro-apoptotic TNFR1 was down-regulated on the monocyte surface, internalized 30 min. p.i. and led to apoptosis predominantly in monocytes without phagocyting bacteria by themselves. Our results suggest, that apoptosis of bystander monocytes occurs after infection with E. coli via internalization of TNFR1, and indicate a relevant role for TNF-α. Modifying monocyte apoptosis in sepsis may be a future therapeutic option.

  13. Blood platelet and monocyte activations and relation to stages of liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatol Panasiuk; Janusz Zak; Edwina Kasprzycka; Katarzyna Janicka; Danuta Prokopowicz

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Blood platelets (plt) and monocytes are the cells that play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of liver damage and liver cirrhosis (LC). In this paper, the analysis of mutual relationship between platelets and monocytes activation in LC was conducted.METHODS: Immunofluorescent flow cytometry was usedto measure the percentage of activated platelet populations(CD62P, CD63), the percentage of plt-monocyte aggregates (pma) (CD41/CD45), and activated monocytes (CD11b, CD14, CD16) in the blood of 20 volunteers and 40 patientswith LC. Platelet activation markers: sP-selectin, platelet factor 4 (PF4), beta-thromboglobulin (βTG) and monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1) were measured and compared in different stages of LC.RESULTS: Platelet activation with the increase in bothβTG serum concentration and elevation of plt population(CD62P and CD63 as well as MIF CD62P and CD63) is elevated as LC develops and thrombocytopenia rises. There is a positive correlation between medial intensityof fluorescence (MIF) CD62P and MIF CD63 in LC. We did not show any relationship between monocyte activation and pma level. SP-selectin concentration correlates positively with plt count and pma, and negatively with stage of plt activation and MIF CD62P and MIF CD63. There was no correlation between MCP-1 concentration andpit, monocyte activation as well as pma level in LC. CD16 monocytes and MIF CD16 populations are significantlyhigher in the end stage of LC. A positive correlation occurs between the value of CD11b monocyte population andMIF CD14 and MIF CD16 on monocytes in LC.CONCLUSION: Platelet and monocyte activation plays an important role in LC. Platelet activation stage does not influence monocyte activation and production of plt aggregates with monocytes in LC. With LC development, thrombocytopenia may be the result of plt consumption in platelet-monocyte aggregates.

  14. iNKT Cell Emigration out of the Lung Vasculature Requires Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanabalasuriar, A; Neupane, A.S; Wang, J; Krummel, M.F; Kubes, P

    2017-01-01

    iNKT cells are a subset of innate T cells that recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d molecules and protect against a variety of bacterial infections including S. pneumoniae. Using lung intravital imaging, we examined the behavior and mechanism of pulmonary iNKT cell activation in response to the potent iNKT cell ligand α-galactosylceramide or during S. pneumoniae infection. In untreated mice the major fraction of iNKT cells resided in the vasculature, but a small critical population resided in the extravascular space in proximity to monocyte-derived DCs. Administration of either α-GalCer or S. pneumoniae, induced CD1d dependent rapid recruitment of neutrophils out of the vasculature. This neutrophil exodus paved the way for extravasation of iNKT cells from the lung vasculature via CCL17. Depletion of monocyte-derived DCs abrogated both the neutrophil and subsequent iNKT cell extravasation. Moreover, impairing iNKT cell migration out of the lung vasculature by blocking CCL17 greatly increased susceptibility to S. pneumoniae infection, suggesting a critical role for the secondary wave of iNKT cells in host defense. PMID:27653688

  15. Monocytes/macrophages infected with Toxoplasma gondii do not increase co-stimulatory molecules while maintaining their migratory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipel, Daniele; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia Lima; Barcelos, Michelle Willmen; Ramalho, André Villaça; Kanashiro, Milton M; Kipnis, Thereza Liberman; Arnholdt, Andrea Cristina Veto

    2009-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is able to disseminate into deep tissues and cross biological barriers, reaching immunoprivileged sites such as the brain and retina. The parasite is able to infect macrophages and dendritic cells and use them for dispersal throughout the body, but the activation state of those cells is unknown. We investigated the ability of human and murine cells from monocytic/macrophage lineages that had not previously been exposed to inflammatory cytokines to up-regulate co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules upon infection. Toxoplasma gondii-infected human monocytes (freshly isolated and THP1 lineage) were unable to up-regulate CD86, CD83, CD40 or CD1a. CD80 expression increased in infected cells but expression of l-selectin and beta2 integrin was unaltered. We evaluated the ability of infected macrophages from wild type C57/BL/6 or CD14(-/-) mice to migrate in 8 mum transwells. Infected cells from CD14(-/-) mice were more likely to de-adhere than infected cells from wild type mice but they did not show any increase in migratory ability. The non-stimulatory profile of these infected cells may contribute to parasite spread throughout the lymphatic circulation in the initial phases of infection.

  16. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-02-04

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM.

  17. Ly6C- Monocytes Regulate Parasite-Induced Liver Inflammation by Inducing the Differentiation of Pathogenic Ly6C+ Monocytes into Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Morias

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes consist of two well-defined subsets, the Ly6C+ and Ly6C- monocytes. Both CD11b+ myeloid cells populations have been proposed to infiltrate tissues during inflammation. While infiltration of Ly6C+ monocytes is an established pathogenic factor during hepatic inflammation, the role of Ly6C- monocytes remains elusive. Mice suffering experimental African trypanosome infection die from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that is initiated by phagocytosis of parasites by liver myeloid cells and culminates in apoptosis/necrosis of liver myeloid and parenchymal cells that reduces host survival. C57BL/6 mice are considered as trypanotolerant to Trypanosoma congolense infection. We have reported that in these animals, IL-10, produced among others by myeloid cells, limits the liver damage caused by pathogenic TNF-producing Ly6C+ monocytes, ensuring prolonged survival. Here, the heterogeneity and dynamics of liver myeloid cells in T. congolense-infected C57/BL6 mice was further dissected. Moreover, the contribution of Ly6C- monocytes to trypanotolerance was investigated. By using FACS analysis and adoptive transfer experiments, we found that the accumulation of Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages in the liver of infected mice coincided with a drop in the pool of Ly6C+ monocytes. Pathogenic TNF mainly originated from Ly6C+ monocytes while Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages were major and equipotent sources of IL-10 within myeloid cells. Moreover, Nr4a1 (Nur77 transcription factor-dependent Ly6C- monocytes exhibited IL-10-dependent and cell contact-dependent regulatory properties contributing to trypanotolerance by suppressing the production of TNF by Ly6C+ monocytes and by promoting the differentiation of the latter cells into macrophages. Thus, Ly6C- monocytes can dampen liver damage caused by an extensive Ly6C+ monocyte-associated inflammatory immune response in T. congolense trypanotolerant animals. In a more general context, Ly6C- or Ly6C

  18. Serum Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Sullivan; Qiaoke Gong; Terry Hyslop; Harish Lavu; Galina Chipitsyna; Yeo, Charles J.; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has etiological association with chronic inflammation. Elevated circulating levels of inflammatory mediators, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), are found in obese individuals. We hypothesized that serum MCP-1 levels are elevated in obese PDA patients. Methods. ELISA was used to analyze MCP-1 serum levels in PDA (n = 62) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) (n = 27). Recursive partitioning statistical anal...

  19. Attenuation of rodent neuropathic pain by an orally active peptide, RAP-103, which potently blocks CCR2- and CCR5-mediated monocyte chemotaxis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padi, Satyanarayana S V; Shi, Xiang Q; Zhao, Yuan Q; Ruff, Michael R; Baichoo, Noel; Pert, Candace B; Zhang, Ji

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine signaling is important in neuropathic pain, with microglial cells expressing CCR2 playing a well-established key role. DAPTA, a HIV gp120-derived CCR5 entry inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit CCR5-mediated monocyte migration and to attenuate neuroinflammation. We report here that as a stabilized analog of DAPTA, the short peptide RAP-103 exhibits potent antagonism for both CCR2 (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] 4.2 pM) and CCR5 (IC50 0.18 pM) in monocyte chemotaxis. Oral administration of RAP-103 (0.05-1 mg/kg) for 7 days fully prevents mechanical allodynia and inhibits the development of thermal hyperalgesia after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rats. Administered from days 8 to 12, RAP-103 (0.2-1 mg/kg) reverses already established hypersensitivity. RAP-103 relieves behavioral hypersensitivity, probably through either or both CCR2 and CCR5 blockade, because by using genetically deficient animals, we demonstrated that in addition to CCR2, CCR5 is also required for the development of neuropathic pain. Moreover, RAP-103 is able to reduce spinal microglial activation and monocyte infiltration, and to inhibit inflammatory responses evoked by peripheral nerve injury that cause chronic pain. Our findings suggest that targeting CCR2/CCR5 should provide greater efficacy than targeting CCR2 or CCR5 alone, and that dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist RAP-103 has the potential for broad clinical use in neuropathic pain treatment.

  20. Platelet binding to monocytes increases the adhesive properties of monocytes by up-regulating the expression and functionality of beta(1) and B-2 integrins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.D.C. Martins; J.M. van Gils; A. Mol; P.L. Hordijk; J.J. Zwaginga

    2006-01-01

    Human monocytes adhere to activated platelets, resulting in the formation of platelet-monocyte complexes (PMC). Complex formation depends on the interaction between platelet-displayed P-selectin and the specific ligand for P-selectin on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1). We have

  1. Serological identification of immunogenic antigens in acute monocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo

    2005-05-01

    In order to improve disease-free survival and potentially a cure, it is necessary to identify more potent leukemia antigen. Here, we defined the acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (LAA) recognized by the humoral immune system for the first time. We have applied the method of serologic analysis of recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX) on acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5), followed by DNA sequencing and analyzing of positive clones. Then, the reactivity of normal and other leukemia sera with positive clones were performed. Thirty-five distinct novel antigens reactive with autologous IgG were identified by SEREX analysis on an acute monocytic leukemia patient and were characterized according to cDNA sequence and the reactivity with allogeneic sera. Twenty of the 35 antigens identified in this study were recognized by IgG antibodies in normal sera, and the remaining 15 were recognized exclusively by sera from allogeneic leukemia patients but not by normal donor sera, suggested that the immune response to these 15 antigens are leukemia related. The 15 immunogenic antigens detected by immune responses in the autologous host facilitate the identification of epitopes recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and are potential candidates for diagnosis and immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  2. Glycation stimulates cutaneous monocyte differentiation in reconstructed skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pageon, H; Zucchi, H; Rousset, F; Girardeau-Hubert, S; Tancrede, E; Asselineau, D

    2017-03-01

    Glycation reaction is a recognized mechanism related to chronological aging. Previous investigations in cutaneous biology have considered the effect of glycation on the dermal matrix molecules, involved in tissue stiffening during skin aging. However, little is known about a possible direct effect of glycation upon cell differentiation. To address such issue, the effect of glycation has been re-investigated in a reconstructed skin model integrating monocytes that are cells capable of differentiating according to different pathways. The results showed that, in the absence of glycation, a small number of these CD45(+) cells could differentiate either into dendritic-like cells (DC-SIGN(+), BDC1a(+), DC-LAMP(+)) or macrophage- like cells (CD14(+), CD68(+), CD163(+)) whereas, with glycation, the number of monocytes, dendritic cells, macrophage-like cells were found surprisingly increased. In-vivo our results showed also that dendritic and macrophage-like cells were increased and suggest a possible link with the age-dependent glycation level in the skin. In addition, we found that, unlike fibroblasts incorporated in the reconstructed skin, these cells expressed specific receptors for AGEs (RAGE and SRA). Taken altogether, our data show that cells of the monocyte lineage, in the presence of AGEs, can differentiate into dendritic or macrophage-like cells and could lead to a micro inflammatory environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The outcome of Cryptococcus neoformans intracellular pathogenesis in human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirofski Liise-anne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that is a facultative intracellular pathogen. The interaction between macrophages and C. neoformans is critical for extrapulmonary dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. C. neoformans can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. However, most studies of intracellular pathogenesis have been made with mouse cells and their relevance to human infection is uncertain. In this study we extended studies of C. neoformans-macrophage cellular interaction/s to human peripheral blood monocytes. Results This study demonstrated that C. neoformans can shed polysaccharide within human monocytes, spread from cell to cell, and be extruded from them. Furthermore, human monocytes responded to ingestion of C. neoformans with cell cycle progression from G1 to S. Conclusion Similarities between mouse and human cells support the suitability of mouse cells for the study of intracellular pathogenesis mechanisms. Given that these hosts diverged over 70 million years ago, the similar pathogenic strategies for C. neoformans in murine and human cells supports the hypothesis that the mechanism that underlies the mammalian intracellular pathogenesis of C. neoformans originated from interactions with a third host, possibly soil amoeboid predators, before the mammalian radiation.

  4. Endotoxin-induced maturation of monocytes in preterm fetal sheep lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Boris W; Joshi, Shubhada N; Moss, Timothy J M; Newnham, John P; Sindelar, Richard; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G

    2007-08-01

    The fetal lung normally contains immature monocytes and very few mature macrophages. The chorioamnionitis frequently associated with preterm birth induces monocyte influx into the fetal lung. Previous studies demonstrated that monocytes in the developing lung can mediate lung injury responses that resemble BPD in humans. We hypothesized that chorioamnionitis would induce maturation of immature monocytes in the fetal lung. Groups of three to seven time-mated ewes received saline or 10 mg of endotoxin (Escherichia coli 055:B5) in saline by intra-amniotic injection for intervals from 1 to 14 days before operative delivery at 124 days of gestational age. Monocytic cells from lung tissue were recovered using Percoll gradients. Monocytic cells consistent with macrophages were identified morphologically and by myosin heavy chain class II expression. An increase in macrophages was preceded by induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the lung and subsequent activation of the transcription factor PU.1. The production of IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages in response to endotoxin challenge in vitro increased 7 and 14 days after exposure to intra-amniotic endotoxin. Recombinant TNF-alpha induced IL-6 production by lung monocytic cells exposed to intra-amniotic endotoxin but not in control cells. Monocytic phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils also increased 7 and 14 days after exposure to intra-amniotic endotoxin. Intra-amniotic endotoxin induced lung monocytes to develop into functionally mature cells consistent with macrophages. These findings have implications for lung immune responses after exposure to chorioamnionitis.

  5. Toll-like receptors elicit different recruitment kinetics of monocytes and neutrophils in mouse acute inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Beat A; Jemelin, Stephane; Emre, Yalin

    2017-03-16

    Leukocyte recruitment is an important process in combatting pathogens. The largest class of circulating leukocytes are neutrophils, which rapidly invade inflamed tissue, followed by inflammatory Ly6C(+) monocytes. Ly6C(low) monocytes patrol the endothelial wall routinely in the steady state. We recently reported early luminal recruitment of Ly6C(low) monocytes, which preceded and orchestrated neutrophil arrival and extravasation in response to TLR7/8-mediated vascular inflammation. Here we dissected the kinetics of recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils and examined the dynamics of Ly6C(low) monocytes in response to several other Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, using intravital confocal microscopy. We observed two types of kinetics in mesenteric veins. TLR2, TLR5 and TLR9 agonists caused early monocyte and neutrophil influx whereas TLR3 and TLR4 agonists rapidly recruited neutrophils and caused Ly6C(low) monocytes to arrive at low levels later on. All TLR agonists, except TLR9, led Ly6C(low) monocytes to meticulously patrol the vascular wall. Finally, these monocytes released pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines implicated in neutrophil recruitment in response to TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 stimulation but not to TLR3 and TLR5 agonists. These results refine our understanding of the early events in the leukocyte recruitment cascade, including the patrolling behaviour of Ly6C(low) monocytes, in TLR-mediated acute vascular inflammation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. P-Selectin Induces the Expression of Tissue Factor on Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Giuliana; Lorenzet, Roberto; de Blasi, Antonio; Ready, Neal; Ready, Neal; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce

    1994-09-01

    P-selectin on activated platelets and stimulated endothelial cells mediates cell adhesion with monocytes and neutrophils. Since activated platelets induce tissue factor on mononuclear leukocytes, we examined the effect of P-selectin on the expression of tissue factor activity in monocytes. Purified P-selectin stimulated tissue factor expression on mononuclear leukocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing P-selectin stimulated tissue factor procoagulant activity in purified monocytes, whereas untransfected CHO cells and CHO cells expressing E-selectin did not. Anti-P-selectin antibodies inhibited the effects of purified P-selectin and CHO cells expressing P-selectin on monocytes. Incubation of CHO cells expressing P-selectin with monocytes leads to the development of tissue factor mRNA in monocytes and to the expression of tissue factor antigen on the monocyte surface. These results indicate that P-selectin upregulates the expression of tissue factor on monocytes as well as mediates the binding of platelets and endothelial cells with monocytes and neutrophils. The binding of P-selectin to monocytes in the area of vascular injury may be a component of a mechanism that initiates thrombosis.

  7. Enrichment of Two Isomeric Heparin Oligosaccharides Exhibiting Different Affinities toward Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca L; Dykstra, Andrew B; Wei, Wei; Holsclaw, Cynthia; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Leary, Julie A

    2016-12-06

    Chemokine-GAG interactions are crucial to facilitate chemokine immobilization, resulting in the formation of chemokine gradients that guide cell migration. Here we demonstrate chromatographic isolation and purification of two heparin hexasaccharide isomers that interact with the oligomeric chemokine Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 with different binding affinities. The sequences of these two hexasaccharides were deduced from unique MS/MS product ions and HPLC compositional analysis. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) showed that the two isolated oligosaccharides have different conformations and both displayed preferential binding for one of the two distinct conformations known for MCP-1 dimers. A significant shift in arrival time distribution of close to 70 Å(2) was observed, indicating a more compact protein:hexasaccharide conformation. Clear differences in the MS spectra between bound and unbound protein allowed calculation of Kd values from the resulting data. The structural difference between the two hexasaccharides was defined as the differential location of a single sulfate at either C-6 of glucosamine or C-2 of uronic acid in the reducing disaccharide, resulting in a 200-fold difference in binding affinity for MCP-1. These data indicate sequence specificity for high affinity binding, supporting the view that sulfate position, and not simply the number of sulfates, is important for heparan sulfate protein binding.

  8. Children with postsurgical capillary leak syndrome can be distinguished by antigen expression on neutrophils and monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnok, Attila; Pipek, Michal; Valet, Guenter; Richter, Jacqueline; Hambsch, Joerg; Schneider, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Our initial studies indicate that children who develop post- operative capillary leak syndrome (CLS) following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can be distinguished based on their pre-operative level of circulating cytokines an adhesion molecules. We tested flow cytometric analysis of surface antigen expression as a potential assay for risk assessment of CLS. 24th preoperative blood samples were stained with monoclonal antibodies for the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, LFA1, MAC1, (beta) -integrin, activation markers CD25, CD54, CD69, HLA- DR, CD14 or CD4. Cells were measured on a dual-laser flow cytometer calibrated with microbeads. Antigen expression was detected as mean fluorescence intensity. The data indicate, that neutrophils of CLS patients express preoperatively higher levels of LFA1 and monocytes higher levels of HLA-DR and activation markers thus are in a state of activation. This could in combination with surgical trauma and CPB lead to their additional stimulation and migration into sites of inflammation and induce postoperative CLS. It is planned to set up a Flow-Classification program for individual risk assessment. By discriminate analysis over 80 percent of the patients were correctly classified. Our preliminary study indicates that flow cytometry with its low samples requirements and rapid access of the results could be a powerful tool to perform risk assessment prior to pediatric open heart surgery.

  9. Migration = cloning; aliasiing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Kleist, Josva; Nestmann, Uwe

    1999-01-01

    In Obliq, a lexically scoped, distributed, object-oriented programming language, object migration was suggested as the creation of a copy of an object’s state at the target site, followed by turning the object itself into an alias, also called surrogate, for the remote copy. We consider the creat......In Obliq, a lexically scoped, distributed, object-oriented programming language, object migration was suggested as the creation of a copy of an object’s state at the target site, followed by turning the object itself into an alias, also called surrogate, for the remote copy. We consider...... the creation of object surrogates as an abstraction of the abovementioned style of migration. We introduce Øjeblik, a distribution-free subset of Obliq, and provide three different configuration-style semantics, which only differ in the respective aliasing model. We show that two of the semantics, one of which...... matches Obliq’s implementation, render migration unsafe, while our new proposal for a third semantics is provably safe. Our work suggests a straightforward repair of Obliq’s aliasing model such that it allows programs to safely migrate objects....

  10. Biometrics and international migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redpath, Jillyanne

    2007-01-01

    This paper will focus on the impact of the rapid expansion in the use of biometric systems in migration management on the rights of individuals; it seeks to highlight legal issues for consideration in implementing such systems, taking as the starting point that the security interests of the state and the rights of the individual are not, and should not be, mutually exclusive. The first part of this paper briefly describes the type of biometric applications available, how biometric systems function, and those used in migration management. The second part examines the potential offered by biometrics for greater security in migration management, and focuses on developments in the use of biometrics as a result of September 11. The third part discusses the impact of the use of biometrics in the management of migration on the individual's right to privacy and ability to move freely and lawfully. The paper highlights the increasing need for domestic and international frameworks to govern the use of biometric applications in the migration/security context, and proposes a number of issues that such frameworks could address.

  11. Planet Formation with Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, J E

    2006-01-01

    In the core-accretion model, gas-giant planets form solid cores which then accrete gaseous envelopes. Tidal interactions with disk gas cause a core to undergo inward type-I migration in 10^4 to 10^5 years. Cores must form faster than this to survive. Giant planets clear a gap in the disk and undergo inward type-II migration in <10^6 years if observed disk accretion rates apply to the disk as a whole. Type-II migration times exceed typical disk lifetimes if viscous accretion occurs mainly in the surface layers of disks. Low turbulent viscosities near the midplane may allow planetesimals to form by coagulation of dust grains. The radius r of such planetesimals is unknown. If r<0.5 km, the core formation time is shorter than the type-I migration timescale and cores will survive. Migration is substantial in most cases, leading to a wide range of planetary orbits, consistent with the observed variety of extrasolar systems. When r is of order 100m and midplane alpha is of order 3 times 10^-5, giant planets si...

  12. Immature monocytes recruited to the ischemic mouse brain differentiate into macrophages with features of alternative activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Mur, Francesc; Pérez-de-Puig, Isabel; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Urra, Xabier; Justicia, Carles; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Acute stroke induces a local inflammatory reaction causing leukocyte infiltration. Circulating monocytes are recruited to the ischemic brain and become tissue macrophages morphologically indistinguishable from reactive microglia. However, monocytes are a heterogeneous population of cells with different functions. Herein, we investigated the infiltration and fate of the monocyte subsets in a mouse model of focal brain ischemia by permanent occlusion of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery. We separated two main subtypes of CD11b(hi) monocytes according to their expression of the surface markers Ly6C and CD43. Using adoptive transfer of reporter monocytes and monocyte depletion, we identified the pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo)CCR2(+) subset as the predominant monocytes recruited to the ischemic tissue. Monocytes were seen in the leptomeninges from where they entered the cortex along the penetrating arterioles. Four days post-ischemia, they had invaded the infarcted core, where they were often located adjacent to blood vessels. At this time, Iba-1(-) and Iba-1(+) cells in the ischemic tissue incorporated BrdU, but BrdU incorporation was rare in the reporter monocytes. The monocyte phenotype progressively changed by down-regulating Ly6C, up-regulating F4/80, expressing low or intermediate levels of Iba-1, and developing macrophage morphology. Moreover, monocytes progressively acquired the expression of typical markers of alternatively activated macrophages, like arginase-1 and YM-1. Collectively, the results show that stroke mobilized immature pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo) monocytes that acutely infiltrated the ischemic tissue reaching the core of the lesion. Monocytes differentiated to macrophages with features of alternative activation suggesting possible roles in tissue repair during the sub-acute phase of stroke.

  13. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  14. A rapid crosstalk of human gammadelta T cells and monocytes drives the acute inflammation in bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Eberl

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells are a minor subset of T cells in human blood and differ from other T cells by their immediate responsiveness to microbes. We previously demonstrated that the primary target for Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells is (E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP, an essential metabolite produced by a large range of pathogens. Here we wished to study the consequence of this unique responsiveness in microbial infection. The majority of peripheral Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells shares migration properties with circulating monocytes, which explains the presence of these two distinct blood cell types in the inflammatory infiltrate at sites of infection and suggests that they synergize in anti-microbial immune responses. Our present findings demonstrate a rapid and HMB-PP-dependent crosstalk between Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells and autologous monocytes that results in the immediate production of inflammatory mediators including the cytokines interleukin (IL-6, interferon (IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, and oncostatin M (OSM; the chemokines CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10; and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, under these co-culture conditions monocytes differentiate within 18 hours into inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs with antigen-presenting functions. Addition of further microbial stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan induces CCR7 and enables these inflammatory DCs to trigger the generation of CD4(+ effector alphabeta T cells expressing IFN-gamma and/or IL-17. Importantly, our in vitro model replicates the responsiveness to microbes of effluent cells from peritoneal dialysis (PD patients and translates directly to episodes of acute PD-associated bacterial peritonitis, where Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cell numbers and soluble inflammatory mediators are elevated in patients infected with HMB-PP-producing pathogens. Collectively, these findings suggest a direct link between invading pathogens, microbe

  15. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Puck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  16. En fornemmelse for migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schütze, Laura Maria

    Afhandlingen undersøger, hvordan sted, museets rolle som aktør og religion er relevante for produktionen af migration på Immigrantmuseet (2012) og i Københavns Museums udstilling At blive københavner (2010). Afhandlingen er baseret på udstillingsanalyse samt interview med relevant museumsfagligt......, anvendes som virkemidler til at nuancere migration og distancere udstillingen fra den offentlige debat om indvandring. Afhandlingen peger på, at produktionen af den nyere danske historie på museum er præget af et fravær af religion. Det skyldes, at de museumsfaglige praksisser og traditioner afspejler en...... identiteter, som vi tager for givet: nationer, byer, kvinder - såvel som migration og religion. Afhandlingen argumenterer følgelig for, at museernes produktion af (materiel) religion er et særdeles relevant, men kun ringe udforsket, genstandsfelt for religionssociologien....

  17. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jieshi Xie; Le Yang; Lei Tian; Weiyang Li; Lin Yang; Liying Li

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver an...

  18. Monocyte-induced downregulation of nitric oxide synthase in cultured aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczin, N; Antonov, A; Papapetropoulos, A; Munn, D H; Virmani, R; Kolodgie, F D; Gerrity, R; Catravas, J D

    1996-09-01

    Since endothelium-dependent vasodilation is altered in atherosclerosis and enhanced monocyte/endothelial interactions are implicated in early atherosclerosis, we evaluated the effects of monocytes on the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) pathway by estimating release of biologically active NO from cultured endothelial cells and levels of constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS). NO release was estimated in a short-term bioassay using endothelial cell-induced cGMP accumulation in vascular smooth muscle (SM) cells. Exposure of SM cells to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) produced large increases in SM cGMP content; this increase was prevented by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the inhibitor of endothelial NOS. Confluent monolayers of PAECs and HAECs cocultured with monocytes also stimulated SM cGMP formation; however, NO release from these cultures was attenuated in a coculture time (2 to 48 hours)- and monocyte concentration (20 to 200 x 10(3) per well)-dependent manner. This effect of monocyte adhesion appeared to be selective for NO release since other biochemical pathways, such as atriopeptin-and isoproterenol-induced cyclic nucleotide accumulation within the endothelial cells, were not altered by monocytes. The effects of adherent monocytes on NO release were mimicked by monocyte-derived cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1 alpha. Furthermore, the conditioned medium of monocytes contained significant quantities of these cytokines. Conditioned medium, as well as monocytes physically separated from the endothelial cells, attenuated NO release, suggesting that soluble factors may mediate the effects of monocytes. An IL-1 beta neutralizing antibody fully prevented the NO dysfunction in response to directly adherent monocytes. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid (Tiron), and exogenous L-arginine failed to improve NO release, suggesting that oxidant stress

  19. Unix Application Migration Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Microsoft. Redmond

    2003-01-01

    Drawing on the experience of Microsoft consultants working in the field, as well as external organizations that have migrated from UNIX to Microsoft® Windows®, this guide offers practical, prescriptive guidance on the issues you are likely to face when porting existing UNIX applications to the Windows operating system environment. Senior IT decision makers, network managers, and operations managers will get real-world guidance and best practices on planning and implementation issues to understand the different methods through which migration or co-existence can be accomplished. Also detailing

  20. Analysing immune cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  1. Making Migration Meaningful

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benwell, Ann Fenger

    2013-01-01

    . The article focuses on changing patterns of mobility in the Mongolian ‘age of the market’ and its effects on population groups. Internal and international migration has continually risen as individuals and families have moved to places of opportunity. Connections are believed to be maintained during periods...... of absence by migrant family members, as both men and women are culturally permitted to be separate from their families. Migration is understood to contribute to prosperity, and separations contribute to generate growth and hishig (good fortune) for the good of the family. However, such mobility is also...

  2. What's driving migration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, H

    1995-01-01

    During the 1990s investment in prevention of international or internal migration declined, and crisis intervention increased. The budgets of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and the UN Development Program remained about the same. The operating assumption is that war, persecution, famine, and environmental and social disintegration are inevitable. Future efforts should be directed to stabilizing populations through investment in sanitation, public health, preventive medicine, land tenure, environmental protection, and literacy. Forces pushing migration are likely to increase in the future. Forces include depletion of natural resources, income disparities, population pressure, and political disruption. The causes of migration are not constant. In the past, migration occurred during conquests, settlement, intermarriage, or religious conversion and was a collective movement. Current migration involves mass movement of individuals and the struggle to survive. There is new pressure to leave poor squatter settlements and the scarcities in land, water, and food. The slave trade between the 1500s and the 1800s linked continents, and only 2-3 million voluntarily crossed national borders. Involuntary migration began in the early 1800s when European feudal systems were in a decline, and people sought freedom. Official refugees, who satisfy the strict 1951 UN definition, increased from 15 million in 1980 to 23 million in 1990 but remained a small proportion of international migrants. Much of the mass movement occurs between developing countries. Migration to developed countries is accompanied by growing intolerance, which is misinformed. China practices a form of "population transfer" in Tibet in order to dilute Tibetan nationalism. Colonization of countries is a new less expensive form of control over territory. Eviction of minorities is another popular strategy in Iraq. Public works projects supported by foreign aid displace millions annually. War and civil conflicts

  3. International Migration of Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Martin; Munk, Martin D.; Nikolka, Till

    2017-01-01

    Migrant self-selection is important to labor markets and public finances in both origin and destination countries. We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it using population-wide administrative data from Denmark. Our model predicts that the probabil......Migrant self-selection is important to labor markets and public finances in both origin and destination countries. We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it using population-wide administrative data from Denmark. Our model predicts...

  4. Effect of serum concentration on adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells onto cultured EC monolayer and EC-SMC Co-culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie FAN; Take-shi KARINO

    2008-01-01

    Background:The adhesion of monocytes to the endothelium following accumulation oflow-density lipoprotein(LDL) in subendothelial spaces is an important step in the development of intimal hyperplasia in arterially implanted vein grafts and atherosclerosis in both animals and humans.However.it iS not well known how serum factors affect the adhesion of monocytes.Methods:We have studied the efrect of fetal calf serum(FCS).which we considered a source of LDL.on the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells(Ecs)by using human monocytic THP-1 cells and both a monolayer of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells(EC monoculture)and a co-culture with bovine aortic smooth muscle cells(EC-SMC co-culture).Results:It was found that the addition of FCS to the medium greatly affected the adhesion of THP-1 cells,and the higher the concentration of FCS in the medium,the greater the adhesion of THP-1 cells to endothelial cells.Adhesion of THP-1 cells to an EC-SMC co-culture Was approximately twofold greater than that to an EC monoculture,and after adhering to endothelial cells,many THP-1 cells transmigrated into the layer of smooth muscle cells.Conclusion:The results suggest that the elevation of the LDL(cholesterol)level in blood provides a favorable condition for the development of intimal hyperplasia and atherosclerosis by promoting the adhesion of monocytcs to the endothelium and their subsequent migration into subendothelial spaces.

  5. Migration strategies of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, H

    1972-03-24

    Physiological and ecological results from a variety of species are consistent with what seem to be valid general statements concerning insect migration. These are as follows: (i)During migration locomotory functions are enhanced and vegetative functions such as feeding and reproduction are suppressed. (ii) Migration usually occurs prereproductively in the life of the adult insect (the oogenesis-flight syndrome). (iii)Since migrant individuals are usually prereproductive, their reproductive values, and hence colonizing abilities, are at or near maximum. (iv) Migrants usually reside in temporary habitats. (v)Migrants have a high potential for population increase, r, which is also advantageous for colonizers. (vi)Both the physiological and ecological parameters of migration are modifiable by environmental factors (that is, phenotypically modifiable)to suit the prevailing conditions. Taken together, these criteria establish a comprehensive theory and adumbrate the basic strategy for migrant insects. This basic strategy is modified to suit the ecological requirements of individual species. Comparative studies of these modifications are of considerable theoretical and practical interest, the more so since most economically important insects are migrants. No satisfactory general statements can as yet be made with respect to the genotype and migration. Certainly we expect colonizing populiations to possess genotypes favoring a high r, but genotypic variation in r depends on the heritabilities of life table statistics, and such measurements are yet to be made (10, 53). The fact that flight duration can be increased by appropriate selection in Oncopeltus fasciatus, and the demonstration of additive genetic variance for this trait in Lygaeus kalmii, suggest that heritability studies of migratory behavior would also be worth pursuing. Most interesting of course, will be possible genetic correlations between migration and life history parameters. Also, migration often

  6. Enhanced migration of seismic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrion, P.M. (PPPG/UFBA, Instituto de Geociencias, Rua Gaetano Moura 123, Federacao, 40.210 Salvador, Bahia (BR))

    1990-10-01

    The so-called enhanced migration which uses diffraction tomography as the repair tool for correction of amplitudes (reflection coefficients) of migrated sections is discussed. As with any linearized procedure, diffraction tomography requires knowledge of the initial model. It is suggested that the initial model is taken as the migrated image. It will be demonstrated that diffraction tomography applied to the data residuals improves the amplitudes of the migrated images. Migration is redefined as the reconstruction of the wavefront sets of distributions (reflection interfaces), and the inversion process as tomographic correction of migrated images.

  7. Migration scenarii in extrasolar systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crida A.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review talk, I present the theory of type I migration of small mass planets, and its latest developments that open the possibility of outward migration in the inner part of a protoplanetary disk. I also review the type II migration of giant planets, and mention the runaway, type III. Then, we focus on the migration of pairs of planets in resonance. The eccentricity of the planets raise, and possibly their mutual inclination as well. Also, the migration rate can be changed, and directed outward if the outer planet is the lighter. Last, we present a synthetic scenario of migration for the giant planets of our Solar System.

  8. Purification of Human Monocytes and Lymphocyte Populations by Counter Current Elutriation– A Short Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Elizabeth V.; Benoit, Marie E.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of the activation processes involved in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells often required large numbers of cells that have not been possibly altered or activated by adherence to surfaces, by binding of antibodies to surface antigens during positive selection, or by release of activators by platelets or other non myeloid cells during isolation or co-culture. Human peripheral blood monocytes as well as lymphocytes from the same blood donor can be...

  9. The glial scar-monocyte interplay: a pivotal resolution phase in spinal cord repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravid Shechter

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response in the injured spinal cord, an immune privileged site, has been mainly associated with the poor prognosis. However, recent data demonstrated that, in fact, some leukocytes, namely monocytes, are pivotal for repair due to their alternative anti-inflammatory phenotype. Given the pro-inflammatory milieu within the traumatized spinal cord, known to skew monocytes towards a classical phenotype, a pertinent question is how parenchymal-invading monocytes acquire resolving properties essential for healing, under such unfavorable conditions. In light of the spatial association between resolving (interleukin (IL-10 producing monocytes and the glial scar matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG, in this study we examined the mutual relationship between these two components. By inhibiting the de novo production of CSPG following spinal cord injury, we demonstrated that this extracellular matrix, mainly known for its ability to inhibit axonal growth, serves as a critical template skewing the entering monocytes towards the resolving phenotype. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated that this matrix alone is sufficient to induce such monocyte polarization. Reciprocal conditional ablation of the monocyte-derived macrophages concentrated at the lesion margins, using diphtheria toxin, revealed that these cells have scar matrix-resolving properties. Replenishment of monocytic cell populations to the ablated mice demonstrated that this extracellular remodeling ability of the infiltrating monocytes requires their expression of the matrix-degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13, a property that was found here to be crucial for functional recovery. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the glial scar-matrix, a known obstacle to regeneration, is a critical component skewing the encountering monocytes towards a resolving phenotype. In an apparent feedback loop, monocytes were found to regulate scar resolution. This

  10. Transmission of pseudorabies virus from immune-masked blood monocytes to endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Walle, Gerlinde; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Pensaert, Maurice

    2003-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) may cause abortion, even in the presence of vaccination-induced immunity. Blood monocytes are essential to transport the virus in these immune animals, including transport to the pregnant uterus. Infected monocytes express viral proteins on their cell surface. Specific antibodies recognize these proteins and should activate antibody-dependent cell lysis. Previous work showed that addition of PRV-specific polyclonal antibodies to PRV-infected monocytes induced internal...

  11. Monocyte CD163 is altered in association with diabetic complications: possible protective role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Danqing; Brooks, Belinda; Wong, Jencia; Aamidor, Sarah; Seehoo, Rebecca; Sutanto, Surya; Harrisberg, Brian; Yue, Dennis K; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V

    2016-12-01

    The scavenger receptor CD163 is exclusively expressed by monocyte/macrophages and is shed by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and neutrophil elastase (ELA2) as soluble CD163 (sCD163). Monocyte phenotype is altered in diabetes, but the relationship among monocyte CD163, sCD163, and diabetic complications is not known and was investigated in this study. Blood was obtained from patients with diabetes for >10 yr and mice with diabetes for ≤20 wk. Blood from people and mice without diabetes acted as controls. The percentage of CD163(+) monocytes and monocyte CD163 mRNA was determined by flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively. Plasma sCD163, MMPs, and ELA2 were measured by ELISA. The ability of glucocorticoids to stimulate isolated monocyte CD163 expression was also investigated. The percentage of CD163(+) monocytes was significantly decreased and sCD163 significantly increased (both P CD163 mRNA was unaltered. sCD163 correlated with worsening renal function, as determined by eGFR (r = -0.48, P CD163(+) monocytes at wk 10 preceded alteration in kidney collagen IV mRNA at wk 20 (all P CD163(+) monocytes (P CD163(+) monocytes were consistent with increased monocyte activation and shedding. The murine data indicated that these changes preceded the development of diabetic complications. Taken together, these results suggest that higher circulating percentage of CD163(+) monocytes may have anti-inflammatory effects and may protect from development of diabetic complications. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  12. Practical Data Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Johny

    2012-01-01

    This book is for executives and practitioners tasked with the movement of data from old systems to a new repository. It uses a series of steps guaranteed to get the reader from an empty new system to one that is working and backed by the user population. Using this proven methodology will vastly increase the chances of a successful migration.

  13. Migrating the Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    The migration of Blaga’s universalist, even centralist poems from Romanian of the first third of the 20th C. into American of the first fifth of the 21st C. illustrates the uses of Pierre Joris’s nomadic methods. My translations of Blaga read well for a teenage audience whose only exposure to lit...

  14. Digitizing migration heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2011-01-01

    Museums are increasingly digitizing their collections and making them available to the public on-line. Creating such digital resources may become means for social inclusion. For museums that acknowledge migration history and cultures of ethnic minority groups as important subjects in multiethnic...

  15. Migration and Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoppi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    European powers imposed the nation-state on Africa through colonialism. But even after African independencies, mainstream discourses and government policies have amplified the idea that sedentariness and the state are the only acceptable mode of modernity. Migration is portrayed as a menace...

  16. Migration as Adventure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2017-01-01

    Narratives of adventure constitute a well-established convention of describing travel experiences, yet the significance of this narrative genre in individuals’ accounts of their migration and life abroad has been little investigated. Drawing on Simmel and Bakhtin, among others, this article...

  17. Migration and regional inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Lianqing; Swider, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    rising, regional inequality has actually decreased, and most recently, remained stable. Our study suggests that China’s unique migratory regime is crucial to understanding these findings. We conduct a counterfactual simulation to demonstrate how migration and remittances have mitigated income inequality...

  18. Migration as Adventure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2017-01-01

    Narratives of adventure constitute a well-established convention of describing travel experiences, yet the significance of this narrative genre in individuals’ accounts of their migration and life abroad has been little investigated. Drawing on Simmel and Bakhtin, among others, this article...

  19. Describing migration spatial structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, A; Willekens, F; Little, J; Raymer, J

    The age structure of a population is a fundamental concept in demography and is generally depicted in the form of an age pyramid. The spatial structure of an interregional system of origin-destination-specific migration streams is, however, a notion lacking a widely accepted definition. We offer a

  20. Migrating the Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    The migration of Blaga’s universalist, even centralist poems from Romanian of the first third of the 20th C. into American of the first fifth of the 21st C. illustrates the uses of Pierre Joris’s nomadic methods. My translations of Blaga read well for a teenage audience whose only exposure to lit...

  1. Describing migration spatial structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, A; Willekens, F; Little, J; Raymer, J

    2002-01-01

    The age structure of a population is a fundamental concept in demography and is generally depicted in the form of an age pyramid. The spatial structure of an interregional system of origin-destination-specific migration streams is, however, a notion lacking a widely accepted definition. We offer a d

  2. Dispersal and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ringing of birds unveiled many aspects of avian migration and dispersal movements. However, there is even much more to be explored by the use of ringing and other marks. Dispersal is crucial in understanding the initial phase of migration in migrating birds as it is to understand patterns and processes of distribution and gene flow. So far, the analysis of migration was largely based on analysing spatial and temporal patters of recoveries of ringed birds. However, there are considerable biases and pitfalls in using recoveries due to spatial and temporal variation in reporting probabilities. Novel methods are required for future studies separating the confounding effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of recovery data and heterogeneity of the landscape as well. These novel approaches should aim a more intensive and novel use of the existing recovery data by taking advantage of, for instance, dynamic and multistate modeling, should elaborate schemes for future studies, and should also include other marks that allow a more rapid data collection, like telemetry, geolocation and global positioning systems, and chemical and molecular markers. The latter appear to be very useful in the delineating origin of birds and connectivity between breeding and non–breeding grounds. Many studies of migration are purely descriptive. However, King and Brooks (King & Brooks, 2004 examine if movement patterns of dolphins change after the introduction of a gillnet ban. Bayesian methods are an interesting approach to this problem as they provide a meaningful measure of the probability that such a change occurred rather than simple yes/no response that is often the result of classical statistical methods. However, the key difficulty of a general implementation of Bayesian methods is the complexity of the modelling —there is no general userfriendly package that is easily accessible to most scientists. Drake and Alisauskas (Drake & Alisauskas, 2004 examine the

  3. World Migration Degree Global migration flows in directed networks

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this article we analyze the global flow of migrants from 206 source countries to 145 destination countries (2006-2010) and focus on the differences in the migration network pattern between destination and source counters as represented by its degree and weight distribution. Degree represents the connectivity of a country to the global migration network, and plays an important role in defining migration processes and characteristics. Global analysis of migration degree distribution offers a...

  4. Prognostic value of preoperative peripheral monocyte count in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qing-Qi; Fu, Shun-Jun; Zhao, Qiang; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Ji, Fei; Chen, Mao-Gen; Wu, Lin-Wei; He, Xiao-Shun

    2016-07-01

    Prognostic value of peripheral monocyte, as a member of inflammatory cells, was widely being investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who underwent liver transplantation (LT) and the relationship between monocyte count and tumor-related characteristics. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 101 HCC patients after LT. Preoperative monocyte count and demographic, clinical, and pathologic data were analyzed. The optimal cutoff value of monocyte count was 456/mm(3), with the sensitivity and specificity of 69.4 and 61.5 %, respectively. Elevated preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count was significantly associated with large tumor size. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) (80.9, 70.1, and 53.3 % vs 55.1, 38.7, and 38.7 %, P = 0.007) and overall survival (OS) rates (95.7, 76.6, and 64.8 % vs 72.2, 44.1, and 36.1 %, P = 0.002) of HCC patients in the peripheral blood monocyte count ≤456/mm(3) group were higher than those in the peripheral blood monocyte count >456/mm(3) group. In conclusion, elevated preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage and it can be considered as a prognostic factor for HCC patients after LT.

  5. Labeling monocytes with gold nanoparticles to track their recruitment in atherosclerosis with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhour, Peter; Naha, Pratap C; O'Neill, Sean M; Litt, Harold I; Reilly, Muredach P; Ferrari, Victor A; Cormode, David P

    2016-05-01

    Monocytes are actively recruited from the circulation into developing atherosclerotic plaques. In the plaque, monocytes differentiate into macrophages and eventually form foam cells. Continued accumulation of foam cells can lead to plaque rupture and subsequent myocardial infarction. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is the best modality to image the coronary arteries non-invasively, therefore we have sought to track the accumulation of monocytes into atherosclerotic plaques using CT. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and stabilized with a variety of ligands. Select formulations were incubated with an immortalized monocyte cell line in vitro and evaluated for cytotoxicity, effects on cytokine release, and cell uptake. These data identified a lead formulation, 11-MUDA capped gold nanoparticles, to test for labeling primary monocytes. The formulation did not the affect the viability or cytokine release of primary monocytes and was highly taken up by these cells. Gold labeled primary monocytes were injected into apolipoprotein E deficient mice kept on Western diet for 10 weeks. Imaging was done with a microCT scanner. A significant increase in attenuation was measured in the aorta of mice receiving the gold labeled cells as compared to control animals. Following the experiment, the biodistribution of gold was evaluated in major organs. Additionally, plaques were sectioned and examined with electron microscopy. The results showed that gold nanoparticles were present inside monocytes located within plaques. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles as effective cell labeling contrast agents for non-invasive imaging of monocyte accumulation within plaques with CT.

  6. In vitro modulation of caprine monocyte immune functions by ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecchi, Cristina; Invernizzi, Guido; Agazzi, Alessandro; Ferroni, Mariella; Pisani, Laura Francesca; Savoini, Giovanni; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    The in vitro effects of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) on phagocytosis and the extracellular respiratory burst in caprine monocytes were assessed. Blood monocytes incubated with increasing concentrations of EPA or DHA (25-200 μM) demonstrated increased phagocytosis compared to unexposed monocytes. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was not markedly affected in the presence of EPA and DHA, except at 200 μM, at which concentrations monocyte viability was also reduced.

  7. The multiple roles of monocyte subsets in steady state and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Clinton S; Swirski, Filip K

    2010-08-01

    Monocytes participate importantly in immunity. Produced in the bone marrow and released into the blood, they circulate in blood or reside in a spleen reservoir before entering tissue and giving rise to macrophages or dendritic cells. Monocytes are more than transitional cells that adapt to a particular tissue environment indiscriminately. Accumulating evidence now indicates that monocytes are heterogeneous in several species and are themselves predetermined for particular function in the steady state and inflammation. Future therapeutics may harness this heterogeneity to target harmful functions while sparing those that are beneficial. Here, we review recent advances on the ontogeny and function of monocytes and their subsets in humans and mice.

  8. Differential Expression of CD163 on Monocyte Subsets in Healthy and HIV-1 Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Emma; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Westhorpe, Clare; Cameron, Paul U.; Brew, Bruce J.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Jaworowski, Anthony; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004), supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16− monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16− monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively), which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16− subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16− monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD163

  9. Differential expression of CD163 on monocyte subsets in healthy and HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Tippett

    Full Text Available CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004, supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16- monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively, which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16- subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16- monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD

  10. Differential expression of monocyte surface markers among TB patients with diabetes co-morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stew, Samuel S; Martinez, Perla J; Schlesinger, Larry S; Restrepo, Blanca I

    2013-12-01

    The expression of monocyte surface markers was compared between tuberculosis patients with and without type 2 diabetes (DM2). DM2 was associated with increased CCR2 expression, which may restrain monocyte traffic to the lung. Other host factors associated with baseline monocyte changes were older age (associated with lower CD11b) and obesity (associated with higher RAGE). Given that DM2 patients are more likely to be older and obese, their monocytes are predicted to be altered in function in ways that affect their interaction with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  11. Modulation of the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in stimulated human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlin-Hansen, L.; Eskeland, T.; Kolset, S.O. (Univ. of Tromso (Norway))

    1989-09-05

    Proteoglycan biosynthesis was studied in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after exposure to typical activators of the monocyte/macrophage system: interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). By morphological examination, both monocytes and MDM were stimulated by these activators. Treatment with IFN-gamma resulted in a slight decrease in the expression of (35S)chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) in both monocytes and MDM, whereas LPS treatment increased the (35S)CSPG expression 1.8 and 2.2 times, respectively. PMA, in contrast, decreased the CSPG expression 0.4 times in monocytes, whereas MDM were stimulated to increase the biosynthesis 1.9 times. An increase in the sulfate density of the chondroitin sulfate chains was evident following differentiation of monocytes into MDM due to the expression of disulfated disaccharide units of the chondroitin sulfate E type (CS-E). However, monocytes exposed to PMA did also express disaccharides of the chondroitin sulfate E type. Furthermore, the expression of CS-E in MDM was increased 2 times following PMA treatment. An inactive phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-diacetate, did not affect the expression of CS-E in either monocytes or MDM when compared with control cultures, suggesting that protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways may be involved in the regulation of sulfation of CSPG. Exposure to LPS or IFN-gamma did not lead to any changes in the sulfation of the chondroitin sulfate chains.

  12. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lissner, Michelle M; Thomas, Brandon J; Wee, Kathleen; Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R; Smale, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    .... An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults...

  13. The International Organization for Migration in Global Migration Governance

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This project focuses on the IOM, the notion of global governance of migration and the interaction between these two. The point of departure has been an attempt to grasp the current global approach to migration and comprehend whether, or to what degree, there is governance of migration issues taking place at a global level.

  14. Globalization, Migration and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishMigration may become the most important branch of demography in the earlydecades of the new millennium in a rapidly globalizing world. This paper discusses the causes, costsand benefits of international migration to countries of the South and North, and key issues of commonconcern. International migration is as old as national boundaries, though its nature, volume,direction, causes and consequences have changed. The causes of migration are rooted in the rate ofpopulation growth and the proportion of youth in the population, their education and training,employment opportunities, income differentials in society, communication and transportationfacilities, political freedom and human rights and level of urbanization. Migration benefits the Souththrough remittances of migrants, improves the economic welfare of the population (particularly womenof South countries generally, increases investment, and leads to structural changes in the economy.However, emigration from the South has costs too, be they social or caused by factors such as braindrain. The North also benefits by migration through enhancement of economic growth, development ofnatural resources, improved employment prospects, social development and through exposure toimmigrants' new cultures and lifestyles. Migration also has costs to the North such as of immigrantintegration, a certain amount of destabilization of the economy, illegal immigration, and socialproblems of discrimination and exploitation. Issues common to both North and South include impact onprivate investment, trade, international cooperation, and sustainable development. Both North andSouth face a dilemma in seeking an appropriate balance between importing South's labour or itsproducts and exporting capital and technology from the North.FrenchLa migration est sans doute devenue la partie la plus importante de la démographie des premières décennies du nouveau millénaire dans un monde qui change rapidement. Ce

  15. Adiponectin Promotes Monocyte-to-Fibroblast Transition in Renal Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Lin, Song-Chang; Chen, Gang; He, Liqun; Hu, Zhaoyong; Chan, Lawrence; Trial, JoAnn; Entman, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow–derived fibroblasts may contribute substantially to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis through the excessive production and deposition of extracellular matrix. However, the mechanisms underlying the accumulation and activation of these fibroblasts are not understood. Here, we used a mouse model of tubulointerstitial fibrosis to determine whether adiponectin, which is elevated in CKD and is associated with disease progression, regulates monocyte-to-fibroblast transition and fibroblast activation in injured kidneys. In wild-type mice, the expression of adiponectin and the number of bone marrow–derived fibroblasts in the kidney increased after renal obstruction. In contrast, the obstructed kidneys of adiponectin-knockout mice had fewer bone marrow–derived fibroblasts. Adiponectin deficiency also led to a reduction in the number of myofibroblasts, the expression of profibrotic chemokines and cytokines, and the number of procollagen-expressing M2 macrophages in injured kidneys. Consistent with these findings, adiponectin-deficiency reduced the expression of collagen I and fibronectin. Similar results were observed in wild-type and adiponectin-knockout mice after ischemia-reperfusion injury. In cultured bone marrow–derived monocytes, adiponectin stimulated the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and extracellular matrix proteins and activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, specific activation of AMPK increased the expression of α-SMA and extracellular matrix proteins, while inhibition of AMPK attenuated these responses. Taken together, these findings identify adiponectin as a critical regulator of monocyte-to-fibroblast transition and renal fibrosis, suggesting that inhibition of adiponectin/AMPK signaling may represent a novel therapeutic target for fibrotic kidney disease. PMID:23833260

  16. Monocyte function in intravenous drug abusers with lymphadenopathy syndrome and in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: selective impairment of chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, G; Bottazzi, B; Acero, R; Bersani, L; Rossi, V; Introna, M; Lazzarin, A; Galli, M; Mantovani, A

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated monocyte function in 17 intravenous drug abusers with the clinical and laboratory features of lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS). LAS patients had normal numbers of circulating monocytes. Monocytes from LAS patients were comparable to cells from normal donors in terms of phagocytosis of latex beads, interleukin-1 secretion, O2- release and killing of antibody-sensitized lymphoma cells or actinomycin D pretreated WEHI 164 cells. In contrast 13 out of 17 LAS subjects tested in this respect as well as six out of nine AIDS patients showed a marked defect of monocyte chemotaxis. Thus monocytes from patients with LAS or AIDS have a selective defect of monocyte chemotaxis. PMID:2998656

  17. CHARACTERISTICS OF MIGRATION IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela DĂNĂCICĂ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the patterns of migration in Romania. Labor migration in Romania has seen major growth after 1989. Permanent migration rapidly increased in the early years after the revolution, decreasing rapidly thereafter, due to difficulties of obtaining long term residence and work permit in the host countries. However, temporary migration has been found to evolve very dynamically, requiring economic analysis of potential externalities, whether positive or the negative of this phenomenon.

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF MIGRATION IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela DĂNĂCICĂ

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the patterns of migration in Romania. Labor migration in Romania has seen major growth after 1989. Permanent migration rapidly increased in the early years after the revolution, decreasing rapidly thereafter, due to difficulties of obtaining long term residence and work permit in the host countries. However, temporary migration has been found to evolve very dynamically, requiring economic analysis of potential externalities, whet...

  19. International migration under the microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.; Massey, D.; Raymer, J.; Beauchemin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Although humanitarian crises, such as the ongoing mass exodus from Syria toward Europe, tend to focus global attention on migration, each year millions of people migrate to and from affected countries throughout the world. Progress has been made in understanding drivers of migration, and we have

  20. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the pancreas of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong; ZHU Su-wen; LIU Dong-juan; LIU Guo-liang; SHAN Zhong-yan

    2005-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes has been recognized as an organ specific autoimmune disease owing to the immune destruction of pancreatic islet β cells in genetically susceptible individuals.In both human and rodent models of type 1 diabetes, such as nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, biobreeding rats, the disease has a distinct stage characterized by immune cells infiltrating in the pancreas (insulitis).The major populations of infiltrating cells are macrophages and T lymphocytes.Therefore, immune cell infiltration of pancreatic islets may be a crucial step in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 can specifically attract monocytes in vivo.Interferon induced protein-10 has chemoattractant effects on the activated lymphocytes.In this study, we analysed the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the pancreas of mice and interferon inducible protein-10 mRNA in the pancreas of NOD mice, and discussed their possible role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.Methods The immunohistochemical method and immunoelectronmicroscopy were used to evaluate the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the pancreas of NOD mice and BALB/c mice.RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interferon inducible protein mRNA in NOD mice.Results Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was positive in the pancreas of NOD mice, whereas negative in the pancreas of BALB/C mice.RT-PCR showed that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interferon inducible protein-10 mRNA could be found in the pancreas of NOD mice.Immunoelectronmicroscopy demonstrated that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was produced by β cells and stored in the cytoplasm of the cells.Conclusions Pancreatic islet β cells produce monocyte chemoattractantprotein-1 in NOD mice.Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 may play an important part in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes by attracting monocytes/macrophages to infiltrate pancreatic

  1. Monocyte Activation by Necrotic Cells Is Promoted by Mitochondrial Proteins and Formyl Peptide Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouser, Elliott D.; Shao, Guohong; Julian, Mark W.; Macre, Jennifer E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Huang, Qin; Wewers, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Necrotic cells evoke potent innate immune responses through unclear mechanisms. The mitochondrial fraction of the cell retains constituents of its bacterial ancestors, including N-formyl peptides, which are potentially immunogenic. Thus, we hypothesized that the mitochondrial fraction of the cell, particularly N-formyl peptides, contributes significantly to the activation of monocytes by necrotic cells. Design Human peripheral blood monocytes were incubated with necrotic cell fractions and mitochondrial proteins in order to investigate their potential for immune cell activation. Setting University medical center research laboratory. Subjects Healthy human adults served as blood donors. Measurements and Main Results Human blood monocyte activation was measured after treatment with cytosolic, nuclear and mitochondrial fractions of necrotic HepG2 cells or necrotic HepG2 cells depleted of N-formyl peptides [Rho(0) cells]. The specific role of the high affinity formyl peptide receptor (FPR) was then tested using specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing. The capacity of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides to activate monocytes was confirmed using a synthetic peptide conforming to the N-terminus of mitochondrial NADH subunit 6. The results demonstrated that mitochondrial cell fractions most potently activated monocytes, and IL-8 was selectively released at low protein concentrations. Mitochondria from Rho(0) cells induced minimal monocyte IL-8 release, and specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing confirmed that FPR contributes significantly to monocyte IL-8 responses to both necrotic cells and mitochondrial proteins. N-formyl peptides alone did not induce monocyte IL-8 release; whereas, the combination of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) dramatically increased IL-8 release from monocytes. Likewise, HMGB1, the nuclear homologue of TFAM, did not induce monocyte IL-8 release unless combined with

  2. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchta, Alicja; Naidoo, Avee; Verschoor, Chris P; Loukov, Dessi; Thevaranjan, Netusha; Mandur, Talveer S; Nguyen, Phuong-Son; Jordana, Manel; Loeb, Mark; Xing, Zhou; Kobzik, Lester; Larché, Maggie J; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18-22 mo) mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this "age-associated inflammation" as they produced more of the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNF in the steady state and when stimulated with bacterial products. Using an aged mouse model of pneumococcal colonization we found that chronic exposure to TNF with age altered the maturity of circulating monocytes, as measured by F4/80 expression, and this decrease in monocyte maturation was directly linked to susceptibility to infection. Ly6C+ monocytes from old mice had higher levels of CCR2 expression, which promoted premature egress from the bone marrow when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although Ly6C+ monocyte recruitment and TNF levels in the blood and nasopharnyx were higher in old mice during S. pneumoniae colonization, bacterial clearance was impaired. Counterintuitively, elevated TNF and excessive monocyte recruitment in old mice contributed to impaired anti-pneumococcal immunity since bacterial clearance was improved upon pharmacological reduction of TNF or Ly6C+ monocytes, which were the major producers of TNF. Thus, with age TNF impairs inflammatory monocyte development, function and promotes premature egress, which contribute to systemic inflammation and is ultimately detrimental to anti-pneumococcal immunity.

  3. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Puchta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18-22 mo mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this "age-associated inflammation" as they produced more of the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNF in the steady state and when stimulated with bacterial products. Using an aged mouse model of pneumococcal colonization we found that chronic exposure to TNF with age altered the maturity of circulating monocytes, as measured by F4/80 expression, and this decrease in monocyte maturation was directly linked to susceptibility to infection. Ly6C+ monocytes from old mice had higher levels of CCR2 expression, which promoted premature egress from the bone marrow when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although Ly6C+ monocyte recruitment and TNF levels in the blood and nasopharnyx were higher in old mice during S. pneumoniae colonization, bacterial clearance was impaired. Counterintuitively, elevated TNF and excessive monocyte recruitment in old mice contributed to impaired anti-pneumococcal immunity since bacterial clearance was improved upon pharmacological reduction of TNF or Ly6C+ monocytes, which were the major producers of TNF. Thus, with age TNF impairs inflammatory monocyte development, function and promotes premature egress, which contribute to systemic inflammation and is ultimately detrimental to anti-pneumococcal immunity.

  4. Diabetic conditions promote binding of monocytes to vascular smooth muscle cells and their subsequent differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Park, Jehyun; Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes is associated with significantly accelerated rates of atherosclerosis, key features of which include the presence of excessive macrophage-derived foam cells in the subendothelial space. We examined the hypothesis that enhanced monocyte-vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) interactions leading to subendothelial monocyte retention and differentiation to macrophages under diabetic conditions may be underlying mechanisms. Human aortic VSMCs (HVSMCs) treated with diabetic stimuli high glucose (HG) or S100B, a ligand of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, exhibited significantly increased binding of THP-1 monocytic cells. Diabetic stimuli increased the expression of the adhesive chemokine fractalkine (FKN) in HVSMCs. Pretreatment of HVSMCs with FKN or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) neutralizing antibodies significantly inhibited monocyte-VSMC binding, whereas monocytes treated with FKN showed enhanced binding to VSMC. Mouse aortic VSMCs (MVSMCs) derived from type 2 diabetic db/db mice exhibited significantly increased FKN levels and binding to mouse WEHI78/24 monocytic cells relative to nondiabetic control db/+ cells. The enhanced monocyte binding in db/db cells was abolished by both FKN and MCP-1 antibodies. Endothelium-denuded aortas from db/db mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice also exhibited enhanced FKN expression and monocyte binding, relative to respective controls. Coculture with HVSMCs increased CD36 expression in THP-1 cells, and this was significantly augmented by treatment of HVSMCs with S100B or HG. CD36 mRNA and protein levels were also significantly increased in WEHI78/24 cells after coincubation with db/db MVSMCs relative to control MVSMCs. These results demonstrate that diabetic conditions may accelerate atherosclerosis by inducing key chemokines in the vasculature that promote VSMC-monocyte interactions, subendothelial monocyte retention, and differentiation.

  5. Aged mice have increased inflammatory monocyte concentration and altered expression of cell-surface functional receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kelley Strohacker; Whitney L Breslin; Katie C Carpenter; Brian K McFarlin

    2012-03-01

    The expression of monocyte cell-surface receptors represents one index of immune dysfunction, which is common with aging. Although mouse models of aging are prevalent, monocyte subset assessment is rare. Our purpose was to compare cell receptor expression on classic (CD115+/Gr-1high) and non-classic (CD115+/Gr-1low) monocytes from 80- or 20-week-old CD-1 mice. Three-colour flow cytometry was used to determine the concentration of monocyte subsets and their respective cell-surface expression of TLR2, TLR4, CD80, CD86, MHC II and CD54. These receptors were selected because they have been previously associated with altered monocyte function. Data were analysed with independent -tests; significance was set at < 0.05. Old mice had a greater concentration of both classic (258%, =0.003) and non-classic (70%, =0.026) monocytes. The classic : non-classic monocyte ratio doubled in old as compared with that in young mice (=0.006), indicating a pro-inflammatory shift. TLR4 ($\\downarrow$27%, =0.001) and CD80 ($\\downarrow$37%, =0.004) were decreased on classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. TLR2 ($\\uparrow$24%, =0.002) and MHCII ($\\downarrow$21%, =0.026) were altered on non-classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. The increased classic : non-classic monocyte ratio combined with changes in the cell-surface receptor expression on both monocyte subsets is indicative of immune dysfunction, which may increase age-associated disease risk.

  6. Migrating for a Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2015-01-01

    a strong sense of agency and self-empowerment. In the post-WWII period, numerous Caribbean women trained in nursing at British hospitals that have been described as marred by race and gender related inequality and associated forms of exploitation. Yet, the nurses interviewed about this training emphasised......Youths from the Global South migrating for further education often face various forms of discrimination. This Caribbean case study discusses how conditions in the home country can provide a foundation for educational migration that helps the migrants overcome such obstacles and even develop...... its high quality and downplayed the problems encountered. This positive attitude, it is argued, must be understood in the light of the key ideological role of education, particularly for a profession, as an avenue of social and personal mobility in the late-colonial Caribbean societies and the ways...

  7. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  8. Religion, migration og integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Jørn

    2010-01-01

    Sammenhængen mellem religion og integration har de sidste år været genstand for debat. Artiklen kommer ind på begreber og sammenhænge relateret til området (migration, diaspora, assimilation, etnicitet, kultur) og ser på religionens mulige rolle som negativ eller positiv ressource i integrationss......Sammenhængen mellem religion og integration har de sidste år været genstand for debat. Artiklen kommer ind på begreber og sammenhænge relateret til området (migration, diaspora, assimilation, etnicitet, kultur) og ser på religionens mulige rolle som negativ eller positiv ressource i...

  9. Tracking migrating birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Mikkel

    and many experiments are only becoming possible with the current development of tracking technologies. During this thesis work I have been tracking the poorly known movements of several species of long-distance migrants and document highly complex migration patterns. In three manuscripts these movements......Migratory movements of birds has always fascinated man and led to many questions concerning the ecological drivers behind, the necessary adaptations and the navigational abilities required. However, especially for the long-distance migrants, basic descriptions of their movements are still lacking...... habitats with those in rural habitats. Some species have decreased the frequency of migrants and migration distance in urban environments, and others have not. The other manuscript describes the small scale movements of three different Palaearctic migrants during winter in Africa in a farmland habitat...

  10. Managing the Mass Migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Xinzhen

    2012-01-01

    Big crowds and foul air on the train,frighteningly long queues and fierce clashes at the station...these are common scenes during China's Spring Festival travel rush.The annual travel peak is known as the world's biggest human migration.This year's stampede is still ongoing.Lasting over 40 days,people began retuming to their hometowns on January 8 and the final stragglers will make their way back to the cities by February 16.

  11. Migration with fiscal externalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercowitz, Z; Pines, D

    1991-11-01

    "This paper analyses the distribution of a country's population among regions when migration involves fiscal externalities. The main question addressed is whether a decentralized decision making [by] regional governments can produce an optimal population distribution...or a centralized intervention is indispensable, as argued before in the literature.... It turns out that, while with costless mobility the fiscal externality is fully internalized by voluntary interregional transfers, with costly mobility, centrally coordinated transfers still remain indispensable for achieving the socially optimal allocation."

  12. Making Migration Meaningful

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benwell, Ann Fenger

    2013-01-01

    of absence by migrant family members, as both men and women are culturally permitted to be separate from their families. Migration is understood to contribute to prosperity, and separations contribute to generate growth and hishig (good fortune) for the good of the family. However, such mobility is also...... inadvertently contributed to the breakdown of the institutions of marriage and family – institutions that were supported by separations in the pastoral economy...

  13. Enforcement and illegal migration

    OpenAIRE

    Orrenius, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Border enforcement of immigration laws attempts to raise the costs of illegal immigration, while interior enforcement also lowers the benefits. Border and interior enforcement therefore reduce the net benefits of illegal immigration and should lower the probability that an individual will decide to migrate. While some empirical studies find that border and interior enforcement serve as significant deterrents to illegal immigration, immigration enforcement is costly and carries significant uni...

  14. Functorial Data Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Spivak, David I

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple database definition language: that of categories and functors. A database schema is a category and a state is a set-valued functor. We show that morphisms of schemas induce three "data migration functors" that translate states from one schema to the other in canonical ways. Database states form a boolean topos of which the classical "relational algebra" is a fragment. These ideas thus create a new denotational semantics for database theory.

  15. Gender and migration from Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklov, Guy; Carletto, Calogero; Azzarri, Carlo; Davis, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    This article examines the dynamics and causes of the shift in the gender composition of migration, and more particularly, in women's access to migration opportunities and decision-making. Our analysis focuses on Albania, a natural laboratory for studying international migration where out-migration was essentially nonexistent from the end of World War II to the end of the 1980s. Interest in the Albanian case is heightened because of the complex layers of inequality existing at the time when migration began: relatively low levels of inequality within the labor market and educational system-a product of the Communist era-while household relations remained heavily steeped in tradition and patriarchy. We use micro-level data from the Albania 2005 Living Standards Measurement Study, including migration histories for family members since migration began. Based on discrete-time hazard models, the analysis shows a dramatic increase in male migration and a gradual and uneven expansion of the female proportion of this international migration. Female migration, which is shown to be strongly associated with education, wealth, and social capital, appears responsive to economic incentives and constraints. Using information on the dependency of female migration to the household demographic structure as well as the sensitivity of female migration to household-level shocks, we show how household-level constraints and incentives affect male and female migration differently. Throughout this period, however, women's migration behavior appears more directly aligned with household-level factors, and there is little evidence to suggest that increased female migration signals rising behavioral independence among Albanian women.

  16. Conservation physiology of animal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Souliere, Christopher M; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  17. Circulating classical CD14++CD16− monocytes predict shorter time to initial treatment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients: Differential effects of immune chemotherapy on monocyte-related membrane and soluble forms of CD163

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LAPUC, IZABELA; BOLKUN, LUKASZ; ELJASZEWICZ, ANDRZEJ; RUSAK, MALGORZATA; LUKSZA, EWA; SINGH, PAULINA; MIKLASZ, PAULA; PISZCZ, JAROSLAW; PTASZYNSKA-KOPCZYNSKA, KATARZYNA; JASIEWICZ, MALGORZATA; KAMINSKI, KAROL; DABROWSKA, MILENA; BODZENTA-LUKASZYK, ANNA; KLOCZKO, JANUSZ; MONIUSZKO, MARCIN

    2015-01-01

    ...). Moreover, we set out to analyze the effects of standard immune chemotherapy on different monocyte subsets and levels of membrane-associated and soluble forms of CD163, a monocyte/macrophage-related...

  18. Hydrodynamics of pronuclear migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule (MT) filaments play a key role in many processes involved in cell devision including spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and pronuclear positioning. We present a direct numerical technique to simulate MT dynamics in such processes. Our method includes hydrodynamically mediated interactions between MTs and other cytoskeletal objects, using singularity methods for Stokes flow. Long-ranged many-body hydrodynamic interactions are computed using a highly efficient and scalable fast multipole method, enabling the simulation of thousands of MTs. Our simulation method also takes into account the flexibility of MTs using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory as well as their dynamic instability. Using this technique, we simulate pronuclear migration in single-celled Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Two different positioning mechanisms, based on the interactions of MTs with the motor proteins and the cell cortex, are explored: cytoplasmic pulling and cortical pushing. We find that although the pronuclear complex migrates towards the center of the cell in both models, the generated cytoplasmic flows are fundamentally different. This suggest that cytoplasmic flow visualization during pronuclear migration can be utilized to differentiate between the two mechanisms.

  19. A case of human monocytic ehrlichiosis in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ehrlichiosis is a bacterial zoonosis transmitted by hematophagous arthropods - ticks. In humans, it occurs as monocytic, granulocytic, and ewingii ehrlichiosis. Pathological process is based on parasitic presence of Ehrlichia organisms within peripheral blood cells - monocytes and granulocytes. Case Outline. Fifty-two year old patient was admitted to hospital due to high fever of over 40°C that lasted two days, accompanied with chills, muscle aches, malaise, loss of appetite, headache, confusion, breathing difficulties, and mild dry cough. The history suggested tick bite that occurred seven days before the onset of disease. Doxycycline was introduced and administered for 14 days, causing the disease to subside. Indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to analyze three serum samples obtained from this patient for Ehrlichia chaffeensis antibodies, and peripheral blood smear was evaluated for the presence of Ehrlichia and Ehrlichia aggregation into morulae. Conclusion. Ehrlichiosis should be considered in each case where there is a history of tick bite together with the clinical picture (high fever, chills, muscle aches, headache, generalized weakness and malaise, and possible maculopapular rash. The presence of Ehrlichia chaffeensis antibodies was confirmed in a patient with the history of tick bite, appropriate clinical picture and indirect immunofluorescence assay. This confirmed the presence of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis, a disease that is uncommonly identified in our country.

  20. Interleukin 18 stimulates HIV type 1 in monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, L; Puren, A J; Barton, H A; Novick, D; Peskind, R L; Shenkar, R; Gu, Y; Su, M S; Dinarello, C A

    1998-10-13

    The cytokine interleukin (IL) 18 (formerly interferon gamma-inducing factor) induces the T helper type 1 response. In the present studies, IL-18 increased HIV type 1 (HIV-1) production from 5- to 30-fold in the chronically infected U1 monocytic cell line. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity by the addition of TNF-binding protein reduced IL-18-stimulated HIV-1 production by 48%. In the same cultures, IL-18-induced IL-8 was inhibited by 96%. Also, a neutralizing anti-IL-6 mAb reduced IL-18-induced HIV-1 by 63%. Stimulation of U1 cells with IL-18 resulted in increased production of IL-6, and exogenous IL-6 added to U1 cells increased HIV-1 production 4-fold over control. A specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase reduced IL-18-induced HIV-1 by 73%, and a 50% inhibition was observed at 0.05 microM. In the same cultures, IL-8 was inhibited by 87%. By gel-shift and supershift analyses, increased binding activity of the transcription factor NF-kappaB was measured in nuclear extracts from U1 cells 1 h after exposure to IL-18. These results demonstrate induction of HIV-1 by IL-18 in a monocyte target associated with an intermediate role for TNF and IL-6, activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  1. Effects of Two Fullerene Derivatives on Monocytes and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Pacor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two fullerene derivatives (fullerenes 1 and 2, bearing a hydrophilic chain on the pyrrolidinic nitrogen, were developed with the aim to deliver anticancer agents to solid tumors. These two compounds showed a significantly different behaviour on human neoplastic cell lines in vitro in respect to healthy leukocytes. In particular, the pyrrolidinium ring on the fullerene carbon cage brings to a more active compound. In the present work, we describe the effects of these fullerenes on primary cultures of human monocytes and macrophages, two kinds of immune cells representing the first line of defence in the immune response to foreign materials. These compounds are not recognized by circulating monocytes while they get into macrophages. The evaluation of the pronecrotic or proapoptotic effects, analysed by means of analysis of the purinergic receptor P2X7 activation and of ROS scavenging activity, has allowed us to show that fullerene 2, but not its analogue fullerene 1, displays toxicity, even though at concentrations higher than those shown to be active on neoplastic cells.

  2. Effects of Two Fullerene Derivatives on Monocytes and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacor, Sabrina; Grillo, Alberto; Đorđević, Luka; Zorzet, Sonia; Lucafò, Marianna; Da Ros, Tatiana; Prato, Maurizio; Sava, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Two fullerene derivatives (fullerenes 1 and 2), bearing a hydrophilic chain on the pyrrolidinic nitrogen, were developed with the aim to deliver anticancer agents to solid tumors. These two compounds showed a significantly different behaviour on human neoplastic cell lines in vitro in respect to healthy leukocytes. In particular, the pyrrolidinium ring on the fullerene carbon cage brings to a more active compound. In the present work, we describe the effects of these fullerenes on primary cultures of human monocytes and macrophages, two kinds of immune cells representing the first line of defence in the immune response to foreign materials. These compounds are not recognized by circulating monocytes while they get into macrophages. The evaluation of the pronecrotic or proapoptotic effects, analysed by means of analysis of the purinergic receptor P2X7 activation and of ROS scavenging activity, has allowed us to show that fullerene 2, but not its analogue fullerene 1, displays toxicity, even though at concentrations higher than those shown to be active on neoplastic cells.

  3. Clinical history and hematological findings among canines with monocytic ehrlichiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonarmart, Walasinee; Sungpradit, Sivapong; Rawangchue, Thanakorn; Suphaphiphat, Karuna; Suksusieng, Sineenart; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk

    2014-01-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is a tick borne disease caused by Ehrlichia canis, an obligate intracellular rickettsial organism belonging to the family Anaplasmataceae. Canine ehrlichiosis causes hemaotological changes among infected animals which could be used as a potential predictor for diagnosing canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). Ninety-four blood samples were obtained from canines that either presented for a routine health check-up or for clinical illness. A history, physical and laboratory test were conducted on each animal. All samples were examined for E. canis using a 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification to confirm CME infection. Thirty-six of the samples were positive for E. canis using PCR and the rest were negative. The Mann-Whitney and chi-square test were used to compare the differences between the PCR-positive and negative animals. PCR-positive animals had a higher mean body temperature than PCR-negative animals. The following were significantly lower in PCR-positive animals: white blood cell count, eosinophil count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet count, and the random distribution of width (RDW) of the red blood cells. We evaluated complete blood cell count findings to determine factors associated with CME using multivariable logistic regression analysis and found thrombocytopenia was significantly associated with CME (OR = 0.085; 95% CI: 0.78-0.92, p < 0.001). For every decrease in the platelet count of 10,000 there was a 15% increase in the likelihood of having CME.

  4. Migrations in Slovenian geography textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Senegačnik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, the migrations are treated in almost all geographical textbooks for different levels of education. In the textbooks for the elementary school from the sixth to ninth grade, students acquire knowledge of the migrations by the inductive approach. Difficulty level of treatment and quantity of information are increasing by the age level. In the grammar school program a trail of gaining knowledge on migration is deductive. Most attention is dedicated to migrations in general geography textbooks. The textbooks for vocational and technical school programs deal with migrations to a lesser extent and with different approaches.

  5. Blood monocyte oxidative burst activity in acute P. falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Theander, T G

    1989-01-01

    The release of superoxide anion from blood monocytes was studied in eight patients with acute primary attack P. falciparum malaria. Before treatment a significant enhancement of the oxidative burst prevailed, which contrasts with previous findings of a depressed monocyte chemotactic responsiveness....... During treatment and after clinical recovery the activity of superoxide anion release normalized in all patients....

  6. The immune theory of psychiatric diseases : a key role for activated microglia and circulating monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, Wouter; Gibney, Sinead M.; Drexhage, Roosmarijn C.; Pont-Lezica, Lorena; Doorduin, Janine; Klein, Hans C.; Steiner, Johann; Connor, Thomas J.; Harkin, Andrew; Versnel, Marjan A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes a key role for mononuclear phagocytes in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. There is accumulating evidence for activation of microglia (histopathology and PET scans) and circulating monocytes (enhanced gene expression of immune genes, an overproduction of monocyte

  7. DYSFUNCTION OF MONOCYTES AND DENDRITIC CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH PREMATURE OVARIAN FAILURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEK, A; VAN KASTEREN, Y; DE HAAN-MEULMAN, M; SCHOEMAKER, J; DREXHAGE, HA

    1993-01-01

    PROBLEM: Due to the presence of ovarian antibodies it has been suggested that premature ovarian failure (POF) belongs to the autoimmune endocrinopathies. Monocytes and the monocyte-derived dendritic cells play a prominent role in the initial stages of endocrine autoimmune reactions: the accumulation

  8. Phenotypic, functional, and quantitative characterization of canine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Bueno

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The yield as well as phenotypic and functional parameters of canine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were analyzed. The cells that remained adherent to Teflon after 10 days of culture had high phagocytic activity when inoculated with Leishmania chagasi. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of cultured cells were positive for the monocyte/macrophage marker CD14.

  9. Evidence for a dual function of monocyte-derived mononuclear phagocytes during chronic intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Pool, Lieneke; Frising, Ulrika

    Mononuclear phagocytes derived from tissue-infiltrating monocytes play diverse roles in immunity, ranging from pathogen killing to immune regulation. We and others showed that, upon recruitment to the intestinal mucosa, the differentiation of Ly6Chi monocytes into phagocytes with anti- versus pro...... suggest a dual and time-restricted contribution of MDP during the development and healing phases of the disease....

  10. High glucose-induced oxidative stress increases transient receptor potential channel expression in human monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wuensch, Tilo; Thilo, Florian; Krueger, Katharina;

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel-induced cation influx activates human monocytes, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of high glucose-induced oxidative stress on TRP channel expression in human monocytes....

  11. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Pro-Inflammatory Monocytes in Bipolar Disorder A Twin Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padmos, Roos C.; Van Baal, G. Caroline M.; Vonk, Ronald; Wijkhuijs, Annemarie J. M.; Kahn, Rene S.; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    Context: A monocyte pro-inflammatory state has previously been reported in bipolar disorder (BD). Objective: To determine the contribution of genetic and environmental influences on the association between monocyte pro- inflammatory state and BD. Design: A quantitative polymerase chain reaction

  12. Tumour necrosis factor and eicosanoid production from monocytes exposed to HIV in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, J; Kabrit, P; Hansen, J E;

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that exposure of monocytes to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) augments production of proinflammatory mediators. The production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and the eicosanoids PGE2 and LTB4 from human monocytes was evaluated after exposure to two...

  13. Monocyte cell surface glycosaminoglycans positively modulate IL-4-induced differentiation toward dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, E. den; Grefte, S.; Huijs, T.; Dam, G.B. ten; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Berk, L.C.J. van den; Bladergroen, B.A.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.

    2008-01-01

    IL-4 induces the differentiation of monocytes toward dendritic cells (DCs). The activity of many cytokines is modulated by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In this study, we explored the effect of GAGs on the IL-4-induced differentiation of monocytes toward DCs. IL-4 dose-dependently up-regulated the expr

  14. Reticuloendothelial cell function in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA: studies on the mechanism of peripheral monocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the activity of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA using an in vitro assay of monocyte-macrophage interaction with erythrocytes and an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC assay. The monocytes of AIHA patients in the hemolyzing period phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells and anti-D coated red cells more avidly than normal control monocytes. There was no significant relationship between phagocytic activity and ADCC activity. The activated monocytes phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells, but had no ADCC activity in a short time 51Cr release assay. Phagocytic activity of the patients' monocytes against autologous erythrocytes rapidly decreased after treatment with prednisolone even though the red cell sensitization with antibody remained almost the same as during the hemolyzing period. We postulated that the activation of monocytes in AIHA was due to the "arming" effect of anti-erythrocyte antibody, but we think that other mechanisms may also be involved in the activation of monocytes.

  15. [Peripheral blood monocyte hepcidin in patients with multiple myeloma is associated with anemia of chronic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Zhou, Dao-Bin; Duan, Ming-Hui; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Jie-Ping; Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Shen, Ti; Wu, Yong-Ji

    2013-04-01

    Disorders of iron utilization caused by abnormal elevation of hepcidin levels are the main mechanism of anemia of chronic disease. Hepcidin is mainly produced by the liver. Recently it has been found that monocytes are another source of hepcidin. The increased hepcidin in serum and urine of multiple myeloma patients may be one cause of anemia of chronic disease (ACD). However it is unclear whether the peripheral blood monocyte hepcidin is involved in the pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease. This study was purposed to investigate the role of monocyte hepcidin in multiple myeloma patients with anemia of chronic disease. The clinical data and peripheral venous blood of multiple myeloma patients were collected.Serum concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α was detected by ELISA. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated by CD14(+) magnetic beads. Hepcidin, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA of monocytes were detected by real time quantitative PCR. The results showed that the expression level of monocyte hepcidin mRNA in myeloma patients was higher than that in normal controls. In untreated patients, the expression level of monocyte hepcidin mRNA was negatively correlated with hemoglobin, and positively correlated with serum ferritin and IL-6 levels, but unrelated with TNF-α levels.It is concluded that the increased monocyte hepcidin levels in multiple myeloma patients may play an etiologic role in ACD.

  16. The subcellular particulate NADPH-dependent O2.(-)-generating oxidase from human blood monocytes: comparison to the neutrophil system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, A N; Santinga, J T; Gabig, T G

    1982-10-01

    Highly purified preparations of normal human monocytes obtained from peripheral blood were shown to contain a subcellular particulate O2.(-)-generating oxidase system. This O2.(-)-generating activity was present in particulate preparations from monocytes that had been previously stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate but was low or absent in control preparations from unstimulated monocytes or stimulated monocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. In the stimulated preparations from normal monocytes, O2.(-)-generation was linearly proportional to cell protein concentration, insensitive to inhibition by azide, and dependent on NADPH as substrate. These characteristics are similar to the O2.(-)-generating oxidase system from human neutrophils. A significant difference in the apparent Km for NADPH was shown between preparations from stimulated monocytes and neutrophils (monocyte 83 +/- 16 microM, neutrophil 31 +/- 5 microM, mean +/- SE). Additionally, affinity of the stimulated monocyte particulate preparation for NADH was unmeasurably low.

  17. Comparative analysis of signature genes in PRRSV-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these c...

  18. IL-4 induces cAMP and cGMP in human monocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dugas

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human monocytes, preincubated with IFN-γ respond to IL-4 by a cGMP increase through activation of an inducible NO synthase. Here, IL-4 was found to induce an accumulation of cGMP (1 – 3 min and cAMP (20 – 25 min in unstimulated monocytes. This was impaired with NOS inhibitors, but also with EGTA and calcium/calmodulin inhibitors. These results suggest that: (1 IL-4 may stimulate different NOS isoforms in resting and IFN-γ activated monocytes, and (2 cAMP accumulation may be partially dependent on the NO pathway. By RT-PCR, a type III constitutive NOS mRNA was detected in U937 monocytic cells. IL-4 also increased the [Ca2+]i in these cells. Different NOS may thus be expressed in monocytic cells depending on their differentiation and the signals they receive.

  19. Inflammatory monocytes mediate early and organ-specific innate defense during systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Lisa Y; Kasahara, Shinji; Kumasaka, Debra K; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Jhingran, Anupam; Hohl, Tobias M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus that can cause systemic disease in patients with breaches in mucosal integrity, indwelling catheters, and defects in phagocyte function. Although circulating human and murine monocytes bind C. albicans and promote inflammation, it remains unclear whether C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)- and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes exert a protective or a deleterious function during systemic infection. During murine systemic candidiasis, interruption of CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocyte trafficking into infected kidneys impaired fungal clearance and decreased murine survival. Depletion of CCR2-expressing cells led to uncontrolled fungal growth in the kidneys and brain and demonstrated an essential antifungal role for inflammatory monocytes and their tissue-resident derivatives in the first 48 hours postinfection. Adoptive transfer of purified inflammatory monocytes in depleted hosts reversed the defect in fungal clearance to a substantial extent, indicating a compartmentally and temporally restricted protective function that can be transferred to enhance systemic innate antifungal immunity.

  20. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darawan Rinchai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB. This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp.

  1. Pantethine Alters Lipid Composition and Cholesterol Content of Membrane Rafts, With Down-Regulation of CXCL12-Induced T Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijsel-Bonnello, Manuel; Acar, Niyazi; Molino, Yves; Bretillon, Lionel; Khrestchatisky, Michel; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2015-10-01

    Pantethine, a natural low-molecular-weight thiol, shows a broad activity in a large range of essential cellular pathways. It has been long known as a hypolipidemic and hypocholesterolemic agent. We have recently shown that it exerts a neuroprotective action in mouse models of cerebral malaria and Parkinson's disease through multiple mechanisms. In the present study, we looked at its effects on membrane lipid rafts that serve as platforms for molecules engaged in cell activity, therefore providing a target against inappropriate cell response leading to a chronic inflammation. We found that pantethine-treated cells showed a significant change in raft fatty acid composition and cholesterol content, with ultimate downregulation of cell adhesion, CXCL12-driven chemotaxis, and transendothelial migration of various T cell types, including human Jurkat cell line and circulating effector T cells. The mechanisms involved include the alteration of the following: (i) CXCL12 binding to its target cells; (ii) membrane dynamics of CXCR4 and CXCR7, the two CXCL12 receptors; and (iii) cell redox status, a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. In addition, we considered the linker for activation of T cells molecule to show that pantethine effects were associated with the displacement from the rafts of the acylated signaling molecules which had their palmitoylation level reduced.. In conclusion, the results presented here, together with previously published findings, indicate that due to its pleiotropic action, pantethine can downregulate the multifaceted process leading to pathogenic T cell activation and migration.

  2. Human β-Defensin 3 Reduces TNF-α-Induced Inflammation and Monocyte Adhesion in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianying Bian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the role of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3 in the initiation stage of atherosclerosis with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs triggered by tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α. The effects of hBD3 on TNF-α-induced endothelial injury and inflammatory response were evaluated. Our data revealed that first, hBD3 reduced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, hBD3 significantly prevented intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production by HUVECs. Second, western blot analysis demonstrated that hBD3 dose-dependently suppressed the protein levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 in TNF-α-induced HUVECs. As a result, hBD3 inhibited monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-treated endothelial cells. Additionally, hBD3 suppressed TNF-α-induced F-actin reorganization in HUVECs. Third, hBD3 markedly inhibited NF-κB activation by decreasing the phosphorylation of IKK-α/β, IκB, and p65 subunit within 30 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway were also inhibited by hBD3 in HUVECs. In conclusion, hBD3 exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects in endothelial cells in response to TNF-α by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling.

  3. Leukoreduction system chambers are an efficient, valid, and economic source of functional monocyte-derived dendritic cells and lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Isabell A; Zinser, Elisabeth; Strasser, Erwin; Stein, Marcello F; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Knippertz, Ilka

    2013-11-01

    The demand for human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), as well as for primary human B and T lymphocytes for immunological research purposes has been increased in recent years. Classically, these monocytes are isolated from blood, leukapheresis products or buffy coats of healthy donors by plastic adherence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), followed by stimulation with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-4, while lymphocytes are usually isolated from the non-adherent fraction (NAF) by magnetic cell sorting. However, donor-blood is a limited resource and not every blood bank offers leukapheresis products or buffy coats for laboratory use. Additionally, a leukapheresis is very expensive and also the generation/isolation of cells is time- and cost-intensive. To overcome some of these obstacles, we evaluated if low-cost leukoreduction system chambers (LRSCs), which arise after routine donor plateletpheresis procedures, and are usually discarded, would be an alternative and appropriate source of PBMCs to generate moDCs and to isolate lymphocytes. By analyzing the number and phenotype of immature and mature dendritic cells (DCs), as well as of B and T lymphocytes derived from LRSCs, we found all cells to be of high quantity and quality. Further investigations on DCs comprising transwell migration assays, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR), cytokine secretion assays, and cytotoxic T cell induction assays revealed high migratory, as well as stimulatory capacity of these cells. In addition, DCs and T cells were efficiently electroporated with mRNA and showed characteristic cytokine production after co-culture, demonstrating LRSCs as an efficient, valid, and economic source for generation of moDCs and lymphocytes for research purposes.

  4. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  5. Human β-Defensin 3 Reduces TNF-α-Induced Inflammation and Monocyte Adhesion in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Tianying; Li, Houxuan; Zhou, Qian; Ni, Can; Zhang, Yangheng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) in the initiation stage of atherosclerosis with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) triggered by tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α. The effects of hBD3 on TNF-α-induced endothelial injury and inflammatory response were evaluated. Our data revealed that first, hBD3 reduced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, hBD3 significantly prevented intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by HUVECs. Second, western blot analysis demonstrated that hBD3 dose-dependently suppressed the protein levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-induced HUVECs. As a result, hBD3 inhibited monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-treated endothelial cells. Additionally, hBD3 suppressed TNF-α-induced F-actin reorganization in HUVECs. Third, hBD3 markedly inhibited NF-κB activation by decreasing the phosphorylation of IKK-α/β, IκB, and p65 subunit within 30 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway were also inhibited by hBD3 in HUVECs. In conclusion, hBD3 exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects in endothelial cells in response to TNF-α by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling.

  6. MIF Promotes Classical Activation and Conversion of Inflammatory Ly6Chigh Monocytes into TipDCs during Murine Toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Ruiz-Rosado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF mediates immunity against Toxoplasma gondii infection by inducing inflammatory cytokines required to control the parasite replication. However, the role of this inflammatory mediator in the cell-mediated immune response against this infection is still poorly understood. Here, we used T. gondii-infected WT and Mif−/− mice to analyze the role of MIF in the maturation of CD11b+ and CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs. We found that MIF promotes maturation of CD11b+ but not CD8α+ DCs, by inducing IL-12p70 production and CD86 expression. Infected Mif−/− mice showed significantly lower numbers of TNF and inducible nitric oxide synthase- (iNOS- producing DCs (TipDCs compared to infected WT mice. The adoptive transfer of Ly6Chigh monocytes into infected WT or Mif−/− mice demonstrated that MIF participates in the differentiation of Ly6Chigh monocytes into TipDCs. In addition, infected Mif−/− mice display a lower percentage of IFN-γ-producing natural killer (NK cells compared to WT mice, which is associated with reducing numbers of TipDCs in Mif−/− mice. Furthermore, administration of recombinant MIF (rMIF into T. gondii-infected Mif−/− mice restored the numbers of TipDCs and reversed the susceptible phenotype of Mif−/− mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate an important role for MIF inducing cell-mediated immunity to T. gondii infection.

  7. Pharmacological effects of mitraphylline from Uncaria tomentosa in primary human monocytes: Skew toward M2 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, S; de la Puerta, R; Fernandez-Arche, A; Quilez, A M; Muriana, F J G; Garcia-Gimenez, M D; Bermudez, B

    2015-07-21

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willdenow ex Roemer & Schultes) DC. (Rubiaceae) is a Peruvian thorny liana, commonly known as "cat׳s claw", and traditionally used in folk medicine to deal with several inflammatory diseases. Mitraphylline (MTP) is the most abundant pentacyclic oxindolic alkaloid (POA) from U. Tomentosa and has been reported to modify the inflammatory response. Herein, we have sought to identify the mechanisms underlying this modulatory effect of MTP on primary human monocytes and its ability to regulate differentiation processes on human primary monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages. In vitro studies with human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages were performed. Monocytes and M0 macrophages were exposed to MTP (25μM) and LPS (100ng/mL). M0 macrophages were polarized to M1 and M2 phenotypes in the absence or presence of MTP. The activation state of monocytes/macrophages was assessed by flow cytometry, gene expression and protein analysis of different specific markers. In human primary monocytes, the incubation of MTP for 24h reduced the number of classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)) and intermediate (CD14(++)CD16(+)) subsets when compared to untreated or LPS-treated cells. MTP also reduced the chemotactic capacity of human primary monocytes. In addition, MTP promoted the polarization of M0 macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, the abrogation of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα, IL-6 or IL-1β, as well as the restoration of markers for M2 macrophages in LPS-treated M1 macrophages. Our results suggest that MTP may be a key modulator for regulating the plasticity of monocytes/macrophages and the attenuation of the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypoxia modifies the transcriptome of primary human monocytes: modulation of novel immune-related genes and identification of CC-chemokine ligand 20 as a new hypoxia-inducible gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Maria Carla; Puppo, Maura; Santangelo, Clara; Anfosso, Luca; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Fardin, Paolo; Battaglia, Florinda; Varesio, Luigi

    2006-08-01

    Peripheral blood monocytes migrate to and accumulate in hypoxic areas of inflammatory and tumor lesions. To characterize the molecular bases underlying monocyte functions within a hypoxic microenvironment, we investigated the transcriptional profile induced by hypoxia in primary human monocytes using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Profound changes in the gene expression pattern were detected following 16 h exposure to 1% O(2), with 536 and 677 sequences showing at least a 1.5-fold increase and decrease, respectively. Validation of this analysis was provided by quantitative RT-PCR confirmation of expression differences of selected genes. Among modulated genes, 74 were known hypoxia-responsive genes, whereas the majority were new genes whose responsiveness to hypoxia had not been previously described. The hypoxic transcriptome was characterized by the modulation of a significant cluster of genes with immunological relevance. These included scavenger receptors (CD163, STAB1, C1qR1, MSR1, MARCO, TLR7), immunoregulatory, costimulatory, and adhesion molecules (CD32, CD64, CD69, CD89, CMRF-35H, ITGB5, LAIR1, LIR9), chemokines/cytokines and receptors (CCL23, CCL15, CCL8, CCR1, CCR2, RDC1, IL-23A, IL-6ST). Furthermore, we provided conclusive evidence of hypoxic induction of CCL20, a chemoattractant for immature dendritic cells, activated/memory T lymphocytes, and naive B cells. CCL20 mRNA up-regulation was paralleled by increased protein expression and secretion. This study represents the first transcriptome analysis of hypoxic primary human monocytes, which provides novel insights into monocyte functional behavior within ischemic/hypoxic tissues. CCL20 up-regulation by hypoxia may constitute an important mechanism to promote recruitment of specific leukocyte subsets at pathological sites and may have implications for the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  9. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

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  11. File list: NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.Monocytes-CD14+ [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Monocytes-CD14+ [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. DMPD: Monocyte CD14: a multifunctional receptor engaged in apoptosis from both sides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Monocytes-CD14+ [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Monocytes-CD14+ [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Monocytes-CD14+ hg19 No description Blood Monocytes-CD14+ SRX25271...9,SRX252738,SRX252734,SRX252730,SRX252722,SRX252725 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.Monocytes-CD14+.bed ...

  17. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration".

  18. Population, desertification, and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westing, A H

    1994-01-01

    When an imbalance develops between population numbers and the carrying capacity of the land, the persons thereby displaced are referred to as environmental refugees. The utilization of the land beyond sustainability leads to land degradation and ultimately, desertification. The social and political impacts of long-term environmental migration can be distinguished: a) at the site of origin of the displaced persons by the residual population; b) at rural sites of destination within the nation between the new arrivals and preestablished populations; c) in the cities within the nation; d) in the nonindustrialized foreign countries; and e) in the industrialized foreign countries. In the event that an area which had previously been devoted to pastoralism is converted to agriculture, the displaced pastoralists might respond through armed rebellion. In some instances, the disenchanted urban squatters become a politically restive and even a destabilizing force, as occurred in Sudan in the 1980s, especially in Khartoum and Port Sudan. The foreign countries to which many of the displaced persons are migrating are subjected to increasing levels of migrant-induced economic, cultural, and political strains. The growing problems associated with south-to-north migration across the Mediterranean Sea have recently led France, Italy, Portugal, and Spain to enter into a consultative arrangement with Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia. All foreign aid to the nonindustrialized countries that attempts to ameliorate the problem of desertification must adopt integrated approaches that: a) address population issues; b) support environmental education; c) provide for the protection of biodiversity; d) encourage participatory forms of local and national government; e) provide opportunities for income generation outside the livestock sector; and f) foster political security and facilitate ecogeographical (subregional) cooperation.

  19. Many Faces of Migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Antić Gaber

    2013-12-01

    The title “Many faces of migration”, connecting contributions in this special issue, is borrowed from the already mentioned Gallup Institute’s report on global migration (Esipova, 2011. The guiding principle in the selection of the contributions has been their diversity, reflected also in the list of disciplines represented by the authors: sociology, geography, ethnology and cultural anthropology, history, art history, modern Mediterranean studies, gender studies and media studies. Such an approach necessarily leads not only to a diverse, but at least seemingly also incompatib

  20. [Obesity, migration and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamay-Weber, Catherine; Shehu-Brovina, Shqipe; Narring, Françoise

    2012-06-13

    Weight management interventions during adolescence are challenging. Migration adds complexity to this problem, making migrant families more vulnerable. Teenagers confront families to new values transmitted by the host society: opulence, junk food, video games. Obesity should not be seen as a single issue of calories-excess, but must be considered as being part of a larger problem, which takes into account the context of the familial and societal life of the migrants. The caregivers must have an overall view of the situation to provide appropriate approaches to weight management.

  1. Leukocytes require ADAM10 but not ADAM17 for their migration and inflammatory recruitment into the alveolar space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Hess, Franz Martin; Alert, Henriette; Groth, Esther; Pasqualon, Tobias; Schwarz, Nicole; Nyamoya, Stella; Kollert, Jos; van der Vorst, Emiel; Donners, Marjo; Martin, Christian; Uhlig, Stefan; Saftig, Paul; Dreymueller, Daniela; Ludwig, Andreas

    2014-06-26

    Inflammation is a key process in various diseases, characterized by leukocyte recruitment to the inflammatory site. This study investigates the role of a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase (ADAM) 10 and ADAM17 for leukocyte migration in vitro and in a murine model of acute pulmonary inflammation. Inhibition experiments or RNA knockdown indicated that monocytic THP-1 cells and primary human neutrophils require ADAM10 but not ADAM17 for efficient chemokine-induced cell migration. Signaling and adhesion events that are linked to cell migration such as p38 and ρ GTPase-family activation, F-actin polymerization, adhesion to fibronectin, and up-regulation of α5 integrin were also dependent on ADAM10 but not ADAM17. This was confirmed with leukocytes isolated from mice lacking either ADAM10 or ADAM17 in all hematopoietic cells (vav 1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor [Vav]-Adam10(-/-) or Vav-Adam17(-/-) mice). In lipopolysaccharide-induced acute pulmonary inflammation, alveolar recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes was transiently increased in Vav-Adam17(-/-) but steadily reduced in Vav-Adam10(-/-) mice. This deficit in alveolar leukocyte recruitment was also observed in LysM-Adam10(-/-) mice lacking ADAM10 in myeloid cells and correlated with protection against edema formation. Thus, with regard to leukocyte migration, leukocyte-expressed ADAM10 but not ADAM17 displays proinflammatory activities and may therefore serve as a target to limit inflammatory cell recruitment.

  2. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Druszczynska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms.

  3. Cell culture plastics with immobilized interleukin-4 for monocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Met, Özcan;

    2011-01-01

    Standard cell culture plastic was surface modified by passive adsorption or covalent attachment of interleukin (IL)-4 and investigated for its ability to induce differentiation of human monocytes into mature dendritic cells, a process dose-dependently regulated by IL-4. Covalent attachment of IL-4...... proceeded via anthraquinone photochemistry to introduce amine functionalities at the surface followed by coupling of IL-4 through a bifunctional amine-reactive linker. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that undesirable multilayer formation of the photoactive compound could be avoided by reaction...... in water instead of phosphate-buffered saline. Passively adsorbed IL-4 was observed to induce differentiation to dendritic cells, but analysis of cell culture supernatants revealed that leakage of IL-4 into solution could account for the differentiation observed. Covalent attachment resulted in bound IL-4...

  4. Role of neoplastic monocyte-derived fibrocytes in primary myelofibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.; Newberry, Kate J.; Knez, Liza; Post, Sean M.; Ahn, Jihae; Levine, Ross L.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a fatal neoplastic disease characterized by clonal myeloproliferation and progressive bone marrow (BM) fibrosis thought to be induced by mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated by overproduced growth factors. However, tissue fibrosis in other diseases is associated with monocyte-derived fibrocytes. Therefore, we sought to determine whether fibrocytes play a role in the induction of BM fibrosis in PMF. In this study, we show that BM from patients with PMF harbors an abundance of clonal, neoplastic collagen- and fibronectin-producing fibrocytes. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with myelofibrosis patients’ BM cells developed a lethal myelofibrosis-like phenotype. Treatment of the xenograft mice with the fibrocyte inhibitor serum amyloid P (SAP; pentraxin-2) significantly prolonged survival and slowed the development of BM fibrosis. Collectively, our data suggest that neoplastic fibrocytes contribute to the induction of BM fibrosis in PMF, and inhibiting fibrocyte differentiation with SAP may interfere with this process. PMID:27481130

  5. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in monocytes and keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orłowski, Piotr; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata; Winnicka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    these effects are largely unknown. Effects of the mixture of silver nanoparticles of different sizes were compared in in vitro assays for cytotoxicity, caspase-1 and caspase-9 activity and bax expression. In all tested concentrations, silver nanoparticles were more toxic for RAW 264.7 monocytes than for 291.03C......Silver nanoparticles are of interest to be used as antimicrobial agents in wound dressings and coatings in medical devices, but potential adverse effects have been reported in the literature. The possible local inflammatory response to silver nanoparticles and the role of cell death in determining...... keratinocytes and induced significant caspase-1 activity and necrotic cell death. In keratinocytes, more significantly than in macrophages, silver nanoparticles led to increase of caspase-9 activity and apoptosis. These results indicate that effects of silver nanoparticles depend on the type of exposed cells...

  6. Recognition of a polymorphic monocyte antigen in HLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, A; Termijtelen, A; Shaw, S; van Rood, J J

    1982-08-05

    The serological recognition of 'new' gene products of the HLA system can be accomplished by selecting sera with strong leucocyte antibodies and testing these against a panel of cells obtained from donors which are compatible for the known HLA antigens with the antibody producer. This approach, which we termed the HLA-CAP approach (compatible with antibody producer), was essential in the recognition of what is now called the HLA-DR locus and of non HLA-linked T-cell subgroups. Using the same technique, we have defined here several sera recognizing a structure on monocytes similar to one of the alleles of the HLA-linked PL3 or secondary B-cell (SB) system, so far only recognized by cellular techniques.

  7. Glucocorticoid receptors in monocytes in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Binder, C

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics were investigated in 8 males with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes mellitus and 14 healthy males. The cell type studied was monocytes, and a method for correction for heterogeneity in glucocorticoid binding in a mononuclear leucocyte population...... or with HbA1c. In conclusion, no major abnormalities in glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics could be demonstrated in Type 1 diabetes mellitus....... was introduced. The number of receptors and the dissociation constant KD were, respectively, 13,699 and 2.93 X 10(-8) mol/l for the control group and 15,788 and 2.75 X 10(-8) mol/l for diabetics (p greater than 0.05). In diabetics, KD correlated negatively with blood glucose (r = 0.762, p less than 0...

  8. Palaearctic-African Bird Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwajomo, Soladoye Babatola

    Bird migration has attracted a lot of interests over past centuries and the methods used for studying this phenomenon has greatly improved in terms of availability, dimension, scale and precision. In spite of the advancements, relatively more is known about the spring migration of trans......-Saharan migrants than autumn migration. Information about the behavior and interactions of migrants during the nonbreeding season in sub-Saharan Africa is also scarce for many species. Furthermore, very little is known about intra-African migration. This thesis summarizes my research on the autumn migration...... of birds from Europe to Africa and opens up the possibility of studying intra-African migration. I have used long-term, standardized autumn ringing data from southeast Sweden to investigate patterns in biometrics, phenology and population trends as inferred from annual trapping totals. In addition, I...

  9. Network migration for printers

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Further to the recent General Purpose (office) Network reorganisation (as announced in the Bulletin - see here), please note that the majority of print devices will be automatically migrated to the new network IP address range on Tuesday 27 September.   This change should be transparent for these devices and therefore end-users, provided you have installed the printers from the Print Service website. A small number of devices will require manual intervention from the Printer Support team in order to migrate correctly. These devices will not change their IP address until the manual intervention, which will be carried out before Monday 3rd October. However, if you have mistakenly connected directly to the printer’s IP address, then your printing will be affected – please uninstall the printer (for help, see: KB3785), and re-install it from the Print Service website (or follow instructions for visitor machines). Please do this as soon as possible in order to avoid printing issues, t...

  10. Electrochemically induced nanocluster migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, Katrin [Lehrstuhl Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Chemistry, CS06, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Nesselberger, Markus [Department of Chemistry, CS06, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Mayrhofer, Karl J.J. [MPI fuer Eisenforschung, Abt. Grenzflaechenchemie und Oberflaechentechnik, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Kunz, Sebastian; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Kwon, GiHan [Lehrstuhl Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hanzlik, Marianne [Institut fuer Elektronenmikroskopie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Heiz, Ueli [Lehrstuhl Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Arenz, Matthias, E-mail: m.arenz@kemi.ku.d [Department of Chemistry, CS06, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2010-12-30

    In the presented study the influence of electrochemical treatments on size-selected Pt nanoclusters (NCs) supported on amorphous carbon is investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Well-defined Pt NCs are prepared by an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) laser vaporization source and deposited with low kinetic energy ({<=}10 eV/cluster) onto TEM gold grids covered by a thin (2 nm) carbon film. After transfer out of UHV Pt NCs are verified to be uniform in size and randomly distributed on the support. Subsequently, the TEM grids are employed as working electrodes in a standard electrochemical three electrode setup and the Pt nanoclusters are subjected to different electrochemical treatments. It is found that the NC arrangement is not influenced by potential hold conditions (at 0.40 V vs. RHE) or by potential cycling in a limited potential window (V{sub max} = 0.55 V vs. RHE). Upon potential cycling to 1.05 V vs. RHE, however, the NCs migrate on the carbon support. Interestingly, migration in oxygen or argon saturated electrolyte leads to NC coalescence, a mechanism discussed for being responsible for performance degradation of low temperature fuel cells, whereas in carbon monoxide saturated electrolyte the Pt NC agglomerate, but remain separated from each other and thus form distinctive structures.

  11. IGK with conserved IGΚV/IGΚJ repertoire is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Xia, Miaoran; Sun, Xiaoping; He, Zhiqiao; Hu, Fanlei; Chen, Lei; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yin, C Cameron

    2015-11-17

    We have previously reported that immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells. In this study, we further demonstrated that rearranged Ig κ light chain was also frequently expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (6/6), primary myeloblasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (17/18), and mature monocytes (11/12) and neutrophils (3/12) from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, but not or only rarely expressed in mature neutrophils (0/8) or monocytes (1/8) from healthy individuals. Interestingly, myeloblasts and mature monocytes/neutrophils shared several restricted IGKV and IGKJ gene usages but with different expression frequency. Surprisingly, almost all of the acute myeloid leukemia-derived IGKV showed somatic hypermutation; in contrast, mature myeloid cells-derived IGKV rarely had somatic hypermutation. More importantly, although IGK expression appeared not to affect cell proliferation, reduced IGK expression led to a decrease in cell migration in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4, whereas increased IGK expression promoted their motility. In summary, IGK is expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, and is involved in cell migration. These results suggest that myeloid cells-derived IgK may have a role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a novel tumor marker for monitoring minimal residual disease and developing target therapy.

  12. Gender and Migration from Albania

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the dynamics and causes of the shift in the gender composition of migration, and more particularly, in women's access to migration opportunities and decision-making. Our analysis focuses on Albania, a natural laboratory for studying international migration where outmigration was essentially nonexistent from the end of World War II to the end of the 1980s. Interest in the Albanian case is heightened because of the complex layers of inequality existing at the time when mig...

  13. Internal migration transition in Romania?

    OpenAIRE

    Horváth, István

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the shifts in the internal migration patterns in Romania for the last six decades. In the first part a literature-based brief overview of the trends and patterns of internal migration during communism will be presented. In the second (more extensive) part, a statistical-data based analysis of the internal migration trends and patterns over the last 25 years will be provided.

  14. The challenges of managing migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacoli, Cecilia

    2005-10-15

    Migration and urbanisation are driven by economic growth and social change, but also by deepening inequalities. Managing migration should not be equated with curbing it, as this inevitably reduces migrants' rights. But managing population movement whilst respecting the rights of migrants and nonmigrants, supporting the contribution of migration to poverty reduction and economic growth in sending and receiving areas and reducing the human and material costs of movement means that fundamental challenges need to be addressed.

  15. Gender and Migration: Overview Report

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly, Susie; Reeves, Hazel; Piper, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. Over the past four decades total numbers of international migrants have more than doubled but the percentage of the world population migrating has remained fairly constant. There are now 175 million international migrants worldwide or approximately 3.5 per cent of the global population – about half of whom are women, despite the common misconception that men are the migrants. This Overview Report on Gender and Migration takes a broad approach to migration – it looks at the gender dy...

  16. Gender and Migration from Albania

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the dynamics and causes of the shift in the gender composition of migration, and more particularly, in women’s access to migration opportunities and decision-making. Our analysis focuses on Albania, a natural laboratory for studying international migration where out-migration was essentially nonexistent from the end of World War II to the end of the 1980s. Interest in the Albanian case is heightened because of the complex layers of inequality existing at the time when mi...

  17. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-06-01

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  18. Intra-amniotic LPS modulation of TLR signaling in lung and blood monocytes of fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Boris W; Kallapur, Suhas G; Moss, Timothy J; Nitsos, Ilias; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H

    2009-04-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that intra-uterine exposure to inflammation may prime postnatal immune responses. In fetal sheep, intra-amniotic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced chorioamnionitis, lung inflammation and maturation, matured lung monocytes to macrophages and initiated systemic tolerance of fetal monocytes to subsequent challenge with LPS. We hypothesized that LPS-mediated chorioamnionitis altered the response of lung and blood monocytes to Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands such as PamCysK4 (TLR2), flagellin (TLR5), and human CpG-DNA (TLR9). Time-mated ewes were given intra-amniotic injections of LPS or saline. Blood and lung monocytes were assessed after 2 days, 7 days and 2 days and 7 days repetitive LPS injections before delivery at 124 days gestational age (term 150 days). Responsiveness of blood and lung monocytes to TLR-ligands in vitro was assessed by interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and hydrogen peroxide. Monocytes from preterm controls had minimal responses. Lipopolysaccharide-mediated chorioamnionitis increased IL-6, TNF- alpha and hydrogen peroxide to all TLR agonists in blood and lung monocytes. Repetitive exposure to antenatal LPS reduced IL-6, TNF- alpha and hydrogen peroxide to TLR-ligands suggesting tolerance. Tolerance to TLR-ligands reduced IL-1 receptor associated kinase-4 expression. Thus, repeated fetal exposure to LPS induced tolerance to other TLR-ligands. These modulations of fetal innate immunity have implications for host defense and injury responses in preterm infants.

  19. Monocyte-targeting supramolecular micellar assemblies: a molecular diagnostic tool for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Ji; Mlinar, Laurie B; Nord, Kathryn; Sugimoto, Matthew J; Wonder, Emily; Alenghat, Francis J; Fang, Yun; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-02-18

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that can progress silently for decades and result in myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. Diagnostic imaging technologies have made great strides to define the degree of atherosclerotic plaque burden through the severity of arterial stenosis. However, current technologies cannot differentiate more lethal "vulnerable plaques," and are not sensitive enough for preventive medicine. Imaging early molecular markers and quantifying the extent of disease progression continues to be a major challenge in the field. To this end, monocyte-targeting, peptide amphiphile micelles (PAMs) are engineered through the incorporation of the chemokine receptor CCR2-binding motif of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and MCP-1 PAMs are evaluated preclinically as diagnostic tools for atherosclerosis. Monocyte-targeting is desirable as the influx of monocytes is a marker of early lesions, accumulation of monocytes is linked to atherosclerosis progression, and rupture-prone plaques have higher numbers of monocytes. MCP-1 PAMs bind to monocytes in vitro, and MCP-1 PAMs detect and discriminate between early- and late-stage atherosclerotic aortas. Moreover, MCP-1 PAMs are found to be eliminated via renal clearance and the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) without adverse side effects. Thus, MCP-1 PAMs are a promising new class of diagnostic agents capable of monitoring the progression of atherosclerosis.

  20. Quantitative analysis of monocyte subpopulations in murine atherosclerotic plaques by multiphoton microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail S Haka

    Full Text Available The progressive accumulation of monocyte-derived cells in the atherosclerotic plaque is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. However, it is now appreciated that monocytes represent a heterogeneous circulating population of cells that differ in functionality. New approaches are needed to investigate the role of monocyte subpopulations in atherosclerosis since a detailed understanding of their differential mobilization, recruitment, survival and emigration during atherogenesis is of particular importance for development of successful therapeutic strategies. We present a novel methodology for the in vivo examination of monocyte subpopulations in mouse models of atherosclerosis. This approach combines cellular labeling by fluorescent beads with multiphoton microscopy to visualize and monitor monocyte subpopulations in living animals. First, we show that multiphoton microscopy is an accurate and timesaving technique to analyze monocyte subpopulation trafficking and localization in plaques in excised tissues. Next, we demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy can be used to monitor monocyte subpopulation trafficking in atherosclerotic plaques in living animals. This novel methodology should have broad applications and facilitate new insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  1. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  2. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs.

  3. Inhibition of the differentiation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells by human gingival fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Séguier

    Full Text Available We investigated whether gingival fibroblasts (GFs can modulate the differentiation and/or maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs and analyzed soluble factors that may be involved in this immune modulation. Experiments were performed using human monocytes in co-culture with human GFs in Transwell® chambers or using monocyte cultures treated with conditioned media (CM from GFs of four donors. The four CM and supernatants from cell culture were assayed by ELISA for cytokines involved in the differentiation of dendritic cells, such as IL-6, VEGF, TGFβ1, IL-13 and IL-10. The maturation of monocyte-derived DCs induced by LPS in presence of CM was also studied. Cell surface phenotype markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. In co-cultures, GFs inhibited the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs and the strength of this blockade correlated with the GF/monocyte ratio. Conditioned media from GFs showed similar effects, suggesting the involvement of soluble factors produced by GFs. This inhibition was associated with a lower stimulatory activity in MLR of DCs generated with GFs or its CM. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and VEGF significantly (P<0.05 inhibited the inhibitory effect of CM on the differentiation of monocytes-derived DCs and in a dose dependent manner. Our data suggest that IL-6 is the main factor responsible for the inhibition of DCs differentiation mediated by GFs but that VEGF is also involved and constitutes an additional mechanism.

  4. Effect of zinc and nitric oxide on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungmun; Eskin, Suzanne G; Shah, Ankit K; Schildmeyer, Lisa A; McIntire, Larry V

    2012-03-01

    This study describes the effect of zinc on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under different shear stress regimens, which may trigger atherogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to steady shear stress (15 dynes/cm(2) or 1 dyne/cm(2)) or reversing shear stress (time average 1 dyne/cm(2)) for 24 h. In all shear stress regimes, zinc deficiency enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, while heparinase III reduced monocyte adhesion following reversing shear stress exposure. Unlike other shear stress regimes, reversing shear stress alone enhanced monocyte adhesion, which may be associated with increased H(2)O(2) and superoxide together with relatively low levels of nitric oxide (NO) production. L-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment increased monocyte adhesion under 15 dynes/cm(2) and under reversing shear stress. After reversing shear stress, monocyte adhesion dramatically increased with heparinase III treatment followed by a zinc scavenger. Static culture experiments supported the reduction of monocyte adhesion by zinc following endothelial cell cytokine activation. These results suggest that endothelial cell zinc levels are important for the inhibition of monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, and may be one of the key factors in the early stages of atherogenesis.

  5. Species difference of CD137 ligand signaling in human and murine monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqiao Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stimulation of CD137 ligand on human monocytes has been shown to induce DC differentiation, and these CD137L-DCs are more potent than classical DCs, in stimulating T cell responses in vitro. To allow an in vivo evaluation of the potency of CD137L-DCs in murine models we aimed at generating murine CD137L-DCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When stimulated through CD137 ligand murine monocytes responded just as human monocytes with an increased adherence, morphological changes, proliferation and an increase in viable cell numbers. But CD137 ligand signaling did not induce expression of inflammatory cytokines and costimulatory molecules in murine monocytes and these cells had no T cell stimulatory activity. Murine monocytes did not differentiate to inflammatory DCs upon CD137 ligand signaling. Furthermore, while CD137 ligand signaling induces maturation of human immature classical DCs it failed to do so with murine immature classical DCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that both human and murine monocytes become activated by CD137 ligand signaling but only human and not murine monocytes differentiate to inflammatory DCs.

  6. OSCAR-collagen signaling in monocytes plays a proinflammatory role and may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Heidi Schiøler; Guo, Li; Keller, Pernille;

    2016-01-01

    functional maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. OSCAR is upregulated on monocytes from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease, and these monocytes show an increased proosteoclastogenic potential. In the current study, we have addressed a functional role for an OSCAR...... fluid of RA patients plated on ColII secreted TNF-α and IL-8 in an OSCAR-dependent manner. Global RNA profiling showed that components of multiple signaling pathways relevant to RA pathogenesis are regulated at the transcriptional level by OSCAR in monocytes. Thus, OSCAR can play a proinflammatory role...... in monocyte-derived cells and may contribute crucially on multiple levels to RA pathogenesis....

  7. The Neurorepellent Slit2 Inhibits Postadhesion Stabilization of Monocytes Tethered to Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukovozov, Ilya; Huang, Yi-Wei; Zhang, Qiuwang; Liu, Guang Ying; Siu, Allan; Sokolskyy, Yaroslav; Patel, Sajedabanu; Hyduk, Sharon J; Kutryk, Michael J B; Cybulsky, Myron I; Robinson, Lisa A

    2015-10-01

    The secreted neurorepellent Slit2, acting through its transmembrane receptor, Roundabout (Robo)-1, inhibits chemotaxis of varied cell types, including leukocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, toward diverse attractants. The role of Slit2 in regulating the steps involved in recruitment of monocytes in vascular inflammation is not well understood. In this study, we showed that Slit2 inhibited adhesion of monocytic cells to activated human endothelial cells, as well as to immobilized ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Microfluidic live cell imaging showed that Slit2 inhibited the ability of monocytes tethered to endothelial cells to stabilize their actin-associated anchors and to resist detachment in response to increasing shear forces. Transfection of constitutively active plasmids revealed that Slit2 inhibited postadhesion stabilization of monocytes on endothelial cells by preventing activation of Rac1. We further found that Slit2 inhibited chemotaxis of monocytes toward CXCL12 and CCL2. To determine whether Slit2 and Robo-1 modulate pathologic monocyte recruitment associated with vascular inflammation and cardiovascular disease, we tested PBMC from patients with coronary artery disease. PBMC from these patients had reduced surface levels of Robo-1 compared with healthy age- and sex-matched subjects, and Slit2 failed to inhibit chemotaxis of PBMC of affected patients, but not healthy control subjects, toward CCL2. Furthermore, administration of Slit2 to atherosclerosis-prone LDL receptor-deficient mice inhibited monocyte recruitment to nascent atherosclerotic lesions. These results demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits chemotaxis of monocytes, as well as their ability to stabilize adhesions and resist detachment forces. Slit2 may represent a powerful new tool to inhibit pathologic monocyte recruitment in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  8. Les questions de migrations internationales (Questions of International Migrations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samman, Mouna Liliane

    1993-01-01

    Education about international migration should (1) utilize a framework of historical evolution; (2) stress the growing interdependence of nations; (3) emphasize universal moral values and the role of the individual in human rights; and (4) consider the complementary or competing portraits of international migration presented by the media. (DMM)

  9. Patterns of East to West migration in the context of European migration systems possibilities and limits of migration control

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Molodikova

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the main migration trends of the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) migration system in the context of the development of EU migration and migration control and seeks to explain the peculiarities of the CIS migration system’s development.

  10. Monocytes conditioned media stimulate fibronectin expression and spreading of inflammatory breast cancer cells in three-dimensional culture: A mechanism mediated by IL-8 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mona M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is the most aggressive form of breast cancer characterized by invasion of carcinoma cells into dermal lymphatic vessels where they form tumor emboli over expressing adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Although invasion and metastasis are dynamic processes controlled by complex interaction between tumor cells and microenvironment the mechanisms by which soluble mediators may regulate motility and invasion of IBC cells are poorly understood. The present study investigated the effect of media conditioned by human monocytes U937 secreted cytokines, chemokines and growth factors on the expression of adhesion molecules E-cadherin and fibronectin of human IBC cell line SUM149. Furthermore, cytokines signaling pathway involved were also identified. Results U937 secreted cytokines, chemokines and growth factors were characterized by cytokine antibody array. The major U937 secreted cytokines/chemokines were interleukin-8 (IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2. When SUM149 cells were seeded in three dimensional (3D models with media conditioned by U937 secreted cytokines, chemokines and growth factors; results showed: 1 changes in the morphology of IBC cells from epithelial to migratory spindle shape branched like structures; 2 Over-expression of adhesion molecule fibronectin and not E-cadherin. Further analysis revealed that over-expression of fibronectin may be mediated by IL-8 via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Conclusion The present results suggested that cytokines secreted by human monocytes may promote chemotactic migration and spreading of IBC cell lines. Results also indicated that IL-8 the major secreted cytokine by U937 cells may play essential role in fibronectin expression by SUM149 cells via interaction with IL-8 specific receptors and stimulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  11. Variation in dietary salt intake induces coordinated dynamics of monocyte subsets and monocyte-platelet aggregates in humans: implications in end organ inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocyte activation and tissue infiltration are quantitatively associated with high-salt intake induced target organ inflammation. We hypothesized that high-salt challenge would induce the expansion of CD14++CD16+ monocytes, one of the three monocyte subsets with a pro-inflammatory phenotype, that is associated with target organ inflammation in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dietary intervention study was performed in 20 healthy volunteers, starting with a 3-day usual diet and followed with a 7-day high-salt diet (≥15 g NaCl/day, and a 7-day low-salt diet (≤5 g NaCl/day. The amounts of three monocyte subsets ("classical" CD14++CD16-, "intermediate" CD14++CD16+ and "non-classical" CD14+CD16++ and their associations with monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPAs were measured by flow cytometry. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI was used to evaluate renal hypoxia. Switching to a high-salt diet resulted in CD14++ monocyte activation and a rapid expansion of CD14++CD16+ subset and MPAs, with a reciprocal decrease in the percentages of CD14++CD16- and CD14+CD16++ subsets. In vitro study using purified CD14++ monocytes revealed that elevation in extracellular [Na(+] could lead to CD14++CD16+ expansion via a ROS dependent manner. In addition, high-salt intake was associated with progressive hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2* signal and enhanced urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 excretion, indicating a temporal and spatial correlation between CD14++CD16+ subset and renal inflammation. The above changes could be completely reversed by a low-salt diet, whereas blood pressure levels remained unchanged during dietary intervention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work demonstrates that short-term increases in dietary salt intake could induce the expansion of CD14++CD16+ monocytes, as well as an elevation of MPAs, which might be the underlying cellular basis of high-salt induced

  12. Extracellular HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lin; YANG Yi-da; LU Guo-cai; SALVATO Maria S

    2005-01-01

    In our previous work we reported that HIV Tat and 6 cysteine rich peptides of Tat induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) in human monocytes (Yang et al., 2003). Here our results showed that HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in human monocytes, and this activity is inhibited by rabbit anti-Tat. Boiled Tat does not increase CCR5 expression in monocytes. These results provide insight into a new mechanism by which HIV Tat plays a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  13. Interrelationships between paraoxonase-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the regulation of hepatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jordi; Marsillach, Judit; Rull, Anna; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Joven, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the onset and development of liver diseases irrespective of the agent causing the hepatic impairment. The monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is intimately involved in the inflammatory reaction and is directly correlated with the degree of hepatic inflammation in patients with chronic liver disease. Recent studies showed that hepatic paraoxonase-1 may counteract the production of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, thus playing an anti-inflammatory role. The current review summarises experiments suggesting how paraoxonase-1 activity and expression are altered in liver diseases, and their relationships with the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and inflammation.

  14. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U.; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  15. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 plays a key role in type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Li; Guoliang Liu

    2005-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease resulting from the selective destruction of β cells in the pancreatic islets.In both human and rodent models of type 1 diabetes, the clinical disease is preceded by a progressive mononuclear cell invasion of the pancreatic islets (insulitis). In the early stage of insulitis, the major components are monocyte/macrophages, and the recruitment of mononuclear cells is a critical step in the pathogenesis of the type 1 diabetes. Studies have revealed that Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1(MCP-1)specifically recruits monocytes/macrophages into pancreas and plays an important role in the development of insulitis and diabetes.

  16. In vitro production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide is positively correlated with increased blood monocytes after exposure to a swine barn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P J; Khozani, T Talaei; Juurlink, B H J; Senthilselvan, A; Rennie, D C; Gerdts, V; Gawaziuk, J; Schneberger, D; Burch, Lauranell H; Dosman, J A

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been interest in the air quality in and around intensive livestock production facilities, such as modern swine production barns, where agricultural workers and surrounding residents may be exposed to elevated levels of organic dusts. The health effects of these exposures are not completely understood. The study that is reported here is a component of a larger investigation of the relationships among the acute effects of high-concentration endotoxin exposure (swine barn dust), polymorphisms in the TLR4 gene, and respiratory outcomes following exposure to swine confinement buildings. The relationships among a mediator of acute lung inflammation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and clinical responses to acute swine barn exposure were characterized. Analysis of the results showed that in vitro stimulation of human monocytes with as little as 1 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced a significant increase in the monocytes that produced TNF-alpha. Although the proportion of TNF-alpha-positive monocytes after in vitro stimulation with 1 ng/ml of LPS was not associated with gender or TLR4 genotype, it was positively associated with the concentration of monocytes in blood after barn exposure. Thus, these two responses to different forms of LPS exposure are significantly correlated, and more responsive monocytes in vitro indicate a forthcoming relative monocytosis, post barn exposure, which may initiate a cascade of chronic inflammation.

  17. Cadmium Exposure Is Associated with Monocyte Count and Monocyte to HDL Ratio, a Marker of Inflammation and Future Cardiovascular Disease in the Male Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kiook; Chung, Insung

    2017-09-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that humans can be exposed to the in environment and occupation, and its relationship with cardiovascular diseases has been reported. in various reports. Epidemiological studies have also been associated with various inflammatory markers of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we examined the relationship between monocyte count and monocyte to high density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio (MHR) and blood cadmium, which are one of the inflammatory markers of cardiovascular diseases. Data from a total of 733 male fire officers who received a health checkup at a hospital for one year in 2016 were analyzed. Populations were classified into 4 groups according to the quartile of blood cadmium and general characteristics were described. The relationship between monocyte count, MHR and cadmium in blood was statistically analyzed by linear regression analysis. In the univariate analysis and multivariate analysis, monocyte count was significantly higher in the second, third and fourth quartile groups than in the first quartile of cadmium, and the linear trend was significant. In univariate and multivariate analysis, MHR was significantly higher in the third and fourth quartile groups than in the first quartile group, and the linear trend was also significant. This study showed the significant relationship between blood cadmium and monocyte count and MHR among male fire officers. This was also statistically significant in the model adjusted for possible confounders and other cardiovascular risk factors and showed a linear trend. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  18. HANDICRAFTS, INVASIONS AND MIGRATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla Shiomara del Carpio Ovando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is focused on the migratory movements that have characterized Simojovel de Allende, Chiapas. Both indigenous Tsotsil communities as well as mestizos from different municipalities live in Simojovel, which is a town that has had multiple migratory movements due to different reasons. For example, economical struggle that has led to poverty, the lack of opportunities; the political situation, religious and ethnic persecutions, insecurity and the communitarian division between zapatistas and non-zapatistas. There are also cultural factors that have caused migration in Simojovel such as tradition, generational gaps, young people’s interests for new types of work and ways of living. Simojovel has been characterized by its coffee, tobacco and amber, but also by its migratory activity.

  19. Nightly Test system migration

    CERN Document Server

    Win-Lime, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The summer student program allows students to participate to the Cern adventure. They can follow several interesting lectures about particle science and participate to the experiment work. As a summer student, I had worked for LHCb experiment. LHCb uses a lot of software to analyze its data. All this software is organized in packages and projects. They are built and tested during the night using an automated system and the results are displayed on a web interface. Actually, LHCb is changing this system. It is looking for a replacement candidate. So I was charged to unify some internal interfaces to permit a swift migration. In this document, I will describe shortly the system used by LHCb, then I will explain what I have done in detail.

  20. Kirchhoff migration without phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsley, Patrick; Guevara Vasquez, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    We present a simple, frequency domain, preprocessing step to Kirchhoff migration that allows the method to image scatterers when the wave field phase information is lost at the receivers, and only intensities are measured. The resulting imaging method does not require knowing the phases of the probing field or manipulating the phase of the wave field at the receivers. In a regime where the scattered field is small compared to the probing field, the problem of recovering the full-waveform scattered field from intensity data can be formulated as an embarrassingly simple least-squares problem. Although this only recovers the projection (on a known subspace) of the full-waveform scattered field, we show that, for high frequencies, this projection gives Kirchhoff images asymptotically identical to the images obtained with full waveform data. Our method can also be used when the source is modulated by a Gaussian process and autocorrelations are measured at an array of receivers.